Sample records for automated modelling interface

  1. An Intuitive Automated Modelling Interface for Systems Biology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ozan Kahramanogullari; Luca Cardelli; Emmanuelle Caron

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a natural language interface for building stochastic p calculus models of biological systems. In this language, complex constructs describing biochemical events are built from basic primitives of association, dissociation and transformation. This language thus allows us to model biochemical systems modularly by describing their dynamics in a narrative-style language, while making amendments, refinements and extensions on the models

  2. Semantic Modeling among Web Services Interfaces for Services Integration-SOTA(Smart Office Task Automation) platform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tse-ming Tsai; Han-kuan Yu; Ping-yao Liao; Hsin-te Shih

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a smart task framework for automating intranet Web services integration through a mediated ontology. The semantic relationships between the Web Services interfaces and the mediated ontology are registered and maintained, so the platform can take over most of the complex corresponding efforts that were accomplished manually, such as searching, combining, and executing

  3. Spud 1.0: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Ham; P. E. Farrell; G. J. Gorman; J. R. Maddison; C. R. Wilson; S. C. Kramer; J. Shipton; G. S. Collins; C. J. Cotter; M. D. Piggott

    2008-01-01

    The interfaces by which users specify the scenarios to be simulated by scientific computer models are frequently primitive, under-documented and ad-hoc text files which make using the model in question difficult and error-prone and significantly increase the development cost of the model. In this paper, we present a model-independent system, Spud, which formalises the specification of model input formats in

  4. Spud and FLML: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Ham; P. E. Farrell; J. R. Maddison; G. J. Gorman; C. R. Wilson; S. C. Kramer; J. Shipton; G. S. Collins; C. J. Cotter; M. D. Piggott

    2009-01-01

    The interfaces by which users specify the scenarios to be simulated by scientific computer models are frequently primitive, under-documented and ad-hoc text files which make using the model in question difficult and error-prone and significantly increase the development cost of the model. We present a model-independent system, Spud[1], which formalises the specification of model input formats in terms of formal

  5. Spud 1.0: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Ham; P. E. Farrell; G. J. Gorman; J. R. Maddison; C. R. Wilson; S. C. Kramer; J. Shipton; G. S. Collins; C. J. Cotter; M. D. Piggott

    2009-01-01

    The interfaces by which users specify the scenarios to be simulated by scientific computer models are frequently primitive, under-documented and ad-hoc text files which make using the model in question difficult and error-prone and significantly increase the development cost of the model. In this paper, we present a model-independent system, Spud, which formalises the specification of model input formats in

  6. ITR -(ASE + NHS) -(int): Intelligent Human-Machine Interface & Control for Highly Automated Chemical Screening Processes

    E-print Network

    Kaber, David B.

    ITR - (ASE + NHS) - (int): Intelligent Human-Machine Interface & Control for Highly Automated architecture for modeling touch input devices (with portability), including tablet PC. #12;2005 Summer Conduct reconfiguration of interface for screening process operators. Create prototype of intelligent interface on tablet

  7. Human-Machine Interface in Building Automation Systems

    E-print Network

    Sobczak, N. L.

    1981-01-01

    problem between the non-computer knowledgeable operator and the computer based Building Automation System. One of the solutions to this problem is the design and implementation of a human machine interface which educates the operator to utilize the system...

  8. Automation Interfaces of the Orion GNC Executive Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes Orion mission's automation Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) architecture and interfaces. The contents include: 1) Orion Background; 2) Shuttle/Orion Automation Comparison; 3) Orion Mission Sequencing; 4) Orion Mission Sequencing Display Concept; and 5) Status and Forward Plans.

  9. Automated Student Model Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  10. Automated Verification of UMLsec Models

    E-print Network

    Jurjens, Jan

    Automated Verification of UMLsec Models for Security Requirements Jan Jürjens and Pasha Shabalin Jürjens, TU Munich: Automated Verification of UMLsec Models 2 Secure Systems Development High quality: Automated Verification of UMLsec Models 3 Quality vs. Cost Correctness in conflict with cost. Thorough

  11. Automate discovery of deep web interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xin Du; Yongqing Zheng; Zhongmin Yan

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid increase of web sources, more and more deep web databases become available. The information in these databases can only be accessed by submitting queries to back-end databases. However, the traditional search engine interfaces resemble extremely deep web interfaces. Therefore, it is difficult to distinguish them and to find deep web interfaces. This paper proposes a novel method

  12. Control Interface and Tracking Control System for Automated Poultry Inspection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new visible/near-infrared inspection system interface was developed in order to conduct research to test and implement an automated chicken inspection system for online operation on commercial chicken processing lines. The spectroscopic system demonstrated effective spectral acquisition and data ...

  13. An Automated System for Converting App Inventor Apps to Java Interface For Creating and Managing Projects

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    An Automated System for Converting App Inventor Apps to Java Interface For Creating and Managing of Computer Science Graphical Environment For Creating Layouts MIT App Inventor An Automated System for Converting App Inventor Apps to JavaAn Automated System for Converting App Inventor Apps to JavaAn Automated

  14. Space station automation and robotics study. Operator-systems interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This is the final report of a Space Station Automation and Robotics Planning Study, which was a joint project of the Boeing Aerospace Company, Boeing Commercial Airplane Company, and Boeing Computer Services Company. The study is in support of the Advanced Technology Advisory Committee established by NASA in accordance with a mandate by the U.S. Congress. Boeing support complements that provided to the NASA Contractor study team by four aerospace contractors, the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and the California Space Institute. This study identifies automation and robotics (A&R) technologies that can be advanced by requirements levied by the Space Station Program. The methodology used in the study is to establish functional requirements for the operator system interface (OSI), establish the technologies needed to meet these requirements, and to forecast the availability of these technologies. The OSI would perform path planning, tracking and control, object recognition, fault detection and correction, and plan modifications in connection with extravehicular (EV) robot operations.

  15. Automated visual imaging interface for the plant floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutke, John R.

    1991-03-01

    The paper will provide an overview of the challenges facing a user of automated visual imaging (" AVI" ) machines and the philosophies that should be employed in designing them. As manufacturing tools and equipment become more sophisticated it is increasingly difficult to maintain an efficient interaction between the operator and machine. The typical user of an AVI machine in a production environment is technically unsophisticated. Also operator and machine ergonomics are often a neglected or poorly addressed part of an efficient manufacturing process. This paper presents a number of man-machine interface design techniques and philosophies that effectively solve these problems.

  16. On the Interface Debonding Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Chaboche; R. Girard; P. Levasseur

    1997-01-01

    Interface debonding models offer the possibility to simulate numerically the interface crack growth, and the eventual contact friction behaviour on the cracked area. The paper considers models in the framework of an Interface Damage Mechanics, relating displacement discontinuities across the interface to the corresponding tractions, through various constitutive and damage equations. The approach is based on the initial works by

  17. Multi-Paradigm Modelling and Synthesis of User Interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denis Dube; Hans Vangheluwe

    In this article, model-based design and synthesis of reac- tive user interfaces is presented as a particular application of Computer-Automated Multi-Paradigm Modelling (CAM- PaM). Multi-paradigm modelling acknowledges the need to model at different levels of abstraction, using appropriate formalisms. It also gives transformations first-class model status. In the CAMPaM UI development process, a class of user interfaces is modelled. This

  18. Sharing Control Between Human and Automation Using Haptic Interface: Primary and

    E-print Network

    Gillespie, Brent

    Sharing Control Between Human and Automation Using Haptic Interface: Primary and Secondary Task-- In this paper, a paradigm for hu- man/automation control sharing is described in which a machine's manual the actions of the automatic controller. While perceiving the automation actions, the human may express his

  19. Geographic information system/watershed model interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Gary T.

    1989-01-01

    Geographic information systems allow for the interactive analysis of spatial data related to water-resources investigations. A conceptual design for an interface between a geographic information system and a watershed model includes functions for the estimation of model parameter values. Design criteria include ease of use, minimal equipment requirements, a generic data-base management system, and use of a macro language. An application is demonstrated for a 90.1-square-kilometer subbasin of the Patuxent River near Unity, Maryland, that performs automated derivation of watershed parameters for hydrologic modeling.

  20. User interface design for an automated part recognition system 

    E-print Network

    Avitts, Tommie Annette

    1991-01-01

    the five interfaces. The interfaces investigated are described below. One interface utilized a menu command layout with a mouse for command selection (Menu ? Mouse interface) . In another, commands placed on screen buttons were selected using a touch... screen (Button ? Touch interface). The button screen design was also tested with a mouse (Button ? Mouse interface) as a third alternative. Two of the interface alternatives involved the use of a new touch pad device, the UnMouse~. One such interface...

  1. The state of the art in automating usability evaluation of user interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melody Y. Ivory; Marti A. Hearst

    2001-01-01

    Usability evaluation is an increasingly important part of the user interface design process. However, usability evaluation can be expensive in terms of time and human resources, and automation is therefore a promising way to augment existing approaches. This article presents an extensive survey of usability evaluation methods, organized according to a new taxonomy that emphasizes the role of automation. The

  2. Building up object-oriented industrial automation systems: experiences interfacing active objects with technical plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pablo Darscht; Alceu Heinke Frigeri; Carlos Eduardo Pereira

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an object-oriented approach for interfacing industrial automation software with technical plants. The paper focuses on strategies for structuring the software in objects in such a way that the structure may be applied even when using different communication systems. A case study, the automation of a modular production system based on an industrial fieldbus is presented

  3. On Abstractions and Simplifications in the Design of Human-Automation Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, Michael; Degani, Asaf; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report addresses the design of human-automation interaction from a formal perspective that focuses on the information content of the interface, rather than the design of the graphical user interface. It also addresses the issue of the information provided to the user (e.g., user-manuals, training material, and all other resources). In this report, we propose a formal procedure for generating interfaces and user-manuals. The procedure is guided by two criteria: First, the interface must be correct, that is, with the given interface the user will be able to perform the specified tasks correctly. Second, the interface should be succinct. The report discusses the underlying concepts and the formal methods for this approach. Two examples are used to illustrate the procedure. The algorithm for constructing interfaces can be automated, and a preliminary software system for its implementation has been developed.

  4. On Abstractions and Simplifications in the Design of Human-Automation Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, Michael; Degani, Asaf; Shafto, Michael; Meyer, George; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report addresses the design of human-automation interaction from a formal perspective that focuses on the information content of the interface, rather than the design of the graphical user interface. It also addresses the, issue of the information provided to the user (e.g., user-manuals, training material, and all other resources). In this report, we propose a formal procedure for generating interfaces and user-manuals. The procedure is guided by two criteria: First, the interface must be correct, i.e., that with the given interface the user will be able to perform the specified tasks correctly. Second, the interface should be as succinct as possible. The report discusses the underlying concepts and the formal methods for this approach. Several examples are used to illustrate the procedure. The algorithm for constructing interfaces can be automated, and a preliminary software system for its implementation has been developed.

  5. Automated parking garage system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A one-twenty-fifth scale model of the key components of an automated parking garage system is described. The design of the model required transferring a vehicle from an entry level, vertically (+Z, -Z), to a storage location at any one of four storage positions (+X, -X, +Y, +Y, -Y) on the storage levels. There are three primary subsystems: (1) a screw jack to provide the vertical motion of the elevator, (2) a cam-driven track-switching device to provide X to Y motion, and (3) a transfer cart to provide horizontal travel and a small amount to vertical motion for transfer to the storage location. Motive power is provided by dc permanent magnet gear motors, one each for the elevator and track switching device and two for the transfer cart drive system (one driving the cart horizontally and the other providing the vertical transfer). The control system, through the use of a microprocessor, provides complete automation through a feedback system which utilizes sensing devices.

  6. Hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method: An automated technique for mesh-independent simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil

    2014-10-01

    A hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method (HIFEM) is introduced for the mesh-independent treatment of problems with complex morphologies. The proposed method provides an automated framework to capture gradient discontinuities associated with multiple materials interfaces that are in a close proximity or contact, while using finite element meshes that do not conform to the problem geometry. While yielding an optimal precision and convergence rate, other principal advantages of HIFEM include the ease of implementation and the ability to compute enriched solutions for a variety of complex materials interface configurations. Moreover, the construction of enrichment functions in this method is independent of the number and sequence of materials interfaces introduced to the nonconforming mesh. An immediate benefit of this feature is the ability to add new materials phases to already enriched nonconforming elements, without the need to remove/modify existing enrichments or sub-elements. In addition to detailed convergence study, several example problems are presented to show the application of HIFEM for modeling various engineering problems, including woven composites, heterogeneous materials systems, and actively-cooled microvascular systems.

  7. Automated Volumetric Analysis of Interface Fluid in Descemet Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty Using Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, David; Dupps, William J.; Srivastava, Sunil K.; Ehlers, Justis P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We demonstrated a novel automated algorithm for segmentation of intraoperative optical coherence tomography (iOCT) imaging of fluid interface gap in Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) and evaluated the effect of intraoperative maneuvers to promote graft apposition on interface dimensions. Methods. A total of 30 eyes of 29 patients from the anterior segment arm of the PIONEER study was included in this analysis. The iOCT scans were entered into an automated algorithm that delineated the spatial extent of the fluid interface gap in three dimensions between donor and host cornea during surgery. The algorithm was validated against manual segmentation, and performance was evaluated by absolute accuracy and intraclass correlation coefficient. Patients underwent DSAEK using a standard sequence of maneuvers, including controlled elevation of IOP and compressive corneal sweep to promote graft adhesion. Measurement of interface fluid volume, en face area, and maximal interface height were compared between scans before anterior chamber infusion, after pressure elevation alone, and after corneal sweep with pressure elevation using dependent-samples t-test. Results. The algorithm achieved 87% absolute accuracy and an intraclass correlation of 0.96. Nine datasets of a total of 84 (11%) required human correction of segmentation errors. Mean interface fluid volume was significantly decreased by corneal sweep (P = 0.021) and by both maneuvers combined (P = 0.046). Mean en face area was significantly decreased by corneal sweep (P = 0.010) and the maneuvers combined (P < 0.001). Maximal interface height was significantly decreased by pressure elevation (P = 0.010), corneal sweep (P = 0.009), and the maneuvers combined (P = 0.010). Conclusions. Quantitative analysis of iOCT volumetric scans shows the significant effect of controlled pressure elevation and corneal sweep on graft apposition in DSAEK. Computerized iOCT analysis yields objective measurements of interface fluid intraoperatively, which provides information on anatomic outcomes and could be used in future trials. PMID:25103262

  8. Simulation evaluation of a pilot interface with an automated rotorcraft obstacle avoidance system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Coppenbarger; V. H. L. Cheng

    1993-01-01

    Pilot interface with an automated nap-of-the-earth (NOE) rotorcraft guidance and control system was investigated in the NASA Ames Research Center's fixed-base Interchangeable Cab (ICAB) simulator facility. The interface concept, referred to as pilot-directed guidance (PDG), involves interpreting pilot inputs as high-level commands to an inner-loop automatic guidance and control system. With this interface, a pilot can concentrate upon primary course

  9. Automated creation of a forms-based database query interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Magesh Jayapandian; H. V. Jagadish

    2008-01-01

    Forms-based query interfaces are widely used to access databases today. The design of a forms-based interface is often a key step in the deployment of a database. Each form in such an interface is capable of expressing only a very limited range of queries. Ide- ally, the set of forms as a whole must be able to express all pos-

  10. Old and New Models for Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Eliot

    1983-01-01

    Discusses organization design as context for office automation; mature computer-based systems as one application of organization design variables; and emerging office automation systems (organizational information management, personal information management) as another application of these variables. Management information systems models and…

  11. SWISS-MODEL: an automated protein homology-modeling server

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Torsten Schwede; Jürgen Kopp; Nicolas Guex; Manuel C. Peitsch

    2003-01-01

    SWISS-MODEL (http:\\/\\/swissmodel.expasy.org) is a server for automated comparative modeling of three- dimensional (3D) protein structures. It pioneered the field of automated modeling starting in 1993 and is the most widely-used free web-based automated modeling facility today. In 2002 the server computed 120 000 user requests for 3D protein models. SWISS- MODEL provides several levels of user interaction through its World

  12. Model-Based Design of Air Traffic Controller-Automation Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romahn, Stephan; Callantine, Todd J.; Palmer, Everett A.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A model of controller and automation activities was used to design the controller-automation interactions necessary to implement a new terminal area air traffic management concept. The model was then used to design a controller interface that provides the requisite information and functionality. Using data from a preliminary study, the Crew Activity Tracking System (CATS) was used to help validate the model as a computational tool for describing controller performance.

  13. Automated, Parametric Geometry Modeling and Grid Generation for Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrand, Vincent J.; Uchitel, Vadim G.; Whitmire, John B.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this Phase I project is to develop a highly automated software system for rapid geometry modeling and grid generation for turbomachinery applications. The proposed system features a graphical user interface for interactive control, a direct interface to commercial CAD/PDM systems, support for IGES geometry output, and a scripting capability for obtaining a high level of automation and end-user customization of the tool. The developed system is fully parametric and highly automated, and, therefore, significantly reduces the turnaround time for 3D geometry modeling, grid generation and model setup. This facilitates design environments in which a large number of cases need to be generated, such as for parametric analysis and design optimization of turbomachinery equipment. In Phase I we have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the approach. The system has been tested on a wide variety of turbomachinery geometries, including several impellers and a multi stage rotor-stator combination. In Phase II, we plan to integrate the developed system with turbomachinery design software and with commercial CAD/PDM software.

  14. Automation and Accountability in Decision Support System Interface Design M.L. Cummings1

    E-print Network

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    1 Automation and Accountability in Decision Support System Interface Design M.L. Cummings1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology ABSTRACT When the human element is introduced into decision support system. This paper discusses those ethical and social impact issues specific to decision support systems

  15. ITR -(ASE + NHS) -(int): Intelligent Human-Machine Interface & Control for Highly Automated Chemical Screening Processes

    E-print Network

    Kaber, David B.

    changed dramatically in the recent past. Toxicity tests that were once completed manually by human1 ITR - (ASE + NHS) - (int): Intelligent Human-Machine Interface & Control for Highly Automated Chemical Screening Processes 1. Introduction High-throughput, toxicity screening (testing) of dangerous

  16. The State of the Art in Automating Usability Evaluation of User Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Hearst, Marti

    The State of the Art in Automating Usability Evaluation of User Interfaces MELODY Y. IVORY fellowship, and Kaiser Permanente. Authors' addresses: M. Y. Ivory, Computer Science Division, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1776; email: ivory@CS.Berkeley.edu; M. A. Hearst, School

  17. Interface Model of Cold Fusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Talbot A. Chubb

    The interface theory of cold fusion is a variant of Ion Band State (IBS) Theory.1 It models Bloch symmetry deuterons in a 2-dimensional metal lattice instead of the 3-dimensional metal lattice first used. Both IBS variants recognize that the required lattice symmetry has limited extent, with the reactive deuterons being bound inside a closed volume like a box. The reactive

  18. Integrated behavior models for factory automation systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jewgenij Botaschanjan; Benjamin Hummel; Thomas Hensel; Alexander Lindworsky

    2009-01-01

    Despite the large amount of models for different aspects of factory automation systems, many of these models target at individual and in most cases static aspects of the system, such as the geometry or its electric parts. There is a lack of suitable description methods, which integrate these individual models to a behavior model including spatial aspects and the handling

  19. Cooperative control - The interface challenge for men and automated machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, W. W., III; Orlando, N. E.

    1984-01-01

    The research issues associated with the increasing autonomy and independence of machines and their evolving relationships to human beings are explored. The research, conducted by Langley Research Center (LaRC), will produce a new social work order in which the complementary attributes of robots and human beings, which include robots' greater strength and precision and humans' greater physical and intellectual dexterity, are necessary for systems of cooperation. Attention is given to the tools for performing the research, including the Intelligent Systems Research Laboratory (ISRL) and industrial manipulators, as well as to the research approaches taken by the Automation Technology Branch (ATB) of LaRC to achieve high automation levels. The ATB is focusing on artificial intelligence research through DAISIE, a system which tends to organize its environment into hierarchical controller/planner abstractions.

  20. Alloy Interface Interdiffusion Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Garces, Jorge E.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    With renewed interest in developing nuclear-powered deep space probes, attention will return to improving the metallurgical processing of potential nuclear fuels so that they remain dimensionally stable over the years required for a successful mission. Previous work on fuel alloys at the NASA Glenn Research Center was primarily empirical, with virtually no continuing research. Even when empirical studies are exacting, they often fail to provide enough insight to guide future research efforts. In addition, from a fundamental theoretical standpoint, the actinide metals (which include materials used for nuclear fuels) pose a severe challenge to modern electronic-structure theory. Recent advances in quantum approximate atomistic modeling, coupled with first-principles derivation of needed input parameters, can help researchers develop new alloys for nuclear propulsion.

  1. The Haptic Probe: Mechanized Haptic Exploration and Automated Modeling Volkan Patoglu

    E-print Network

    Gillespie, Brent

    The Haptic Probe: Mechanized Haptic Exploration and Automated Modeling Volkan Patoglu Department@umich.edu Abstract It seems likely that humans build internal models of ob- jects that they explore haptically that model be used to render the object through a haptic interface? Or even simpler, can a robot estimate

  2. Modelling Communication Interfaces with COMIX

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Oppenheimer; Dongming Zhang; Wolfgang Nebel

    2001-01-01

    For the communication of hardware and software via memory mapped I\\/O e.g. in an embedded system, it is necessary to specify the communication reg- isters in every detail. Since this work usually needs to be done for hardware and software independently, this work is time consuming, difficult, and error prone. This paper presents an approach to model hw\\/sw interfaces in

  3. Flexible software architecture for user-interface and machine control in laboratory automation.

    PubMed

    Arutunian, E B; Meldrum, D R; Friedman, N A; Moody, S E

    1998-10-01

    We describe a modular, layered software architecture for automated laboratory instruments. The design consists of a sophisticated user interface, a machine controller and multiple individual hardware subsystems, each interacting through a client-server architecture built entirely on top of open Internet standards. In our implementation, the user-interface components are built as Java applets that are downloaded from a server integrated into the machine controller. The user-interface client can thereby provide laboratory personnel with a familiar environment for experiment design through a standard World Wide Web browser. Data management and security are seamlessly integrated at the machine-controller layer using QNX, a real-time operating system. This layer also controls hardware subsystems through a second client-server interface. This architecture has proven flexible and relatively easy to implement and allows users to operate laboratory automation instruments remotely through an Internet connection. The software architecture was implemented and demonstrated on the Acapella, an automated fluid-sample-processing system that is under development at the University of Washington. PMID:9793655

  4. NEW GRAPHICAL REASONING MODELS UNDERSTANDING GRAPHICAL INTERFACES

    E-print Network

    Furnas, George W.

    human graphical reasoning processes. KEYWORDS: Graphical interfaces, mental models, user models, visualNEW GRAPHICAL REASONING MODELS FOR UNDERSTANDING GRAPHICAL INTERFACES George W. Furnas Cognitive points: (1) that certain graphical interfaces are especially easy to learn and use, (2) that special

  5. Investigation of multi-modal interface features for adaptive automation of a human-robot system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David B. Kabera; Melanie C. Wright; Mohamed A. Sheik-Nainar

    The objective of this research was to assess the effectiveness of using a multi-modal interface for adaptive automation (AA) of human control of a simulated telerobotic (remote-control, semi-autonomous robotic) system. We investigated the use of one or more sensory channels to cue dynamic control allocations to a human operator or computer, as part of AA, and to support operator system\\/situation

  6. Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) for Scientific Models

    E-print Network

    Boyd, John P.

    Chapter 15 Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) for Scientific Models 15.1 Introduction The design of Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) is usually regarded as an art for programming- for-the-consumer. Middle a bullet-proof, super-reliable interface for a research code that will be used for a couple of years

  7. Automated parameter optimization for Ecopath ecosystem models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Kavanagh; Nathaniel Newlands; Villy Christensen; Daniel Pauly

    2004-01-01

    Ecopath is mass-balance modeling approach that is widely used for incorporating ecosystem considerations into fisheries science. Up to now, users of Ecopath software who are constructing a model of a given area must carefully adjust input biomass, diets, and other parameters until the Ecopath parameterization is mass-balanced, a slow process leading to non-unique solutions. We present a new computer-automated iterative

  8. Multilevel Modeling for Industrial Automation Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Aschauer; Gerd Dauenhauer; Wolfgang Pree

    2009-01-01

    Model-driven engineering of software intensive systems requires adequate means for describing their essential properties. For the domain of testbed automation systems, conventional modeling formalisms fall short due to the inadequacy of a fixed meta-level hierarchy. In this paper we identify the core problems by examining real-world examples. As a solution, we propose using a unification of classes and objects, known

  9. Trust Model for Security Automation Data 1.0 (TMSAD)

    E-print Network

    Trust Model for Security Automation Data 1.0 (TMSAD) HaroldBooth AdamHalbardier NIST Interagency Report 7802 #12;NIST Interagency Report 7802 Trust Model for Security Automation Data 1.0 (TMSAD) Harold FOR SECURITY AUTOMATION DATA 1.0 (TMSAD) iii Reports on Computer Systems Technology The Information Technology

  10. Solid modeling: foundation for manufacturing automation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalibjian, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    We describe the concept of solid modeling and its applications for Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) processes. A solid modeler uses a complete, unambiguous mathematical description to present the shape of a physical part. A mathematically complete part data base is thus established. This date base can then be used by such CAM application programs as process planners and numerical control (NC) tool-path generators to help produce the modeled part. Without an unambiguous mathematical description, the application programs would not be able to operate without substantial human intervention. The solid modeler, then, provides the foundation upon which fully automated part design and manufacture will rest.

  11. Automated modeling of medical decisions.

    PubMed Central

    Egar, J. W.; Musen, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a graph grammar and a graph-grammar derivation system that, together, generate decision-theoretic models from unordered lists of medical terms. The medical terms represent considerations in a dilemma that confronts the patient and the health-care provider. Our current grammar ensures that several desirable structural properties are maintained in all derived decision models. PMID:8130509

  12. Automation model of sewerage rehabilitation planning.

    PubMed

    Yang, M D; Su, T C

    2006-01-01

    The major steps of sewerage rehabilitation include inspection of sewerage, assessment of structural conditions, computation of structural condition grades, and determination of rehabilitation methods and materials. Conventionally, sewerage rehabilitation planning relies on experts with professional background that is tedious and time-consuming. This paper proposes an automation model of planning optimal sewerage rehabilitation strategies for the sewer system by integrating image process, clustering technology, optimization, and visualization display. Firstly, image processing techniques, such as wavelet transformation and co-occurrence features extraction, were employed to extract various characteristics of structural failures from CCTV inspection images. Secondly, a classification neural network was established to automatically interpret the structural conditions by comparing the extracted features with the typical failures in a databank. Then, to achieve optimal rehabilitation efficiency, a genetic algorithm was used to determine appropriate rehabilitation methods and substitution materials for the pipe sections with a risk of mal-function and even collapse. Finally, the result from the automation model can be visualized in a geographic information system in which essential information of the sewer system and sewerage rehabilitation plans are graphically displayed. For demonstration, the automation model of optimal sewerage rehabilitation planning was applied to a sewer system in east Taichung, Chinese Taiwan. PMID:17302324

  13. Development of a commercial Automated Laser Gas Interface (ALGI) for AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, R.; Mores, M.; Kitchen, R.; Sundquist, M.; Hauser, T.; Stodola, M.; Tannenbaum, S.; Skipper, P.; Liberman, R.; Young, G.; Corless, S.; Tucker, M.

    2013-01-01

    National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) collectively have been developing an interface to introduce CO2 produced by the laser combustion of liquid chromatograph eluate deposited on a CuO substrate directly into the ion source of an AMS system, thereby bypassing the customary graphitization process. The Automated Laser Gas Interface (ALGI) converts dried liquid samples to CO2 gas quickly and efficiently, allowing 96 samples to be measured in as little as 16 h. 14C:12C ratios stabilize typically within 2 min of analysis time per sample. Presented is the recent progress of NEC’s ALGI, a stand-alone accessory to an NEC gas-enabled multi-cathode source of negative ions by Cs sputtering (MC-SNICS) ion source.

  14. Differential Petri net models for industrial automation and supervisory control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabel Demongodin; Nick T. Koussoulas

    2006-01-01

    Supervisory control systems play a central role in modern industrial automation. However, control theory has recently made significant advances in modeling mixed continuous\\/discrete event systems (\\

  15. A semiotic communication model for interface design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raffaella Scalisi

    This research wants to contribute to the c reation o f a semiotic framework for interface design. Using the Jakobson's communication model to analyse the HCI approach to interface development, we explain how some central factors of communication are not enough considered by designers.

  16. Automating Model Transformations and Refactoring for Goal-Oriented Models

    E-print Network

    Bonaventure, Olivier

    Automating Model Transformations and Refactoring for Goal-Oriented Models Promoteur: Axel van Lamsweerde Louvain-la-Neuve Année académique 2009 ­ 2010 #12;#12;Acknowledgments Iam indebted to my supervisor, Axel as the long discussions we had, signi cantly improved the quality of this work. I thank Richard Jones for his

  17. Micromechanical modeling of rough interface behavior

    E-print Network

    Huang, Shiping

    2011-07-28

    In this dissertation, the interface behavior of contacting rough surfaces was studied systematically based upon micromechanical modeling. Firstly, asperity contact mechanics was further developed. It was found that tangential tractions, displacement...

  18. A DIFFUSE INTERFACE MODEL FOR ALLOYS WITH

    E-print Network

    Garcke, Harald

    A DIFFUSE INTERFACE MODEL FOR ALLOYS WITH MULTIPLE COMPONENTS AND PHASES HARALD GARCKE, BRITTA] and the references therein). In recent years modi#12;cations of the original phase #12;eld equation appeared which

  19. Highway automation: System modeling for impacts analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Bresnock; Mark A. Miller; Edward H. Lechner; Steven E. Shladover

    1991-01-01

    Highway automation technologies have been proposed in an attempt to ameliorate the urban problem of congestion and, to a lesser extent, air pollution. The methodology developed to analyze the impacts of an automated highway system in the Southern California region in 2025 is addressed in this paper. An automated highway system scenario is selected from several alternatives based on sensitivity

  20. A Generalized Timeline Representation, Services, and Interface for Automating Space Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.; Johnston, Mark; Frank, Jeremy; Giuliano, Mark; Kavelaars, Alicia; Lenzen, Christoph; Policella, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Numerous automated and semi-automated planning & scheduling systems have been developed for space applications. Most of these systems are model-based in that they encode domain knowledge necessary to predict spacecraft state and resources based on initial conditions and a proposed activity plan. The spacecraft state and resources as often modeled as a series of timelines, with a timeline or set of timelines to represent a state or resource key in the operations of the spacecraft. In this paper, we first describe a basic timeline representation that can represent a set of state, resource, timing, and transition constraints. We describe a number of planning and scheduling systems designed for space applications (and in many cases deployed for use of ongoing missions) and describe how they do and do not map onto this timeline model.

  1. AN AUTOMATED CARTOGRAPHIC GENERALIZATION PROCESS: A PSEUDO-PHYSICAL MODEL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Joubran; Abu Daoud; Y. Doytsher

    Automating the map generalization process has traditionally been a major focus of research in cartography and GIS environment, even though a usable holistic generalization method is still lacking. The model described in this paper examines the generalization process from a new standpoint that views the map as a stage in area warfare. A pseudo physical model was developed for automated

  2. Systems Engineering Interfaces: A Model Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fosse, Elyse; Delp, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Currently: Ops Rev developed and maintains a framework that includes interface-specific language, patterns, and Viewpoints. Ops Rev implements the framework to design MOS 2.0 and its 5 Mission Services. Implementation de-couples interfaces and instances of interaction Future: A Mission MOSE implements the approach and uses the model based artifacts for reviews. The framework extends further into the ground data layers and provides a unified methodology.

  3. MODELLING AND IMPLEMENTING THE CONTROL OF AUTOMATED PRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MODELLING AND IMPLEMENTING THE CONTROL OF AUTOMATED PRODUCTION SYSTEMS USING STATECHARTS AND PLC) / Jaime C. L. FERREIRA DA SILVA (1) / Jean-Marc ROUSSEL (3) (1) Mechanical Engineering Department School 61131-3 languages, Discrete Events Systems, Automated Production Systems. Abstract This paper

  4. Research on information superiority evaluation model of command automation system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jie Zhang; Jing Guo; Xiaoyuan Jiang; Hongda Fan

    2004-01-01

    Information dominance plays a crucial role in achieving the operation superiority in joint operations, and command automation system is the guarantee of obtaining information dominance. So, it is important to analyze and assess the force effectiveness of command automation system. From the view of information dominance, information superiority model based on entropy is developed and information transformation quality of every

  5. Modeling the user in intelligent user interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Stoddard; R. J. Douglass

    1983-01-01

    A methodology for explicitly defining a model of a program's users and for evaluating the effectiveness of the user interface is presented. The development of an explicit user model will reduce user costs by both reducing the cost of software development and increasing user productivity. The components of the methodology are described, and an example of using the methodology in

  6. Model compilation: An approach to automated model derivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Baudin, Catherine; Iwasaki, Yumi; Nayak, Pandurang; Tanaka, Kazuo

    1990-01-01

    An approach is introduced to automated model derivation for knowledge based systems. The approach, model compilation, involves procedurally generating the set of domain models used by a knowledge based system. With an implemented example, how this approach can be used to derive models of different precision and abstraction is illustrated, and models are tailored to different tasks, from a given set of base domain models. In particular, two implemented model compilers are described, each of which takes as input a base model that describes the structure and behavior of a simple electromechanical device, the Reaction Wheel Assembly of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The compilers transform this relatively general base model into simple task specific models for troubleshooting and redesign, respectively, by applying a sequence of model transformations. Each transformation in this sequence produces an increasingly more specialized model. The compilation approach lessens the burden of updating and maintaining consistency among models by enabling their automatic regeneration.

  7. Modeling and Extracting Deep-Web Query Interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wensheng Wu; AnHai Doan; Clement T. Yu; Weiyi Meng

    2009-01-01

    Interface modeling & extraction is a fundamental step in building a uni- form query interface to a multitude of databases on the Web. Existing solutions are limited in that they assume interfaces are flat and thus ignore the inherent struc- ture of interfaces, which then seriously hampers the effectiveness of interface in- tegration. To address this limitation, in this chapter,

  8. Automated model integration at source code level: An approach for implementing models into the NASA Land Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Mocko, D. M.; Kumar, S.; Nearing, G. S.; Arsenault, K. R.; Geiger, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    Model integration bridges the data flow between modeling frameworks and models. However, models usually do not fit directly into a particular modeling environment, if not designed for it. An example includes implementing different types of models into the NASA Land Information System (LIS), a software framework for land-surface modeling and data assimilation. Model implementation requires scientific knowledge and software expertise and may take a developer months to learn LIS and model software structure. Debugging and testing of the model implementation is also time-consuming due to not fully understanding LIS or the model. This time spent is costly for research and operational projects. To address this issue, an approach has been developed to automate model integration into LIS. With this in mind, a general model interface was designed to retrieve forcing inputs, parameters, and state variables needed by the model and to provide as state variables and outputs to LIS. Every model can be wrapped to comply with the interface, usually with a FORTRAN 90 subroutine. Development efforts need only knowledge of the model and basic programming skills. With such wrappers, the logic is the same for implementing all models. Code templates defined for this general model interface could be re-used with any specific model. Therefore, the model implementation can be done automatically. An automated model implementation toolkit was developed with Microsoft Excel and its built-in VBA language. It allows model specifications in three worksheets and contains FORTRAN 90 code templates in VBA programs. According to the model specification, the toolkit generates data structures and procedures within FORTRAN modules and subroutines, which transfer data between LIS and the model wrapper. Model implementation is standardized, and about 80 - 90% of the development load is reduced. In this presentation, the automated model implementation approach is described along with LIS programming interfaces, the general model interface and five case studies, including a regression model, Noah-MP, FASST, SAC-HTET/SNOW-17, and FLake. These different models vary in complexity with software structure. Also, we will describe how these complexities were overcome through using this approach and results of model benchmarks within LIS.

  9. An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2013-09-01

    This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

  10. Multiscale Modeling of Interface Phenomena in Biology

    E-print Network

    at introducing the participants to the mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of the electro-chemical, and the electro- mechanical generation of Calcium signals in smooth muscle cells. (Mostly PhD students interfacing with an electronic substrate of inorganic/organic type (neurochip/prototype of artificial retina

  11. Variational Implicit Solvation with Solute Molecular Mechanics: From Diffuse-Interface to Sharp-Interface Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Zhao, Yanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Central in a variational implicit-solvent description of biomolecular solvation is an effective free-energy functional of the solute atomic positions and the solute-solvent interface (i.e., the dielectric boundary). The free-energy functional couples together the solute molecular mechanical interaction energy, the solute-solvent interfacial energy, the solute-solvent van der Waals interaction energy, and the electrostatic energy. In recent years, the sharp-interface version of the variational implicit-solvent model has been developed and used for numerical computations of molecular solvation. In this work, we propose a diffuse-interface version of the variational implicit-solvent model with solute molecular mechanics. We also analyze both the sharp-interface and diffuse-interface models. We prove the existence of free-energy minimizers and obtain their bounds. We also prove the convergence of the diffuse-interface model to the sharp-interface model in the sense of ?-convergence. We further discuss properties of sharp-interface free-energy minimizers, the boundary conditions and the coupling of the Poisson–Boltzmann equation in the diffuse-interface model, and the convergence of forces from diffuse-interface to sharp-interface descriptions. Our analysis relies on the previous works on the problem of minimizing surface areas and on our observations on the coupling between solute molecular mechanical interactions with the continuum solvent. Our studies justify rigorously the self consistency of the proposed diffuse-interface variational models of implicit solvation. PMID:24058213

  12. Interface dynamics in planar neural field models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neural field models describe the coarse-grained activity of populations of interacting neurons. Because of the laminar structure of real cortical tissue they are often studied in two spatial dimensions, where they are well known to generate rich patterns of spatiotemporal activity. Such patterns have been interpreted in a variety of contexts ranging from the understanding of visual hallucinations to the generation of electroencephalographic signals. Typical patterns include localized solutions in the form of traveling spots, as well as intricate labyrinthine structures. These patterns are naturally defined by the interface between low and high states of neural activity. Here we derive the equations of motion for such interfaces and show, for a Heaviside firing rate, that the normal velocity of an interface is given in terms of a non-local Biot-Savart type interaction over the boundaries of the high activity regions. This exact, but dimensionally reduced, system of equations is solved numerically and shown to be in excellent agreement with the full nonlinear integral equation defining the neural field. We develop a linear stability analysis for the interface dynamics that allows us to understand the mechanisms of pattern formation that arise from instabilities of spots, rings, stripes and fronts. We further show how to analyze neural field models with linear adaptation currents, and determine the conditions for the dynamic instability of spots that can give rise to breathers and traveling waves. PMID:22655970

  13. XRLSim model specifications and user interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D.; Breitfeller, E.; Woodruff, J.P.

    1989-12-01

    The two chapters in this manual document the engineering development leading to modification of XRLSim -- an Ada-based computer program developed to provide a realistic simulation of an x-ray laser weapon platform. Complete documentation of the FY88 effort to develop XRLSim was published in April 1989, as UCID-21736:XRLSIM Model Specifications and User Interfaces, by L. C. Ng, D. T. Gavel, R. M. Shectman. P. L. Sholl, and J. P. Woodruff. The FY89 effort has been primarily to enhance the x-ray laser weapon-platform model fidelity. Chapter 1 of this manual details enhancements made to XRLSim model specifications during FY89. Chapter 2 provides the user with changes in user interfaces brought about by these enhancements. This chapter is offered as a series of deletions, replacements, and insertions to the original document to enable XRLSim users to implement enhancements developed during FY89.

  14. A Generic Approach for Automated Verification of Product Line Models

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of Product Line Models This thesis explores the subject of automatic verification of product line models. This approach is based on the hypothesis that to automatically verify product line models, they should firstA Generic Approach for Automated Verification of Product Line Models A thesis submitted by Raúl

  15. Modeling of metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor structure considering the effects of interface traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Shi, Xiao Rong; Zheng, Xue Jun; Tian, Li; Zhu, Zhe

    2015-06-01

    An improved model, in which the interface traps effects are considered, is developed by combining with quantum mechanical model, dipole switching theory and silicon physics of metal-oxide-semiconductor structure to describe the electrical properties of metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) structure. Using the model, the effects of the interface traps on the surface potential (?Si) of the semiconductor, the low frequency (LF) capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics and memory window of MFIS structure are simulated, and the results show that the ?Si- V and LF C-V curves are shifted toward the positive-voltage direction and the memory window become worse as the density of the interface trap states increases. This paper is expected to provide some guidance to the design and performance improvement of MFIS structure devices. In addition, the improved model can be integrated into electronic design automation (EDA) software for circuit simulation.

  16. Automation Marketplace 2010: New Models, Core Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2010-01-01

    In a year when a difficult economy presented fewer opportunities for immediate gains, the major industry players have defined their business strategies with fundamentally different concepts of library automation. This is no longer an industry where companies compete on the basis of the best or the most features in similar products but one where…

  17. Model driven design in industrial automation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabet Estevez; Isabel Sarachaga; Federico Perez; Dario Orive; Marga Marcos

    2009-01-01

    Current industrial applications demand the design of more and more complex, safe and trustworthy control systems which exhibit a high degree of flexibility and reutilization. To achieve this, the engineering process has to be improved through the integration of the tools involved in the development process. To achieve this goal the definition of Markup Languages for factory automation has been

  18. Interface of Inference Models with Concept and Medical Record Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan L. Rector; Peter D. Johnson; Samson W. Tu; Chris Wroe; Jeremy Rogers

    2001-01-01

    Medical information systems and standards are increasingly based on principled models of at least three distinct sorts of\\u000a information — patient data, concepts (terminology), and guidelines (decision support). Well defined interfaces are required\\u000a between the three types of model to allow development to proceed independently. Two of the major issues to be dealt with in\\u000a the defining of such interfaces

  19. Automated operations planning: Modeling MLRS operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1992-01-01

    The multiples launch rocket system (MLRS) is a highly survivable and automated complement to conventional cannon artillery. For best survivability against counter-battery fire, MLRS operations rely on rapid ``shoot-and-scoot`` tactics by widely dispersed launchers. Such tactics may be difficult to include in a battlefield simulation without requiring players for the individual MLRS items: launchers and resupply vehicles. To reduce this

  20. Automated operations planning: Modeling MLRS operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1992-01-01

    The multiples launch rocket system (MLRS) is a highly survivable and automated complement to conventional cannon artillery. For best survivability against counter-battery fire, MLRS operations rely on rapid shoot-and-scoot'' tactics by widely dispersed launchers. Such tactics may be difficult to include in a battlefield simulation without requiring players for the individual MLRS items: launchers and resupply vehicles. To reduce this

  1. A power line data communication interface using spread spectrum technology in home automation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Shwehdi; A. Z. Khan

    1996-01-01

    Building automation technology is rapidly developing towards more reliable communication systems, devices that control electronic equipments. These equipment if controlled leads to efficient energy management, and savings on the monthly electricity bill. Power Line communication (PLC) has been one of the dreams of the electronics industry for decades, especially for building automation. It is the purpose of this paper to

  2. Perspectives of Interfacing People with Technology in the Development of Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Thomas R.; Ewbank, Ray V. K.

    Noting the increasing impact of office automation on the workings of both people and organizations, this paper purposes the need for implementation methodologies, termed "self-actualizing systems," to introduce automation technologies into the office environment with a minimum of trauma to workers. Such methodologies, it contends, allow users to…

  3. Automated Segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions by Model Outlier Detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koen Van Leemput; Frederik Maes; Dirk Vandermeulen; Alan C. F. Colchester; Paul Suetens

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a fully automated algorithm for segmentation of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions from multispec- tral magnetic resonance (MR) images. The method performs inten- sity-based tissue classification using a stochastic model for normal brain images and simultaneously detects MS lesions as outliers that are not well explained by the model. It corrects for MR field in- homogeneities, estimates tissue-specific

  4. HIGHER-ORDER MODELING AND AUTOMATED DESIGN-SPACE EXPLORATION

    E-print Network

    Esser, Robert

    HIGHER-ORDER MODELING AND AUTOMATED DESIGN-SPACE EXPLORATION J¨orn W. Janneck EECS Department in the same set of languages used to model the original sys- tem. Hence the set of design space exploration for an investigation into different solutions--an exploration of the design space. In many real-world systems

  5. Automating Threat Modeling through the Software Development Life-Cycle

    E-print Network

    Miller, Barton P.

    managers[4]. Operationally Critical Threat As- set and Vulnerability Evaluation (OCTAVE) uses in- formation- diting from a risk management perspective through the generation of threat models. A security auditingAutomating Threat Modeling through the Software Development Life-Cycle Guifr´e Ruiz1 , Elisa

  6. A model for types and levels of human interaction with automation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raja Parasuraman; Thomas B. Sheridan; Christopher D. Wickens

    2000-01-01

    We outline a model for types and levels of automation that provides a framework and an objective basis for deciding which system functions should be automated and to what extent. Appropriate selection is important because automation does not merely supplant but changes human activity and can impose new coordination demands on the human operator. We propose that automation can be

  7. Sharp-interface models for concrete carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jonathan D.; Fernández, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the fast-reaction asymptotics for a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion (RD) system describing the penetration of the carbonation reaction in concrete. The technique of matched-asymptotic expansions is used to show that the RD system leads to two distinct classes of limiting sharp-interface models. We explore three conceptually different diffusion regimes for the effective diffusivities of the driving chemical species. These result in one-phase and two-phase generalised Stefan moving-boundary problems with a nonstandard two-scale (micro-macro) moving-boundary problem - the main result of the paper.

