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Sample records for automated platelet counting

  1. Evaluation of a semi-automated platelet-counting system.

    PubMed

    Rowan, R M; Fraser, C; Gray, J H; McDonald, G A

    1977-04-01

    Coulter Electronics Ltd have produced a semi-automated platelet-counting system. Platelet-rich plasma may be obtained either by tube sedimentation or by means of the Thrombo-fuge, the latter being an instrument designed to produce accelerated sedimentation. The instrument is linear over the entire range of platelet counts, and machine reproducibility is good. Comparison of machine-rated with visual counts satisfied statistical evaluation. The technique can be handled by one operator and platelet counts can be achieved at the rate of 30 per hour by both methods although individual counts on the Thrombo-fuge may be obtained in approximately one-quarter of the time required for tube sedimentation. The throughput using the Thrombo-fuge could certainly be doubled were two sample plates supplied. Few problems were encountered during the evaluation and most could be avoided by meticulous technique. Visual counts must be performed when the sample haematocrit is greater than 50%-Discrepant counts have been obtained in patients with white cell counts exceeding 50 X 10(9)/1 and in patients with giant platelets. ESR elevation for any reason does not lead to serious discrepancy in results. The incidence of platelet clumping due to the presence of platelet agglutinins and of microclot formation due to inadequate mixing is probably much higher than is commonly thought, and certainly peripheral blood film scrutiny should never be omitted in patients with low counts. Careful examination of peripheral blood films must be combined with instrument counting for some time lest further causes of discrepant counting emerge. PMID:856881

  2. Spurious automated platelet count. Enumeration of yeast forms as platelets by the cell-DYN 4000.

    PubMed

    Latif, Shahnila; Veillon, Diana M; Brown, Donald; Kaltenbach, Jenny; Curry, Sherry; Linscott, Andrea J; Oberle, Arnold; Cotelingam, James D

    2003-12-01

    We recently encountered a patient with thrombocytopenia secondary to multiple drug therapy, disseminated prostatic adenocarcinoma, and sepsis who had a sudden decrease in his platelet count as enumerated by the Cell-DYN 4000 hematology analyzer (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA). A manual platelet count performed thereafter was even lower. The etiology of the spurious platelet count was clarified when numerous yeast forms were observed on routine microscopy of the peripheral blood smear. Subsequently, these organisms were identified as Candida glabrata from a positive blood culture (BACTEC 9240, Becton Dickinson, Cockeysville, MD). To our knowledge, this is the first report of spurious enumeration of yeast forms as platelets in an automated hematology system. The principle underlying platelet enumeration by the Cell-DYN 4000 system and other hematology analyzers and the value of microscopy on peripheral smears with unexpected CBC count results are discussed. PMID:14671977

  3. Accuracy of platelet counting by automated hematologic analyzers in acute leukemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation: potential effects of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon Young; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Han, Kyou-Sup; Toh, Cheng Hock

    2010-10-01

    Platelet counting in patients with acute leukemia or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) may have a risk for erroneous counts owing to the presence of nonplatelet particles or platelet activation. We evaluated automated platelet counting methods using the Abbott Cell-Dyn Sapphire (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA), Sysmex XE-2100 (Sysmex, Kobe, Japan), ADVIA 2120 (Siemens Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY), and Beckman Coulter LH 750 (Beckman Coulter, Miami, FL) compared with the international reference method (IRM). Automated platelet counting methods were inaccurate compared with the IRM, without evidence of interfering nonplatelet particles. It is interesting that platelet activation markers were associated with DIC severity and erroneous platelet counting, suggesting that platelet activation is a potential source of inaccuracy. Furthermore, the artifactual in vitro platelet activation induced a high degree of intermethod variation in platelet counts. The inaccuracy of automated platelet counts increased the risk for misdiagnosis of DIC. More attention needs to be given to the accuracy of platelet counts, especially in clinical conditions with florid platelet activation. PMID:20855645

  4. Platelet count

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactions Cancer Certain medicines Bone marrow disease called polycythemia vera Bone marrow making too many platelets without a ... leukemia (CML) Hemolytic anemia Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Polycythemia vera Thrombocytopenia Patient Instructions Deep vein thrombosis - discharge Update ...

  5. Platelet Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash Small purplish spots on the skin called purpura, caused by bleeding under the skin Testing may ... Idiopathic thrombocytopenia (ITP), also known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is the result of antibody production against platelets. ...

  6. Automated platelet counters: a comparative evaluation of latest instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, K; Chin, B; Magnes, J; Thaler, H T; Lotspeich, C; Baisley, A

    1980-08-01

    An extensive evaluation of performance characteristics and accuracy of clinical results for two automated multiparameter whole-blood cell counters (the Coulter Counter Model S-Plus and the Ortho ELT-8) and two single-parameter semiautomated platelet counters (the J. T. Baker MK-4/HC and the Clay-Adams Ultra-Flo 100) is described. Results of comparative assays performed on more than 1,200 clinical specimens are analyzed. These results are compared with manual determinations where appropriate. Particular attention is accorded to the accuracy of platelet counts, especially at abnormal levels below 70 X 10(3)/cu mm, where falsely elevated platelet counts may lead to serious clinical consequences. Both multiparameter instruments yielded accurate results, with the exception of low values reported by the ELT-8 for mean corpuscular volumes above 100 cu micrometer. Results for platelet counts were accurate for most specimens on all four instruments; the ELT-8 was the most reliable (P < 0.01), especially for the critically low counts. Although no instrument is infallible in determining platelet counts at all levels, the authors conclude that addition of platelet-counting capability represents a significant advancement over existing instrumentation. PMID:7405891

  7. Spurious platelet count due to cryoglobulins in a patient with smoldering myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Naveen; John, M Joseph; Mathew, Amrith; Chawla, Rajinder

    2014-01-01

    Use of automated hematology analyzers for routine blood count reporting has increased the reproducibility and accuracy of test results. However, at times, these instruments may generate spurious test results. Such results can result in inappropriate investigations or treatment decisions in patients. Spuriously normal or high platelet counts carry the risk of under diagnosis of the true thrombocytopenia with adverse clinical implications. We present a patient with smoldering myeloma with spurious platelet count due to cryoglobulins. PMID:25118751

  8. Effective estimation of correct platelet counts in pseudothrombocytopenia using an alternative anticoagulant based on magnesium salt.

    PubMed

    Schuff-Werner, Peter; Steiner, Michael; Fenger, Sebastian; Gross, Hans-Jürgen; Bierlich, Alexa; Dreissiger, Katrin; Mannuß, Steffen; Siegert, Gabriele; Bachem, Maximilian; Kohlschein, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Pseudothrombocytopenia remains a challenge in the haematological laboratory. The pre-analytical problem that platelets tend to easily aggregate in vitro, giving rise to lower platelet counts, has been known since ethylenediamine-tetra acetic acid EDTA and automated platelet counting procedures were introduced in the haematological laboratory. Different approaches to avoid the time and temperature dependent in vitro aggregation of platelets in the presence of EDTA were tested, but none of them proved optimal for routine purposes. Patients with unexpectedly low platelet counts or flagged for suspected aggregates, were selected and smears were examined for platelet aggregates. In these cases patients were asked to consent to the drawing of an additional sample of blood anti-coagulated with a magnesium additive. Magnesium was used in the beginning of the last century as anticoagulant for microscopic platelet counts. Using this approach, we documented 44 patients with pseudothrombocytopenia. In all cases, platelet counts were markedly higher in samples anti-coagulated with the magnesium containing anticoagulant when compared to EDTA-anticoagulated blood samples. We conclude that in patients with known or suspected pseudothrombocytopenia the magnesium-anticoagulant blood samples may be recommended for platelet counting. PMID:23808903

  9. Effective estimation of correct platelet counts in pseudothrombocytopenia using an alternative anticoagulant based on magnesium salt

    PubMed Central

    Schuff-Werner, Peter; Steiner, Michael; Fenger, Sebastian; Gross, Hans-Jürgen; Bierlich, Alexa; Dreissiger, Katrin; Mannuß, Steffen; Siegert, Gabriele; Bachem, Maximilian; Kohlschein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Pseudothrombocytopenia remains a challenge in the haematological laboratory. The pre-analytical problem that platelets tend to easily aggregate in vitro, giving rise to lower platelet counts, has been known since ethylenediamine-tetra acetic acid EDTA and automated platelet counting procedures were introduced in the haematological laboratory. Different approaches to avoid the time and temperature dependent in vitro aggregation of platelets in the presence of EDTA were tested, but none of them proved optimal for routine purposes. Patients with unexpectedly low platelet counts or flagged for suspected aggregates, were selected and smears were examined for platelet aggregates. In these cases patients were asked to consent to the drawing of an additional sample of blood anti-coagulated with a magnesium additive. Magnesium was used in the beginning of the last century as anticoagulant for microscopic platelet counts. Using this approach, we documented 44 patients with pseudothrombocytopenia. In all cases, platelet counts were markedly higher in samples anti-coagulated with the magnesium containing anticoagulant when compared to EDTA-anticoagulated blood samples. We conclude that in patients with known or suspected pseudothrombocytopenia the magnesium-anticoagulant blood samples may be recommended for platelet counting. PMID:23808903

  10. Platelet counts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Setyapranata, Stella; Holt, Stephen G

    2016-05-01

    Platelet counts in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) have been reported to be lower than in control populations in one small study but data are sparse. We retrospectively audited real world platelet data from 290 ADPKD patients with corresponding age and sex-matched controls. We analysed 42 972 individual blood counts and patients with ADPKD had statistically lower platelet counts (213 ± 63 vs. 238 ± 69 × 10(9)/L, p < 0.01) on dialysis. In the transplant and chronic kidney disease (CKD) groups, there were no significant differences in the platelet counts. The magnitude of the difference in platelet numbers was small and unlikely to be clinically significant, so findings of low platelets in ADPKD should be further investigated. PMID:26270278

  11. Accuracy of a New Platelet Count System (PLT-F) Depends on the Staining Property of Its Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Atsushi; Takagi, Yuri; Kono, Mari; Morikawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet count is essential for the diagnosis and management of hemostasis abnormalities. Although existing platelet count methods installed in common hematology analyzers can correctly count platelets in normal blood samples, they tend to miscount platelets in some abnormal samples. The newly developed PLT-F channel in the XN-Series hematology analyzer (Sysmex) has been reported to be a reliable platelet count system, even in abnormal samples. However, how the PLT-F platelet counting system achieves such accuracy has not been described in scientific articles. Methods Isolated platelets, erythrocytes, and fragmented erythrocytes were examined using an automated hematology analyzer. The samples were labeled by combining PLT-F reagents and anti-CD62p, CD63, Grp75, Calreticulin, CD41, or CD61 antibody, and analyzed using confocal laser scanning microscopy or flow cytometry. Results The PLT-F system correctly discriminated platelets in erythrocytes. Its reagents strongly stained some intraplatelet organelles labeled with anti-Grp75, but only faintly stained the plasma membrane of both platelets and erythrocytes. Microscopic observation and flow cytometric examination revealed that all of these strongly stained cells were also labeled with platelet-specific anti-CD41 and anti-CD61 antibodies. Conclusions This study revealed that the staining property of the PLT-F reagents, by which platelets and fragmented erythrocytes are clearly distinguished, contributes to the platelet-counting accuracy of the PLT-F system. PMID:26496387

  12. Outcomes of an automated procedure for the selection of effective platelets for patients refractory to random donors based on cross-matching locally available platelet products.

    PubMed

    Rebulla, Paolo; Morelati, Fernanda; Revelli, Nicoletta; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Paccapelo, Cinzia; Nocco, Angela; Greppi, Noemi; Marconi, Maurizio; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Fracchiolla, Nicola; Martinelli, Giovanni; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi

    2004-04-01

    In 1999, we implemented an automated platelet cross-matching (XM) programme to select compatible platelets from the local inventory for patients refractory to random donor platelets. In this study, we evaluated platelet count increments in 40 consecutive refractory patients (8.3% of 480 consecutive platelet recipients) given 569 cross-match-negative platelets between April 1999 and December 2001. XM was performed automatically with a commercially available immunoadherence assay. Pre-, 1- and 24-h post-transfusion platelet counts (mean +/- SD) for the 569 XM-negative platelet transfusions containing 302 +/- 71 x 109 platelets were 7.7 +/- 5.5, 32.0 +/- 21.0 and 16.8 +/- 15.5 x 109/l respectively. Increments were significantly higher (P < 0.05, t-test) than those observed in the same patients given 303 random platelet pools (dose = 318 +/- 52 x 109 platelets) during the month before refractoriness was detected, when pre-, 1- and 24-h post-transfusion counts were 7.0 +/- 8.6, 15.9 +/- 16.1 and 9.6 +/- 12.8 x 109/l respectively. The cost of the platelet XM disposable kit per transfusion to produce 1-h post-transfusion platelet count increments >10 x 109/l was euro 447. This programme enabled the rapid selection of effective platelets for refractory patients, from the local inventory. PMID:15015974

  13. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Rachael F.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa–positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP. PMID:26138687

  14. Era of blood component therapy: time for mandatory pre-donation platelet count for maximizing donor safety and optimizing quality of platelets.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, R U; Biswas, Dipak

    2013-12-01

    Blood bank regulatory agencies including the Drug and Cosmetics Act (DCA) of India do not mandate a predonation platelet count in whole blood donation. Mandating such practice will definitely optimize the quality of random donor platelets (RDP) in terms of platelet yield and patient therapeutic benefit. We observed poor platelet yield in RDP concentrates prepared at our center with a significant number not meeting the DCA guideline of ≥ 4.5 × 10(10) per bag processed from 450 ml of whole blood. Therefore we planned this study to evaluate the pre-donation hematological values in our blood donor population and effect of these values on the quality of platelet concentrates. The prospective study included 221 blood donors eligible for donating 450 ml of whole blood (WB). Following the departmental standard operating procedure (SOP) RDPs were prepared using the 'Top & Bottom' quadruple bag system and automated component extractor. Quality of RDP was assessed as per departmental protocol. All results were recorded and subsequently transcribed to SPSS working sheet. A significant (p<0.001) decrement of donor blood counts has been observed after WB donation. Mean donor Hb and platelets reduced by 0.72 g/dl and 22.1 × 10(6)/ml respectively. Quality of RDPs in terms of platelet yield was significantly better (p<0.001) when donor platelet count was >200 × 10(6)/ml. Although platelet yield significantly correlated with the donor platelet count however quality of RDPs in terms of red cell contamination showed no correlation with the donor hematocrit. Platelet yield in random donor platelets is a concern in Eastern India. A platelet yield of 4.5 × 10(10) per bag as mandated by the DCA of India was only achieved when the donor platelet count was >200 × 10(6)/ml. Posttransfusion platelet recovery (PPR) was unsatisfactory in the transfused patient. Introduction of pre-donation platelet count in whole blood donation will maximize donor safety and optimize patient platelet

  15. Effects of Isotretinoin on the Platelet Counts and the Mean Platelet Volume in Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Ugur Bilgin, Aynur

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to evaluate the platelet counts and the mean platelet volume in patients who received isotretinoin for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Method. A total of 110 patients were included in this retrospective study. Complete blood count parameters were recorded prior to and three-months following the treatment. Results. Both platelet counts and the mean platelet volume were significantly decreased following the treatment. No significant differences were noted on the levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and white blood cell count. Conclusion. Platelet counts and mean platelet volume significantly decreased following isotretinoin treatment. Since the decrease of platelet counts and the mean platelet volume was seen concomitantly, it is concluded that the effect of isotretinoin was through the suppression of bone marrow. PMID:24605049

  16. Neuraxial Anesthesia in Parturients with Low Platelet Counts.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jeffrey; Hua, Betty; Kahana, Madelyn; Shaparin, Naum; Yu, Simon; Davila-Velazquez, Juan

    2016-07-01

    The obstetric anesthesiologist must consider the risk of spinal-epidural hematoma in patients with thrombocytopenia when choosing to provide neuraxial anesthesia. There are little data exploring this complication in the parturient. In this single-center retrospective study of 20,244 obstetric patients, the incidence of peripartum thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100,000/mm) was 1.8% (368 patients). Of these patients, 69% (256) received neuraxial anesthesia. No neuraxial hematoma occurred in any of our patients. The upper 95% confidence limit for spinal-epidural hematoma in patients who received neuraxial anesthesia with a platelet count of <100,000/mm was 1.2%. PMID:27159067

  17. Macrothrombocytopenia in north India: role of automated platelet data in the detection of an under diagnosed entity.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Naveen; John, M Joseph; Mathew, Amrith

    2015-03-01

    Congenital macrothrombocytopenia is being increasingly recognised because of the increasing availability of automated platelet counts during routine complete blood count. If not recognised, these patients may be unnecessarily investigated or treated. The study was done to assess the occurrence of macrothrombocytopenia in the North Indian population and the role of automated platelet parameters in its detection. This prospective study was done on patients whose blood samples were sent for CBC to the hematology laboratory of a tertiary care hospital. Samples were run on Advia-120, a 5-part differential automated analyzer. Routine blood parameters including platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet cytogram pattern and platelet flagging was studied along with peripheral blood smear examination. ANOVA was used to compare difference in mean MPV in patients with macrothrombocytopenia, and those with secondary thrombocytopenia and ITP. Seventy five (0.6 %) patients with CBC evaluation were detected to have macrothrombocytopenia, majority (96 %) of North Indian origin. The MPV (fl) in the 75 patients ranged from 10.9 to 23.3 (mean 15.1 ± 3.1 fl) with a dispersed cytogram pattern distinct from that seen in patients with normal platelet count, raised platelet count or low platelets due to secondary thrombocytopenia (MPV-10.9 ± 2.6) or ITP (10.8 ± 3.5). The difference in mean MPV in these patients was statistically significant (p < 0.00001). Macrothrombocytopenia is an under diagnosed condition and may be initially suspected on automated blood counts. Along with a blood smear examination, automated data (MPV and platelet cytogram pattern) aids the diagnosis and can avoid unnecessary investigations and interventions for these patients. PMID:25548447

  18. Platelet parameters from an automated hematology analyzer in dogs with inflammatory clinical diseases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jo R; Smith, Katherine F; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2014-09-01

    The mean platelet component (MPC) is a proprietary algorithm of an automated laser-based hematology analyzer system which measures the refractive index of platelets. The MPC is related linearly to platelet density and is an indirect index of platelet activation status. Previous investigations of canine inflammatory conditions and models of endotoxemia demonstrated a significant decrease in the MPC, consistent with platelet activation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the MPC and other platelet parameters in dogs with different diseases to determine if they could show differential platelet activation with different pathologies. The hypothesis was that the MPC would decrease in clinical conditions associated with systemic inflammation or platelet activation. Complete blood counts run on the analyzer from dogs with different inflammatory conditions (primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) or thrombocytopenia (ITP), pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism, intra-abdominal sepsis, pancreatitis, intravascular thrombus or thromboembolus and hemangiosarcoma) were reviewed retrospectively and compared with those of control dogs presenting for orthopedic evaluation. Dogs with ITP had a decreased plateletcrit and MPC, with an increased platelet volume and number of large platelets (P < 0.001). Dogs with IMHA had an increased plateletcrit and mass, and more numerous large platelets (P < 0.001).With the exception of the ITP group, there was no difference in MPC in the diseased groups when compared with the controls. The results of this study suggest the MPC does not change in certain canine diseases associated with systemic inflammation. PMID:25082397

  19. Reticulated platelets interfere with flow cytometric reticulocyte counts.

    PubMed

    Ivory, K; Sarria, B; Fairweather-Tait, S J; Hughes, D A

    2007-10-01

    As part of an iron absorption study, we needed to accurately count reticulocytes in the peripheral blood of healthy human volunteers before measuring their enrichment with stable iron isotopes given in an oral dose. Recent studies have suggested the usefulness of reticulocyte counting by flow cytometry, through a combination of differential light scatter and measurement of the stoichiometric binding of thiazole orange (TO) to RNA within the maturing erythrocyte. Using this method we set out to improve the precision of our quantitative analysis by counting more cells, as reticulocytes normally comprise <2% of the red cell population. To ensure exclusion of other cell types, we identified WBCs and platelets with CD16+CD45- allophycocyanin and CD61- phycoerythrin, respectively. After removal of CD16(+) CD45(+) TO(+) WBCs and CD61(+) TO(-) platelets from analysis, the remaining cells were a combination of CD61(-) TO(-) erythrocytes, CD61(-) TO(+) reticulocytes and CD61(+) TO(+) reticulated platelets. Reticulocyte counts were lower after exclusion of CD61(+) TO(+) cells from analysis. They were similarly lower when erythrocyte precursors were positively identified through their glycophorin A expression and TO uptake. We conclude that it is necessary to exclude reticulated platelets from flow cytometric reticulocyte analysis. PMID:17824916

  20. 21 CFR 864.8175 - Calibrator for platelet counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibrator for platelet counting. 864.8175 Section 864.8175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8175 Calibrator...

  1. 21 CFR 864.8175 - Calibrator for platelet counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for platelet counting. 864.8175 Section 864.8175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8175 Calibrator...

  2. 21 CFR 864.8175 - Calibrator for platelet counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibrator for platelet counting. 864.8175 Section 864.8175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8175 Calibrator...

  3. 21 CFR 864.8175 - Calibrator for platelet counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibrator for platelet counting. 864.8175 Section 864.8175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8175 Calibrator...

  4. 21 CFR 864.8175 - Calibrator for platelet counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibrator for platelet counting. 864.8175 Section 864.8175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8175 Calibrator...

  5. Platelet count kinetics following interruption of antiretroviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Eva; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Baker, Jason V.; Somboonwit, Charurut; Llibre, Josep M.; Palfreeman, Adrian; Chini, Maria; Lundgren, Jens D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the mechanisms of platelet kinetics in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study that demonstrated excess mortality with CD4 guided episodic antiretroviral therapy (ART) drug conservation compared with continuous treatment viral suppression. Follow-up analyses of stored plasma samples demonstrated increased activation of both inflammatory and coagulation pathways after stopping ART. Design SMART patients from sites that determined platelets routinely. Methods Platelet counts were retrospectively collected from 2206 patients from visits at study entry, and during follow-up. D-dimer levels were measured at study entry, month 1, and 2. Results Platelet levels decreased in the drug conservation group following randomization, but remained stable in the viral suppression group [median (IQR) decline from study entry to month 4: −24 000/µl (−54 000 to 4000) vs. 3000 (−22 000 to 24 000), respectively, P < 0.0001)] and the rate of developing thrombocytopenia (<100 000/µl) was significantly higher in the drug conservation vs. the viral suppression arm (unadjusted drug conservation/viral suppression [HR (95%CI) = 1.8 (1.2–2.7)]. The decline in platelet count among drug conservation participants on fully suppressive ART correlated with the rise in D-dimer from study entry to either month 1 or 2 (r = −0.41; P = 0.02). Among drug conservation participants who resumed ART 74% recovered to their study entry platelet levels. Conclusion Interrupting ART increases the risk of thrombocytopenia, but reinitiation of ART typically reverses it. Factors contributing to declines in platelets after interrupting ART may include activation of coagulation pathways or HIV-1 replication itself. The contribution of platelets in HIV-related procoagulant activity requires further study. PMID:23018440

  6. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700 Section 864.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  7. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700 Section 864.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  8. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700 Section 864.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  9. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700 Section 864.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  10. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700 Section 864.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  11. Relationship between circulating platelet counts and ductus arteriosus patency following indomethacin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nidhi A.; Hills, Nancy K.; Waleh, Nahid; McCurnin, Donald; Seidner, Steven; Chemtob, Sylvain; Clyman, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if low platelet counts are related to the incidence of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) after indomethacin treatment in preterm human infants. Study design Multivariable logistic regression modeling was used for a cohort of 497 infants, who received indomethacin (within 15 hours of birth). Results Platelet counts were not related to the incidence of permanent closure following indomethacin constriction. There was a relationship between platelet counts and the initial degree of constriction; however, this relationship appeared to be primarily influenced by the high end of the platelet distribution curve. PDA incidence was similar in infants with platelet counts <50 × 109/L and those with platelet counts above this range. Only when platelet counts were consistently >230 × 109/L was there a decrease in PDA incidence. Conclusion In contrast to the evidence in mice, low circulating platelet counts do not affect permanent ductus closure (or ductus reopening) in human preterm infants. PMID:21195414

  12. Evaluation of the platelet counting by Abbott CELL-DYN SAPPHIRE haematology analyser compared with flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, E; Del Vecchio, L; Scopacasa, F; Lo Pardo, C; Capone, F; Pariante, S; Scalia, G; De Caterina, M

    2009-04-01

    The Abbot Cell-Dyn Sapphire is a new generation haematology analyser. The system uses optical/fluorescence flow cytometry in combination with electronic impedance to produce a full blood count. Optical and impedance are the default methods for platelet counting while automated CD61-immunoplatelet analysis can be run as selectable test. The aim of this study was to determine the platelet count performance of the three counting methods available on the instrument and to compare the results with those provided by Becton Dickinson FACSCalibur flow cytometer used as reference method. A lipid interference experiment was also performed. Linearity, carryover and precision were good, and satisfactory agreement with reference method was found for the impedance, optical and CD61-immunoplatelet analysis, although this latter provided the closest results in comparison with flow cytometry. In the lipid interference experiment, a moderate inaccuracy of optical and immunoplatelet counts was observed starting from a very high lipid value. PMID:18177435

  13. Regulation of platelet count by erythropoiesis-stimulating agents – iron axis in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Kiyomi; Fukami, Kei; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Shimamatsu, Kazumasa; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Okuda, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    Higher doses of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) contribute to atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Thrombocytosis is associated with increased mortality in ESA-treated HD patients. We investigated variables affecting platelet count and its variability (platelet count increment [Δplatelet count]) in HD patients. This retrospective longitudinal and observational study of HD outpatients was carried out over 3 years. The outcome was independent determinants of platelet count and Δplatelet count, which were associated with iron indices, ESA dose, and C-reactive protein. In univariate regression analysis, V-shaped relationship was observed between platelet count and transferrin saturation (TSAT), ferritin, serum iron, and hemoglobin (Hb) with the bottom of 0.21, 330 ng/mL, 49 µg/dL, and 10.3 g/dL, respectively. Mixed-effect multivariate regression analysis revealed that TSAT (inversely), Hb ≤10.3 g/dL (inversely), C-reactive protein, and ESA dose were independently associated with platelet count. Δplatelet count was independently and inversely correlated with ΔTSAT and directly correlated with Δferritin. TSAT was independently and inversely associated with ESA dose. ESA dose was directly correlated with iron dose and inversely correlated with TSAT, ferritin ≤330 ng/mL, and Hb ≤10.3 g/dL. ESA dose and TSAT were correlated in determining platelet count and Δplatelet count. Targets of iron indices that reflect iron supply sufficient to avoid platelet count increment and variability may be >21% of TSAT and 300 ng/mL of serum ferritin for appropriate ESA therapy in HD patients. PMID:27099526

  14. A Statistical Analysis of Automated Crater Counts in MOC and HRSC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Werner, S. C.; Brumby, S. P.; Asphaug, E.; Neukum, G.; HRSC Investigator Team

    2006-03-01

    We describe continuing efforts to develop automated crater counting algorithms for Mars surface images. Comparison of automated to manual counts yield automated counts that are within the 1-? error of the manual counts in several adjacent diameter bins.

  15. A side-by-side evaluation of four platelet-counting instruments.

    PubMed

    Dalton, W T; Bollinger, P; Drewinko, B

    1980-08-01

    The performances of four instruments for counting platelets were evaluated in a side-by-side study: the Haema-Count MK-4/HC, an electronic impedance instrument that counts platelets in platelet-rich plasma; the Ultra-Flo 100, and the Coulter Counter Model S-Plus, electronic impedance instruments that count platelets in the presence of intact erythrocytes; and the AutoCounter, an optical instrument that counts platelets in the presence of lysed erythrocytes. The Ultra-Flo 100 and the S-Plus showed the best within-run precision, and all four instruments were considerably more precise than manual platelet counting, especially at low levels of platelet count. The four instruments were all linear in the ranges tested (5 to 650 x 10(9)/or greater), and sample carry-over was less than 0.7% for each. A noteworthy finding was that the erythrocyte concentration of the blood samples affected the displayed platelet count of the S-Plus and, to a lesser extent, that of the AutoCounter, in a predictable way, whereas it did not greatly affect the displayed count of the Ultra-Flo 100. In addition to differences in quality of performances, the four instruments differed considerably in speed and ease of operation and in cost. PMID:7405890

  16. Electronic platelet counts with the Coulter counter. Reassessment of a correction factor.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, E L; Wehman, J; Wall, B

    1976-09-01

    Platelet counts are determined on the Coulter electronic counter by counting the diluted platelet-rich plasma obtained by sedimentation or centrifugation of whole blood. In calculating the whole-blood platelet count, an empirical correction factor for platelet-free plasma trapped by sedimented erythrocytes has been recommended, and a widely-distributed circular slide rule calculator incorporates the correction factor. In this study, visual and electronic platelet counts were compared in 100 specimens with counts ranging from 10 to 1,100 X 10(3) per mul and hematocrits ranging from 17.5 to 48.5%. Platelet-rich plasma samples prepared by a centrifugation method (Plateletfuge) gave machine counts in close agreement with those of samples prepared by sedimentation. Whole-blood platelet counts determined with the circular calculator were consistently lower than visual counts, with an average difference of -17%. The electronic counts were recalculated after elimination of the correction factor, and agreement then improved to an average difference of only +1.6%. The correction factor for trapped platelet-free plasma leads to erroneously low values and should not be used. PMID:961629

  17. Increased platelet count and leucocyte–platelet complex formation in acute symptomatic compared with asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, D; Harrison, P; Mackie, I; Sidhu, P; Purdy, G; Lawrie, A; Watt, H; Machin, S; Brown, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis is considerably higher than in patients with asymptomatic stenosis. In the present study it was hypothesised that excessive platelet activation might partly contribute to this difference. Methods: A full blood count was done and whole blood flow cytometry used to measure platelet surface expression of CD62P, CD63, and PAC1 binding and the percentage of leucocyte–platelet complexes in patients with acute (0–21 days, n = 19) and convalescent (79–365 days) symptomatic (n = 16) and asymptomatic (n = 16) severe (⩾70%) carotid stenosis. Most patients were treated with aspirin (37.5–300 mg daily) although alternative antithrombotic regimens were more commonly used in the symptomatic group. Results: The mean platelet count was higher in patients with acute and convalescent symptomatic compared with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. There were no significant differences in the median percentage expression of CD62P and CD63, or PAC1 binding between the acute or convalescent symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. The median percentages of neutrophil–platelet (p = 0.004), monocyte–platelet (p = 0.046), and lymphocyte–platelet complexes (p = 0.02) were higher in acute symptomatic than in asymptomatic patients. In patients on aspirin monotherapy, the percentages of neutrophil–platelet and monocyte–platelet complexes (p = 0.03) were higher in acute symptomatic (n = 11) than asymptomatic patients (n = 14). In the convalescent phase, the median percentages of all leucocyte–platelet complexes in the symptomatic group dropped to levels similar to those found in the asymptomatic group. Conclusion: Increased platelet count and leucocyte–platelet complex formation may contribute to the early excess risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:16107361

  18. Cross-match-compatible platelets improve corrected count increments in patients who are refractory to randomly selected platelets

    PubMed Central

    Elhence, Priti; Chaudhary, Rajendra K.; Nityanand, Soniya

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-match-compatible platelets are used for the management of thrombocytopenic patients who are refractory to transfusions of randomly selected platelets. Data supporting the effectiveness of platelets that are compatible according to cross-matching with a modified antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA or MACE) are limited. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of cross-match-compatible platelets in an unselected group of refractory patients. Materials and methods One hundred ABO compatible single donor platelet transfusions given to 31 refractory patients were studied. Patients were defined to be refractory if their 24-hour corrected count increment (CCI) was <5×109/L following two consecutive platelet transfusions. Platelets were cross-matched by MACE and the CCI was determined to monitor the effectiveness of platelet transfusions. Results The clinical sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the MACE-cross-matched platelets for post-transfusion CCI were 88%, 54.6%, 39.3% and 93.2%, respectively. The difference between adequate and inadequate post-transfusion 24-hour CCI for MACE cross-matched-compatible vs incompatible single donor platelet transfusions was statistically significant (p=0.000). The 24-hour CCI (mean±SD) was significantly higher for cross-match-compatible platelets (9,250±026.6) than for incompatible ones (6,757.94±2,656.5) (p<0.0001). Most of the incompatible cross-matches (73.2%) were due to anti-HLA antibodies, alone (55.3% of cases) or together with anti-platelet glycoprotein antibodies (17.9%). Discussion The clinical sensitivity and negative predictive value of platelet cross-matching by MACE were high in this study and such tests may, therefore, be used to select compatible platelets for refractory patients. A high negative predictive value demonstrates the greater chance of an adequate response with cross-matched-compatible platelets. PMID

  19. Significance of platelet count and platelet-based models for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qing; Zhang, Jing-Yao; Xu, Xin-Sen; Song, Si-Dong; Qu, Kai; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Yan-Yan; Miao, Run-Chen; Liu, Su-Shun; Dong, Ya-Feng; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effects of platelet count (PLT) and 11 platelet-based indices on postoperative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 172 HCC patients who were treated by partial hepatectomy. Preoperative data, including laboratory biochemical results, were used to calculate the 11 indices included in the analysis. We performed receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine the optimal cut-off values for predicting recurrence. Cumulative rates of HCC recurrence were calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and differences were analyzed by log-rank tests. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of recurrence, early recurrence (within one year after surgery), and late recurrence in HCC. To obtain better prognostic models, PLT-based indices were analyzed separately after being expressed as binary and continuous variables. Two platelet-unrelated, validated HCC prognostic models were included in the analyses as reference indices. Additional analyses were performed after patients were stratified based on hepatitis B virus infection status, cirrhosis, and tumor size to investigate the significance of platelets in different subgroups. RESULTS: In the study cohort, 44.2% (76/172) of patients experienced HCC recurrence, and 50.6% (87/172) died during a median follow-up time of 46 mo. PLT and five of the 11 platelet-related models were significant predisposing factors for recurrence (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that, among the clinical parameters, presence of ascites, PLT ≥ 148 × 109/L, alkaline phosphatase ≥ 116 U/L, and tumor size ≥ 5 cm were independently associated with a higher risk of HCC recurrence (P < 0.05). Independent and significant models included the aspartate aminotransferase/PLT index, fibrosis index based on the four factors, fibro-quotient, aspartate aminotransferase/PLT/γ-glutamyl transpeptidase/alpha-fetoprotein index, and the PLT

  20. [Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adukauskiene, Dalia; Vizgirdaite, Venta; Rimaitis, Kestutis; Aliuskeviciene, Asta

    2006-01-01

    HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) syndrome is a severe, life-threatening pregnancy pathology, which occurs in 0.2-0.8% of all pregnancies, and approximately 10% (2-20%) of pregnancies are complicated with severe preeclampsia. This syndrome usually develops in the third trimester of pregnancy in preeclamptic patients, sometimes it occurs in the second trimester of pregnancy, and very rarely HELLP syndrome may develop within 48-72 hours after delivery. Diagnosis is complicated as there are no specific clinical signs, therefore, this syndrome may be confused with other pathologies like acute fatty liver of pregnancy, idiopathic thrombocytopenia, hemolytic uremic syndrome, appendicitis, and etc. The patients with HELLP syndrome should be treated in the tertiary care hospital, where appropriate diagnostics and multidisciplinary help for mother and fetus can be assured. When the syndrome was described for the first time, L. Weinstein recommended prompt delivery as the only possible treatment. Current studies show that conservative treatment of patients with HELLP syndrome is safe, without an increase in morbidity and mortality. That is why now many authors agree that treatment approach should be based on the estimated gestational age and the condition of the mother and fetus. PMID:17028466

  1. The Ratio of ADP- to TRAP-Induced Platelet Aggregation Quantifies P2Y12-Dependent Platelet Inhibition Independently of the Platelet Count

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Christoph B.; Meyer, Melanie; Bauer, Hans; Schnabel, Katharina; Weik, Patrick; Zhou, Qian; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Diehl, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the association of clinical factors with P2Y12-dependent platelet inhibition as monitored by the ratio of ADP- to TRAP-induced platelet aggregation and conventional ADP-induced aggregation, respectively. Background Controversial findings to identify and overcome high platelet reactivity (HPR) after coronary stent-implantation and to improve clinical outcome by tailored anti-platelet therapy exist. Monitoring anti-platelet therapy ex vivo underlies several confounding parameters causing that ex vivo platelet aggregation might not reflect in vivo platelet inhibition. Methods In a single centre observational study, multiple electrode aggregometry was performed in whole blood of patients after recent coronary stent-implantation. Relative ADP-induced aggregation (r-ADP-agg) was defined as the ratio of ADP- to TRAP- induced aggregation reflecting the individual degree of P2Y12-mediated platelet reactivity. Results Platelet aggregation was assessed in 359 patients. Means (± SD) of TRAP-, ADP-induced aggregation and r-ADP-agg were 794 ± 239 AU*min, 297 ± 153 AU*min and 37 ± 14%, respectively. While ADP- and TRAP-induced platelet aggregation correlated significantly with platelet count (ADP: r = 0.302; p<0.001; TRAP: r = 0.509 p<0.001), r-ADP-agg values did not (r = -0.003; p = 0.960). These findings were unaltered in multivariate analyses adjusting for a range of factors potentially influencing platelet aggregation. The presence of an acute coronary syndrome and body weight were found to correlate with both ADP-induced platelet aggregation and r-ADP-agg. Conclusion The ratio of ADP- to TRAP-induced platelet aggregation quantifies P2Y12-dependent platelet inhibition independently of the platelet count in contrast to conventional ADP-induced aggregation. Furthermore, r-ADP-agg was associated with the presence of an acute coronary syndrome and body weight as well as ADP-induced aggregation. Thus, the r-ADP-agg is a more valid

  2. Platelet count and transfusion requirements during moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jones, R M; de Lloyd, L; Kealaher, E J; Lilley, G J; Precious, E; Burckett St Laurent, D; Hamlyn, V; Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2016-06-01

    Limited data exist on platelet transfusion during postpartum haemorrhage. We retrospectively analysed a consecutive cohort from a single centre of 347 women with moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage, transfused according to national guidelines. Twelve (3%) women required a platelet transfusion. There were no differences between women who did and did not receive platelets with respect to age, mode of initiation of labour or mode of delivery. Women receiving a platelet transfusion had a lower median (IQR [range]) platelet count at study entry than women who did not receive platelets before haemorrhage (135 (97-175 [26-259])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 224 (186-274 [91-1006])×10(9) .l(-1) ), respectively), and at diagnosis of postpartum haemorrhage (median 114 (78-153 [58-238])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 193 (155-243 [78-762])×10(9) .l(-1) respectively). Six women were thrombocytopenic pre-delivery. The cause of haemorrhage that was associated with the highest rate of platelet transfusion was placental abruption, with three of 14 women being transfused. If antenatal thrombocytopenia or consumptive coagulopathy were not present, platelets were only required for haemorrhage > 5000 ml. Early formulaic platelet transfusion would have resulted in many women receiving platelets unnecessarily. Using current guidelines, the need for platelet transfusion is uncommon without antenatal thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy or haemorrhage > 5000 ml. We found no evidence to support early fixed-ratio platelet transfusion. PMID:27062151

  3. Effect of Fingolimod on Platelet Count Among Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Mehrdad; Beni, Ali Amani; Etemadifar, Masoud; Rezaei, Ali; Rivard, Leah; Zadeh, Aryan Rafiee; Sedaghat, Nahid; Ghadimi, Milad

    2015-01-01

    Background: While many studies have previously focused on fingolimod's effect on immune cells, the effect it has on circulating and local central nervous system platelets (Plts) has not yet been investigated. This study will elucidate what effects fingolimod treatment has on multiple sclerosis (MS) patients’ plasma Plt levels. In addition, it will propose possible reasoning for these effects and suggest further investigation into this topic. Methods: This quasi-experimental study used patients from the Isfahan Multiple Sclerosis Society to produce a subject pool of 80 patients, including 14 patients who ceased fingolimod use due to complications. The patients had their blood analyzed to determine Plt levels both 1-month prior to fingolimod treatment and 1-month after fingolimod treatment had been started. Results: The mean level of Plts before initiation of fingolimod therapy (Plt1) among these MS patients was 256.53 ± 66.26. After 1-month of fingolimod treatment, the Plt level yielded an average of 229.96 ± 49.67 (Plt2). This number is significantly lower than the average Plt count before treatment (P < 0.01). Conclusions: MS patients taking oral fingolimod treatment may be at risk for side-effects caused by low Plt levels. This may not be a factor for patients with higher or normal Plt levels. However, a patient with naturally low Plt levels may experience a drop below the normal level and be at risk for excessive bleeding. In addition to these possible harmful side-effects, the decreased Plt population may pose positive effects for MS patients. PMID:26900439

  4. Counting the platelets: a robust and sensitive quantification method for thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Claesson, Kjersti; Lindahl, Tomas L; Faxälv, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Flow chambers are common tools used for studying thrombus formation in vitro. However, the use of such devices is not standardised and there is a large diversity among the flow chamber systems currently used, and also in the methods used for quantifying the thrombus development. It was the study objective to evaluate a new method for analysis and quantification of platelet thrombus formation that can facilitate comparison of results between research groups. Whole blood was drawn over a collagen patch in commercial Ibid or in-house constructed PDMS flow chambers. Five percent of the platelets were fluorescently labelled and z-stack time-lapse images were captured during thrombus formation. Images were processed in a Python script in which the number of platelets and their respective x-, y- and z-positions were obtained. For comparison with existing methods the platelets were also labelled and quantified using fluorescence intensity and thrombus volume estimations by confocal microscopy. The presented method was found less sensitive to microscope and image adjustments and provides more details on thrombus development dynamics than the methods for measuring fluorescence intensity and thrombus volume estimation. The platelet count method produced comparable results with commercial and PDMS flow chambers, and could also obtain information regarding the stability of each detected platelet in the thrombus. In conclusion, quantification of thrombus formation by platelet count is a sensitive and robust method that enables measurement of platelet accumulation and platelet stability in an absolute scale that could be used for comparisons between research groups. PMID:26842994

  5. Detection and quantification of circulating immature platelets: agreement between flow cytometric and automated detection.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Homam; Nadipalli, Srinivas; Usmani, Saba; DeLao, Timothy; Green, LaShawna; Kleiman, Neal S

    2016-07-01

    Immature platelets-also termed reticulated platelets (RP)-are platelets newly released into the circulation, and have been associated with a variety of pathological thrombotic events. They can be assessed by flow cytometry after staining with thiazole orange (TO) or by using a module added to a fully automated analyzer that is currently in wide clinical use and expressed as a fraction of the total platelet count (IPF). We sought to assess the correlation and agreement between these two methods. IPF was measured using Sysmex XE 2100-and at the same time point- we used TO staining and flow cytometry to measure RP levels. Two different gates were used for the flow cytometry method, 1 and 0.5 %. Measurements from the automated analyzer were then compared separately to measurements performed using each gate. Agreement between methods was assessed using Bland-Altman method. Pearson's correlation coefficient was also calculated. 129 subjects were enrolled and stratified into 5 groups: (1) Healthy subjects, (2) End stage renal disease, (3) Chronic stable coronary artery disease, (4) Post Coronary artery bypass surgery, (5) Peripheral thrombocytopenia. Median IPF levels were increased for patients in groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 (4.0, 4.7, 4.3, and 8.3 % respectively) compared to healthy subjects (2.5 %) p = 0.0001. Although the observed correlation between the two methods tended to be good in patients with high IPF values (i.e., group 5), the overall observed correlation was poor (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = 0.27). Furthermore, there was poor agreement between the two methods in all groups. Despite the good correlation that was observed between the two methods at higher IPF values, the lack of agreement was significant. PMID:26831482

  6. The relationship of platelet count, mean platelet volume with metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists: a focus on gender differences.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoung-Jin; Shim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Hye-Ree; Jung, Dong-Hyuk; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is becoming globally prevalent and it is clinically important because of its association with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. Recently, platelet count has been linked to insulin resistance and MS in addition to being a marker of hemostasis. Also, mean platelet volume (MPV) has been known to represent platelet activity. Platelet counts and MPV are modified by various biosocial and lifestyle factors such as race, age, gender, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Thus, the direction and magnitude of this association may differ by gender. In this regard, proper interpretion of platelet counts and MPV by gender could be important in the people with MS. We examined the relationship between platelet counts, MPV, and MS through gender-specific analyses for 3827 Korean adults (2169 men and 1658 women) in a health examination program. In women, platelet counts were significantly higher in subjects with MS compared to in those without MS (p < 0.001), whereas MPV was significantly lower (p = 0.001). However, no such trend was observed in men. Multiple regression analyses also showed that MS is positively associated with platelet counts and inversely associated with MPV, independently of confounding variables only in women. The results suggest that platelet counts and MPV might be a surrogate marker associated with clustered MS in women. PMID:21736420

  7. Correlation of platelets count with endoscopic findings in a cohort of Egyptian patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elsalam, Sherief; Habba, Eslam; Elkhalawany, Walaa; Tawfeek, Salwa; Elbatea, Hassan; El-Kalla, Ferial; Soliman, Hanan; Soliman, Samah; Yousef, Mohamed; Kobtan, Abdelrahman; El Nawasany, Sally; Awny, Sheren; Amer, Ibrahim; Mansour, Loai; Rizk, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    Screening endoscopy is recommended for early detection of esophageal varices (EVs) in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension. However, this approach is limited by its invasiveness and cost. The aim of the study was to determine if platelet count can predict the presence of EVs, especially large (grade III, IV) EVs in need of prophylactic therapy, in a cohort of Egyptian patients with liver cirrhosis. In all, 110 patients with cirrhosis were prospectively analyzed. The presence of medium or large EVs was correlated with patients' platelet count and FIB-4. Esophageal varices were present in 87 (79.09%) patients. Among those with thrombocytopenia (platelet level below 150,000), 25.97% (20 patients) and 27.27% (21 patients) had EV grade II and EV grade III or IV, respectively. Whereas in patients in whom the platelet count was above 150,000, only 21.21% (7 patients) and 9.09% (3 patients) of patients had grade II EV and EV grade III or IV, respectively. A platelet count cut-off value of 149,000 was found to have specificity of 82% and sensitivity 39% for detection of presence of varices. A FIB-4 cut-off value of 3.175 was found to have an 83.3% sensitivity and 39.5% specificity in detecting large (grade III, IV) EVs. Platelet count is a noninvasive parameter with high accuracy for prediction of EVs. Cirrhotic patients with normal platelet counts (above 150,000), especially in financially deprived developing countries, can avoid screening endoscopy as they are at a low risk for variceal bleeding, and presence of large EVs in these patients is much less common than in those with thrombocytopenia. A 3.175 cut-off value of FIB-4 could be useful as a noninvasive predictor of large varices requiring prophylactic banding in cirrhotic patients. PMID:27281094

  8. Correlation of platelets count with endoscopic findings in a cohort of Egyptian patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsalam, Sherief; Habba, Eslam; Elkhalawany, Walaa; Tawfeek, Salwa; Elbatea, Hassan; El-kalla, Ferial; Soliman, Hanan; Soliman, Samah; Yousef, Mohamed; Kobtan, Abdelrahman; El Nawasany, Sally; Awny, Sheren; Amer, Ibrahim; Mansour, Loai; Rizk, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Screening endoscopy is recommended for early detection of esophageal varices (EVs) in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension. However, this approach is limited by its invasiveness and cost. The aim of the study was to determine if platelet count can predict the presence of EVs, especially large (grade III, IV) EVs in need of prophylactic therapy, in a cohort of Egyptian patients with liver cirrhosis. In all, 110 patients with cirrhosis were prospectively analyzed. The presence of medium or large EVs was correlated with patients’ platelet count and FIB-4. Esophageal varices were present in 87 (79.09%) patients. Among those with thrombocytopenia (platelet level below 150,000), 25.97% (20 patients) and 27.27% (21 patients) had EV grade II and EV grade III or IV, respectively. Whereas in patients in whom the platelet count was above 150,000, only 21.21% (7 patients) and 9.09% (3 patients) of patients had grade II EV and EV grade III or IV, respectively. A platelet count cut-off value of 149,000 was found to have specificity of 82% and sensitivity 39% for detection of presence of varices. A FIB-4 cut-off value of 3.175 was found to have an 83.3% sensitivity and 39.5% specificity in detecting large (grade III, IV) EVs. Platelet count is a noninvasive parameter with high accuracy for prediction of EVs. Cirrhotic patients with normal platelet counts (above 150,000), especially in financially deprived developing countries, can avoid screening endoscopy as they are at a low risk for variceal bleeding, and presence of large EVs in these patients is much less common than in those with thrombocytopenia. A 3.175 cut-off value of FIB-4 could be useful as a noninvasive predictor of large varices requiring prophylactic banding in cirrhotic patients. PMID:27281094

  9. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Counts in Patients With Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mohamadreza

    2016-01-01

    This study was a before and after clinical evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication on platelet counts in a group of 23 patients with chronic Idiopathic (Autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (CITP). H. pylori infection was identified in patients by a 13C-urea breath test and confirmed by an H. pylori stool antigen test. Eradication was conducted in patients testing positive. Infected (n = 10) and uninfected (n = 13) patient groups did not differ with respect to age, gender, history of previous splenectomy, treatment with anti-D, current treatment with corticosteroids, or initial platelet counts. H. pylori eradication was successful in eight infected CITP patients, with two patients not responsive to treatment. Compared to the uninfected group, patients in the infected group who responded to eradication therapy had significantly increased platelet counts after six months (56.2 ± 22.2 vs. 233 ± 85.6 ×103 million cells/L; P < 0.01), whereas platelet counts in the non-responding patients and uninfected group did not differ after this period of time. H. pylori eradication promotes significant platelet count improvement in patients with CITP. Thus, all patients with CITP should be tested and treated for H. pylori infections. PMID:26925898

  10. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Counts in Patients With Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mohamadreza

    2016-01-01

    This study was a before and after clinical evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication on platelet counts in a group of 23 patients with chronic Idiopathic (Autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (CITP). H. pylori infection was identified in patients by a (13)C-urea breath test and confirmed by an H. pylori stool antigen test. Eradication was conducted in patients testing positive. Infected (n = 10) and uninfected (n = 13) patient groups did not differ with respect to age, gender, history of previous splenectomy, treatment with anti-D, current treatment with corticosteroids, or initial platelet counts. H pylori eradication was successful in eight infected CITP patients, with two patients not responsive to treatment. Compared to the uninfected group, patients in the infected group who responded to eradication therapy had significantly increased platelet counts after six months (56.2 ± 22.2 vs. 233 ± 85.6 ×10(3) million cells/L; P < 0.01), whereas platelet counts in the non-responding patients and uninfected group did not differ after this period of time. H. pylori eradication promotes significant platelet count improvement in patients with CITP. Thus, all patients with CITP should be tested and treated for H. pylori infections. PMID:26925898

  11. Automated Counting of Particles To Quantify Cleanliness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, James

    2005-01-01

    A machine vision system, similar to systems used in microbiological laboratories to count cultured microbes, has been proposed for quantifying the cleanliness of nominally precisely cleaned hardware by counting residual contaminant particles. The system would include a microscope equipped with an electronic camera and circuitry to digitize the camera output, a personal computer programmed with machine-vision and interface software, and digital storage media. A filter pad, through which had been aspirated solvent from rinsing the hardware in question, would be placed on the microscope stage. A high-resolution image of the filter pad would be recorded. The computer would analyze the image and present a histogram of sizes of particles on the filter. On the basis of the histogram and a measure of the desired level of cleanliness, the hardware would be accepted or rejected. If the hardware were accepted, the image would be saved, along with other information, as a quality record. If the hardware were rejected, the histogram and ancillary information would be recorded for analysis of trends. The software would perceive particles that are too large or too numerous to meet a specified particle-distribution profile. Anomalous particles or fibrous material would be flagged for inspection.

  12. Amikacin can be added to blood to reduce the fall in platelet count.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaomian; Wu, Xiaoli; Deng, Weixiong; Li, Jieqiu; Luo, Wenshen

    2011-10-01

    Our objective was to develop an effective method to prevent the fall in platelet count for patients with anticoagulant-dependent (AD) pseudothrombocytopenia, a spurious phenomenon due to anticoagulant-induced aggregation of platelets. We report a case of insidious multianticoagulant-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia in which AD pseudothrombocytopenia may be caused by 4 anticoagulants, eg, EDTA, sodium citrate, heparin, and sodium fluoride (NaF). Multianticoagulant-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia was confirmed by finding clumped platelets on microscopic evaluation in 4 anticoagulated blood samples. With this case, we tried a variety of reagents, including aminoglycosides, eg, gentamicin and amikacin, vitamin B(6), and aminophylline to inhibit pseudothrombocytopenia. Except for amikacin, all reagents failed to prevent pseudothrombocytopenia. Microscopic examination of K(2)-EDTA-, heparin-, sodium citrate-, and NaF-anticoagulated blood samples showed massive platelet clumping, but no aggregate was seen in the anticoagulated blood with amikacin. When amikacin was added within 1 hour after blood sample withdrawal, platelet, WBC, and RBC counts and hemoglobin level, mean corpuscular volume, and mean platelet volume remained unchanged for up to 4 hours at room temperature. These findings suggest that amikacin could inhibit and dissociate pseudo platelet aggregation in multianticoagulant-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia and EDTA-induced pseudothrombocytopenia. PMID:21917689

  13. The automated counting of spots for the ELISpot assay.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Natalie; Self, Steve; Wakefield, Jon

    2006-10-20

    An automated method for counting spot-forming units in the ELISpot assay is described that uses a statistical model fit to training data that is based on counts from one or more experts. The method adapts to variable background intensities and provides considerable flexibility with respect to what image features can be used to model expert counts. Point estimates of spot counts are produced together with intervals that reflect the degree of uncertainty in the count. Finally, the approach is completely transparent and "open source" in contrast to methods embedded in current commercial software. An illustrative application to data from a study of the reactivity of T-cells from healthy human subjects to a pool of immunodominant peptides from CMV, EBV and flu is presented. PMID:17010368

  14. A new platelet storage lesion index based on paired samples, without and with EDTA and cell counting: comparison of three types of leukoreduced preparations.

    PubMed

    Seghatchian, Jerard

    2006-12-01

    Platelets derived from whole blood and diverse apheresis procedures come in contact with various artificial surfaces and undergo contact activation, sheer stress-induced shape changes, aggregation and microvesiculation during collection, processing and storage. These dynamic changes are qualitatively reflected in the log-normal platelet size distribution patterns seen, when using modern automated cell counters and can be measured quantitatively by counting the paired samples, without and with added EDTA, and calculating the differences (d) in platelet cellular indices (dPLT/dMPV/dPDW). Reporting the differences instead of the absolute values of cellular indices makes the measurements independent of basic principles used for cell counting (i.e. aperture-impedance or flow-optic). The measurements can be performed either in blood centres, hospital blood banks or nearby patient clinics equipped with a validated cell counter. At least three useful quality indices could be derived simultaneously from this procedure (accurate estimation of platelet yields using the value of the EDTA-containing sample); quantitative assessment of the % of reversible platelet aggregates, an age/pH/temperature-dependent degree of microvesiculation/apoptosis/PS exposure, based on the response to EDTA. This new set of indices correlate significantly with other conventional tests for platelet quality; hence, provide additional supportive evidence for confirming the low pH values and the subjective poor swirling data occasionally seen with stored PC. In the following study, the Sysmex SE 9000 was successfully employed for estimation of platelet cellular indices comparing the platelet storage lesion index of three types of leukoreduced platelet concentrates in current practice. The relationship between this in vitro response to clinical outcome remains to be established. PMID:17113347

  15. Interim analysis of safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib in patients with myelofibrosis and low platelet counts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ruxolitinib, a Janus kinase 1 and 2 inhibitor, demonstrated improvements in spleen volume, symptoms, and survival over placebo and best available therapy in intermediate-2 or high-risk myelofibrosis patients with baseline platelet counts ≥100 × 109/L in phase III studies. The most common adverse events were dose-dependent anemia and thrombocytopenia, which were anticipated because thrombopoietin and erythropoietin signal through JAK2. These events were manageable, rarely leading to treatment discontinuation. Because approximately one-quarter of MF patients have platelet counts <100 × 109/L consequent to their disease, ruxolitinib was evaluated in this subset of patients using lower initial doses. Interim results of a phase II study of ruxolitinib in myelofibrosis patients with baseline platelet counts of 50-100 × 109/L are reported. Methods Ruxolitinib was initiated at a dose of 5 mg twice daily (BID), and doses could be increased by 5 mg once daily every 4 weeks to 10 mg BID if platelet counts remained adequate. Additional dosage increases required evidence of suboptimal efficacy. Assessments included measurement of spleen volume by MRI, MF symptoms by MF Symptom Assessment Form v2.0 Total Symptom Score [TSS]), Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC); EORTC QLQ-C30, and safety/tolerability. Results By week 24, 62% of patients achieved stable doses ≥10 mg BID. Median reductions in spleen volume and TSS were 24.2% and 43.8%, respectively. Thrombocytopenia necessitating dose reductions and dose interruptions occurred in 12 and 8 patients, respectively, and occurred mainly in patients with baseline platelet counts ≤75 × 109/L. Seven patients experienced platelet count increases ≥15 × 109/L. Mean hemoglobin levels remained stable over the treatment period. Two patients discontinued for adverse events: 1 for grade 4 retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to multiple and suspected pre-existing renal artery aneurysms and 1

  16. Mean platelet volume to platelet count ratio predicts in-hospital complications and long-term mortality in type A acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Ze; Chen, Qing-Jie; Sun, Hui-Ping; Zeng, Rui; Zeng, Zhi; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Yi-Tong; Yang, Yi-Ning

    2016-09-01

    Type A acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening vascular emergency because of its high morbidity and mortality. Platelet is a pivotal ingredient involved in the development of acute aortic dissection. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether mean platelet volume (MPV)/platelet count ratio predicts in-hospital complications and long-term mortality in type A acute aortic dissection. In this single-center and prospective cohort study, 106 consecutive patients with Stanford type A acute aortic dissection admitted to the hospital within 12 h after onset were recruited. The best cut-off value of MPV/platelet count ratio predicting all-cause mortality was determined by the receiver operator characteristic analysis. Patients were divided into high (H-MPV/platelet count) and low (L-MPV/platelet count) groups based on the cut-off value of 7.49 (10 fl/10/l). Patients were followed up for 3.5 years. Of the 106 acute aortic dissection patients, 71 (67.0%) died during the study period, with a median follow-up duration of 570 days. Compared to the L-MPV/platelet count group, patients with H-MPV/platelet count had a higher risk of in-hospital complications including hypotension, hypoxemia, myocardial ischemia/infarction, conscious disturbance, pericardial tamponade, paraplegia, and poor survival (all P < 0.05). In multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounders, MPV/platelet count ratio was positively associated with the hazard of all-cause mortality, irrespective of interventions either with medication only or urgent surgery, and the hazard ratios were 2.81 (95% confidence interval 1.28-4.48) for the H-MPV/platelet count group when taking L-MPV/platelet count group as the reference (P = 0.005). The MPV/platelet count ratio was a strong independent predictor for in-hospital complications and long-term mortality in patients with type A acute aortic dissection. PMID:26575495

  17. From Crater to Graph: Manual and Automated Crater Counting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Werner, S. C.; Brumby, S. P.; Foing, B. H.; Asphaug, E.; Neukum, G.; Team, H.; Team, I.