  8. Modeling of aerosol deposition with interface devices.

    PubMed

    Finlay, W H; Martin, A R

    2007-01-01

    Various approaches can be used to mathematically model the performance of different masks, mouthpieces, and aerosol delivery devices. The sophistication of such models can vary widely, from the use of simple algebraic empirical correlations to advanced computational fluid dynamics simulations. Bench-top testing is also often used to model aspects of devices, since it is difficult to capture certain aspects of device behavior with mathematical models. These various approaches to modeling differ in their limitations. Empirical correlations exist for predicting the effects of varying mouthpiece diameter and mouth-throat dimensions on extrathoracic losses, but are restricted to stable, nonballistic aerosols in certain flow rate ranges. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations that solve the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations typically require near-wall turbulence corrections in order to adequately model mouth-throat deposition, while Large Eddy Simulation (LES) removes this deficiency. Bench-top models that use replicas of the extrathoracic airways vary in their accuracy and generality in replicating the filtering properties of these airways. Choosing and using these various modeling approaches for evaluating patient-device interfaces requires knowledge of their merits and pitfalls, a brief discussion of which is given here. PMID:17411402

  9. Development of an automated speech recognition interface for personal emergency response systems

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Melinda; Young, Vicky; Boger, Jennifer; Mihailidis, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Background Demands on long-term-care facilities are predicted to increase at an unprecedented rate as the baby boomer generation reaches retirement age. Aging-in-place (i.e. aging at home) is the desire of most seniors and is also a good option to reduce the burden on an over-stretched long-term-care system. Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERSs) help enable older adults to age-in-place by providing them with immediate access to emergency assistance. Traditionally they operate with push-button activators that connect the occupant via speaker-phone to a live emergency call-centre operator. If occupants do not wear the push button or cannot access the button, then the system is useless in the event of a fall or emergency. Additionally, a false alarm or failure to check-in at a regular interval will trigger a connection to a live operator, which can be unwanted and intrusive to the occupant. This paper describes the development and testing of an automated, hands-free, dialogue-based PERS prototype. Methods The prototype system was built using a ceiling mounted microphone array, an open-source automatic speech recognition engine, and a 'yes' and 'no' response dialog modelled after an existing call-centre protocol. Testing compared a single microphone versus a microphone array with nine adults in both noisy and quiet conditions. Dialogue testing was completed with four adults. Results and discussion The microphone array demonstrated improvement over the single microphone. In all cases, dialog testing resulted in the system reaching the correct decision about the kind of assistance the user was requesting. Further testing is required with elderly voices and under different noise conditions to ensure the appropriateness of the technology. Future developments include integration of the system with an emergency detection method as well as communication enhancement using features such as barge-in capability. Conclusion The use of an automated dialog-based PERS has the potential to provide users with more autonomy in decisions regarding their own health and more privacy in their own home. PMID:19583876

  10. Automated data acquisition technology development:Automated modeling and control development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the completion of, and improvements made to, the software developed for automated data acquisition and automated modeling and control development on the Texas Micro rackmounted PC's. This research was initiated because a need was identified by the Metal Processing Branch of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for a mobile data acquisition and data analysis system, customized for welding measurement and calibration. Several hardware configurations were evaluated and a PC based system was chosen. The Welding Measurement System (WMS), is a dedicated instrument strickly for use of data acquisition and data analysis. In addition to the data acquisition functions described in this thesis, WMS also supports many functions associated with process control. The hardware and software requirements for an automated acquisition system for welding process parameters, welding equipment checkout, and welding process modeling were determined in 1992. From these recommendations, NASA purchased the necessary hardware and software. The new welding acquisition system is designed to collect welding parameter data and perform analysis to determine the voltage versus current arc-length relationship for VPPA welding. Once the results of this analysis are obtained, they can then be used to develop a RAIL function to control welding startup and shutdown without torch crashing.

  11. Automated Verification of Model Transformations in the Automotive Industry

    E-print Network

    Cordy, James R.

    Automated Verification of Model Transformations in the Automotive Industry Gehan M. K. Selim1 Electrical and Controls Integration Lab, General Motors Research and Development, Warren, Michigan, USA Abstract. Many companies have adopted MDD for developing their software systems. Several studies have

  12. Automated Validation of Software Models Steve Sims Rance Cleaveland

    E-print Network

    Cleaveland, Rance

    Automated Validation of Software Models Steve Sims Rance Cleaveland Reactive Systems, Inc. www those in the automotive, aviation and medical-device industries, will have similar needs, owing Eagle Software www.neweagle.net sranville@neweagle.net Abstract This paper describes the application

  13. Interactive Assessment of User Preference Models: The Automated Travel Assistant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg Linden; Steve Hanks; Neal Lesh

    This paper presents the candidate\\/critique model of interactive problem solv - ing, in which an automated problem solver communicates candidate solutions to the user and the user critiques those solutions. The system starts with minimal in formation about the user's preferences, and preferences are elicite d and inferred incrementally by analyz- ing the critiques. The system's goal is to present

  14. Automating sensitivity analysis of computer models using computer calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Oblow, E.M.; Pin, F.G.

    1985-01-01

    An automated procedure for performing sensitivity analyses has been developed. The procedure uses a new FORTRAN compiler with computer calculus capabilities to generate the derivatives needed to set up sensitivity equations. The new compiler is called GRESS - Gradient Enhanced Software System. Application of the automated procedure with ''direct'' and ''adjoint'' sensitivity theory for the analysis of non-linear, iterative systems of equations is discussed. Calculational efficiency consideration and techniques for adjoint sensitivity analysis are emphasized. The new approach is found to preserve the traditional advantages of adjoint theory while removing the tedious human effort previously needed to apply this theoretical methodology. Conclusions are drawn about the applicability of the automated procedure in numerical analysis and large-scale modelling sensitivity studies. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Improved Interfacing of Electrical Machine Models to Electromagnetic Transients Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Gole; R. W. Menzies; H. M. Turanli; D. A. Woodford

    1984-01-01

    A new technique is presented for interfacing electrical machine models with electromagnetic transients programs. The machine models with their associated controls, loads or turbines can be assembled as subroutines by the user and interfaced to the electrical network or other machine models directly. The machine models employ the standard state variable equations and may use any integration technique for solution.

  16. Design of interface circuits with electrical battery models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoon-Ho Kim; Hoi-Doo Ha

    1997-01-01

    In designing interface circuits to a battery, often the battery is assumed to be a simple voltage source. However, the battery itself has internal parameters. This means that the internal parameters of the battery models need to be considered for the interface design. Several electrical battery models are presented. Then, using these electrical battery models, the analysis and the design

  17. Beyond Hacking: a Model Based Approach to User Interface Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Wilson; P. Johnson; C. Kelly; J. Cunningham; P. Markopoulos

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of models in the design of user interfaces, with particular emphasis on integration across different modelling stages. We are concerned with bridging the gap between psychologically motivated mod- elling approaches to HCI and implementation oriented interaction models, to produce a task-informed user interface design process. An early version of a UIDE which provides support for

  18. A framework for modeling the consequences of the propagation of automation degradation: application to

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A framework for modeling the consequences of the propagation of automation degradation: application of automation degradation in the context of a socio-technical network. This modelling approach involves two integrating these two views for describing the evolution of system performances under automation degradation

  19. Author's personal copy Modelling and automation of water and wastewater treatment processes

    E-print Network

    Author's personal copy Preface Modelling and automation of water and wastewater treatment processes on the applications of modelling and automation to water and wastewater treatment processes. The session, under their profession, with automation figuring prominently among the new disciplines required to improve

  20. State modeling and pass automation in spacecraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J.; Kulp, D.; Rashkin, R.

    1996-01-01

    The integrated monitoring and control commercial off-the-shelf system (IMACCS), which demonstrates the feasibility of automating spacecraft monitoring and control activities through the use of state modeling, is described together with its use. The use of the system for the control and ground support of the solar, anomalous and magnetic particle explorer (SAMPEX) spacecraft is considered. A key component of IMACCS is the Altair mission control system which implements finite state modeling as an element of its expert system capability. Using the finite state modeling and state transition capabilities of the Altair mission control system, IMACCS features automated monitoring, routine pass support, anomaly resolution and emergency 'lights on again' response. Automatic orbit determination and the production of typical flight dynamics products exists. These functionalities are described.

  1. Automating the identification of structural model parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Martinez, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    System identification methods are analytical techniques for resolving the correct model form and parametric values. However, for system identification to become a practical tool for engineering analysis, the estimation techniques/codes must communicate with finite element software packages, without intensive analyst intervention and supervision. This paper presents a technique used to integrate commercial software packages for finite element modeling (MSC/NASTRAN), mathematical programming techniques (ADS), and general linear system analysis (PRO-MATLAB). The parameter estimation techniques and the software for controlling the overall system were programmed in PRO-MATLAB. Two examples of application of this software are presented. The examples consist of a truss structure in which the model form is well defined and an electronics package whose model form is ill-defined since it is difficult to model with finite elements. A comparison of the resulting updated models with the experimental data showed significant improvement. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Automated Two Higgs Doublet Model at NLO

    E-print Network

    Celine Degrande

    2014-12-22

    The Two Higgs Doublet Model at NLO is generated automatically by FeynRules and NLOCT and allows any computation to be performed at NLO in QCD inside MadGraph5_aMC@NLO. The model can handle both four and five massless flavours. Preliminary results of the shape comparison between the two schemes are shown.

  3. Automated refinement and inference of analytical models for metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael D; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R; Jenkins, Jerry W; Hood, Jonathan E; Soni, Abhishek S; Wikswo, John P; Lipson, Hod

    2011-10-01

    The reverse engineering of metabolic networks from experimental data is traditionally a labor-intensive task requiring a priori systems knowledge. Using a proven model as a test system, we demonstrate an automated method to simplify this process by modifying an existing or related model--suggesting nonlinear terms and structural modifications--or even constructing a new model that agrees with the system's time series observations. In certain cases, this method can identify the full dynamical model from scratch without prior knowledge or structural assumptions. The algorithm selects between multiple candidate models by designing experiments to make their predictions disagree. We performed computational experiments to analyze a nonlinear seven-dimensional model of yeast glycolytic oscillations. This approach corrected mistakes reliably in both approximated and overspecified models. The method performed well to high levels of noise for most states, could identify the correct model de novo, and make better predictions than ordinary parametric regression and neural network models. We identified an invariant quantity in the model, which accurately derived kinetics and the numerical sensitivity coefficients of the system. Finally, we compared the system to dynamic flux estimation and discussed the scaling and application of this methodology to automated experiment design and control in biological systems in real time. PMID:21832805

  4. A power line data communication interface using spread spectrum technology in home automation

    SciTech Connect

    Shwehdi, M.H.; Khan, A.Z. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-07-01

    Building automation technology is rapidly developing towards more reliable communication systems, devices that control electronic equipments. These equipment if controlled leads to efficient energy management, and savings on the monthly electricity bill. Power Line communication (PLC) has been one of the dreams of the electronics industry for decades, especially for building automation. It is the purpose of this paper to demonstrate communication methods among electronic control devices through an AC power line carrier within the buildings for more efficient energy control. The paper outlines methods of communication over a powerline, namely the X-10 and CE bus. It also introduces the spread spectrum technology as to increase speed to 100--150 times faster than the X-10 system. The powerline carrier has tremendous applications in the field of building automation. The paper presents an attempt to realize a smart house concept, so called, in which all home electronic devices from a coffee maker to a water heater microwave to chaos robots will be utilized by an intelligent network whenever one wishes to do so. The designed system may be applied very profitably to help in energy management for both customer and utility.

  5. Models for Automated Tube Performance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    C. Brunkhorst

    2002-12-12

    High power radio-frequency systems, as typically used in fusion research devices, utilize vacuum tubes. Evaluation of vacuum tube performance involves data taken from tube operating curves. The acquisition of data from such graphical sources is a tedious process. A simple modeling method is presented that will provide values of tube currents for a given set of element voltages. These models may be used as subroutines in iterative solutions of amplifier operating conditions for a specific loading impedance.

  6. Modelling melt-solid interfaces in Bridgman growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Patrick G.; Berry, Robert F.; Debnam, William J.; Fripp, Archibald F.; Huang, YU

    1989-01-01

    Doped epoxy models with abrupt interfaces were prepared to test radiographic and computer enhancement procedures used to study the images of melt-solid interfaces during crystal growth in Bridgman furnaces. A column averaging procedure resulted in improved images that faithfully reproduced the positions and shapes of interfaces even at very low density differences. These techniques were applied to lead tin telluride growing in Bridgman furnaces.

  7. A quasi-dynamic nonlinear finite element model to investigate prosthetic interface stresses during walking for trans-tibial amputees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaohong Jia; Ming Zhang; Xiaobing Li; Winson C. C. Lee

    2005-01-01

    Background. To predict the interface pressure between residual limb and prosthetic socket for trans-tibial amputees during walking.Methods. A quasi-dynamic finite element model was built based on the actual geometry of residual limb, internal bones and socket liner. To simulate the friction\\/slip boundary conditions between the skin and liner, automated surface-to-surface contact was used. Besides variable external loads and material inertia,

  8. The Application of the Cumulative Logistic Regression Model to Automated Essay Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberman, Shelby J.; Sinharay, Sandip

    2010-01-01

    Most automated essay scoring programs use a linear regression model to predict an essay score from several essay features. This article applied a cumulative logit model instead of the linear regression model to automated essay scoring. Comparison of the performances of the linear regression model and the cumulative logit model was performed on a…

  9. An Automated Meeting Assistant: A Tangible Mixed Reality Interface for the AMIDA Automatic Content Linking Device 

    E-print Network

    Ehnes, Jochen

    2009-01-01

    to others or bring them onto the shared projection screen easily if they consider them relevant. Yet, irrelevant documents don't draw too much attention from the discussion. In this paper we describe the concept and implementation of this user interface...

  10. Rapid Automated Aircraft Simulation Model Updating from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brian, Geoff; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Techniques to identify aircraft aerodynamic characteristics from flight measurements and compute corrections to an existing simulation model of a research aircraft were investigated. The purpose of the research was to develop a process enabling rapid automated updating of aircraft simulation models using flight data and apply this capability to all flight regimes, including flight envelope extremes. The process presented has the potential to improve the efficiency of envelope expansion flight testing, revision of control system properties, and the development of high-fidelity simulators for pilot training.

  11. Modeling and Verification of NoC Communication Interfaces

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    Modeling and Verification of NoC Communication Interfaces Vinitha Palaniveloo1 Arcot Sowmya1 already used for in computer networks. The NoC, on-chip communication architecture interfaces to IP cores for semi- conductors are networking and communication, medical, defense, automotive and consumer

  12. Evaluation of a Contextual Assistant Interface Using Cognitive Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Belkacem Chikhaoui; Helene Pigot

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive models allow predicting some aspects of utility and usability of human machine interfaces, and also simulating the interaction with these interfaces. The action of predicting is based on a task analysis which analyses what a user is required to do in terms of actions and cognitive processes to achieve a task. Task analysis facilitates the understanding of the functionalities

  13. Rapid Prototyping of Hydrologic Model Interfaces with IPython

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farthing, M. W.; Winters, K. D.; Ahmadia, A. J.; Hesser, T.; Howington, S. E.; Johnson, B. D.; Tate, J.; Kees, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    A significant gulf still exists between the state of practice and state of the art in hydrologic modeling. Part of this gulf is due to the lack of adequate pre- and post-processing tools for newly developed computational models. The development of user interfaces has traditionally lagged several years behind the development of a particular computational model or suite of models. As a result, models with mature interfaces often lack key advancements in model formulation, solution methods, and/or software design and technology. Part of the problem has been a focus on developing monolithic tools to provide comprehensive interfaces for the entire suite of model capabilities. Such efforts require expertise in software libraries and frameworks for creating user interfaces (e.g., Tcl/Tk, Qt, and MFC). These tools are complex and require significant investment in project resources (time and/or money) to use. Moreover, providing the required features for the entire range of possible applications and analyses creates a cumbersome interface. For a particular site or application, the modeling requirements may be simplified or at least narrowed, which can greatly reduce the number and complexity of options that need to be accessible to the user. However, monolithic tools usually are not adept at dynamically exposing specific workflows. Our approach is to deliver highly tailored interfaces to users. These interfaces may be site and/or process specific. As a result, we end up with many, customized interfaces rather than a single, general-use tool. For this approach to be successful, it must be efficient to create these tailored interfaces. We need technology for creating quality user interfaces that is accessible and has a low barrier for integration into model development efforts. Here, we present efforts to leverage IPython notebooks as tools for rapid prototyping of site and application-specific user interfaces. We provide specific examples from applications in near-shore environments as well as levee analysis. We discuss our design decisions and methodology for developing customized interfaces, strategies for delivery of the interfaces to users in various computing environments, as well as implications for the design/implementation of simulation models.

  14. Automated Decomposition of Model-based Learning Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian C.; Millar, Bill

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of sensor rich, massively distributed autonomous systems is being developed that has the potential for unprecedented performance, such as smart buildings, reconfigurable factories, adaptive traffic systems and remote earth ecosystem monitoring. To achieve high performance these massive systems will need to accurately model themselves and their environment from sensor information. Accomplishing this on a grand scale requires automating the art of large-scale modeling. This paper presents a formalization of [\\em decompositional model-based learning (DML)], a method developed by observing a modeler's expertise at decomposing large scale model estimation tasks. The method exploits a striking analogy between learning and consistency-based diagnosis. Moriarty, an implementation of DML, has been applied to thermal modeling of a smart building, demonstrating a significant improvement in learning rate.

  15. A New Web-based Multi-tier Model for Distributed Automation Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikolay Kakanakov; Mitko Shopov; Grisha Spasov

    In this paper a new Web-based multi-tier model for Distributed Automation Systems is proposed. The presented model is constructed for scalability, flexibility and platform independence. Based on the model, integration of automation and business information systems is attained. The model consists of four tiers: Client tier, Presentation tier, Services tier and Data tier. To achieve reliability and security a functional

  16. The design of the computer-human interface of integrated resource management automation (IRMA) 

    E-print Network

    Holtfrerich, David Russell

    1991-01-01

    representative of the end user com- munity. This paper tracks the design of IRMA as it progressed through three prototypes systems to the final release product. Jamileth, without your loving persistence and encouragement, this paper would never have been... assistance. ABSTRACT DEDICATION ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES TABLE OF CONTENTS Page lv V Vl V111 INTRODUCTION PROGRAM DESIGN METHODOLOGIES Prototyping Software life cycle Interface design methods GENERAL DESIGN OF IRMA...

  17. Finite element modeling of frictionally restrained composite interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Ahmed, Shamim

    1989-01-01

    The use of special interface finite elements to model frictional restraint in composite interfaces is described. These elements simulate Coulomb friction at the interface, and are incorporated into a standard finite element analysis of a two-dimensional isolated fiber pullout test. Various interfacial characteristics, such as the distribution of stresses at the interface, the extent of slip and delamination, load diffusion from fiber to matrix, and the amount of fiber extraction or depression are studied for different friction coefficients. The results are compared to those obtained analytically using a singular integral equation approach, and those obtained by assuming a constant interface shear strength. The usefulness of these elements in micromechanical modeling of fiber-reinforced composite materials is highlighted.

  18. Multibody dynamics model building using graphical interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macala, Glenn A.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the extremely laborious task of manually deriving equations of motion for the simulation of multibody spacecraft dynamics has largely been eliminated. Instead, the dynamicist now works with commonly available general purpose dynamics simulation programs which generate the equations of motion either explicitly or implicitly via computer codes. The user interface to these programs has predominantly been via input data files, each with its own required format and peculiarities, causing errors and frustrations during program setup. Recent progress in a more natural method of data input for dynamics programs: the graphical interface, is described.

  19. Spin interfaces in the Ashkin-Teller model and SLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlef, Y.; Rajabpour, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the scaling properties of the spin interfaces in the Ashkin-Teller model. These interfaces are a very simple instance of lattice curves coexisting with a fluctuating degree of freedom, which renders the analytical determination of their exponents very difficult. One of our main findings is the construction of boundary conditions which ensure that the interface still satisfies the Markov property in this case. Then, using a novel technique based on the transfer matrix, we compute numerically the left-passage probability, and our results confirm that the spin interface is described by a Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLE) in the scaling limit. Moreover, at a particular point of the critical line, we describe a mapping of the Ashkin-Teller model onto an integrable 19-vertex model, which, in turn, relates to an integrable dilute Brauer model.

  20. Friction Modeling and Compensation for Haptic Interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas L. Bernstein; Dale A. Lawrence; Lucy Y. Pao

    2005-01-01

    Friction cancellation and high gain force feedback are studied for their relative beneìts in mitigating the effects of friction in haptic interfaces. Although either technique alone is capable of signiìcant improvements, we ìnd that a combination of approximate cancellation coupled with variable-gain low-bandwidth force feedback provides ex- cellent friction reduction and is more robust. This improves the feel of the

  1. Automated extraction of knowledge for model-based diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Avelino J.; Myler, Harley R.; Towhidnejad, Massood; Mckenzie, Frederic D.; Kladke, Robin R.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of accessing computer aided design (CAD) design databases and extracting a process model automatically is investigated as a possible source for the generation of knowledge bases for model-based reasoning systems. The resulting system, referred to as automated knowledge generation (AKG), uses an object-oriented programming structure and constraint techniques as well as internal database of component descriptions to generate a frame-based structure that describes the model. The procedure has been designed to be general enough to be easily coupled to CAD systems that feature a database capable of providing label and connectivity data from the drawn system. The AKG system is capable of defining knowledge bases in formats required by various model-based reasoning tools.

  2. Petri net modelling of buffers in automated manufacturing systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M; Dicesare, F

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents Petri net models of buffers and a methodology by which buffers can be included in a system without introducing deadlocks or overflows. The context is automated manufacturing. The buffers and models are classified as random order or order preserved (first-in-first-out or last-in-first-out), single-input-single-output or multiple-input-multiple-output, part type and/or space distinguishable or indistinguishable, and bounded or safe. Theoretical results for the development of Petri net models which include buffer modules are developed. This theory provides the conditions under which the system properties of boundedness, liveness, and reversibility are preserved. The results are illustrated through two manufacturing system examples: a multiple machine and multiple buffer production line and an automatic storage and retrieval system in the context of flexible manufacturing. PMID:18263017

  3. Phase field modeling with large interface thickness and undercooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. C.; Lin, H. K.; Lan, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    The interface thickness is the most crucial parameter in the phase field model (PFM) for the accuracy and the computability. However, the Gibbs-Thomson equation can be satisfied only when the interface thickness is sufficiently small, especially with a large undercooling, but this greatly limits the applications of PFM to a realistic problem. The temperature correction in the thin-interface model partially resolves the problem, but the range is rather limited. In this report, we propose a new formulation of PFM by adding extra terms stabilizing the hyperbolic tangent profile of the phase-field, and this allows us to use a much larger interface thickness for simulation, even with a large undercooling. Several benchmark comparisons with analytical solutions are carried out and discussed.

  4. Numerical modeling of capillary electrophoresis - electrospray mass spectrometry interface design.

    PubMed

    Jarvas, Gabor; Guttman, Andras; Foret, Frantisek

    2015-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis hyphenated with electrospray mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS) has emerged in the past decade as one of the most powerful bioanalytical techniques. As the sensitivity and efficiency of new CE-ESI-MS interface designs are continuously improving, numerical modeling can play important role during their development. In this review, different aspects of computer modeling and simulation of CE-ESI-MS interfaces are comprehensively discussed. Relevant essentials of hydrodynamics as well as state-of-the-art modeling techniques are critically evaluated. Sheath liquid-, sheathless-, and liquid-junction interfaces are reviewed from the viewpoint of multidisciplinary numerical modeling along with details of single and multiphase models together with electric field mediated flows, electrohydrodynamics, and free fluid-surface methods. Practical examples are given to help non-specialists to understand the basic principles and applications. Finally, alternative approaches like air amplifiers are also included. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 34: 558-569, 2015. PMID:24676884

  5. Back to the Future: A Non-Automated Method of Constructing Transfer Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Mingyu; Beck, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Representing domain knowledge is important for constructing educational software, and automated approaches have been proposed to construct and refine such models. In this paper, instead of applying automated and computationally intensive approaches, we simply start with existing hand-constructed transfer models at various levels of granularity and…

  6. A generalized computational interface for combined thermodynamic and kinetic modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hua Xiong; Zhiheng Huang; Zhiyong Wu; Paul P. Conway

    2011-01-01

    The computational interface developed by Huang et al. (2008) [Z. Huang, P.P. Conway, R.C. Thomson, A.T. Dinsdale, J.A.J. Robinson, CALPHAD 32 (2008) 129–134] has been extended and generalized in different programming and modeling environments, which includes C, Fortran, Python and Java besides MATLAB and COMSOL Multiphysics. The generalized computational interface can be used to integrate various software packages for materials and

  7. Diffuse interface model of diffusion-limited crystal growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph B. Collins; Herbert Levine

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to diffusion-limited crystal growth is proposed. It consists of a modified (nonequilibrium) Cahn-Hilliard representation of the interface coupled to a diffusion equation. Arguments are given as to its superiority over previous models. These are illlustrated in a one-dimensional solution which shows how the system selects a unique interface velocity. The selection can be interpreted as the requirement

  8. A sharp-interface phase change model for a mass-conservative interface tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yohei; Ni?eno, Bojan

    2013-09-01

    A new phase-change model has been developed for a mass-conservative interface tracking method. The mass transfer rate is directly calculated from the heat flux at the liquid-vapor interface, and the phase change takes place only in the cells which include this interface. As a consequence of the sharpness of the mass transfer rate distribution, the velocity jump across the interface can be captured, and high accuracy can be maintained. The method has been implemented in an incompressible Navier-Stokes equations solver employing a projection method based on a staggered finite-volume algorithm on Cartesian grids. The model has been verified for one-dimensional phase-change problems and a three-dimensional simulation of a growing vapor bubble in a superheated liquid under zero gravity condition. The computed results agree with theoretical solutions, and the accuracy of the model is confirmed to be of second-order in space using a grid refinement study. A three-dimensional simulation of a rising vapor bubble in a superheated liquid under gravity has been performed as a validation case, and good agreement with experimental data is obtained for the bubble growth rate. As a demonstration of the applicability of the method to engineering problems, a nucleate boiling simulation is presented with a comparison to experimental data. Good agreement is obtained for the bubble shapes and the bubble departure period. In all the simulation cases, strict mass conservation is satisfied.

  9. Squashing Cubes: Automating Deformable Model Construction for Graphics Doug L. James Jernej Barbic Christopher D. Twigg (Carnegie Mellon University)

    E-print Network

    James, Doug L.

    Squashing Cubes: Automating Deformable Model Construction for Graphics Doug L. James Jernej Barbic) a flexible plastic chair; (Right) a complex swaying bridge superstructure. Introduction The vast majority models remains a tedious process for animators. Squashing Cubes (SC) automates the construction

  10. AUTOMATED GEOSPATIAL WATERSHED ASSESSMENT (AGWA): A GIS-BASED HYDROLOGIC MODELING TOOL FOR WATERSHED MANAGEMENT AND LANDSCAPE ASSESSMENT 1798

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA, see: www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/agwa) tool is a GIS interface jointly developed by the USDA-ARS, US-EPA, U. Arizona, and U. Wyoming to automate the parameterization and execution of the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and KINEmatic Runoff and EROSion...

  11. Anisotropic network model: systematic evaluation and a new web interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eran Eyal; Lee-wei Yang; Ivet Bahar

    2006-01-01

    Motivation: The Anisotropic Network Model (ANM) is a simple yet powerful model for normal mode analysis of proteins. Despite its broad use for exploring biomolecular collective motions, ANM has not been systematically evaluated to date. A lack of a convenient interface has been an additional obstacle for easy usage. Results: ANM has been evaluated on a large set of proteins

  12. (in press) User Modeling and Adaptive Interfaces Negotiated Collusion

    E-print Network

    Bickmore, Timothy

    they felt the system knew them, for users manifesting particular personality traits. KEYWORDS: Embodied(in press) User Modeling and Adaptive Interfaces Negotiated Collusion: Modeling Social Language, or to influence these variables during interaction with users. Humans use a variety of kinds of social language

  13. Flashover of a vacuum-insulator interface: A statistical model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. A. Stygar; H. C. Ives; T. C. Wagoner; J. A. Lott; V. Anaya; H. C. Harjes; J. P. Corley; R. W. Shoup; D. L. Fehl; G. R. Mowrer; Z. R. Wallace; R. A. Anderson; J. D. Boyes; J. W. Douglas; M. L. Horry; T. F. Jaramillo; D. L. Johnson; F. W. Long; T. H. Martin; D. H. McDaniel; O. Milton; M. A. Mostrom; D. A. Muirhead; T. D. Mulville; J. J. Ramirez; L. E. Ramirez; T. M. Romero; J. F. Seamen; J. W. Smith; C. S. Speas; R. B. Spielman; K. W. Struve; G. E. Vogtlin; D. E. Walsh; E. D. Walsh; M. D. Walsh; O. Yamamoto

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a statistical model for the flashover of a 45° vacuum-insulator interface (such as would be found in an accelerator) subject to a pulsed electric field. The model assumes that the initiation of a flashover plasma is a stochastic process, that the characteristic statistical component of the flashover delay time is much greater than the plasma formative time,

  14. The Potential Coupling Interface: Metadata for Model Coupling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom Bulatewicz; Janice E. Cuny; Maureen Warman

    2004-01-01

    Model coupling is a nontrivial task that is not adequately supported in existing frameworks. Our long term goal is to support the fast-prototyping of model couplings, enabling scientists to quickly experiment with a variety of linkings without having to make an upfront investment in repro- gramming. This paper introduces the centerpiece of our framework, the Potential Coupling Interface (PCI), a

  15. A distributed data component for the open modeling interface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the volume of collected data continues to increase in the environmental sciences, so does the need for effective means for accessing those data. We have developed an Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI) data component that retrieves input data for model components from environmental information syste...

  16. Model-based automated detection of mammalian cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Rok; Kanduser, Masa; Pernus, Franjo

    2001-11-01

    Manually counting cell colonies, especially those that originate from fibroblast cell lines, is a time-consuming, eye-straining and tedious task in which consistency of counting is difficult to maintain. In this paper we present a novel model-based image segmentation method, which employs prior knowledge about the shape of a colony with the aim to automatically detect isolated, touching and overlapping cell colonies of various sizes and intensities. First, a set of hypothetical model instances is generated by using a robust statistical approach to estimate the model parameters and a novel confidence measure to quantify the difference between a model instance and the underlying image. Second, the model instances matching the individual colonies in the image are selected from the set by a minimum description length principle. The procedure was applied to images of Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line DC3F, which forms poorly defined or 'fuzzy' colonies. The correlation with manual counting was determined and the cell survival curves obtained by automated and manual counting were compared. The results obtained show that the proposed automatic procedure was capable to correctly identify 91% of cell colonies typical of mammalian cell lines.

  17. Model-based automated detection of mammalian cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Bernard, R; Kanduser, M; Pernus, F

    2001-11-01

    Manually counting cell colonies, especially those that originate from fibroblast cell lines, is a time-consuming, eye-straining and tedious task in which consistency of counting is difficult to maintain. In this paper we present a novel model-based image segmentation method, which employs prior knowledge about the shape of a colony with the aim to automatically detect isolated, touching and overlapping cell colonies of various sizes and intensities. First, a set of hypothetical model instances is generated by using a robust statistical approach to estimate the model parameters and a novel confidence measure to quantify the difference between a model instance and the underlying image. Second, the model instances matching the individual colonies in the image are selected from the set by a minimum description length principle. The procedure was applied to images of Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line DC3F, which forms poorly defined or 'fuzzy' colonies. The correlation with manual counting was determined and the cell survival curves obtained by automated and manual counting were compared. The results obtained show that the proposed automatic procedure was capable to correctly identify 91% of cell colonies typical of mammalian cell lines. PMID:11720364

  18. Automated macromolecular model building for X-ray crystallography using ARP/wARP version 7

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gerrit G; Cohen, Serge X; Lamzin, Victor S; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2008-01-01

    ARP/wARP is a software suite to build macromolecular models in X-ray crystallography electron density maps. Structural genomics initiatives and the study of complex macromolecular assemblies and membrane proteins all rely on advanced methods for 3D structure determination. ARP/wARP meets these needs by providing the tools to obtain a macromolecular model automatically, with a reproducible computational procedure. ARP/wARP 7.0 tackles several tasks: iterative protein model building including a high-level decision-making control module; fast construction of the secondary structure of a protein; building flexible loops in alternate conformations; fully automated placement of ligands, including a choice of the best fitting ligand from a “cocktail”; and finding ordered water molecules. All protocols are easy to handle by a non-expert user through a graphical user interface or a command line. The time required is typically a few minutes although iterative model building may take a few hours. PMID:18600222

  19. Automated Diagnosis of Data-Model Conflicts Using Metadata

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Richard O.; Altman, Russ B.

    1999-01-01

    The authors describe a methodology for helping computational biologists diagnose discrepancies they encounter between experimental data and the predictions of scientific models. The authors call these discrepancies data-model conflicts. They have built a prototype system to help scientists resolve these conflicts in a more systematic, evidence-based manner. In computational biology, data-model conflicts are the result of complex computations in which data and models are transformed and evaluated. Increasingly, the data, models, and tools employed in these computations come from diverse and distributed resources, contributing to a widening gap between the scientist and the original context in which these resources were produced. This contextual rift can contribute to the misuse of scientific data or tools and amplifies the problem of diagnosing data-model conflicts. The authors' hypothesis is that systematic collection of metadata about a computational process can help bridge the contextual rift and provide information for supporting automated diagnosis of these conflicts. The methodology involves three major steps. First, the authors decompose the data-model evaluation process into abstract functional components. Next, they use this process decomposition to enumerate the possible causes of the data-model conflict and direct the acquisition of diagnostically relevant metadata. Finally, they use evidence statically and dynamically generated from the metadata collected to identify the most likely causes of the given conflict. They describe how these methods are implemented in a knowledge-based system called Grendel and show how Grendel can be used to help diagnose conflicts between experimental data and computationally built structural models of the 30S ribosomal subunit. PMID:10495098

  20. Integrating Automated Range Registration with Multiview Geometry for the Photorealistic Modeling

    E-print Network

    Stamos, Ioannis

    photography. This paper presents a system that integrates automated 3D-to-3D and 2D-to-3D registra- tion techniques, with multiview geometry for the photorealistic modeling of urban scenes. The 3D range scans are registered using our automated 3D-to-3D registra- tion method that matches 3D features (linear or circular

  1. Common model and infrastructure for application of XML within the automation domain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin WOLLSCHLAEGER; P. Wenzel

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of XML as a description language has become state of the art within the automation and control domain. Use cases and application scenarios are manifold, resulting in heterogeneous XML document structures. However, a common basic model for XML applications suitable for the automation domain is still lacking. This paper describes requirements and principle structures for such a

  2. Individual Differences in Response to Automation: The Five Factor Model of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szalma, James L.; Taylor, Grant S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of operator personality (Five Factor Model) and characteristics of the task and of adaptive automation (reliability and adaptiveness--whether the automation was well-matched to changes in task demand) to operator performance, workload, stress, and coping. This represents the first investigation of how the Five…

  3. Critical interfaces and duality in the Ashkin-Teller model

    SciTech Connect

    Picco, Marco [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Hautes Energies, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7589, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Santachiara, Raoul [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, CNRS, Batiment 100, Universite Paris-Sud, UMR 8626, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-06-15

    We report on the numerical measures on different spin interfaces and Fortuin-Kasteleyn (FK) cluster boundaries in the Askhin-Teller (AT) model. For a general point on the AT critical line, we find that the fractal dimension of a generic spin cluster interface can take one of four different possible values. In particular we found spin interfaces whose fractal dimension is d{sub f}=3/2 all along the critical line. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the boundaries of FK clusters was found to satisfy all along the AT critical line a duality relation with the fractal dimension of their outer boundaries. This result provides clear numerical evidence that such duality, which is well known in the case of the O(n) model, exists in an extended conformal field theory.

  4. Modeling antennas near to and penetrating a lossy interface

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G.J.; Miller, E.K.

    1983-09-22

    In this paper, we describe a technique for modeling wire objects interacting across or penetrating the planar interface which separates two half spaces. The moment-method treatment is employed, based on the thin wire approximation to the electric-field integral equation, with the effect of the interface included via the usual Sommerfeld integrals. The computation time associated with evaluating the latter is substantially shortened by using an interpolation based technique plus asymptotic field expressions. Although developed specifically for the wire problem, the procedure is also applicable, with slight modification, to modeling surface objects as well. Special account is taken of the charge discontinuity that occurs at the point a wire penetrates the interface. Example calculations are shown for the antenna-ground stake problem; monopole antenna driven against a simple ground screen; the fields of buried objects; and a simple EMP simulator.

  5. Interface fracture and composite deformation of model laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Matthew R.

    Model laminates were studied to improve the understanding of composite mechanical behavior. NiAl/Mo and NiAl/Cr model laminates, with a series of interfaces, were bonded at 1100°C. Reaction layers were present in all laminates, varying in thickness with bonding conditions. Interface fracture strengths and resistances were determined under primarily mode II loading conditions using a novel technique, the asymmetrically-loaded shear (ALS) test, in which one layer of the laminate was loaded in compression, producing a stable interface crack. The NiAl/Mo interface was also fractured in four-point bending. A small amount of plasticity was found to play a role in crack initiation. During steady-state mode II interface fracture of NiAl/Mo model laminates, large-scale slip was observed near the crack tip in the NiAl adjacent to the interface. After testing, the local slope and curvature of the interface were characterized at intervals along the interface and at slip locations to qualitatively describe local stresses present at and just ahead of the crack tip. The greatest percentage of slip occurred where closing forces on the crack tip were below the maximum value and were decreasing with crack growth. A mechanism for crack propagation is presented describing the role of large-scale slip in crack propagation. The mechanical response of structural laminates in 3-D stress states, as would be present in a polycrystalline aggregate composed of lamellar grains, are lacking. In order to understand the response of laminates composed of hard and soft phases, Pb/Zn laminates were prepared and tested in compression with varying lamellar orientation relative to the loading axis. A model describing the mechanical response in a general state assuming elastic-perfectly plastic isotropic layers was developed. For the 90° laminate, a different approach was applied, using the friction hill concepts used in forging analyses. With increasing ratios of cross-sectional radius to layer thickness for each layer, the model predicts the laminate yield strength, increasing up to the rule of mixtures yield strength.

  6. Modeling Software Applications and User Interfaces Using Metaphorical Entities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Nill; Vishal Sikka

    The power of metaphor has long been recognized in user interface design and more broadly in human interaction circles. More recently metaphor also found its way into the software development process. This paper aims to combine occurrences of metaphor in the two fields with ideas from the field of model driven architecture. We suggest that it is possible to create

  7. INTERFACING ACOUSTIC MODELS WITH NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Michael T.

    . In addition, since word graphs can be made arbitrarily large by using lengthy acoustic processing with littleINTERFACING ACOUSTIC MODELS WITH NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING SYSTEMS Michael T. Johnson, Mary P on implementation and ef- ficiency issues associated with the use of word graphs for inter- facing acoustic speech

  8. Automatic task model generation for Interface Agent development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria Eyharabide; Analía Amandi

    2005-01-01

    To give the user proper assistance, an interface agent should be able to predict the user's intentions. Usually, they achieve that through the use of a detailed task model for a particular application domain. However, to develop such knowledge representations is a difficult and time-consuming activity. Generally, it is tedious and annoying for the agent developers to express such knowledge

  9. Model-driven embedded systems design environment for the industrial automation sector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Strasser; Christoph Sünder; Antonio Valentini

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a model-driven embedded systems design approach which is applied to Industrial Automation and Control Systems (IACS). Therefore, an overview on existing model-driven approaches is given and their applicability for IACS is discussed. The special requirements of the industrial automation sector are taken into account by a novel architecture, utilizing existing model-driven techniques.

  10. Automated model selection in covariance estimation and spatial whitening of MEG and EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Engemann, Denis A; Gramfort, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography (M/EEG) measure non-invasively the weak electromagnetic fields induced by post-synaptic neural currents. The estimation of the spatial covariance of the signals recorded on M/EEG sensors is a building block of modern data analysis pipelines. Such covariance estimates are used in brain-computer interfaces (BCI) systems, in nearly all source localization methods for spatial whitening as well as for data covariance estimation in beamformers. The rationale for such models is that the signals can be modeled by a zero mean Gaussian distribution. While maximizing the Gaussian likelihood seems natural, it leads to a covariance estimate known as empirical covariance (EC). It turns out that the EC is a poor estimate of the true covariance when the number of samples is small. To address this issue the estimation needs to be regularized. The most common approach downweights off-diagonal coefficients, while more advanced regularization methods are based on shrinkage techniques or generative models with low rank assumptions: probabilistic PCA (PPCA) and factor analysis (FA). Using cross-validation all of these models can be tuned and compared based on Gaussian likelihood computed on unseen data. We investigated these models on simulations, one electroencephalography (EEG) dataset as well as magnetoencephalography (MEG) datasets from the most common MEG systems. First, our results demonstrate that different models can be the best, depending on the number of samples, heterogeneity of sensor types and noise properties. Second, we show that the models tuned by cross-validation are superior to models with hand-selected regularization. Hence, we propose an automated solution to the often overlooked problem of covariance estimation of M/EEG signals. The relevance of the procedure is demonstrated here for spatial whitening and source localization of MEG signals. PMID:25541187

  11. Automated optic disk boundary detection by modified active contour model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Chutatape, Opas; Chew, Paul

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel deformable-model-based algorithm for fully automated detection of optic disk boundary in fundus images. The proposed method improves and extends the original snake (deforming-only technique) in two aspects: clustering and smoothing update. The contour points are first self-separated into edge-point group or uncertain-point group by clustering after each deformation, and these contour points are then updated by different criteria based on different groups. The updating process combines both the local and global information of the contour to achieve the balance of contour stability and accuracy. The modifications make the proposed algorithm more accurate and robust to blood vessel occlusions, noises, ill-defined edges and fuzzy contour shapes. The comparative results show that the proposed method can estimate the disk boundaries of 100 test images closer to the groundtruth, as measured by mean distance to closest point (MDCP) <3 pixels, with the better success rate when compared to those obtained by gradient vector flow snake (GVF-snake) and modified active shape models (ASM). PMID:17355059

  12. Improved user interface design for site selection modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    Koffman, L.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Site Selection Modeling System (SSMS) is a customized application within the Environmental Data Atlas (EDA), which is an integrated geographic information system (GIS) for environmental applications at the Savannah River site (SRS) developed jointly by the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of Westinghouse Savannah River Company and by the University of South Carolina (USC). The SSMS was developed to assist analysts with site selection activities carried out by the ESS and is a powerful tool with a graphical user interface that allows non-GIS analysts to use the application. However, use of the SSMS in recent siting exercises revealed deficiencies in the user interface as a production tool. This paper specifies user interface design criteria necessary for a production application and describes the implementation of these design criteria in the SSMS.

  13. A general graphical user interface for automatic reliability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liceaga, Carlos A.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1991-01-01

    Reported here is a general Graphical User Interface (GUI) for automatic reliability modeling of Processor Memory Switch (PMS) structures using a Markov model. This GUI is based on a hierarchy of windows. One window has graphical editing capabilities for specifying the system's communication structure, hierarchy, reconfiguration capabilities, and requirements. Other windows have field texts, popup menus, and buttons for specifying parameters and selecting actions. An example application of the GUI is given.

  14. Automated MRI cerebellar size measurements using active appearance modeling.

    PubMed

    Price, Mathew; Cardenas, Valerie A; Fein, George

    2014-12-01

    Although the human cerebellum has been increasingly identified as an important hub that shows potential for helping in the diagnosis of a large spectrum of disorders, such as alcoholism, autism, and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, the high costs associated with manual segmentation, and low availability of reliable automated cerebellar segmentation tools, has resulted in a limited focus on cerebellar measurement in human neuroimaging studies. We present here the CATK (Cerebellar Analysis Toolkit), which is based on the Bayesian framework implemented in FMRIB's FIRST. This approach involves training Active Appearance Models (AAMs) using hand-delineated examples. CATK can currently delineate the cerebellar hemispheres and three vermal groups (lobules I-V, VI-VII, and VIII-X). Linear registration with the low-resolution MNI152 template is used to provide initial alignment, and Point Distribution Models (PDM) are parameterized using stellar sampling. The Bayesian approach models the relationship between shape and texture through computation of conditionals in the training set. Our method varies from the FIRST framework in that initial fitting is driven by 1D intensity profile matching, and the conditional likelihood function is subsequently used to refine fitting. The method was developed using T1-weighted images from 63 subjects that were imaged and manually labeled: 43 subjects were scanned once and were used for training models, and 20 subjects were imaged twice (with manual labeling applied to both runs) and used to assess reliability and validity. Intraclass correlation analysis shows that CATK is highly reliable (average test-retest ICCs of 0.96), and offers excellent agreement with the gold standard (average validity ICC of 0.87 against manual labels). Comparisons against an alternative atlas-based approach, SUIT (Spatially Unbiased Infratentorial Template), that registers images with a high-resolution template of the cerebellum, show that our AAM approach offers superior reliability and validity. Extensions of CATK to cerebellar hemisphere parcels are envisioned. PMID:25192657

  15. Automating the Modeling and Optimization of the Performance of Signal Processing Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Veloso, Manuela M.

    Automating the Modeling and Optimization of the Performance of Signal Processing Algorithms Bryan W not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA. #12;Keywords: Machine learning, signal processing, signal transform optimization, automatic

  16. BUSINESS PROCESSES MODELLING AND AUTOMATION IN THE BANKING SECTOR: A CASE STUDY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARA NIKOLAIDOU; DIMOSTHENIS ANAGNOSTOPOULOS; APHRODITE TSALGATIDOU

    The banking sector is a competitive environment, where business process re-engineering is constantly needed. Business process modelling and automation are effective tools towards this direction, improving the performance of business activities and enabling enterprise-wide monitoring and coordination. In this paper, we present a case study of modelling and automating business processes in the Loan Monitoring Department of a medium-sized Bank.

  17. Fractal model for the ac response of a rough interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. H.

    1985-07-01

    A fractal model is proposed for a rough interface between two materials of very different conductivities, e.g., an electrode and an electrolyte. The equivalent circuit of the model, which takes into consideration the resistance in the two substances and the capacitance of the interface, has the property of the so-called constant-phase-angle element, i.e., a passive circuit element whose complex impedance has a power-law singularity at low frequencies. The exponent of the frequency dependence is related to the fractal dimension. The model also provides insight into the conducting properties of the percolating cluster and the source of the 1/f noise in electronic components.

  18. Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Barry H. Rabin

    2014-07-01

    12. Other advances in QNDE and related topics: Preferred Session Laser-ultrasonics Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces 41st Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation Conference QNDE Conference July 20-25, 2014 Boise Centre 850 West Front Street Boise, Idaho 83702 James A. Smith, Jeffrey M. Lacy, Barry H. Rabin, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID ABSTRACT: The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) which is assigned with reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU. The new LEU fuel is based on a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to complete the fuel qualification process, the laser shock technique is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being investigated to characterize interface strength in fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on specimen’s surface is intractably complex. The shock wave energy is inferred from the velocity on the backside and the depth of the impression left on the surface from the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses and strengths at the interface, a finite element model is being developed and validated by comparing numerical and experimental results for back face velocities and front face depressions with experimental results. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop a finite element model for laser shock.

  19. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-print Network

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  20. Automated MRI segmentation for individualized modeling of current flow in the human head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Su, Yuzhuo; Datta, Abhishek; Rorden, Christopher; Parra, Lucas C.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) and high-density electroencephalography require accurate models of current flow for precise targeting and current source reconstruction. At a minimum, such modeling must capture the idiosyncratic anatomy of the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skull for each individual subject. Currently, the process to build such high-resolution individualized models from structural magnetic resonance images requires labor-intensive manual segmentation, even when utilizing available automated segmentation tools. Also, accurate placement of many high-density electrodes on an individual scalp is a tedious procedure. The goal was to develop fully automated techniques to reduce the manual effort in such a modeling process. Approach. A fully automated segmentation technique based on Statical Parametric Mapping 8, including an improved tissue probability map and an automated correction routine for segmentation errors, was developed, along with an automated electrode placement tool for high-density arrays. The performance of these automated routines was evaluated against results from manual segmentation on four healthy subjects and seven stroke patients. The criteria include segmentation accuracy, the difference of current flow distributions in resulting HD-tDCS models and the optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets.Main results. The segmentation tool can segment out not just the brain but also provide accurate results for CSF, skull and other soft tissues with a field of view extending to the neck. Compared to manual results, automated segmentation deviates by only 7% and 18% for normal and stroke subjects, respectively. The predicted electric fields in the brain deviate by 12% and 29% respectively, which is well within the variability observed for various modeling choices. Finally, optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets do not differ significantly.Significance. Fully automated individualized modeling may now be feasible for large-sample EEG research studies and tDCS clinical trials.

  1. A Multiple Agent Model of Human Performance in Automated Air Traffic Control and Flight Management Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin; Pisanich, Gregory; Condon, Gregory W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A predictive model of human operator performance (flight crew and air traffic control (ATC)) has been developed and applied in order to evaluate the impact of automation developments in flight management and air traffic control. The model is used to predict the performance of a two person flight crew and the ATC operators generating and responding to clearances aided by the Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS). The purpose of the modeling is to support evaluation and design of automated aids for flight management and airspace management and to predict required changes in procedure both air and ground in response to advancing automation in both domains. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Dynamic behavior of interfaces: modeling with nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sagis, Leonard M C

    2014-04-01

    In multiphase systems the transfer of mass, heat, and momentum, both along and across phase interfaces, has an important impact on the overall dynamics of the system. Familiar examples are the effects of surface diffusion on foam drainage (Marangoni effect), or the effect of surface elasticities on the deformation of vesicles or red blood cells in an arterial flow. In this paper we will review recent work on modeling transfer processes associated with interfaces in the context of nonequilibrium thermodynamics (NET). The focus will be on NET frameworks employing the Gibbs dividing surface model, in which the interface is modeled as a two-dimensional plane. This plane has excess variables associated with it, such as a surface mass density, a surface momentum density, a surface energy density, and a surface entropy density. We will review a number of NET frameworks which can be used to derive balance equations and constitutive models for the time rate of change of these excess variables, as a result of in-plane (tangential) transfer processes, and exchange with the adjoining bulk phases. These balance equations must be solved together with mass, momentum, and energy balances for the bulk phases, and a set of boundary conditions coupling the set of bulk and interface equations. This entire set of equations constitutes a comprehensive continuum model for a multiphase system, and allows us to examine the role of the interfacial dynamics on the overall dynamics of the system. With respect to the constitutive equations we will focus primarily on equations for the surface extra stress tensor. PMID:23672962

  3. Generalized model for solid-on-solid interface growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richele, M. F.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2015-05-01

    We present a probabilistic cellular automaton (PCA) model to study solid-on-solid interface growth in which the transition rules depend on the local morphology of the profile obtained from the interface representation of the PCA. We show that the model is able to reproduce a wide range of patterns whose critical roughening exponents are associated to different universality classes, including random deposition, Edwards-Wilkinson, and Kardar-Parisi-Zhang. By means of the growth exponent method, we consider a particular set of the model parameters to build the two-dimensional phase diagram corresponding to a planar cut of the higher dimensional parameter space. A strong indication of phase transition between different universality classes can be observed, evincing different regimes of deposition, from layer-by-layer to Volmer-Weber and Stransk-Krastanov-like modes. We expect that this model can be useful to predict the morphological properties of interfaces obtained at different surface deposition problems, since it allows us to simulate several experimental situations by setting the values of the specific transition probabilities in a very simple and direct way.

  4. Thermal Edge-Effects Model for Automated Tape Placement of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    Two-dimensional thermal models for automated tape placement (ATP) of thermoplastic composites neglect the diffusive heat transport that occurs between the newly placed tape and the cool substrate beside it. Such lateral transport can cool the tape edges prematurely and weaken the bond. The three-dimensional, steady state, thermal transport equation is solved by the Green's function method for a tape of finite width being placed on an infinitely wide substrate. The isotherm for the glass transition temperature on the weld interface is used to determine the distance inward from the tape edge that is prematurely cooled, called the cooling incursion Delta a. For the Langley ATP robot, Delta a = 0.4 mm for a unidirectional lay-up of PEEK/carbon fiber composite, and Delta a = 1.2 mm for an isotropic lay-up. A formula for Delta a is developed and applied to a wide range of operating conditions. A surprise finding is that Delta a need not decrease as the Peclet number Pe becomes very large, where Pe is the dimensionless ratio of inertial to diffusive heat transport. Conformable rollers that increase the consolidation length would also increase Delta a, unless other changes are made, such as proportionally increasing the material speed. To compensate for premature edge cooling, the thermal input could be extended past the tape edges by the amount Delta a. This method should help achieve uniform weld strength and crystallinity across the width of the tape.

  5. Automated Modeling and Analysis of Accretion Stream Models for Magnetic CVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Cash, J.

    2004-05-01

    We will present the results of our modification to an existing smoothing particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code used to model the accretion stream of magnetic cataclysmic variable stars known as polars. These numerical stream models yield a 3-dimensional map of the gas distribution throughout the stream, including the distribution of material as it impacts the white dwarf surface. The models are being completely automated and will run in parallel using MPI and PBS as a batch job scheduling system. The automation sets up a series of models covering a range of parameter space and extracts specific information on the system geometry for comparison to observations of well studied polars. The progress and initial results of the code modification, automation, and observational comparisons at the time of the conference will be presented. This work was supported by NASA/OSS NNG04GD62G NASA/MU-SPIN NNG04GC40A, NASA/URC NCCW-0085 and NASA/PAIR NCC 5-454.

  6. Stability of finite difference models containing two boundaries or interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefethen, L. N.

    1984-01-01

    The stability of finite difference models of hyperbolic initial boundary value problems is connected with the propagation and reflection of parasitic waves. Wave propagation ideas are applied to models containing two boundaires or interfaces, where repeated reflection of trapped wave packets is a potential new source of instability. Various known instability phenomena are accounted for in a unified way. Results show: (1) dissipativity does not ensure stability when three or more formulas are concatenated at a boundary or internal interface; (2) algebraic GKS instabilities can be converted by a second boundary to exponential instabilities only when an infinite numerical reflection coefficient is present; and (3) GKS-stability and P-stability can be established in certain problems by showing that all numerical reflection coefficients have modulus less than 1.

  7. Selecting UML models for test-driven development along the automation systems engineering process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reinhard Hametner; Dietmar Winkler; Thomas Östreicher; Natascha Surnic; Stefan Biffl

    2010-01-01

    Test-driven development (TDD) - an established approach in business IT software development - enables test case generation based on models early in the development process. Applying TDD and models in automation systems engineering (ASE) can increase testing effectiveness and efficiency. A key question is which models are suitable for ASE application. UML models support software and systems engineering development in

  8. ROBUST FINITE DIFFERENCE TIME DOMAIN MODELING INTERFACE Jeffrey J. Daniels1

    E-print Network

    Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    . To accomplish this, a program utilizing the IDL graphical user interface (GUI) was designed. The program output of the model. Ideally, we would like to utilize the same graphical interface for: 1) model input, 2) model output, and the display of field data. A graphical interface engine has been developed

  9. Abstract User Interfaces: A Model and Notation to Support Plasticity in Interactive Systems

    E-print Network

    Cordy, James R.

    Abstract User Interfaces: A Model and Notation to Support Plasticity in Interactive Systems Kevin A introduces the Abstract User Interface (AUI) model and notation for specifying abstract interaction in interactive soft- ware systems with graphical, direct manipulation user interfaces. The AUI model is aimed

  10. Image quality and performance modeling for automated target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, John M.; Nelson, Eric

    2009-05-01

    Several methods have been developed for quantifying the information potential of imagery exploited by a human observer. The National Imagery Interpretability Ratings Scale (NIIRS) has proven to be a useful standard for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) applications. A comparable standard for automated information extraction would be useful for a variety of applications, including tasking and collection management. This paper examines the applicability of NIIRS to automated exploitation methods. In particular, we compare image-based estimates of the NIIRS to observed performance of an automated target detection (ATD) algorithm. In addition, we examine other image metrics and their relationship to ATD performance. The findings indicate that NIIRS is not a good predictor of ATD performance, but methods that quantify the complexity of the clutter hold promise.

  11. Bacterial Adhesion to Hexadecane (Model NAPL)-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, S.; Zoueki, C. R.; Tufenkji, N.

    2009-05-01

    The rates of biodegradation of NAPLs have been shown to be influenced by the adhesion of hydrocarbon- degrading microorganisms as well as their proximity to the NAPL-water interface. Several studies provide evidence for bacterial adhesion or biofilm formation at alkane- or crude oil-water interfaces, but there is a significant knowledge gap in our understanding of the processes that influence initial adhesion of bacteria on to NAPL-water interfaces. In this study bacterial adhesion to hexadecane, and a series of NAPLs comprised of hexadecane amended with toluene, and/or with asphaltenes and resins, which are the surface active fractions of crude oils, were examined using a Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. The microorganisms employed were Mycobacterium kubicae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida, which are hydrocarbon degraders or soil microorganisms. MATH assays as well as electrophoretic mobility measurements of the bacterial cells and the NAPL droplet surfaces in aqueous solutions were conducted at three solution pHs (4, 6 and 7). Asphaltenes and resins were shown to generally decrease microbial adhesion. Results of the MATH assay were not in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of bacteria- hydrocarbon interactions based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) model of free energy of interaction between the cell and NAPL droplets. In this model the free energy of interaction between two colloidal particles is predicted based on electrical double layer, van der Waals and hydrophobic forces. It is likely that the steric repulsion between bacteria and NAPL surfaces, caused by biopolymers on bacterial surfaces and aphaltenes and resins at the NAPL-water interface contributed to the decreased adhesion compared to that predicted by the XDLVO model.

  12. a Deformable Template Model with Feature Tracking for Automated Ivus Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, Prakash; Hau Chen, Chi

    2010-02-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) can be used to create a 3D vascular profile of arteries for preventative prediction of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). Segmentation of individual B-scan frames is a crucial step for creating profiles. Manual segmentation is too labor intensive to be of routine use. Automated segmentation algorithms are not yet accurate enough. We present a method of tracking features across frames of ultrasound data to increase automated segmentation accuracy using a deformable template model.

  13. Analytical Model Based Evaluation of Human Machine Interfaces Using Cognitive Modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Belkacem Chikhaoui

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive models allow predicting some aspects of util- ity and usability of human machine interfaces (HMI), and simulating the interaction with these interfaces. The action of predicting is based on a task analysis, which investigates what a user is required to do in terms of actions and cognitive processes to achieve a task. Task analysis facilitates the understanding of the

  14. Behavior of asphaltene model compounds at w/o interfaces.

    PubMed

    Nordgård, Erland L; Sørland, Geir; Sjöblom, Johan

    2010-02-16

    Asphaltenes, present in significant amounts in heavy crude oil, contains subfractions capable of stabilizing water-in-oil emulsions. Still, the composition of these subfractions is not known in detail, and the actual mechanism behind emulsion stability is dependent on perceived interfacial concentrations and compositions. This study aims at utilizing polyaromatic surfactants which contains an acidic moiety as model compounds for the surface-active subfraction of asphaltenes. A modified pulse-field gradient (PFG) NMR method has been used to study droplet sizes and stability of emulsions prepared with asphaltene model compounds. The method has been compared to the standard microscopy droplet counting method. Arithmetic and volumetric mean droplet sizes as a function of surfactant concentration and water content clearly showed that the interfacial area was dependent on the available surfactant at the emulsion interface. Adsorption of the model compounds onto hydrophilic silica has been investigated by UV depletion, and minor differences in the chemical structure of the model compounds caused significant differences in the affinity toward this highly polar surface. The cross-sectional areas obtained have been compared to areas from the surface-to-volume ratio found by NMR and gave similar results for one of the two model compounds. The mean molecular area for this compound suggested a tilted geometry of the aromatic core with respect to the interface, which has also been proposed for real asphaltenic samples. The film behavior was further investigated using a liquid-liquid Langmuir trough supporting the ability to form stable interfacial films. This study supports that acidic, or strong hydrogen-bonding fractions, can promote stable water-in-oil emulsion. The use of model compounds opens up for studying emulsion behavior and demulsifier efficiency based on true interfacial concentrations rather than perceived interfaces. PMID:19852481

  15. Language model applications to spelling with Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mora-Cortes, Anderson; Manyakov, Nikolay V; Chumerin, Nikolay; Van Hulle, Marc M

    2014-01-01

    Within the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) community, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) have raised great hopes as they provide alternative communication means for persons with disabilities bypassing the need for speech and other motor activities. Although significant advancements have been realized in the last decade, applications of language models (e.g., word prediction, completion) have only recently started to appear in BCI systems. The main goal of this article is to review the language model applications that supplement non-invasive BCI-based communication systems by discussing their potential and limitations, and to discern future trends. First, a brief overview of the most prominent BCI spelling systems is given, followed by an in-depth discussion of the language models applied to them. These language models are classified according to their functionality in the context of BCI-based spelling: the static/dynamic nature of the user interface, the use of error correction and predictive spelling, and the potential to improve their classification performance by using language models. To conclude, the review offers an overview of the advantages and challenges when implementing language models in BCI-based communication systems when implemented in conjunction with other AAL technologies. PMID:24675760

  16. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Smith, James A.; Rabin, Barry H.

    2015-03-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding.

  17. Model-Driven Configuration of Automated Parking Facilities

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    parking space. For the purposes of this project, small robots were used to simulate cars and Bluetooth garage and a car, represented by the NXT robot, are the main objects. · A garage can be divided the context of an automated parking facility, whereby a driver may drop a car off at the entrance to a garage

  18. Building Project Model Support for Automated Labor Monitoring

    E-print Network

    Sacks, Rafael

    . Experimental data were collected, using an ADC system, from the job site of a reinforced concrete building of the automated project perfor- mance control APPC initiative. Project performance control broadly refers of the project is as close as possible to a set of desirable values. Perfor- mance is measured in terms

  19. A Feedback Model for Automated Real Estate Assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Carbone; Richard L. Longini

    1977-01-01

    Pressing changes are needed in the administration of real estate taxation that will not only ensure that all properties be assessed accurately and equitably, but will enable taxpayers to perceive that they are being treated fairly. In this paper, we examine what properties an automated mass appraisal system should exhibit so as to meet efficacy, equity and public acceptability criteria.

  20. GoSam-2.0: a tool for automated one-loop calculations within the Standard Model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, Gavin; van Deurzen, Hans; Greiner, Nicolas; Heinrich, Gudrun; Luisoni, Gionata; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo; Mirabella, Edoardo; Ossola, Giovanni; Peraro, Tiziano; Schlenk, Johannes; von Soden-Fraunhofen, Johann Felix; Tramontano, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    We present the version 2.0 of the program package GoSam for the automated calculation of one-loop amplitudes. GoSam is devised to compute one-loop QCD and/or electroweak corrections to multi-particle processes within and beyond the Standard Model. The new code contains improvements in the generation and in the reduction of the amplitudes, performs better in computing time and numerical accuracy, and has an extended range of applicability. The extended version of the "Binoth-Les-Houches-Accord" interface to Monte Carlo programs is also implemented. We give a detailed description of installation and usage of the code, and illustrate the new features in dedicated examples.

  1. A Model of Process-Based Automation: Cost and Quality Implications in the Medication Management Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Trent Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand how a set of systems, as defined by the business process, creates value. The three studies contained in this work develop the model of process-based automation. The model states that complementarities among systems are specified by handoffs in the business process. The model also provides theory to…

  2. To appear in Proceedings of AAAI94 Automated Modeling for Answering Prediction Questions

    E-print Network

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    , which separates as­ pects of the scenario that must be modeled from those that can be ignored is comprehensible. To balance these competing requirements, a modeler must choose a system boundary that separatesTo appear in Proceedings of AAAI­94 Automated Modeling for Answering Prediction Questions

  3. Accurate Modeling of Dispersive Material Interfaces in High-Order Finite-Difference Methods

    E-print Network

    Accurate Modeling of Dispersive Material Interfaces in High-Order Finite-Difference Methods Roberto of dispersion, it is particularly important to have an appropriate procedure to model material interfaces a Lorentz material interfaced with vacuum and excited at its plasma frequency. Index Terms-- finite

  4. NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Tribological Interfaces Studied by an Analytical Dislocation Model and

    E-print Network

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Tribological Interfaces Studied by an Analytical Dislocation Model and In;3 ABSTRACT Tribological Interfaces Studied by an Analytical Dislocation Model and In-situ Transmission the classic "buried interface" problem in tribological research. Direct observa- tions of the sliding behavior

  5. High level modelling and design of asynchronous interface logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, A. V.; Koelmans, A. M.; Lavagno, L.

    1993-11-01

    The authors propose a new methodology to design asynchronous circuits that is divided in two stages: abstract synthesis and logic synthesis. The first state is carried out by refining an abstract model, based on logic predicates describing the correct input-output behavior of the circuit, into a labelled Petri net and then into a formalization of timing diagrams (the Signal Transition Graph). This refinement involves hierarchical decomposition of the initial implementation until its size can be handled by automated logic synthesis tools, as well as replacing symbolic events occurring on the input-output ports of the labelled Petri net with up and down transitions occurring on the input-output wires of a circuit implementation.

  6. Modeling the Energy Use of a Connected and Automated Transportation System (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Brown, A.

    2014-07-01

    Early research points to large potential impacts of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) on transportation energy use - dramatic savings, increased use, or anything in between. Due to a lack of suitable data and integrated modeling tools to explore these complex future systems, analyses to date have relied on simple combinations of isolated effects. This poster proposes a framework for modeling the potential energy implications from increasing penetration of CAV technologies and for assessing technology and policy options to steer them toward favorable energy outcomes. Current CAV modeling challenges include estimating behavior change, understanding potential vehicle-to-vehicle interactions, and assessing traffic flow and vehicle use under different automation scenarios. To bridge these gaps and develop a picture of potential future automated systems, NREL is integrating existing modeling capabilities with additional tools and data inputs to create a more fully integrated CAV assessment toolkit.

  7. Object-oriented modular place\\/transition formalism for systematic modeling and validation of industrial automation systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Vyatkin; H.-M. Hanisch; T. Pfeiffer

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a framework for formal modeling and validation of automation systems destined to use by control engineers. The framework is based on a modeling formalism of net condition\\/event systems which is graphical, modular, and typed. This allows for modeling of realistic hierarchically organized automation systems in a closed-loop. The framework consists of methodologies and tools, which enable formal analysis

  8. Formulation of a model for automating infection surveillance: algorithmic detection of central-line associated bloodstream infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bala Hota; Michael Lin; Joshua A Doherty; Tara Borlawsky; Keith Woeltje; Kurt Stevenson; Yosef Khan; Jeremy Young; Robert A Weinstein; William Trick

    2010-01-01

    Objective To formulate a model for translating manual infection control surveillance methods to automated, algorithmic approaches. Design We propose a model for creating electronic surveillance algorithms by translating existing manual surveillance practices into automated electronic methods. Our model suggests that three dimensions of expert knowledge be consulted: clinical, surveillance, and informatics. Once collected, knowledge should be applied through a process

  9. Yun-Heh Chen-Burger, The University of Edinburgh, UK; Dave Robertson, The University of Edinburgh, UK Automation Business Modelling

    E-print Network

    Chen-Burger, Yun-Heh (Jessica)

    a part of business process re-engineering & improvement initiatives. Automating Business Modelling, UK Automation Business Modelling Enterprise Modelling (EM) methods are frequently used by entrepreneurs as an analysis tool for describing & redesigning their businesses. The resulting product

  10. Models of Interface Separation Accompanied by Plastic Dissipation at Multiple Scales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yueguang Wei; John W. Hutchinson

    1999-01-01

    Two continuum mechanical models of interface fracture for interfaces joining materials where at least one undergoes plastic\\u000a deformation are reviewed and examined critically. The embedded process zone model (EPZ model) has an adhesive zone, characterized\\u000a by a work of separation and an interface strength, embedded within a continuum model of the adjoining materials. The SSV model\\u000a imposes an elastic, plasticity-free

  11. Disturbed state model for sand-geosynthetic interfaces and application to pull-out tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Surajit Pal; G. Wije Wathugala

    1999-01-01

    Successful numerical simulation of geosynthetic-reinforced earth structures depends on selecting proper constitutive models for soils, geosynthetics and soil-geosynthetic interfaces. Many constitutive models are available for modelling soils and geosynthetics. However, constitutive models for soil-geosynthetic interfaces which can capture most of the important characteristics of interface response are not readily available. In this paper, an elasto-plastic constitutive model based on the

  12. User Interface Modelling with UML Paulo Pinheiro da Silva and Norman W. Paton

    E-print Network

    da Silva, Paulo Pinheiro

    User Interface Modelling with UML Paulo Pinheiro da Silva and Norman W. Paton Department,norm}@cs.man.ac.uk Abstract. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a natural candi­ date for user interface (UI) modelling, it is by no means clear how to model UIs using UML. This paper presents a user inter­ face modelling case study

  13. User Interface Modelling with UML Paulo Pinheiro da Silva and Norman W. Paton

    E-print Network

    Pinheiro da Silva, Paulo

    User Interface Modelling with UML Paulo Pinheiro da Silva and Norman W. Paton Department,norm}@cs.man.ac.uk Abstract. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a natural candi- date for user interface (UI) modelling, it is by no means clear how to model UIs using UML. This paper presents a user inter- face modelling case study

  14. Towards an Improved Pilot-Vehicle Interface for Highly Automated Aircraft: Evaluation of the Haptic Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, Paul; Goodrich, Kenneth; Williams, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The control automation and interaction paradigm (e.g., manual, autopilot, flight management system) used on virtually all large highly automated aircraft has long been an exemplar of breakdowns in human factors and human-centered design. An alternative paradigm is the Haptic Flight Control System (HFCS) that is part of NASA Langley Research Center s Naturalistic Flight Deck Concept. The HFCS uses only stick and throttle for easily and intuitively controlling the actual flight of the aircraft without losing any of the efficiency and operational benefits of the current paradigm. Initial prototypes of the HFCS are being evaluated and this paper describes one such evaluation. In this evaluation we examined claims regarding improved situation awareness, appropriate workload, graceful degradation, and improved pilot acceptance. Twenty-four instrument-rated pilots were instructed to plan and fly four different flights in a fictitious airspace using a moderate fidelity desktop simulation. Three different flight control paradigms were tested: Manual control, Full Automation control, and a simplified version of the HFCS. Dependent variables included both subjective (questionnaire) and objective (SAGAT) measures of situation awareness, workload (NASA-TLX), secondary task performance, time to recognize automation failures, and pilot preference (questionnaire). The results showed a statistically significant advantage for the HFCS in a number of measures. Results that were not statistically significant still favored the HFCS. The results suggest that the HFCS does offer an attractive and viable alternative to the tactical components of today s FMS/autopilot control system. The paper describes further studies that are planned to continue to evaluate the HFCS.

  15. A Diffuse Interface Model for Electrowetting with Moving Contact Lines

    E-print Network

    Nochetto, Ricardo H; Walker, Shawn W

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a diffuse interface model for the phenomenon of electrowetting on dielectric and present an analysis of the arising system of equations. Moreover, we study discretization techniques for the problem. The model takes into account different material parameters on each phase and incorporates the most important physical processes, such as incompressibility, electrostatics and dynamic contact lines; necessary to properly reflect the relevant phenomena. The arising nonlinear system couples the variable density incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for velocity and pressure with a Cahn-Hilliard type equation for the phase variable and chemical potential, a convection diffusion equation for the electric charges and a Poisson equation for the electric potential. Numerical experiments are presented, which illustrate the wide range of effects the model is able to capture, such as splitting and coalescence of droplets.

  16. An efficient approach to automate the manual trial and error calibration of activated sludge models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gürkan Sin; Dirk J. W. De Pauw; Stefan Weijers; Peter A. Vanrolleghem

    2008-01-01

    An efficient approach is introduced to help automate the rather tedious manual trial and error way of model calibration currently used in activated sludge model- ing practice. To this end, we have evaluated a Monte Carlo based calibration approach consisting of four steps: (i) parameter subset selection, (ii) defining parameter space, (iii) parameter sampling for Monte Carlo simulations and (iv)

  17. General Models for Automated Essay Scoring: Exploring an Alternative to the Status Quo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, P. Adam

    2005-01-01

    Powers, Burstein, Chodorow, Fowles, and Kukich (2002) suggested that automated essay scoring (AES) may benefit from the use of "general" scoring models designed to score essays irrespective of the prompt for which an essay was written. They reasoned that such models may enhance score credibility by signifying that an AES system measures the same…

  18. Automated Model-Based Tissue Classification of MR Images of the Brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koen Van Leemput; Frederik Maes; Dirk Vandermeulen; Paul Suetens

    1999-01-01

    We describe a fully automated method for model- based tissue classification of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain. The method interleaves classification with estimation of the model parameters, improving the classification at each iteration. The algorithm is able to segment single- and multi- spectral MR images, corrects for MR signal inhomogeneities, and incorporates contextual information by means of Markov

  19. A Binary Programming Approach to Automated Test Assembly for Cognitive Diagnosis Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelman, Matthew D.; Kim, Wonsuk; Roussos, Louis; Verschoor, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Automated test assembly (ATA) has been an area of prolific psychometric research. Although ATA methodology is well developed for unidimensional models, its application alongside cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs) is a burgeoning topic. Two suggested procedures for combining ATA and CDMs are to maximize the cognitive diagnostic index and to use a…

  20. Learning Exploration Policies with Models Conference on Automated Learning and Discovery (CONALD'98)

    E-print Network

    Schmidhuber, Juergen

    Learning Exploration Policies with Models Conference on Automated Learning and Discovery (CONALD'98 on ``useful'' experiences. Using an additional exploration model, we learn an exploration policy maximiz­ ing ``exploration rewards'' for visits of states that promise information gain. We augment this approach

  1. Data for Environmental Modeling (D4EM): Background and Applications of Data Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Data for Environmental Modeling (D4EM) project demonstrates the development of a comprehensive set of open source software tools that overcome obstacles to accessing data needed by automating the process of populating model input data sets with environmental data available fr...

  2. Modeling and Automated Containment of Worms Sarah Sellke, Ness B. Shroff, and Saurabh Bagchi

    E-print Network

    Bagchi, Saurabh

    Modeling and Automated Containment of Worms Sarah Sellke, Ness B. Shroff, and Saurabh Bagchi School Self-propagating codes, called worms, such as Code Red, Nimda, and Slammer, have drawn significant community in modeling the spread of worms and in providing adequate defense mecha- nisms against them

  3. Automated Modelling of Cartridge Valve Flow Mapping Song Liu and Bin Yao

    E-print Network

    Yao, Bin

    Automated Modelling of Cartridge Valve Flow Mapping Song Liu and Bin Yao Abstract-- Proportional or manufacturer supplied flow mappings as the model of the cartridge valves. Neither method is ideal to the inaccuracy of the manufacturer supplied flow mappings. To solve this practically very significant problem

  4. A two-phase diffuse-interface model for Hele Shaw flows with large property contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Beckermann, C.

    2008-12-01

    A novel two-phase diffuse-interface model is used to simulate flows inside a Hele-Shaw cell. The model assumes that the two phases coexist inside the diffuse interface, with different velocities and properties. A separate equation is used to calculate the slip velocity between the two phases inside the diffuse interface. It is shown that for one-dimensional flows parallel to the diffuse interface, the results are independent of the diffuse-interface width, regardless of the magnitude of the density and viscosity contrasts between the phases. This two-phase approach is coupled with a phase-field equation for calculating the interface motion. The model is applied to a buoyancy-driven two-phase flow involving a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and validated through a comparison with available sharp-interface results. The flows and interface topology changes are investigated for large density and viscosity contrasts between the phases. The convergence of the results with respect to the interface width is examined in detail. It is shown that the two-phase model converges better than a standard diffuse-interface model that assumes the presence of a single velocity inside the diffuse interface. Remaining interface width dependencies can be attributed to the capillary stress term in the momentum equation.

  5. The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA): Developing Post-Fire Model Parameters Using Precipitation and Runoff Records from Gauged Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, B. S.; Goodrich, D. C.; Guertin, D. P.; Burns, I. S.; Canfield, E.; Sidman, G.

    2014-12-01

    New tools and functionality have been incorporated into the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA) to assess the impacts of wildfire on runoff and erosion. AGWA (see: www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/agwa or http://www.epa.gov/esd/land-sci/agwa/) is a GIS interface jointly developed by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Arizona, and the University of Wyoming to automate the parameterization and execution of a suite of hydrologic and erosion models (RHEM, WEPP, KINEROS2 and SWAT). Through an intuitive interface the user selects an outlet from which AGWA delineates and discretizes the watershed using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The watershed model elements are then intersected with terrain, soils, and land cover data layers to derive the requisite model input parameters. With the addition of a burn severity map AGWA can be used to model post wildfire changes to a catchment. By applying the same design storm to burned and unburned conditions a rapid assessment of the watershed can be made and areas that are the most prone to flooding can be identified. Post-fire precipitation and runoff records from gauged forested watersheds are now being used to make improvements to post fire model input parameters. Rainfall and runoff pairs have been selected from these records in order to calibrate parameter values for surface roughness and saturated hydraulic conductivity used in the KINEROS2 model. Several objective functions will be tried in the calibration process. Results will be validated. Currently Department of Interior Burn Area Emergency Response (DOI BAER) teams are using the AGWA-KINEROS2 modeling interface to assess hydrologically imposed risk immediately following wild fire. These parameter refinements are being made to further improve the quality of these assessments.

  6. A robust and flexible Geospatial Modeling Interface (GMI) for environmental model deployment and evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper provides an overview of the GMI (Geospatial Modeling Interface) simulation framework for environmental model deployment and assessment. GMI currently provides access to multiple environmental models including AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W), Nitrate Leaching and Economic Analysis 2 (NLEA...

  7. Modeling the interface area aspect ratio of carbide grains in WCCo composites

    E-print Network

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    Keywords: Cemented carbide Electron backscattered diffraction Interface area aspect ratio Five parameterModeling the interface area aspect ratio of carbide grains in WC­Co composites Xiaokun Yuan a analysis The average interface area aspect ratios of carbide grains in WC­Co composites are measured from

  8. Modeling the Interface Defeat Phenomenon Using a Physically-Based Ceramic Damage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, David; Rajendran, Arunachalam

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents results from simulations of metallic rods impacting confined ceramic targets. If the ceramic target is properly confined, a phenomenon known as "interface defeat" may occur at a critical impact velocity. When this happens, the projectile is defeated at the ceramic surface, with no penetration into the ceramic. Due to the severe deformations that the projectile experiences during interface defeat, this phenomenon has been traditionally impossible to numerically simulate using conventional Lagrangian finite element algorithms. However, recent advances in particle method techniques have eliminated some of the numerical problems associated with such large deformations. Employing a new generalized particle algorithm option that is now available in the Lagrangian hydrocode EPIC, we simulated several "interface defeat" experimental configurations using the Rajendran-Grove (RG) ceramic model to describe the ceramic material's response to dynamic impact. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate the ability of the RG model to reproduce and predict the phenomenon of interface defeat.

  9. FULLY AUTOMATED NON-NATIVE SPEECH RECOGNITION USING CONFUSION-BASED ACOUSTIC MODEL INTEGRATION AND GRAPHEMIC CONSTRAINTS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FULLY AUTOMATED NON-NATIVE SPEECH RECOGNITION USING CONFUSION-BASED ACOUSTIC MODEL INTEGRATION automated approach for the recognition of non-native speech based on acoustic model modification. For a na improvements. 1. INTRODUCTION The drastic drop in performance for automatic speech recognition (ASR) systems

  10. ORIGAMI -- The Oak Ridge Geometry Analysis and Modeling Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    A revised ``ray-tracing`` package which is a superset of the geometry specifications of the radiation transport codes MORSE, MASH (GIFT Versions 4 and 5), HETC, and TORT has been developed by ORNL. Two additional CAD-based formats are also included as part of the superset: the native format of the BRL-CAD system--MGED, and the solid constructive geometry subset of the IGES specification. As part of this upgrade effort, ORNL has designed an Xwindows-based utility (ORIGAMI) to facilitate the construction, manipulation, and display of the geometric models required by the MASH code. Since the primary design criterion for this effort was that the utility ``see`` the geometric model exactly as the radiation transport code does, ORIGAMI is designed to utilize the same ``ray-tracing`` package as the revised version of MASH. ORIGAMI incorporates the functionality of two previously developed graphical utilities, CGVIEW and ORGBUG, into a single consistent interface.

  11. Intelligent User Interfaces for Information Analysis: A Cognitive Model

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarting, Irene S.; Nelson, Rob A.; Cowell, Andrew J.

    2006-01-29

    Intelligent user interfaces (IUIs) for information analysis (IA) need to be designed with an intrinsic understanding of the analytical objectives and the dimensions of the information space. These analytical objectives are oriented around the requirement to provide decision makers with courses of action. Most tools available to support analysis barely skim the surface of the dimensions and categories of information used in analysis, and almost none are designed to address the ultimate requirement of decision support. This paper presents a high-level model of the cognitive framework of information analysts in the context of doing their jobs. It is intended that this model will enable the derivation of design requirements for advanced IUIs for IA.

  12. Model Based Control Design Using SLPS "Simulink PSpice Interface"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehpour, Saeid; Kulcu, Ercan K.; Alnajjar, Hisham

    This paper elaborates on the new integration offered with the PSpice SLPS interface and the MATLAB simulink products. SLPS links the two widely used design products, PSpice and Mathwork's Simulink simulator. The SLPS simulation environment supports the substitution of an actual electronic block with an "ideal model", better known as the mathematical simulink model. Thus enabling the designer to identify and correct integration issues of electronics within a system. Moreover, stress audit can be performed by using the PSpice smoke analysis which helps to verify whether the components are working within the manufacturer's safe operating limits. It is invaluable since many companies design and test the electronics separately from the system level. Therefore, integrations usually are not discovered until the prototype level, causing critical time delays in getting a product to the market.

  13. Time-domain matched interface and boundary (MIB) modeling of Debye dispersive media with curved interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc Duy; Zhao, Shan

    2014-12-01

    A new finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is introduced for solving transverse magnetic Maxwell's equations in Debye dispersive media with complex interfaces and discontinuous wave solutions. Based on the auxiliary differential equation approach, a hybrid Maxwell-Debye system is constructed, which couples the wave equation for the electric component with Maxwell's equations for the magnetic components. This hybrid formulation enables the calculation of the time dependent parts of the interface jump conditions, so that one can track the transient changes in the regularities of the electromagnetic fields across a dispersive interface. Effective matched interface and boundary (MIB) treatments are proposed to rigorously impose the physical jump conditions which are not only time dependent, but also couple both Cartesian directions and both magnetic field components. Based on a staggered Yee lattice, the proposed MIB scheme can deal with arbitrarily curved interfaces and nonsmooth interfaces with sharped edges. Second order convergences are numerically achieved in solving dispersive interface problems with constant curvatures, general curvatures, and nonsmooth corners.

  14. Interfacing dispersion models in the HGSYSTEM hazard-assessment package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witlox, H. W. M.; McFarlane, K.

    The hazard-assessment software package HGSYSTEM consists of mathematical models for simulating one or more of the consecutive phases between spillage and far-field dispersion of a gaseous pollutant or hydrogen fluoride in moist air. HGSYSTEM can be used for both an unpressurised, low-momentum release and a pressurised, high-momentum release. For a pressurised release. the HGSYSTEM model HFPLUME (for HF) or PLUME (for ideal gas) calculates the flashing (depressurisation), jet flow and near-field dispersion and the HGSYSTEM model HEGADAS calculates the ground-level far-field heavy-gas dispersion. Transition and matching criteria are formulated for interfacing near-fieldjet models with far-field dispersion models. These criteria are validated by means of a HFPLUME HEGADAS simulation of the Goldfish experiments (steady-state and finite-duration pressurised release of HF). A sensitivity analysis to the problem parameters has been carried out to study the dispersion behaviour for a wider range of problems.

  15. Modeling and Implementing of an Automated Warehouse via Colored Timed Petri Nets; a Behavior Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shan-Jun He; Fei Cheng; Jian Luo

    2007-01-01

    The automated warehouse considered here consists of a number of rack locations with three cranes, a narrow aisle shuttle, and several buffer stations with the roller. Based on analyzing of the behaviors of the active resources in the system, a modular and computerized model is presented via a colored timed Petri net approach, in which places are multicolored to simplify

  16. Model-Based Automated Extraction of Microtubules from Electron Tomography Volume

    E-print Network

    1 Model-Based Automated Extraction of Microtubules from Electron Tomography Volume Ming Jiang, Qiang Ji*, Senior Member, IEEE, and Bruce F. McEwen I. INTRODUCTION Microtubules form the skeletons, the microtubules attach to chromosomes via kinetochore to drive the movement of chromosomes during mitosis. Re

  17. Automated Test Assembly for Cognitive Diagnosis Models Using a Genetic Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelman, Matthew; Kim, Wonsuk; Roussos, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    Much recent psychometric literature has focused on cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs), a promising class of instruments used to measure the strengths and weaknesses of examinees. This article introduces a genetic algorithm to perform automated test assembly alongside CDMs. The algorithm is flexible in that it can be applied whether the goal is to…

  18. Automating Prostate Capsule Contour Estimation for 3D Model Reconstruction Using Shape and Histological Features

    E-print Network

    McKenzie, Rick

    Automating Prostate Capsule Contour Estimation for 3D Model Reconstruction Using Shape to compare the efficiency of different form of cancerous prostate surgical removal. An accurate assessment of the percentage and depth of extra-capsular soft tissue removed with the prostate by the various surgical

  19. Classification of Safety Requirements for Formal Verification of Software Models of Industrial Automation Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Friedemann Bitsch

    By use of formal methods the trust in the safe function of software can be increased. But the use of formal methods in practical software development is rare. One of the reasons is difficulties arising from formal specification of safety requirements. In this paper characteristics of safety requirements of software models of industrial automation systems are analysed by classifying these

  20. Evaluation of automated cell disruptor methods for oomycetous and ascomycetous model organisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two automated cell disruptor-based methods for RNA extraction; disruption of thawed cells submerged in TRIzol Reagent (method QP), and direct disruption of frozen cells on dry ice (method CP), were optimized for a model oomycete, Phytophthora capsici, and compared with grinding in a mortar and pestl...

  1. Performabilty Modeling of an Automated Manufacturing System with Deterministic and Stochastic Petri Nets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christoph Lindemann; Gianfranco Ciardo; Reinhard German; Giinter Hommel

    1993-01-01

    A deterministic and stochastic Petri net (DSPN) model for an automated manufacturing system in which tools are subject to wear and maintenance is presented. The DSPN takes into account the degradable performance of tools due to wear and the deterministic service times of parts. The service requirements of parts at tools dependent on their wear are represented in the DSPN

  2. A Discriminative Model-Constrained Graph Cuts Approach to Fully Automated Pediatric

    E-print Network

    Carneiro, Gustavo

    labels and multi-spectral voxel intensities. The discriminative model relies not only on observed local Hornegger1 , and Dorin Comaniciu2 1 Chair of Pattern Recognition, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. In this paper we present a fully automated approach to the segmentation of pediatric brain tumors in multi

  3. Automated Support for Building Behavioral Models of EventDriven Systems

    E-print Network

    Chechik, Marsha

    ­lift/three­floor elevator system, and describe our tool, Sawblade, which provides automated support for the method. 1 of the functions in A use a function or data defined in B. Considerable research has gone into automatically of architecture and automatic comparison with a conceptual pattern [25, 13]. The models described above are mostly

  4. Automated substrate resistance extraction in nanoscale VLSI by exploiting a geometry-based analytical model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yiorgos I. Bontzios; Michael G. Dimopoulos; Alkis A. Hatzopoulos

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a new automated method for determining the substrate resistance is presented. It exploits a geometric formulation of the current streamlines between coupled structures and builds an analytical model for the substrate resistance. Both simulation and measurement data are utilized in order to show the validity of the proposed scheme. The measurement data are obtained from a fabricated

  5. Automated volumetric grid generation for finite element modeling of human hand joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Underhill, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Rainsberger, R. [XYZ Scientific Applications, Inc., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We are developing techniques for finite element analysis of human joints. These techniques need to provide high quality results rapidly in order to be useful to a physician. The research presented here increases model quality and decreases user input time by automating the volumetric mesh generation step.

  6. LT Tyson Scofield, USCG and Dr. Alan Brown Manning and Automation Model for Naval Ship

    E-print Network

    Brown, Alan

    1 LT Tyson Scofield, USCG and Dr. Alan Brown Manning and Automation Model for Naval Ship Analysis and Optimization ABSTRACT The manning of a ship is a major driver of total ownership cost. The Government Accounting Office (GAO) states that "the cost of the ship's crew is the largest expense incurred over

  7. Semi-Automated 3D City Modeling Using Stereo High-Resolution Satellite Images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pooya Sarabandi; Anne S. Kiremidjian; Ronald T. Eguchi

    This paper presents a methodology for generating semi-automated 3D models of urban area from stereo high-resolution satellite images. Prevalent adoption of the Rational Function Model (RFM) during recent years as a replacement for rigorous satellite orientation sensor model by most commercial imagery providers, makes 3D information extraction fast and reliable for most end-users. This paper presents an application of RFM

  8. Parallelization of a hydrological model using the message passing interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Yiping; Li, Tiejian; Sun, Liqun; Chen, Ji

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing knowledge about the natural processes, hydrological models such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) are becoming larger and more complex with increasing computation time. Additionally, other procedures such as model calibration, which may require thousands of model iterations, can increase running time and thus further reduce rapid modeling and analysis. Using the widely-applied SWAT as an example, this study demonstrates how to parallelize a serial hydrological model in a Windows® environment using a parallel programing technology—Message Passing Interface (MPI). With a case study, we derived the optimal values for the two parameters (the number of processes and the corresponding percentage of work to be distributed to the master process) of the parallel SWAT (P-SWAT) on an ordinary personal computer and a work station. Our study indicates that model execution time can be reduced by 42%–70% (or a speedup of 1.74–3.36) using multiple processes (two to five) with a proper task-distribution scheme (between the master and slave processes). Although the computation time cost becomes lower with an increasing number of processes (from two to five), this enhancement becomes less due to the accompanied increase in demand for message passing procedures between the master and all slave processes. Our case study demonstrates that the P-SWAT with a five-process run may reach the maximum speedup, and the performance can be quite stable (fairly independent of a project size). Overall, the P-SWAT can help reduce the computation time substantially for an individual model run, manual and automatic calibration procedures, and optimization of best management practices. In particular, the parallelization method we used and the scheme for deriving the optimal parameters in this study can be valuable and easily applied to other hydrological or environmental models.

  9. Modeling interface-controlled phase transformation kinetics in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, E. L.; Vo, N. Q.; Philippe, T.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-05-01

    The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation is widely used to describe phase transformation kinetics. This description, however, is not valid in finite size domains, in particular, thin films. A new computational model incorporating the level-set method is employed to study phase evolution in thin film systems. For both homogeneous (bulk) and heterogeneous (surface) nucleation, nucleation density and film thickness were systematically adjusted to study finite-thickness effects on the Avrami exponent during the transformation process. Only site-saturated nucleation with isotropic interface-kinetics controlled growth is considered in this paper. We show that the observed Avrami exponent is not constant throughout the phase transformation process in thin films with a value that is not consistent with the dimensionality of the transformation. Finite-thickness effects are shown to result in reduced time-dependent Avrami exponents when bulk nucleation is present, but not necessarily when surface nucleation is present.