    2005-12-01

    Impact craters are some of the most abundant, and most interesting features on Mars. They hold a wealth of information about Martian geology, providing clues to the relative age, local composition and erosional history of the surface. A great deal of effort has been expended to count and understand the nature of planetary crater populations (Hartman and Neukum, 2001). Highly trained experts have developed personal methods for conducting manual crater surveys. In addition, several efforts are underway to automate this process in order to keep up with the rapid increase in planetary surface image data. These efforts make use of a variety of methods, including the direct application of traditional image processing algorithms such as the Hough transform, and recent developments in genetic programming, an artificial intelligence-based technique, in which manual crater surveys are used as examples to `grow' or `evolve' crater counting algorithms. (Plesko, C. S. et al., LPSC 2005, Kim, J. R. et al., LPSC 2001, Michael, G. G. P&SS 2003, Earl, J. et al, LPSC 2005) In this study we examine automated crater counting techniques, and compare them with traditional manual techniques on MOC imagery, and demonstrate capabilities for the analysis of multi-spectral and HRSC Digital Terrain Model data as well. Techniques are compared and discussed to define and develop a robust automated crater detection strategy.

  18. Thymidine phosphorylase gene variant, platelet counts and survival in gastrointestinal cancer patients treated by fluoropyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liu; Chen, Fengju; Chen, Yangyang; Yang, Xiaomei; Xu, Sanpeng; Ge, Shuwang; Fu, Shengling; Chao, Tengfei; Yu, Qianqian; Liao, Xin; Hu, Guangyuan; Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Xianglin

    2014-01-01

    The predictive value of thymidine phosphorylase gene variants (TP, also called platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor) and thrombocytosis were controversial and worthy of further study in gastrointestinal cancer (GIC) patients. We screened all of the common missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (MAF ≥ 0.1) in fluoropyrimidines (FU) pathway genes (including TP, TS, ENOSF1 and DPD). Three of them were selected and genotyped using Sequenom MassARRAY in 141 GIC patients. TP expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Our aim was to evaluate the prognostic significance of studied genes and platelet counts in GIC patients. Multivariate analyses indicated in rs11479-T allele carriers, platelet counts negatively correlated to overall survival. In addition, T allele of TP: rs11479 was associated with higher TP expression in cancer tissues. We suggest TP: rs11479 variant combined with platelet counts may be useful prognostic makers in GIC patients receiving first-line FU chemotherapy and thrombopoietin factor should be used with caution in the rs11479 T allele bearing patients. PMID:25027354

  19. Platelet count recovery after intravenous immunoglobulin predicts a favorable outcome in children with immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Mi Hong; Kim, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a common acquired bleeding disorder. Even though most children recover, either spontaneously or with therapy, 10-20% of newly diagnosed ITP cases have a chronic course beyond 12 months. This study evaluated whether clinical and laboratory findings can predict the response to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and progression to persistent or chronic ITP in children. Methods During the period between March 2003 and June 2015, we retrospectively analyzed 72 children, newly diagnosed with ITP, who received IVIG treatment. Peripheral blood counts were obtained at diagnosis and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after IVIG treatment. Results After 6 months of IVIG treatment, 14 of 72 patients (19.4%) had persistent ITP, and after 12 months, 7 of 40 patients (17.5%) had chronic ITP. Age at diagnosis, gender, history of viral infection, or vaccination before disease onset were not statistically correlated with platelet recovery at 6 and 12 months. However, a platelet count recovery of ≥100×103/µL at 1 and 3 months was significantly correlated with platelet recovery at 6 (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively) and 12 (P=0.007 and P=0.004, respectively) months. Conclusion This study demonstrated that early platelet count recovery, at 1 and 3 months after IVIG treatment, predicts a short disease duration and a favorable outcome in children with newly diagnosed ITP. Further investigation in a larger group of patients is warranted to validate these findings. PMID:27382553

  20. Automated pneumatic transfer irradiation system for delayed neutron counting

    SciTech Connect

    Heifer, Paul G.; Millard, Hugh T. Jr.; Zermane, Albert J

    1982-07-01

    The Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor has been used for uranium and thorium neutron activation analysis by delayed neutron counting for the past eleven years. As the requirements for analysis increased the original General Atomic pneumatic system was upgraded in several stages. By 1979 we had reached the practical limits of safe through-put for that system and a new pneumatic transfer system was built. A single large Roots type blower is used to drive four individual transfer tubes simultaneously (two termini in the core and two outside the reflector). A microprocessor controls the operation and is paced by a minicomputer, which is also used to collect and reduce the counting data. Two irradiations and counting cycles are performed on each sample, one in the core, a Cd-lined terminus for thorium, and one in the reflector mounted terminus for uranium. Video displays at both the reactor console and the pneumatic system operating station indicate the status of the system and the locations of the samples at all times. This highly automated system is capable of 1,200 irradiations for delayed neutron counting in a 10 hour day, and, in addition, incorporates programmable versatility for other irradiation-counting experiments, and provides a high degree of reactor and radiological safety with only remote operator attention. (author)

  1. Automated counting of bacterial colonies by image analysis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Pei-Ju; Tseng, Min-Jen; He, Zong-Sian; Li, Chia-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    Research on microorganisms often involves culturing as a means to determine the survival and proliferation of bacteria. The number of colonies in a culture is counted to calculate the concentration of bacteria in the original broth; however, manual counting can be time-consuming and imprecise. To save time and prevent inconsistencies, this study proposes a fully automated counting system using image processing methods. To accurately estimate the number of viable bacteria in a known volume of suspension, colonies distributing over the whole surface area of a plate, including the central and rim areas of a Petri dish are taken into account. The performance of the proposed system is compared with verified manual counts, as well as with two freely available counting software programs. Comparisons show that the proposed system is an effective method with excellent accuracy with mean value of absolute percentage error of 3.37%. A user-friendly graphical user interface is also developed and freely available for download, providing researchers in biomedicine with a more convenient instrument for the enumeration of bacterial colonies. PMID:25451456

  2. Performance of automated platelet quantification using different analysers in comparison with an immunological reference method in thrombocytopenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Trabuio, Ernesto; Valverde, Sara; Antico, Francesco; Manoni, Fabio; Gessoni, Gianluca

    2009-01-01

    Background Rapidly available and accurate platelet counts play an important role in the evaluation of haemorrhagic status and in assessing the need for platelet transfusions. We, therefore, evaluated platelet counting performance of haematology analysers using optical, impedance and immunological methods in thrombocytopenic patients. Materials and Methods We considered 99 patients with a platelet (plt) count under 50x109 plt/L. We compared the platelet counts obtained using ADVIA 2120 (optical method), Cell-Dyn Sapphire (optical, impedance and immunological methods with CD61) and a reference, double staining (CD41+CD61) immunological method. Results The platelet counts of all the considered methods showed good correlation with those of the reference method, despite an overestimation in platelet quantification. The degree of inaccuracy was greater for platelet counts under 20 x109 plt/L. Conclusions Clinicians who use platelet thresholds below 20 x109 plt/L for making clinical decisions must be aware of the limitations in precision and accuracy of cell counters at this level of platelet count. Inaccurate counts of low platelet numbers could create problems if attempts are made to reduce the threshold below 20x109 plt/L. PMID:19290080

  3. Dietary α-linolenic acid increases the platelet count in ApoE-/- mice by reducing clearance.

    PubMed

    Stivala, Simona; Reiner, Martin F; Lohmann, Christine; Lüscher, Thomas F; Matter, Christian M; Beer, Juerg H

    2013-08-01

    Previously we reported that dietary intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) reduces atherogenesis and inhibits arterial thrombosis. Here, we analyze the substantial increase in platelet count induced by ALA and the mechanisms of reduced platelet clearance. Eight-week-old male apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice were fed a 0.21g% cholesterol diet complemented by either a high- (7.3g%) or low-ALA (0.03g%) content. Platelet counts doubled after 16 weeks of ALA feeding, whereas the bleeding time remained similar. Plasma glycocalicin and glycocalicin index were reduced, while reticulated platelets, thrombopoietin, and bone marrow megakaryocyte colony-forming units remained unchanged. Platelet contents of liver and spleen were substantially reduced, without affecting macrophage function and number. Glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) shedding, exposure of P-selectin, and activated integrin αIIbβ3 upon activation with thrombin were reduced. Dietary ALA increased the platelet count by reducing platelet clearance in the reticulo-endothelial system. The latter appears to be mediated by reduced cleavage of GPIb by tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme and reduced platelet activation/expression of procoagulant signaling. Ex vivo, there was less adhesion of human platelets to von Willebrand factor under high shear conditions after ALA treatment. Thus, ALA may be a promising tool in transfusion medicine and in high turnover/high activation platelet disorders. PMID:23801636

  4. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... are related to immunity and fighting infection. Platelet Production Platelets are produced in the bone marrow, the ... platelet destruction and also decreased bone marrow platelet production. These problems are caused by autoantibodies. Antibodies are ...

  5. Platelet count/spleen diameter ratio to predict esophageal varices in Mexican patients with hepatic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Cervantes-Guevara, Gabino; Chávez-Sánchez, Manuela; Dávalos-Cobián, Carlos; Ornelas-Cázares, Susana; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; Chávez-Tostado, Mariana; Ramírez-Campos, Kenia Militzi; Ramírez-Arce, Anaís del Rocío; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To validate whether the platelet count/spleen size ratio can be used to predict the presence of esophageal varices in Mexican patients with hepatic cirrhosis. METHODS: This was an analytical cross-sectional study to validate the diagnostic test for hepatic cirrhosis and was performed between February 2010 and December 2011. Patients with a diagnosis of hepatic cirrhosis were included and stratified using their Child-Pugh score. Biochemical parameters were evaluated, and ultrasound was used to measure the longest diameter of the spleen. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio was calculated and analyzed to determine whether it can predict the presence of esophageal varices. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was used as the gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were determined, with the cutoff points determined by receiver-operating characteristic curves. RESULTS: A total of 91 patients were included. The mean age was 53.75 ± 12 years; 50 (54.9%) were men, and 41 (45.0%) women. The etiology of cirrhosis included alcohol in 48 (52.7%), virally induced in 24 (26.3%), alcoholism plus hepatitis C virus in three (3.2%), cryptogenic in nine (9.8%), and primary biliary cirrhosis in seven (7.6%). Esophageal varices were present in 73 (80.2%) patients. Child-Pugh classification, 17 (18.6%) patients were classified as class A, 37 (40.6%) as class B, and 37 (40.6%) as class C. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio to detect esophageal varices independent of the grade showed using a cutoff value of ≤ 884.3, had 84% sensitivity, 70% specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 94% and 40%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio may be a useful tool for detecting esophageal varices in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. PMID:24616574

  6. White blood cell count, sex and age are major determinants of heterogeneity of platelet indices in an adult general population: results from the MOLI-SANI project

    PubMed Central

    Santimone, Iolanda; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; De Curtis, Amalia; Spinelli, Maria; Cugino, Daniela; Gianfagna, Francesco; Zito, Francesco; Donati, Maria Benedetta; Cerletti, Chiara; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2011-01-01

    Background The understanding of non-genetic regulation of platelet indices - platelet count, plateletcrit, mean platelet volume, and platelet distribution width - is limited. The association of these platelet indices with a number of biochemical, environmental and clinical variables was studied in a large cohort of the general population. Design and Methods Men and women (n=18,097, 52% women, 56±12 years) were randomly recruited from various villages in Molise (Italy) in the framework of the population-based cohort study “Moli-sani”. Hemochromocytometric analyses were performed using an automatic analyzer (Beckman Coulter, IL, Milan, Italy). Associations of platelet indices with dependent variables were investigated by multivariable linear regression analysis. Results Full models including age, sex, body mass index, blood pressure, smoking, menopause, white and red blood cell counts, mean corpuscular volume, D-dimers, C-reactive protein, high-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins, triglycerides, glucose, and drug use explained 16%, 21%, 1.9% and 4.7% of platelet count, plateletcrit, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width variability, respectively; variables that appeared to be most strongly associated were white blood cell count, age, and sex. Platelet count, mean platelet volume and plateletcrit were positively associated with white blood cell count, while platelet distribution width was negatively associated with white blood cell count. Platelet count and plateletcrit were also positively associated with C-reactive protein and D-dimers (P<0.0001). Each of the other variables, although associated with platelet indices in a statistically significant manner, only explained less than 0.5% of their variability. Platelet indices varied across Molise villages, independently of any other platelet count determinant or characteristics of the villages. Conclusions The association of platelet indices with white blood cell count, C-reactive protein

  7. Use of the Platelet Count/Spleen Diameter Ratio for the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Esophageal Varices in Patients with Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Adnan; Abdulhadi, Mamdouh M.; Marenco, Simona; Bella, Abdelhaleem; AlSaudi, Dib; El-Haddad, Ahmed; Inferrera, Simona; Savarino, Vincenzo; Giannini, Edoardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: In patients with liver cirrhosis, the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio has been validated as a parameter for the noninvasive diagnosis of esophageal varices. Schistosoma infection is a frequent cause of portal hypertension in Middle Eastern countries, and is associated with the development of esophageal varices. In this study we aimed to evaluate the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio as a noninvasive tool for the prediction of the presence of esophageal varices in patients with schistosoma-related chronic liver disease. Patients and Methods: Forty-three patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis underwent upper digestive endoscopy to check for the presence of esophageal varices. Furthermore, all patients underwent abdominal ultrasonography, and maximum spleen diameter (in mm) was measured. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio was calculated in all patients. Results: Esophageal varices were found in 31 patients (72%). Age and gender were not significantly different between patients with and without varices. In patients with varices, median platelet count (82,000/μL versus 172,000/μL, P < 0.0001) and platelet count/spleen diameter ratio (571 versus 1651, P < 0.0001) were significantly lower, while spleen diameter (147 mm versus 109 mm, P = 0.0006) was significantly larger. In multivariate analysis, the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio was the only parameter independently associated with the presence of varices (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: In this study we have validated the use of the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio for the noninvasive diagnosis of esophageal varices in patients with portal hypertension caused by schistosoma infection. In these patients, the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio might be used to allow better rationalization of medical resources and use of endoscopy. PMID:21912056

  8. Automation of spot counting in interphase cytogenetics using brightfield microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vrolijk, H.; Sloos, W.C.R.; Rijke, F.M. van de

    1996-06-01

    In situ hybridization techniques allow the enumeration of chromosomal abnormalities and form a great potential for many clinical applications. Although the use of fluorescent labels is preferable regarding sensitivity and colormultiplicity, chromogenic labels can provide an excellent alternative in relatively simple situations, e.g., where it is sufficient to use a centromere-specific probe to detect abnormalities of one specific chromosome. When the frequency of chromosomal aberrations is low, several hundreds or even thousands of cells have to be evaluated to achieve sufficient statistical confidence. Since manual counting is tedious, fatiguing, and time consuming, automation can assist to process the slides more efficiently. Therefore, a system has been developed for automated spot counting using brightfield microscopy. This paper addresses both the hardware system aspects and the software image analysis algorithms for nuclei and spot detection. As a result of the automated slide analysis the system provides the frequency spot distribution of the selected cells. The automatic classification can, however, be overruled by human interaction, since each individual cell is stored in a gallery and can be relocated for visual inspection. With this system a thousand cells can be automatically analyzed in approximately 10 min, while an extra 5-10 min is necessary for visual evaluation. The performance of the system was analyzed using a model system for trisomy consisting of a mixture of male and female lymphocytes hybridized with probes for chromosomes 7 and Y. The sensitivity for trisomy detection in the seeding experiment was such that a frequency of 3% trisomic cells could be picked up automatically as being abnormal according to the multiple proportion test, while trisomy as low as 1.5% could be detected after interaction. 26 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Candidate Loci Associated with Platelet Count in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Hee; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Moon, Sanghoon; Kim, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are derived from the fragments that are formed from the cytoplasm of bone marrow megakaryocytes-small irregularly shaped anuclear cells. Platelets respond to vascular damage, contracts blood vessels, and attaches to the damaged region, thereby stopping bleeding, together with the action of blood coagulation factors. Platelet activation is known to affect genes associated with vascular risk factors, as well as with arteriosclerosis and myocardial infarction. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study with 352,228 single-nucleotide polymorphisms typed in 8,842 subjects of the Korea Association Resource (KARE) project and replicated the results in 7,861 subjects from an independent population. We identified genetic associations between platelet count and common variants nearby chromosome 4p16.1 (p = 1.46 × 10-10, in the KIAA0232 gene), 6p21 (p = 1.36 × 10-7, in the BAK1 gene), and 12q24.12 (p = 1.11 × 10-15, in the SH2B3 gene). Our results illustrate the value of large-scale discovery and a focus for several novel research avenues. PMID:25705162

  10. Thrombocytopenia in Patients with Gastric Varices and the Effect of Balloon-occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration on the Platelet Count

    PubMed Central

    Saad, W. E.; Bleibel, W.; Adenaw, N.; Wagner, C. E.; Anderson, C.; Angle, J. F.; Al-Osaimi, A. M.; Davies, M. G.; Caldwell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Gastric varices primarily occur in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension and splenomegaly and thus are probably associated with thrombocytopenia. However, the prevalence and severity of thrombocytopenia are unknown in this clinical setting. Moreover, one-third of patients after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) have aggravated splenomegaly, which potentially may cause worsening thrombocytopenia. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence and degree of thrombocytopenia in patients with gastric varices associated with gastrorenal shunts undergoing BRTO, to determine the prognostic factors of survival after BRTO (platelet count included), and to assess the effect of BRTO on platelet count over a 1-year period. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of 35 patients who underwent BRTO (March 2008–August 2011). Pre- and post-BRTO platelet counts were noted. Potential predictors of bleeding and survival (age, gender, liver disease etiology, platelet count, model for end stage liver disease [MELD]-score, presence of ascites or hepatocellular carcinoma) were analyzed (multivariate analysis). A total of 91% (n = 32/35) of patients had thrombocytopenia (<150,000 platelet/cm3) pre-BRTO. Platelet counts at within 48-h, within 2 weeks and at 30-60 days intervals (up to 6 months) after BRTO were compared with the baseline pre-BRTO values. Results: 35 Patients with adequate platelet follow-up were found. A total of 92% and 17% of patients had a platelet count of <150,000/cm3 and <50,000/cm3, respectively. There was a trend for transient worsening of thrombocytopenia immediately (<48 h) after BRTO, however, this was not statistically significant. Platelet count was not a predictor of post-BRTO rebleeding or patient survival. However, MELD-score, albumin, international normalized ratio (INR), and etiology were predictors of rebleeding. Conclusion: Thrombocytopenia is very common (>90% of patients) in patients

  11. Evaluation of platelet count after isolated biological aortic valve replacement with Freedom Solo bioprosthesis†

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Antonio; Gilmanov, Daniyar; Murzi, Michele; Parri, Maria S.; Cerillo, Alfredo G.; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Farneti, Pier A.; Glauber, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The risk of thrombocytopenia in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) with the Freedom Solo (FS) bioprosthesis is controversial. The aim of our study was to evaluate the postoperative evolution of platelet count and function after AVR in patients undergoing isolated biological AVR with FS. METHODS Between May 2005 and June 2010, 322 patients underwent isolated biological AVR. Of these, 116 patients received FS and were compared with 206 patients who received biological valves. Platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), and platelet distribution width (PDW) were evaluated at baseline (T0), first (T1), second (T2), and fifth (T3) postoperative days, respectively. RESULTS Overall in-hospital mortality was 1.5% with no difference between the two groups. Thirty-seven (11.5%) patients developed thrombocytopenia. FS implantation was associated with a higher incidence of thrombocytopenia compared with the control group (24.1% vs 4.4%, p < 0.0001). Patients in the FS group showed a lower platelet count than the control group at T1 (99.4 ± 38 × 103 μl−1 vs 122.5 ± 41.6 × 103 μl−1, p < 0.001), T2 (79.7 ± 36.3 × 103 μl−1 vs 122.5 ± 43.3 × 103 μl−1, p < 0.001) and T3 (86.6 ± 57.4 × 103 μl−1 vs 158.4 ± 55.8 × 103 μl−1, p < 0.001). Moreover, the FS group also had a higher MPV (11.6 ± 0.9 fl vs 11 ± 1 fl, p < 0.001) and higher PDW (15.1 ± 2.3 fl vs 13.9 ± 2.1 fl, p < 0.001) at T3. In a multivariable analysis, FS (p < 0.0001), body surface area (p < 0.0001), cardiopulmonary bypass time (p = 0.003), and lower preoperative platelet counts (p = 0.006) were independent predictors of thrombocytopenia. CONCLUSIONS The FS valve might increase the risk of thrombocytopenia and platelet activation, in the absence of adverse clinical events. Prospective randomized studies on platelet function need to confirm our data. PMID:21664141

  12. Evaluation of platelet function using the in vitro bleeding time and corrected count increment of transfused platelets. Comparison between platelet concentrates derived from pooled buffy coates and apheresis.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, L; Kristensen, J; Olsson, K; Bring, J; Högman, C F

    1996-01-01

    The functional capacity of transfused platelets was evaluated with in vitro bleeding time (IVBT) and corrected count increment (CCI) in order to compare platelet concentrates (PCs) derived from pooled buffy coats (BC-PCs) with PCs collected by apheresis (A-PCs). The suspension medium in the BC-PCs was 30% CPD plasma and 70% of an additive solution (containing sodium and potassium chloride, sodium citrate and phosphate, mannitol), and in the A-PCs the medium was 100% CPD plasma. IVBT was evaluated using a Thrombostat 4000/2. BC-PC and A-PC were transfused 57 and 41 times, respectively to 36 patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. PCs transfused within 2 days of donation were considered fresh, and those transfused within 3-5 days were considered stored. IVBT was determined before, as well as 10-30 min and 24 h after transfusion; CCI was determined 10-30 min and 24 h after transfusion. The median pretransfusion IVBT value was 486 s. It was measurable in 21 of 98 (21%) of the transfusions, i.e. below the cutoff limit of 486 s. Ten to 30 min after transfusion, the IVBT showed a measurable reduction in 90% of the transfusions with fresh BC-PCs, 92% of those with fresh a-PCs, 63% of those with stored BC-PCs and 79% of those with stored A-PCs. After 24 h, the corresponding values were 63% for fresh BC-PCs, 50% for fresh A-PCs, 26% for stored BC-PCs and 38% for stored A-PCs. The median value of CCI 10-30 min after transfusion was 20 for fresh BC-PCs, 17 for fresh A-PCs, 16 for stored BC-PCs and 14 for stored A-PCs. The difference in IVBT between fresh and stored BC-PCs was significant (p = 0.032), unlike that between fresh and stored A-PC. After 24 h the corresponding values were 7 for fresh BC-PCs, 4 for fresh A-PCs, 4 for stored BC-PCs and 3 for stored A-PCs. When all transfusions with fresh PCs (BC-PCs + A-PCs) were compared with all transfusions with stored PCs, a statistical difference was demonstrated in both CCI (p = 0.027) and IVBT (p = 0.043). Spearman

  13. Validity of Particle-Counting Method Using Laser-Light Scattering for Detecting Platelet Aggregation in Diabetic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadate, Hiromichi; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    We aimed to study the validity of a new analytical approach that reflected the phase from platelet activation to the formation of small platelet aggregates. We hoped that this new approach would enable us to use the particle-counting method with laser-light scattering to measure platelet aggregation in healthy controls and in diabetic patients without complications. We measured agonist-induced platelet aggregation for 10 min. Agonist was added to the platelet-rich plasma 1 min after measurement started. We compared the total scattered light intensity from small aggregates over a 10-min period (established analytical approach) and that over a 2-min period from 1 to 3 min after measurement started (new analytical approach). Consequently platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was significantly greater than in healthy controls by both analytical approaches. However, platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c < 6.5%, i.e. patients in the early stages of diabetes, was significantly greater than in healthy controls only by the new analytical approach, not by the established analytical approach. These results suggest that platelet aggregation as detected by the particle-counting method using laser-light scattering could be applied in clinical examinations by our new analytical approach.

  14. Platelets: the few, the young, and the active.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Carol; Briggs, Carol; Machin, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Many modern automated cell counters in high-volume clinical hematology laboratories use new, improved technologies for routine platelet analysis. The latest progress includes the use of state-of-the art information technology, specific fluorescent dyes, and monoclonal antibodies to obtain more reliable platelet counts. This information allows the accurate and precise enumeration of platelets even in thrombocytopenic patients and the reporting of novel platelet parameters. In the near future, digital image analysis may permit even better platelet analysis. PMID:25676376

  15. The effect of high altitude on platelet counts, thrombopoietin and erythropoietin levels in young Bolivian airmen visiting the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Bowen, Angela L.; Navia, Pilar; Rios-Dalenz, Jaime; Pollard, Andrew J.; Williams, David; Heath, Donald

    Recognition of thrombosis as a complication of exposure to high altitude has stimulated interest in rheological changes resulting from hypobaric hypoxia. Previous studies of platelet counts at high altitude have yielded conflicting results and have not been studied in conjunction with potential mediating cytokines. We studied the effects of high-altitude exposure on platelet numbers, thrombopoietin (tpo) and erythropoietin (epo) levels in man. A group of 28 volunteers from the Bolivian Airforce stationed at Santa Cruz (600 m altitude) were studied 48 h and 1 week after their ascent to La Paz (3600 m). In addition 105 volunteers based at Santa Cruz for at least 1 year were compared with 175 age- and sex-matched residents at El Alto (4200 m). Platelet counts were measured immediately after sampling and serum samples assayed for tpo and epo. In the ascending group, mean platelet counts were 251×109, 367×109 and 398×109/l at 600 m and following 48 h and 1 week at 3600 m respectively. Mean tpo levels were 132.5, 76 and 92 pg/ml with epo values of 2.98, 11.6 and 7.9 mIU/ml respectively. In the resident populations mean platelet counts were 271×109/l in the low- and 471×109/l in the high-altitude groups. Mean tpo and epo levels measured 69.3 pg/ml and 4.5 mIU/ml respectively at 600 m and 58.5 pg/ml and 5.1 mIU/ml at 4200 m. In conclusion we have demonstrated a significant and sustained elevation in platelet numbers within 48 h of ascent to high altitude. Our findings do not support a role for tpo as a mediator of the increased platelet count. However, these data do not discount epo as a potential candidate.