  10. Modeling Automated Highway Systems with VeriJ Universite Pierre & Marie Curie, CNRS-UMR7606 (LIP6/MoVe)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling Automated Highway Systems with VeriJ ZHANG Yan Universit´e Pierre & Marie Curie, CNRS of an automated highway system is used to present the basic constructs of the language. 1 Introduction Modeling to handle low level models or complex specification formalisms. The area of automated highway systems

  11. Andrey G. Kalinichev Molecular Modeling of Aqueous Solutions and Substrate-Solution Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.

    and desalination. The course is intended for graduate students (associated with the WaterCAMPWS or not) who have modeling of polymer membranes for water purification and desalination o Molecular models of polymer of inorganic (mineral) interfaces molecular models of polymer membranes and membrane-water interfaces o

  12. INTERFACE CRACK PROPAGATION IN POROUS AND TIME-DEPENDENT MATERIALS ANALYZED WITH DISCRETE MODELS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    THEOCHARIS BAXEVANIS; ERIC DUFOUR; GILLES PIJAUDIER-CABOT

    2008-01-01

    A model describing the crack propagation at the interface between a rigid substratum and a beam is considered. The interface is modeled using a b er bundle model (i.e. using a discrete set of elements having a random strength). The distribution of avalanches, dened as the distance over which the crack is propagated under a xed force, is studied in

  13. Infrared detector arrays: Electronic interface analysis, design, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Steven G.

    1998-11-01

    Advances in infrared (IR) detector technology coupled with advances in analog Si CMOS technology have resulted in on-focal-plane hybrid integration of high performance Si readout circuitry with high density IR detector arrays made from a variety of low bandgap semiconductor materials. This dissertation focuses on characterizations or several linear IR photodiode arrays employing on- focal-plane Si CMOS readout circuitry. Significant performance improvements are reported using buffered capacitive transimpedance amplifiers (CTIA) to interconnect with photodiode arrays instead of reverse- biased, self-integrating techniques. Near zero volt detector bias is maintained by buffered interfacing techniques which greatly reduce dark currents and improve linearity. Key performance issues are CMOS op amp input offset voltage and input voltage noise. Emphasis has been placed on noise analysis as improved modeling has revealed dominating noise sources to be preamp white noise and preamp 1/f noise. Preamp white noise dominates at shorter exposure times while preamp 1/f noise dominates at longer exposure times on InGaAs arrays evaluated. Under small detector bias conditions (<20 mV) applied by CMOS op amp input offset voltage, detector 1/f noise limits sensitivity of Ge arrays at longer exposure times. Analytical tools developed explain direct increases in noise equivalent input charge or noise equivalent electrons with exposure time. Detector thermal shot noise, with a square root dependence On exposure time never limits sensitivity of devices evaluated. Improved models for the critical interface between IR detector and readout circuitry will greatly assist evaluating recommended improvements in IR detector and CMOS op amp design.

  14. Automated NMR fragment based screening identified a novel interface blocker to the LARG/RhoA complex.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jia; Ma, Rongsheng; Wang, Wei; Wang, Na; Sasaki, Ryan; Snyderman, David; Wu, Jihui; Ruan, Ke

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase cycles between the inactive GDP form and the activated GTP form, catalyzed by the upstream guanine exchange factors. The modulation of such process by small molecules has been proven to be a fruitful route for therapeutic intervention to prevent the over-activation of the small GTPase. The fragment based approach emerging in the past decade has demonstrated its paramount potential in the discovery of inhibitors targeting such novel and challenging protein-protein interactions. The details regarding the procedure of NMR fragment screening from scratch have been rarely disclosed comprehensively, thus restricts its wider applications. To achieve a consistent screening applicable to a number of targets, we developed a highly automated protocol to cover every aspect of NMR fragment screening as possible, including the construction of small but diverse libray, determination of the aqueous solubility by NMR, grouping compounds with mutual dispersity to a cocktail, and the automated processing and visualization of the ligand based screening spectra. We exemplified our streamlined screening in RhoA alone and the complex of the small GTPase RhoA and its upstream guanine exchange factor LARG. Two hits were confirmed from the primary screening in cocktail and secondary screening over individual hits for LARG/RhoA complex, while one of them was also identified from the screening for RhoA alone. HSQC titration of the two hits over RhoA and LARG alone, respectively, identified one compound binding to RhoA.GDP at a 0.11 mM affinity, and perturbed the residues at the switch II region of RhoA. This hit blocked the formation of the LARG/RhoA complex, validated by the native gel electrophoresis, and the titration of RhoA to ¹?N labeled LARG in the absence and presence the compound, respectively. It therefore provides us a starting point toward a more potent inhibitor to RhoA activation catalyzed by LARG. PMID:24505392

  15. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  16. A Petri-Net-Based Modeling Framework for Automated Negotiation Protocols in Electronic Commerce

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shujuan Ji; Qijia Tian; Yongquan Liang

    A negotiation protocol is a specification of the rules that govern deliberation among negotiation agents. To model negotiation\\u000a protocols formally is an important task in the designing of automated negotiation systems for electronic commerce. Lots of\\u000a work has been done for negotiation modeling, but there still lacks a formalism for negotiation protocols of time-constrained\\u000a multi-issue negotiation, which can be widely

  17. Motivation Sharp Interface NSK model Asymptotics Prospects Sharp-Interface Asymptotics for

    E-print Network

    Helluy, Philippe

    is the density, u the velocity and p() is the pressure given by a constitutive relation. Rankine-Hugoniot Asymptotics Prospects Uniqueness of solutions Numerical simulations by C. M¨arkle Rankine Hugoniot conditions the Rankine Hugoniot conditions and zero entropy dissipation at the interface, i.e. W (+ ) + 1 2 |u+ - w|2 = W

  18. Paper presented at the 4th International Conference Working on Safety, Crete, Greece, 2008 Functional modeling for risk assessment of automation in a changing air

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    Functional modeling for risk assessment of automation in a changing air traffic management environment R or to let automation act autonomously. The Functional Resonance Analysis Method (FRAM) provides a framework from ERASMUS automation. Various instantiations of a partial model resulting from the application

  19. A computational model of skilled use of a graphical user interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Muneo Kitajirna; Peter G. Polson

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computational model of skilled use of a graphical user interface based on Kintsch's construction-integration theory [4, 8]. The model uses knowledge of a detailed representation of information on the display, a user's goals and expectations, knowledge about the interface, and knowledge about the application domain to compute actions necessary to accomplish the user's current goal. The

  20. Assembly of components based on interface automata and UML component model

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Assembly of components based on interface automata and UML component model Samir Chouali , Sebti, smouelhi, hmountassir }@lifc.univ-fcomte.fr Abstract. We propose an approach which combines component UML specify component based system architecture with compo- nent UML model, and component interfaces

  1. Interface debonding models: a viscous regularization with a limited rate dependency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Chaboche; F. Feyel; Y. Monerie

    2001-01-01

    Interface models have been developed over the past 10 years for simulating various scales of composite debonding effects, such as decohesion between matrix and fibers and delamination in laminates, formulated with and without rate dependencies.We give several examples of how sudden “solution jumps” can occur in rate-independent models like the Tvergaard depending on the geometry, interface behavior, and finite element

  2. The evaluation of an adaptive user interface model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bronwin Jason; André P. Calitz; Jéan H. Greyling

    2010-01-01

    User expertise and skill affects the way users interact with software. It is envisaged that an adaptive user interface (AUI) which dynamically changes from a novice user interface (UI) to an expert UI could possibly improve users' performance. Contact centres (CCs), are the primary interaction point between a company and its customers and an important challenge is to increase the

  3. Refinement-Based Student Modeling and Automated Bug Library Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baffes, Paul; Mooney, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of student modeling and intelligent tutoring systems focuses on the development of the ASSERT algorithm (Acquiring Stereotypical Student Errors by Refining Theories). Topics include overlay modeling; bug libraries (databases of student misconceptions); dynamic modeling; refinement-based modeling; and experimental results from tests at…

  4. Disturbed state model for sand-geosynthetic interfaces and application to pull-out tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Surajit; Wije Wathugala, G.

    1999-12-01

    Successful numerical simulation of geosynthetic-reinforced earth structures depends on selecting proper constitutive models for soils, geosynthetics and soil-geosynthetic interfaces. Many constitutive models are available for modelling soils and geosynthetics. However, constitutive models for soil-geosynthetic interfaces which can capture most of the important characteristics of interface response are not readily available. In this paper, an elasto-plastic constitutive model based on the disturbed state concept (DSC) for geosynthetic-soil interfaces has been presented. The proposed model is capable of capturing most of the important characteristics of interface response, such as dilation, hardening and softening. The behaviour of interfaces under the direct shear test has been predicted by the model. The present model has been implemented in the finite element procedure in association with the thin-layer element. Five pull-out tests with two different geogrids have been simulated numerically using FEM. For the calibration of the constitutive models used in FEM, the standard laboratory tests used are: (1) triaxial tests for the sand, (2) direct shear tests for the interfaces and (3) axial tension tests for the geogrids. The results of the finite element simulations of pull-out tests agree well with the test data. The proposed model can be used for the stress-deformation study of geosynthetic-reinforced embankments through numerical simulation.

  5. Automated Nonlinear Regression Modeling for HCI Antti Oulasvirta

    E-print Network

    for Informatics and Saarland University ABSTRACT Predictive models in HCI, such as models of user perfor- mance literature provides useful introduction [9]). As a concrete example, consider Fitts' law. Although at times

  6. Automated generation of compact models for fluidic microsystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marek Turowski; Zhijian Chen; Andrzej J. Przekwas

    2000-01-01

    Simulation and design of microfluidic systems requires various level models: high-fidelity models for design and optimization of particular elements and devices as well as system-level models allowing for VLSI-scale simulation of such systems. For the latter purpose, reduced or compact models are necessary to make such system simulations computationally feasible. In this paper, we present a design methodology and practical

  7. Automated Generation of Compact Models for Fluidic Microsystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marek Turowski; Zhijian Chen; Andrzej Przekwas

    2001-01-01

    Simulation and design of microfluidic systems requires various level models: high-fidelity models (usually 3D) for design and optimization of particular elements and devices, as well as system-level models allowing for VLSI-scale simulation of such systems. For the latter purpose, reduced or compact models are necessary to make such system simulations computationally feasible. In this paper, we present a design methodology

  8. Computer-automated multiparadigm modeling in control systems technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. Mosterman; J. Sztipanovits; S. Engell

    2004-01-01

    The use of model-based technologies has made it imperative for the development of a feedback control system to deal with many different tasks such as: plant modeling in all its variety; model reduction to achieve a complexity or level of abstraction suitable for the design task at hand; synthesis of control laws that vary from discrete event reactive control to

  9. Model-based metrics of human-automation function allocation in complex work environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So Young

    Function allocation is the design decision which assigns work functions to all agents in a team, both human and automated. Efforts to guide function allocation systematically has been studied in many fields such as engineering, human factors, team and organization design, management science, and cognitive systems engineering. Each field focuses on certain aspects of function allocation, but not all; thus, an independent discussion of each does not address all necessary issues with function allocation. Four distinctive perspectives emerged from a review of these fields: technology-centered, human-centered, team-oriented, and work-oriented. Each perspective focuses on different aspects of function allocation: capabilities and characteristics of agents (automation or human), team structure and processes, and work structure and the work environment. Together, these perspectives identify the following eight issues with function allocation: 1) Workload, 2) Incoherency in function allocations, 3) Mismatches between responsibility and authority, 4) Interruptive automation, 5) Automation boundary conditions, 6) Function allocation preventing human adaptation to context, 7) Function allocation destabilizing the humans' work environment, and 8) Mission Performance. Addressing these issues systematically requires formal models and simulations that include all necessary aspects of human-automation function allocation: the work environment, the dynamics inherent to the work, agents, and relationships among them. Also, addressing these issues requires not only a (static) model, but also a (dynamic) simulation that captures temporal aspects of work such as the timing of actions and their impact on the agent's work. Therefore, with properly modeled work as described by the work environment, the dynamics inherent to the work, agents, and relationships among them, a modeling framework developed by this thesis, which includes static work models and dynamic simulation, can capture the issues with function allocation. Then, based on the eight issues, eight types of metrics are established. The purpose of these metrics is to assess the extent to which each issue exists with a given function allocation. Specifically, the eight types of metrics assess workload, coherency of a function allocation, mismatches between responsibility and authority, interruptive automation, automation boundary conditions, human adaptation to context, stability of the human's work environment, and mission performance. Finally, to validate the modeling framework and the metrics, a case study was conducted modeling four different function allocations between a pilot and flight deck automation during the arrival and approach phases of flight. A range of pilot cognitive control modes and maximum human taskload limits were also included in the model. The metrics were assessed for these four function allocations and analyzed to validate capability of the metrics to identify important issues in given function allocations. In addition, the design insights provided by the metrics are highlighted. This thesis concludes with a discussion of mechanisms for further validating the modeling framework and function allocation metrics developed here, and highlights where these developments can be applied in research and in the design of function allocations in complex work environments such as aviation operations.

  10. User modeling in expert man-machine interfaces: a case study in intelligent information retrieval

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GIORGIO BRAJNIK; GIOVANNI GUIDA; CARLO TASSO

    1990-01-01

    The requirements of a user modeling component for an expert interface are analyzed, and the main points of a proposed approach to user modeling are stated. The authors focus on a knowledge-based system, called UM-tool, devoted to creating, maintaining, and using explicit user models within an expert interface. UM-tool supports a novel approach to user modeling, which is based both

  11. Automated Diagnosis of Data-Model Conflicts Using Metadata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard O Chen; Russ B Altman

    1999-01-01

    The authors describe a methodology for helping computational biologists diagnose discrepancies they encounter between experimental data and the predictions of scientific models. The authors call these discrepancies data-model conflicts. They have built a prototype system to help scientists resolve these conflicts in a more systematic, evidence-based manner.In computational biology, data-model conflicts are the result of complex computations in which data

  12. Automated model formulation for time-varying flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. J.; Hanagud, S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented here is an identification technique that uses the sensor information to choose a new model out of a finite set of discrete model space, in order to follow the observed changes to the given time varying flexible structure. Boundary condition sets or other information on model variations are used to organize the set of possible models laterally into a search tree with levels of abstraction used to order the models vertically within branches. An object-oriented programming approach is used to represent the model set in the search tree. A modified A (asterisk) best first search algorithm finds the model where the model response best matches the current observations. Several extensions to this methodology are discussed. Methods of possible integration of rules with the current search algorithm are considered to give weight to interpreted trends that may be found in a series of observations. This capability might lead, for instance, to identifying a model that incorporates a progressive damage rather than with incorrect paramenters such as added mass. Another new direction is to consider the use of noisy time domain sensor feedback rather than frequency domain information in the search algorithm to improve the real-time capability of the developed procedure.

  13. Automated tuning of large-scale multivariable model predictive controllers for spatially-distributed processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Junqiang Fan; Gregory E. Stewart

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an automated tuning method of a large-scale multivariable model predictive controller for multiple array paper machine cross-directional (CD) processes. Paper machine CD processes are large-scale spatially-distributed dynamical systems. Due to these systems' (almost) spatially invariant nature, the closed-loop transfer functions are approximated by transfer matrices with rectangular circulant matrix blocks, whose input and output singular vectors are

  14. An application of structural modeling and automated reasoning to real-time systems design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shinichi Honiden; Naoshi Uchihira; Kazunori Matsumoto; Kazuo Matsumura; Masahiko Arai

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an application of structural modeling and automated reasoning as a software development environment for real-time systems. This application satisfies two major requirements for such an environment: (1) to synthesize an absolutely correct program and, (2) to increase software productivity. The real-time systems, which consist of concurrent programs, are described by a Prolog based concurrent object-oriented language, called

  15. First Steps to Automated Driver Verification via Model Checking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Matoušek

    2006-01-01

    The paper summarizes the current state of our work addressing the verification of Windows kernel drivers via model checking technique. Our goal is to implement a tool that extracts verification models using driver source code and specifications of the kernel environment written in DeSpec language, which we introduced previously. The DeSpec language enables specifying the kernel environment as well as

  16. Developing Automated Helicopter Models Using Simulated Annealing and Genetic Search

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Namir Aldawoodi; Rafael Perez; Kimon Valavanis; Wendy Alvis

    A heuristic technique is presented that applies simulated annealing search to derive mathematical equations that model a pilot for an X-CELL 60 helicopter. The technique uses a pre-defined alphabet of formulas and combines them to create a mathematical model of the system controller or pilot. The proposed technique provides a new tool that can be used to develop an accurate

  17. Automated Extraction of Inductive Invariants to Aid Model Checking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Case; Alan Mishchenko; Robert K. Brayton

    2007-01-01

    Model checking can be aided by inductive in- variants, small local properties that can be proved by simple induction. We present a way to automatically extract inductive invariants from a design and then prove them. The set of candidate invariants is broad, expensive to prove, and many invariants can be shown to not be helpful to model checking. In this

  18. Automated Extraction of Inductive Invariants to Aid Model Checking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Case; Alan Mishchenko; Robert K. Brayton

    2007-01-01

    Model checking can be aided by inductive invariants, small local properties that can be proved by simple induction. We present a way to automatically extract inductive invariants from a design and then prove them. The set of candidate invariants is broad, expensive to prove, and many invariants can be shown to not be helpful to model checking. In this work,

  19. A Model of Information Security Based on Office Automation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chunyong Yin; Ruxia Sun; Shuoben Bi

    2009-01-01

    The prosperity of electronic office has changed the traditional office behaviors and more and more people are willing to conduct computer office. Management and security of electronics document become an important problem. This paper proposes a secure document management model, which makes use of data classifying and cryptoapi. The structure of document management model and key technologies of realizing user

  20. Automated parametrical antenna modelling for ambient assisted living applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemzadeh, R.; John, W.; Mathis, W.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper a parametric modeling technique for a fast polynomial extraction of the physically relevant parameters of inductively coupled RFID/NFC (radio frequency identification/near field communication) antennas is presented. The polynomial model equations are obtained by means of a three-step procedure: first, full Partial Element Equivalent Circuit (PEEC) antenna models are determined by means of a number of parametric simulations within the input parameter range of a certain antenna class. Based on these models, the RLC antenna parameters are extracted in a subsequent model reduction step. Employing these parameters, polynomial equations describing the antenna parameter with respect to (w.r.t.) the overall antenna input parameter range are extracted by means of polynomial interpolation and approximation of the change of the polynomials' coefficients. The described approach is compared to the results of a reference PEEC solver with regard to accuracy and computation effort.

  1. Optical modeling of a-Si:H solar cells with rough interfaces: Effect of back contact and interface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, M.; van Swaaij, R. A. C. M. M.; Metselaar, J. W.; Schropp, R. E. I.

    2000-12-01

    An approach to study the optical behavior of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells with rough interfaces using computer modeling is presented. In this approach the descriptive haze parameters of a light scattering interface are related to the root mean square roughness of the interface. Using this approach we investigated the effect of front window contact roughness and back contact material on the optical properties of a single junction a-Si:H superstrate solar cell. The simulation results for a-Si:H solar cells with SnO2:F as a front contact and ideal Ag, ZnO/Ag, and Al/Ag as a back contact are shown. For cells with an absorber layer thickness of 150-600 nm the simulations demonstrate that the gain in photogenerated current density due to the use of a textured superstrate is around 2.3 mA cm-2 in comparison to solar cells with flat interfaces. The effect of the front and back contact roughness on the external quantum efficiency (QE) of the solar cell for different parts of the light spectrum was determined. The choice of the back contact strongly influences the QE and the absorption in the nonactive layers for the wavelengths above 650 nm. A practical Ag back contact can be successfully simulated by introducing a thin buffer layer between the n-type a-Si:H and Ag back contact, which has optical properties similar to Al, indicating that the actual reflection at the n-type a-Si:H/Ag interface is smaller than what is expected from the respective bulk optical parameters. In comparison to the practical Ag contact the QE of the cell can be strongly improved by using a ZnO layer at the Ag back contact or an ideal Ag contact. The photogenerated current densities for a solar cell with a 450 nm thick intrinsic a-Si:H layer with ZnO/Ag and ideal Ag are 16.7 and 17.3 mA cm-2, respectively, compared to 14.4 mA cm-2 for the practical Ag back contact. The effect of increasing the roughness of the contact interfaces was investigated for both superstrate and substrate types of solar cells. Increasing the roughness of the carrier electrode, i.e., the rough electrode on which the silicon cell structure is deposited, up to 35 nm leads to a strong increase in the photogenerated current density; for higher values of the interface roughness the photogenerated current density tends to saturate.

  2. Diffuse-interface model for rapid phase transformations in nonequilibrium systems.

    PubMed

    Galenko, Peter; Jou, David

    2005-04-01

    A thermodynamic approach to rapid phase transformations within a diffuse interface in a binary system is developed. Assuming an extended set of independent thermodynamic variables formed by the union of the classic set of slow variables and the space of fast variables, we introduce finiteness of the heat and solute diffusive propagation at the finite speed of the interface advancing. To describe transformations within the diffuse interface, we use the phase-field model which allows us to follow steep but smooth changes of phase within the width of the diffuse interface. Governing equations of the phase-field model are derived for the hyperbolic model, a model with memory, and a model of nonlinear evolution of transformation within the diffuse interface. The consistency of the model is proved by the verification of the validity of the condition of positive entropy production and by outcomes of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. A comparison with existing sharp-interface and diffuse-interface versions of the model is given. PMID:15903744

  3. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 10, NO. 3, MAY/JUNE 2004 445 Model-Based Optoelectronic Packaging Automation

    E-print Network

    Kurzweg, Timothy P.

    -Based Optoelectronic Packaging Automation Timothy P. Kurzweg, Member, IEEE, Allon Guez, and Shubham K. Bhat Abstract--In this paper, we present an automation technique that yields high-performance, low-cost optoelectronic of the automation system. In addition to this feed-forward model, the controller is designed with feed- back

  4. Modeling Auditory-Haptic Interface Cues from an Analog Multi-line Telephone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Bittner, Rachael M.

    2012-01-01

    The Western Electric Company produced a multi-line telephone during the 1940s-1970s using a six-button interface design that provided robust tactile, haptic and auditory cues regarding the "state" of the communication system. This multi-line telephone was used as a model for a trade study comparison of two interfaces: a touchscreen interface (iPad)) versus a pressure-sensitive strain gauge button interface (Phidget USB interface controllers). The experiment and its results are detailed in the authors' AES 133rd convention paper " Multimodal Information Management: Evaluation of Auditory and Haptic Cues for NextGen Communication Dispays". This Engineering Brief describes how the interface logic, visual indications, and auditory cues of the original telephone were synthesized using MAX/MSP, including the logic for line selection, line hold, and priority line activation.

  5. Automated compact dynamical modeling: An enabling tool for analog designers

    E-print Network

    Bond, Bradley N.

    In this paper we summarize recent developments in compact dynamical modeling for both linear and nonlinear systems arising in analog applications. These techniques include methods based on the projection framework, rational ...

  6. Automated verification of model-based programs under uncertainty

    E-print Network

    Mahtab, Tazeen, 1981-

    2004-01-01

    Highly robust embedded systems have been enabled through software executives that have the ability to reason about their environment. Those that employ the model-based autonomy paradigm automatically diagnose and plan ...

  7. Adsorption of solutes at liquidvapor interfaces: insights from lattice gas models

    E-print Network

    Geissler, Phillip

    Adsorption of solutes at liquid­vapor interfaces: insights from lattice gas models Suriyanarayanan DOI: 10.1039/c2fd20106b The adsorption behavior of ions at liquid­vapor interfaces exhibits several coarse fluctuations in solvent density and cohesive energy. Here we show that even such lattice gas

  8. ANALYSIS OF MESH DEPENDENCE IN RIGID COHESIVE INTERFACE FINITE ELEMENT MODELS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katerina D. Papoulia; Stephen A. Vavasis; Chin-Hang Sam; Pritam Ganguly

    We consider the use of initially rigid cohesive interface models in a dynamic fi nite element solution of a fracture process. Our focus is on convergence of finite element solutions using rigid cohesive interfaces to a continuum solution as the mesh spacingx (and therefore time stept) tends to zero. We present pinwheel meshes, which possess the \\

  9. VRID: A Design Model and Methodology for Developing Virtual Reality Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Jacob, Robert J.K.

    VRID: A Design Model and Methodology for Developing Virtual Reality Interfaces Vildan Tanriverdi 02155 {vildan | jacob} @eecs.tufts.edu ABSTRACT Compared to conventional interfaces, Virtual reality (VR Descriptors Realism-Virtual reality, Computing Methodologies General Terms Design, Theory Keywords: Virtual

  10. Extending UML Use Case Modelling to Support Graphical User Interface Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Phillips; Elizabeth A. Kemp; Sai Mei Kek

    2001-01-01

    UML supports the construction of several views of a software system. The paper reviews use case modelling in UML from the viewpoint of its suitability as input to the early stages of graphical user interface design. Three use case representations are compared, and an extended tabular representation is proposed which assists with the identification of user interface elements. This is

  11. Inferring Intent in Eye-Based Interfaces: Tracing Eye Movements with Process Models

    E-print Network

    Salvucci, Dario D.

    Inferring Intent in Eye-Based Interfaces: Tracing Eye Movements with Process Models Dario D dario+@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT While current eye-based interfaces offer enormous potential for efficient human-computer interaction, they also manifest the difficulty of inferring intent from user eye

  12. Automated mask creation from a 3D model using Faethm.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2007-11-01

    We have developed and implemented a method which given a three-dimensional object can infer from topology the two-dimensional masks needed to produce that object with surface micro-machining. The masks produced by this design tool can be generic, process independent masks, or if given process constraints, specific for a target process. This design tool calculates the two-dimensional mask set required to produce a given three-dimensional model by investigating the vertical topology of the model.

  13. Automated model-based organ delineation for radiotherapy planning in prostatic region

    SciTech Connect

    Pekar, Vladimir [Philips Research Laboratories, Hamburg (Germany)]. E-mail: vladimir.pekar@philips.com; McNutt, Todd R. [Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI (United States); Kaus, Michael R. [Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Purpose: Organ delineation is one of the most tedious and time-consuming parts of radiotherapy planning. It is usually performed by manual contouring in two-dimensional slices using simple drawing tools, and it may take several hours to delineate all structures of interest in a three-dimensional (3D) data set used for planning. In this paper, a 3D model-based approach to automated organ delineation is introduced that allows for a significant reduction of the time required for contouring. Methods and materials: The presented method is based on an adaptation of 3D deformable surface models to the boundaries of the anatomic structures of interest. The adaptation is based on a tradeoff between deformations of the model induced by its attraction to certain image features and the shape integrity of the model. To make the concept clinically feasible, interactive tools are introduced that allow quick correction in problematic areas in which the automated model adaptation may fail. A feasibility study with 40 clinical data sets was done for the male pelvic area, in which the risk organs (bladder, rectum, and femoral heads) were segmented by automatically adapting the corresponding organ models. Results: In several cases of the validation study, minor user interaction was required. Nevertheless, a statistically significant reduction in the time required compared with manual organ contouring was achieved. The results of the validation study showed that the presented model-based approach is accurate (1.0-1.7 mm mean error) for the tested anatomic structures. Conclusion: A framework for organ delineation in radiotherapy planning is presented, including automated 3D model-based segmentation, as well as tools for interactive corrections. We demonstrated that the proposed approach is significantly more efficient than manual contouring in two-dimensional slices.

  14. Investigating automated depth modelling of archaeo-magnetic datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheyney, Samuel; Hill, Ian; Linford, Neil; Leech, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic surveying is a commonly used tool for first-pass non-invasive archaeological surveying, and is often used to target areas for more detailed geophysical investigation, or excavation. Quick and routine processing of magnetic datasets mean survey results are typically viewed as 2D greyscale maps and the shapes of anomalies are interpreted in terms of likely archaeological structures. This technique is simple, but ignores some of the information content of the data. The data collected using dense spatial sampling with modern precise instrumentation are capable of yielding numerical estimates of the depths to buried structures, and their physical properties. The magnetic field measured at the surface is a superposition of the responses to all anomalous magnetic susceptibilities in the subsurface, and is therefore capable of revealing a 3D model of the magnetic properties. The application of mathematical modelling techniques to very-near-surface surveys such as for archaeology is quite rare, however similar methods are routinely used in regional scale mineral exploration surveys. Inverse modelling techniques have inherent ambiguity due to the nature of the mathematical "inverse problem". Often, although a good fit to the recorded values can be obtained, the final model will be non-unique and may be heavily biased by the starting model provided. Also the run time and computer resources required can be restrictive. Our approach is to derive as much information as possible from the data directly, and use this to define a starting model for inversion. This addresses both the ambiguity of the inverse problem and reduces the task for the inversion computation. A number of alternative methods exist that can be used to obtain parameters for source bodies in potential field data. Here, methods involving the derivatives of the total magnetic field are used in association with advanced image processing techniques to outline the edges of anomalous bodies more accurately. When combined with the use of methods such as downwards continuation, Euler deconvolution and pseudo-gravity transformations, which can reveal information concerning depth and susceptibility parameters, a rapidly obtained initial model may be devised allowing subsequent inversion of data to be achieved more efficiently and with increased confidence in the final result. The long-term objective is to devise a procedure which will lead to models of the 3D subsurface materials with minimal user control, and short computing time, however retaining confidence in the final result. Such methods would be applicable to a variety of other near-surface magnetic data, such as brownfield sites.

  15. Automated GOMS--to--ACT-R Model Generation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert St Amant

    Abstract: We describe a system, G2A, that produces ACT-R modelsfrom GOMS models containing hierarchical methods,visual and memory stores, and control constructs. BecauseGOMS is a more abstract formalism than ACT-R,a single GOMS operator might be plausibly translated indi#erent ways into ACT-R productions (e.g., a GOMSLook-for operator might be carried out by di#erent visualsearch strategies in ACT-R). Given a GOMS model,G2A generates

  16. IDEF3 and IDEF4 automation system requirements document and system environment models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinn, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements specification is provided for the IDEF3 and IDEF4 tools that provide automated support for IDEF3 and IDEF4 modeling. The IDEF3 method is a scenario driven process flow description capture method intended to be used by domain experts to represent the knowledge about how a particular system or process works. The IDEF3 method provides modes to represent both (1) Process Flow Description to capture the relationships between actions within the context of a specific scenario, and (2) Object State Transition to capture the allowable transitions of an object in the domain. The IDEF4 method provides a method for capturing the (1) Class Submodel or object hierarchy, (2) Method Submodel or the procedures associated with each classes of objects, and (3) the Dispath Matching or the relationships between the objects and methods in the object oriented design. The requirements specified describe the capabilities that a fully functional IDEF3 or IDEF4 automated tool should support.

  17. NeuroGPS: automated localization of neurons for brain circuits using L1 minimization model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Tingwei; Zheng, Ting; Yang, Zhongqing; Ding, Wenxiang; Li, Shiwei; Li, Jing; Zhou, Hang; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2013-04-01

    Drawing the map of neuronal circuits at microscopic resolution is important to explain how brain works. Recent progresses in fluorescence labeling and imaging techniques have enabled measuring the whole brain of a rodent like a mouse at submicron-resolution. Considering the huge volume of such datasets, automatic tracing and reconstruct the neuronal connections from the image stacks is essential to form the large scale circuits. However, the first step among which, automated location the soma across different brain areas remains a challenge. Here, we addressed this problem by introducing L1 minimization model. We developed a fully automated system, NeuronGlobalPositionSystem (NeuroGPS) that is robust to the broad diversity of shape, size and density of the neurons in a mouse brain. This method allows locating the neurons across different brain areas without human intervention. We believe this method would facilitate the analysis of the neuronal circuits for brain function and disease studies.

  18. XML Web Services Automation: A Software Engineering Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas Nicoloudis; Christine Mingins

    2002-01-01

    XML Web services are a mechanism for exposing program functionality over the Web, typically to other services. In this paper we analyse the interactions of standalone applications and Web services and investigate modeling role-based interactions. From this investigation, we engineer a tool that automates the process of generating Web services based on an application's set of compliant interface primitives. These

  19. Development of interactive graphic user interfaces for modeling reaction-based biogeochemical processes in batch systems with BIOGEOCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Li, M.; Yeh, G.

    2010-12-01

    The BIOGEOCHEM numerical model (Yeh and Fang, 2002; Fang et al., 2003) was developed with FORTRAN for simulating reaction-based geochemical and biochemical processes with mixed equilibrium and kinetic reactions in batch systems. A complete suite of reactions including aqueous complexation, adsorption/desorption, ion-exchange, redox, precipitation/dissolution, acid-base reactions, and microbial mediated reactions were embodied in this unique modeling tool. Any reaction can be treated as fast/equilibrium or slow/kinetic reaction. An equilibrium reaction is modeled with an implicit finite rate governed by a mass action equilibrium equation or by a user-specified algebraic equation. A kinetic reaction is modeled with an explicit finite rate with an elementary rate, microbial mediated enzymatic kinetics, or a user-specified rate equation. None of the existing models has encompassed this wide array of scopes. To ease the input/output learning curve using the unique feature of BIOGEOCHEM, an interactive graphic user interface was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio and .Net tools. Several user-friendly features, such as pop-up help windows, typo warning messages, and on-screen input hints, were implemented, which are robust. All input data can be real-time viewed and automated to conform with the input file format of BIOGEOCHEM. A post-processor for graphic visualizations of simulated results was also embedded for immediate demonstrations. By following data input windows step by step, errorless BIOGEOCHEM input files can be created even if users have little prior experiences in FORTRAN. With this user-friendly interface, the time effort to conduct simulations with BIOGEOCHEM can be greatly reduced.

  20. High-Level Optimization via Automated Statistical Modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric A. Brewer

    1995-01-01

    We use the models to select among several data layouts for an iterative PDE solver and to select among several sort-ing algorithms. The selection is correct more than 99% of the time on each of four platforms. In the few cases it selects suboptimally, the selected implementation performs nearly as well; that is, it always makes at least a very

  1. Environment Modeling for Automated Testing of Cloud Applications

    E-print Network

    Xie, Tao

    }@microsoft.com, {xxm, lj}@nju.edu.cn Abstract: Recently, cloud computing platforms, such as Microsoft Azure-intensive computing. To ensure high quality of cloud applications under development, developer testing (also referred Cloud Computing, Software Testing, Dynamic Symbolic Execution, Cloud Environment Model Introduction

  2. AUTOMATED TRACKING AND MODELING OF MICROTUBULE DYNAMICS , A. Altinok2

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    volume we are able to model MT dynamics us- ing machine learning techniques. In the process. of Electrical and Computer Engineering1 , Dept. of Computer Science2 , Dept. of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology3 University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 website: http

  3. Automated Decomposition of Model-based Learning Problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian C. Williams; Bill Millar

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of sensor rich, massively distributed autonomous systems is being developed that has the potential for unprecedented performance, such as smart buildings, reconfigurable factories, adaptive traffic systems and remote earth ecosystem monitor- ing. To achieve high performance these massive sys- tems will need to accurately model themselves and their environment from sensor information. Accom- plishing this on a

  4. Automated volumetric breast density derived by shape and appearance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Serghei; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John

    2014-03-01

    The image shape and texture (appearance) estimation designed for facial recognition is a novel and promising approach for application in breast imaging. The purpose of this study was to apply a shape and appearance model to automatically estimate percent breast fibroglandular volume (%FGV) using digital mammograms. We built a shape and appearance model using 2000 full-field digital mammograms from the San Francisco Mammography Registry with known %FGV measured by single energy absorptiometry method. An affine transformation was used to remove rotation, translation and scale. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to extract significant and uncorrelated components of %FGV. To build an appearance model, we transformed the breast images into the mean texture image by piecewise linear image transformation. Using PCA the image pixels grey-scale values were converted into a reduced set of the shape and texture features. The stepwise regression with forward selection and backward elimination was used to estimate the outcome %FGV with shape and appearance features and other system parameters. The shape and appearance scores were found to correlate moderately to breast %FGV, dense tissue volume and actual breast volume, body mass index (BMI) and age. The highest Pearson correlation coefficient was equal 0.77 for the first shape PCA component and actual breast volume. The stepwise regression method with ten-fold cross-validation to predict %FGV from shape and appearance variables and other system outcome parameters generated a model with a correlation of r2 = 0.8. In conclusion, a shape and appearance model demonstrated excellent feasibility to extract variables useful for automatic %FGV estimation. Further exploring and testing of this approach is warranted.

  5. An Improvement in Thermal Modelling of Automated Tape Placement Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barasinski, Anaïs; Leygue, Adrien; Soccard, Eric; Poitou, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    The thermoplastic tape placement process offers the possibility of manufacturing large laminated composite parts with all kinds of geometries (double curved i.e.). This process is based on the fusion bonding of a thermoplastic tape on a substrate. It has received a growing interest during last years because of its non autoclave abilities. In order to control and optimize the quality of the manufactured part, we need to predict the temperature field throughout the processing of the laminate. In this work, we focus on a thermal modeling of this process which takes in account the imperfect bonding existing between the different layers of the substrate by introducing thermal contact resistance in the model. This study is leaning on experimental results which inform us that the value of the thermal resistance evolves with temperature and pressure applied on the material.

  6. An Improvement in Thermal Modelling of Automated Tape Placement Process

    SciTech Connect

    Barasinski, Anaies; Leygue, Adrien; Poitou, Arnaud [GEM, UMR CNRS-Centrale Nantes 1 rue de la Noe, BP 92101, F-44321 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Soccard, Eric [EADS IW, Techno campus EMC2, Allee du Chaffault, 44340 Bouguenais (France)

    2011-01-17

    The thermoplastic tape placement process offers the possibility of manufacturing large laminated composite parts with all kinds of geometries (double curved i.e.). This process is based on the fusion bonding of a thermoplastic tape on a substrate. It has received a growing interest during last years because of its non autoclave abilities.In order to control and optimize the quality of the manufactured part, we need to predict the temperature field throughout the processing of the laminate. In this work, we focus on a thermal modeling of this process which takes in account the imperfect bonding existing between the different layers of the substrate by introducing thermal contact resistance in the model. This study is leaning on experimental results which inform us that the value of the thermal resistance evolves with temperature and pressure applied on the material.

  7. Automated Petri-net modelling based on production management data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Gradišar

    2007-01-01

    Timed Petri nets can be used for the modelling and analysis of a wide range of concurrent discrete-event systems, e.g. production systems. The present paper describes how to do so while starting from the information about the structure of a production facility and about the products usually given in production-data management systems. We describe a method for using these data

  8. Ab-initio molecular modeling of interfaces in tantalum-carbon system

    SciTech Connect

    Balani, Kantesh; Mungole, Tarang [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur-208016 (India); Bakshi, Srinivasa Rao [Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33174 (United States); Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Agarwal, Arvind [Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33174 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Processing of ultrahigh temperature TaC ceramic material with sintering additives of B{sub 4}C and reinforcement of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) gives rise to possible formation of several interfaces (Ta{sub 2}C-TaC, TaC-CNT, Ta{sub 2}C-CNT, TaB{sub 2}-TaC, and TaB{sub 2}-CNT) that could influence the resultant properties. Current work focuses on interfaces developed during spark plasma sintering of TaC-system and performing ab initio molecular modeling of the interfaces generated during processing of TaC-B{sub 4}C and TaC-CNT composites. The energy of the various interfaces has been evaluated and compared with TaC-Ta{sub 2}C interface. The iso-surface electronic contours are extracted from the calculations eliciting the enhanced stability of TaC-CNT interface by 72.2%. CNTs form stable interfaces with Ta{sub 2}C and TaB{sub 2} phases with a reduction in the energy by 35.8% and 40.4%, respectively. The computed Ta-C-B interfaces are also compared with experimentally observed interfaces in high resolution TEM images.

  9. Software data news Single bubble dissolution model The graphical user interface SiBu-GUI

    E-print Network

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Software data news Single bubble dissolution model ­ The graphical user interface SiBu-GUI Jens-mail: greinert@nioz.nl Availability and documentation: Executable, documentation and demo data at http://users

  10. AIDE, A SYSTEM FOR DEVELOPING INTERACTIVE USER INTERFACES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent progress in environmental science and engineering has seen increasing use of interactive interfaces for computer models. nitial applications centered on the use of interactive software to assist in building complicated input sequences required by batch programs. rom these ...

  11. Sketch-based interfaces for modeling and users' needs: Redefining connections

    E-print Network

    Elsen, Catherine

    The goal of this paper is to reexamine assumptions about sketch-based interfaces for modeling in the context of designers' needs and practices. Research questions examine (a) the type of sketch support and (b) the timing ...

  12. Charged copolymers at an interface : a model E. Bringuier

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    the conformation and free energy of diblock copolymers containing a neutral hydrophobic and a water-soluble and water-insoluble, whereas the second one is a water-soluble polyelectrolyte. We assume soluble dans l'eau, à une interface eau-huile ou eau-air. On restreint l'étude à la séquence chargée

  13. Models and Methods for HW\\/SW Intellectual Property Interfacing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ross B. Ortega

    1998-01-01

    This paper focuses on the problem of enabling system companies toquickly integrate IPs from different sources, and adapt them to differentmanufacturing technologies. An evolutionary approach from currentmethodologies is possible with appropriate and extensive CAD support.We cover the main aspects of interfacing Intellectual Property, both inhardware and software form, in an embedded system design context. Inparticular, we review the main approaches

  14. An architecture and model for cognitive engineering simulation analysis - Application to advanced aviation automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Smith, Barry R.

    1993-01-01

    The process of designing crew stations for large-scale, complex automated systems is made difficult because of the flexibility of roles that the crew can assume, and by the rapid rate at which system designs become fixed. Modern cockpit automation frequently involves multiple layers of control and display technology in which human operators must exercise equipment in augmented, supervisory, and fully automated control modes. In this context, we maintain that effective human-centered design is dependent on adequate models of human/system performance in which representations of the equipment, the human operator(s), and the mission tasks are available to designers for manipulation and modification. The joint Army-NASA Aircrew/Aircraft Integration (A3I) Program, with its attendant Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System (MIDAS), was initiated to meet this challenge. MIDAS provides designers with a test bed for analyzing human-system integration in an environment in which both cognitive human function and 'intelligent' machine function are described in similar terms. This distributed object-oriented simulation system, its architecture and assumptions, and our experiences from its application in advanced aviation crew stations are described.

  15. Connection of envelope functions at semiconductor heterointerfaces. I. Interface matrix calculated in simplest models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Ando; S. Wakahara; H. Akera

    1989-01-01

    The boundary conditions for the envelope functions at semiconductor heterointerfaces are calculated. They are obtained in a form of a 2×2 interface matrix, which gives two linear relations among the envelopes and their derivatives at interfaces. The two models considered are a linear-chain tight-binding model consisting of a cation s orbital and an anion p orbital and an empirical pseudopotential

  16. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model-Finite Element Analysis Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Carol

    2002-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts reflecting every detail of the finished product. Ideally, in the aerospace industry, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) provide numerical. control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in aircraft and space vehicles. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. Presently, the process of preparing CAD models for FEA consumes a great deal of the analyst's time.

  17. Statistical modelling of networked human-automation performance using working memory capacity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nisar; de Visser, Ewart; Shaw, Tyler; Mohamed-Ameen, Amira; Campbell, Mark; Parasuraman, Raja

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the challenging problem of modelling the interaction between individual attentional limitations and decision-making performance in networked human-automation system tasks. Analysis of real experimental data from a task involving networked supervision of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles by human participants shows that both task load and network message quality affect performance, but that these effects are modulated by individual differences in working memory (WM) capacity. These insights were used to assess three statistical approaches for modelling and making predictions with real experimental networked supervisory performance data: classical linear regression, non-parametric Gaussian processes and probabilistic Bayesian networks. It is shown that each of these approaches can help designers of networked human-automated systems cope with various uncertainties in order to accommodate future users by linking expected operating conditions and performance from real experimental data to observable cognitive traits like WM capacity. Practitioner Summary: Working memory (WM) capacity helps account for inter-individual variability in operator performance in networked unmanned aerial vehicle supervisory tasks. This is useful for reliable performance prediction near experimental conditions via linear models; robust statistical prediction beyond experimental conditions via Gaussian process models and probabilistic inference about unknown task conditions/WM capacities via Bayesian network models. PMID:24308716

  18. Intelligent sensor-model automated control of PMR-15 autoclave processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, S.; Kranbuehl, D.; Loos, A.; Hinds, B.; Koury, J.

    1992-01-01

    An intelligent sensor model system has been built and used for automated control of the PMR-15 cure process in the autoclave. The system uses frequency-dependent FM sensing (FDEMS), the Loos processing model, and the Air Force QPAL intelligent software shell. The Loos model is used to predict and optimize the cure process including the time-temperature dependence of the extent of reaction, flow, and part consolidation. The FDEMS sensing system in turn monitors, in situ, the removal of solvent, changes in the viscosity, reaction advancement and cure completion in the mold continuously throughout the processing cycle. The sensor information is compared with the optimum processing conditions from the model. The QPAL composite cure control system allows comparison of the sensor monitoring with the model predictions to be broken down into a series of discrete steps and provides a language for making decisions on what to do next regarding time-temperature and pressure.

  19. Automated Testing of Security Functions Using a Combined Model and Interface-Driven Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ramaswamy Chandramouli; Mark R. Blackburn

    2004-01-01

    Independent Security Functional Testing (Testing of security functions of a product or system for conformance to published behavior) is often given a low priority in traditional security evaluations, due to combination of cost and technical considerations, except in the case of high assurance products. However we argue that the overall security of an Enterprise IT environment depends upon the weakest

  20. Toward adaptive conversational interfaces: Modeling speech convergence with animated personas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon L. Oviatt; Courtney Darves; Rachel Coulston

    2004-01-01

    The design of robust interfaces that process conversational speech is a challenging research direction largely because users' spoken language is so variable. This research explored a new dimension of speaker stylistic variation by examining whether users' speech converges systematically with the text-to-speech (TTS) heard from a software partner. To pursue this question, a study was conducted in which twenty-four 7

  1. Effects of modeling errors on trajectory predictions in air traffic control automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Michael R. C.; Zhao, Yiyuan; Slattery, Rhonda

    1996-01-01

    Air traffic control automation synthesizes aircraft trajectories for the generation of advisories. Trajectory computation employs models of aircraft performances and weather conditions. In contrast, actual trajectories are flown in real aircraft under actual conditions. Since synthetic trajectories are used in landing scheduling and conflict probing, it is very important to understand the differences between computed trajectories and actual trajectories. This paper examines the effects of aircraft modeling errors on the accuracy of trajectory predictions in air traffic control automation. Three-dimensional point-mass aircraft equations of motion are assumed to be able to generate actual aircraft flight paths. Modeling errors are described as uncertain parameters or uncertain input functions. Pilot or autopilot feedback actions are expressed as equality constraints to satisfy control objectives. A typical trajectory is defined by a series of flight segments with different control objectives for each flight segment and conditions that define segment transitions. A constrained linearization approach is used to analyze trajectory differences caused by various modeling errors by developing a linear time varying system that describes the trajectory errors, with expressions to transfer the trajectory errors across moving segment transitions. A numerical example is presented for a complete commercial aircraft descent trajectory consisting of several flight segments.

  2. Aspects of automation mode confusion

    E-print Network

    Wheeler, Paul H. (Paul Harrison)

    2007-01-01

    Complex systems such as commercial aircraft are difficult for operators to manage. Designers, intending to simplify the interface between the operator and the system, have introduced automation to assist the operator. In ...

  3. Automated optimization of water-water interaction parameters for a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Joseph C; Chiu, See-Wing; Kirby, Peter; Jakobsson, Eric; Pandit, Sagar A

    2014-02-13

    We have developed an automated parameter optimization software framework (ParOpt) that implements the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm and applied it to a coarse-grained polarizable water model. The model employs a tabulated, modified Morse potential with decoupled short- and long-range interactions incorporating four water molecules per interaction site. Polarizability is introduced by the addition of a harmonic angle term defined among three charged points within each bead. The target function for parameter optimization was based on the experimental density, surface tension, electric field permittivity, and diffusion coefficient. The model was validated by comparison of statistical quantities with experimental observation. We found very good performance of the optimization procedure and good agreement of the model with experiment. PMID:24460506

  4. The use of analytical models in human-computer interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugerty, Leo

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a large number of human-computer interface (HCI) researchers have investigated building analytical models of the user, which are often implemented as computer models. These models simulate the cognitive processes and task knowledge of the user in ways that allow a researcher or designer to estimate various aspects of an interface's usability, such as when user errors are likely to occur. This information can lead to design improvements. Analytical models can supplement design guidelines by providing designers rigorous ways of analyzing the information-processing requirements of specific tasks (i.e., task analysis). These models offer the potential of improving early designs and replacing some of the early phases of usability testing, thus reducing the cost of interface design. This paper describes some of the many analytical models that are currently being developed and evaluates the usefulness of analytical models for human-computer interface design. This paper will focus on computational, analytical models, such as the GOMS model, rather than less formal, verbal models, because the more exact predictions and task descriptions of computational models may be useful to designers. The paper also discusses some of the practical requirements for using analytical models in complex design organizations such as NASA.

  5. MODELING FRACTURES AND BARRIERS AS INTERFACES FOR FLOW IN POROUS MEDIA

    E-print Network

    MODELING FRACTURES AND BARRIERS AS INTERFACES FOR FLOW IN POROUS MEDIA VINCENT MARTIN, J Vol. 26, No. 5, pp. 1667­1691 Abstract. We consider a fractured porous medium that is studied at a scale such that the fractures can be modeled individually. Models for flow in which the fractures

  6. Shock modeling of the head-media interface in an operational hard disk drive

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric M. Jayson; Paul W. Smith; Frank E. Talke

    2003-01-01

    A complete model of an operational hard disk drive (HDD) subject to shock loads is developed to investigate the response of the head\\/media interface. The model is a coupled solution of the structural components and the hydrodynamic lubrication between the magnetic recording head and the disk surface. The structural model is a finite element simulation of the HDD using commercially

  7. Generating Phenotypical Erroneous Human Behavior to Evaluate Human-automation Interaction Using Model Checking

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Matthew L.; Bass, Ellen J.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2012-01-01

    Breakdowns in complex systems often occur as a result of system elements interacting in unanticipated ways. In systems with human operators, human-automation interaction associated with both normative and erroneous human behavior can contribute to such failures. Model-driven design and analysis techniques provide engineers with formal methods tools and techniques capable of evaluating how human behavior can contribute to system failures. This paper presents a novel method for automatically generating task analytic models encompassing both normative and erroneous human behavior from normative task models. The generated erroneous behavior is capable of replicating Hollnagel’s zero-order phenotypes of erroneous action for omissions, jumps, repetitions, and intrusions. Multiple phenotypical acts can occur in sequence, thus allowing for the generation of higher order phenotypes. The task behavior model pattern capable of generating erroneous behavior can be integrated into a formal system model so that system safety properties can be formally verified with a model checker. This allows analysts to prove that a human-automation interactive system (as represented by the model) will or will not satisfy safety properties with both normative and generated erroneous human behavior. We present benchmarks related to the size of the statespace and verification time of models to show how the erroneous human behavior generation process scales. We demonstrate the method with a case study: the operation of a radiation therapy machine. A potential problem resulting from a generated erroneous human action is discovered. A design intervention is presented which prevents this problem from occurring. We discuss how our method could be used to evaluate larger applications and recommend future paths of development. PMID:23105914

  8. A conceptual model of the automated credibility assessment of the volunteered geographic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, N. H.; Jackson, M. J.; Ishak, M. H. I.

    2014-02-01

    The use of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) in collecting, sharing and disseminating geospatially referenced information on the Web is increasingly common. The potentials of this localized and collective information have been seen to complement the maintenance process of authoritative mapping data sources and in realizing the development of Digital Earth. The main barrier to the use of this data in supporting this bottom up approach is the credibility (trust), completeness, accuracy, and quality of both the data input and outputs generated. The only feasible approach to assess these data is by relying on an automated process. This paper describes a conceptual model of indicators (parameters) and practical approaches to automated assess the credibility of information contributed through the VGI including map mashups, Geo Web and crowd - sourced based applications. There are two main components proposed to be assessed in the conceptual model - metadata and data. The metadata component comprises the indicator of the hosting (websites) and the sources of data / information. The data component comprises the indicators to assess absolute and relative data positioning, attribute, thematic, temporal and geometric correctness and consistency. This paper suggests approaches to assess the components. To assess the metadata component, automated text categorization using supervised machine learning is proposed. To assess the correctness and consistency in the data component, we suggest a matching validation approach using the current emerging technologies from Linked Data infrastructures and using third party reviews validation. This study contributes to the research domain that focuses on the credibility, trust and quality issues of data contributed by web citizen providers.

  9. Automation's Effect on Library Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakshinamurti, Ganga

    1985-01-01

    Reports on survey studying the human-machine interface in Canadian university, public, and special libraries. Highlights include position category and educational background of 118 participants, participants' feelings toward automation, physical effects of automation, diffusion in decision making, interpersonal communication, future trends,…

  10. Semi-automated Blastocyst Microinjection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonardo Mattos; Edward Grant; Randy Thresher

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the design and development of a semi-automated system for microinjection of embryonic stem cells into blastocysts. Semi-automation is achieved through treating cell microinjection as a computer game. In this first phase, cell manipulation and microinjection is carried out using a joystick and an interactive graphical user interface (GUI). For this system to be developed

  11. A multilayered sharp interface model of coupled freshwater and saltwater flow in coastal systems: model development and application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1990-01-01

    The model allows for regional simulation of coastal groundwater conditions, including the effects of saltwater dynamics on the freshwater system. Vertically integrated freshwater and saltwater flow equations incorporating the interface boundary condition are solved within each aquifer. Leakage through confining layers is calculated by Darcy's law, accounting for density differences across the layer. The locations of the interface tip and toe, within grid blocks, are tracked by linearly extrapolating the position of the interface. The model has been verified using available analytical solutions and experimental results and applied to the Soquel-Aptos basin, Santa Cruz County, California. -from Author

  12. limmaGUI: A graphical user interface for linear modeling of microarray data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James M. Wettenhall; Gordon K. Smyth

    2004-01-01

    Summary: limmaGUI is a graphical user interface (GUI) based on R-Tcl\\/Tk for the exploration and linear modeling of data from two-color spotted microarray experiments, espe- cially the assessment of differential expression in complex experiments. limmaGUI provides an interface to the statistical methods of the limma package for R, and is itself implemented as an R package. The software provides point

  13. Interface delamination in plastic IC packages induced by thermal loading and vapor pressure - a micromechanics model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Liu; L. Cheng; Y.-W. Zhang

    2003-01-01

    A micromechanics model and an associated computational scheme are proposed to study interface delamination in plastic integrated circuit (IC) packages induced by thermal loading and vapor pressure. The die and die-pad are taken as elastic materials, while the die-attach and molding compound are taken as elasto-visco-plastic materials. The interface between molding compound and the die-pad is characterized by a cohesive

  14. Complex dynamics generated by a sharp interface model of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Frankel; V. Roytburd; G. Sivashinsky

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents results of a numerical study of a free-interface problem modelling self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (solid combustion) in a one-dimensional infinite medium. Evolution of the free interface exhibits a remarkable range of dynamical scenarios such as finite and infinite sequences of period doubling; the latter leading to chaotic oscillations, reverse sequences and infinite period bifurcation that may replace the

  15. Pilot interaction with cockpit automation 2: An experimental study of pilots' model and awareness of the Flight Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine B.; Woods, David D.

    1994-01-01

    Technological developments have made it possible to automate more and more functions on the commercial aviation flight deck and in other dynamic high-consequence domains. This increase in the degrees of freedom in design has shifted questions away from narrow technological feasibility. Many concerned groups, from designers and operators to regulators and researchers, have begun to ask questions about how we should use the possibilities afforded by technology skillfully to support and expand human performance. In this article, we report on an experimental study that addressed these questions by examining pilot interaction with the current generation of flight deck automation. Previous results on pilot-automation interaction derived from pilot surveys, incident reports, and training observations have produced a corpus of features and contexts in which human-machine coordination is likely to break down (e.g., automation surprises). We used these data to design a simulated flight scenario that contained a variety of probes designed to reveal pilots' mental model of one major component of flight deck automation: the Flight Management System (FMS). The events within the scenario were also designed to probe pilots' ability to apply their knowledge and understanding in specific flight contexts and to examine their ability to track the status and behavior of the automated system (mode awareness). Although pilots were able to 'make the system work' in standard situations, the results reveal a variety of latent problems in pilot-FMS interaction that can affect pilot performance in nonnormal time critical situations.

  16. An automated method to build groundwater model hydrostratigraphy from airborne electromagnetic data and lithological borehole logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, P. A.; Foged, N.; He, X.; Christiansen, A. V.; Refsgaard, J. C.; Auken, E.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2015-02-01

    Large-scale integrated hydrological models are important decision support tools in water resources management. The largest source of uncertainty in such models is the hydrostratigraphic model. Geometry and configuration of hydrogeological units are often poorly determined from hydrogeological data alone. Due to sparse sampling in space, lithological borehole logs may overlook structures that are important for groundwater flow at larger scales. Good spatial coverage along with high spatial resolution makes airborne time-domain electromagnetic (AEM) data valuable for the structural input to large-scale groundwater models. We present a novel method to automatically integrate large AEM data-sets and lithological information into large-scale hydrological models. Clay-fraction maps are produced by translating geophysical resistivity into clay-fraction values using lithological borehole information. Voxel models of electrical resistivity and clay fraction are classified into hydrostratigraphic zones using k-means clustering. Hydraulic conductivity values of the zones are estimated by hydrological calibration using hydraulic head and stream discharge observations. The method is applied to a Danish case study. Benchmarking hydrological performance by comparison of simulated hydrological state variables, the cluster model performed competitively. Calibrations of 11 hydrostratigraphic cluster models with 1-11 hydraulic conductivity zones showed improved hydrological performance with increasing number of clusters. Beyond the 5-cluster model hydrological performance did not improve. Due to reproducibility and possibility of method standardization and automation, we believe that hydrostratigraphic model generation with the proposed method has important prospects for groundwater models used in water resources management.

  17. Toward the virtual cell: Automated approaches to building models of subcellular organization “learned” from microscopy images

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Taráz E.; Li, Jieyue; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    We review state-of-the-art computational methods for constructing, from image data, generative statistical models of cellular and nuclear shapes and the arrangement of subcellular structures and proteins within them. These automated approaches allow consistent analysis of images of cells for the purposes of learning the range of possible phenotypes, discriminating between them, and informing further investigation. Such models can also provide realistic geometry and initial protein locations to simulations in order to better understand cellular and subcellular processes. To determine the structures of cellular components and how proteins and other molecules are distributed among them, the generative modeling approach described here can be coupled with high throughput imaging technology to infer and represent subcellular organization from data with few a priori assumptions. We also discuss potential improvements to these methods and future directions for research. PMID:22777818

  18. Automated High-Throughput Characterization of Single Neurons by Means of Simplified Spiking Models

    PubMed Central

    Hagens, Olivier; Naud, Richard; Koch, Christof; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2015-01-01

    Single-neuron models are useful not only for studying the emergent properties of neural circuits in large-scale simulations, but also for extracting and summarizing in a principled way the information contained in electrophysiological recordings. Here we demonstrate that, using a convex optimization procedure we previously introduced, a Generalized Integrate-and-Fire model can be accurately fitted with a limited amount of data. The model is capable of predicting both the spiking activity and the subthreshold dynamics of different cell types, and can be used for online characterization of neuronal properties. A protocol is proposed that, combined with emergent technologies for automatic patch-clamp recordings, permits automated, in vitro high-throughput characterization of single neurons. PMID:26083597

  19. Carleton University, TR SCE-06-06, Version 2 August 2006 Automated Traceability Analysis for UML Model

    E-print Network

    Carleton University

    Carleton University, TR SCE-06-06, Version 2 August 2006 1 Automated Traceability Analysis for UML}@sce.carleton.ca ABSTRACT During iterative, UML-based software development, various UML diagrams, modeling the same system analysis requires that some traceability links be established between model elements at the two levels

  20. Detection of altered hippocampal morphology in multiple sclerosis-associated depression using automated surface mesh modeling

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Stefan M.; O’Connor, Mary-Frances; Gill, Raja; Kern, Kyle C.; Shi, Yonggang; Henry, Roland G.; Pelletier, Daniel; Mohr, David C.; Sicotte, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Depression is very common in multiple sclerosis (MS) but the underlying biological mechanisms are poorly understood. The hippocampus plays a key role in mood regulation and is implicated in the pathogenesis of depression. This study utilizes volumetric and shape analyses of the hippocampus to characterize neuroanatomical correlates of depression in MS. A cross-section of 109 female MS patients was evaluated. Bilateral hippocampi were segmented from MRI scans (volumetric T1-weighted, 1mm3) using automated tools. Shape analysis was performed using surface mesh modeling. Depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale. Eighty-three subjects were classified as low depression (CES-D 0-20) versus 26 subjects with high depression (CES-D ? 21). Right hippocampal volumes (p=0.04) were smaller in the high depression versus the low depression groups, but there was no significant difference in left hippocampal volumes. Surface rendering analysis revealed hippocampal shape changes in depressed MS patients were clustered in the right hippocampus. Significant associations were found between right hippocampal shape and affective symptoms but not vegetative symptoms of depression. Our results suggested that regionally clustered reductions in hippocampal thickness can be detected by automated surface mesh modeling and may be a biological substrate of MS depression in female patients. PMID:22847919

  1. Detection of altered hippocampal morphology in multiple sclerosis-associated depression using automated surface mesh modeling.

    PubMed

    Gold, Stefan M; O'Connor, Mary-Frances; Gill, Raja; Kern, Kyle C; Shi, Yonggang; Henry, Roland G; Pelletier, Daniel; Mohr, David C; Sicotte, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Depression is very common in multiple sclerosis (MS) but the underlying biological mechanisms are poorly understood. The hippocampus plays a key role in mood regulation and is implicated in the pathogenesis of depression. This study utilizes volumetric and shape analyses of the hippocampus to characterize neuroanatomical correlates of depression in MS. A cross-section of 109 female patients with MS was evaluated. Bilateral hippocampi were segmented from MRI scans (volumetric T1 -weighted, 1 mm(3) ) using automated tools. Shape analysis was performed using surface mesh modeling. Depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale. Eighty-three subjects were classified as low depression (CES-D 0-20) versus 26 subjects with high depression (CES-D ? 21). Right hippocampal volumes (P = 0.04) were smaller in the high depression versus the low depression groups, but there was no significant difference in left hippocampal volumes. Surface rendering analysis revealed that hippocampal shape changes in depressed patients with MS were clustered in the right hippocampus. Significant associations were found between right hippocampal shape and affective symptoms but not vegetative symptoms of depression. Our results suggested that regionally clustered reductions in hippocampal thickness can be detected by automated surface mesh modeling and may be a biological substrate of MS depression in female patients. PMID:22847919

  2. Determination of friction models for metallic die–workpiece interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Hayhurst; M. W. Chan

    2005-01-01

    A two-parameter friction model is used which combines the Coulomb friction model and the friction factor yield stress model. The drawback of this two-parameter model is the complex nature of its calibration. In this paper a new technique is proposed to calibrate the model, which utilizes two testpiece geometries, namely the solid cylindrical compression testpiece and the ring compression testpiece.

  3. Closed-Loop Modeling in Future Automation System Engineering and Validation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valeriy Vyatkin; Hans-Michael Hanisch; Cheng Pang; Chia-Han Yang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new framework for design and validation of industrial automation systems based on systematic application of formal methods. The engineering methodology proposed in this paper is based on the component design of automated manufacturing systems from intelligent mechatronic components. Foundations of such componentspsila information infrastructure are the new IEC 61499 architecture and the automation object concept. It

  4. Mathematical Modeling Research to Support the Development of Automated Insulin-Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Steil, Garry M.; Reifman, Jaques

    2009-01-01

    The world leaders in glycemia modeling convened during the Eighth Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting in Bethesda, Maryland, on 14 November 2008, to discuss the current practices in mathematical modeling and make recommendations for its use in developing automated insulin-delivery systems. This report summarizes the collective views of the 25 participating experts in addressing the following four topics: current practices in modeling efforts for closed-loop control; framework for exchange of information and collaboration among research centers; major barriers for the development of accurate models; and key tasks for developing algorithms to build closed-loop control systems. Among the participants, the following main conclusions and recommendations were widely supported: Physiologic variance represents the single largest technical challenge to creating accurate simulation models.A Web site describing different models and the data supporting them should be made publically available, with funding agencies and journals requiring investigators to provide open access to both models and data.Existing simulation models should be compared and contrasted, using the same evaluation and validation criteria, to better assess the state of the art, understand any inherent limitations in the models, and identify gaps in data and/or model capability. PMID:20144371

  5. Mathematical modeling research to support the development of automated insulin-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Steil, Garry M; Reifman, Jaques

    2009-03-01

    The world leaders in glycemia modeling convened during the Eighth Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting in Bethesda, Maryland, on 14 November 2008, to discuss the current practices in mathematical modeling and make recommendations for its use in developing automated insulin-delivery systems. This report summarizes the collective views of the 25 participating experts in addressing the following four topics: current practices in modeling efforts for closed-loop control; framework for exchange of information and collaboration among research centers; major barriers for the development of accurate models; and key tasks for developing algorithms to build closed-loop control systems. Among the participants, the following main conclusions and recommendations were widely supported: 1. Physiologic variance represents the single largest technical challenge to creating accurate simulation models. 2. A Web site describing different models and the data supporting them should be made publically available, with funding agencies and journals requiring investigators to provide open access to both models and data. 3. Existing simulation models should be compared and contrasted, using the same evaluation and validation criteria, to better assess the state of the art, understand any inherent limitations in the models, and identify gaps in data and/or model capability. PMID:20144371

  6. A Demonstration of Automated DNA Sequencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latourelle, Sandra; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    Details a simulation that employs a paper-and-pencil model to demonstrate the principles behind automated DNA sequencing. Discusses the advantages of automated sequencing as well as the chemistry of automated DNA sequencing. (DDR)

  7. An automated shell for management of parametric dispersion/deposition modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Paddock, R.A.; Absil, M.J.G.; Peerenboom, J.P.; Newsom, D.E.; North, M.J.; Coskey, R.J. Jr.

    1994-03-01

    In 1993, the US Army tasked Argonne National Laboratory to perform a study of chemical agent dispersion and deposition for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program using an existing Army computer model. The study explored a wide range of situations in terms of six parameters: agent type, quantity released, liquid droplet size, release height, wind speed, and atmospheric stability. A number of discrete values of interest were chosen for each parameter resulting in a total of 18,144 possible different combinations of parameter values. Therefore, the need arose for a systematic method to assemble the large number of input streams for the model, filter out unrealistic combinations of parameter values, run the model, and extract the results of interest from the extensive model output. To meet these needs, we designed an automated shell for the computer model. The shell processed the inputs, ran the model, and reported the results of interest. By doing so, the shell compressed the time needed to perform the study and freed the researchers to focus on the evaluation and interpretation of the model predictions. The results of the study are still under review by the Army and other agencies; therefore, it would be premature to discuss the results in this paper. However, the design of the shell could be applied to other hazards for which multiple-parameter modeling is performed. This paper describes the design and operation of the shell as an example for other hazards and models.

  8. A correction for Dupuit-Forchheimer interface flow models of seawater intrusion in unconfined coastal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koussis, Antonis D.; Mazi, Katerina; Riou, Fabien; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-06-01

    Interface flow models that use the Dupuit-Forchheimer (DF) approximation for assessing the freshwater lens and the seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers lack representation of the gap through which fresh groundwater discharges to the sea. In these models, the interface outcrops unrealistically at the same point as the free surface, is too shallow and intersects the aquifer base too far inland, thus overestimating an intruding seawater front. To correct this shortcoming of DF-type interface solutions for unconfined aquifers, we here adapt the outflow gap estimate of an analytical 2-D interface solution for infinitely thick aquifers to fit the 50%-salinity contour of variable-density solutions for finite-depth aquifers. We further improve the accuracy of the interface toe location predicted with depth-integrated DF interface solutions by ?20% (relative to the 50%-salinity contour of variable-density solutions) by combining the outflow-gap adjusted aquifer depth at the sea with a transverse-dispersion adjusted density ratio (Pool and Carrera, 2011), appropriately modified for unconfined flow. The effectiveness of the combined correction is exemplified for two regional Mediterranean aquifers, the Israel Coastal and Nile Delta aquifers.

  9. User interface model discovery: towards a generic approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andy Gimblett; Harold W. Thimbleby

    2010-01-01

    UI model discovery is a lightweight formal method in which a model of an interactive system is automatically discovered by exploring the system's state space, simulating the actions of a user; such models are then amenable to automatic analysis targetting structural usability concerns. This paper specifies UI model discovery in some detail, providing a formal, generic and language-neutral API and

  10. Focusing Graphical User Interfaces in Model-Driven Software Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Link; Thomas Schuster; Philip Hoyer; Sebastian Abeck

    2008-01-01

    To meet fast changing demands on modern software architectures the ambition to shorten and improve software development processes has increased. The approach of model-driven software development focuses models as specification of software and on transformations of those models to finally get source code. The advantage of the model-driven approach still has to be proven because a continuous tool- supported transformation

  11. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces D. Schebarchov,1

    E-print Network

    Schulze, Tim

    - dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal with an appropriate level of coarse-graining. Phase field crystal (PFC)2 modelling is one possible way forwardDegenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces D. Schebarchov,1 T. P

  12. A spoken interface based on the contextual modelling of smart homes

    E-print Network

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    A spoken interface based on the contextual modelling of smart homes Pablo A. Haya and Germán information can enhance user interaction within a smart home environment. We propose that the context gathered implemented a middleware between the model of the smart home and the physical world in such a way that changes

  13. Modeling reach for use in user interface design Aaron P. Toney, Bruce H. Thomas

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Bruce

    anthropometric models. Designers of everyday objects like buildings, cars, and appliances regularly use anthropometric models to tailor their designs to their intended user population. Currently, creating user on the anthropometric tools currently used by other design communities to create user interfaces that are dynamically

  14. A Tactile/Haptic Interface Object Reference Model USERLab, Department of Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Carter, Jim

    A Tactile/Haptic Interface Object Reference Model Jim Carter USERLab, Department of Computer In this paper, we describe present a reference model for evaluating and designing individual tactile or haptic in individual and groups of tactile or haptic interaction objects. Categories and Subject Descriptors H.5.2 User

  15. Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    of Cyberinfrastructure for End-to-End Environmental Explorations (C4E4), this multi-disciplinary team utilizes current, fusion of data and models has been undertaken by the C4E4 team over the St. Joseph watershed in Northern/hydrological modeling interface using a Surface Water Analysis Tool (SWAT). The focus of the current paper is to discuss

  16. Evaluation of the User Interface in an Information Retrieval System: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tague, Jean; Schultz, Ryan

    1989-01-01

    Presents an evaluation model that is appropriate to the assessment of the effect, from the perspective of the user, of variations in the interface to an information retrieval system. The application of the model to the evaluation of an experimental online catalog is described. (11 references) (Author/CLB)

  17. Rethinking Design Process: Using 3D Digital Models as an Interface in Collaborative Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Suining

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study for an alternative design process by integrating a designer-user collaborative session with digital models. The collaborative session took place in a 3D AutoCAD class for a real world project. The 3D models served as an interface for designer-user collaboration during the design process. Students not only learned…

  18. CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY TOOL (CMT): A GIS-BASED AUTOMATED EXTRACTION MODEL FOR CHANNEL GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    JUDI, DAVID [Los Alamos National Laboratory; KALYANAPU, ALFRED [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BERSCHEID, ALAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-17

    This paper describes an automated Channel Morphology Tool (CMT) developed in ArcGIS 9.1 environment. The CMT creates cross-sections along a stream centerline and uses a digital elevation model (DEM) to create station points with elevations along each of the cross-sections. The generated cross-sections may then be exported into a hydraulic model. Along with the rapid cross-section generation the CMT also eliminates any cross-section overlaps that might occur due to the sinuosity of the channels using the Cross-section Overlap Correction Algorithm (COCoA). The CMT was tested by extracting cross-sections from a 5-m DEM for a 50-km channel length in Houston, Texas. The extracted cross-sections were compared directly with surveyed cross-sections in terms of the cross-section area. Results indicated that the CMT-generated cross-sections satisfactorily matched the surveyed data.

  19. Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool is a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) interface jointly developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service, and the University of Arizona to a...

  20. Conservative phase-field lattice Boltzmann model for interface tracking equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Martin; Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2015-06-01

    Based on the phase-field theory, we propose a conservative lattice Boltzmann method to track the interface between two different fluids. The presented model recovers the conservative phase-field equation and conserves mass locally and globally. Two entirely different approaches are used to calculate the gradient of the phase field, which is needed in computation of the normal to the interface. One approach uses finite-difference stencils similar to many existing lattice Boltzmann models for tracking the two-phase interface, while the other one invokes central moments to calculate the gradient of the phase field without any finite differences involved. The former approach suffers from the nonlocality of the collision operator while the latter is entirely local making it highly suitable for massive parallel implementation. Several benchmark problems are carried out to assess the accuracy and stability of the proposed model.

  1. A methodology for model-based development and automated verification of software for aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L.; Schatalov, M.; Hagner, M.; Goltz, U.; Maibaum, O.

    Today's software for aerospace systems typically is very complex. This is due to the increasing number of features as well as the high demand for safety, reliability, and quality. This complexity also leads to significant higher software development costs. To handle the software complexity, a structured development process is necessary. Additionally, compliance with relevant standards for quality assurance is a mandatory concern. To assure high software quality, techniques for verification are necessary. Besides traditional techniques like testing, automated verification techniques like model checking become more popular. The latter examine the whole state space and, consequently, result in a full test coverage. Nevertheless, despite the obvious advantages, this technique is rarely yet used for the development of aerospace systems. In this paper, we propose a tool-supported methodology for the development and formal verification of safety-critical software in the aerospace domain. The methodology relies on the V-Model and defines a comprehensive work flow for model-based software development as well as automated verification in compliance to the European standard series ECSS-E-ST-40C. Furthermore, our methodology supports the generation and deployment of code. For tool support we use the tool SCADE Suite (Esterel Technology), an integrated design environment that covers all the requirements for our methodology. The SCADE Suite is well established in avionics and defense, rail transportation, energy and heavy equipment industries. For evaluation purposes, we apply our approach to an up-to-date case study of the TET-1 satellite bus. In particular, the attitude and orbit control software is considered. The behavioral models for the subsystem are developed, formally verified, and optimized.

  2. Drawing interfaces : building geometric models with hand-drawn sketches

    E-print Network

    Branda, Ewan E. (Ewan Edward), 1964-

    1998-01-01

    Architects work on drawings and models, not buildings. Today, in many architectural practices, drawings and models are produced in digital format using Computer-aided Design (CAD) tools. Unquestionably, digital media have ...

  3. Finite element analysis of thermal residual stresses at graded ceramic-metal interfaces. I - Model description and geometrical effects. II- Interface optimization for residual stress reduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Williamson; B. H. Rabin; J. T. Drake

    1993-01-01

    An elastic FEM numerical model for simulating residual stresses at graded ceramic-metal interfaces during cooling, which accounts for the effect of plasticity, was developed and used to investigate residual stresses at ceramic-metal graded and nongraded interfaces in Al2O3-Ni system. Specimen geometries were designed to provide information related to joining, coating, and thick-film applications. The results demonstrate the importance of accounting

  4. Distribution automation applications of fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold; Johnston, A.; Friend, H.

    1989-01-01

    Motivations for interest and research in distribution automation are discussed. The communication requirements of distribution automation are examined and shown to exceed the capabilities of power line carrier, radio, and telephone systems. A fiber optic based communication system is described that is co-located with the distribution system and that could satisfy the data rate and reliability requirements. A cost comparison shows that it could be constructed at a cost that is similar to that of a power line carrier system. The requirements for fiber optic sensors for distribution automation are discussed. The design of a data link suitable for optically-powered electronic sensing is presented. Empirical results are given. A modeling technique that was used to understand the reflections of guided light from a variety of surfaces is described. An optical position-indicator design is discussed. Systems aspects of distribution automation are discussed, in particular, the lack of interface, communications, and data standards. The economics of distribution automation are examined.

  5. Analytical modeling of transfer admittance in small MOSFETs and application to interface state characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddara, Hisham; Ghibaudo, Gérard

    1988-06-01

    A simple analytical model for the transfer admittance (dynamic transconductance) of MOS transistors is presented. This model establishes, for the first time, a direct correlation between the transfer admittance and the interface state admittance in an explicit analytical form. Experimental measurements have been performed and the obtained results are in good agreement with our theory. Subsequently, we present a new method for characterising interface states in MOS transistors of channel lengths less than 10 ?m from the measurement of the imaginary part of the inverse of the transfer admittance.

  6. A model for investigating the behaviour of non-spherical particles at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Morris, G; Neethling, S J; Cilliers, J J

    2011-02-01

    This paper introduces a simple method for modelling non-spherical particles with a fixed contact angle at an interface whilst also providing a method to fix the particles orientation. It is shown how a wide variety of particle shapes (spherical, ellipsoidal, disc) can be created from a simple initial geometry containing only six vertices. The shapes are made from one continuous surface with edges and corners treated as smooth curves not discontinuities. As such, particles approaching cylindrical and orthorhombic shapes can be simulated but the contact angle crossing the edges will be fixed. Non-spherical particles, when attached to an interface can cause large distortions in the surface which affect the forces acting on the particle. The model presented is capable of resolving this distortion of the surface around the particle at the interface as well as allowing for the particle's orientation to be controlled. It is shown that, when considering orthorhombic particles with rounded edges, the flatter the particle the more energetically stable it is to sit flat at the interface. However, as the particle becomes more cube like, the effects of contact angle have a greater effect on the energetically stable orientations. Results for cylindrical particles with rounded edges are also discussed. The model presented allows the user to define the shape, dimensions, contact angle and orientation of the particle at the interface allowing more in-depth investigation of the complex phenomenon of 3D film distortion around an attached particle and the forces that arise due to it. PMID:21067767

  7. Control of enterprise interfaces for supply chain enterprise modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Interrante, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Macfarlane, J.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Information and Computing Sciences Div.

    1995-04-01

    There is a current trend for manufacturing enterprises in a supply chain of a particular industry to join forces in an attempt to promote efficiencies and improve competitive position. Such alliances occur in the context of specific legal and business agreements such that each enterprise retains a majority of its business and manufacturing information as private and shares other information with its trading partners. Shared information may include enterprise demand projections, capacities, finished goods inventories, and aggregate production schedules. Evidence of the trend toward information sharing includes the recent emphases on vendor-managed inventories, quick response, and Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The increased competition brought on by the global marketplace is driving industries to consider the advantages of trading partner agreements. Aggregate-level forecasts, supply-chain production smoothing, and aggregate-level inventory policies can reduce holding costs, record-keeping overhead, and lead time in product development. The goal of this research is to orchestrate information exchange among trading partners to allow for aggregate-level analysis to enhance supply chain efficiency. The notion of Enterprise Interface Control (EIC) is introduced as a means of accomplishing this end.

  8. A Translational Animal Model for Scar Compression Therapy Using an Automated Pressure Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalil, A.; Tejiram, S.; Travis, T. E.; Prindeze, N. J.; Carney, B. C.; Moffatt, L. T.; Johnson, L. S.; Ramella-Roman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pressure therapy has been used to prevent and treat hypertrophic scars following cutaneous injury despite the limited understanding of its mechanism of action and lack of established animal model to optimize its usage. Objectives: The aim of this work was to test and characterize a novel automated pressure delivery system designed to deliver steady and controllable pressure in a red Duroc swine hypertrophic scar model. Methods: Excisional wounds were created by dermatome on 6 red Duroc pigs and allowed to scar while assessed weekly via gross visual inspection, laser Doppler imaging, and biopsy. A portable novel automated pressure delivery system was mounted on developing scars (n = 6) for 2 weeks. Results: The device maintained a pressure range of 30 ± 4 mm Hg for more than 90% of the 2-week treatment period. Pressure readings outside this designated range were attributed to normal animal behavior and responses to healing progression. Gross scar examination by the Vancouver Scar Scale showed significant and sustained (>4 weeks) improvement in pressure-treated scars (P < .05). Histological examination of pressure-treated scars showed a significant decrease in dermal thickness compared with other groups (P < .05). Pressure-treated scars also showed increased perfusion by laser Doppler imaging during the treatment period compared with sham-treated and untreated scars (P < .05). Cellular quantification showed differential changes among treatment groups. Conclusion: These results illustrate the applications of this technology in hypertrophic scar Duroc swine model and the evaluation and optimization of pressure therapy in wound-healing and hypertrophic scar management.

  9. Murphy Tools: Utilizing Extracted GUI Models for Industrial Software Testing

    E-print Network

    Memon, Atif M.

    --graphical user interface; GUI test automation; model extraction; reverse engineering; industrial test environment is a technique for using models as a basis for automated test generation. The industrial adoption of MBTMurphy Tools: Utilizing Extracted GUI Models for Industrial Software Testing Pekka Aho VTT

  10. Interfacing BIM with Building Thermal and Daylighting Modeling 

    E-print Network

    Yan, Wei; Clayton, Mark; Haberl, Jeff; WoonSeong, Jeong; Bun Kim, Jong; Sandeep, Kota; Bermudez, Jose; Dixit, Manish

    2013-01-01

    may be reduced significantly due to the use of automatic translation between BIM and building energy models. For example, in the sample of BESTEST Case 600 in LBNL Modelica Buildings library, the two windows on the south wall need to be combined... whose structures are in between (or a hybrid of) BIM and the building models in LBNL Modelica Buildings library, to facilitate the mapping from BIM to Modelica energy models. Based on BIM (geometry, materials, location, etc.), the prototype will output...

  11. Automated Generation of Fault Management Artifacts from a Simple System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Andrew K.; Day, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of off-nominal behavior - failure modes and fault propagation - in complex systems is often based purely on engineering intuition; specific cases are assessed in an ad hoc fashion as a (fallible) fault management engineer sees fit. This work is an attempt to provide a more rigorous approach to this understanding and assessment by automating the creation of a fault management artifact, the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) through querying a representation of the system in a SysML model. This work builds off the previous development of an off-nominal behavior model for the upcoming Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We further developed the previous system model to more fully incorporate the ideas of State Analysis, and it was restructured in an organizational hierarchy that models the system as layers of control systems while also incorporating the concept of "design authority". We present software that was developed to traverse the elements and relationships in this model to automatically construct an FMEA spreadsheet. We further discuss extending this model to automatically generate other typical fault management artifacts, such as Fault Trees, to efficiently portray system behavior, and depend less on the intuition of fault management engineers to ensure complete examination of off-nominal behavior.

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 18, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2002 1 Time-Domain Passivity Control of Haptic Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    Control of Haptic Interfaces Blake Hannaford, Senior Member, IEEE, and Jee-Hwan Ryu Abstract--A patent-pending, energy-based method is presented for controlling a haptic interface system to ensure stable contact under or more subsystems in real-time software. Active behavior is indicated by a negative value of the PO

  13. Modeling and Analysis Generic Interface for eXternal numerical codes (MAGIX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, T.; Bernst, I.; Panoglou, D.; Muders, D.; Ossenkopf, V.; Röllig, M.; Schilke, P.

    2013-01-01

    The Modeling and Analysis Generic Interface for eXternal numerical codes (MAGIX) is a model optimizer developed under the framework of the coherent set of astrophysical tools for spectroscopy (CATS) project. The MAGIX package provides a framework of an easy interface between existing codes and an iterating engine that attempts to minimize deviations of the model results from available observational data, constraining the values of the model parameters and providing corresponding error estimates. Many models (and, in principle, not only astrophysical models) can be plugged into MAGIX to explore their parameter space and find the set of parameter values that best fits observational/experimental data. MAGIX complies with the data structures and reduction tools of Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), but can be used with other astronomical and with non-astronomical data. http://www.astro.uni-koeln.de/projects/schilke/MAGIX

  14. Laboratory measurements and theoretical modeling of seismoelectric interface response and coseismic wave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schakel, M. D.; Slob, E. C.; Heller, H. K. J. [Department of Geotechnology, Delft University of Technology, PO Box 5048, 2600 GA, Delft (Netherlands); Smeulders, D. M. J. [Department of Geotechnology, Delft University of Technology, PO Box 5048, 2600 GA, Delft (Netherlands); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-04-01

    A full-waveform seismoelectric numerical model incorporating the directivity pattern of a pressure source is developed. This model provides predictions of coseismic electric fields and the electromagnetic waves that originate from a fluid/porous-medium interface. An experimental setup in which coseismic electric fields and interface responses are measured is constructed. The seismo-electric origin of the signals is confirmed. The numerically predicted polarity reversal of the interfacial signal and seismoelectric effects due to multiple scattering are detected in the measurements. Both the simulated coseismic electric fields and the electromagnetic waves originating from interfaces agree with the measurements in terms of travel times, waveform, polarity, amplitude, and spatial amplitude decay, demonstrating that seismoelectric effects are comprehensively described by theory.

  15. Evaluation of 3D Model Accuracy for Automated Unloading of Containers Alice Kirchheim*, Wolfgang Echelmeyer*, Todor Stoyanov#

    E-print Network

    Cremers, Daniel

    Evaluation of 3D Model Accuracy for Automated Unloading of Containers Alice Kirchheim*, Wolfgang the handling of mass goods during container unloading is done manually as containers are often packed systems for unloading in a general, largely unconstrained environment is, however, very challenging due

  16. Diffuse interface models of locally inextensible vesicles in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aland, Sebastian; Egerer, Sabine; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2014-11-01

    We present a new diffuse interface model for the dynamics of inextensible vesicles in a viscous fluid with inertial forces. A new feature of this work is the implementation of the local inextensibility condition in the diffuse interface context. Local inextensibility is enforced by using a local Lagrange multiplier, which provides the necessary tension force at the interface. We introduce a new equation for the local Lagrange multiplier whose solution essentially provides a harmonic extension of the multiplier off the interface while maintaining the local inextensibility constraint near the interface. We also develop a local relaxation scheme that dynamically corrects local stretching/compression errors thereby preventing their accumulation. Asymptotic analysis is presented that shows that our new system converges to a relaxed version of the inextensible sharp interface model. This is also verified numerically. To solve the equations, we use an adaptive finite element method with implicit coupling between the Navier-Stokes and the diffuse interface inextensibility equations. Numerical simulations of a single vesicle in a shear flow at different Reynolds numbers demonstrate that errors in enforcing local inextensibility may accumulate and lead to large differences in the dynamics in the tumbling regime and smaller differences in the inclination angle of vesicles in the tank-treading regime. The local relaxation algorithm is shown to prevent the accumulation of stretching and compression errors very effectively. Simulations of two vesicles in an extensional flow show that local inextensibility plays an important role when vesicles are in close proximity by inhibiting fluid drainage in the near contact region.

  17. Smart Frameworks and Self-Describing Models: Model Metadata for Automated Coupling of Hydrologic Process Components (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckham, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    Model coupling frameworks like CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System) and ESMF (Earth System Modeling Framework) have developed mechanisms that allow heterogeneous sets of process models to be assembled in a plug-and-play manner to create composite "system models". These mechanisms facilitate code reuse, but must simultaneously satisfy many different design criteria. They must be able to mediate or compensate for differences between the process models, such as their different programming languages, computational grids, time-stepping schemes, variable names and variable units. However, they must achieve this interoperability in a way that: (1) is noninvasive, requiring only relatively small and isolated changes to the original source code, (2) does not significantly reduce performance, (3) is not time-consuming or confusing for a model developer to implement, (4) can very easily be updated to accommodate new versions of a given process model and (5) does not shift the burden of providing model interoperability to the model developers, e.g. by requiring them to provide their output in specific forms that meet the input requirements of other models. In tackling these design challenges, model framework developers have learned that the best solution is to provide each model with a simple, standardized interface, i.e. a set of standardized functions that make the model: (1) fully-controllable by a caller (e.g. a model framework) and (2) self-describing. Model control functions are separate functions that allow a caller to initialize the model, advance the model's state variables in time and finalize the model. Model description functions allow a caller to retrieve detailed information on the model's input and output variables, its computational grid and its timestepping scheme. If the caller is a modeling framework, it can compare the answers to these queries with similar answers from other process models in a collection and then automatically call framework service components as necessary to mediate the differences between the coupled models. This talk will first review two key products of the CSDMS project, namely a standardized model interface called the Basic Model Interface (BMI) and the CSDMS Standard Names. The standard names are used in conjunction with BMI to provide a semantic matching mechanism that allows output variables from one process model to be reliably used as input variables to other process models in a collection. They include not just a standardized naming scheme for model variables, but also a standardized set of terms for describing the attributes and assumptions of a given model. To illustrate the power of standardized model interfaces and metadata, a smart, light-weight modeling framework written in Python will be introduced that can automatically (without user intervention) couple a set of BMI-enabled hydrologic process components together to create a spatial hydrologic model. The same mechanisms could also be used to provide seamless integration (import/export) of data and models.

  18. DisplayObjects: Prototyping Functional Physical Interfaces on 3D Styrofoam, Paper or Cardboard Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Akaoka; Tim Ginn; Roel Vertegaal

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces DisplayObjects, a rapid prototyping workbench that allows functional interfaces to be projected onto real 3D physical prototypes. DisplayObjects uses a Vicon motion capture system to track the location of physical models. 3D software renditions of the 3D physical model are then texture-mapped with interactive behavior and projected back onto the physical model to allow real- time interactions

  19. Rich Interfaces for Dependability: Compositional Methods for Dynamic Fault Trees and Arcade models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hichem Boudali; Pepijn Crouzen; Boudewijn R. Haverkort; Matthias Kuntz; Mariëlle Stoelinga

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses two behavioural interfaces for reliability\\u000aanalysis: dynamic fault trees, which model the system\\u000areliability in terms of the reliability of its components\\u000aand Arcade, which models the system reliability at an architectural\\u000alevel. For both formalisms, the reliability is analyzed\\u000aby transforming the DFT or Arcade model to a set\\u000aof input-output Markov Chains. By using compositional

  20. Tape-Drop Transient Model for In-Situ Automated Tape Placement of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    Composite parts of nonuniform thickness can be fabricated by in-situ automated tape placement (ATP) if the tape can be started and stopped at interior points of the part instead of always at its edges. This technique is termed start/stop-on-the-part, or, alternatively, tape-add/tape-drop. The resulting thermal transients need to be managed in order to achieve net shape and maintain uniform interlaminar weld strength and crystallinity. Starting-on-the-part has been treated previously. This paper continues the study with a thermal analysis of stopping-on-the-part. The thermal source is switched off when the trailing end of the tape enters the nip region of the laydown/consolidation head. The thermal transient is determined by a Fourier-Laplace transform solution of the two-dimensional, time-dependent thermal transport equation. This solution requires that the Peclet number Pe (the dimensionless ratio of inertial to diffusive heat transport) be independent of time and much greater than 1. Plotted isotherms show that the trailing tape-end cools more rapidly than the downstream portions of tape. This cooling can weaken the bond near the tape end; however the length of the affected region is found to be less than 2 mm. To achieve net shape, the consolidation head must continue to move after cut-off until the temperature on the weld interface decreases to the glass transition temperature. The time and elapsed distance for this condition to occur are computed for the Langley ATP robot applying PEEK/carbon fiber composite tape and for two upgrades in robot performance. The elapsed distance after cut-off ranges from about 1 mm for the present robot to about 1 cm for the second upgrade.