  16. An automated cell-counting algorithm for fluorescently-stained cells in migration assays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A cell-counting algorithm, developed in Matlab®, was created to efficiently count migrated fluorescently-stained cells on membranes from migration assays. At each concentration of cells used (10,000, and 100,000 cells), images were acquired at 2.5 ×, 5 ×, and 10 × objective magnifications. Automated cell counts strongly correlated to manual counts (r2 = 0.99, P < 0.0001 for a total of 47 images), with no difference in the measurements between methods under all conditions. We conclude that our automated method is accurate, more efficient, and void of variability and potential observer bias normally associated with manual counting. PMID:22011343

  17. Pretreatment platelet count as a predictor for survival and distant metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YU-PEI; CHEN, CHEN; MAI, ZHUO-YAO; GAO, JIN; SHEN, LU-JUN; ZHAO, BING-CHENG; CHEN, MENG-KUN; CHEN, GANG; YAN, FANG; HUANG, TONG-YI; XIA, YUN-FEI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of different pretreatment platelet (PLT) counts on the treatment outcome in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or radiotherapy (RT) alone. A total of 1,501 NPC patients, including 412 receiving CCRT and 1,089 receiving RT, were enrolled in the present study. The PLT count cut-off points for the CCRT and RT groups were 150 and 300×109/l, respectively, and the PLT counts were categorized it into three groups: Low (PLT≤150×109/l), moderate (150×109/l300×109/l). To identify independent predictors of overall survival (OS), the Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine local-regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates in the CCRT and RT patients. Furthermore, univariate and multivariate analysis indicated that compared with a moderate PLT count, a low PLT count was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for OS rate in CCRT patients [hazard ratio (HR), 2.024; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.165–3.516], and a high PLT count was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for OS and DMFS rates in CCRT (OS: HR, 1.742; 95% CI, 1.090–2.786; DFMS: HR, 2.110; 95%CI, 1.084–4.108) and RT (OS: HR, 1.740; 95%CI, 1.283–2.362; DMFS: HR, 2.819; 95% CI, 1.766–4.497) patients. Compared with a low PLT count, a high PLT count was significantly and independently associated with a poor DMFS rate in the RT patients (P=0.025; HR, 2.454; 95% CI, 1.121–5.372). Therefore, the present study indicates that low and high PLT counts may be useful indicators of survival and distant metastasis in NPC patients who have undergone radiation treatment. PMID:25663931

  18. The evaluation of sequential platelet counts has prognostic value for acute kidney injury patients requiring dialysis in the intensive care setting

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Carla; Soares, Márcio; Rocha, Eduardo; Cardoso, Lucio; Maccariello, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic value of platelet counts in acute kidney injury patients requiring renal replacement therapy. METHODS: This prospective cohort study was performed in three tertiary-care hospitals. Platelet counts were obtained upon admission to the intensive care unit and during the first week of renal replacement therapy on days 1, 3, 5 and 7. The outcome of interest was the hospital mortality rate. With the aim of minimizing individual variation, we analyzed the relative platelet counts on days 3, 5, 7 and at the point of the largest variation during the first week of renal replacement therapy. Logistic regression analysis was used to test the prognostic value of the platelet counts. RESULTS: The study included 274 patients. The hospital mortality rate was 62%. The survivors had significantly higher platelet counts upon admission to the intensive care unit compared to the non-survivors [175.5×103/mm3 (108.5–259×103/mm3) vs. 148×103/mm3 (80−141×103/mm3)] and during the first week of renal replacement therapy. The relative platelet count reductions were significantly associated with a higher hospital mortality rate compared with the platelet count increases (70% vs. 44% at the nadir, respectively). A relative platelet count reduction >60% was significantly associated with a worse outcome (mortality rate = 82.6%). Relative platelet count variations and the percentage of reduction were independent risk factors of hospital mortality during the first week of renal replacement therapy. CONCLUSION: Platelet counts upon admission to the intensive care unit and at the beginning of renal replacement therapy as well as sequential platelet count evaluation have prognostic value in acute kidney injury patients requiring renal replacement therapy. PMID:23778497

  19. Ezetimibe Reduces Plant Sterol Accumulation and Favorably Increases Platelet Count in Sitosterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Rgia A.; Myrie, Semone B.; Mymin, David; Merkens, Louise S.; Roullet, Jean-Baptiste; Steiner, Robert D.; Jones, Peter J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess if ezetimibe (EZE), a sterol-absorption inhibitor, improves platelet (PLT) count and size relative to its effect on plasma plant sterol (PS) in patients with sitosterolemia (STSL). Study design Patients with STSL (5 males, 3 females, 16 to 56 years of age) receiving EZE intervention as part of their routine care participated in this study. EZE was discontinued for 14 weeks (off) and then resumed for another 14 weeks (on). Hematology variables along with plasma and red blood cells (RBC) PS and total cholesterol (TC) levels were measured at the end of each phase. Results EZE increased PLT count (23 ± 9%) and decreased mean PLT volume (MPV; 10 ± 3%, all P < .05). In patients off EZE, PLT counts inversely correlated (r = − 0.96 and r = − 0.91, all P < .01) with plasma and RBC PS to TC ratio (PS/TC), and MPV positively correlated (r = 0.91, P = .03 and r = 0.93, P = .02) with plasma and RBC PS/TC. EZE reduced plasma and RBC sitosterol (−35 ± 4 and −28 ± 3%), total PS (−37 ± 4 and −28 ± 3%, all P < .0001) levels and PS/TC (−27 ± 4 and −28 ± 4%, P < .01). Conclusion EZE reduces plasma and RBC PS levels, and increasing PLT count and decreasing MPV, and thereby may reduce the risk for bleeding in STSL. Plasma PS levels and ABCG5/ABCG8 genes should be analyzed in patients with unexplained hematologic abnormalities. PMID:25444527

  20. Platelet Count Mediates the Contribution of a Genetic Variant in LRRC16A to ARDS Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongyue; Wang, Zhaoxi; Su, Li; Chen, Feng; Tejera, Paula; Bajwa, Ednan K.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Lin, Xihong

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Platelets are believed to be critical in pulmonary-origin ARDS as mediators of endothelial damage through their interactions with fibrinogen and multiple signal transduction pathways. A prior meta-analysis identified five loci for platelet count (PLT): BAD, LRRC16A, CD36, JMJD1C, and SLMO2. This study aims to validate the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of PLT within BAD, LRRC16A, CD36, JMJD1C, and SLMO2 among critically ill patients and to investigate the associations of these QTLs with ARDS risk that may be mediated through PLT. METHODS: ARDS cases and at-risk control subjects were recruited from the intensive care unit of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Exome-wide genotyping data of 629 ARDS cases and 1,026 at-risk control subjects and genome-wide gene expression profiles of 18 at-risk control subjects were generated for analysis. RESULTS: Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7766874 within LRRC16A was a significant locus for PLT among at-risk control subjects (β = −13.00; 95% CI, −23.22 to −2.77; P = .013). This association was validated using LRRC16A gene expression data from at-risk control subjects (β = 77.03 per 1 SD increase of log2-transformed expression; 95% CI, 27.26-126.80; P = .005). Further, rs7766874 was associated with ARDS risk conditioned on PLT (OR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51-0.90; P = .007), interacting with PLT (OR = 1.15 per effect allele per 100 × 103/μL of PLT; 95% CI, 1.03-1.30; P = .015), and mediated through PLT (indirect OR = 1.045; 95% CI, 1.007-1.085; P = .021). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the role of LRRC16A in platelet formation and suggest the importance of LRRC16A in ARDS pathophysiology by interacting with, and being mediated through, platelets. PMID:25254322

  1. Combination of recombinant factor VIIa and fibrinogen corrects clot formation in primary immune thrombocytopenia at very low platelet counts.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ole H; Stentoft, Jesper; Radia, Deepti; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Sørensen, Benny

    2013-01-01

    Haemostatic treatment modalities alternative to platelet transfusion are desirable to control serious acute bleeds in primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). This study challenged the hypothesis that recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) combined with fibrinogen concentrate may correct whole blood (WB) clot formation in ITP. Blood from ITP patients (n = 12) was drawn into tubes containing 3·2% citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor 18·3 μg/ml. WB [mean platelet count 22 × 10(9) /l (range 0-42)] was spiked in vitro with buffer, donor platelets (+40 × 10(9) /l), rFVIIa (1 or 4 μg/ml), fibrinogen (1 or 3 mg/ml), or combinations of rFVIIa and fibrinogen. Coagulation profiles were recorded by tissue factor (0·03 pmol/l) activated thromboelastometry. Coagulation in ITP was characterized by a prolonged clotting time (CT, 1490 s (mean)) and a low maximum velocity (MaxVel, 3·4 mm × 100/s) and maximum clot firmness (MCF, 38·2 mm). Fibrinogen showed no haemostatic effect, whereas rFVIIa reduced the CT and increased the MaxVel. The combination of fibrinogen and rFVIIa revealed a significant synergistic effect, improving all parameters (CT 794 s, MaxVel 7·9 mm × 100/s, MCF 50·7 mm) even at very low platelet counts. These data suggest that rFVIIa combined with fibrinogen corrects the coagulopathy of ITP even at very low platelet counts, and may represent an alternative to platelet transfusion. PMID:23151086

  2. Relation Between Platelet Count and Platelet Reactivity to Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk: From the Assessment of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy With Drug-Eluting Stents Study.

    PubMed

    Giustino, Gennaro; Kirtane, Ajay J; Généreux, Philippe; Baber, Usman; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Weisz, Giora; Maehara, Akiko; Rinaldi, Michael J; Metzger, Christopher; Henry, Timothy D; Cox, David A; Duffy, Peter L; Mazzaferri, Ernest L; Brodie, Bruce R; Stuckey, Thomas D; Dangas, George D; Francese, Dominic P; Litherland, Claire; Mehran, Roxana; Stone, Gregg W

    2016-06-01

    Whether the association between platelet count (PC) and thrombotic and bleeding risk is independent of or varies by residual platelet reactivity to antiplatelet therapies is unclear. We sought to investigate the independent and combined effects of PC and platelet reactivity on thrombotic and bleeding risk after coronary artery implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES). Patients enrolled in the prospective, multicenter Assessment of Dual AntiPlatelet Therapy with Drug-Eluting Stents study were stratified by PC tertiles. The study cohort comprised 8,402 patients. By linear regression analysis, lower PC was strongly and independently associated with higher platelet reactive units (PRUs) on clopidogrel. After multivariable adjustment (including PRU and aspirin reactive units), high, but not low, PC tertile was independently associated with higher risk of thrombotic complications, including spontaneous myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis. Although no independent association was observed between PC tertiles and hemorrhagic risk, both high and low PC tertiles were associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality. After stratification of PC tertiles by tertiles of PRUs, the crude risk of thrombotic complications was highest in patients in the high PC and high PRU tertiles. By multivariable adjustment, PRU increases were uniformly associated with higher risk of thrombotic events across PC tertiles, without evidence of interaction. In conclusion, higher PCs and higher PRUs act independently and synergistically in determining thrombotic risk. Alongside PRU, PCs could be a simple hematological parameter to consider for risk stratification and in tailoring duration and potency of pharmacologic platelet inhibition after DES implantation. PMID:27067621

  3. Quality control in a manual and an automated leukocyte differential count.

    PubMed

    Takubo, T; Tatsumi, N

    1999-01-01

    Quality control (QC) has been introduced in laboratories, and QC surveys in leukocyte differential count to enhance quality have been performed by College of American Pathologists, Japanese Association of Medical Technologists, Osaka Medical Association and manufacturers. The results of QC survey in a manual leukocyte differential count indicated problems on the differentiation of segmented neutrophils and band neutrophils and the detection of pathological blood cells on blood smear. While the results of QC survey in an automated leukocyte differential count performed by same manufacturer with an automated blood cell counter were satisfactory, however, there was a difference in leukocyte differential cell counts among laboratories with other manufacturer's instruments because the synthetic blood material used in QC is an exclusive item for an instrument. It is necessary to further reeducate the medical technologists in order to improve morphological performance, and to standardize the synthetic blood material for compatibility with various automated blood cell counters. PMID:10926263

  4. A new type of pseudothrombocytopenia: EDTA-mediated agglutination of platelets bearing Fab fragments of a chimaeric antibody.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, C G; Machin, S J

    1994-07-01

    In vitro agglutination of platelets leading to low automated platelet counts was observed in EDTA-anticoagulated blood from human volunteers receiving infusions of Fab fragments of a chimaeric monoclonal antibody to platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. This pseudothrombocytopenia depended on the presence of chimaeric Fab on the platelet surface and was not seen when sodium citrate was used as anticoagulent. Preliminary evidence suggests that this phenomenon might be mediated by immunoglobulin G reactive with the human component of the chimaeric Fab. It is important to exclude pseudothrombocytopenia when low automated platelet counts are reported in association with the administration of chimaeric anti-platelet antibodies. PMID:7993813

  5. Elevated Platelet Count as Predictor of Recurrence in Rectal Cancer Patients Undergoing Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    The impact of systemic inflammatory response (SIR) on prognostic and predictive outcome in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has not been fully investigated. This retrospective study enrolled 89 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and for whom platelet (PLT) counts and SIR status [neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR)] were available. Both clinical values of PLT and SIR status in rectal cancer patients were investigated. Elevated PLT, NLR, PLR, and pathologic TNM stage III [ypN(+)] were associated with significantly poor overall survival (OS). Elevated PLT, NLR, and ypN(+) were shown to independently predict OS. Elevated PLT and ypN(+) significantly predicted poor disease-free survival (DFS). Elevated PLT was identified as the only independent predictor of DFS. PLT counts are a promising pre-CRT biomarker for predicting recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer. PMID:25692418

  6. 21 CFR 864.5200 - Automated cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated cell counter. 864.5200 Section 864.5200....5200 Automated cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated cell counter is a fully-automated or semi-automated device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets using a sample of...

  7. 21 CFR 864.5200 - Automated cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated cell counter. 864.5200 Section 864.5200....5200 Automated cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated cell counter is a fully-automated or semi-automated device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets using a sample of...

  8. 21 CFR 864.5200 - Automated cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated cell counter. 864.5200 Section 864.5200....5200 Automated cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated cell counter is a fully-automated or semi-automated device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets using a sample of...

  9. 21 CFR 864.5200 - Automated cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated cell counter. 864.5200 Section 864.5200....5200 Automated cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated cell counter is a fully-automated or semi-automated device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets using a sample of...

  10. 21 CFR 864.5200 - Automated cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated cell counter. 864.5200 Section 864.5200....5200 Automated cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated cell counter is a fully-automated or semi-automated device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets using a sample of...

  11. Automating Partial Period Bond Valuation with Excel's Day Counting Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicknair, David; Spruell, James

    2009-01-01

    An Excel model for calculating the actual price of bonds under a 30 day/month, 360 day/year day counting assumption by nesting the DAYS360 function within the PV function is developed. When programmed into an Excel spreadsheet, the model can accommodate annual and semiannual payment bonds sold on or between interest dates using six fundamental…

  12. An image-processing program for automated counting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, D.J.; Anderson, W.H.; Anthony, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    An image-processing program developed by the National Institute of Health, IMAGE, was modified in a cooperative project between remote sensing specialists at the Ohio State University Center for Mapping and scientists at the Alaska Science Center to facilitate estimating numbers of black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) in flocks at Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. The modified program, DUCK HUNT, runs on Apple computers. Modifications provide users with a pull down menu that optimizes image quality; identifies objects of interest (e.g., brant) by spectral, morphometric, and spatial parameters defined interactively by users; counts and labels objects of interest; and produces summary tables. Images from digitized photography, videography, and high- resolution digital photography have been used with this program to count various species of waterfowl.

  13. Assessing Rotation-Invariant Feature Classification for Automated Wildebeest Population Counts

    PubMed Central

    Torney, Colin J.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Borner, Felix; Lloyd-Jones, David J.; Moyer, David; Maliti, Honori T.; Mwita, Machoke; Fredrick, Howard; Borner, Markus; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and on-demand animal population counts are the holy grail for wildlife conservation organizations throughout the world because they enable fast and responsive adaptive management policies. While the collection of image data from camera traps, satellites, and manned or unmanned aircraft has advanced significantly, the detection and identification of animals within images remains a major bottleneck since counting is primarily conducted by dedicated enumerators or citizen scientists. Recent developments in the field of computer vision suggest a potential resolution to this issue through the use of rotation-invariant object descriptors combined with machine learning algorithms. Here we implement an algorithm to detect and count wildebeest from aerial images collected in the Serengeti National Park in 2009 as part of the biennial wildebeest count. We find that the per image error rates are greater than, but comparable to, two separate human counts. For the total count, the algorithm is more accurate than both manual counts, suggesting that human counters have a tendency to systematically over or under count images. While the accuracy of the algorithm is not yet at an acceptable level for fully automatic counts, our results show this method is a promising avenue for further research and we highlight specific areas where future research should focus in order to develop fast and accurate enumeration of aerial count data. If combined with a bespoke image collection protocol, this approach may yield a fully automated wildebeest count in the near future. PMID:27227888

  14. Assessing Rotation-Invariant Feature Classification for Automated Wildebeest Population Counts.

    PubMed

    Torney, Colin J; Dobson, Andrew P; Borner, Felix; Lloyd-Jones, David J; Moyer, David; Maliti, Honori T; Mwita, Machoke; Fredrick, Howard; Borner, Markus; Hopcraft, J Grant C

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and on-demand animal population counts are the holy grail for wildlife conservation organizations throughout the world because they enable fast and responsive adaptive management policies. While the collection of image data from camera traps, satellites, and manned or unmanned aircraft has advanced significantly, the detection and identification of animals within images remains a major bottleneck since counting is primarily conducted by dedicated enumerators or citizen scientists. Recent developments in the field of computer vision suggest a potential resolution to this issue through the use of rotation-invariant object descriptors combined with machine learning algorithms. Here we implement an algorithm to detect and count wildebeest from aerial images collected in the Serengeti National Park in 2009 as part of the biennial wildebeest count. We find that the per image error rates are greater than, but comparable to, two separate human counts. For the total count, the algorithm is more accurate than both manual counts, suggesting that human counters have a tendency to systematically over or under count images. While the accuracy of the algorithm is not yet at an acceptable level for fully automatic counts, our results show this method is a promising avenue for further research and we highlight specific areas where future research should focus in order to develop fast and accurate enumeration of aerial count data. If combined with a bespoke image collection protocol, this approach may yield a fully automated wildebeest count in the near future. PMID:27227888

  15. Carica papaya Leaves Juice Significantly Accelerates the Rate of Increase in Platelet Count among Patients with Dengue Fever and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Subenthiran, Soobitha; Choon, Tan Chwee; Cheong, Kee Chee; Thayan, Ravindran; Teck, Mok Boon; Muniandy, Prem Kumar; Afzan, Adlin; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Ismail, Zakiah

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the platelet increasing property of Carica papaya leaves juice (CPLJ) in patients with dengue fever (DF). An open labeled randomized controlled trial was carried out on 228 patients with DF and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Approximately half the patients received the juice, for 3 consecutive days while the others remained as controls and received the standard management. Their full blood count was monitored 8 hours for 48 hours. Gene expression studies were conducted on the ALOX 12 and PTAFR genes. The mean increase in platelet counts were compared in both groups using repeated measure ANCOVA. There was a significant increase in mean platelet count observed in the intervention group (P < 0.001) but not in the control group 40 hours since the first dose of CPLJ. Comparison of mean platelet count between intervention and control group showed that mean platelet count in intervention group was significantly higher than control group after 40 and 48 hours of admission (P < 0.01). The ALOX 12 (FC  =  15.00) and PTAFR (FC  =  13.42) genes were highly expressed among those on the juice. It was concluded that CPLJ does significantly increase the platelet count in patients with DF and DHF. PMID:23662145

  16. Does Carica papaya leaf-extract increase the platelet count? An experimental study in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarathna, Sinhalagoda Lekamlage Chandi Asoka; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Waduge, Roshitha Nilmini; Rajapakse, Rajapakse Peramune Veddikkarage Jayanthe; Kularatne, Senanayake Abeysinghe Mudiyanselage

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential role of fresh Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract on haematological and biochemical parameters and toxicological changes in a murine model. Methods In total 36 mice were used for the trial. Fresh C. papaya leaf extract [0.2 mL (2 g)/mouse] was given only to the test group (18 mice). General behavior, clinical signs and feeding patterns were recorded. Blood and tissue samples were collected at intervals. Haematological parameters including platelet, red blood cell (RBC), white blood cell (WBC), packed cell volume (PCV), serum biochemistry including serum creatinine, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) were determined. Organs for possible histopathological changes were examined. Results Neither group exhibited alteration of behavior or reduction in food and water intake. Similarly, no significant changes in SGOT, SGPT and serum creatinine levels were detected in the test group. Histopathological organ changes were not observed in either group of mice except in three liver samples of the test group which had a mild focal necrosis. The platelet count (11.33±0.35)×105/µL (P=0.000 04) and the RBC count (7.97±0.61)×106/µL (P=0.000 03) were significantly increased in the test group compared to that of the controls. However, WBC count and PCV (%) values were not changed significantly in the test group. The platelet count in the test group started to increase significantly from Day 3 (3.4±0.18×105/µL), reaching almost a fourfold higher at Day 21 (11.3×105/µL), while it was 3.8×105/µL and 5.5×105/µL at Day 3 and Day 21 respectively in the control. Likewise, the RBC count in the test group increased from 6×106/µL to 9×106/ µL at Day 21 while it remained near constant in the control group (6×106/µL). Conclusions Fresh C. papaya leaf extract significantly increased the platelet and RBC counts in the test group as compared to controls. Therefore, it is very

  17. Genome-wide Association Study of Platelet Count Identifies Ancestry-Specific Loci in Hispanic/Latino Americans

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Ursula M.; Jain, Deepti; Hodonsky, Chani J.; Morrison, Jean V.; Davis, James P.; Brown, Lisa; Sofer, Tamar; Conomos, Matthew P.; Schurmann, Claudia; McHugh, Caitlin P.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Stilp, Adrienne; Plantinga, Anna; Baier, Leslie; Bien, Stephanie A.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Taylor, Kent D.; Liu, Yongmei; Auer, Paul L.; Franceschini, Nora; Szpiro, Adam; Rice, Ken; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hanson, Robert L.; Papanicolaou, George; Rich, Stephen S.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Browning, Brian L.; Browning, Sharon R.; Weir, Bruce S.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; North, Kari E.; Thornton, Timothy A.; Reiner, Alex P.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play an essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis. We performed a genome-wide association study of platelet count in 12,491 participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos by using a mixed-model method that accounts for admixture and family relationships. We discovered and replicated associations with five genes (ACTN1, ETV7, GABBR1-MOG, MEF2C, and ZBTB9-BAK1). Our strongest association was with Amerindian-specific variant rs117672662 (p value = 1.16 × 10−28) in ACTN1, a gene implicated in congenital macrothrombocytopenia. rs117672662 exhibited allelic differences in transcriptional activity and protein binding in hematopoietic cells. Our results underscore the value of diverse populations to extend insights into the allelic architecture of complex traits. PMID:26805783

  18. Genome-wide Association Study of Platelet Count Identifies Ancestry-Specific Loci in Hispanic/Latino Americans.

    PubMed

    Schick, Ursula M; Jain, Deepti; Hodonsky, Chani J; Morrison, Jean V; Davis, James P; Brown, Lisa; Sofer, Tamar; Conomos, Matthew P; Schurmann, Claudia; McHugh, Caitlin P; Nelson, Sarah C; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Stilp, Adrienne; Plantinga, Anna; Baier, Leslie; Bien, Stephanie A; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Laurie, Cecelia A; Taylor, Kent D; Liu, Yongmei; Auer, Paul L; Franceschini, Nora; Szpiro, Adam; Rice, Ken; Kerr, Kathleen F; Rotter, Jerome I; Hanson, Robert L; Papanicolaou, George; Rich, Stephen S; Loos, Ruth J F; Browning, Brian L; Browning, Sharon R; Weir, Bruce S; Laurie, Cathy C; Mohlke, Karen L; North, Kari E; Thornton, Timothy A; Reiner, Alex P

    2016-02-01

    Platelets play an essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis. We performed a genome-wide association study of platelet count in 12,491 participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos by using a mixed-model method that accounts for admixture and family relationships. We discovered and replicated associations with five genes (ACTN1, ETV7, GABBR1-MOG, MEF2C, and ZBTB9-BAK1). Our strongest association was with Amerindian-specific variant rs117672662 (p value = 1.16 × 10(-28)) in ACTN1, a gene implicated in congenital macrothrombocytopenia. rs117672662 exhibited allelic differences in transcriptional activity and protein binding in hematopoietic cells. Our results underscore the value of diverse populations to extend insights into the allelic architecture of complex traits. PMID:26805783

  19. A Comparison of Automated and Manual Crater Counting Techniques in Images of Elysium Planitia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Brumby, S. P.; Asphaug, E.

    2004-11-01

    Surveys of impact craters yield a wealth of information about Martian geology, providing clues to the relative age, local composition and erosional history of the surface. Martian craters are also of intrinsic geophysical interest, given that the processes by which they form are not entirely clear, especially cratering in ice-saturated regoliths (Plesko et al. 2004, AGU) which appear common on Mars (Squyres and Carr 1986). However, the deluge of data over the last decade has made comprehensive manual counts prohibitive, except in select regions. Given that most small craters on Mars may be secondaries from a few very recent impact events (McEwen et al. in press, Icarus 2004), using select regions for age dating introduces considerable potential for sampling error. Automation is thus an enabling planetary science technology. In contrast to machine counts, human counts are prone to human decision making, thus not intrinsically reproducible. One can address human "noise" by averaging over many human counts (Kanefsky et al. 2001), but this multiplies the already laborious effort required. In this study, we test automated crater counting algorithms developed with the Los Alamos National Laboratory genetic programming suite GENIE (Harvey et al., 2002) against established manual counts of craters in Elysium Planitia, using MOC and THEMIS data. We intend to establish the validity of our method against well-regarded hand counts (Hartmann et al. 2000), and then apply it generally to larger regions of Mars. Previous work on automated crater counting used customized algorithms (Bierhaus et al. 2003, Burl et al.. 2001). Algorithms generated by genetic programming have the advantage of requiring little time or user effort to generate, so it is relatively easy to generate a suite of algorithms for varied terrain types, or to compare results from multiple algorithms for improved accuracy (Plesko et al. 2003).

  20. Improving reliability of live/dead cell counting through automated image mosaicing.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Filippo; Tesei, Anna; Paganelli, Giulia; Zoli, Wainer; Bevilacqua, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Cell counting is one of the basic needs of most biological experiments. Numerous methods and systems have been studied to improve the reliability of counting. However, at present, manual cell counting performed with a hemocytometer still represents the gold standard, despite several problems limiting reproducibility and repeatability of the counts and, at the end, jeopardizing their reliability in general. We present our own approach based on image processing techniques to improve counting reliability. It works in two stages: first building a high-resolution image of the hemocytometer's grid, then counting the live and dead cells by tagging the image with flags of different colours. In particular, we introduce GridMos (http://sourceforge.net/p/gridmos), a fully-automated mosaicing method to obtain a mosaic representing the whole hemocytometer's grid. In addition to offering more significant statistics, the mosaic "freezes" the culture status, thus permitting analysis by more than one operator. Finally, the mosaic achieved can thus be tagged by using an image editor, thus markedly improving counting reliability. The experiments performed confirm the improvements brought about by the proposed counting approach in terms of both reproducibility and repeatability, also suggesting the use of a mosaic of an entire hemocytometer's grid, then labelled trough an image editor, as the best likely candidate for the new gold standard method in cell counting. PMID:25438936

  1. Comparison of different platelet count thresholds to guide administration of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Murphy, Michael F; Tinmouth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether different platelet transfusion thresholds for administration of prophylactic platelet transfusions (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding) affect the efficacy and safety of prophylactic platelet transfusions in preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy with or without stem cell transplantation. PMID:25722651

  2. Fibrinogen concentrate as first-line therapy in aortic surgery reduces transfusion requirements in patients with platelet counts over or under 100×109/L

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Cristina; Rahe-Meyer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Background Administration of fibrinogen concentrate, targeting improved maximum clot firmness (MCF) of the thromboelastometric fibrin-based clot quality test (FIBTEM) is effective as first-line haemostatic therapy in aortic surgery. We performed a post-hoc analysis of data from a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of fibrinogen concentrate, to investigate whether fibrinogen concentrate reduced transfusion requirements for patients with platelet counts over or under 100×109/L. Material and methods Aortic surgery patients with coagulopathic bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass were randomised to receive either fibrinogen concentrate (n=29) or placebo (n=32). Platelet count was measured upon removal of the aortic clamp, and coagulation and haematology parameters were measured peri-operatively. Transfusion of allogeneic blood components was recorded and compared between groups. Results After cardiopulmonary bypass, haemostatic and coagulation parameters worsened in all groups; plasma fibrinogen level (determined by the Clauss method) decreased by 43–58%, platelet count by 53–64%, FIBTEM maximum clot firmness (MCF) by 38–49%, FIBTEM maximum clot elasticity (MCE) by 43–54%, extrinsically activated test (EXTEM) MCF by 11–22%, EXTEM MCE by 25–41% and the platelet component of the clot by 23–39%. Treatment with fibrinogen concentrate (mean dose 7–9 g in the 4 groups) significantly reduced post-operative allogeneic blood component transfusion requirements when compared to placebo both for patients with a platelet count ≥100×109/L and for patients with a platelet count <100×109/L. Discussion FIBTEM-guided administration of fibrinogen concentrate reduced transfusion requirements when used as a first-line haemostatic therapy during aortic surgery in patients with platelet counts over or under 100×109/L. PMID:25369608

  3. The effect of the perfluorocarbon emulsion Oxycyte on platelet count and function in the treatment of decompression sickness in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Cronin, William A; Senese, Angela L; Arnaud, Francoise G; Regis, David P; Auker, Charles R; Mahon, Richard T

    2016-09-01

    Decompression from elevated ambient pressure is associated with platelet activation and decreased platelet counts. Standard treatment for decompression sickness (DCS) is hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Intravenous perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion is a nonrecompressive therapy being examined that improves mortality in animal models of DCS. However, PFC emulsions are associated with a decreased platelet count. We used a swine model of DCS to study the effect of PFC therapy on platelet count, function, and hemostasis. Castrated male swine (n = 50) were fitted with a vascular port, recovered, randomized, and compressed to 180 feet of sea water (fsw) for 31 min followed by decompression at 30 fsw/min. Animals were observed for DCS, administered 100% oxygen, and treated with either emulsified PFC Oxycyte (DCS-PFC) or isotonic saline (DCS-NS). Controls underwent the same procedures, but were not compressed (Sham-PFC and Sham-NS). Measurements of platelet count, thromboelastometry, and coagulation were obtained 1 h before compression and 1, 24, 48, 96, 168 and 192 h after treatment. No significant changes in normalized platelet counts were observed. Prothrombin time was elevated in DCS-PFC from 48 to 192 h compared with DCS-NS, and from 96 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. Normalized activated partial thromboplastin time was also elevated in DCS-PFC from 168 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. No bleeding events were noted. DCS treated with PFC (Oxycyte) does not impact platelet numbers, whole blood clotting by thromboelastometry, or clinical bleeding. Late changes in prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time associated with PFC use in both DCS therapy and controls warrant further investigation. PMID:26650458

  4. Prognostic Factors of the Efficacy of High-dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome During Pregnancy: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Ren, Chenchen; Mao, Minhong; Cui, Shihong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors which can affect the efficacy of corticosteroid (CORT) therapy in the management of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome.Research articles reporting the efficacy of CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients were searched in several electronic databases including EMBASE, Google Scholar, Ovid SP, PubMed, and Web of Science. Study selection was based on predefined eligibility criteria. Efficacy was defined by the changes from baseline in HELLP syndrome indicators after CORT therapy. Meta-analyses were carried out with Stata software.Data of 778 CORT-treated HELLP syndrome patients recruited in 22 studies were used in the analyses. Corticosteroid treatment to HELLP syndrome patients was associated with significant changes from baseline in platelet count; serum levels of aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); mean blood pressure; and urinary output. Lower baseline platelet count predicted higher change in platelet count after CORT therapy. Lower baseline platelet count and lower baseline urinary output predicted greater changes in LDH levels after CORT therapy. There was also an inverse relationship between the change from baseline in LDH levels and intensive care duration. Higher CORT doses were associated with greater declines in the aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and LDH levels. Incidence of cesarean delivery was inversely associated with the gestation age. The percentage of nulliparous women had a positive association with the intensive care stay duration.High-dose CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients provides benefits in improving disease markers and reducing intensive care duration, especially in cases such as mothers with much lower baseline platelet count and LDH levels. PMID:27043683

  5. Prognostic Factors of the Efficacy of High-dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Ren, Chenchen; Mao, Minhong; Cui, Shihong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to identify the factors which can affect the efficacy of corticosteroid (CORT) therapy in the management of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. Research articles reporting the efficacy of CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients were searched in several electronic databases including EMBASE, Google Scholar, Ovid SP, PubMed, and Web of Science. Study selection was based on predefined eligibility criteria. Efficacy was defined by the changes from baseline in HELLP syndrome indicators after CORT therapy. Meta-analyses were carried out with Stata software. Data of 778 CORT-treated HELLP syndrome patients recruited in 22 studies were used in the analyses. Corticosteroid treatment to HELLP syndrome patients was associated with significant changes from baseline in platelet count; serum levels of aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); mean blood pressure; and urinary output. Lower baseline platelet count predicted higher change in platelet count after CORT therapy. Lower baseline platelet count and lower baseline urinary output predicted greater changes in LDH levels after CORT therapy. There was also an inverse relationship between the change from baseline in LDH levels and intensive care duration. Higher CORT doses were associated with greater declines in the aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and LDH levels. Incidence of cesarean delivery was inversely associated with the gestation age. The percentage of nulliparous women had a positive association with the intensive care stay duration. High-dose CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients provides benefits in improving disease markers and reducing intensive care duration, especially in cases such as mothers with much lower baseline platelet count and LDH levels. PMID:27043683

  6. Corticosteroid Therapy for Management of Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count (HELLP) Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Minhong; Chen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome is a severe condition of pregnancy that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Corticoteroid (CORT) therapy is common in the management of HELLP syndrome. This study evaluates the efficacy of CORT therapy to patients with HELLP Syndrome. MATERIAL AND METHODS A literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases. Meta-analyses of means difference and odds ratio were carried under the random-effects model. RESULTS Fifteen studies (675 CORT treated and 787 control HELLP patients) were included. CORT treatment significantly improved platelet count (mean difference between CORT treated and controls in changes from baseline, MD: 38.08 [15.71, 60.45]×109; p=0.0009), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (MD: -440 [-760, -120] IU/L; p=0.007), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (MD: -143.34 [-278.69, -7.99] IU/L; p=0.04) but the decrease in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels was not statistically significant (MD: -48.50 [-114.32, 17.32] IU/L; p=0.15). Corticosteroid treatment was also associated with significantly less blood transfusion rate (odds ratio, OR: 0.42 [0.24, 0.76]; p=0.004) and hospital/ICU stay (MD: -1.79 [-3.54, -0.05] days; p=0.04). Maternal mortality (OR: 1.27 [0.45, 3.60]; p=0.65), birth weight (MD: 0.09 [-0.11, 0.28]; p=0.38) and the prevalence of morbid conditions (OR: 0.79 [0.58, 1.08]; p=0.14) did not differ significantly between both groups. CONCLUSIONS Corticosteroid administration to HELLP patients improves platelet count, and the serum levels of LDH and ALT, and reduces hospital/ICU stay and blood transfusion rate, but is not significantly associated with better maternal mortality and overall morbidity. PMID:26633822

  7. FISH and chips: automation of fluorescent dot counting in interphase cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Netten, H; Young, I T; van Vliet, L J; Tanke, H J; Vroljik, H; Sloos, W C

    1997-05-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization allows the enumeration of chromosomal abnormalities in interphase cell nuclei. This process is called dot counting. To estimate the distribution of chromosomes per cell, a large number of cells have to be analyzed, especially when the frequency of aberrant cells is low. Automation of dot counting is required because manual counting is tedious, fatiguing, and time-consuming. We developed a completely automated fluorescence microscope system that can examine 500 cells in approximately 15 min to determine the number of labeled chromosomes (seen as dots) in each cell nucleus. This system works with two fluorescent dyes, one for the DNA hybridization dots and one for the cell nucleus. After the stage has moved to a new field, the image is automatically focused, acquired by a Photometrics KAF 1400 camera (Photometrics Ltd., Tuscon, AZ, USA), and then analyzed on a Macintosh Quadra 840AV (Apple Computer, Inc., Cupertino, CA, USA) computer. After the required number of cells has been analyzed, the user may interact to correct the computer by working with a gallery of the cell images. The automated dot counter has been tested on a number of normal specimens where 4,'6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) was used for the nucleus counterstain and a centromeric 8 probe was used to mark the desired chromosome. The slides contained lymphocytes from cultured blood. We compared the results of the dot counter with manual counting. Manually obtained results, published in the literature, were used as the "ground truth." For a normal specimen, 97.5% of cells will have two dots. Fully automated scanning of 13 slides showed that an average of 89% of all nuclei were counted correctly. In other words, an average of 11% has to be interactively corrected, using a monitor display. The machine accuracies, after interactive correction, are comparable to panels of human experts (manual). The fully automatically obtained results are biased with respect to manual

  8. [Rapid Rise of Trans-oxygenerator Pressure Gradient Accompanied by Rapid Decrease of Platelet Counts During Open-heart Surgery].

    PubMed

    Ryugo, Masahiro; Mouri, Norio; Kurita, Shigeaki; Hara, Kazunobu; Tagaya, Masashi

    2015-06-01

    A 77-year-old male patient with 2-vessel coronary artery disease and previous myocardial infarction underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Following systemic heparinization, cardiopulmonary bypass using heparin coated circuit was started. Ten minutes after starting the cardiopulmonary bypass, the trans-oxygenerator pressure gradient rapidly increased accompanied by a rapid decrease of platelet counts. Emergency replacement of cardiopulmonary bypass circuit with a non-heparin coated one was performed because the development of heparin induced thrombocytepenia (HIT) was strongly suspected. On-pump CABG was accomplished as planned, and the postoperative course was uneventful. HIT might be ruled out as HIT specific antibodies were not detected in the intraoperative serum samples. PMID:26066875

  9. Procoagulant and platelet-derived microvesicle absolute counts determined by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Lisa; Harrison, Paul; Kohler, Malcolm; Ferry, Berne

    2014-01-01

    Background Flow cytometry is the most commonly used technology to measure microvesicles (MVs). Despite reported limitations of this technique, MV levels obtained using conventional flow cytometry have yielded many clinically relevant findings, such as associations with disease severity and ability to predict clinical outcomes. This study aims to determine if MV enumeration by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity, as this may explain how flow cytometry generates clinically relevant results. Methods One hundred samples from healthy individuals and patients with obstructive sleep apnoea were analysed by conventional flow cytometry (FACSCalibur) and by three functional MV assays: Zymuphen MP-activity in which data were given as phosphatidylserine equivalent, STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay expressed as clotting time and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) reflecting in vitro thrombin generation. Correlations were determined by Spearman correlation. Results Absolute counts of lactadherin+ procoagulant MVs generated by flow cytometry weakly correlated with the results obtained from the Zymuphen MP-activity (r=0.5370, p<0.0001); correlated with ETP (r=0.7444, p<0.0001); negatively correlated with STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay clotting time (−0.7872, p<0.0001), reflecting a positive correlation between clotting activity and flow cytometry. Levels of Annexin V+ procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs were also associated with functional assays. Absolute counts of MVs derived from other cell types were not correlated with the functional results. Conclusions Quantitative results of procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs from conventional flow cytometry are associated with the functional capability of the MVs, as defined by three functional MV assays. Flow cytometry is a valuable technique for the quantification of MVs from different cellular origins; however, a combination of several analytical techniques may give the most comprehensive

  10. Platelet count/spleen diameter ratio: proposal and validation of a non-invasive parameter to predict the presence of oesophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, E; Botta, F; Borro, P; Risso, D; Romagnoli, P; Fasoli, A; Mele, M R; Testa, E; Mansi, C; Savarino, V; Testa, R

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: Cirrhotic patients frequently undergo screening endoscopy for the presence of oesophageal varices (OV). In the future, this social and medical burden will increase due to the greater number of patients with chronic liver disease and their improved survival. In this study, our aims were (1) to identify clinical, biochemical, and ultrasonographic parameters which might non-invasively predict the presence of OV in patients with liver cirrhosis; (2) to evaluate the reproducibility of the obtained results in a different, although related, further group of patients; and (3) to assess the predictiveness of the identified rules in patients with compensated cirrhosis. Methods: In the first part of the study we retrospectively evaluated the presence of OV in 145 cirrhotic patients, and in the second part we evaluated the reproducibility of the study results in a subsequent group of 121 patients. Finally, we evaluated these parameters in a subgroup of 145 patients with compensated disease. All 266 patients underwent a complete biochemical workup, upper digestive endoscopy, and ultrasonographic measurement of spleen bipolar diameter. Platelet count/spleen diameter ratio was calculated for all patients. Results: The prevalence rates of OV were 61% and 58% in the first and second groups of patients, respectively. In the first part of the study, we found that platelet count, spleen diameter, platelet count/spleen diameter ratio, and Child- Pugh class were significantly different among patients with or without OV, although the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio was the only parameter which was independently associated with the presence of OV in a multivariate analysis. A platelet count/spleen diameter ratio cut off value of 909 had 100% negative predictive value for a diagnosis of OV. This result was reproduced in the second group of patients as well as in patients with compensated disease. In a cost-benefit analysis, screening cirrhotic patients according

  11. Association of the Preoperative Neutrophil-to-ymphocyte Count Ratio and Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Count Ratio with Clinicopathological Characteristics in Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Mi; Kim, Eun Heui; Kim, Jong Ho; Park, Su Bin; Nam, Yoon Jeong; Ahn, Kang Hee; Oh, Min Young; Kim, Won Jin; Jeon, Yun Kyung; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Yong Ki; Kim, In Ju

    2015-01-01

    Background Several inflammatory biomarkers, especially a high preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte count ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte count ratio (PLR), are known to be indicator of poor prognosis in several cancers. However, very few studies have evaluated the significance of the NLR and PLR in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). We evaluated the association of the preoperative NLR and PLR with clinicopathological characteristics in patients with PTC. Methods This study included 1,066 female patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for PTC. Patients were stratified into 4 quartiles by preoperative NLR and PLR. And the combination of preoperative NLR and PLR was calculated on the basis of data obtained value of tertile as follows: patients with both an elevated PLR and an elevated NLR were allocated a score of 2, and patients showing one or neither were allocated a score of 1 or 0, respectively. Results The preoperative NLR and PLR were significantly lower in patients aged ≥45 years and in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The PLR was significantly higher in patients with tumor size >1 cm (P=0.021).When the patients were categorized into the aforementioned four groups, the group with the higher preoperative PLR was found to have a significantly increased incidence of lateral lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P=0.018). However, there are no significant association between the combination of preoperative NLR and PLR and prognostic factors in PTC patients. Conclusion These results suggest that a preoperative high PLR were significant associated with lateral LNM in female patients with PTC. PMID:26354491

  12. Fully automated detection of the counting area in blood smears for computer aided hematology.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Stephan; Schlarb, Timo; Hasslmeyer, Erik; Zerfass, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    For medical diagnosis, blood is an indispensable indicator for a wide variety of diseases, i.e. hemic, parasitic and sexually transmitted diseases. A robust detection and exact segmentation of white blood cells (leukocytes) in stained blood smears of the peripheral blood provides the base for a fully automated, image based preparation of the so called differential blood cell count in the context of medical laboratory diagnostics. Especially for the localization of the blood cells and in particular for the segmentation of the cells it is necessary to detect the working area of the blood smear. In this contribution we present an approach for locating the so called counting area on stained blood smears that is the region where cells are predominantly separated and do not interfere with each other. For this multiple images of a blood smear are taken and analyzed in order to select the image corresponding to this area. The analysis involves the computation of an unimodal function from image content that serves as indicator for the corresponding image. This requires a prior segmentation of the cells that is carried out by a binarization in the HSV color space. Finally, the indicator function is derived from the number of cells and the cells' surface area. Its unimodality guarantees to find a maximum value that corresponds to the counting areas image index. By this, a fast lookup of the counting area is performed enabling a fully automated analysis of blood smears for medical diagnosis. For an evaluation the algorithm's performance on a number of blood smears was compared with the ground truth information that has been defined by an adept hematologist. PMID:22256137

  13. Fast automated yeast cell counting algorithm using bright-field and fluorescence microscopic images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The faithful determination of the concentration and viability of yeast cells is important for biological research as well as industry. To this end, it is important to develop an automated cell counting algorithm that can provide not only fast but also accurate and precise measurement of yeast cells. Results With the proposed method, we measured the precision of yeast cell measurements by using 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% viability samples. As a result, the actual viability measured with the proposed yeast cell counting algorithm is significantly correlated to the theoretical viability (R2 = 0.9991). Furthermore, we evaluated the performance of our algorithm in various computing platforms. The results showed that the proposed algorithm could be feasible to use with low-end computing platforms without loss of its performance. Conclusions Our yeast cell counting algorithm can rapidly provide the total number and the viability of yeast cells with exceptional accuracy and precision. Therefore, we believe that our method can become beneficial for a wide variety of academic field and industries such as biotechnology, pharmaceutical and alcohol production. PMID:24215650

  14. Agreement of manual cell counts and automated counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) hematology analyzer for analysis of equine synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Van de Water, Eline; Oosterlinck, Maarten; Duchateau, Luc; Pille, Frederik

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the scil Vet abc Plus(+) (SCIL Animal Care Company, Altorf, France), an impedance hematology analyzer, can accurately quantify and differentiate nucleated blood cells (NBCs) in equine synovial fluid. Synovial fluid samples (n=242) in different stages of experimentally induced inflammation were analyzed with and without hyaluronidase pretreatment and compared to manual hemocytometer counts and smear reviews. No significant effect of hyaluronidase pretreatment was observed. Total nucleated cell counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) were significantly higher compared to the manual method (P=0.02), yet the difference was small and clinically irrelevant (ratio manual/automated count equal to 0.97 with 95% CI [0.95, 1.00]). Differential cell counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) were not accurate. In conclusion, the scil Vet abc Plus(+) hematology analyzer is highly accurate for quantification, but not accurate for differentiation of NBCs in equine synovial fluid. PMID:27234537

  15. Automated parasite faecal egg counting using fluorescence labelling, smartphone image capture and computational image analysis.

    PubMed

    Slusarewicz, Paul; Pagano, Stefanie; Mills, Christopher; Popa, Gabriel; Chow, K Martin; Mendenhall, Michael; Rodgers, David W; Nielsen, Martin K

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal parasites are a concern in veterinary medicine worldwide and for human health in the developing world. Infections are identified by microscopic visualisation of parasite eggs in faeces, which is time-consuming, requires technical expertise and is impractical for use on-site. For these reasons, recommendations for parasite surveillance are not widely adopted and parasite control is based on administration of rote prophylactic treatments with anthelmintic drugs. This approach is known to promote anthelmintic resistance, so there is a pronounced need for a convenient egg counting assay to promote good clinical practice. Using a fluorescent chitin-binding protein, we show that this structural carbohydrate is present and accessible in shells of ova of strongyle, ascarid, trichurid and coccidian parasites. Furthermore, we show that a cellular smartphone can be used as an inexpensive device to image fluorescent eggs and, by harnessing the computational power of the phone, to perform image analysis to count the eggs. Strongyle egg counts generated by the smartphone system had a significant linear correlation with manual McMaster counts (R(2)=0.98), but with a significantly lower coefficient of variation (P=0.0177). Furthermore, the system was capable of differentiating equine strongyle and ascarid eggs similar to the McMaster method, but with significantly lower coefficients of variation (P<0.0001). This demonstrates the feasibility of a simple, automated on-site test to detect and/or enumerate parasite eggs in mammalian faeces without the need for a laboratory microscope, and highlights the potential of smartphones as relatively sophisticated, inexpensive and portable medical diagnostic devices. PMID:27025771

  16. An automated fringe counting laser interferometer for low frequency vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, B. F.; Federman, Charles

    Low-frequency accelerometers and velocity transducers are widely used to investigate vibrations on structures such as buildings, bridges, aircraft, ships, power plant equipment, and in seismic applications. Previous work at NBS in this area has focused on the development of accurate calibration methods for transducers by optical methods in the frequency range of 2-100 Hz. This paper describes a computer-controlled fringe-counting interferometric system for transducer calibration. The calibration system uses digital signal analysis for accurate low-frequency voltage measurements. The measurement procedures are fully automated, with menu-driven programs using the computer soft keys for controlling the test frequencies and acceleration, setting test parameters, collecting and storing data and producing reports and graphs. An error analysis is given and experimental data are presented for a typical transducer calibrated on this system.

  17. Automated system for sampling, counting, and biological analysis of rotifer populations

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Claus-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Zooplankton organisms with short generation times, such as rotifers, are ideal models to study general ecological and evolutionary questions on the population level, because meaningful experiments can often be completed within a couple of weeks. Yet biological analysis of such populations is often extremely time consuming, owing to abundance estimation by counting, measuring body size, or determining the investment into sexual versus asexual reproduction. An automated system for sampling and analyzing experimental rotifer populations is described. It relies on image analysis of digital photographs taken from subsamples of the culture. The system works completely autonomously for up to several weeks and can sample up to 12 cultures at time intervals down to a few hours. It allows quantitative analysis of female population density at a precision equivalent to that of conventional methods (i.e., manual counts of samples fixed in Lugol solution), and it can also recognize males, which allows detecting temporal variation of sexual reproduction in such cultures. Another parameter that can be automatically measured with the image analysis system is female body size. This feature may be useful for studies of population productivity and/or in competition experiments with clones of different body size. In this article, I describe the basic setup of the system and tests on the efficiency of data collection, and show some example data sets on the population dynamics of different strains of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus. PMID:21151824

  18. QuantiFly: Robust Trainable Software for Automated Drosophila Egg Counting.

    PubMed

    Waithe, Dominic; Rennert, Peter; Brostow, Gabriel; Piper, Matthew D W

    2015-01-01

    We report the development and testing of software called QuantiFly: an automated tool to quantify Drosophila egg laying. Many laboratories count Drosophila eggs as a marker of fitness. The existing method requires laboratory researchers to count eggs manually while looking down a microscope. This technique is both time-consuming and tedious, especially when experiments require daily counts of hundreds of vials. The basis of the QuantiFly software is an algorithm which applies and improves upon an existing advanced pattern recognition and machine-learning routine. The accuracy of the baseline algorithm is additionally increased in this study through correction of bias observed in the algorithm output. The QuantiFly software, which includes the refined algorithm, has been designed to be immediately accessible to scientists through an intuitive and responsive user-friendly graphical interface. The software is also open-source, self-contained, has no dependencies and is easily installed (https://github.com/dwaithe/quantifly). Compared to manual egg counts made from digital images, QuantiFly achieved average accuracies of 94% and 85% for eggs laid on transparent (defined) and opaque (yeast-based) fly media. Thus, the software is capable of detecting experimental differences in most experimental situations. Significantly, the advanced feature recognition capabilities of the software proved to be robust to food surface artefacts like bubbles and crevices. The user experience involves image acquisition, algorithm training by labelling a subset of eggs in images of some of the vials, followed by a batch analysis mode in which new images are automatically assessed for egg numbers. Initial training typically requires approximately 10 minutes, while subsequent image evaluation by the software is performed in just a few seconds. Given the average time per vial for manual counting is approximately 40 seconds, our software introduces a timesaving advantage for experiments

  19. QuantiFly: Robust Trainable Software for Automated Drosophila Egg Counting

    PubMed Central

    Waithe, Dominic; Rennert, Peter; Brostow, Gabriel; Piper, Matthew D. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development and testing of software called QuantiFly: an automated tool to quantify Drosophila egg laying. Many laboratories count Drosophila eggs as a marker of fitness. The existing method requires laboratory researchers to count eggs manually while looking down a microscope. This technique is both time-consuming and tedious, especially when experiments require daily counts of hundreds of vials. The basis of the QuantiFly software is an algorithm which applies and improves upon an existing advanced pattern recognition and machine-learning routine. The accuracy of the baseline algorithm is additionally increased in this study through correction of bias observed in the algorithm output. The QuantiFly software, which includes the refined algorithm, has been designed to be immediately accessible to scientists through an intuitive and responsive user-friendly graphical interface. The software is also open-source, self-contained, has no dependencies and is easily installed (https://github.com/dwaithe/quantifly). Compared to manual egg counts made from digital images, QuantiFly achieved average accuracies of 94% and 85% for eggs laid on transparent (defined) and opaque (yeast-based) fly media. Thus, the software is capable of detecting experimental differences in most experimental situations. Significantly, the advanced feature recognition capabilities of the software proved to be robust to food surface artefacts like bubbles and crevices. The user experience involves image acquisition, algorithm training by labelling a subset of eggs in images of some of the vials, followed by a batch analysis mode in which new images are automatically assessed for egg numbers. Initial training typically requires approximately 10 minutes, while subsequent image evaluation by the software is performed in just a few seconds. Given the average time per vial for manual counting is approximately 40 seconds, our software introduces a timesaving advantage for experiments

  20. Comparison of cell counting methods in rodent pulmonary toxicity studies: automated and manual protocols and considerations for experimental design

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Antonini, James M.; Meighan, Terence G.; Young, Shih-Houng; Eye, Tracy J.; Hammer, Mary Ann; Erdely, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicity studies often use bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) to investigate potential adverse lung responses to a particulate exposure. The BAL cellular fraction is counted, using automated (i.e. Coulter Counter®), flow cytometry or manual (i.e. hemocytometer) methods, to determine inflammatory cell influx. The goal of the study was to compare the different counting methods to determine which is optimal for examining BAL cell influx after exposure by inhalation or intratracheal instillation (ITI) to different particles with varying inherent pulmonary toxicities in both rat and mouse models. General findings indicate that total BAL cell counts using the automated and manual methods tended to agree after inhalation or ITI exposure to particle samples that are relatively nontoxic or at later time points after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle when the response resolves. However, when the initial lung inflammation and cytotoxicity was high after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle, significant differences were observed when comparing cell counts from the automated, flow cytometry and manual methods. When using total BAL cell count for differential calculations from the automated method, depending on the cell diameter size range cutoff, the data suggest that the number of lung polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) varies. Importantly, the automated counts, regardless of the size cutoff, still indicated a greater number of total lung PMN when compared with the manual method, which agreed more closely with flow cytometry. The results suggest that either the manual method or flow cytometry would be better suited for BAL studies where cytotoxicity is an unknown variable. PMID:27251196

  1. Comparison of cell counting methods in rodent pulmonary toxicity studies: automated and manual protocols and considerations for experimental design.

    PubMed

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Antonini, James M; Meighan, Terence G; Young, Shih-Houng; Eye, Tracy J; Hammer, Mary Ann; Erdely, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary toxicity studies often use bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) to investigate potential adverse lung responses to a particulate exposure. The BAL cellular fraction is counted, using automated (i.e. Coulter Counter®), flow cytometry or manual (i.e. hemocytometer) methods, to determine inflammatory cell influx. The goal of the study was to compare the different counting methods to determine which is optimal for examining BAL cell influx after exposure by inhalation or intratracheal instillation (ITI) to different particles with varying inherent pulmonary toxicities in both rat and mouse models. General findings indicate that total BAL cell counts using the automated and manual methods tended to agree after inhalation or ITI exposure to particle samples that are relatively nontoxic or at later time points after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle when the response resolves. However, when the initial lung inflammation and cytotoxicity was high after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle, significant differences were observed when comparing cell counts from the automated, flow cytometry and manual methods. When using total BAL cell count for differential calculations from the automated method, depending on the cell diameter size range cutoff, the data suggest that the number of lung polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) varies. Importantly, the automated counts, regardless of the size cutoff, still indicated a greater number of total lung PMN when compared with the manual method, which agreed more closely with flow cytometry. The results suggest that either the manual method or flow cytometry would be better suited for BAL studies where cytotoxicity is an unknown variable. PMID:27251196

  2. High-Throughput Method for Automated Colony and Cell Counting by Digital Image Analysis Based on Edge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Counting cells and colonies is an integral part of high-throughput screens and quantitative cellular assays. Due to its subjective and time-intensive nature, manual counting has hindered the adoption of cellular assays such as tumor spheroid formation in high-throughput screens. The objective of this study was to develop an automated method for quick and reliable counting of cells and colonies from digital images. For this purpose, I developed an ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge and a CellProfiler Pipeline Cell Colony Counting, and compared them to other open-source digital methods and manual counts. The ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge is valuable in counting cells and colonies, and measuring their area, volume, morphology, and intensity. In this study, I demonstrate that Cell Colony Edge is superior to other open-source methods, in speed, accuracy and applicability to diverse cellular assays. It can fulfill the need to automate colony/cell counting in high-throughput screens, colony forming assays, and cellular assays. PMID:26848849

  3. Derivation of New Readability Formulas (Automated Readability Index, Fog Count and Flesch Reading Ease Formula) for Navy Enlisted Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, J. P.; And Others

    Three readability formulas were recalculated to be more suitable for Navy use. The three formulas are the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Fog Count, and Flesch Reading Ease Formula. They were derived from test results of 531 Navy enlisted personnel enrolled in four technical training schools. Personnel were tested for their reading…

  4. Acquired platelet function defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... dark black, or tarry bowel movements ; or vomiting blood or material that looks like coffee grounds Nosebleeds ... Tests that may done include: Bleeding time Platelet aggregation test Platelet count PT and PTT

  5. Relationship between automated total nucleated cell count and enumeration of cells on direct smears of canine synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Dusick, Allison; Young, Karen M; Muir, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Canine osteoarthritis is a common disorder seen in veterinary clinical practice and causes considerable morbidity in dogs as they age. Synovial fluid analysis is an important tool for diagnosis and treatment of canine joint disease and obtaining a total nucleated cell count (TNCC) is particularly important. However, the low sample volumes obtained during arthrocentesis are often insufficient for performing an automated TNCC, thereby limiting diagnostic interpretation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether estimation of TNCC in canine synovial fluid could be achieved by performing manual cell counts on direct smears of fluid. Fifty-eight synovial fluid samples, taken by arthrocentesis from 48 dogs, were included in the study. Direct smears of synovial fluid were prepared, and hyaluronidase added before cell counts were obtained using a commercial laser-based instrument. A protocol was established to count nucleated cells in a specific region of the smear, using a serpentine counting pattern; the mean number of nucleated cells per 400 × field was then calculated. There was a positive correlation between the automated TNCC and mean manual cell count, with more variability at higher TNCC. Regression analysis was performed to estimate TNCC from manual counts. By this method, 78% of the samples were correctly predicted to fall into one of three categories (within the reference interval, mildly to moderately increased, or markedly increased) relative to the automated TNCC. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreement was good to excellent. The results of the study suggest that interpretation of canine synovial fluid samples of low volume can be aided by methodical manual counting of cells on direct smears. PMID:25439439

  6. Relationship between automated total nucleated cell count and enumeration of cells on direct smears of canine synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    Dusick, Allison; Young, Karen M.; Muir, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Canine osteoarthritis is a common condition seen in veterinary clinical practice and causes considerable morbidity in dogs as they age. Synovial fluid analysis is an important tool for diagnosis and treatment of canine joint disease and obtaining a total nucleated cell count (TNCC) is particularly important. The low volume of fluid obtained during arthrocentesis is often insufficient for obtaining an automated TNCC, thereby limiting sample interpretation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether estimation of TNCC in canine synovial fluid could be achieved by performing manual cell counts on direct smears of fluid. Fifty eight synovial fluid samples, taken by arthrocentesis from 48 dogs, were included in the study. Direct smears of synovial fluid were prepared, and hyaluronidase added before cell counts were obtained using a commercial laser-based instrument. A protocol was established to count nucleated cells in a specific region of the smear, using a serpentine counting pattern; mean number of nucleated cells/400× field was then calculated. There was a positive correlation between the automated TNCC and mean manual cell count, with more variability at higher TNCC. Regression analysis was performed to estimate TNCC from manual counts. By this method, 78% of the samples were correctly predicted to fall into one of three categories (within the reference interval, mildly to moderately elevated, or markedly elevated) relative to the automated TNCC. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreement was good to excellent. The results of the study suggest that interpretation of canine synovial fluid samples of low volume can be aided by manual cell counting of direct smears. PMID:25439439

  7. Comparison of different platelet count thresholds to guide administration of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon J; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Murphy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in people who are thrombocytopenic due to bone marrow failure. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy in the last 40 years, some areas continue to provoke debate, especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004, and previously updated in 2012 that addressed four separate questions: prophylactic versus therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy; prophylactic platelet transfusion threshold; prophylactic platelet transfusion dose; and platelet transfusions compared to alternative treatments. This review has now been split into four smaller reviews looking at these questions individually; this review compares prophylactic platelet transfusion thresholds. Objectives To determine whether different platelet transfusion thresholds for administration of prophylactic platelet transfusions (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding) affect the efficacy and safety of prophylactic platelet transfusions in preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6, 23 July 2015), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950), and ongoing trial databases to 23 July 2015. Selection criteria We included RCTs involving transfusions of platelet concentrates, prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent bleeding in people with haematological disorders (receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy or undergoing HSCT) that compared different thresholds for

  8. Flow cytometric analysis of platelet activation under calcium ion-chelating conditions.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, T; Yokota, M; Tsuda, I; Tatsumi, N

    2002-04-01

    Platelet activation and aggregation results in factitious counting and sizing in routine haematology testing. In this study, the possibility of platelet activation in anticoagulated solutions was examined. Whole blood was examined using an automated counter and a flow cytometer before and after strong vortex agitation. Blood treated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) exhibited platelet activation both pre- and postagitation but activated platelets did not cause platelet aggregation. With sodium citrate, platelets were only minimally activated both pre- and postagitation. Heparin-treated blood exhibited minimal platelet activation preagitation, but agitation resulted in strong platelet activation and aggregation. Platelet size was increased by agitation in blood with EDTA and with sodium citrate, in association with significant increases in mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW), but MPV and PDW were significantly higher in EDTA solution than in sodium citrate solution. Change in platelet size was observed even in the presence of EDTA, indicating that careful sampling and processing are needed in the collection of specimens. Specimens obtained from patients with EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia exhibited the same level of activation as controls, although platelets exhibited aggregation in such specimens. In conclusion, platelet activation involving platelet size change can occur in the absence of calcium ions in blood treated with EDTA. PMID:11985558