  1. Molecular Modeling of Transport across Surfactant Covered Oil-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelevich, Dmitry; Chauhan, Anuj; Gupta, Ashish

    2006-11-01

    Mass transport across densely packed surfactant covered oil-water interfaces in microemulsions plays a key role in numerous applications such as separations, reactions, drug delivery, and detoxification. In this talk we present results of molecular modeling of transport of solute molecules across hexadecane-water interfaces covered by Brij surfactants and development of a theoretical model for the transport mechanism. We discuss effects of such parameters as solute sizes and degrees of hydrophobicity, as well as the length of surfactant molecules on the transport properties. We obtain a generalized Langevin equation for the solute transport using molecular dynamics simulations with the solute center of mass constrained in the direction normal to the interface. We observe non-trivial behavior of the stochastic force acting on the solute: the autocorrelation time of this force is extremely sensitive to the solute position within the interface and the force relaxation times differ by two orders of magnitude within a narrow region of the interface. This phenomenon is related to the density fluctuations of the surfactant as well as water and oil molecules around the solute. We further discuss implications of this phenomenon on the transport properties.

  2. Interface modeling to predict well casing damage for big hill strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2012-02-01

    Oil leaks were found in well casings of Caverns 105 and 109 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. According to the field observations, two instances of casing damage occurred at the depth of the interface between the caprock and top of salt. This damage could be caused by interface movement induced by cavern volume closure due to salt creep. A three dimensional finite element model, which allows each cavern to be configured individually, was constructed to investigate shear and vertical displacements across each interface. The model contains interfaces between each lithology and a shear zone to examine the interface behavior in a realistic manner. This analysis results indicate that the casings of Caverns 105 and 109 failed by shear stress that exceeded shear strength due to the horizontal movement of the top of salt relative to the caprock, and tensile stress due to the downward movement of the top of salt from the caprock, respectively. The casings of Caverns 101, 110, 111 and 114, located at the far ends of the field, are predicted to be failed by shear stress in the near future. The casings of inmost Caverns 107 and 108 are predicted to be failed by tensile stress in the near future.

  3. Modeling and matching of landmarks for automation of Mars Rover localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission, begun in January 2004, has been extremely successful. However, decision-making for many operation tasks of the current MER mission and the 1997 Mars Pathfinder mission is performed on Earth through a predominantly manual, time-consuming process. Unmanned planetary rover navigation is ideally expected to reduce rover idle time, diminish the need for entering safe-mode, and dynamically handle opportunistic science events without required communication to Earth. Successful automation of rover navigation and localization during the extraterrestrial exploration requires that accurate position and attitude information can be received by a rover and that the rover has the support of simultaneous localization and mapping. An integrated approach with Bundle Adjustment (BA) and Visual Odometry (VO) can efficiently refine the rover position. However, during the MER mission, BA is done manually because of the difficulty in the automation of the cross-sitetie points selection. This dissertation proposes an automatic approach to select cross-site tie points from multiple rover sites based on the methods of landmark extraction, landmark modeling, and landmark matching. The first step in this approach is that important landmarks such as craters and rocks are defined. Methods of automatic feature extraction and landmark modeling are then introduced. Complex models with orientation angles and simple models without those angles are compared. The results have shown that simple models can provide reasonably good results. Next, the sensitivity of different modeling parameters is analyzed. Based on this analysis, cross-site rocks are matched through two complementary stages: rock distribution pattern matching and rock model matching. In addition, a preliminary experiment on orbital and ground landmark matching is also briefly introduced. Finally, the reliability of the cross-site tie points selection is validated by fault detection, which considers the mapping capability of MER cameras and the reason for mismatches. Fault detection strategies are applied in each step of the cross-site tie points selection to automatically verify the accuracy. The mismatches are excluded and localization errors are minimized. The method proposed in this dissertation is demonstrated with the datasets from the 2004 MER mission (traverse of 318 m) as well as the simulated test data at Silver Lake (traverse of 5.5 km), California. The accuracy analysis demonstrates that the algorithm is efficient at automatically selecting a sufficient number of well-distributed high-quality tie points to link the ground images into an image network for BA. The method worked successfully along with a continuous 1.1 km stretch. With the BA performed, highly accurate maps can be created to help the rover to navigate precisely and automatically. The method also enables autonomous long-range Mars rover localization.

  4. SENSPECTRA : an elastic, strain-aware physical modeling interface

    E-print Network

    Leclerc, Vincent, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    Senspectra is a computationally augmented physical modeling toolkit designed for sensing and visualization of structural strain. The system functions as a distributed sensor network consisting of nodes, embedded with ...

  5. A multiphase model for compressible flows with interfaces, shocks, detonation waves and cavitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Saurel; Olivier Lemetayer

    2001-01-01

    A compressible multiphase unconditionally hyperbolic model is proposed. It is able to deal with a wide range of applications: interfaces between compressible materials, shock waves in condensed multiphase mixtures, homogeneous two-phase flows (bubbly and droplet flows) and cavitation in liquids. Here we focus on the generalization of the formulation to an arbitrary number of fluids, and to mass and energy

  6. A Monthly Water-Balance Model Driven By a Graphical User Interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a monthly water-balance model driven by a graphical user interface, referred to as the Thornthwaite monthly water-balance program. Computations of monthly water-balance components of the hydrologic cycle are made for a specified location. The program can be used as a research tool, an assessment tool, and a tool for classroom instruction.

  7. Development of a GIS interface for WEPP model application to Great Lakes forested watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation will highlight efforts on development of a new WEPP GIS interface, targeted toward application in forested regions bordering the Great Lakes. The key components and algorithms of the online GIS system will be outlined. The general procedures used to provide input to the WEPP model ...

  8. PUBLICATIONS --G. CAGINALP--January 2010 Phase Field (Diffuse Interface Model)-Computational

    E-print Network

    Çaginalp, Gunduz

    ). "Phase field computations of single-needle crystals, crystal growth and motion by mean curvature" (with E analysis of phase field alloys'' (with W. Xie) in Free Boundary Problems, Theory and Application, PitmanPUBLICATIONS -- G. CAGINALP--January 2010 Phase Field (Diffuse Interface Model)- Computational

  9. suitable QM/MM interaction models and treatments for the QM/MM interface region,

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    of a molecular system to be described at the sim- plest level possible: as atoms, using quantum or classical, as a continuous medium that lacks atomic detail2,4 . Molecular interactions are captured by potential surfacessuitable QM/MM interaction models and treatments for the QM/MM interface region, and efficient

  10. Modeling fractures as interfaces for flow and transport in porous media

    E-print Network

    Modeling fractures as interfaces for flow and transport in porous media Clarisse Alboin J´er^ome Jaffr´e Jean E. Roberts Christophe Serres § September 10, 2001 Abstract Fractures in a porous medium into account interaction between the fracture and the surrounding rock. We proved existence and uniqueness

  11. Support of surgical process modeling by using adaptable software user interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumuth, T.; Kaschek, B.; Czygan, M.; Goldstein, D.; Strauß, G.; Meixensberger, J.; Burgert, O.

    2010-03-01

    Surgical Process Modeling (SPM) is a powerful method for acquiring data about the evolution of surgical procedures. Surgical Process Models are used in a variety of use cases including evaluation studies, requirements analysis and procedure optimization, surgical education, and workflow management scheme design. This work proposes the use of adaptive, situation-aware user interfaces for observation support software for SPM. We developed a method to support the modeling of the observer by using an ontological knowledge base. This is used to drive the graphical user interface for the observer to restrict the search space of terminology depending on the current situation. In the evaluation study it is shown, that the workload of the observer was decreased significantly by using adaptive user interfaces. 54 SPM observation protocols were analyzed by using the NASA Task Load Index and it was shown that the use of the adaptive user interface disburdens the observer significantly in workload criteria effort, mental demand and temporal demand, helping him to concentrate on his essential task of modeling the Surgical Process.

  12. Programming models and HW-SW interfaces abstraction for multi-processor SoC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed Amine Jerraya; Aimen Bouchhima; Frédéric Pétrot

    2006-01-01

    For the design of classic computers the Parallel programming concept is used to abstract HW\\/SW interfaces during high level specification of application software. The software is then adapted to existing multiprocessor platforms using a low level software layer that implements the programming model. Unlike classic computers, the design of heterogeneous MPSoC includes also building the processors and other kind of

  13. DIFFUSE INTERFACE MODELS ON GRAPHS FOR CLASSIFICATION OF HIGH DIMENSIONAL DATA

    E-print Network

    Soatto, Stefano

    DIFFUSE INTERFACE MODELS ON GRAPHS FOR CLASSIFICATION OF HIGH DIMENSIONAL DATA ANDREA L. BERTOZZI of high dimensional data. This work develops a class of variational algorithms that combine recent ideas in social networks, and segmentation of shapes in high dimensional datasets. Key words. Nystr¨om extension

  14. Coupled Surface Diffusion and Motion by Mean Curvature from a Diffuse Interface Model

    E-print Network

    Novick-Cohen, Amy

    of binary alloys coupled motion by mean curvature and motion by surface diffusion occurs the coarseningCoupled Surface Diffusion and Motion by Mean Curvature from a Diffuse Interface Model Amy Novick growth, surface diffusion, theory. Abstract A degenerate Allen-Cahn/Cahn-Hilliard system which

  15. ?-conome: an automated tissue counting platform of cone photoreceptors for rodent models of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized by the sequential loss of rod and cone photoreceptors. The preservation of cones would prevent blindness due to their essential role in human vision. Rod-derived Cone Viability Factor is a thioredoxin-like protein that is secreted by rods and is involved in cone survival. To validate the activity of Rod-derived Cone Viability Factors (RdCVFs) as therapeutic agents for treating retinitis Pigmentosa, we have developed e-conome, an automated cell counting platform for retinal flat mounts of rodent models of cone degeneration. This automated quantification method allows for faster data analysis thereby accelerating translational research. Methods An inverted fluorescent microscope, motorized and coupled to a CCD camera records images of cones labeled with fluorescent peanut agglutinin lectin on flat-mounted retinas. In an average of 300 fields per retina, nine Z-planes at magnification X40 are acquired after two-stage autofocus individually for each field. The projection of the stack of 9 images is subject to a threshold, filtered to exclude aberrant images based on preset variables. The cones are identified by treating the resulting image using 13 variables empirically determined. The cone density is calculated over the 300 fields. Results The method was validated by comparison to the conventional stereological counting. The decrease in cone density in rd1 mouse was found to be equivalent to the decrease determined by stereological counting. We also studied the spatiotemporal pattern of the degeneration of cones in the rd1 mouse and show that while the reduction in cone density starts in the central part of the retina, cone degeneration progresses at the same speed over the whole retinal surface. We finally show that for mice with an inactivation of the Nucleoredoxin-like genes Nxnl1 or Nxnl2 encoding RdCVFs, the loss of cones is more pronounced in the ventral retina. Conclusion The automated platform ?-conome used here for retinal disease is a tool that can broadly accelerate translational research for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22185426

  16. Modeling of the cometary nucleus-coma interface region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Korosmezey, A.

    1989-01-01

    A well-developed dusty cometary atmosphere extends to distances over 4 orders of magnitude larger than the size of the nucleus. Pre-encounter models of the inner coma were based on the assumption that a spherically symmetric description was adequate to describe the dust-gas interaction region. Recent observational evidence together with a new generation of multidimensional theoretical models demonstrate that the inner cometary environment is far from spherical symmetry and a number of unexpected phenomena (dust jet broadening, subsolar dust spike formation, etc.) might play a significant role in this region.

  17. Sequential Model-Based Parameter Optimization: an Experimental Investigation of Automated and Interactive Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutter, Frank; Bartz-Beielstein, Thomas; Hoos, Holger H.; Leyton-Brown, Kevin; Murphy, Kevin P.

    This work experimentally investigates model-based approaches for optimizing the performance of parameterized randomized algorithms. Such approaches build a response surface model and use this model for finding good parameter settings of the given algorithm. We evaluated two methods from the literature that are based on Gaussian process models: sequential parameter optimization (SPO) (Bartz-Beielstein et al. 2005) and sequential Kriging optimization (SKO) (Huang et al. 2006). SPO performed better "out-of-the-box," whereas SKO was competitive when response values were log transformed. We then investigated key design decisions within the SPO paradigm, characterizing the performance consequences of each. Based on these findings, we propose a new version of SPO, dubbed SPO+, which extends SPO with a novel intensification procedure and a log-transformed objective function. In a domain for which performance results for other (modelfree) parameter optimization approaches are available, we demonstrate that SPO+ achieves state-of-the-art performance. Finally, we compare this automated parameter tuning approach to an interactive, manual process that makes use of classical

  18. Automated method for modeling seven-helix transmembrane receptors from experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Herzyk, P; Hubbard, R E

    1995-01-01

    A rule-based automated method is presented for modeling the structures of the seven transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors. The structures are generated by using a simulated annealing Monte Carlo procedure that positions and orients rigid helices to satisfy structural restraints. The restraints are derived from analysis of experimental information from biophysical studies on native and mutant proteins, from analysis of the sequences of related proteins, and from theoretical considerations of protein structure. Calculations are presented for two systems. The method was validated through calculations using appropriate experimental information for bacteriorhodopsin, which produced a model structure with a root mean square (rms) deviation of 1.87 A from the structure determined by electron microscopy. Calculations are also presented using experimental and theoretical information available for bovine rhodopsin to assign the helices to a projection density map and to produce a model of bovine rhodopsin that can be used as a template for modeling other G-protein-coupled receptors. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 11 PMID:8599649

  19. A prototype natural language interface to a large complex knowledge base, the Foundational Model of Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Distelhorst, Gregory; Srivastava, Vishrut; Rosse, Cornelius; Brinkley, James F

    2003-01-01

    We describe a constrained natural language interface to a large knowledge base, the Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA). The interface, called GAPP, handles simple or nested questions that can be parsed to the form, subject-relation-object, where subject or object is unknown. With the aid of domain-specific dictionaries the parsed sentence is converted to queries in the StruQL graph-searching query language, then sent to a server we developed, called OQAFMA, that queries the FMA and returns output as XML. Preliminary evaluation shows that GAPP has the potential to be used in the evaluation of the FMA by domain experts in anatomy. PMID:14728162

  20. Modeling the washboard effect at the head\\/disk interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qing Dai; Ferdi Hendriks; Bruno Marchon

    2004-01-01

    A model is presented that accounts for the observation of periodic lubricant ripples formed when a slider is flying on-track over a lubricated disk surface. It is shown that lubricant flow modulation from the air shear stress due to the low flying slider acting as a spring is responsible for the observed corrugation, as repeated flying over the same track

  1. New Model for Multimedia Interfaces to Online Public Access Catalogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pejtersen, Annelise Mark

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Book House, an interactive, multimedia online public access catalog (OPAC) developed in Denmark that uses icons, text, and animation. An alternative design model that addresses problems in OPACs is described; and database design, system navigation, use for fiction retrieval, and evaluation are discussed. (20 references) (MES)

  2. Development of a chemical process modeling environment based on CAPE-OPEN interface standards and the Microsoft .NET framework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Martin Barrett Jr.; Jun Yang

    2005-01-01

    Chemical process simulation has long been used as a design tool in the development of chemical plants, and has long been considered a means to evaluate different design options. The CAPE-OPEN interface standards were developed to allow process modeling components to be used in any compliant process modeling environment. Use of the CAPE-OPEN interfaces and the .NET framework will allow

  3. Open boundary conditions for the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmarais, J. L.; Kuerten, J. G. M.

    2014-04-01

    New techniques are developed for solving multi-phase flows in unbounded domains using the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D. They extend two open boundary conditions originally designed for the Navier-Stokes equations. The non-dimensional formulation of the DIM generalizes the approach to any fluid. The equations support a steady state whose analytical approximation close to the critical point depends only on temperature. This feature enables the use of detectors at the boundaries switching between conventional boundary conditions in bulk phases and a multi-phase strategy in interfacial regions. Moreover, the latter takes advantage of the steady state approximation to minimize the interface-boundary interactions. The techniques are applied to fluids experiencing a phase transition and where the interface between the phases travels through one of the boundaries. When the interface crossing the boundary is fully developed, the technique greatly improves results relative to cases where conventional boundary conditions can be used. Limitations appear when the interface crossing the boundary is not a stable equilibrium between the two phases: the terms responsible for creating the true balance between the phases perturb the interior solution. Both boundary conditions present good numerical stability properties: the error remains bounded when the initial conditions or the far field values are perturbed. For the PML, the influence of its main parameters on the global error is investigated to make a compromise between computational costs and maximum error. The approach can be extended to multiple spatial dimensions.

  4. Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Process Interface Including the HyPEP Model

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-05-01

    The Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Plant interface is the intermediate heat transport loop that will connect a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) to a thermochemical, high-temperature electrolysis, or hybrid hydrogen production plant. A prototype plant called the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 2018-2021 timeframe, and will involve a VHTR, a high-temperature interface, and a hydrogen production plant. The interface is responsible for transporting high-temperature thermal energy from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant while protecting the nuclear plant from operational disturbances at the hydrogen plant. Development of the interface is occurring under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) and involves the study, design, and development of high-temperature heat exchangers, heat transport systems, materials, safety, and integrated system models. Research and development work on the system interface began in 2004 and is expected to continue at least until the start of construction of an engineering-scale demonstration plant.

  5. Modeling Complex Cross-Systems Software Interfaces Using SysML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandutianu, Sanda; Morillo, Ron; Simpson, Kim; Liepack, Otfrid; Bonanne, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The complex flight and ground systems for NASA human space exploration are designed, built, operated and managed as separate programs and projects. However, each system relies on one or more of the other systems in order to accomplish specific mission objectives, creating a complex, tightly coupled architecture. Thus, there is a fundamental need to understand how each system interacts with the other. To determine if a model-based system engineering approach could be utilized to assist with understanding the complex system interactions, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) sponsored a task to develop an approach for performing cross-system behavior modeling. This paper presents the results of applying Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) principles using the System Modeling Language (SysML) to define cross-system behaviors and how they map to crosssystem software interfaces documented in system-level Interface Control Documents (ICDs).

  6. Intelligent architecture: user interface design to elicit knowledge models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Penn; R Conroy-Dalton; Nick Dalton; Laura Dekker; Chiron Mottram; A. Turner

    1995-01-01

    Much of the difficulty in architectural design is in integrating and making explicit theknowledge of the many converging disciplines (engineering, sociology, ergonomicsand psychology, to name a few), the building requirements from many viewpoints,and to model the complex system interactions. The many r?les of the architect simplycompound this. This paper describes a system currently under development?a 3Ddesign medium and intelligent analysis

  7. Planning a port interface for an ocean incineration system: computer-model user's manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glucksman, M.A.; Marcus, H.S.

    1986-06-01

    The User's Manual is written to accompany the computer model developed in the report, Planning a Port Interface For An Ocean Incineration System. The model is based on SYMPHONY (TM) a Lotus Development Corp. product. Apart from the requirement for the software, the model needs an IBM PC compatible personal computer with at least 576 kilobytes of RAM. The model assumes the viewpoint of a planner that has yet to choose a particular type of vessel and port technology. The model contains four types of information: physical parameters of system alternatives, government regulations, risks associated with different system alternatives, and relevant background information.

  8. Model studies of Rayleigh instabilities via microdesigned interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2000-10-17

    The energetic and kinetic properties of surfaces play a critical role in defining the microstructural changes that occur during sintering and high-temperature use of ceramics. Characterization of surface diffusion in ceramics is particularly difficult, and significant variations in reported values of surface diffusivities arise even in well-studied systems. Effects of impurities, surface energy anisotropy, and the onset of surface attachment limited kinetics (SALK) are believed to contribute to this variability. An overview of the use of Rayleigh instabilities as a means of characterizing surface diffusivities is presented. The development of models of morphological evolution that account for effects of surface energy anisotropy is reviewed, and the potential interplay between impurities and surface energy anisotropy is addressed. The status of experimental studies of Rayleigh instabilities in sapphire utilizing lithographically introduced pore channels of controlled geometry and crystallography is summarized. Results of model studies indicate that impurities can significantly influence both the spatial and temporal characteristics of Rayleigh instabilities; this is attributed at least in part to impurity effects on the surface energy anisotropy. Related model experiments indicate that the onset of SALK may also contribute significantly to apparent variations in surface diffusion coefficients.

  9. Virtual 3D controllable machine models for implementation of automations laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erick A. Salazar; Manuel E. Macías

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays engineer students, typically of automation, need to prove their PLC logic programs against diverse automatic systems, this gives the student a competitive approach to the working world. For a student to prove their knowledge, a fully equipped laboratory oriented for this course is needed. For the purpose of automation only, it is required at least a PLC for control,

  10. Case Study for New Feature Extraction Algorithms, Automated Data Classification, and Model-Assisted Probability of Detection Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrin, John C.; Knopp, Jeremy S.

    2007-03-01

    This paper explores feature extraction algorithms for crack characterization in eddy current inspection of fastener sites. A novel feature extraction method fitting approximate models to data associated with geometric part features addressing adjacent fastener sites and panel edges is developed. Data classification methods in the circumferential direction around fastener sites are developed to better characterize fatigue cracks with improved noise invariance. Model-assisted probability of detection results are presented highlighting the benefit of automation in NDE.

  11. Modelling and interpreting biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structure using automated micropenetrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoon, Stephen R.; Felde, Vincent J. M. N. L.; Drahorad, Sylvie L.; Felix-Henningsen, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Soil penetrometers are used routinely to determine the shear strength of soils and deformable sediments both at the surface and throughout a depth profile in disciplines as diverse as soil science, agriculture, geoengineering and alpine avalanche-safety (e.g. Grunwald et al. 2001, Van Herwijnen et al. 2009). Generically, penetrometers comprise two principal components: An advancing probe, and a transducer; the latter to measure the pressure or force required to cause the probe to penetrate or advance through the soil or sediment. The force transducer employed to determine the pressure can range, for example, from a simple mechanical spring gauge to an automatically data-logged electronic transducer. Automated computer control of the penetrometer step size and probe advance rate enables precise measurements to be made down to a resolution of 10's of microns, (e.g. the automated electronic micropenetrometer (EMP) described by Drahorad 2012). Here we discuss the determination, modelling and interpretation of biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structures using automated micropenetrometry. We outline a model enabling the interpretation of depth dependent penetration resistance (PR) profiles and their spatial differentials using the model equations, ? {}(z) ={}? c0{}+? 1n[? n{}(z){}+anz + bnz2] and d? /dz = ? 1n[d? n(z) /dz{} {}+{}Frn(z)] where ? c0 and ? n are the plastic deformation stresses for the surface and nth soil structure (e.g. soil crust, layer, horizon or void) respectively, and Frn(z)dz is the frictional work done per unit volume by sliding the penetrometer rod an incremental distance, dz, through the nth layer. Both ? n(z) and Frn(z) are related to soil structure. They determine the form of ? {}(z){} measured by the EMP transducer. The model enables pores (regions of zero deformation stress) to be distinguished from changes in layer structure or probe friction. We have applied this method to both artificial calibration soils in the laboratory, and in-situ field studies. In particular, we discuss the nature and detection of surface and buried (fossil) subsurface Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs), voids, macroscopic particles and compositional layers. The strength of surface BSCs and the occurrence of buried BSCs and layers has been detected at sub millimetre scales to depths of 40mm. Our measurements and field observations of PR show the importance of morphological layering to overall BSC functions (Felde et al. 2015). We also discuss the effect of penetrometer shaft and probe-tip profiles upon the theoretical and experimental curves, EMP resolution and reproducibility, demonstrating how the model enables voids, buried biological soil crusts, exotic particles, soil horizons and layers to be distinguished one from another. This represents a potentially important contribution to advancing understanding of the relationship between BSCs and dryland soil structure. References: Drahorad SL, Felix-Henningsen P. (2012) An electronic micropenetrometer (EMP) for field measurements of biological soil crust stability, J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci., 175, 519-520 Felde V.J.M.N.L., Drahorad S.L., Felix-Henningsen P., Hoon S.R. (2015) Ongoing oversanding induces biological soil crust layering - a new approach for BSC structure elucidation determined from high resolution penetration resistance data (submitted) Grunwald, S., Rooney D.J., McSweeney K., Lowery B. (2001) Development of pedotransfer functions for a profile cone penetrometer, Geoderma, 100, 25-47 Van Herwijnen A., Bellaire S., Schweizer J. (2009) Comparison of micro-structural snowpack parameters derived from penetration resistance measurements with fracture character observations from compression tests, Cold Regions Sci. {& Technol.}, 59, 193-201

  12. Microwave landing system modeling with application to air traffic control automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulose, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Compared to the current instrument landing system, the microwave landing system (MLS), which is in the advanced stage of implementation, can potentially provide significant fuel and time savings as well as more flexibility in approach and landing functions. However, the expanded coverage and increased accuracy requirements of the MLS make it more susceptible to the features of the site in which it is located. An analytical approach is presented for evaluating the multipath effects of scatterers that are commonly found in airport environments. The approach combines a multiplane model with a ray-tracing technique and a formulation for estimating the electromagnetic fields caused by the antenna array in the presence of scatterers. The model is applied to several airport scenarios. The reduced computational burden enables the scattering effects on MLS position information to be evaluated in near real time. Evaluation in near real time would permit the incorporation of the modeling scheme into air traffic control automation; it would adaptively delineate zones of reduced accuracy within the MLS coverage volume, and help establish safe approach and takeoff trajectories in the presence of uneven terrain and other scatterers.

  13. Automated Geometric Model Builder Using Range Image Sensor Data: Final Acquistion

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.; Sackos, J.

    1999-02-01

    This report documents a data collection where we recorded redundant range image data from multiple views of a simple scene, and recorded accurate survey measurements of the same scene. Collecting these data was a focus of the research project Automated Geometric Model Builder Using Range Image Sensor Data (96-0384), supported by Sandia's Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program during fiscal years 1996, 1997, and 1998. The data described here are available from the authors on CDROM, or electronically over the Internet. Included in this data distribution are Computer-Aided Design (CAD) models we constructed from the survey measurements. The CAD models are compatible with the SolidWorks 98 Plus system, the modern Computer-Aided Design software system that is central to Sandia's DeskTop Engineering Project (DTEP). Integration of our measurements (as built) with the constructive geometry process of the CAD system (as designed) delivers on a vision of the research project. This report on our final data collection will also serve as a final report on the project.

  14. Partially Automated Method for Localizing Standardized Acupuncture Points on the Heads of Digital Human Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungdae; Kang, Dae-In

    2015-01-01

    Having modernized imaging tools for precise positioning of acupuncture points over the human body where the traditional therapeutic method is applied is essential. For that reason, we suggest a more systematic positioning method that uses X-ray computer tomographic images to precisely position acupoints. Digital Korean human data were obtained to construct three-dimensional head-skin and skull surface models of six individuals. Depending on the method used to pinpoint the positions of the acupoints, every acupoint was classified into one of three types: anatomical points, proportional points, and morphological points. A computational algorithm and procedure were developed for partial automation of the positioning. The anatomical points were selected by using the structural characteristics of the skin surface and skull. The proportional points were calculated from the positions of the anatomical points. The morphological points were also calculated by using some control points related to the connections between the source and the target models. All the acupoints on the heads of the six individual were displayed on three-dimensional computer graphical image models. This method may be helpful for developing more accurate experimental designs and for providing more quantitative volumetric methods for performing analyses in acupuncture-related research. PMID:26101534

  15. VoICE: A semi-automated pipeline for standardizing vocal analysis across models

    PubMed Central

    Burkett, Zachary D.; Day, Nancy F.; Peñagarikano, Olga; Geschwind, Daniel H.; White, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    The study of vocal communication in animal models provides key insight to the neurogenetic basis for speech and communication disorders. Current methods for vocal analysis suffer from a lack of standardization, creating ambiguity in cross-laboratory and cross-species comparisons. Here, we present VoICE (Vocal Inventory Clustering Engine), an approach to grouping vocal elements by creating a high dimensionality dataset through scoring spectral similarity between all vocalizations within a recording session. This dataset is then subjected to hierarchical clustering, generating a dendrogram that is pruned into meaningful vocalization “types” by an automated algorithm. When applied to birdsong, a key model for vocal learning, VoICE captures the known deterioration in acoustic properties that follows deafening, including altered sequencing. In a mammalian neurodevelopmental model, we uncover a reduced vocal repertoire of mice lacking the autism susceptibility gene, Cntnap2. VoICE will be useful to the scientific community as it can standardize vocalization analyses across species and laboratories. PMID:26018425

  16. VoICE: A semi-automated pipeline for standardizing vocal analysis across models.

    PubMed

    Burkett, Zachary D; Day, Nancy F; Peñagarikano, Olga; Geschwind, Daniel H; White, Stephanie A

    2015-01-01

    The study of vocal communication in animal models provides key insight to the neurogenetic basis for speech and communication disorders. Current methods for vocal analysis suffer from a lack of standardization, creating ambiguity in cross-laboratory and cross-species comparisons. Here, we present VoICE (Vocal Inventory Clustering Engine), an approach to grouping vocal elements by creating a high dimensionality dataset through scoring spectral similarity between all vocalizations within a recording session. This dataset is then subjected to hierarchical clustering, generating a dendrogram that is pruned into meaningful vocalization "types" by an automated algorithm. When applied to birdsong, a key model for vocal learning, VoICE captures the known deterioration in acoustic properties that follows deafening, including altered sequencing. In a mammalian neurodevelopmental model, we uncover a reduced vocal repertoire of mice lacking the autism susceptibility gene, Cntnap2. VoICE will be useful to the scientific community as it can standardize vocalization analyses across species and laboratories. PMID:26018425

  17. Partially Automated Method for Localizing Standardized Acupuncture Points on the Heads of Digital Human Models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungdae; Kang, Dae-In

    2015-01-01

    Having modernized imaging tools for precise positioning of acupuncture points over the human body where the traditional therapeutic method is applied is essential. For that reason, we suggest a more systematic positioning method that uses X-ray computer tomographic images to precisely position acupoints. Digital Korean human data were obtained to construct three-dimensional head-skin and skull surface models of six individuals. Depending on the method used to pinpoint the positions of the acupoints, every acupoint was classified into one of three types: anatomical points, proportional points, and morphological points. A computational algorithm and procedure were developed for partial automation of the positioning. The anatomical points were selected by using the structural characteristics of the skin surface and skull. The proportional points were calculated from the positions of the anatomical points. The morphological points were also calculated by using some control points related to the connections between the source and the target models. All the acupoints on the heads of the six individual were displayed on three-dimensional computer graphical image models. This method may be helpful for developing more accurate experimental designs and for providing more quantitative volumetric methods for performing analyses in acupuncture-related research. PMID:26101534

  18. Model of the tail region of the heliospheric interface

    E-print Network

    Vladislav V. Izmodenov; Dmitry B. Alexashov

    2003-08-12

    Physical processes in the tail of the solar wind interaction region with the partially ionized local interstellar medium are investigated in a framework of the self-consistent kinetic-gas dynamic model. It is shown that the charge exchange process of the hydrogen atoms with the plasma protons results in suppression of the gas dynamic instabilities and disappearance the contact discontinuity at sufficiently (~3000 AU) large distances from the Sun. The solar wind plasma temperature decreases and, ultimately, the parameters of the plasma and hydrogen atoms approach to the corresponding parameters of the unperturbed interstellar medium at large heliocentric distances.

  19. ON THE USE OF WEB SERVICES FOR BUILDING DISTRIBUTED AUTOMATION SYSTEMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MITKO SHOPOV; HRISTO MATEV; GRISHA SPASOV

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses the applicability of Web services for building distributed automation systems and the benefits they bring. An adaptation of some of the well- proven enterprise architecture models and their applicability in distributed measurement is presented. The presented sample implementation is based on open and standardized approaches - high-level programming languages, object-oriented platforms, Internet technologies, and standardized communication interfaces.

  20. Integrating Automated Data into Ecosystem Models: How Can We Drink from a Firehose?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. F.; Harmon, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Sensors and imaging are changing the way we are measuring ecosystem behavior. Within short time frames, we are able to capture how organisms behave in response to rapid change, and detect events that alter composition and shift states. To transform these observations into process-level understanding, we need to efficiently interpret signals. One way to do this is to automatically integrate the data into ecosystem models. In our soil carbon cycling studies, we collect continuous time series for meteorological conditions, soil processes, and automated imagery. To characterize the timing and clarity of change behavior in our data, we adopted signal-processing approaches like coupled wavelet/coherency analyses. In situ CO2 measurements allow us to visualize when root/microbial activity results in CO2 being respired from the soil surface, versus when other chemical/physical phenomena may alter gas pathways. While these approaches are interesting in understanding individual phenomena, they fail to get us beyond the study of individual processes. Sensor data are compared with the outputs from ecosystem models to detect the patterns in specific phenomena or to revise model parameters or traits. For instance, we measured unexpected levels of soil CO2 in a tropical ecosystem. By examining small-scale ecosystem model parameters, we were able to pinpoint those parameters that needed to be altered to resemble the data outputs. However, we do not capture the essence of large-scale ecosystem shifts. The time is right to utilize real-time data assimilation as an additional forcing of ecosystem models. Continuous, diurnal soil temperature and moisture, along with hourly hyphal or root growth could feed into well-established ecosystem models such as HYDRUS or DayCENT. This approach would provide instantaneous "measurements" of shifting ecosystem processes as they occur, allowing us to identify critical process connections more efficiently.

  1. Bilinear modeling of EMG signals to extract user-independent features for multiuser myoelectric interface.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takamitsu; Morimoto, Jun

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we propose a multiuser myoelectric interface that can easily adapt to novel users. When a user performs different motions (e.g., grasping and pinching), different electromyography (EMG) signals are measured. When different users perform the same motion (e.g., grasping), different EMG signals are also measured. Therefore, designing a myoelectric interface that can be used by multiple users to perform multiple motions is difficult. To cope with this problem, we propose for EMG signals a bilinear model that is composed of two linear factors: 1) user dependent and 2) motion dependent. By decomposing the EMG signals into these two factors, the extracted motion-dependent factors can be used as user-independent features. We can construct a motion classifier on the extracted feature space to develop the multiuser interface. For novel users, the proposed adaptation method estimates the user-dependent factor through only a few interactions. The bilinear EMG model with the estimated user-dependent factor can extract the user-independent features from the novel user data. We applied our proposed method to a recognition task of five hand gestures for robotic hand control using four-channel EMG signals measured from subject forearms. Our method resulted in 73% accuracy, which was statistically significantly different from the accuracy of standard nonmultiuser interfaces, as the result of a two-sample t -test at a significance level of 1%. PMID:23475334

  2. Automated choroidal segmentation of 1060 nm OCT in healthy and pathologic eyes using a statistical model

    PubMed Central

    Kaji?, Vedran; Esmaeelpour, Marieh; Považay, Boris; Marshall, David; Rosin, Paul L.; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    A two stage statistical model based on texture and shape for fully automatic choroidal segmentation of normal and pathologic eyes obtained by a 1060 nm optical coherence tomography (OCT) system is developed. A novel dynamic programming approach is implemented to determine location of the retinal pigment epithelium/ Bruch’s membrane /choriocapillaris (RBC) boundary. The choroid–sclera interface (CSI) is segmented using a statistical model. The algorithm is robust even in presence of speckle noise, low signal (thick choroid), retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) detachments and atrophy, drusen, shadowing and other artifacts. Evaluation against a set of 871 manually segmented cross-sectional scans from 12 eyes achieves an average error rate of 13%, computed per tomogram as a ratio of incorrectly classified pixels and the total layer surface. For the first time a fully automatic choroidal segmentation algorithm is successfully applied to a wide range of clinical volumetric OCT data. PMID:22254171

  3. Automated Object-Oriented Simulation Framework for Modelling of Superconducting Magnets at CERN

    E-print Network

    Maciejewski, Micha?; Bartoszewicz, Andrzej

    The thesis aims at designing a flexible, extensible, user-friendly interface to model electro thermal transients occurring in superconducting magnets. Simulations are a fundamental tool for assessing the performance of a magnet and its protection system against the effects of a quench. The application is created using scalable and modular architecture based on object-oriented programming paradigm which opens an easy way for future extensions. What is more, each model composed of thousands of blocks is automatically created in MATLAB/Simulink. Additionally, the user is able to automatically run sets of simulations with varying parameters. Due to its scalability and modularity the framework can be easily used to simulate wide range of materials and magnet configurations.

  4. Automated choroidal segmentation of 1060 nm OCT in healthy and pathologic eyes using a statistical model.

    PubMed

    Kaji?, Vedran; Esmaeelpour, Marieh; Považay, Boris; Marshall, David; Rosin, Paul L; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    A two stage statistical model based on texture and shape for fully automatic choroidal segmentation of normal and pathologic eyes obtained by a 1060 nm optical coherence tomography (OCT) system is developed. A novel dynamic programming approach is implemented to determine location of the retinal pigment epithelium/ Bruch's membrane /choriocapillaris (RBC) boundary. The choroid-sclera interface (CSI) is segmented using a statistical model. The algorithm is robust even in presence of speckle noise, low signal (thick choroid), retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) detachments and atrophy, drusen, shadowing and other artifacts. Evaluation against a set of 871 manually segmented cross-sectional scans from 12 eyes achieves an average error rate of 13%, computed per tomogram as a ratio of incorrectly classified pixels and the total layer surface. For the first time a fully automatic choroidal segmentation algorithm is successfully applied to a wide range of clinical volumetric OCT data. PMID:22254171

  5. MaxMod: a hidden Markov model based novel interface to MODELLER for improved prediction of protein 3D models.

    PubMed

    Parida, Bikram K; Panda, Prasanna K; Misra, Namrata; Mishra, Barada K

    2015-02-01

    Modeling the three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins assumes great significance because of its manifold applications in biomolecular research. Toward this goal, we present MaxMod, a graphical user interface (GUI) of the MODELLER program that combines profile hidden Markov model (profile HMM) method with Clustal Omega program to significantly improve the selection of homologous templates and target-template alignment for construction of accurate 3D protein models. MaxMod distinguishes itself from other existing GUIs of MODELLER software by implementing effortless modeling of proteins using templates that bear modified residues. Additionally, it provides various features such as loop optimization, express modeling (a feature where protein model can be generated directly from its sequence, without any further user intervention) and automatic update of PDB database, thus enhancing the user-friendly control of computational tasks. We find that HMM-based MaxMod performs better than other modeling packages in terms of execution time and model quality. MaxMod is freely available as a downloadable standalone tool for academic and non-commercial purpose at http://www.immt.res.in/maxmod/. PMID:25636267

  6. Interface projection techniques for fluid-structure interaction modeling with moving-mesh methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Sathe, Sunil; Pausewang, Jason; Schwaab, Matthew; Christopher, Jason; Crabtree, Jason

    2008-12-01

    The stabilized space-time fluid-structure interaction (SSTFSI) technique developed by the Team for Advanced Flow Simulation and Modeling (T?AFSM) was applied to a number of 3D examples, including arterial fluid mechanics and parachute aerodynamics. Here we focus on the interface projection techniques that were developed as supplementary methods targeting the computational challenges associated with the geometric complexities of the fluid-structure interface. Although these supplementary techniques were developed in conjunction with the SSTFSI method and in the context of air-fabric interactions, they can also be used in conjunction with other moving-mesh methods, such as the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method, and in the context of other classes of FSI applications. The supplementary techniques currently consist of using split nodal values for pressure at the edges of the fabric and incompatible meshes at the air-fabric interfaces, the FSI Geometric Smoothing Technique (FSI-GST), and the Homogenized Modeling of Geometric Porosity (HMGP). Using split nodal values for pressure at the edges and incompatible meshes at the interfaces stabilizes the structural response at the edges of the membrane used in modeling the fabric. With the FSI-GST, the fluid mechanics mesh is sheltered from the consequences of the geometric complexity of the structure. With the HMGP, we bypass the intractable complexities of the geometric porosity by approximating it with an “equivalent”, locally-varying fabric porosity. As test cases demonstrating how the interface projection techniques work, we compute the air-fabric interactions of windsocks, sails and ringsail parachutes.

  7. Simple model for linear and nonlinear mixing at unstable fluid interfaces in spherical geometry.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, J D

    1999-08-01

    A simple model was recently described for predicting linear and nonlinear mixing at an unstable planar fluid interface subjected to an arbitrary time-dependent variable acceleration history [J. D. Ramshaw, Phys. Rev. E 58, 5834 (1998)]. Here we present an analogous model for describing the mixing of two adjacent spherical fluid shells of different density resulting from an arbitrary time-dependent mean interface radius R(t). As in the planar case, the model is based on a heuristic expression for the kinetic energy of the system. This expression is based on that for the kinetic energy of a linearly perturbed interface, but with a dynamically renormalized effective wavelength which becomes proportional to the half-width a(t) of the mixing layer in the nonlinear regime. An equation of motion for s=R(2)a is then derived from Lagrange's equations. This evolution equation properly reduces to Plesset's equation for small perturbations, and to the previous planar model in the limit of very large R. The conservation properties of the model are established, and a suitable numerical scheme which preserves these properties is proposed. PMID:11969962

  8. International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 36 (2006) 511526 A dynamic model of interaction between reliance on automation and

    E-print Network

    Lee, John D.

    2006-01-01

    between reliance on automation and cooperation in multi-operator multi-automation situations Ji Gaoa elements of automation. The success of such multi-operator multi-automation systems depends not only on individual operator's appropriate use of automation, but also on cooperation between operators. Inappropriate

  9. Automated multi-objective calibration of a water quality model for the Senne river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Griensven, A.; Bauwens, W.

    2003-04-01

    Integrated modelling for water quality leads to a higher number of output variables and parameters and the optimisation is therefore very tedious. A multi-objective calibration is able to integrate several variables or several output locations simultaneously and leads to a solution that accounts for several objectives. The method is automated by using the shuffled complex evolution algorithm for the minimisation of a global optimisation criterion that represents the errors on the output variables that are to be considered for decision making. A method of aggregation of the individual objective, based on the cumulative distribution function of the errors, can overcome the weighting problems of the traditional multi-objective calibrations. The uncertainty on the calibration is evaluated based on the following criteria: the degree of trade-off, the identifiability and the variability of the output for the "equally good" calibrations. A high degree of trade-off indicates problems in the structure of the model or the program whereby not all variables can be considered in the calibration process. It is then not appropriate to use all output variables for decision making. The analysis also allows analysing whether the decision based on the model output can be influenced by uncertainties due to the calibration. The methodology is applied on the river Senne that is highly polluted by spoint source pollution as well as diffuse pollution by agriculture. The highly urbanised area of the Brussels Capital region is modelled with KOSIM, while the other areas are modelled with ESWAT that considers among others rainfall runoff, crop management, nutrient wash-off, river flow, river water quality processes.

  10. Integrated surface and groundwater modelling in the Thames Basin, UK using the Open Modelling Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Jonathan; Abesser, Corinna; Hughes, Andrew; Jackson, Chris; Kingdon, Andrew; Mansour, Majdi; Pachocka, Magdalena; Wang, Lei; Williams, Ann

    2013-04-01

    The River Thames catchment is situated in the south-east of England. It covers approximately 16,000 km2 and is the most heavily populated river basin in the UK. It is also one of the driest and has experienced severe drought events in the recent past. With the onset of climate change and human exploitation of our environment, there are now serious concerns over the sustainability of water resources in this basin with 6 million m3 consumed every day for public water supply alone. Groundwater in the Thames basin is extremely important, providing 40% of water for public supply. The principal aquifer is the Chalk, a dual permeability limestone, which has been extensively studied to understand its hydraulic properties. The fractured Jurassic limestone in the upper catchment also forms an important aquifer, supporting baseflow downstream during periods of drought. These aquifers are unconnected other than through the River Thames and its tributaries, which provide two-thirds of London's drinking water. Therefore, to manage these water resources sustainably and to make robust projections into the future, surface and groundwater processes must be considered in combination. This necessitates the simulation of the feedbacks and complex interactions between different parts of the water cycle, and the development of integrated environmental models. The Open Modelling Interface (OpenMI) standard provides a method through which environmental models of varying complexity and structure can be linked, allowing them to run simultaneously and exchange data at each timestep. This architecture has allowed us to represent the surface and subsurface flow processes within the Thames basin at an appropriate level of complexity based on our understanding of particular hydrological processes and features. We have developed a hydrological model in OpenMI which integrates a process-driven, gridded finite difference groundwater model of the Chalk with a more simplistic, semi-distributed conceptual model of the Jurassic limestone. A distributed river routing model of the Thames has also been integrated to connect the surface and subsurface hydrological processes. This application demonstrates the potential benefits and issues associated with implementing this approach.

  11. Wall modeling for implicit large-eddy simulation and immersed-interface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen Li; Hickel, Stefan; Devesa, Antoine; Berland, Julien; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2014-02-01

    We propose and analyze a wall model based on the turbulent boundary layer equations (TBLE) for implicit large-eddy simulation (LES) of high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows in conjunction with a conservative immersed-interface method for mapping complex boundaries onto Cartesian meshes. Both implicit subgrid-scale model and immersed-interface treatment of boundaries offer high computational efficiency for complex flow configurations. The wall model operates directly on the Cartesian computational mesh without the need for a dual boundary-conforming mesh. The combination of wall model and implicit LES is investigated in detail for turbulent channel flow at friction Reynolds numbers from Re ? = 395 up to Re ? =100,000 on very coarse meshes. The TBLE wall model with implicit LES gives results of better quality than current explicit LES based on eddy viscosity subgrid-scale models with similar wall models. A straightforward formulation of the wall model performs well at moderately large Reynolds numbers. A logarithmic-layer mismatch, observed only at very large Reynolds numbers, is removed by introducing a new structure-based damping function. The performance of the overall approach is assessed for two generic configurations with flow separation: the backward-facing step at Re h = 5,000 and the periodic hill at Re H = 10,595 and Re H = 37,000 on very coarse meshes. The results confirm the observations made for the channel flow with respect to the good prediction quality and indicate that the combination of implicit LES, immersed-interface method, and TBLE-based wall modeling is a viable approach for simulating complex aerodynamic flows at high Reynolds numbers. They also reflect the limitations of TBLE-based wall models.