  9. Effect of an automated dipping and backflushing system on somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Olde Riekerink, R G M; Ohnstad, I; van Santen, B; Barkema, H W

    2012-09-01

    Postmilking teat disinfection is an effective management practice to prevent transmission of contagious mastitis pathogens from cow to cow. With farms increasing in size and an increase in the number of rotary milking parlors, the need for automation of postmilking teat disinfection is mounting. Automated teat dipping and backflushing (ADB) systems have existed for some years, but their effect on udder health was never examined in a field study on commercial dairy farms. The objectives of this study were, therefore, to evaluate the effect of introducing an ADB system in a herd on (1) bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), (2) individual cow SCC, and (3) the proportion of newly elevated SCC. Dairy herd improvement data were collected over a 30-mo period on 25 sets of 3 farms. Each set of 3 farms contained a farm that installed an ADB system, one that disinfected teats using dipping after milking, and one that sprayed teats after milking. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models. Bulk milk SCC on farms that sprayed or dipped before installing an ADB system were 16,000 and 30,000 cells/mL lower in the period 6 to 18 mo after installation, respectively, than on farms that continued spraying or dipping the teats after milking. In the same period after installing an ADB system, proportions of cows with elevated SCC were 4.3 and 1.2% lower, respectively, compared with spraying and with dipping. Similarly, proportions of cows that had newly elevated SCC were 1.5% lower and 0.3% higher, respectively, compared with farms that sprayed or dipped. Installing an ADB system had a beneficial effect on bulk milk SCC, individual cow SCC, and the proportion of newly elevated SCC. The effect was most prominent in the period 6 to 18 mo after installation of an ADB system. PMID:22916897

  10. Hormonal contraception and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Saleh, A A; Ginsburg, K A; Duchon, T A; Dorey, L G; Hirata, J; Alshameeri, R S; Dombrowski, M P; Mammen, E F

    1995-05-15

    73 healthy women (29 controls, 25 using OCs, and 19 using Norplant) were selected from the clinic population at North Oakland Medical Center for inclusion in this study after obtaining informed consent. Age, race, height, weight, blood pressure, and cigarette smoking were recorded for each subject. 12 patients were on monophasic OCs while 13 were on triphasic preparations. Both hormonal contraceptive groups had used their particular contraceptive for at least 3 months prior to blood drawing. Platelet tests were performed within 2 hours of sample collection: platelet counts (PLC) and mean platelet volume (MPV) were determined on an Automated Platelet Counter (Baker 810 Platelet Analyzer). Whole blood aggregation was performed on a platelet aggregometer (Chrono-Log, Model 550) using both ADP (ADP, 5 mM) and collagen (COLL, 2 mcg/ml) as inducing agents. Demographic differences were not significant (p 0.05) among the 3 treatment groups, whose average age was 25.3-25.8 years old. Furthermore, no significant differences (p 0.05) in platelet function were detected among controls or subjects receiving either oral contraceptives or Norplant, compared to control patients. The mean platelet counts (X 10/9/L) were 223 for OC users, 231 for Norplant users, and 232 for controls. The respective platelet aggregation (ADP, ohms) values were 12.5, 18.0, and 19.2 as well as (COLL, ohms) 35.6, 40.7, and 39.0. These results demonstrated that there is no evidence for altered platelet function, with the testing methods employed, in women using either Norplant or combination low dose oral contraceptives. To date, several studies have examined this issue, with contradictory reports about the effects of hormonal contraceptives in platelet function. After controlling for differences between various steroid preparations and other such confounding variables, some of these conflicting conclusions could be the result of a lack of uniformity among the methods used to evaluate platelet aggregation

  11. Spontaneous chronic subdural hematomas in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with normal platelet count and no appreciable brain atrophy: Two case reports and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jokonya, Luxwell; Musara, Aaron; Cakana, Andrew; Kalangu, Kazadi K. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs) usually occur in elderly patients following minor head trauma. Their occurrence is usually linked to cerebral atrophy secondary to alcohol, old age, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Spontaneous CSDHs have also been documented but are rare. They are usually caused by coagulopathies and various pathologies resulting in intracranial hypotension. Cases: We have observed a number of spontaneous CSDHs in HIV patients with normal platelet counts and no appreciable cerebral atrophy possibly caused by platelet dysfunction, hence we report about two such cases. To the best of our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in literature before. Conclusion: It is important to include CSDHs in the differential diagnosis of HIV patients presenting with neurological deficits even without a history of trauma. PMID:27308093

  12. Automated Axon Counting in Rodent Optic Nerve Sections with AxonJ.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Kasra; Scheetz, Todd E; Christopher, Mark; Miller, Kathy; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Tandon, Anamika; Anderson, Michael G; Fingert, John H; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a publicly available tool, AxonJ, which quantifies the axons in optic nerve sections of rodents stained with paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In this study, we compare AxonJ's performance to human experts on 100x and 40x images of optic nerve sections obtained from multiple strains of mice, including mice with defects relevant to glaucoma. AxonJ produced reliable axon counts with high sensitivity of 0.959 and high precision of 0.907, high repeatability of 0.95 when compared to a gold-standard of manual assessments and high correlation of 0.882 to the glaucoma damage staging of a previously published dataset. AxonJ allows analyses that are quantitative, consistent, fully-automated, parameter-free, and rapid on whole optic nerve sections at 40x. As a freely available ImageJ plugin that requires no highly specialized equipment to utilize, AxonJ represents a powerful new community resource augmenting studies of the optic nerve using mice. PMID:27226405

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity assessment in "in vitro" culture systems by automated cell counting.

    PubMed

    Liempi, Ana; Castillo, Christian; Cerda, Mauricio; Droguett, Daniel; Duaso, Juan; Barahona, Katherine; Hernández, Ariane; Díaz-Luján, Cintia; Fretes, Ricardo; Härtel, Steffen; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic, neglected tropical disease in Latin America that is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. In vitro models constitute the first experimental approach to study the physiopathology of the disease and to assay potential new trypanocidal agents. Here, we report and describe clearly the use of commercial software (MATLAB(®)) to quantify T. cruzi amastigotes and infected mammalian cells (BeWo) and compared this analysis with the manual one. There was no statistically significant difference between the manual and the automatic quantification of the parasite; the two methods showed a correlation analysis r(2) value of 0.9159. The most significant advantage of the automatic quantification was the efficiency of the analysis. The drawback of this automated cell counting method was that some parasites were assigned to the wrong BeWo cell, however this data did not exceed 5% when adequate experimental conditions were chosen. We conclude that this quantification method constitutes an excellent tool for evaluating the parasite load in cells and therefore constitutes an easy and reliable ways to study parasite infectivity. PMID:25553972

  14. Automated Axon Counting in Rodent Optic Nerve Sections with AxonJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, Kasra; Scheetz, Todd E.; Christopher, Mark; Miller, Kathy; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Tandon, Anamika; Anderson, Michael G.; Fingert, John H.; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a publicly available tool, AxonJ, which quantifies the axons in optic nerve sections of rodents stained with paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In this study, we compare AxonJ’s performance to human experts on 100x and 40x images of optic nerve sections obtained from multiple strains of mice, including mice with defects relevant to glaucoma. AxonJ produced reliable axon counts with high sensitivity of 0.959 and high precision of 0.907, high repeatability of 0.95 when compared to a gold-standard of manual assessments and high correlation of 0.882 to the glaucoma damage staging of a previously published dataset. AxonJ allows analyses that are quantitative, consistent, fully-automated, parameter-free, and rapid on whole optic nerve sections at 40x. As a freely available ImageJ plugin that requires no highly specialized equipment to utilize, AxonJ represents a powerful new community resource augmenting studies of the optic nerve using mice.

  15. New technologies for automated cell counting based on optical image analysis ;The Cellscreen'.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Marlies; Lütkemeyer, Dirk; Gudermann, Frank; Lehmann, Jürgen

    2002-01-01

    A prototype of a newly developed apparatus for measuring cell growth characteristics of suspension cells in micro titre plates over a period of time was examined. Fully automated non-invasive cell counts in small volume cultivation vessels, e.g. 96 well plates, were performed with the Cellscreen system by Innovatis AG, Germany. The system automatically generates microscopic images of suspension cells which had sedimented on the base of the well plate. The total cell number and cell geometry was analysed without staining or sampling using the Cedex image recognition technology. Thus, time course studies of cell growth with the identical culture became possible. Basic parameters like the measurement range, the minimum number of images which were required for statistically reliable results, as well as the influence of the measurement itself and the effect of evaporation in 96 well plates on cell proliferation were determined. A comparison with standard methods including the influence of the cultured volume per well (25 mul to 200 mul) on cell growth was performed. Furthermore, the toxic substances ammonia, lactate and butyrate were used to show that the Cellscreen system is able to detect even the slightest changes in the specific growth rate. PMID:19003093

  16. Automated Axon Counting in Rodent Optic Nerve Sections with AxonJ

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Kasra; Scheetz, Todd E.; Christopher, Mark; Miller, Kathy; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Tandon, Anamika; Anderson, Michael G.; Fingert, John H.; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a publicly available tool, AxonJ, which quantifies the axons in optic nerve sections of rodents stained with paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In this study, we compare AxonJ’s performance to human experts on 100x and 40x images of optic nerve sections obtained from multiple strains of mice, including mice with defects relevant to glaucoma. AxonJ produced reliable axon counts with high sensitivity of 0.959 and high precision of 0.907, high repeatability of 0.95 when compared to a gold-standard of manual assessments and high correlation of 0.882 to the glaucoma damage staging of a previously published dataset. AxonJ allows analyses that are quantitative, consistent, fully-automated, parameter-free, and rapid on whole optic nerve sections at 40x. As a freely available ImageJ plugin that requires no highly specialized equipment to utilize, AxonJ represents a powerful new community resource augmenting studies of the optic nerve using mice. PMID:27226405

  17. Use of the Cell-Dyn Sapphire hematology analyzer for automated counting of blood cells in body fluids.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Dieter; Van Moer, Guy; Martens, Geert A; Nanos, Nikolaos; Smet, Lutgarde; Jochmans, Kristin; De Waele, Marc

    2010-02-01

    The enumeration and identification of blood cells in body fluids offers important information for the diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. Manual microscopic methods (hemacytometer total cell count and cytocentrifuged differential count) have inherent analytic and economic disadvantages but are still considered the "gold standard" methods. We evaluated the analytic and clinical performance of the Cell-Dyn Sapphire hematology analyzer (Abbott Diagnostics Division, Santa Clara, CA) for automated blood cell counting and leukocyte differential counting in cerebrospinal fluid, serous fluid (peritoneal and pleural fluid), and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluid, and we compared the performance with the respective manual methods. In the present article, we describe its applicability for the distinct body fluids, and we highlight limitations and caveats. PMID:20093239

  18. The Prognostic Value of Platelet Count in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Qing; Qu, Kai; Zhang, Jing-Yao; Song, Si-Dong; Liu, Su-Shun; Tai, Ming-Hui; Liu, Hao-Chen; Liu, Chang

    2015-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia has been acknowledged to be a crucial risk factor for cirrhosis formation and hepatocarcinogenesis in chronic liver diseases. However, to date, the association between platelet count (PLT) and the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains inconsistent and controversial. The aim of the present study was to determine whether PLT could be used as a useful predictor of survival in patients with HCC. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2014. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between PLT and survival for HCC, and hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for overall survival (OS) or recurrence-free survival (RFS) were provided. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle-Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did subgrouped and meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 33 eligible articles (published from 1998 to 2014) involved 5545 patients by retrieval. A low level of preoperative PLT was found to be significantly associated with a poor survival of HCC. Irrespective of the therapy used, the pooled HRs for OS and RFS were 1.41 (95% CI, 1.14-1.75) and 1.44 (95% CI, 1.13-1.83), respectively. Specifically, in patients who underwent liver resection, the pooled HRs for OS and RFS were 1.67 (95% CI, 1.22-2.27) and 1.44 (95% CI, 1.04-1.99), respectively. Furthermore, patients with preoperative thrombocytopenia (PLT < 100 × 10⁹/L) had a worse OS (HR: 1.73, 95% CI, 1.29-2.32) and RFS (HR: 1.57, 95% CI, 1.31-1.87) in comparison with patients without thrombocytopenia. All our findings showed no significant changes due to the removal of any study or the use of an opposite-effects model, and there was no significant

  19. Homocysteinemia is inversely correlated with platelet count and directly correlated with sE- and sP-selectin levels in females homozygous for C677T methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Rongioletti, Mauro; Baldassini, Mauro; Papa, Fabrizio; Capoluongo, Ettore; Rocca, Bianca; Cristofaro, Raimondo De; Salvati, Giuseppina; Larciprete, Giovanni; Stroppolo, Annalisa; Angelucci, Piero Antonio; Cirese, Elio; Ameglio, Franco

    2005-01-01

    Plasma homocysteine levels depend in part on the molecular nature of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and on blood folate intake. Little has been reported on platelet counts in the presence of hyperhomocysteinemia and MTHFR polymorphisms, with the exception of delayed platelet recovery in homozygous MTHFR C677T subjects after treatment with methotrexate for ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the possibility of a link between the platelet count and plasma homocysteine levels in different MTHFR variants in 165 female patients. Determinations of plasma homocysteine levels were by ELISA and of MTHFR polymorphisms (A1298C and C677T) were by inverse hybridization. Serum P- and E-selectin concentrations were obtained by ELISA. An inverse correlation (R=-0.88, P<0.001) was observed between blood platelet counts and plasma homocysteine levels in the women homozygous for MTHFR C677T. This correlation did not depend on pregnancy or other variables reported. Serum concentrations of sE- and sP-selectin, markers of endothelial and platelet activation, were significantly and positively correlated with homocysteine levels. These findings suggest that homocysteine affects platelet numbers in women with MTHFR C677T possibly consequent to endothelial and platelet activation. PMID:16011963

  20. COVASIAM: an Image Analysis Method That Allows Detection of Confluent Microbial Colonies and Colonies of Various Sizes for Automated Counting

    PubMed Central

    Corkidi, G.; Diaz-Uribe, R.; Folch-Mallol, J. L.; Nieto-Sotelo, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work we introduce the confluent and various sizes image analysis method (COVASIAM), an automated colony count technique that uses digital imaging technology for detection and separation of confluent microbial colonies and colonies of various sizes growing on petri dishes. The proposed method takes advantage of the optical properties of the surfaces of most microbial colonies. Colonies in the petri dish are epi-illuminated in order to direct the reflection of concentrated light coming from a halogen lamp towards an image-sensing device. In conjunction, a multilevel threshold algorithm is proposed for colony separation and counting. These procedures improved the quantification of colonies showing confluence or differences in size. We tested COVASIAM with a sample set of microorganisms that form colonies with contrasting physical properties: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus nidulans, Escherichia coli, Azotobacter vinelandii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Rhizobium etli. These physical properties range from smooth to hairy, from bright to opaque, and from high to low convexities. COVASIAM estimated an average of 95.47% (ς = 8.55%) of the manually counted colonies, while an automated method based on a single-threshold segmentation procedure estimated an average of 76% (ς = 16.27) of the manually counted colonies. This method can be easily transposed to almost every image-processing analyzer since the procedures to compile it are generically standard. PMID:9546177

  1. Hematopoietic progenitor cell collection after autologous transplant for multiple myeloma: low platelet count predicts for poor collection and sole use of resulting graft enhances risk of myelodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, X; Rosenbaum, ER; Tyler, LN; Sawyer, J; Heuck, CJ; Barlogie, B; Cottler-Fox, M

    2014-01-01

    Collection of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) after previous autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant (aHCT) was studied in 221 patients with multiple myeloma (MM). With a total of 333 collections, the median number of CD34 cells collected was 4.7 × 106 CD34 + cells/kg, and 74% of the patients collected ≥2.5 × 106 CD34 + cells/kg. Among 26 variables examined, the strongest predictor for poor collection was a platelet count <100 × 106/l before mobilization (P<0.001). A subsequent aHCT was performed in 154 of the 221 patients. Sole use of HPC procured after aHCT in 86 patients was associated with delayed platelet recovery (P<0.001) and linked to development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-associated cytogenetic abnormalities (MDS-CA; P = 0.027, odds ratio (OR) 10.34) and a tendency towards clinical MDS/acute myeloid leukemia (AML; P = 0.091, OR 3.57). However, treatment-related mortality (P = 0.766) and time to absolute neutrophil count recovery ≥0.5 × 109/l (P = 0.879) were similar to when a pre-aHCT graft was used. Indeed, adding HPC collected before any aHCT neutralized the risk of MDS-CA or MDS/AML. Therefore, we advise generous initial HPC collection to broaden the salvage armamentarium for patients with MM. PMID:23852547

  2. Design and Validation of an Augmented Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index Comprising Pretransplant Ferritin, Albumin, and Platelet Count for Prediction of Outcomes after Allogeneic Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Jennifer E; Storer, Barry E; Armand, Philippe; Raimondi, Roberto; Gibson, Christopher; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Oneto, Rosi; Bruno, Benedetto; Martin, Paul J; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storb, Rainer; Sorror, Mohamed L

    2015-08-01

    Pretransplant values of serum ferritin, albumin, and peripheral blood counts were previously suggested to provide prognostic information about hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes. Whether these "biomarkers" have prognostic value independent of each other and the HCT-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) is unknown. We analyzed data from 3917 allogeneic HCT recipients at multiple sites in the United States and Italy using multivariate models including each biomarker and the HCT-CI. Data from all sites were then randomly divided into a training set (n = 2352) to develop weights for the relevant biomarkers to be added to the HCT-CI scores and a validation set (n = 1407) to validate an augmented HCT-CI compared with the original index. Multivariate analysis with data from one site showed that ferritin, albumin, and platelets-not neutrophils or hemoglobin-were independently associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and decreased overall survival. Findings were validated in data from the other sites. Subsequently, in a training set from all sites, ferritin >2500 mg/dL (hazard ratio [HR], 1.69); albumin 3 to 3.5 g/dL (HR, 1.61) and <3.0 g/dL (HR, 2.27); and platelets 50 to <100,000 (HR, 1.28), 20 to <50,000 (HR, 1.29), and <20,000 (HR, 1.55) were statistically significantly associated with NRM. Weights were assigned to these laboratory values following the same equation used to design the original index. In the validation set, the addition of the biomarkers to the original index to develop an augmented HCT-CI resulted in a statistically significant increase in a higher c-statistic estimate for prediction of NRM (P = .0007). Ferritin, albumin, and platelet counts are important prognostic markers that further refine the discriminative power of the HCT-CI for transplant outcomes. PMID:25862589

  3. Automation of the γ-ray spectroscopy counting system at the Dow Chemical Company Analytical Sciences Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romick, J. D.; Rigot, W. L.; Morabito, P. L.; Quinn, T. J.; Kocher, C. W.; Duke, D. J.

    1994-12-01

    The neutron activation analysis group within the Analytical Sciences Laboratory analyzes 3000-5000 samples annually for a wide variety of analytes. Due to the high sample load, it is imperative that the gamma spectroscopy counting system be automated to maximize the efficiency of the system while ensuring the accuracy of the analyses. Using a Zymark robotic system, Compumotor drives, and DEC-based Canberra/Nuclear Data software we have automated sample changing, detector positioning, and data acquisition. Automation of these functions has resulted in a more consistent counting geometry, minimized crosstalk between samples, and accurate repositioning of the detectors for standardless quantitative analysis. The Zymark robotic system currently controls two detector systems, but is designed to control up to three independent detector systems. Canberra/Nuclear Data software, operating on a Microvax 3100, issues commands to the Zymark controller to change samples when spectral acquisition is complete. Once a new sample is in place, the robot sends a signal to the Microvax to begin data acquisition. Up to 40 samples, with sizes between 1 and 20 ml, can be accommodated using customized sample racks and sample holders. The location of the sample racks relative to the detectors has eliminated noticeable crosstalk between samples in the racks and samples being counted. The two HPGe detectors for each detector system sit on motorized platforms controlled by programmable Compumotor drives. Programmed function keys move the detectors in or out at fixed increments to optimize sample/detector geometry. The high resolution of the stepper motors enables accurate repositioning of detectors so that previously acquired standard spectra can be compared with samples activated and counted under identical conditions but at different times.

  4. Monitoring individual cow udder health in automated milking systems using online somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, L P; Bjerring, M; Løvendahl, P

    2016-01-01

    This study presents and validates a detection and monitoring model for mastitis based on automated frequent sampling of online cell count (OCC). Initially, data were filtered and adjusted for sensor drift and skewed distribution using ln-transformation. Acceptable data were passed on to a time-series model using double exponential smoothing to estimate level and trends at cow level. The OCC levels and trends were converted to a continuous (0-1) scale, termed elevated mastitis risk (EMR), where values close to zero indicate healthy cow status and values close to 1 indicate high risk of mastitis. Finally, a feedback loop was included to dynamically request a time to next sample, based on latest EMR values or errors in the raw data stream. The estimated EMR values were used to issue 2 types of alerts, new and (on-going) intramammary infection (IMI) alerts. The new alerts were issued when the EMR values exceeded a threshold, and the IMI alerts were issued for subsequent alerts. New alerts were only issued after the EMR had been below the threshold for at least 8d. The detection model was evaluated using time-window analysis and commercial herd data (6 herds, 595,927 milkings) at different sampling intensities. Recorded treatments of mastitis were used as gold standard. Significantly higher EMR values were detected in treated than in contemporary untreated cows. The proportion of detected mastitis cases using new alerts was between 28.0 and 43.1% and highest for a fixed sampling scheme aiming at 24h between measurements. This was higher for IMI alerts, between 54.6 and 89.0%, and highest when all available measurements were used. The lowest false alert rate of 6.5 per 1,000 milkings was observed when all measurements were used. The results showed that a dynamic sampling scheme with a default value of 24h between measurements gave only a small reduction in proportion of detected mastitis treatments and remained at 88.5%. It was concluded that filtering of raw data

  5. Automated air-void system characterization of hardened concrete: Helping computers to count air-voids like people count air-voids---Methods for flatbed scanner calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Karl

    Since the discovery in the late 1930s that air entrainment can improve the durability of concrete, it has been important for people to know the quantity, spacial distribution, and size distribution of the air-voids in their concrete mixes in order to ensure a durable final product. The task of air-void system characterization has fallen on the microscopist, who, according to a standard test method laid forth by the American Society of Testing and Materials, must meticulously count or measure about a thousand air-voids per sample as exposed on a cut and polished cross-section of concrete. The equipment used to perform this task has traditionally included a stereomicroscope, a mechanical stage, and a tally counter. Over the past 30 years, with the availability of computers and digital imaging, automated methods have been introduced to perform the same task, but using the same basic equipment. The method described here replaces the microscope and mechanical stage with an ordinary flatbed desktop scanner, and replaces the microscopist and tally counter with a personal computer; two pieces of equipment much more readily available than a microscope with a mechanical stage, and certainly easier to find than a person willing to sit for extended periods of time counting air-voids. Most laboratories that perform air-void system characterization typically have cabinets full of prepared samples with corresponding results from manual operators. Proponents of automated methods often take advantage of this fact by analyzing the same samples and comparing the results. A similar iterative approach is described here where scanned images collected from a significant number of samples are analyzed, the results compared to those of the manual operator, and the settings optimized to best approximate the results of the manual operator. The results of this calibration procedure are compared to an alternative calibration procedure based on the more rigorous digital image accuracy

  6. PLATELET COUNT TO SPLEEN DIAMETER RATIO AND TO SPLEEN AREA RATIO AS PREDICTORS FOR ESOPHA-GEAL VARICES IN CHRONIC HEPATITIS C PATIENTS WITH LIVER CIRRHOSIS.

    PubMed

    Albreedy, Ashraf M

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic detection of esophageal varices (EV) especially the high risk esophageal varices (HREV) is recommended in cirrhotic patients. There are several studies about non-invasive markers to predict the presence of EV. The aim of this study was to evaluate platelet count to spleen diameter (P/D) ratio and platelet count to spleen area (P/A) ratio as predictors for EV and HREV in patients with liver cirrhosis. This prospective study included 100 cirrhotic patients without previous variceal hemorrhage or endoscopic intervesion. Biochemical, imaging and endoscopic findings were collected in all patients. Several parameters including P/D and P/A ratio were measured and their association with the presence of EV and HREV was tested. The results showed that only P/D and P/A ratios were found to be independent predictors for the presence of EV and HREV in multivariant analysis. For prediction of the EV formation in cirrhotic patients, P/D ratio at value < or =979.9 and P/A ratio of < or =20.6 had area under the curve (AUC) 0.922 and 0.975 respectively with sensitivity 100%, specificity 30% for P/D ratio and sensitivity 100%, specificity 75% for P/A ratio. For prediction of the HREV formation, P/D ratio at value < or = 587.9 and P/A ratio of 513.7 had AUC 0.867 and 0.991 respectively with sensitivity 100%, specificity 50% for P/D ratio and sensitivity 100%, specificity 88% for P/A ratio. PMID:26939226

  7. Role of Platelet Parameters on Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Case-Control Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a common otological disorder characterized by a hearing loss greater than 30 dB over three consecutive frequencies, in less than 72 hours. It has been established that platelet parameters, such as mean platelet volume, are associated with ischemic heart events, whose clinical manifestations are similar to those of SSNHL. Hence, we aimed to determine if the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width are related to the occurrence and severity of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. A case-control prospective study was conducted in a teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred-eight patients with SSNHL and an equal number of healthy, age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from the subjects, and the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width were measured with an automated blood cell counter. Analysis of the audiometry and hematological test results using SPSS22 software showed no statistical correlation between the platelet parameters and the occurrence of SSNHL, but correlation coefficients showed a significant correlation between PDW and hearing loss severity in patients group. However, further investigation is required to unequivocally establish the absence of correlation between the platelet parameters and occurrence of SSNHL. PMID:26829393

  8. Espina: A Tool for the Automated Segmentation and Counting of Synapses in Large Stacks of Electron Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan; Alonso-Nanclares, Lidia; Rodríguez, José-Rodrigo; DeFelipe, Javier; Rodríguez, Ángel; Merchán-Pérez, Ángel

    2011-01-01

    The synapses in the cerebral cortex can be classified into two main types, Gray's type I and type II, which correspond to asymmetric (mostly glutamatergic excitatory) and symmetric (inhibitory GABAergic) synapses, respectively. Hence, the quantification and identification of their different types and the proportions in which they are found, is extraordinarily important in terms of brain function. The ideal approach to calculate the number of synapses per unit volume is to analyze 3D samples reconstructed from serial sections. However, obtaining serial sections by transmission electron microscopy is an extremely time consuming and technically demanding task. Using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope microscopy, we recently showed that virtually all synapses can be accurately identified as asymmetric or symmetric synapses when they are visualized, reconstructed, and quantified from large 3D tissue samples obtained in an automated manner. Nevertheless, the analysis, segmentation, and quantification of synapses is still a labor intensive procedure. Thus, novel solutions are currently necessary to deal with the large volume of data that is being generated by automated 3D electron microscopy. Accordingly, we have developed ESPINA, a software tool that performs the automated segmentation and counting of synapses in a reconstructed 3D volume of the cerebral cortex, and that greatly facilitates and accelerates these processes. PMID:21633491

  9. Automated high performance liquid chromatography and liquid scintillation counting determination of pesticide mixture octanol/water partition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, R.P.; Carroll, J.M.; Kresta, A.M.

    1987-12-01

    Two novel methods are reported for measuring octanol/water partition rates of pesticides. A liquid scintillation counting (LSC) method was developed for automated monitoring of /sup 14/C-labeled pesticides partitioning in biphasic water/octanol cocktail systems with limited success. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for automated partition rate monitoring of several constituents in a pesticide mixture, simultaneously. The mean log Kow +/- SD determined from triplicate experimental runs were for: 2,4-D-DMA (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid dimethylamine), 0.65 +/- .17; Deet (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), 2.02 +/- .01; Guthion (O,O-dimethyl-S-(4-oxo-1,2,3-benzotriazin-3(4H)-ylmethyl) phosphorodithioate), 2.43 +/- .03; Methyl-Parathion (O,O-dimethyl-O-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphorothioate), 2.68 +/- .05; and Fenitrothion (O,O-dimethyl O-(4-nitro-m-tolyl) phosphorothioate), 3.16 +/- .03. A strong positive linear correlation (r = .9979) was obtained between log Kow and log k' (log Kow = 2.35 (log k') + 0.63). The advantages that this automated procedure has in comparison with the standard manual shake-flask procedure are discussed.

  10. White Blood Cell Count to Mean Platelet Volume Ratio Is a Prognostic Factor in Patients with Non-ST Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome with or without Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Fakour, Sanam; Arjmand, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Leukocyte and platelet have been found to be associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS). We aimed to determine the usefulness of a novel marker named white blood cell count to mean platelet volume ratio (WMR) for predicting outcomes of non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) with or without MetS. Subjects and Methods A total of 331 NSTE-ACS individuals (60±12.5 years, 57.4% male) were enrolled and followed for a median of 24 months. MetS was identified using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results Patients were divided into two groups: high WMR (WMR≥720) and low WMR (WMR<720). Major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and MetS rates were significantly greater in the higher WMR group compared to those in the low WMR group (MACE: 14.3% vs. 25%, p=0.014; MetS: 50.9% vs. 75%, p<0.001). MetS was diagnosed in 62.2% of patients. MACE incidence in patients with or without MetS was comparable (p=0.737). Among MetS individuals, patients in the high WMR group had more MACE than the low WMR group (11.2% vs. 26.5%, p=0.007). However, MACE was comparable among non-MetS individuals (p=0.681). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, hazard ratios (HR) of MACE incidence for high-WMR in MetS individuals was 2.616 (95% confidence interval: 1.282–5.339, p=0.008). However, HR of MACE incidence for high WMR in non-MetS individuals was not significant. Conclusion Among NSTE-ACS patients without revascularization therapy, elevated admission WMR was associated with an increased risk of developing composite MACE in MetS individuals but not in non-MetS patients. PMID:27014354

  11. Software-Automated Counting of Ki-67 Proliferation Index Correlates With Pathologic Grade and Disease Progression of Follicular Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Samols, Mark A.; Smith, Nathan E.; Gerber, Jonathan M.; Vuica-Ross, Milena; Gocke, Christopher D.; Burns, Kathleen H.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Cornish, Toby C.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the accuracy of software-assisted measurement of the Ki-67 proliferation index (PI) and its correlation with the grade and clinical progression of follicular lymphoma (FL). Methods High-power field equivalents were extracted from H&E- and Ki-67–immunostained slides of FL, and a nuclear quantitation algorithm was used to calculate a PI. Representative fields were manually counted for validation with close agreement. Results The PI was significantly higher in World Health Organization grade 3 FL than grade 1 to 2 FL. Disease progression, as defined by subsequent treatment with radiation or cytotoxic chemotherapy, was also significantly associated with elevated PI but not pathologic grade. Conclusions These data show that software-automated quantitation of Ki-67 can provide both a useful adjunct to pathologic grade in FL and improved prognostic information for patients. PMID:24045557

  12. Automated benthic counting of living and non-living components in Ngedarrak Reef, Palau via subsurface underwater video.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ma Shiela Angeli; David, Laura; Peñaflor, Eileen; Ticzon, Victor; Soriano, Maricor

    2008-10-01

    We introduce an automated benthic counting system in application for rapid reef assessment that utilizes computer vision on subsurface underwater reef video. Video acquisition was executed by lowering a submersible bullet-type camera from a motor boat while moving across the reef area. A GPS and echo sounder were linked to the video recorder to record bathymetry and location points. Analysis of living and non-living components was implemented through image color and texture feature extraction from the reef video frames and classification via Linear Discriminant Analysis. Compared to common rapid reef assessment protocols, our system can perform fine scale data acquisition and processing in one day. Reef video was acquired in Ngedarrak Reef, Koror, Republic of Palau. Overall success performance ranges from 60% to 77% for depths of 1 to 3 m. The development of an automated rapid reef classification system is most promising for reef studies that need fast and frequent data acquisition of percent cover of living and nonliving components. PMID:18210202

  13. Serum bactericidal assay for the evaluation of typhoid vaccine using a semi-automated colony-counting method.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi Seon; Sahastrabuddhe, Sushant; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun; Yang, Jae Seung

    2016-08-01

    Typhoid fever, mainly caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), is a life-threatening disease, mostly in developing countries. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is widely used to quantify antibodies against S. Typhi in serum but does not provide information about functional antibody titers. Although the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) using an agar plate is often used to measure functional antibody titers against various bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens, it has rarely been used for typhoid vaccines because it is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In the present study, we established an improved SBA against S. Typhi using a semi-automated colony-counting system with a square agar plate harboring 24 samples. The semi-automated SBA efficiently measured bactericidal titers of sera from individuals immunized with S. Typhi Vi polysaccharide vaccines. The assay specifically responded to S. Typhi Ty2 but not to other irrelevant enteric bacteria including Vibrio cholerae and Shigella flexneri. Baby rabbit complement was more appropriate source for the SBA against S. Typhi than complements from adult rabbit, guinea pig, and human. We also examined the correlation between SBA and ELISA for measuring antibody responses against S. Typhi using pre- and post-vaccination sera from 18 human volunteers. The SBA titer showed a good correlation with anti-Vi IgG quantity in the serum as determined by Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.737 (P < 0.001). Taken together, the semi-automated SBA might be efficient, accurate, sensitive, and specific enough to measure functional antibody titers against S. Typhi in sera from human subjects immunized with typhoid vaccines. PMID:27216239

  14. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  15. Automated counting of morphologically normal red blood cells by using digital holographic microscopy and statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Inkyu; Yi, Faliu

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we overview a method to automatically count morphologically normal red blood cells (RBCs) by using off-axis digital holographic microscopy and statistical methods. Three kinds of RBC are used as training and testing data. All of the RBC phase images are obtained with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) that is robust to transparent or semitransparent biological cells. For the determination of morphologically normal RBCs, the RBC's phase images are first segmented with marker-controlled watershed transform algorithm. Multiple features are extracted from the segmented cells. Moreover, the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test is conducted to show that the 3D features from 3D imaging method can improve the discrimination performance for counting of normal shapes of RBCs. Finally, the classifier is designed by using statistical Bayesian algorithm and the misclassification rates are measured with leave-one-out technique. Experimental results show the feasibility of the classification method for calculating the percentage of each typical normal RBC shape.

  16. An automated particle counting immunoassay (PACIA) for determination of blocking antibodies against timothy grass pollen in sera from desensitized allergics.

    PubMed

    Djurup, R; Magnusson, C G; Minuva, U; Søndergaard, I; Osterballe, O; Weeke, B

    1983-04-01

    An automated particle counting immunoassay (PACIA) for measurement of blocking antibodies (antigen neutralizing capacity) against timothy grass pollen extract in sera from desensitized allergics is described. Latex particles coated with F(ab')2-anti-timothy are agglutinated by timothy. Serum containing anti-timothy antibodies inhibits the agglutination. Non-agglutinated particles are counted in a modified AutoCounter. Nineteen of 20 sera from timothy allergics who had undergone immunotherapy with purified timothy extract for 30 weeks, showed significant agglutination-inhibition. None of 42 normal human sera gave significant inhibition. The inhibiting antibody could be removed by absorption with protein A and was thus of non-IgE nature, i.e. blocking antibody. The results obtained correlated statistically significantly with those found with a double-antibody method (rS = 0.62, n = 20, t = 3.35, P less than 0.01) and with the cumulated dosage of timothy allergen extract administered to the individual patient (rS = 0.56, n = 20, t = 2.87, P less than 0.02). Between-assay coefficient of variation was from 6.4% to 18.3%. The capacity is 40 samples per hour. The method has also been applied to measurement of blocking antibodies to honey bee and wasp venom. PMID:6846744

  17. Highly Sensitive Automated Method for DNA Damage Assessment: Gamma-H2AX Foci Counting and Cell Cycle Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Laia; Terradas, Mariona; Martín, Marta; Tusell, Laura; Genescà, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the H2AX protein is an early step in the double strand break (DSB) repair pathway; therefore, phosphorylated histone (γH2AX) foci scoring is widely used as a measure for DSBs. Foci scoring is performed either manually or semi-automatically using hand-operated capturing and image analysis software. In general, both techniques are laborious and prone to artifacts associated with manual scoring. While a few fully automated methods have been described in the literature, none of them have been used to quantify γH2AX foci in combination with a cell cycle phase analysis. Adding this feature to a rapid automated γH2AX foci quantification method would reduce the scoring uncertainty that arises from the variations in the background level of the γH2AX signal throughout the cell cycle. The method was set up to measure DNA damage induced in human mammary epithelial cells by irradiation under a mammogram device. We adapted a FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) Spot-counting system, which has a slide loader with automatic scanning and cell capture system throughout the thickness of each cell (z-stack), to meet our assay requirements. While scanning the sample, the system classifies the selected nuclei according to the signal patterns previously described by the user. For our purposes, a double staining immunofluorescence was carried out with antibodies to detect γH2AX and pericentrin, an integral component of the centrosome. We could thus distinguish both the number of γH2AX foci per cell and the cell cycle phase. Furthermore, restrictive settings of the program classifier reduced the “touching nuclei” problem described in other image analysis software. The automated scoring was faster than and as sensitive as its manually performed counterpart. This system is a reliable tool for γH2AX radio-induced foci counting and provides essential information about the cell cycle stage. It thus offers a more complete and rapid assessment of DNA damage. PMID

  18. Mean platelet volume measurement, EDTA or citrate?

    PubMed

    Dastjerdi, Mansour Siavash; Emami, Tajolmolouk; Najafian, Alireza; Amini, Masoud

    2006-10-01

    Most laboratories use EDTA for anticoagulation of whole blood prior to automated cell counting but due to platelet swelling, mean platelet volume (MPV) values may increase with its use. MPV changes may be less with acid citrate based anticoagulation. As MPV is a marker of platelet function and its precise measurement is important in a number of clinical situations, this study was performed to assess if EDTA and citrate based anticoagulated blood samples can be used interchangeably for MPV measurement. In this cross sectional descriptive study, EDTA and citrate based anticoagulated blood samples of the same patients were assessed by auto-analyzer within 1 h of sampling. In the 61 evaluated patients, there was a close correlation between MPV as measured by EDTA and citrate, but mean MPV measured from EDTA samples was 0.66 fL (9%) more than citrate. There was also a significant negative correlation between platelets count and MPV by both methods. The results of our study reveal that MPV can be measured accurately by both methods of anticoagulation; EDTA and citrate if analysis be performed within 1 h of sampling. PMID:17607580

  19. Platelet function and ageing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris I

    2016-08-01

    There are clear age-related changes in platelet count and function, driven by changes in hematopoietic tissue, the composition of the blood and vascular health. Platelet count remains relatively stable during middle age (25-60 years old) but falls in older people. The effect of age on platelet function is slightly less clear. The longstanding view is that platelet reactivity increases with age in an almost linear fashion. There are, however, serious limitations to the data supporting this dogma. We can conclude that platelet function increases during middle age, but little evidence exists on the changes in platelet responsiveness in old age (>75 years old). This change in platelet function is driven by differential mRNA and microRNA expression, an increase in oxidative stress and changes in platelet receptors. These age-related changes in platelets are particularly pertinent given that thrombotic disease and use of anti-platelet drugs is much more prevalent in the elderly population, yet the majority of platelet research is carried out in young to middle-aged (20-50 years old) human volunteers and young mice (2-6 months old). We know relatively little about exactly how platelets from people over 75 years old differ from those of middle-aged subjects, and we know even less about the mechanisms that drive these changes. Addressing these gaps in our knowledge will provide substantial understanding in how cell signalling changes during ageing and will enable the development of more precise anti-platelet therapies. PMID:27068925

  20. Platelet function defects in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailidis, D P; Jenkins, W J; Barradas, M A; Jeremy, J Y; Dandona, P

    1986-01-01

    Platelet function in alcoholic patients was assessed on admission and during abstinence in hospital. On admission platelets from these patients were significantly less responsive (percentage aggregation and thromboxane A2 release) to conventional in vitro aggregating agents (adrenaline, adenosine diphosphate, and collagen) than platelets from healthy, moderate drinkers. Initially, platelet counts in platelet rich plasma tended to be low and the Simplate II bleeding times frequently prolonged. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release, however, were inhibited even in patients with normal platelet counts on admission. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release returned to normal or became hyper-responsive during two to three weeks of abstinence. Platelet counts rose during this period, the largest responses occurring in those patients with the lowest counts on admission. Bleeding times reverted to normal during abstinence and correlated significantly with changes in platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 release, and platelet count and with the estimated ethanol consumption during the week before admission. Chronic, heavy alcohol ingestion evidently exerts an inhibitory effect on platelet function even in the absence of alcohol in the blood, and this phenomenon is reversible on abstaining. The impaired platelet function, together with the reduced platelet count, may contribute to the bleeding diathesis associated with chronic alcoholism and to the increased incidence and recurrence of gastrointestinal haemorrhage associated with excessive alcohol intake. PMID:3094624

  1. A shear gradient-activated microfluidic device for automated monitoring of whole blood haemostasis and platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abhishek; Graveline, Amanda; Waterhouse, Anna; Vernet, Andyna; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of blood haemostasis is essential for the management of patients who use extracorporeal devices, receive anticoagulation therapy or experience coagulopathies. However, current monitoring devices do not measure effects of haemodynamic forces that contribute significantly to platelet function and thrombus formation. Here we describe a microfluidic device that mimics a network of stenosed arteriolar vessels, permitting evaluation of blood clotting within small sample volumes under pathophysiological flow. By applying a clotting time analysis based on a phenomenological mathematical model of thrombus formation, coagulation and platelet function can be accurately measured in vitro in patient blood samples. When the device is integrated into an extracorporeal circuit in pig endotoxemia or heparin therapy models, it produces real-time readouts of alterations in coagulation ex vivo that are more reliable than standard clotting assays. Thus, this disposable device may be useful for personalized diagnostics and for real-time surveillance of antithrombotic therapy in clinic. PMID:26733371

  2. A shear gradient-activated microfluidic device for automated monitoring of whole blood haemostasis and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abhishek; Graveline, Amanda; Waterhouse, Anna; Vernet, Andyna; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Ingber, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of blood haemostasis is essential for the management of patients who use extracorporeal devices, receive anticoagulation therapy or experience coagulopathies. However, current monitoring devices do not measure effects of haemodynamic forces that contribute significantly to platelet function and thrombus formation. Here we describe a microfluidic device that mimics a network of stenosed arteriolar vessels, permitting evaluation of blood clotting within small sample volumes under pathophysiological flow. By applying a clotting time analysis based on a phenomenological mathematical model of thrombus formation, coagulation and platelet function can be accurately measured in vitro in patient blood samples. When the device is integrated into an extracorporeal circuit in pig endotoxemia or heparin therapy models, it produces real-time readouts of alterations in coagulation ex vivo that are more reliable than standard clotting assays. Thus, this disposable device may be useful for personalized diagnostics and for real-time surveillance of antithrombotic therapy in clinic. PMID:26733371

  3. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted. PMID:21514232

  4. Blood Count Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Your blood contains red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in your blood. This helps doctors check on your overall health. ...

  5. Blood Count Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in ... helps doctors check on your overall health. The tests can also help to diagnose diseases and conditions ...

  6. Platelet Count and Major Bleeding in Patients Receiving Vitamin K Antagonists for Acute Venous Thromboembolism, Findings From Real World Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Giorgi-Pierfranceschi, Matteo; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Cattabiani, Chiara; Guida, Anna; Pagán, Barbara; Morales, Maria Del Valle; Salgado, Estuardo; Suriñach, José Maria; Tolosa, Carles; Monreal, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The outcome of patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) and abnormal platelet count (PlC) at baseline has not been consistently studied. In real-world clinical practice, a number of patients with abnormal PlC receive vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) to treat acute VTE despite their higher risk of bleeding.We used the Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica registry database to compare the rate of major bleeding in patients receiving VKA for long-term therapy of acute VTE according to PlC levels at baseline. Patients were categorized as having very low (<100,000/μL), low (100,000-150,000/μL), normal (150,000-300,000/μL), high (300,000-450,000/μL), or very high (>450,000/μL) PlC at baseline.Of 55,369 patients recruited as of January 2015, 37,000 (67%) received long-term therapy with VKA. Of these, 611 patients (1.6%) had very low PlC, 4006 (10.8%) had low PlC, 25,598 (69%) had normal PlC, 5801 (15.6%) had high PlC, and 984 (2.6%) had very high PlC at baseline. During the course of VKA therapy (mean, 192 days), there were no differences in the duration or intensity (as measured by international normalized ratio levels) of treatment between subgroups. The rate of major bleeding was 3.6%, 2.1%, 1.9%, 2.1%, and 3.7%, respectively, and the rate of fatal bleeding was 0.98%, 0.17%, 0.29%, 0.34%, and 0.50%, respectively. Patients with very low or very high PlC levels were more likely to have severe comorbidities.We found a nonlinear "U-shaped" relationship between PlC at baseline and major bleeding during therapy with VKA for VTE. Consistent alteration of PlC values at baseline suggested a greater frailty. PMID:26632687

  7. Mean platelet volume as an indicator of platelet rejuvenation following bone-marrow transplantation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seanger, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    Thrombocytopenia of unpredictable duration and severity is an expected outcome of the radiation/chemotherapy protocols performed prior to bone-marrow transplantation. Serial evaluation of the platelet count and mean platelet volume of patients diagnosed with acute leukemia demonstrated the mean platelet volume to increase into reference limits 24 to 40 hours prior to a rise in the platelet count in those patients whose bone-marrow successfully responded to induction chemotherapy. Serial platelet counts and measurements of mean platelet volume were performed on 31 patients following bone marrow transplantation. Numerous platelet transfusions, together with sustained thrombocytopenia, inhibited accurate assessment of 29 of 31 patients. Two patients, however, demonstrated a rise in the mean platelet volume prior to an increase in the platelet count. Both of these patients received no platelet transfusions during the period preceding or following the rise in the platelet count. It was proposed that the serial evaluation of the mean platelet volume may assist practitioners in the decision-making process of deciding whether platlet transfusions are required, or an increase in the number of circulating platelets is imminent. A decision not to transfuse would have the direct benefit of decreasing patient costs, in conjunction with eliminating a potential source for the development of an antibody against platelets.

  8. A new colorimetrically-calibrated automated video-imaging protocol for day-night fish counting at the OBSEA coastal cabled observatory.

    PubMed

    del Río, Joaquín; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Costa, Corrado; Menesatti, Paolo; Sbragaglia, Valerio; Nogueras, Marc; Sarda, Francesc; Manuèl, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Field measurements of the swimming activity rhythms of fishes are scant due to the difficulty of counting individuals at a high frequency over a long period of time. Cabled observatory video monitoring allows such a sampling at a high frequency over unlimited periods of time. Unfortunately, automation for the extraction of biological information (i.e., animals' visual counts per unit of time) is still a major bottleneck. In this study, we describe a new automated video-imaging protocol for the 24-h continuous counting of fishes in colorimetrically calibrated time-lapse photographic outputs, taken by a shallow water (20 m depth) cabled video-platform, the OBSEA. The spectral reflectance value for each patch was measured between 400 to 700 nm and then converted into standard RGB, used as a reference for all subsequent calibrations. All the images were acquired within a standardized Region Of Interest (ROI), represented by a 2 × 2 m methacrylate panel, endowed with a 9-colour calibration chart, and calibrated using the recently implemented "3D Thin-Plate Spline" warping approach in order to numerically define color by its coordinates in n-dimensional space. That operation was repeated on a subset of images, 500 images as a training set, manually selected since acquired under optimum visibility conditions. All images plus those for the training set were ordered together through Principal Component Analysis allowing the selection of 614 images (67.6%) out of 908 as a total corresponding to 18 days (at 30 min frequency). The Roberts operator (used in image processing and computer vision for edge detection) was used to highlights regions of high spatial colour gradient corresponding to fishes' bodies. Time series in manual and visual counts were compared together for efficiency evaluation. Periodogram and waveform analysis outputs provided very similar results, although quantified parameters in relation to the strength of respective rhythms were different. Results

  9. Possible correlation of b3-a2-type bcr-abl messenger RNA defined by semiquantitative RT-PCR to platelet and megakaryocyte counts in Philadelphia-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, K; Futaki, M; Dan, K; Nomura, T

    1994-04-01

    Thirty-five patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1)-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) were classified on the basis of the fusion pattern of bcr-abl mRNA determined by the reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Semiquantitative assay of the bcr exon 2/abl exon 2 fused mRNA (b2-a2) and bcr exon 3/abl exon 2 fused mRNA (b3-a2) resulted in 21 patients showing b3-a2 type mRNA, seven showing b2-a2 type and seven showing coexpression. Quantification of the autoradiographic signals of amplified products was estimated using an MCID image analysis system. The relative intensity was defined as the ratio of bcr-abl signal to that of beta-actin. The relationship between the semiquantified bcr-abl mRNA and the platelet/megakaryocyte counts was analyzed. A possible correlation was found between the semiquantified b3-a2 type mRNA and the platelet (p < .05, N = 28) and megakaryocyte (p < .05, N = 13) counts of these patients. This finding suggests the possibility that b3-a2 mRNA may affect the thrombopoietic activity in Ph1-positive CML in a dose-response manner. PMID:7520786

  10. Is the blood basophil count sufficiently precise, accurate, and specific?: three automated hematology instruments and flow cytometry compared.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Erik K; Henriksson, Carola E; Holthe, Mette R; Urdal, Petter

    2012-01-01

    We compared the performance of the basophil count of 3 hematology instruments with a flow cytometric method (FCM) in which CD123 and CD193 were used as basophil markers. By analyzing 112 patient samples, we found the ADVIA 120 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Deerfield, IL) and CELL-DYN Sapphire (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA) to underestimate the number of basophils by approximately 50% and the Sysmex XE-2100 (Sysmex, Kobe, Japan) and ADVIA to overestimate the basophil count in some samples with pathologic leukocytes. All 3 instruments had large (25%-50%) analytic within-run coefficients of variation. Compared with the FCM, we found a relatively good correlation for the CELL-DYN basophil count (r = 0.81), an intermediate correlation for the Sysmex (r = 0.64), and a poor correlation for the ADVIA (r = 0.24). When excluding the 52 samples flagged for the presence of pathologic leukocytes, these correlations were found to be 0.84, 0.90, and 0.57, respectively. The basophil count of the 3 instruments is, at least presently, of unsatisfactory quality. PMID:22180481

  11. Prognostic Significance of Combination of Preoperative Platelet Count and Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio (COP-NLR) in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Based on a Large Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Lianmin; Zhu, Kaikai; Shi, Bowen; Yin, Yuesong; Zhu, Jinfang; Yue, Dongsheng; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Changli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of the combination of the preoperative platelet count and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (COP-NLR) for predicting postoperative survival of patients undergoing complete resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods The preoperative COP-NLR was calculated on the basis of data obtained.Patients with both an increased platelet count (>30.0×104 mm-3) and an elevated NLR (>2.3) were assigned a score of 2, and patients with one or neither were assigned as a score of 1 or 0, respectively. Results A total of 1238 NSCLC patients were enrolled in this analysis. Multivariate analysis using the 15 clinicolaboratory variables selected by univariate analyses demonstrated that the preoperative COP-NLR was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (HR: 1.834, 95%CI: 1.536 to 2.200, P<0.001) and OS (HR: 1.810, 95%CI: 1.587 to 2.056, P<0.001). In sub-analyses by tumor stage (I, II, IIIA), a significant association was found between DFS and OS and level of COP-NLR in each subgroup (P<0.001, P=0.002, P<0.001 for DFS, respectively; P<0.001, P=0.001, P<0.001 for OS). When the subgroup of patients with high-risk COP-NLR (score of 2) was analyzed, no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy could be found (P=0.237 for DFS and P=0.165 for OS). Conclusions The preoperative COP-NLR is able to predict the prognosis of patients with NSCLC and divide these patients into three independent groups before surgery. Our results also demonstrate that high-risk patients based on the COP-NLR do not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Independent validation of our findings is warranted. PMID:25950176

  12. Platelet aggregation in presence of anticoagulants dependent pseudothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, G; Calvano, D; Mattaini, R; Cosini, I; Giardini, C

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of pseudothrombocytopenia anticoagulants dependence in a healthy woman. Platelet count was performed on the automated impedance haematological analyzer utilizing peripheral blood samples anticoagulated with ethylene diamine tetra-acetate, heparin and sodium citrate. We pointed out that the severe thrombocytopenia was principally time and ethylene diamine tetra-acetate dependent. As regard both the temperature (37 degrees C) and the other anticoagulants (heparin, sodium citrate), the phenomenon was variable. The phenomenon "in vitro" was confirmed by the normal aggregation, moreover we showed that the platelets of a normal subject aggregated with plasma and ethylene diamine tetra-acetate of pseudothrombocytopenic subject. We report this case because often, in a healthy subject, it is possible to make a mistake in diagnosis and to employ more sophisticated and expansive investigations. Moreover it is very important to point out the pseudothrombocytopenia in case of heparinic therapy because it is possible to have a dilated thrombocytopenia. PMID:8414132

  13. Platelet destruction in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura: kinetics and clearance of indium-111-labeled autologous platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ballem, P.J.; Gernsheimer, T.; Cerqueira, M.; Slichter, S.J.

    1989-05-01

    Using autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets, platelet kinetics and the sites of platelet destruction were assessed in 16 normal subjects (13 with and three without spleens), in 17 studies of patients with primary autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP), in six studies of patients with secondary AITP, in ten studies of patients with AITP following splenectomy, and in five thrombocytopenic patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In normal subjects, the spleen accounted for 24 +/- 4% of platelet destruction and the liver for 15 +/- 2%. Untreated patients with primary AITP had increased splenic destruction (40 +/- 14%, p less than 0.001) but not hepatic destruction (13 +/- 5%). Compared with untreated patients, prednisone treated patients did not have significantly different spleen and liver platelet sequestration. Patients with secondary AITP had similar platelet counts, platelet survivals, and increases in splenic destruction of platelets as did patients with primary AITP. In contrast, patients with myelodysplastic syndromes had a normal pattern of platelet destruction. In AITP patients following splenectomy, the five nonresponders all had a marked increase (greater than 45%) in liver destruction compared to five responders (all less than 40%). Among all patients with primary or secondary AITP, there was an inverse relationship between the percent of platelets destroyed in the liver plus spleen and both the platelet count (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001) and the platelet survival (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001). In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, total liver plus spleen platelet destruction, the platelet survival and the platelet turnover were all significant independent predictors of the platelet count. Thus platelet destruction is shifted to the spleen in primary and secondary AITP. Failure of splenectomy is associated with a marked elevation in liver destruction.

  14. [Assessment of platelet function in man].