  12. Modeling strategic use of human computer interfaces with novel hidden Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Laura J.; Poore, Joshua C.; Krum, David M.; Schwartz, Jana L.; Coskren, William D.; Jones, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Immersive software tools are virtual environments designed to give their users an augmented view of real-world data and ways of manipulating that data. As virtual environments, every action users make while interacting with these tools can be carefully logged, as can the state of the software and the information it presents to the user, giving these actions context. This data provides a high-resolution lens through which dynamic cognitive and behavioral processes can be viewed. In this report, we describe new methods for the analysis and interpretation of such data, utilizing a novel implementation of the Beta Process Hidden Markov Model (BP-HMM) for analysis of software activity logs. We further report the results of a preliminary study designed to establish the validity of our modeling approach. A group of 20 participants were asked to play a simple computer game, instrumented to log every interaction with the interface. Participants had no previous experience with the game's functionality or rules, so the activity logs collected during their naïve interactions capture patterns of exploratory behavior and skill acquisition as they attempted to learn the rules of the game. Pre- and post-task questionnaires probed for self-reported styles of problem solving, as well as task engagement, difficulty, and workload. We jointly modeled the activity log sequences collected from all participants using the BP-HMM approach, identifying a global library of activity patterns representative of the collective behavior of all the participants. Analyses show systematic relationships between both pre- and post-task questionnaires, self-reported approaches to analytic problem solving, and metrics extracted from the BP-HMM decomposition. Overall, we find that this novel approach to decomposing unstructured behavioral data within software environments provides a sensible means for understanding how users learn to integrate software functionality for strategic task pursuit.

  13. Modeling strategic use of human computer interfaces with novel hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Laura J; Poore, Joshua C; Krum, David M; Schwartz, Jana L; Coskren, William D; Jones, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Immersive software tools are virtual environments designed to give their users an augmented view of real-world data and ways of manipulating that data. As virtual environments, every action users make while interacting with these tools can be carefully logged, as can the state of the software and the information it presents to the user, giving these actions context. This data provides a high-resolution lens through which dynamic cognitive and behavioral processes can be viewed. In this report, we describe new methods for the analysis and interpretation of such data, utilizing a novel implementation of the Beta Process Hidden Markov Model (BP-HMM) for analysis of software activity logs. We further report the results of a preliminary study designed to establish the validity of our modeling approach. A group of 20 participants were asked to play a simple computer game, instrumented to log every interaction with the interface. Participants had no previous experience with the game's functionality or rules, so the activity logs collected during their naïve interactions capture patterns of exploratory behavior and skill acquisition as they attempted to learn the rules of the game. Pre- and post-task questionnaires probed for self-reported styles of problem solving, as well as task engagement, difficulty, and workload. We jointly modeled the activity log sequences collected from all participants using the BP-HMM approach, identifying a global library of activity patterns representative of the collective behavior of all the participants. Analyses show systematic relationships between both pre- and post-task questionnaires, self-reported approaches to analytic problem solving, and metrics extracted from the BP-HMM decomposition. Overall, we find that this novel approach to decomposing unstructured behavioral data within software environments provides a sensible means for understanding how users learn to integrate software functionality for strategic task pursuit. PMID:26191026

  14. Third-generation electrokinetically pumped sheath-flow nanospray interface with improved stability and sensitivity for automated capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometry analysis of complex proteome digests.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Zhang, Zhenbin; Mou, Si; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-05-01

    We have reported a set of electrokinetically pumped sheath flow nanoelectrospray interfaces to couple capillary zone electrophoresis with mass spectrometry. A separation capillary is threaded through a cross into a glass emitter. A side arm provides fluidic contact with a sheath buffer reservoir that is connected to a power supply. The potential applied to the sheath buffer drives electro-osmosis in the emitter to pump the sheath fluid at nanoliter per minute rates. Our first-generation interface placed a flat-tipped capillary in the emitter. Sensitivity was inversely related to orifice size and to the distance from the capillary tip to the emitter orifice. A second-generation interface used a capillary with an etched tip that allowed the capillary exit to approach within a few hundred micrometers of the emitter orifice, resulting in a significant increase in sensitivity. In both the first- and second-generation interfaces, the emitter diameter was typically 8 ?m; these narrow orifices were susceptible to plugging and tended to have limited lifetime. We now report a third-generation interface that employs a larger diameter emitter orifice with very short distance between the capillary tip and the emitter orifice. This modified interface is much more robust and produces much longer lifetime than our previous designs with no loss in sensitivity. We evaluated the third-generation interface for a 5000 min (127 runs, 3.5 days) repetitive analysis of bovine serum albumin digest using an uncoated capillary. We observed a 10% relative standard deviation in peak area, an average of 160?000 theoretical plates, and very low carry-over (much less than 1%). We employed a linear-polyacrylamide (LPA)-coated capillary for single-shot, bottom-up proteomic analysis of 300 ng of Xenopus laevis fertilized egg proteome digest and identified 1249 protein groups and 4038 peptides in a 110 min separation using an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; peak capacity was ?330. The proteome data set using this third-generation interface-based CZE-MS/MS is similar in size to that generated using a commercial ultraperformance liquid chromatographic analysis of the same sample with the same mass spectrometer and similar analysis time. PMID:25786131

  15. Cockpit automation - In need of a philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    Concern has been expressed over the rapid development and deployment of automatic devices in transport aircraft, due mainly to the human interface and particularly the role of automation in inducing human error. The paper discusses the need for coherent philosophies of automation, and proposes several approaches: (1) flight management by exception, which states that as long as a crew stays within the bounds of regulations, air traffic control and flight safety, it may fly as it sees fit; (2) exceptions by forecasting, where the use of forecasting models would predict boundary penetration, rather than waiting for it to happen; (3) goal-sharing, where a computer is informed of overall goals, and subsequently has the capability of checking inputs and aircraft position for consistency with the overall goal or intentions; and (4) artificial intelligence and expert systems, where intelligent machines could mimic human reason.

  16. Automating the analytical laboratory via the Chemical Analysis Automation paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.; Rzeszutko, C.

    1997-10-01

    To address the need for standardization within the analytical chemistry laboratories of the nation, the Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program within the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology`s Robotic Technology Development Program is developing laboratory sample analysis systems that will automate the environmental chemical laboratories. The current laboratory automation paradigm consists of islands-of-automation that do not integrate into a system architecture. Thus, today the chemist must perform most aspects of environmental analysis manually using instrumentation that generally cannot communicate with other devices in the laboratory. CAA is working towards a standardized and modular approach to laboratory automation based upon the Standard Analysis Method (SAM) architecture. Each SAM system automates a complete chemical method. The building block of a SAM is known as the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). The SLM, either hardware or software, automates a subprotocol of an analysis method and can operate as a standalone or as a unit within a SAM. The CAA concept allows the chemist to easily assemble an automated analysis system, from sample extraction through data interpretation, using standardized SLMs without the worry of hardware or software incompatibility or the necessity of generating complicated control programs. A Task Sequence Controller (TSC) software program schedules and monitors the individual tasks to be performed by each SLM configured within a SAM. The chemist interfaces with the operation of the TSC through the Human Computer Interface (HCI), a logical, icon-driven graphical user interface. The CAA paradigm has successfully been applied in automating EPA SW-846 Methods 3541/3620/8081 for the analysis of PCBs in a soil matrix utilizing commercially available equipment in tandem with SLMs constructed by CAA.

  17. The DaveMLTranslator: An Interface for DAVE-ML Aerodynamic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Melissa A.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    It can take weeks or months to incorporate a new aerodynamic model into a vehicle simulation and validate the performance of the model. The Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language (DAVE-ML) has been proposed as a means to reduce the time required to accomplish this task by defining a standard format for typical components of a flight dynamic model. The purpose of this paper is to describe an object-oriented C++ implementation of a class that interfaces a vehicle subsystem model specified in DAVE-ML and a vehicle simulation. Using the DaveMLTranslator class, aerodynamic or other subsystem models can be automatically imported and verified at run-time, significantly reducing the elapsed time between receipt of a DAVE-ML model and its integration into a simulation environment. The translator performs variable initializations, data table lookups, and mathematical calculations for the aerodynamic build-up, and executes any embedded static check-cases for verification. The implementation is efficient, enabling real-time execution. Simple interface code for the model inputs and outputs is the only requirement to integrate the DaveMLTranslator as a vehicle aerodynamic model. The translator makes use of existing table-lookup utilities from the Langley Standard Real-Time Simulation in C++ (LaSRS++). The design and operation of the translator class is described and comparisons with existing, conventional, C++ aerodynamic models of the same vehicle are given.

  18. Automation based on knowledge modeling theory and its applications in engine diagnostic systems using Space Shuttle Main Engine vibrational data. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jonnathan H.

    1995-01-01

    Humans can perform many complicated tasks without explicit rules. This inherent and advantageous capability becomes a hurdle when a task is to be automated. Modern computers and numerical calculations require explicit rules and discrete numerical values. In order to bridge the gap between human knowledge and automating tools, a knowledge model is proposed. Knowledge modeling techniques are discussed and utilized to automate a labor and time intensive task of detecting anomalous bearing wear patterns in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP).

  19. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    SciTech Connect

    Paumel, K.; Baque, F. [CEA, DEN, Nuclear Technology Department, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Moysan, J.; Corneloup, G. [Laboratoire de Caracterisation Non Destructive, Universite de la Mediterranee, IUT Aix-en-Provence, Avenue Gaston Berger, 13625 Aix-en-Provence (France); Chatain, D. [CNRS, Aix-Marseille Universite, CINAM-UPR3118, Campus de Luminy, Case 913, 13288 Marseille cedex 09 (France)

    2011-08-15

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  20. Continental hydrosystem modelling: the concept of nested stream-aquifer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flipo, N.; Mouhri, A.; Labarthe, B.; Biancamaria, S.; Rivière, A.; Weill, P.

    2014-08-01

    Coupled hydrological-hydrogeological models, emphasising the importance of the stream-aquifer interface, are more and more used in hydrological sciences for pluri-disciplinary studies aiming at investigating environmental issues. Based on an extensive literature review, stream-aquifer interfaces are described at five different scales: local [10 cm-~10 m], intermediate [~10 m-~1 km], watershed [10 km2-~1000 km2], regional [10 000 km2-~1 M km2] and continental scales [>10 M km2]. This led us to develop the concept of nested stream-aquifer interfaces, which extends the well-known vision of nested groundwater pathways towards the surface, where the mixing of low frequency processes and high frequency processes coupled with the complexity of geomorphological features and heterogeneities creates hydrological spiralling. This conceptual framework allows the identification of a hierarchical order of the multi-scale control factors of stream-aquifer hydrological exchanges, from the larger scale to the finer scale. The hyporheic corridor, which couples the river to its 3-D hyporheic zone, is then identified as the key component for scaling hydrological processes occurring at the interface. The identification of the hyporheic corridor as the support of the hydrological processes scaling is an important step for the development of regional studies, which is one of the main concerns for water practitioners and resources managers. In a second part, the modelling of the stream-aquifer interface at various scales is investigated with the help of the conductance model. Although the usage of the temperature as a tracer of the flow is a robust method for the assessment of stream-aquifer exchanges at the local scale, there is a crucial need to develop innovative methodologies for assessing stream-aquifer exchanges at the regional scale. After formulating the conductance model at the regional and intermediate scales, we address this challenging issue with the development of an iterative modelling methodology, which ensures the consistency of stream-aquifer exchanges between the intermediate and regional scales. Finally, practical recommendations are provided for the study of the interface using the innovative methodology MIM (Measurements-Interpolation-Modelling), which is graphically developed, scaling in space the three pools of methods needed to fully understand stream-aquifer interfaces at various scales. In the MIM space, stream-aquifer interfaces that can be studied by a given approach are localised. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated with two examples. The first one proposes an upscaling framework, structured around river reaches of ~10-100 m, from the local to the watershed scale. The second example highlights the usefulness of space borne data to improve the assessment of stream-aquifer exchanges at the regional and continental scales. We conclude that further developments in modelling and field measurements have to be undertaken at the regional scale to enable a proper modelling of stream-aquifer exchanges from the local to the continental scale.

  1. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paumel, K.; Moysan, J.; Chatain, D.; Corneloup, G.; Baqué, F.

    2011-08-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  2. Modeling the interface of Li metal and Li solid electrolytes from first principles Nicholas Lepley, N. A. W. Holzwarth

    E-print Network

    Holzwarth, Natalie

    an electrochemical cell of Li/Li3PS4/Li with excellent cycle life . Overview Solid electrolyte materialsModeling the interface of Li metal and Li solid electrolytes from first principles Nicholas Lepley reactive electrode/electrolyte interfaces, and with the discovery of several new high conductivity solids

  3. Power Modeling of Graphical User Interfaces on OLED Mian Dong Yung-Seok Kevin Choi Lin Zhong

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    Power Modeling of Graphical User Interfaces on OLED Displays Mian Dong Yung-Seok Kevin Choi Lin Algorithms, Measurement, Human Factors Keywords OLED Display, Graphic User Interface, Low Power 1, optimization as well as energy- efficient GUI design, given the display content or even the graph- ical user

  4. Designing of Multi-Interface Diverging Experiments to Model Rayleigh-Taylor Growth in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Meakin, C.; Arnett, D.; Miles, A.; Robey, H.; Hansen, J.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M.

    2008-05-01

    In previous experiments on the Omega Laser, researchers studying blast-wave-driven instabilities have observed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities under conditions scaled to the He/H interface of SN1987A. Most of these experiments have been planar experiments, as the energy available proved unable to accelerate enough mass in a diverging geometry. With the advent of the NIF laser, which can deliver hundreds of kJ to an experiment, it is possible to produce 3D, blast-wave-driven, multiple-interface explosions and to study the mixing that develops. We report scaling simulations to model the interface dynamics of a multilayered, diverging Rayleigh-Taylor experiment for NIF using CALE, a hybrid adaptive Lagrangian-Eulerian code developed at LLNL. Specifically, we looked both qualitatively and quantitatively at the Rayleigh-Taylor growth and multi-interface interactions in mass-scaled, spherically divergent systems using different materials. The simulations will assist in the target design process and help choose diagnostics to maximize the information we receive in a particular shot. Simulations are critical for experimental planning, especially for experiments on large-scale facilities. *This research was sponsored by LLNL through contract LLNL B56128 and by the NNSA through DOE Research Grant DE-FG52-04NA00064.

  5. A study of the ice-water interface using the TIP4P/2005 water model.

    PubMed

    Benet, Jorge; MacDowell, Luis G; Sanz, Eduardo

    2014-10-28

    In this work we study the ice-water interface under coexistence conditions by means of molecular simulations using the TIP4P/2005 water model. Following the methodology proposed by Hoyt and co-workers [J. J. Hoyt, M. Asta and A. Karma, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2001, 86, 5530] we measure the interfacial free energy of ice with liquid water by analysing the spectrum of capillary fluctuations of the interface. We get an orientationally averaged interfacial free energy of 27(2) mN m(-1), in good agreement with a recent estimate obtained from simulation data of the size of critical clusters [E. Sanz, C. Vega, J. R. Espinosa, R. Caballero-Bernal, J. L. F. Abascal and C. Valeriani, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 15008]. We also estimate the interfacial free energy of different planes and obtain 27(2), 28(2) and 28(2) mN m(-1) for the basal, the primary prismatic and the secondary prismatic planes respectively. Finally, we inspect the structure of the interface and find that its thickness is approximately 4-5 molecular diameters. Moreover, we find that when the basal plane is exposed to the fluid the interface alternates regions of cubic ice with regions of hexagonal ice. PMID:25213106

  6. Characterizing and Modeling Brittle Bi-material Interfaces Subjected to Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos N.; Berggreen, Christian

    2014-12-01

    This work is based on the investigation, both experimentally and numerically, of the Mode II fracture process and bond strength of bondlines formed in co-cured composite/metal joints. To this end, GFRP-to-steel double strap joints were tested in tension, so that the bi-material interface was subjected to shear with debonding occurring under Mode II conditions. The study of the debonding process and thus failure of the joints was based both on stress and energy considerations. Analytical formulas were utilized for the derivation of the respective shear strength and fracture toughness measures which characterize the bi-material interface, by considering the joint's failure load, geometry and involved materials. The derived stress and toughness magnitudes were further utilized as the parameters of an extrinsic cohesive law, applied in connection with the modeling the bi-material interface in a finite element simulation environment. It was concluded that interfacial fracture in the considered joints was driven by the fracture toughness and not by strength considerations, and that LEFM is well suited to analyze the failure of the joint. Additionally, the double strap joint geometry was identified and utilized as a characterization test for measuring the Mode II fracture toughness of brittle bi-material interfaces.

  7. A surfactantless emulsion as a model for the liquid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Katherine Mary

    An electrochemically polarised liquid-liquid interface in the form of a surfactantless oil-in-water emulsion has been developed, and its creation, stabilisation and use as a model liquid-liquid system for structural characterisation using Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) are described. The emulsion, composed of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE)-in-D20, was created using a condensation method and the two main processes of destabilisation, sedimentation and coalescence, were minimised using density-matching and electrochemistry. The stabilised emulsion interface was then studied with SANS, using the Dll and D22 diffractometers at the ILL and LOQ at ISIS. This was to determine structural information regarding a layer of adsorbed Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein at the interface with and without stabilising salts and the only analysable results were obtained using Dll, due to the lower Q-range accessible. The BSA layer thickness was determined to be 40 and 48 A for emulsions with and without salts respectively, and this was comparable with the literature thickness of 40 A. Another use for the surfactantless emulsion would be for electrodeless electrodeposition of metals at the interface, utilising the interfacial potential, and preliminary experiments were carried out using both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions.

  8. A study of the ice-water interface using the TIP4P/2005 water model

    E-print Network

    Jorge Benet; Luis G. MacDowell; Eduardo Sanz

    2014-10-01

    In this work we study the ice-water interface under coexistence conditions by means of molecular simulations using the TIP4P/2005 water model. Following the methodology proposed by Hoyt and co-workers [J. J. Hoyt, M. Asta and A. Karma, Phys. Rev. Lett., 86, 5530, (2001)] we measure the interfacial free energy of ice with liquid water by analysing the spectrum of capillary fluctuations of the interface. We get an orientationally averaged interfacial free energy of 27(2) mN/m, in good agreement with a recent estimate obtained from simulation data of the size of critical clusters [E. Sanz, C. Vega, J. R. Espinosa, R. Caballero-Bernal, J. L. F. Abascal and C. Valeriani, JACS, 135, 15008, (2013)]. We also estimate the interfacial free energy of different planes and obtain 27(2), 28(2)and 28(2) mN/m for the basal, the primary prismatic and the secondary prismatic planes respectively. Finally, we inspect the structure of the interface and find that its thickness is of approximately 4-5 molecular diameters. Moreover, we find that when the basal plane is exposed to the fluid the interface alternates regions of cubic ice with regions of hexagonal ice.

  9. Automation of one-loop QCD corrections

    E-print Network

    Valentin Hirschi; Rikkert Frederix; Stefano Frixione; Maria Vittoria Garzelli; Fabio Maltoni; Roberto Pittau

    2013-05-14

    We present the complete automation of the computation of one-loop QCD corrections, including UV renormalization, to an arbitrary scattering process in the Standard Model. This is achieved by embedding the OPP integrand reduction technique, as implemented in CutTools, into the MadGraph framework. By interfacing the tool so constructed, which we dub MadLoop, with MadFKS, the fully automatic computation of any infrared-safe observable at the next-to-leading order in QCD is attained. We demonstrate the flexibility and the reach of our method by calculating the production rates for a variety of processes at the 7 TeV LHC.

  10. Formulation of consumables management models: Mission planning processor payload interface definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torian, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Consumables models required for the mission planning and scheduling function are formulated. The relation of the models to prelaunch, onboard, ground support, and postmission functions for the space transportation systems is established. Analytical models consisting of an orbiter planning processor with consumables data base is developed. A method of recognizing potential constraint violations in both the planning and flight operations functions, and a flight data file storage/retrieval of information over an extended period which interfaces with a flight operations processor for monitoring of the actual flights is presented.

  11. An approximate model and empirical energy function for solute interactions with a water-phosphatidylcholine interface.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, C R; Schwonek, J P

    1993-01-01

    An empirical model of a liquid crystalline (L alpha phase) phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayer interface is presented along with a function which calculates the position-dependent energy of associated solutes. The model approximates the interface as a gradual two-step transition, the first step being from an aqueous phase to a phase of reduced polarity, but which maintains a high enough concentration of water and/or polar head group moieties to satisfy the hydrogen bond-forming potential of the solute. The second transition is from the hydrogen bonding/low polarity region to an effectively anhydrous hydrocarbon phase. The "interfacial energies" of solutes within this variable medium are calculated based upon atomic positions and atomic parameters describing general polarity and hydrogen bond donor/acceptor propensities. This function was tested for its ability to reproduce experimental water-solvent partitioning energies and water-bilayer partitioning data. In both cases, the experimental data was reproduced fairly well. Energy minimizations carried out on beta-hexyl glucopyranoside led to identification of a global minimum for the interface-associated glycolipid which exhibited glycosidic torsion angles in agreement with prior results (Hare, B.J., K.P. Howard, and J.H. Prestegard. 1993. Biophys. J. 64:392-398). Molecular dynamics simulations carried out upon this same molecule within the simulated interface led to results which were consistent with a number of experimentally based conclusions from previous work, but failed to quantitatively reproduce an available NMR quadrupolar/dipolar coupling data set (Sanders, C.R., and J.H. Prestegard. 1991. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 113:1987-1996). The proposed model and functions are readily incorporated into computational energy modeling algorithms and may prove useful in future studies of membrane-associated molecules. PMID:8241401

  12. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schebarchov, D; Schulze, T P; Hendy, S C

    2014-02-21

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level. PMID:24559357

  13. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schebarchov, D., E-mail: Dmitri.Schebarchov@gmail.com [University Chemical Laboratories, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Schulze, T. P., E-mail: schulze@math.utk.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1300 (United States); Hendy, S. C. [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand) [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2014-02-21

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level.

  14. A cell-electrode interface noise model for high-density microelectrode arrays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil Joye; Alexandre Schmid; Yusuf Leblebici

    2009-01-01

    A cell-electrode interface noise model is developed which is dedicated to enable the co-simulation of the cell-electrode electrical characteristics, along with the electronics of novel CMOS-based MEA. The electrode noise is investigated for Pt and Pt black electrodes. It is shown that the electrode noise can be the dominant noise source in the full system. Moreover, Pt black electrodes benefit

  15. Numerical analysis of composite systems by using interphase\\/interface models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Chaboche; R. Girard; A. Schaff

    1997-01-01

    The paper considers two classes of approaches for the numerical analysis of composite systems: the first one discretizes\\u000a the assumed interphase (between matrix and fibre) as volumic elements and uses material models that degenerate from Continuum\\u000a Damage Mechanics. The second one introduces interface elements that relate non linearly the normal and tangential tractions\\u000a to the corresponding displacement discontinuities, incorporating a

  16. A Hybrid Geometric–Statistical Deformable Model for Automated 3-D Segmentation in Brain MRI

    PubMed Central

    Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Tam, Roger

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel 3-D deformable model-based approach for accurate, robust, and automated tissue segmentation of brain MRI data of single as well as multiple magnetic resonance sequences. The main contribution of this study is that we employ an edge-based geodesic active contour for the segmentation task by integrating both image edge geometry and voxel statistical homogeneity into a novel hybrid geometric–statistical feature to regularize contour convergence and extract complex anatomical structures. We validate the accuracy of the segmentation results on simulated brain MRI scans of both single T1-weighted and multiple T1/T2/PD-weighted sequences. We also demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method when applied to clinical brain MRI scans. When compared to a current state-of-the-art region-based level-set segmentation formulation, our white matter and gray matter segmentation resulted in significantly higher accuracy levels with a mean improvement in Dice similarity indexes of 8.55% (p < 0.0001) and 10.18% (p < 0.0001), respectively. PMID:19336280

  17. Modeling and control of tissue compression and temperature for automation in robot-assisted surgery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Utkarsh; Li, Baichun; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is being used widely due to its various benefits that includes reduced patient trauma and increased dexterity and ergonomics for the operating surgeon. Making the whole or part of the surgical procedure autonomous increases patient safety and will enable the robotic surgery platform to be used in telesurgery. In this work, an Electrosurgery procedure that involves tissue compression and application of heat such as the coaptic vessel closure has been automated. A MIMO nonlinear model characterizing the tissue stiffness and conductance under compression was feedback linearized and tuned PID controllers were used to control the system to achieve both the displacement and temperature constraints. A reference input for both the constraints were chosen as a ramp and hold trajectory which reflect the real constraints that exist in an actual surgical procedure. Our simulations showed that the controllers successfully tracked the reference trajectories with minimal deviation and in finite time horizon. The MIMO system with controllers developed in this work can be used to drive a surgical robot autonomously and perform electrosurgical procedures such as coaptic vessel closures. PMID:25569973

  18. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Hwisoo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model. PMID:26076406

  19. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hwisoo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model. PMID:26076406

  20. Longitudinal Characterization of Brain Atrophy of a Huntington Disease Mouse Model by Automated Morphological Analyses of Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiangyang; Peng, Qi; Li, Qing; Jahanshad, Neda; Hou, Zhipeng; Jiang, Mali; Masuda, Naoki; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Miller, Michael I.; Mori, Susumu; Ross, Christopher A.; Duan, Wenzhen

    2010-01-01

    Mouse models of human diseases play crucial roles in understanding disease mechanisms and developing therapeutic measures. Huntington’s disease (HD) is characterized by striatal atrophy that begins long before the onset of motor symptoms. In symptomatic HD, striatal volumes decline predictably with disease course. Thus, imaging based volumetric measures have been proposed as outcomes for presymptomatic as well as symptomatic clinical trials of HD. Magnetic resonance imaging of the mouse brain structures is becoming widely available and has been proposed as one of the biomarkers of disease progression and drug efficacy testing. However, three-dimensional and quantitative morphological analyses of the brains are not straightforward. In this paper, we describe a tool for automated segmentation and voxel-based morphological analyses of the mouse brains. This tool was applied to a well-established mouse model of Huntington disease, the R6/2 transgenic mouse strain. Comparison between the automated and manual segmentation results showed excellent agreement in most brain regions. The automated method was able to sensitively detect atrophy as early as 3 weeks of age and accurately follow disease progression. Comparison between ex vivo and in vivo MRI suggests that the ex vivo end-point measurement of brain morphology is also a valid approach except for the morphology of the ventricles. This is the first report of longitudinal characterization of brain atrophy in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease by using automatic morphological analysis. PMID:19850133

  1. Simplifying the interaction between cognitive models and task environments with the JSON Network Interface.

    PubMed

    Hope, Ryan M; Schoelles, Michael J; Gray, Wayne D

    2014-12-01

    Process models of cognition, written in architectures such as ACT-R and EPIC, should be able to interact with the same software with which human subjects interact. By eliminating the need to simulate the experiment, this approach would simplify the modeler's effort, while ensuring that all steps required of the human are also required by the model. In practice, the difficulties of allowing one software system to interact with another present a significant barrier to any modeler who is not also skilled at this type of programming. The barrier increases if the programming language used by the modeling software differs from that used by the experimental software. The JSON Network Interface simplifies this problem for ACT-R modelers, and potentially, modelers using other systems. PMID:24338626

  2. Understanding the Search Interfaces of the Deep Web Based on Domain Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaojie Yuan; Huibin Zhang; Zong-Yun Yang; Yanlong Wen

    2009-01-01

    The Web has been rapidly deepened by many searchable databases online recently. Those databases can be accessed through form-based search interfaces that allow users to specify query conditions. For integrating Web databases, the very first challenge is to understand the search interface. Such a search interface can be considered as an interface schema with multiple attributes, however, the interface is

  3. Interface Design and Human Factors Considerations for Model-Based Tight Glycemic Control in Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Logan; Steel, James; Le Compte, Aaron; Evans, Alicia; Tan, Chia-Siong; Penning, Sophie; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to implement. Model-based methods and computerized protocols offer the opportunity to improve TGC quality and compliance. This research presents an interface design to maximize compliance, minimize real and perceived clinical effort, and minimize error based on simple human factors and end user input. Method The graphical user interface (GUI) design is presented by construction based on a series of simple, short design criteria based on fundamental human factors engineering and includes the use of user feedback and focus groups comprising nursing staff at Christchurch Hospital. The overall design maximizes ease of use and minimizes (unnecessary) interaction and use. It is coupled to a protocol that allows nurse staff to select measurement intervals and thus self-manage workload. Results The overall GUI design is presented and requires only one data entry point per intervention cycle. The design and main interface are heavily focused on the nurse end users who are the predominant users, while additional detailed and longitudinal data, which are of interest to doctors guiding overall patient care, are available via tabs. This dichotomy of needs and interests based on the end user's immediate focus and goals shows how interfaces must adapt to offer different information to multiple types of users. Conclusions The interface is designed to minimize real and perceived clinical effort, and ongoing pilot trials have reported high levels of acceptance. The overall design principles, approach, and testing methods are based on fundamental human factors principles designed to reduce user effort and error and are readily generalizable. PMID:22401330

  4. Automation for System Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land; Throop, David; Thronesbery, Carroll; Flores, Joshua; Bennett, Ted; Wennberg, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This presentation describes work to integrate a set of tools to support early model-based analysis of failures and hazards due to system-software interactions. The tools perform and assist analysts in the following tasks: 1) extract model parts from text for architecture and safety/hazard models; 2) combine the parts with library information to develop the models for visualization and analysis; 3) perform graph analysis and simulation to identify and evaluate possible paths from hazard sources to vulnerable entities and functions, in nominal and anomalous system-software configurations and scenarios; and 4) identify resulting candidate scenarios for software integration testing. There has been significant technical progress in model extraction from Orion program text sources, architecture model derivation (components and connections) and documentation of extraction sources. Models have been derived from Internal Interface Requirements Documents (IIRDs) and FMEA documents. Linguistic text processing is used to extract model parts and relationships, and the Aerospace Ontology also aids automated model development from the extracted information. Visualizations of these models assist analysts in requirements overview and in checking consistency and completeness.

  5. Design of an automated cocktail mixing experience

    E-print Network

    Aguirre, Alejandro, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the design concept development of an automated cocktail mixing device and user interface that is capable of dispensing a variety of alcoholic and non-alcoholic ingredients to produce a myriad of drink ...

  6. Automated modeling of ecosystem CO2 fluxes based on closed chamber measurements: A standardized conceptual and practical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Hagemann, Ulrike; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Closed chamber measurements are widely used for determining the CO2 exchange of small-scale or heterogeneous ecosystems. Among the chamber design and operational handling, the data processing procedure is a considerable source of uncertainty of obtained results. We developed a standardized automatic data processing algorithm, based on the language and statistical computing environment R© to (i) calculate measured CO2 flux rates, (ii) parameterize ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary production (GPP) models, (iii) optionally compute an adaptive temperature model, (iv) model Reco, GPP and net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and (v) evaluate model uncertainty (calibration, validation and uncertainty prediction). The algorithm was tested for different manual and automatic chamber measurement systems (such as e.g. automated NEE-chambers and the LI-8100A soil CO2 Flux system) and ecosystems. Our study shows that even minor changes within the modelling approach may result in considerable differences of calculated flux rates, derived photosynthetic active radiation and temperature dependencies and subsequently modeled Reco, GPP and NEE balance of up to 25%. Thus, certain modeling implications will be given, since automated and standardized data processing procedures, based on clearly defined criteria, such as statistical parameters and thresholds are a prerequisite and highly desirable to guarantee the reproducibility, traceability of modelling results and encourage a better comparability between closed chamber based CO2 measurements.

  7. VSDMIP 1.5: an automated structure- and ligand-based virtual screening platform with a PyMOL graphical user interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Álvaro Cortés Cabrera; Rubén Gil-Redondo; Almudena Perona; Federico Gago; Antonio Morreale

    2011-01-01

    A graphical user interface (GUI) for our previously published virtual screening (VS) and data management platform VSDMIP (Gil-Redondo\\u000a et al. J Comput Aided Mol Design, 23:171–184, 2009) that has been developed as a plugin for the popular molecular visualization program PyMOL is presented. In addition, a ligand-based\\u000a VS module (LBVS) has been implemented that complements the already existing structure-based VS

  8. Membrane Model for the G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin: Hydrophobic Interface and Dynamical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Thomas; Botelho, Ana V.; Beyer, Klaus; Brown, Michael F.

    2004-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the only member of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors with a known structure at atomic resolution. A molecular dynamics model of rhodopsin in a POPC phospholipid bilayer was simulated for 15 ns, revealing a conformation significantly different from the recent crystal structures. The structure of the bilayer compared with a protein-free POPC control indicated hydrophobic matching with the nonpolar interface of the receptor, in agreement with deuterium NMR experiments. A new generalized molecular surface method, based on a three-dimensional Voronoi cell construction for atoms with different radii, was developed to quantify cross-sectional area profiles for the protein, lipid acyl chains and headgroups, and water. Thus, it was possible to investigate the bilayer deformation due to curvature of the individual lipid monolayers. Moreover, the generalized molecular surface derived hydrophobic interface allowed benchmarking of the hydropathy sequence analysis, an important structural genomics tool. Five water molecules diffused into internal hydration sites during the simulation, yielding a total of 12 internal waters. The cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal tail, containing the G-protein recognition and protein sorting sequences, exhibited a high mobility, in marked contrast to the extracellular and transmembrane domains. The proposed functional coupling of the highly conserved ERY motif to the lipid-water interface via the cytoplasmic loops provides insight into lipid effects on G-protein-coupled receptor activation in terms of a flexible surface model, involving the spontaneous monolayer curvature. PMID:15041649

  9. Automated extraction of digital terrain models, roads and buildings using airborne lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong

    Airborne lidar has become a commercially viable remote sensing platform, and can provide accurate elevation data about both topographic surfaces and non-terrain objects. Its capability of mapping topography and 3-D models of civil objects is uncommon to other remote sensing technologies. This dissertation presents a collection of algorithms developed for automatically extracting useful information from lidar data exclusively. The algorithms focus on automated extraction of DTMs, 3-D roads and buildings utilizing single- or multi-return lidar range and intensity data. The hierarchical terrain recovery algorithm can intelligently discriminate between terrain and non-terrain lidar points by adaptive and robust filtering. It processes the range data bottom up and top down to estimate high quality DTMs using the hierarchical strategy. Road ribbons are detected by classifying lidar intensity and height data. The 3-D grid road networks are reconstructed using a sequential Hough transformation, and are verified using road ribbons and lidar-derived DTMs. The attributes of road segments including width, length and slope are computed. Building models are created with a high level of accuracy. The building boundaries are detected by segmenting lidar height data. A sequential linking technique is proposed to reconstruct building boundaries to regular polygons, which are then rectified to be of cartographical quality. Then prismatic models are created for flat roof buildings, and polyhedral models are created for non-flat roof buildings by the incremental selective refining and vertical wall rectification procedures. Many attributes of these building models are derived from the lidar data. These algorithms have been tested using many lidar datasets of varying terrain type, coverage type and point density. The results show that in most areas the lidar-derived DTMs retain most terrain details and remove non-terrain objects reliably; the road ribbons and grid road networks are sketched well in built-up areas; and the extracted building footprints have high positioning accuracy equivalent to ground-truth data surveyed in field. A toolkit, called Lidar Expert, has been developed to bundle these algorithms and to offer the capability of performing fast information extraction from lidar data.

  10. Modeling of multi-interface, diverging, hydrodynamic experiments for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Miles, A. R.; Hansen, J. F.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Arnett, D.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2009-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will soon provide experiments with far more than ten times the energy than has been previously available on laser facilities. In the context of supernova-relevant hydrodynamics, this will enable experiments in which hydrodynamic instabilities develop from multiple, coupled interfaces in a diverging explosion. This paper discusses the design of such blast-wave-driven explosions in which the relative masses of the layers are scaled to those within the star. It reports scaling simulations with CALE to model the global dynamics of such an experiment. CALE is a hybrid, Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code. The simulations probed the instability growth and multi-interface interactions in mass-scaled systems using different materials. The simulations assist in the target design process and in developing an experiment that can be diagnosed.

  11. Modeling of Multi-Interface, Diverging, Hydrodynamic Experiments for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Miles, A. R.; Hansen, J. F.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Arnett, D.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2008-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will soon provide experiments with far more than ten times the energy than has been previously available on laser facilities. In the context of supernova-relevant hydrodynamics, this will enable experiments in which hydrodynamic instabilities develop from multiple, coupled interfaces in a diverging explosion. This presentation discusses the design of such blast-wave-driven explosions in which the relative masses of the layers are scaled to those within the star. It reports scaling simulations with CALE to model the global dynamics of such an experiment. The simulations probed the instability growth and multi-interface interactions in mass-scaled systems to assess the diagnosability and experimental value of different designs using a variety of materials. Initial conditions in the simulation near the irradiated surface have been shown to lead to spurious structure on the shock; therefore, a series of simulations to understand this structure is also discussed.

  12. Testing of Environmental Satellite Bus-Instrument Interfaces Using Engineering Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagnier, Donald; Hayner, Rick; Nosek, Thomas; Roza, Michael; Hendershot, James E.; Razzaghi, Andrea I.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the formulation and execution of a laboratory test of the electrical interfaces between multiple atmospheric scientific instruments and the spacecraft bus that carries them. The testing, performed in 2002, used engineering models of the instruments and the Aura spacecraft bus electronics. Aura is one of NASA s Earth Observatory System missions. The test was designed to evaluate the complex interfaces in the command and data handling subsystems prior to integration of the complete flight instruments on the spacecraft. A problem discovered during the flight integration phase of the observatory can cause significant cost and schedule impacts. The tests successfully revealed problems and led to their resolution before the full-up integration phase, saving significant cost and schedule. This approach could be beneficial for future environmental satellite programs involving the integration of multiple, complex scientific instruments onto a spacecraft bus.

  13. Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation

    E-print Network

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

  14. Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces using a random forest model with hybrid features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Chen, Luonan

    2012-03-01

    Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces provides crucial information for the research on protein-protein interaction and drug design. Existing machine learning methods generally judge whether a given residue is likely to be a hot spot by extracting features only from the target residue. However, hot spots usually form a small cluster of residues which are tightly packed together at the center of protein interface. With this in mind, we present a novel method to extract hybrid features which incorporate a wide range of information of the target residue and its spatially neighboring residues, i.e. the nearest contact residue in the other face (mirror-contact residue) and the nearest contact residue in the same face (intra-contact residue). We provide a novel random forest (RF) model to effectively integrate these hybrid features for predicting hot spots in protein interfaces. Our method can achieve accuracy (ACC) of 82.4% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.482 in Alanine Scanning Energetics Database, and ACC of 77.6% and MCC of 0.429 in Binding Interface Database. In a comparison study, performance of our RF model exceeds other existing methods, such as Robetta, FOLDEF, KFC, KFC2, MINERVA and HotPoint. Of our hybrid features, three physicochemical features of target residues (mass, polarizability and isoelectric point), the relative side-chain accessible surface area and the average depth index of mirror-contact residues are found to be the main discriminative features in hot spots prediction. We also confirm that hot spots tend to form large contact surface areas between two interacting proteins. Source data and code are available at: http://www.aporc.org/doc/wiki/HotSpot. PMID:22258275

  15. Fast and accurate timed execution of high level embedded software using HW\\/SW interface simulation model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aimen Bouchhima; Sungjoo Yoo; Ahmed Amine Jerraya

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a methodology to perform early design stage validation of hardware\\/software (HW\\/SW) systems using a HW\\/SW interface simulation model. Given a SW application described at the OS abstraction level and a HW Platform described at an arbitrary abstraction level, we aim at providing the adaptation layer, i.e. simulation model of the HW\\/SW interface, which will enable

  16. Development of a non-linear finite element modelling of the below-knee prosthetic socket interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Zhang; M. Lord; A. R. Turner-Smith; V. C. Roberts

    1995-01-01

    A non-linear finite element model has been established to predict the pressure and shear stress distribution at the limb-socket interface in below-knee amputees with consideration of the skin-liner interface friction and slip. In this model, the limb tissue and socket liner were respectively meshed into 954 and 450 three-dimensional eight-node isoparametric brick elements, based on measurements of an individual's amputated

  17. Corrections to complex ray tracing for modeling ultrasonic beam interaction with single interfaces when the reflection\\/transmission coefficient vanishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Smaine Zeroug

    2000-01-01

    A high-frequency high-order asymptotic solution is presented to model the interaction of time-harmonic ultrasonic beams with single planar interfaces. The zeroth-order term of the asymptotic expansion yields the well-known ray acoustics solution often used as the basis, for instance, of fast ultrasonic modeling and simulation codes. Whenever the interface reflection or transmission coefficient vanishes in the neighborhood of the specular

  18. BOADICEA breast cancer risk prediction model: updates to cancer incidences, tumour pathology and web interface

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A J; Cunningham, A P; Kuchenbaecker, K B; Mavaddat, N; Easton, D F; Antoniou, A C

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA) is a risk prediction model that is used to compute probabilities of carrying mutations in the high-risk breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, and to estimate the future risks of developing breast or ovarian cancer. In this paper, we describe updates to the BOADICEA model that extend its capabilities, make it easier to use in a clinical setting and yield more accurate predictions. Methods: We describe: (1) updates to the statistical model to include cancer incidences from multiple populations; (2) updates to the distributions of tumour pathology characteristics using new data on BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and women with breast cancer from the general population; (3) improvements to the computational efficiency of the algorithm so that risk calculations now run substantially faster; and (4) updates to the model's web interface to accommodate these new features and to make it easier to use in a clinical setting. Results: We present results derived using the updated model, and demonstrate that the changes have a significant impact on risk predictions. Conclusion: All updates have been implemented in a new version of the BOADICEA web interface that is now available for general use: http://ccge.medschl.cam.ac.uk/boadicea/. PMID:24346285

  19. Using the ARTMO toolbox for automated retrieval of biophysical parameters through radiative transfer model inversion: Optimizing LUT-based inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrelst, J.; Rivera, J. P.; Leonenko, G.; Alonso, L.; Moreno, J.

    2012-04-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) modeling plays a key role for earth observation (EO) because it is needed to design EO instruments and to develop and test inversion algorithms. The inversion of a RT model is considered as a successful approach for the retrieval of biophysical parameters because of being physically-based and generally applicable. However, to the broader community this approach is considered as laborious because of its many processing steps and expert knowledge is required to realize precise model parameterization. We have recently developed a radiative transfer toolbox ARTMO (Automated Radiative Transfer Models Operator) with the purpose of providing in a graphical user interface (GUI) essential models and tools required for terrestrial EO applications such as model inversion. In short, the toolbox allows the user: i) to choose between various plant leaf and canopy RT models (e.g. models from the PROSPECT and SAIL family, FLIGHT), ii) to choose between spectral band settings of various air- and space-borne sensors or defining own sensor settings, iii) to simulate a massive amount of spectra based on a look up table (LUT) approach and storing it in a relational database, iv) to plot spectra of multiple models and compare them with measured spectra, and finally, v) to run model inversion against optical imagery given several cost options and accuracy estimates. In this work ARTMO was used to tackle some well-known problems related to model inversion. According to Hadamard conditions, mathematical models of physical phenomena are mathematically invertible if the solution of the inverse problem to be solved exists, is unique and depends continuously on data. This assumption is not always met because of the large number of unknowns and different strategies have been proposed to overcome this problem. Several of these strategies have been implemented in ARTMO and were here analyzed to optimize the inversion performance. Data came from the SPARC-2003 dataset, which was acquired on the agricultural test site Barrax, Spain. LUTs were created using the 4SAIL and FLIGHT models and were inverted against CHRIS data in order to retrieve maps of chlorophyll content (chl) and leaf area index (LAI). The following inversion steps have been optimized: 1. Cost function. The performances of about 50 different cost functions (i.e. minimum distance functions) were compared. Remarkably, in none of the studied cases the widely used root mean square error (RMSE) led to most accurate results. Depending on the retrieved parameter, more successful functions were: 'Sharma and Mittal', 'Shanno?s entropy', 'Hellinger distance', 'Pearso?s chi-square'. 2. Gaussian noise. Earth observation data typically encompass a certain degree of noise due to errors related to radiometric and geometric processing. In all cases, adding 5% Gaussian noise to the simulated spectra led to more accurate retrievals as compared to without noise. 3. Average of multiple best solutions. Because multiple parameter combinations may lead to the same spectra, a way to overcome this problem is not searching for the top best match but for a percentage of best matches. Optimized retrievals were encountered when including an average of 7% (Chl) to 10% (LAI) top best matches. 4. Integration of estimates. The option is provided to integrate estimates of biochemical contents at the canopy level (e.g., total chlorophyll: Chl × LAI, or water: Cw × LAI), which can lead to increased robustness and accuracy. 5. Class-based inversion. This option is probably ARTMÓs most powerful feature as it allows model parameterization depending on the imagés land cover classes (e.g. different soil or vegetation types). Class-based inversion can lead to considerably improved accuracies compared to one generic class. Results suggest that 4SAIL and FLIGHT performed alike for Chl but not for LAI. While both models rely on the leaf model PROSPECT for Chl retrieval, their different nature (e.g. numerical vs. ray tracing) may cause that retrieval of structural parameters such as LAI differ. Finally, i

  20. Modelling nutrient exchange at the sediment water interface of river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenot, Marie; Billen, Gilles; Garnier, Josette

    2007-07-01

    SummaryIn-stream benthic processes can play a significant role on the water quality of overlying waters flowing through a river network. In order to better understand and quantify the fate of nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and silica) during their travel through the river continuum, a deterministic benthic sub-model was developed with the purpose of being connected to a drainage network model. This benthic sub-model resolves the differential equations representing early diagenesis in the sediment, linking the sedimentation rate of organic matter onto the sediment to the resulting flux of nutrients across the sediment-water interface. The model has been developed for conditions where sedimentation prevails as well as for situations where net erosion prevents the built-up of a significant sediment layer and where only a biofilm can develop, attached to solid substrates. The benthic model was tested independently of the main water column biological-hydrological model to which it is intended to be coupled. For this, three case studies were chosen from the literature representing various sedimentation/erosion conditions: the 8th order river Seine (France), the water storage basin of Méry s/Oise (France), and the headwater stream Orneau (Belgium). The general benthic model has been validated for ammonium, nitrate, oxygen and phosphorus fluxes across the sediment-water interface. The capability of the model to correctly predict the observed nutrients profiles within the sediment was also validated for organic carbon, ammonium and phosphorus. An uncertainty analysis showed that using two modelling objectives (observed fluxes and concentration profiles in the sediment) strongly reduces the uncertainty in parameters calibration. A sensitivity analysis illustrated the complexity of the interacting reactions driving each variable, and justifies the usefulness of the model as a tool for understanding and predicting the behaviour of the benthic compartment of river systems.

  1. A novel automated behavioral test battery assessing cognitive rigidity in two genetic mouse models of autism.

    PubMed

    Pu?cian, Alicja; L?ski, Szymon; Górkiewicz, Tomasz; Meyza, Ksenia; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Knapska, Ewelina

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive behaviors are a key feature of many pervasive developmental disorders, such as autism. As a heterogeneous group of symptoms, repetitive behaviors are conceptualized into two main subgroups: sensory/motor (lower-order) and cognitive rigidity (higher-order). Although lower-order repetitive behaviors are measured in mouse models in several paradigms, so far there have been no high-throughput tests directly measuring cognitive rigidity. We describe a novel approach for monitoring repetitive behaviors during reversal learning in mice in the automated IntelliCage system. During the reward-motivated place preference reversal learning, designed to assess cognitive abilities of mice, visits to the previously rewarded places were recorded to measure cognitive flexibility. Thereafter, emotional flexibility was assessed by measuring conditioned fear extinction. Additionally, to look for neuronal correlates of cognitive impairments, we measured CA3-CA1 hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP). To standardize the designed tests we used C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, representing two genetic backgrounds, for induction of autism by prenatal exposure to the sodium valproate. We found impairments of place learning related to perseveration and no LTP impairments in C57BL/6 valproate-treated mice. In contrast, BALB/c valproate-treated mice displayed severe deficits of place learning not associated with perseverative behaviors and accompanied by hippocampal LTP impairments. Alterations of cognitive flexibility observed in C57BL/6 valproate-treated mice were related to neither restricted exploration pattern nor to emotional flexibility. Altogether, we showed that the designed tests of cognitive performance and perseverative behaviors are efficient and highly replicable. Moreover, the results suggest that genetic background is crucial for the behavioral effects of prenatal valproate treatment. PMID:24808839

  2. MIQuant – Semi-Automation of Infarct Size Assessment in Models of Cardiac Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Tiago; de Pina, Maria de Fátima; Guedes, Joana G.; Freire, Ana; Quelhas, Pedro; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua

    2011-01-01

    Background The cardiac regenerative potential of newly developed therapies is traditionally evaluated in rodent models of surgically induced myocardial ischemia. A generally accepted key parameter for determining the success of the applied therapy is the infarct size. Although regarded as a gold standard method for infarct size estimation in heart ischemia, histological planimetry is time-consuming and highly variable amongst studies. The purpose of this work is to contribute towards the standardization and simplification of infarct size assessment by providing free access to a novel semi-automated software tool. The acronym MIQuant was attributed to this application. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were subject to permanent coronary artery ligation and the size of chronic infarcts was estimated by area and midline-length methods using manual planimetry and with MIQuant. Repeatability and reproducibility of MIQuant scores were verified. The validation showed high correlation (rmidline length?=?0.981; rarea?=?0.970 ) and agreement (Bland-Altman analysis), free from bias for midline length and negligible bias of 1.21% to 3.72% for area quantification. Further analysis demonstrated that MIQuant reduced by 4.5-fold the time spent on the analysis and, importantly, MIQuant effectiveness is independent of user proficiency. The results indicate that MIQuant can be regarded as a better alternative to manual measurement. Conclusions We conclude that MIQuant is a reliable and an easy-to-use software for infarct size quantification. The widespread use of MIQuant will contribute towards the standardization of infarct size assessment across studies and, therefore, to the systematization of the evaluation of cardiac regenerative potential of emerging therapies. PMID:21980376

  3. A novel automated behavioral test battery assessing cognitive rigidity in two genetic mouse models of autism

    PubMed Central

    Pu?cian, Alicja; ??ski, Szymon; Górkiewicz, Tomasz; Meyza, Ksenia; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Knapska, Ewelina

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive behaviors are a key feature of many pervasive developmental disorders, such as autism. As a heterogeneous group of symptoms, repetitive behaviors are conceptualized into two main subgroups: sensory/motor (lower-order) and cognitive rigidity (higher-order). Although lower-order repetitive behaviors are measured in mouse models in several paradigms, so far there have been no high-throughput tests directly measuring cognitive rigidity. We describe a novel approach for monitoring repetitive behaviors during reversal learning in mice in the automated IntelliCage system. During the reward-motivated place preference reversal learning, designed to assess cognitive abilities of mice, visits to the previously rewarded places were recorded to measure cognitive flexibility. Thereafter, emotional flexibility was assessed by measuring conditioned fear extinction. Additionally, to look for neuronal correlates of cognitive impairments, we measured CA3-CA1 hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP). To standardize the designed tests we used C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, representing two genetic backgrounds, for induction of autism by prenatal exposure to the sodium valproate. We found impairments of place learning related to perseveration and no LTP impairments in C57BL/6 valproate-treated mice. In contrast, BALB/c valproate-treated mice displayed severe deficits of place learning not associated with perseverative behaviors and accompanied by hippocampal LTP impairments. Alterations of cognitive flexibility observed in C57BL/6 valproate-treated mice were related to neither restricted exploration pattern nor to emotional flexibility. Altogether, we showed that the designed tests of cognitive performance and perseverative behaviors are efficient and highly replicable. Moreover, the results suggest that genetic background is crucial for the behavioral effects of prenatal valproate treatment. PMID:24808839

  4. Automated detection of arterial input function in DSC perfusion MRI in a stroke rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, M.-Y.; Lee, T.-H.; Yang, S.-T.; Kuo, H.-H.; Chyi, T.-K.; Liu, H.-L.

    2009-05-01

    Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimation requires deconvolution of the tissue concentration time curves with an arterial input function (AIF). However, image-based determination of AIF in rodent is challenged due to limited spatial resolution. We evaluated the feasibility of quantitative analysis using automated AIF detection and compared the results with commonly applied semi-quantitative analysis. Permanent occlusion of bilateral or unilateral common carotid artery was used to induce cerebral ischemia in rats. The image using dynamic susceptibility contrast method was performed on a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner with a spin-echo echo-planar-image sequence (TR/TE = 700/80 ms, FOV = 41 mm, matrix = 64, 3 slices, SW = 2 mm), starting from 7 s prior to contrast injection (1.2 ml/kg) at four different time points. For quantitative analysis, CBF was calculated by the AIF which was obtained from 10 voxels with greatest contrast enhancement after deconvolution. For semi-quantitative analysis, relative CBF was estimated by the integral divided by the first moment of the relaxivity time curves. We observed if the AIFs obtained in the three different ROIs (whole brain, hemisphere without lesion and hemisphere with lesion) were similar, the CBF ratios (lesion/normal) between quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses might have a similar trend at different operative time points. If the AIFs were different, the CBF ratios might be different. We concluded that using local maximum one can define proper AIF without knowing the anatomical location of arteries in a stroke rat model.

  5. ISMARA: automated modeling of genomic signals as a democracy of regulatory motifs.

    PubMed

    Balwierz, Piotr J; Pachkov, Mikhail; Arnold, Phil; Gruber, Andreas J; Zavolan, Mihaela; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Accurate reconstruction of the regulatory networks that control gene expression is one of the key current challenges in molecular biology. Although gene expression and chromatin state dynamics are ultimately encoded by constellations of binding sites recognized by regulators such as transcriptions factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), our understanding of this regulatory code and its context-dependent read-out remains very limited. Given that there are thousands of potential regulators in mammals, it is not practical to use direct experimentation to identify which of these play a key role for a particular system of interest. We developed a methodology that models gene expression or chromatin modifications in terms of genome-wide predictions of regulatory sites and completely automated it into a web-based tool called ISMARA (Integrated System for Motif Activity Response Analysis). Given only gene expression or chromatin state data across a set of samples as input, ISMARA identifies the key TFs and miRNAs driving expression/chromatin changes and makes detailed predictions regarding their regulatory roles. These include predicted activities of the regulators across the samples, their genome-wide targets, enriched gene categories among the targets, and direct interactions between the regulators. Applying ISMARA to data sets from well-studied systems, we show that it consistently identifies known key regulators ab initio. We also present a number of novel predictions including regulatory interactions in innate immunity, a master regulator of mucociliary differentiation, TFs consistently disregulated in cancer, and TFs that mediate specific chromatin modifications. PMID:24515121

  6. Automated Detection and Predictive Modeling of Flux Transfer Events using CLUSTER Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipes, T. B.; Karimabadi, H.; Driscoll, J.; Wang, Y.; Lavraud, B.; Slavin, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Almost all statistical studies of flux ropes (FTEs) and traveling compression regions (TCRs) have been based on (i) visual inspection of data to compile a list of events and (ii) use of histograms and simple linear correlation analysis to study their properties and potential causes and dependencies. This approach has several major drawbacks including being highly subjective and inefficient. The traditional use of histograms and simple linear correlation analysis is also only useful for analysis of systems that show dominant dependencies on one or two variables at the most. However, if the system has complex dependencies, more sophisticated statistical techniques are required. For example, Wang et al. [2006] showed evidence that FTE occurrence rate are affected by IMF Bygsm, Bzgsm, and magnitude, and the IMF clock, tilt, spiral, and cone angles. If the initial findings were correct that FTEs occur only during periods of southward IMF, one could use the direction of IMF as a predictor of occurrence of FTEs. But in light of Wang et al. result, one cannot draw quantitative conclusions about conditions under which FTEs occur. It may be that a certain combination of these parameters is the true controlling parameter. To uncover this, one needs to deploy more sophisticated techniques. We have developed a new, sophisticated data mining tool called MineTool. MineTool is highly accurate, flexible and capable of handling difficult and even noisy datasets extremely well. It has the ability to outperform standard data mining tools such as artificial neural networks, decision/regression trees and support vector machines. Here we present preliminary results of the application of this tool to the CLUSTER data to perform two tasks: (i) automated detection of FTEs, and (ii) predictive modeling of occurrences of FTEs based on IMF and magnetospheric conditions.

  7. 6 2 IEEE SOFTWARE Published by the IEEE Computer Society 0740-7459/03/$17.00 2003 IEEE Modeling user interfaces is a well-estab-

    E-print Network

    Pinheiro da Silva, Paulo

    interfaces along with an applica- tion's other aspects. For example, most MB- UIDEs have a domain model, you can enhance communication be- tween design team members. Integrating application and interface user interfaces is a well-estab- lished discipline in its own right. For example, modeling techniques

  8. Intelligent interface design and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Intelligent interface concepts and systematic approaches to assessing their functionality are discussed. Four general features of intelligent interfaces are described: interaction efficiency, subtask automation, context sensitivity, and use of an appropriate design metaphor. Three evaluation methods are discussed: Functional Analysis, Part-Task Evaluation, and Operational Testing. Design and evaluation concepts are illustrated with examples from a prototype expert system interface for environmental control and life support systems for manned space platforms.

  9. Applying MetaModeling for the Definition of Model-Driven Development Methods of Advanced User Interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Sauer

    2011-01-01

    \\u000a The user interfaces of interactive systems become increasingly complex due to new interaction paradigms, required adaptability,\\u000a use of innovative technologies, multi-media and interaction modalities. Their development thus demands for sophisticated processes\\u000a and methods, as they are deployed in software engineering. Model-driven development is a promising candidate for mastering\\u000a the complex development task in a systematic, precise and appropriately formal way.

  10. Automated Software Development Workstation (ASDW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernie

    1990-01-01

    Software development is a serious bottleneck in the construction of complex automated systems. An increase of the reuse of software designs and components has been viewed as a way to relieve this bottleneck. One approach to achieving software reusability is through the development and use of software parts composition systems. A software parts composition system is a software development environment comprised of a parts description language for modeling parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, a composition editor that aids a user in the specification of a new application from existing parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates an implementation of a new application in a target language. The Automated Software Development Workstation (ASDW) is an expert system shell that provides the capabilities required to develop and manipulate these software parts composition systems. The ASDW is now in Beta testing at the Johnson Space Center. Future work centers on responding to user feedback for capability and usability enhancement, expanding the scope of the software lifecycle that is covered, and in providing solutions to handling very large libraries of reusable components.

  11. Work Practice Simulation of Complex Human-Automation Systems in Safety Critical Situations: The Brahms Generalized berlingen Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Linde, Charlotte; Seah, Chin; Shafto, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The transition from the current air traffic system to the next generation air traffic system will require the introduction of new automated systems, including transferring some functions from air traffic controllers to on­-board automation. This report describes a new design verification and validation (V&V) methodology for assessing aviation safety. The approach involves a detailed computer simulation of work practices that includes people interacting with flight-critical systems. The research is part of an effort to develop new modeling and verification methodologies that can assess the safety of flight-critical systems, system configurations, and operational concepts. The 2002 Ueberlingen mid-air collision was chosen for analysis and modeling because one of the main causes of the accident was one crew's response to a conflict between the instructions of the air traffic controller and the instructions of TCAS, an automated Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System on-board warning system. It thus furnishes an example of the problem of authority versus autonomy. It provides a starting point for exploring authority/autonomy conflict in the larger system of organization, tools, and practices in which the participants' moment-by-moment actions take place. We have developed a general air traffic system model (not a specific simulation of Überlingen events), called the Brahms Generalized Ueberlingen Model (Brahms-GUeM). Brahms is a multi-agent simulation system that models people, tools, facilities/vehicles, and geography to simulate the current air transportation system as a collection of distributed, interactive subsystems (e.g., airports, air-traffic control towers and personnel, aircraft, automated flight systems and air-traffic tools, instruments, crew). Brahms-GUeM can be configured in different ways, called scenarios, such that anomalous events that contributed to the Überlingen accident can be modeled as functioning according to requirements or in an anomalous condition, as occurred during the accident. Brahms-GUeM thus implicitly defines a class of scenarios, which include as an instance what occurred at Überlingen. Brahms-GUeM is a modeling framework enabling "what if" analysis of alternative work system configurations and thus facilitating design of alternative operations concepts. It enables subsequent adaption (reusing simulation components) for modeling and simulating NextGen scenarios. This project demonstrates that BRAHMS provides the capacity to model the complexity of air transportation systems, going beyond idealized and simple flights to include for example the interaction of pilots and ATCOs. The research shows clearly that verification and validation must include the entire work system, on the one hand to check that mechanisms exist to handle failures of communication and alerting subsystems and/or failures of people to notice, comprehend, or communicate problematic (unsafe) situations; but also to understand how people must use their own judgment in relating fallible systems like TCAS to other sources of information and thus to evaluate how the unreliability of automation affects system safety. The simulation shows in particular that distributed agents (people and automated systems) acting without knowledge of each others' actions can create a complex, dynamic system whose interactive behavior is unexpected and is changing too quickly to comprehend and control.

  12. A knowledge- and model-based system for automated weaning from mechanical ventilation: technical description and first clinical application.

    PubMed

    Schädler, Dirk; Mersmann, Stefan; Frerichs, Inéz; Elke, Gunnar; Semmel-Griebeler, Thomas; Noll, Oliver; Pulletz, Sven; Zick, Günther; David, Matthias; Heinrichs, Wolfgang; Scholz, Jens; Weiler, Norbert

    2014-10-01

    To describe the principles and the first clinical application of a novel prototype automated weaning system called Evita Weaning System (EWS). EWS allows an automated control of all ventilator settings in pressure controlled and pressure support mode with the aim of decreasing the respiratory load of mechanical ventilation. Respiratory load takes inspired fraction of oxygen, positive end-expiratory pressure, pressure amplitude and spontaneous breathing activity into account. Spontaneous breathing activity is assessed by the number of controlled breaths needed to maintain a predefined respiratory rate. EWS was implemented as a knowledge- and model-based system that autonomously and remotely controlled a mechanical ventilator (Evita 4, Dräger Medical, Lübeck, Germany). In a selected case study (n = 19 patients), ventilator settings chosen by the responsible physician were compared with the settings 10 min after the start of EWS and at the end of the study session. Neither unsafe ventilator settings nor failure of the system occurred. All patients were successfully transferred from controlled ventilation to assisted spontaneous breathing in a mean time of 37 ± 17 min (± SD). Early settings applied by the EWS did not significantly differ from the initial settings, except for the fraction of oxygen in inspired gas. During the later course, EWS significantly modified most of the ventilator settings and reduced the imposed respiratory load. A novel prototype automated weaning system was successfully developed. The first clinical application of EWS revealed that its operation was stable, safe ventilator settings were defined and the respiratory load of mechanical ventilation was decreased. PMID:23892513

  13. Improved modeling of electrified interfaces using the effective screening medium method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Ikutaro; Sugino, Osamu; Bonnet, Nicéphore; Otani, Minoru

    2014-03-01

    The effective screening medium (ESM) method has been developed as a way to simulate electrified interfaces within a first principles framework using periodic boundary conditions. Given a slab geometry standing for the interface, the ESM method allows filling the region away from the slab with a dielectric screening medium- the ESM per se-as a simple way to include electrostatic screening effect of the environment. In the original version of the ESM method, the relative permittivity changes discontinuously from ? = 1 to ? > 1 at the boundary located between the molecular system and the ESM, which causes numerical instability when the electron density of the molecular system touches the boundary. Here we improve upon the description of the screening medium by imposing a smooth transition of the dielectric permittivity between the molecular system and the ESM (smooth ESM), thus precluding numerical instabilities when molecules come in contact with the ESM. Moreover, at short distances, the smooth ESM acts as a repulsive wall, and thus the simulation cell can serve as a natural container for molecules in molecular dynamics simulations. Consequently, the smooth ESM method is a substantial advancement in modeling solid-liquid interfaces under electric bias.

  14. BEM solution of delamination problems using an interface damage and plasticity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotopoulos, C. G.; Manti?, V.; Roubí?ek, T.

    2013-04-01

    The problem of quasistatic and rate-independent evolution of elastic-plastic-brittle delamination at small strains is considered. Delamination processes for linear elastic bodies glued by an adhesive to each other or to a rigid outer surface are studied. The energy amounts dissipated in fracture Mode I (opening) and Mode II (shear) at an interface may be different. A concept of internal parameters is used here on the delaminating interfaces, involving a couple of scalar damage variable and a plastic tangential slip with kinematic-type hardening. The so-called energetic solution concept is employed. An inelastic process at an interface is devised in such a way that the dissipated energy depends only on the rates of internal parameters and therefore the model is associative. A fully implicit time discretization is combined with a spatial discretization of elastic bodies by the BEM to solve the delamination problem. The BEM is used in the solution of the respective boundary value problems, for each subdomain separately, to compute the corresponding total potential energy. Sample problems are analysed by a collocation BEM code to illustrate the capabilities of the numerical procedure developed.

  15. A Cognitive System Model for Human/Automation Dynamics in Airspace Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Pisanich, Gregory; Lebacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NASA has initiated a significant thrust of research and development focused on providing the flight crew and air traffic managers automation aids to increase capacity in en route and terminal area operations through the use of flexible, more fuel-efficient routing, while improving the level of safety in commercial carrier operations. In that system development, definition of cognitive requirements for integrated multi-operator dynamic aiding systems is fundamental. In order to support that cognitive function definition, we have extended the Man Machine Integrated Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) to include representation of multiple cognitive agents (both human operators and intelligent aiding systems) operating aircraft, airline operations centers and air traffic control centers in the evolving airspace. The demands of this application require representation of many intelligent agents sharing world-models, and coordinating action/intention with cooperative scheduling of goals and actions in a potentially unpredictable world of operations. The MIDAS operator models have undergone significant development in order to understand the requirements for operator aiding and the impact of that aiding in the complex nondeterminate system of national airspace operations. The operator model's structure has been modified to include attention functions, action priority, and situation assessment. The cognitive function model has been expanded to include working memory operations including retrieval from long-term store, interference, visual-motor and verbal articulatory loop functions, and time-based losses. The operator's activity structures have been developed to include prioritization and interruption of multiple parallel activities among multiple operators, to provide for anticipation (knowledge of the intention and action of remote operators), and to respond to failures of the system and other operators in the system in situation-specific paradigms. The model's internal representation has been be modified so that multiple, autonomous sets of equipment will function in a scenario as the single equipment sets do now. In order to support the analysis requirements with multiple items of equipment, it is necessary for equipment to access the state of other equipment objects at initialization time (a radar object may need to access the position and speed of aircraft in its area, for example), and as a function of perception and sensor system interaction. The model has been improved to include multiple world-states as a function of equipment am operator interaction. The model has been used -1o predict the impact of warning and alert zones in aircraft operation, and, more critic-ally, the interaction of flight-deck based warning mechanisms and air traffic controller action in response to ground-based conflict prediction and alerting systems. In this operation, two operating systems provide alerting to two autonomous, but linked sets of operators, whose view of the system and whose dynamics in response are radically different. System stability and operator action was predicted using the MIDAS model.

  16. Modulation Depth Estimation and Variable Selection in State-Space Models for Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid developments in neural interface technology are making it possible to record increasingly large signal sets of neural activity. Various factors such as asymmetrical information distribution and across-channel redundancy may, however, limit the benefit of high-dimensional signal sets, and the increased computational complexity may not yield corresponding improvement in system performance. High-dimensional system models may also lead to overfitting and lack of generalizability. To address these issues, we present a generalized modulation depth measure using the state-space framework that quantifies the tuning of a neural signal channel to relevant behavioral covariates. For a dynamical system, we develop computationally efficient procedures for estimating modulation depth from multivariate data. We show that this measure can be used to rank neural signals and select an optimal channel subset for inclusion in the neural decoding algorithm. We present a scheme for choosing the optimal subset based on model order selection criteria. We apply this method to neuronal ensemble spike-rate decoding in neural interfaces, using our framework to relate motor cortical activity with intended movement kinematics. With offline analysis of intracortical motor imagery data obtained from individuals with tetraplegia using the BrainGate neural interface, we demonstrate that our variable selection scheme is useful for identifying and ranking the most information-rich neural signals. We demonstrate that our approach offers several orders of magnitude lower complexity but virtually identical decoding performance compared to greedy search and other selection schemes. Our statistical analysis shows that the modulation depth of human motor cortical single-unit signals is well characterized by the generalized Pareto distribution. Our variable selection scheme has wide applicability in problems involving multisensor signal modeling and estimation in biomedical engineering systems. PMID:25265627

  17. Modeling of high power automotive batteries by the use of an automated test system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernhard Schweighofer; Klaus M. Raab; Georg Brasseur

    2003-01-01

    In order to estimate the field of application for an electrical energy storage, its performance at different operating conditions has to be measured and evaluated. An automated test system has been designed to speed up measurement and to ensure reproducible measurement conditions. This paper focuses on the performance of this test system and on measured data. Based on this data,

  18. Simulating an Automated Approach to Discovery and Modeling of Open Source Software Development Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Jensen; Walt Scacchi

    Process discovery has been shown to be challenging offering limited results, however, most work has been conducted in closed source systems. This paper describes a new approach to process discovery that examines the Internet information spaces of open source software development projects. In searching for an automated solution to the process discovery problem, we first have simulated it by having

  19. A colored timed Petri net model to manage resources in complex automated manufacturing systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Pia Fanti

    2003-01-01

    Automated Manufacturing Systems (AMSs) can process different parts according to operation sequences sharing a finite number of resources. In these systems deadlock situations can occur so that the flow of parts is permanently inhibited and the processing of jobs is partially or completely blocked. This paper proposes a control strategy to manage resources in complex systems where multiple resource acquisitions

  20. AUTOMATED GIS WATERSHED ANALYSIS TOOLS FOR RUSLE/SEDMOD SOIL EROSION AND SEDIMENTATION MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive procedure for computing soil erosion and sediment delivery metrics has been developed using a suite of automated Arc Macro Language (AML ) scripts and a pair of processing- intensive ANSI C++ executable programs operating on an ESRI ArcGIS 8.x Workstation platform...

  1. Fast Custom Instruction Identification Algorithm Based on Basic Convex Pattern Model for Supporting ASIP Automated Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kang Zhao; Jinian Bian; Sheqin Dong; Yang Song; Satoshi Goto

    2008-01-01

    To improve the computation efficiency of the application specific instruction-set processor (ASIP), a strategy of hardware\\/software collaborative design is usually utilized. In this process, the autocustomization of specific instruction set has always been a key part to support the automated design of ASIP. The key issue of this problem is how to effectively reduce the huge exponential exploration space in

  2. Molecules to modeling: Toxoplasma gondii oocysts at the human–animal–environment interface

    PubMed Central

    VanWormer, Elizabeth; Fritz, Heather; Shapiro, Karen; Mazet, Jonna A.K.; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental transmission of extremely resistant Toxoplasma gondii oocysts has resulted in infection of diverse species around the world, leading to severe disease and deaths in human and animal populations. This review explores T. gondii oocyst shedding, survival, and transmission, emphasizing the importance of linking laboratory and landscape from molecular characterization of oocysts to watershed-level models of oocyst loading and transport in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Building on discipline-specific studies, a One Health approach incorporating tools and perspectives from diverse fields and stakeholders has contributed to an advanced understanding of T. gondii and is addressing transmission at the rapidly changing human–animal–environment interface. PMID:23218130

  3. Molecules to modeling: Toxoplasma gondii oocysts at the human-animal-environment interface.

    PubMed

    VanWormer, Elizabeth; Fritz, Heather; Shapiro, Karen; Mazet, Jonna A K; Conrad, Patricia A

    2013-05-01

    Environmental transmission of extremely resistant Toxoplasma gondii oocysts has resulted in infection of diverse species around the world, leading to severe disease and deaths in human and animal populations. This review explores T. gondii oocyst shedding, survival, and transmission, emphasizing the importance of linking laboratory and landscape from molecular characterization of oocysts to watershed-level models of oocyst loading and transport in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Building on discipline-specific studies, a One Health approach incorporating tools and perspectives from diverse fields and stakeholders has contributed to an advanced understanding of T. gondii and is addressing transmission at the rapidly changing human-animal-environment interface. PMID:23218130

  4. Modelling the Bioelectronic Interface in Engineered Tethered Membranes: From Biosensing to Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Hoiles, William; Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Cornell, Bruce

    2014-10-31

    This paper studies the construction and predictive models of three novel measurement platforms: (i) a Pore Formation Measurement Platform (PFMP) for detecting the presence of pore forming proteins and peptides, (ii) the Ion Channel Switch (ICS) biosensor for detecting the presence of analyte molecules in a fluid chamber, and (iii) an Electroporation Measurement Platform (EMP) that provides reliable measurements of the electroporation phenomenon. Common to all three measurement platforms is that they are comprised of an engineered tethered membrane that is formed via a rapid solvent exchange technique allowing the platform to have a lifetime of several months. The membrane is tethered to a gold electrode bioelectronic interface that includes an ionic reservoir separating the membrane and gold surface, allowing the membrane to mimic the physiological response of natural cell membranes. The electrical response of the PFMP, ICS, and EMP are predicted using continuum theories for electrodiffusive flow coupled with boundary conditions for modelling chemical reactions and electrical double layers present at the bioelectronic interface. Experimental measurements are used to validate the predictive accuracy of the dynamic models. These include using the PFMP for measuring the pore formation dynamics of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and the protein toxin Staphylococcal ?-Hemolysin; the ICS biosensor for measuring nano-molar concentrations of streptavidin, ferritin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (pregnancy hormone hCG); and the EMP for measuring electroporation of membranes with different tethering densities, and membrane compositions. PMID:25373111

  5. Development of a semi-automated method for mitral valve modeling with medial axis representation using 3D ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    M. Pouch, Alison; A. Yushkevich, Paul; M. Jackson, Benjamin; S. Jassar, Arminder; Vergnat, Mathieu; H. Gorman, Joseph; C. Gorman, Robert; M. Sehgal, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Precise 3D modeling of the mitral valve has the potential to improve our understanding of valve morphology, particularly in the setting of mitral regurgitation (MR). Toward this goal, the authors have developed a user-initialized algorithm for reconstructing valve geometry from transesophageal 3D ultrasound (3D US) image data. Methods: Semi-automated image analysis was performed on transesophageal 3D US images obtained from 14 subjects with MR ranging from trace to severe. Image analysis of the mitral valve at midsystole had two stages: user-initialized segmentation and 3D deformable modeling with continuous medial representation (cm-rep). Semi-automated segmentation began with user-identification of valve location in 2D projection images generated from 3D US data. The mitral leaflets were then automatically segmented in 3D using the level set method. Second, a bileaflet deformable medial model was fitted to the binary valve segmentation by Bayesian optimization. The resulting cm-rep provided a visual reconstruction of the mitral valve, from which localized measurements of valve morphology were automatically derived. The features extracted from the fitted cm-rep included annular area, annular circumference, annular height, intercommissural width, septolateral length, total tenting volume, and percent anterior tenting volume. These measurements were compared to those obtained by expert manual tracing. Regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measurements were compared to qualitative assessments of MR severity. The accuracy of valve shape representation with cm-rep was evaluated in terms of the Dice overlap between the fitted cm-rep and its target segmentation. Results: The morphological features and anatomic ROA derived from semi-automated image analysis were consistent with manual tracing of 3D US image data and with qualitative assessments of MR severity made on clinical radiology. The fitted cm-reps accurately captured valve shape and demonstrated patient-specific differences in valve morphology among subjects with varying degrees of MR severity. Minimal variation in the Dice overlap and morphological measurements was observed when different cm-rep templates were used to initialize model fitting. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the use of deformable medial modeling for semi-automated 3D reconstruction of mitral valve geometry using transesophageal 3D US. The proposed algorithm provides a parametric geometrical representation of the mitral leaflets, which can be used to evaluate valve morphology in clinical ultrasound images. PMID:22320803

  6. 3D Database System of Mercede Church : The Use of 3D Models as an Interface to Information

    E-print Network

    Tokyo, University of

    3D Database System of Mercede Church : The Use of 3D Models as an Interface to Information Yasuhide models. The "3D database system" can deal with much information by connecting to existing database. To effectively utilize the 3D models obtained by scanning, we need to associate them with other information

  7. Industrial data monitoring using intranet-based high level of a hierarchical model of an automated system of industrial enterprise maintenance and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnikov, Konstantin I.

    2001-10-01

    It's difficult now to disclaim the availability of application of Internet technologies in industry. Originally not intended for industrial automation they nevertheless can be used as a part of a multilevel hierarchical automation system. The paper shows one of the possible solutions. A way to construct Intranet based high level of a hierarchical model of an automated system for a complex industrial object (reactor, power unit, continuous process) is considered. Some schemes of the level construction are proposed. The main point of these schemes is disposition of the Web server in interlevel area to collect data and to keep system integrity. The approach is illustrated on the example of the Novosibirsk Hydroelectric Power Station (NHPS) automated system of maintenance and control (ASMC) Engineering Level.

  8. Automated Kinematic Modelling of Warped Galaxy Discs in Large Hi Surveys: 3D Tilted Ring Fitting of HI Emission Cubes

    E-print Network

    Kamphuis, P; Oh, S- H; Spekkens, K; Urbancic, N; Serra, P; Koribalski, B S; Dettmar, R -J

    2015-01-01

    Kinematical parameterisations of disc galaxies, employing emission line observations, are indispensable tools for studying the formation and evolution of galaxies. Future large-scale HI surveys will resolve the discs of many thousands of galaxies, allowing a statistical analysis of their disc and halo kinematics, mass distribution and dark matter content. Here we present an automated procedure which fits tilted-ring models to Hi data cubes of individual, well-resolved galaxies. The method builds on the 3D Tilted Ring Fitting Code (TiRiFiC) and is called FAT (Fully Automated TiRiFiC). To assess the accuracy of the code we apply it to a set of 52 artificial galaxies and 25 real galaxies from the Local Volume HI Survey (LVHIS). Using LVHIS data, we compare our 3D modelling to the 2D modelling methods DiskFit and rotcur. A conservative result is that FAT accurately models the kinematics and the morphologies of galaxies with an extent of eight beams across the major axis in the inclination range 20$^{\\circ}$-90$^{...

  9. Stochastic modelling of a large subduction interface earthquake in Wellington, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois-Holden, C.; Zhao, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Wellington region, home of New Zealand's capital city, is cut by a number of major right-lateral strike slip faults, and is underlain by the currently locked west-dipping subduction interface between the down going Pacific Plate, and the over-riding Australian Plate. A potential cause of significant earthquake loss in the Wellington region is a large magnitude (perhaps 8+) "subduction earthquake" on the Australia-Pacific plate interface, which lies ~23 km beneath Wellington City. "It's Our Fault" is a project involving a comprehensive study of Wellington's earthquake risk. Its objective is to position Wellington city to become more resilient, through an encompassing study of the likelihood of large earthquakes, and the effects and impacts of these earthquakes on humans and the built environment. As part of the "It's Our Fault" project, we are working on estimating ground motions from potential large plate boundary earthquakes. We present the latest results on ground motion simulations in terms of response spectra and acceleration time histories. First we characterise the potential interface rupture area based on previous geodetically-derived estimates interface of slip deficit. Then, we entertain a suitable range of source parameters, including various rupture areas, moment magnitudes, stress drops, slip distributions and rupture propagation directions. Our comprehensive study also includes simulations from historical large world subduction events translated into the New Zealand subduction context, such as the 2003 M8.3 Tokachi-Oki Japan earthquake and the M8.8 2010 Chili earthquake. To model synthetic seismograms and the corresponding response spectra we employed the EXSIM code developed by Atkinson et al. (2009), with a regional attenuation model based on the 3D attenuation model for the lower North-Island which has been developed by Eberhart-Phillips et al. (2005). The resulting rupture scenarios all produce long duration shaking, and peak ground accelerations that, typically range between 0.2-0.7 g in Wellington city. Many of these scenarios also produce long period motions that are currently not captured by the current NZ design spectra.

  10. Multiscale modeling of metal-composite interfaces in titanium-graphite fiber metal laminates part II: Continuum scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacob M Hundley; H Thomas Hahn; Jenn-Ming Yang; Andrew B Facciano

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a multiscale numerical framework designed to predict the nonlinear constitutive behavior of metal-composite interfaces in titanium-graphite fiber metal laminates. Molecular-level property predictions derived in a separate analysis are used to parameterize a finite element model of the interface by means of a traction-separation constitutive law. Additional continuum-level energy dissipation and progressive failure phenomena are implemented into commercial

  11. Three-dimensional interface modelling with two-dimensional seismic data: the Alpine crust-mantle boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldhauser, F.; Kissling, E.; Ansorge, J.; Mueller, St.

    1998-01-01

    We present a new approach to determine the 3-D topography and lateral continuity of seismic interfaces using 2-D-derived controlled-source seismic reflector data. The aim of the approach is to give the simplest possible structure consistent with all reflector data and error estimates. We define simplicity of seismic intrafaces by the degree of interface continuity (ie shortest length of offsets) and by the degree of interface roughness (least surface roughness). The method is applied to structural information of the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) obtained from over 250 controlled-source seismic reflection and refraction profiles in the greater Alpine region. The reflected and refracted phases from the Moho interface and their interpretation regarding crustal thickness are reviewed and their reliability weighted. Weights assigned to each reflector element are transformed to depth errors considering Fresnel volumes. The 2-D-derived reflector elements are relocated in space (3-D migration) and interpolation is performed between the observed reflector elements to obtain continuity of model parameters. Interface offsets are intoduced only where required according to the prinipal of simplicity. The resulting 3-D model of the ALpine crust-mantle boundary shows two offsets that eivide the interface into a European, an Adriatic and a Ligurian Moho, with the European Moho subducting below the Adriatic Moho, and with the Adriatic Moho underthrusting the Ligurian Moho. Each sub-interface depicts the smoothest possible (ie simplest) surface, fitting the reflector data within their assigned errors. The results are consistent with previous studies for those regions with dense and reliable controlled-source seismic data. The newly derived Alpine Moho interface, however, surpasses earlier studies by its lateral extent over an area of about 600km by 600km, by quantifying reliability estimates along the interface, and by obeying the priciple of being consistently as simple as possible.

  12. Modeling fire susceptibility to delineate wildland-urban interface for municipal-scale fire risk management.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Ellen; Rapaport, Eric; Sherren, Kate

    2013-12-01

    The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the region where development meets and intermingles with wildlands. The WUI has an elevated fire risk due to the proximity of development and residents to wildlands with natural wildfire regimes. Existing methods of delineating WUI are typically applied over a large region, use proxies for risk, and do not consider site-specific fire hazard drivers. While these models are appropriate for federal and provincial risk management, municipal managers require models intended for smaller regions. The model developed here uses the Burn-P3 fire behavior model to model WUI from local fire susceptibility (FS) in two study communities. Forest fuel code (FFC) maps for the study communities were modified using remote sensing data to produce detailed forest edges, including ladder fuels, update data currency, and add buildings and roads. The modified FFC maps used in Burn-P3 produced bimodal FS distributions for each community. The WUI in these communities was delineated as areas within community bounds where FS was greater than or equal to -1 SD from the mean FS value ([Formula: see text]), which fell in the trough of the bimodal distribution. The WUI so delineated conformed to the definition of WUI. This model extends WUI modeling for broader risk management initiatives for municipal management of risk, as it (a) considers site-specific drivers of fire behavior; (b) models risk, represented by WUI, specific to a community; and, (c) does not use proxies for risk. PMID:24036629

  13. Rnomads: An R Interface with the NOAA Operational Model Archive and Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Operational Model Archive and Distribution System (NOMADS) facilitates rapid delivery of real time and archived environmental data sets from multiple agencies. These data are distributed free to the scientific community, industry, and the public. The rNOMADS package provides an interface between NOMADS and the R programming language. Like R itself, rNOMADS is open source and cross platform. It utilizes server-side functionality on the NOMADS system to subset model outputs for delivery to client R users. There are currently 57 real time and 10 archived models available through rNOMADS. Atmospheric models include the Global Forecast System and North American Mesoscale. Oceanic models include WAVEWATCH III and U. S. Navy Operational Global Ocean Model. rNOMADS has been downloaded 1700 times in the year since it was released. At the time of writing, it is being used for wind and solar power modeling, climate monitoring related to food security concerns, and storm surge/inundation calculations, among others. We introduce this new package and show how it can be used to extract data for infrasonic waveform modeling in the atmosphere.

  14. Dispersion of pollutants over land-water-land interface: Study using CALPUFF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indumati, S.; Oza, R. B.; Mayya, Y. S.; Puranik, V. D.; Kushwaha, H. S.

    The CALMET/CALPUFF modeling system is used to study atmospheric dispersion of pollutant over land-water-land interface. It is shown that the default scheme used by CALMET/CALPUFF to handle inhomogeneous surfaces does not take care of the different turbulence characteristics over such surfaces. An alternative method is suggested to incorporate different turbulent characteristics over inhomogeneous surfaces by using the appropriate atmospheric stability category over different surfaces. The results show that the presence of water body can increase the ground level concentration by a factor of up to 50 for the width of water body varying from 1 km to 5 km. It is also shown that the effect of water body on the ground level concentration decreases as the distance from the water body increases. The present study showed that for land-water interface, the realistic specification of turbulence characteristics over inhomogeneous surfaces significantly changes the estimation of ground level concentration as compared to the default scheme available in the CALMET/CALPUFF modeling system and is expected to give realistic results.

  15. Interface capturing using a compressive advection method and a compositional modelling approach: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhihua; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    Progress on a consistent approach for interface-capturing in which each component represents a different phase/fluid is described. The aim is to develop a general multiphase modelling approach based on fully-unstructured meshes that can exploit the latest mesh adaptivity methods, and in which each fluid phase may have a number of components. The method is based on the P1DG-P2 finite element pair, in which the velocity has a linear discontinuous variation and the pressure has a quadratic continuous variation. The method is compared against experimental results for a collapsing water column test case and a convergence study is performed. The method is then used to simulate horizontal slug flow. Progress on a consistent approach for interface-capturing in which each component represents a different phase/fluid is described. The aim is to develop a general multiphase modelling approach based on fully-unstructured meshes that can exploit the latest mesh adaptivity methods, and in which each fluid phase may have a number of components. The method is based on the P1DG-P2 finite element pair, in which the velocity has a linear discontinuous variation and the pressure has a quadratic continuous variation. The method is compared against experimental results for a collapsing water column test case and a convergence study is performed. The method is then used to simulate horizontal slug flow. EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  16. MIG version 0.0 model interface guidelines: Rules to accelerate installation of numerical models into any compliant parent code

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, R.M.; Wong, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    A set of model interface guidelines, called MIG, is presented as a means by which any compliant numerical material model can be rapidly installed into any parent code without having to modify the model subroutines. Here, {open_quotes}model{close_quotes} usually means a material model such as one that computes stress as a function of strain, though the term may be extended to any numerical operation. {open_quotes}Parent code{close_quotes} means a hydrocode, finite element code, etc. which uses the model and enforces, say, the fundamental laws of motion and thermodynamics. MIG requires the model developer (who creates the model package) to specify model needs in a standardized but flexible way. MIG includes a dictionary of technical terms that allows developers and parent code architects to share a common vocabulary when specifying field variables. For portability, database management is the responsibility of the parent code. Input/output occurs via structured calling arguments. As much model information as possible (such as the lists of required inputs, as well as lists of precharacterized material data and special needs) is supplied by the model developer in an ASCII text file. Every MIG-compliant model also has three required subroutines to check data, to request extra field variables, and to perform model physics. To date, the MIG scheme has proven flexible in beta installations of a simple yield model, plus a more complicated viscodamage yield model, three electromechanical models, and a complicated anisotropic microcrack constitutive model. The MIG yield model has been successfully installed using identical subroutines in three vectorized parent codes and one parallel C++ code, all predicting comparable results. By maintaining one model for many codes, MIG facilitates code-to-code comparisons and reduces duplication of effort, thereby reducing the cost of installing and sharing models in diverse new codes.

  17. Use of a graphical user interface approach for digital and physical simulation in power systems control education: application to an HVDC transmission system model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond R. Shoults; Edmundo Barrera-Cardiel

    1992-01-01

    The authors present the design of a laboratory with software and hardware structures for digital and physical simulation in the area of power systems control education. The hardware structure includes a physically based model of the power system. The software structure includes a special man-machine interface designed with a graphical user interface approach. This interface allows the user full control

  18. A RT0Based Compliance Checker Model for Automated Trust Negotiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhensong Liao; Hai Jin

    2007-01-01

    Compliance checker is an important component for automated trust negotiation (ATN) to examine whether the credentials match the access control policies. A good design for compliance checker helps to\\u000a speed up trust establishment between parties during the negotiation, and can also improve negotiation efficiency. Unfortunately,\\u000a it has been noted that compliance checker has got little attention in design and implementation.

  19. Managing the Life-cycle of Industrial Automation Systems with Product Line Variability Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roman Froschauer; Deepak Dhungana; Paul Grünbacher

    2008-01-01

    The current trend towards component-based software architectures has also influenced the development of industrial automation systems (IAS). Despite many advances, the life-cycle management of large-scale, component-based IAS still remains a big challenge. The knowledge required for the maintenance and runtime reconfiguration is often tacit and relies on individual stakeholders' capabilities - an error-prone and risky strategy in safety critical environments.

  20. Automated fault-management in a simulated spaceflight micro-world

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, Bernd; Di Nocera, Francesco; Rottger, Stefan; Parasuraman, Raja

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As human spaceflight missions extend in duration and distance from Earth, a self-sufficient crew will bear far greater onboard responsibility and authority for mission success. This will increase the need for automated fault management (FM). Human factors issues in the use of such systems include maintenance of cognitive skill, situational awareness (SA), trust in automation, and workload. This study examine the human performance consequences of operator use of intelligent FM support in interaction with an autonomous, space-related, atmospheric control system. METHODS: An expert system representing a model-base reasoning agent supported operators at a low level of automation (LOA) by a computerized fault finding guide, at a medium LOA by an automated diagnosis and recovery advisory, and at a high LOA by automate diagnosis and recovery implementation, subject to operator approval or veto. Ten percent of the experimental trials involved complete failure of FM support. RESULTS: Benefits of automation were reflected in more accurate diagnoses, shorter fault identification time, and reduced subjective operator workload. Unexpectedly, fault identification times deteriorated more at the medium than at the high LOA during automation failure. Analyses of information sampling behavior showed that offloading operators from recovery implementation during reliable automation enabled operators at high LOA to engage in fault assessment activities CONCLUSIONS: The potential threat to SA imposed by high-level automation, in which decision advisories are automatically generated, need not inevitably be counteracted by choosing a lower LOA. Instead, freeing operator cognitive resources by automatic implementation of recover plans at a higher LOA can promote better fault comprehension, so long as the automation interface is designed to support efficient information sampling.