    PubMed

    Gaussem, Pascale

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of platelet function was primarily designed to explore patients with hemostatic disorders, but is becoming important for the monitoring of anti platelet agents, mostly aspirin and clopidogrel. Beside platelet counting, morphological analysis and bleeding time, a number of dedicated platelet function instruments are now available, generally allowing a rapid evaluation of platelet function in whole blood. The other tests including aggregometry and ELISA measurement of activation markers are generally restricted to specialized laboratories. Although aggregometry is still considered as the "gold standard", the recently developed flow cytometric-based platelet function analysis provides a wide choice of tests that assess the number of surface receptors, the measure of secretion and aggregation, the quantification of microparticules and leukocyte-platelet aggregates. It also allows the measure of the function of the ADP receptor P2Y12 by the phosphorylation level of the VASP protein, method currently under evaluation to monitor the platelet response to clopidogrel treatment. PMID:17243268

  15. Low local blood perfusion, high white blood cell and high platelet count are associated with primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in a 4T1 mouse breast cancer metastasis model

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHUAN; CHEN, YING-GE; GAO, JIAN-LI; LYU, GUI-YUAN; SU, JIE; ZHANG, QI; JI, XIN; YAN, JI-ZHONG; QIU, QIAO-LI; ZHANG, YUE-LI; LI, LIN-ZI; XU, HAN-TING; CHEN, SU-HONG

    2015-01-01

    It was originally thought that no single routine blood test result would be able to indicate whether or not a patient had cancer; however, several novel studies have indicated that the median survival and prognosis of cancer patients were markedly associated with the systemic circulation features of cancer patients. In addition, certain parameters, such as white blood cell (WBC) count, were largely altered in malignant tumors. In the present study, routine blood tests were performed in order to observe the change of blood cells in tumor-bearing mice following the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into the mammary fat pad; in addition, blood flow in breast tumor sites was measured indirectly using laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), in an attempt to explain the relevance between the blood circulation features and the growth or metastasis of breast cancer in mice model. The LDPI and blood test results indicated that the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into BALB/c mice led to thrombosis as well as high WBC count, high platelet count, high plateletcrit and low blood perfusion. Following implantation of the 4T1 cells for four weeks, the lung metastatic number was determined and the Pearson correlation coefficient revealed that the number of visceral lung metastatic sites had a marked negative association with the ratio of basophils (BASO%; r=-0.512; P<0.01) and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin was significantly correlated with primary tumor weight (r=0.425; P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that tumor growth led to thrombosis and acute anemia in mice; in addition, when blood BASO% was low, an increased number of lung metastases were observed in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26622565

  16. Function of human platelets during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, V L; Hicks, R E; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Colman, R W

    1977-06-01

    The interaction between human platelets and nonbiologic surfaces was studied during in vitro recirculation of 500 ml of fresh, heparinized human blood in four different perfusion circuits. Circuits differed in surface area (0.1 m2 or 0.9 m2) and in surface composition. No important differences were observed between standard silicone-rubber and filler-free, silicone-rubber surfaces. Platelet counts decreased to 85% of control in 0.1- m2 circuits, but retained normal sensitivity to aggregating agents and released only small amounts of platelet factor 4 (PF4). In contrast, platelet counts in 0.9-m2 circuits decreased to 20% of control within 2 min and platelet sensitivity was depressed out of proportion to the fall in platelet count. Plasma PF4 progressively increased and platelet PF4 content progressively decreased during 6 h of recirculation. The results indicate that human platelets may exist in three conditions during extracorporeal circulation. Some platelets are unaltered, some are less sensitive to aggregating agents, and others have undergone extensive release. The ratio of blood volume to surface area appears to be an important determinant of platelet-surface interaction. PMID:18017

  17. Expansion of the neonatal platelet mass is achieved via an extension of platelet lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Hu, Zhongbo; Mager, Donald E.; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Debrincat, Marlyse A.; Pleines, Irina; Josefsson, Emma C.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Italiano, Joseph; Ramsey, Haley; Grozovsky, Renata; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chavda, Chaitanya

    2014-01-01

    The fetal/neonatal hematopoietic system must generate enough blood cells to meet the demands of rapid growth. This unique challenge might underlie the high incidence of thrombocytopenia among preterm neonates. In this study, neonatal platelet production and turnover were investigated in newborn mice. Based on a combination of blood volume expansion and increasing platelet counts, the platelet mass increased sevenfold during the first 2 weeks of murine life, a time during which thrombopoiesis shifted from liver to bone marrow. Studies applying in vivo biotinylation and mathematical modeling showed that newborn and adult mice had similar platelet production rates, but neonatal platelets survived 1 day longer in circulation. This prolonged lifespan fully accounted for the rise in platelet counts observed during the second week of murine postnatal life. A study of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins showed that neonatal platelets had higher levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and were more resistant to apoptosis induced by the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 than adult platelets. However, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Bcl-2 alone did not shorten neonatal platelet survival or reduce platelet counts in newborn mice, indicating the existence of redundant or alternative mechanisms mediating the prolonged lifespan of neonatal platelets. PMID:24599546

  18. Identification of an Interaction between VWF rs7965413 and Platelet Count as a Novel Risk Marker for Metabolic Syndrome: An Extensive Search of Candidate Polymorphisms in a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nakatochi, Masahiro; Ushida, Yasunori; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Yoshida, Yasuko; Kawai, Shun; Kato, Ryuji; Nakashima, Toru; Iwata, Masamitsu; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Ando, Masahiko; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Takaaki; Oda, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Mutsuharu; Kato, Sawako; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Maruyama, Shoichi; Matsuo, Seiichi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Although many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified to be associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), there was only a slight improvement in the ability to predict future MetS by the simply addition of SNPs to clinical risk markers. To improve the ability to predict future MetS, combinational effects, such as SNP—SNP interaction, SNP—environment interaction, and SNP—clinical parameter (SNP × CP) interaction should be also considered. We performed a case-control study to explore novel SNP × CP interactions as risk markers for MetS based on health check-up data of Japanese male employees. We selected 99 SNPs that were previously reported to be associated with MetS and components of MetS; subsequently, we genotyped these SNPs from 360 cases and 1983 control subjects. First, we performed logistic regression analyses to assess the association of each SNP with MetS. Of these SNPs, five SNPs were significantly associated with MetS (P < 0.05): LRP2 rs2544390, rs1800592 between UCP1 and TBC1D9, APOA5 rs662799, VWF rs7965413, and rs1411766 between MYO16 and IRS2. Furthermore, we performed multiple logistic regression analyses, including an SNP term, a CP term, and an SNP × CP interaction term for each CP and SNP that was significantly associated with MetS. We identified a novel SNP × CP interaction between rs7965413 and platelet count that was significantly associated with MetS [SNP term: odds ratio (OR) = 0.78, P = 0.004; SNP × CP interaction term: OR = 1.33, P = 0.001]. This association of the SNP × CP interaction with MetS remained nominally significant in multiple logistic regression analysis after adjustment for either the number of MetS components or MetS components excluding obesity. Our results reveal new insight into platelet count as a risk marker for MetS. PMID:25646961

  19. Platelet abnormalities in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eneman, Benedicte; Levtchenko, Elena; van den Heuvel, Bert; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2016-08-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a common kidney disease associated with a significantly increased risk of thrombotic events. Alterations in plasma levels of pro- and anti-coagulant factors are involved in the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis in NS. However, the fact that the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis is elevated in NS points to an additional role for blood platelets. Increased platelet counts and platelet hyperactivity have been observed in nephrotic children. Platelet hyperaggregability, increased release of active substances, and elevated surface expression of activation-dependent platelet markers have been documented. The mechanisms underlying those platelet alterations are multifactorial and are probably due to changes in plasma levels of platelet-interfering proteins and lipid changes, as a consequence of nephrosis. The causal relationship between platelet alterations seen in NS and the occurrence of thromboembolic phenomena remains unclear. Moreover, the efficiency of prophylactic treatment using antiplatelet agents for the prevention of thrombotic complications in nephrotic patients is also unknown. Thus, antiplatelet medication is currently not generally recommended for routine prophylactic therapy. PMID:26267676

  20. Platelet depletion and severity of streptococcal endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dall, Lawrence; Miller, Todd; Herndon, Betty; Diez, Ireneo; Dew, Michelle

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of thrombocytopenia in streptococcal endocarditis using an animal model. DESIGN: A model of human septic endocarditis was established in rats (polyethylene catheters across the aortic valve and administration of Streptococcus sanguis, 5×107 colony forming units [cfu] intravenous). Thrombocytopenia at four levels was produced by antiplatelet serum. Secondary methods of producing thrombocytopenia were also evaluated. At sacrifice (96 h after platelet depletion and 72 h after infection), vegetations were removed, weighed, diluted, plated and counted. Potential mechanisms of the dose-response relationship between vegetation density and platelet count were evaluated. SETTING: Controlled research laboratory experiments. POPULATION STUDIED: Animal models of streptococcal endocarditis. MAIN RESULTS: The bacterial density of the aortic valve vegetations significantly increased as the platelet count decreased (P=0.0007). In severely thrombocytopenic animals (two-dose antiplatelet serum), data suggest increased vegetation embolism. Platelet depletion, which was minimal with chemical methods, was produced most effectively by antithrombocyte serum. Platelet surfaces in endocarditis were found to express elevated CD62p proteins (72.7% endocarditis, 34.7% control). Platelet protein fractions were evaluated in vitro by both streptocidal (P=0.19) and phagocytosis-stimulating assays. Platelet presence in mature aortic valve vegetations averaged only about 2%. CONCLUSIONS: In platelet depletion experiments using a rat model, a dose-response relationship of peripheral circulating platelet depletion to aortic valve vegetation density was found. The mechanism relating thrombocytopenia to endocarditis severity remains unresolved. PMID:22346555

  1. Evaluation of platelet cross-matching in the management of patients refractory to platelet transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Osama S.; Aladl, Doaa A.; El Ghannam, Doaa M.; Elderiny, Wesam E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-match-compatible platelets are used to support thrombocytopenic patients who are refractory to randomly selected platelets. However, few studies have addressed the efficacy of using this strategy for patients requiring intensive platelet transfusion therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of cross-match-compatible platelets in an unselected group of patients refractory to platelets from random donors. Materials and methods A total of 406 cross-match-compatible platelet components were administered to 40 evaluable patients who were refractory to random-donor platelets. A solid-phase red cell adherence method was used for platelet cross-matching. The corrected count increment was used to monitor the effectiveness of each platelet transfusion. Multivariate analysis was performed to detect whether any variables could predict the response to transfusion. Results Statistically significant improvements were found in the mean corrected count increment when comparing cross-match-compatible platelets with randomly selected and incompatible platelets (p<0.001 for each). Compatible platelet transfusions were associated with a good response in 72.9% of cases while incompatible platelets were associated with a poor response in 66.7% of transfusion events (p<0.001). In the presence of clinical factors or alloimmunisation, compatible platelets were associated with good responses in 67.9% and 28.0% respectively vs 100% and 93.3% in their absence (p=0.009, p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that cross-matching and alloimmunisation were the strongest predictors of transfusion response at 1 hour, while ABO compatibility, type of units received, followed by alloimmunisation then clinical factors were predictors at 24 hours. Discussion Platelet cross-matching using the solid-phase red cell adherence technique is an effective and rapid first-line approach for the management of patients refractory to platelet transfusions. PMID:24931840

  2. Hemostatic Function, Survival, and Membrane Glycoprotein Changes in Young versus Old Rabbit Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Blajchman, Morris A.; Senyi, Andrew F.; Hirsh, Jack; Genton, Edward; George, James N.

    1981-01-01

    Although in vitro studies have demonstrated functional differences between young and old platelets, in vivo differences have not been precisely established. Therefore the in vivo hemostatic function of young and old platelets and the survival time have been examined in rabbits. The hemostatic function was measured by performing serial ear bleeding times in irradiation-induced thrombocytopenic rabbits. After irradiation with 930 rad the platelet count gradually diminished reaching a nadir (∼20 × 103/μl) at 10 d. The platelets present in the circulation, 7-10 d after irradiation, were considered old platelets, and the platelets present after recovery, 11-14 d postirradiation, young platelets. The measurement of platelet size was consistent with the hypothesis that platelets become smaller with age: the mean size was 3.84 μm3 for old platelets and 5.86 μm3 for young platelets. Regression analysis of the relationship between the bleeding time and the platelet count in 18 rabbits showed a significantly different slope for rabbits with predominantly old platelets compared with rabbits with predominantly young platelets (P < 0.001). Young platelets were more effective giving much shorter bleeding times than old platelets at comparable platelet counts. Survival times of young and old platelets were measured using platelets harvested on day 8 postirradiation (old platelets) and day 12 postirradiation (young platelets) that were labeled and then reinjected into normal recipient animals. The mean platelet survival time, calculated by gamma function, of old platelets was 28.8 h; of young platelets, 87.4 h; and of normally circulating heterogeneous platelets, (normal platelets) 53.0 h. Notably, the survival of old platelets was found to be exponential, and of young platelets, linear. Analysis of the membrane glycoproteins in young, old and normal platelets indicated that there was no qualitative difference amongst the young, normal, and old platelets. The relative

  3. The international experience of bacterial screen testing of platelet components with an automated microbial detection system: a need for consensus testing and reporting guidelines.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Richard J; McDonald, Carl P

    2014-04-01

    The BacT/ALERT microbial detection system (bioMerieux, Inc, Durham, NC) is in routine use in many blood centers as a prerelease test for platelet collections. Published reports document wide variation in practices and outcomes. A systematic review of the English literature was performed to describe publications assessing the use of the BacT/ALERT culture system on platelet collections as a routine screen test of more than 10000 platelet components. Sixteen publications report the use of confirmatory testing to substantiate initial positive culture results but use varying nomenclature to classify the results. Preanalytical and analytical variables that may affect the outcomes differ widely between centers. Incomplete description of protocol details complicates comparison between sites. Initial positive culture results range from 539 to 10606 per million (0.054%-1.061%) and confirmed positive from 127 to 1035 per million (0.013%-0.104%) donations. False-negative results determined by outdate culture range from 662 to 2173 per million (0.066%-0.217%) and by septic reactions from 0 to 66 per million (0%-0.007%) collections. Current culture protocols represent pragmatic compromises between optimizing analytical sensitivity and ensuring the timely availability of platelets for clinical needs. Insights into the effect of protocol variations on outcomes are generally restricted to individual sites that implement limited changes to their protocols over time. Platelet manufacturers should reassess the adequacy of their BacT/ALERT screening protocols in light of the growing international experience and provide detailed documentation of all variables that may affect culture outcomes when reporting results. We propose a framework for a standardized nomenclature for reporting of the results of BacT/ALERT screening. PMID:24636779

  4. PLATELET FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Jonathan N.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is the underlying cause of a number of major clinical conditions and genetic disorders worldwide. While therapeutic agents that bind and stimulate the thrombopoietin receptor are currently available, the development of drugs that directly stimulate megakaryocytes to generate platelets has lagged behind. To improve the management of thrombocytopenia, we will need to define the cell biological pathways that drive the production of platelets from megakaryocytes. This review integrates the latest research of platelet biogenesis and focuses on the molecular pathways that power and regulate proplatelet production. PMID:20620432

  5. In vivo effects of eltrombopag on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia: no evidence of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B.; Linden, Matthew D.; Babula, Bracken; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R.; Tate, Chinara; Mathur, Kanika; Frelinger, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin-receptor agonist, on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are not fully characterized. This study used whole blood flow cytometry to examine platelet function in 20 patients receiving eltrombopag treatment at days 0, 7, and 28. Platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa, P-selectin, and GPIb was measured with and without low and high adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) concentrations. Before eltrombopag treatment with no ex vivo agonist, platelet activation was higher in ITP patients than controls. Platelet GPIb and activated GPIIb/IIIa expression without added agonist was unchanged following eltrombopag treatment, whereas a slight increase in P-selectin was observed. Expression of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa in response to high-dose ADP was lower during eltrombopag treatment than at baseline. Eltrombopag led to a slight increase in platelet reactivity to TRAP only in responders to eltrombopag but not to levels above those in controls; whole blood experiments demonstrated that this increase was probably because of higher platelet counts rather than higher platelet reactivity. In conclusion, although thrombocytopenic ITP patients have higher baseline platelet activation than controls, eltrombopag did not cause platelet activation or hyper-reactivity, irrespective of whether the platelet count increased. PMID:22294727

  6. The effect of time of day and exercise on platelet functions and platelet-neutrophil aggregates in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Aldemir, Hatice; Kiliç, Nedret

    2005-12-01

    Platelet activation state changes by exercise. The effect of exercise time on platelet activation state and formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates are not known yet. In this study the effect of exercise and time of day were examined on platelet activity with platelet-neutrophil aggregates. Ten moderately active males aged 27+/- 1.63 (mean+/-S.D.) years completed sub-maximal (70% VO(2max)) exercise trials for 30 min. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded. Venous blood samples were obtained at rest, immediately post-exercise and after 30 min of recovery. Whole blood was analysed for haematocrit (Hct), haemoglobin (Hb), platelet count (PC), mean platelet count (MPV) and platelet aggregation (PA). Platelet-neutrophil aggregates and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) levels were assayed. Platelet count showed significant increase after morning exercise ((236+/- 32)x10(9) l(-1) versus (202+/- 34)x10(9) l(-1) baseline, p < 0.05). Exercise resulted in significantly lower MPV after the evening exercise (9.16+/- 0.5 fl versus 9.65+/- 0.36 fl, p < 0.05). Platelet aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) decreased after morning exercise and the recovery aggregation levels were significantly different at two different times of the day (68+/- 20% a.m. versus 80+/- 12% p.m., p < 0.05). It was also showed that platelet-neutrophil aggregates increased significantly from baseline after both exercises. Exercise-induced platelet-neutrophil aggregates were higher in the evening (10.7+/- 1.3% p.m. versus 6.4+/- 1.8% a.m., p < 0.0001). It is therefore concluded that besides platelet-platelet aggregation, exercise can cause platelet- neutrophil aggregates. In addition, time of day has an effect on platelet activation related events. Circadian variations of physiological parameters may have an effect on thrombus formation by platelet activation. PMID:16311912

  7. Computerised method for recording platelet density distribution.

    PubMed

    Järemo, P

    1995-05-01

    In the present study a computerized apparatus was employed for scanning light transmission variations along test tubes containing density-separated platelets. The device consists of a stepping motor, a stationary halogen lamp and a photopotentiometer connected to a personal computer. Anticoagulated whole blood was layered on a performed continuous Percoll gradient having a density span from 1090 kg/l (bottom) to 1040 kg/l (top). After centrifugation at 3400g for 1.5 hours, high-density cells (i.e. erythrocytes) pass through to the bottom of the test tube and the lighter platelets remain in the gradient. The test tube is moved by the computer between the halogen lamp and the photopotentiometer. Transmission variations along the gradient were recorded and registered in the computer. Density markers beads were used as an internal standard and platelet peak density was determined. After perforating the test tube the gradient was divided into 45 aliquots. In all fractions determination of platelet counts and mean platelet volume was carried out. In addition, in the aliquots having a platelet count > 20 x 10(12)/l the ratio beta-thromboglobulin per platelet was also determined. The platelet distribution in the gradient was illustrated graphically. A good agreement was found when comparing platelet distributions in the gradients and light transmission variations along the test tubes. PMID:7781754

  8. IgG platelet antibodies in EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia bind to platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb.

    PubMed

    Fiorin, F; Steffan, A; Pradella, P; Bizzaro, N; Potenza, R; De Angelis, V

    1998-08-01

    EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) consists of an inappropriate low platelet count caused by autoantibodies present in the serum samples reacting with platelets only in EDTA-anticoagulated blood. By using immunoprecipitation and Western blot techniques, we studied the immunochemical specificity of platelet agglutinating autoantibodies in the serum samples of 10 patients with PTCP. Furthermore, to evaluate a possible role of PTCP-associated IgG autoantibodies in increased platelet turnover, we assayed the plasma glycocalicin (GC) level and calculated the GC index for every patient. Our results provide direct evidence that an epitope located on platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb is recognized by PTCP-associated IgG antibodies; moreover GC levels in patients with EDTA-dependent PTCP were similar to control levels, thus excluding an increased platelet turnover. We conclude that antiplatelet antibodies directed against platelet cryptantigens are unlikely to have a major role in the increased removal of cells from circulation. PMID:9704616

  9. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  10. The role of anticoagulation in the measurement of platelet volumes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C B; Diaz, D D; Quinn, P G; Lapins, M; Kurtz, S R; Valeri, C R

    1983-09-01

    The effect of anticoagulation on platelet size stability was studied using blood collected in seven different anticoagulants and stored at room temperature for up to eight hours. The mean platelet volume (MPV) value was most stable in blood collected in 15% ACD and ACD/Na2EDTA. In blood collected in Na2EDTA, K3EDTA, or 11.9% ACD, there was an increase in MPV in the first two hours, after which the MPVs remained stable up to eight hours. Sodium citrate and heparin proved unreliable for the measurement of platelet volume. Platelet counts were stable (less than 5% variation) in all anticoagulants except heparin, which had 16% variation for the eight hours of study. Simultaneously, RBC counts and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) measurements were stable in all seven anticoagulants, with sodium citrate producing the most variation. A negative correlation was observed between MCV and pH of the anticoagulated blood. WBC counts showed less than 3% variation in all anticoagulants except sodium citrate and heparin. Separate experiments demonstrated that electrolyte composition, pH, tonicity, and method of calcium chelation all influenced the stability of the MPV. Of the anticoagulants studied, ACD/Na2 EDTA appeared to provide the best conditions of anticoagulation for both routine clinical and research laboratory measurement of the MPV. It inhibited platelet activation but left the platelets in their normal discoid shape. Platelets could be removed from the anticoagulant and studied in functional assays for up to eight hours after blood drawing. Both platelet counts and MPVs remained stable in blood collected in ACD/Na2 EDTA anticoagulant for up to eight hours at room temperature. In 52 volunteers studied, an inverse correlation (r = -0.72, P less than 0.001) was observed between platelet count and MPV, suggesting that the circulating platelet mass may be a more important indicator of platelet homeostasis than either the platelet count or the mean platelet volume alone. PMID

  11. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  12. Detection of microbial contamination in platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Tracy L.; Leparc, German; Huffman, Debra E.; Gennaccaro, Angela L.; Garcia-Lopez, Alicia; Klungness, Greta; Stephans, Christie; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2005-03-01

    In the United States, approximately 100 patients develop fatal sepsis associated with platelet transfusions every year. Current culture methods take 24-48 hours to acquire results, which in turn decrease the shelf life of platelets. Many of the microorganisms that contaminate platelets can replicate easily at room temperature, which is the necessary storage temperature to keep platelets functional. Therefore, there is a need for in-situ quality control assessment of the platelet quality. For this purpose, a real time spectrophotometric technique has been developed. The Spectral Acquisition Processing Detection (SAPD) method, comprised of a UV-vis spectrophotometer and modeling algorithms, is a rapid method that can be performed prior to platelet transfusion to decrease the risk of bacterial infection to patients. The SAPD method has been used to determine changes in cell suspensions, based on size, shape, chemical composition and internal structure. Changes in these cell characteristics can in turn be used to determine microbial contamination, platelet aging and other physiologic changes. Detection limits of this method for platelet suspensions seeded with bacterial contaminants were identified to be less than 100 cfu/ml of sample. Bacterial counts below 1000 cfu/ml are not considered clinically significant. The SAPD method can provide real-time identification of bacterial contamination of platelets affording patients an increased level of safety without causing undue strain on laboratory budgets or personnel while increasing the time frame that platelets can be used by dramatically shortening contaminant detection time.

  13. Do we need time adjusted mean platelet volume measurements?

    PubMed

    Lancé, Marcus D; van Oerle, Rene; Henskens, Yvonne M C; Marcus, Marco A E

    2010-09-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) is associated with various diseases. Several authors reported anticoagulant and time dependency. Therefore, standardized laboratory methods are essential. The aim of this study was to standardize the MPV measurement. Blood was collected in potassium-ethylenediaminetetra-acid (EDTA) and sodium-citrate tubes. First, MPV and platelet count were determined every half hour for 4 hours in 20 healthy volunteers. The same parameters were acquired from a second group of 100 healthy donors. We measured at the point of highest stability determined in the first step and aimed to determine a reference range. Citrate samples revealed significantly smaller MPV (7.0 fL ± 0.69 standard deviation [SD]) than EDTA (8.0 fL ± 0.8 SD). Platelets swell until 120 minutes in EDTA and until 60 minutes in citrate. Mean platelet count changed significantly in citrate. In the second group, no inverse correlation between MPV and platelet count was seen. A reference range was calculated (EDTA, 7.2-10.8 fL; citrate, 6.1-9.5 fL). Platelets stored in citrate are significantly smaller compared to those stored in EDTA. Timing is important when measuring platelet volume. Optimal measuring time should be 120 minutes after venipuncture. For this we depicted a reference range. Platelet count is most stable in EDTA. There was no inverse relation between MPV and platelet count. PMID:20858586

  14. Geometric complexity identifies platelet activation in familial hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Giorgio; Aglianò, Margherita; Volpi, Nila; Stefanutti, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a genetic disease, is associated with a severe incidence of athero-thrombotic events, related, also, to platelet hyperreactivity. A plethora of methods have been proposed to identify those activated circulating platelets, none of these has proved really effective. We need efficient methods to identify the circulating platelet status in order to follow the patients after therapeutic procedures. We propose the use of computerized fractal analysis for an objective characterization of the complexity of circulating platelet shapes observed by means of transmission electron microscopy in order to characterize the in vivo hyperactivated platelets of familial hypercholesterolemic patients, distinguishing them from the in vivo resting platelets of healthy individuals. Platelet boundaries were extracted by means of automatically image analysis. Geometric complexity (fractal dimension, D) by box counting was automatically calculated. The platelet boundary observed by electron microscopy is fractal, the shape of the circulating platelets is more complex in FH (n = 6) than healthy subjects (n = 5, P < 0.01), with 100% correct classification in selected individuals. In vitro activated platelets from healthy subjects show an analogous increase of D. The observed high D in the platelet boundary in FH originates from the in vivo platelet activation. Computerized fractal analysis of platelet shape observed by transmission electron microscopy can provide accurate, quantitative data to study platelet activation in familial hypercholesterolemia and after administration of drugs or other therapeutic procedures. PMID:25877374

  15. Platelets contribute to growth and metastasis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Chhagan; Rastogi, Archana; Shasthry, Saggere Muralikrishna; Bajpai, Meenu; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Kumar, Anupam; Sarin, Shiv K

    2016-09-01

    To determine the association of platelets with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth and its metastasis. We examined platelets, laboratory, and radiological data of consecutive 420 HCC and 1008 cirrhosis cases. Follow-up information of platelet count in cirrhosis to HCC, pre- to post-therapy, and post-therapy to HCC outcome was analyzed. Cytokine profiling was performed in HCC and cirrhosis (n = 10 each). On the basis of imaging, HCC was divided into six subgroups. Cytosmears of HCC were assessed for platelet clustering around tumor cells. An in vitro Matrigel invasion assay was performed on human HCC cell lines using graded concentration of platelets. Baseline platelet numbers and platelet/lymphocyte ratios (PLRs) were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in HCC than cirrhosis. IL-1, IL-6, FGF, G-CSF, thrombopoietin, and VEGF were higher in HCC than cirrhosis. Platelet counts were increased after HCC conversion of cirrhosis (p < 0.001) and decreased (p < 0.001) after therapy. Platelets and PLR in recurrence cases were higher than in responders at baseline. AFP, PIVKAII, platelets, and PLR increase (p < 0.001 each) with advancement in HCC growth. Multivariate analysis showed platelets (p = 0.002), PLR (p = 0.004), and AFP (p < 0.001) associated with distant metastasis. Platelet clustering seen in 75.7% of HCC group 3, 45% in group 2, and 12.5% in group 1 cases (p < 0.001). Invaded cells in Matrigel assay positively correlated with platelet concentration. Platelets can contribute to the development, growth, invasion, and metastasis of HCC. Rising platelet count after HCC therapy is indicative of incomplete response or recurrence. PMID:27457354

  16. Smart fast blood counting of trace volumes of body fluids from various mammalian species using a compact custom-built microscope cytometer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Gao, Tingjuan; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Carrade-Holt, Danielle; Lane, Stephen M.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Dwyre, Denis M.; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Cell counting in human body fluids such as blood, urine, and CSF is a critical step in the diagnostic process for many diseases. Current automated methods for cell counting are based on flow cytometry systems. However, these automated methods are bulky, costly, require significant user expertise, and are not well suited to counting cells in fluids other than blood. Therefore, their use is limited to large central laboratories that process enough volume of blood to recoup the significant capital investment these instruments require. We present in this talk a combination of a (1) low-cost microscope system, (2) simple sample preparation method, and (3) fully automated analysis designed for providing cell counts in blood and body fluids. We show results on both humans and companion and farm animals, showing that accurate red cell, white cell, and platelet counts, as well as hemoglobin concentration, can be accurately obtained in blood, as well as a 3-part white cell differential in human samples. We can also accurately count red and white cells in body fluids with a limit of detection ~3 orders of magnitude smaller than current automated instruments. This method uses less than 1 microliter of blood, and less than 5 microliters of body fluids to make its measurements, making it highly compatible with finger-stick style collections, as well as appropriate for small animals such as laboratory mice where larger volume blood collections are dangerous to the animal's health.

  17. Platelet transfusion prophylaxis for patients with haematological malignancies: where to now?

    PubMed

    Stanworth, S J; Hyde, C; Brunskill, S; Murphy, M F

    2005-12-01

    National guidelines for platelet transfusion in many countries recommend that the general platelet transfusion trigger for prophylaxis is 10x10(9)/l. This annotation reviews the evidence for this threshold level and discusses other current unresolved issues relevant to platelet transfusion practice such as the optimal dose and the clinical benefit of a strategy for the prophylactic use of platelet transfusions when the platelet count falls below a given threshold. PMID:16351634

  18. Thrombospondin 1 expression and angiogenesis in breast carcinoma and their relation with platelet activity

    PubMed Central

    Ersoz, Gulriz; Dilek, Fatma Husniye; Gencer, Ercan; Kosar, Mehmet Nuri; Dilek, Osman Nuri

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates angiogenesis and the expression of thrombospondin 1 in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and their possible relation to platelet counts and platelet activity. The study included 20 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma. Platelet activity was evaluated by determining thromboxane B2 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels by enzyme immunoassay (EIA).Thrombospondin (TSP) 1 and CD34 expression was studied immunohistochemically. Mean platelet count of the patient group was significantly greater than the mean platelet count of the control group (P < 0.05). The platelet counts were positively correlated with tumour size (r=0.609; P < 0.01). Platelet counts were higher in the patients who had grade 3 microvessel density (P < 0.05). The mean basal platelet cGMP level in the patient group was significantly lower than it was in the control group (P < 0.05). Focal TSP immunoreactivity was detectable in 5 (20%) cases in the tumour cells, and in 9 (45%) cases in the stroma. We did not find any correlation between TSP-1 staining and angiogenesis, platelet counts, platelet activity, and the histological prognostic parameters. Our study confirms the essential role of platelets in tumour growth and angiogenesis. Decreased levels of cGMP in the patient group may cause platelet hyperreactivity. Although thrombospondin 1 may be upregulated in malignant breast tissue, this is not sufficient for tumour growth and dissemination according to our results. PMID:19396698

  19. Identification of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline Aparecida; Zulli, Roberto; Soares, Sheila; de Castro, Vagner; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the occurrence and the causes of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients. INTRODUCTION: Platelet refractoriness (unsatisfactory post-transfusion platelet increment) is a severe problem that impairs the treatment of oncohematologic patients and is not routinely investigated in most Brazilian services. METHODS: Forty-four episodes of platelet concentrate transfusion were evaluated in 16 patients according to the following parameters: corrected count increment, clinical conditions and detection of anti-platelet antibodies by the platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) and panel reactive antibodies against human leukocyte antigen class I (PRA-HLA). RESULTS: Of the 16 patients evaluated (median age: 53 years), nine (56%) were women, seven of them with a history of pregnancy. An unsatisfactory increment was observed in 43% of the transfusion events, being more frequent in transfusions of random platelet concentrates (54%). Platelet refractoriness was confirmed in three patients (19%), who presented immunologic and non-immunologic causes. Alloantibodies were identified in eight patients (50%) by the PIFT and in three (19%) by the PRA-HLA. Among alloimmunized patients, nine (64%) had a history of transfusion, and three as a result of pregnancy (43%). Of the former, two were refractory (29%). No significant differences were observed, probably as a result of the small sample size. CONCLUSION: The high rate of unsatisfactory platelet increment, refractoriness and alloimmunization observed support the need to set up protocols for the investigation of this complication in all chronically transfused patients, a fundamental requirement for the guarantee of adequate management. PMID:21437433

  20. Acquired Platelet Dysfunction with Eosinophilia (APDE) Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Diksha D; Nayar, Priyanka S; Manchanda, Rumma V

    2016-06-01

    Acquired platelet dysfunction with eosinophilia (APDE) is a syndrome which has transient state of platelet dysfunction in the presence of marked eosinophilia. This bleeding disorder, otherwise known as "non-thrombocytopenic purpura with eosinophilia", occurs commonly in children from South-East Asia. We report an 11 years old male child, who presented with ecchymotic patches over lower limbs, of recent onset. His hemogram revealed increased eosinophils with a normal platelet count. Coagulation screen revealed normal parameters except increase in bleeding time. Platelet aggregation studies showed normal platelet aggregation with ristocetin, reduced aggregation with ADP and no aggregation was seen with collagen. PMID:27408400

  1. Quality assessment of platelet concentrates prepared by platelet rich plasma-platelet concentrate, buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC) and apheresis-PC methods

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravindra P.; Marwaha, Neelam; Malhotra, Pankaj; Dash, Sumitra

    2009-01-01

    Background: Platelet rich plasma-platelet concentrate (PRP-PC), buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC), and apheresis-PC were prepared and their quality parameters were assessed. Study Design: In this study, the following platelet products were prepared: from random donor platelets (i) platelet rich plasma - platelet concentrate (PRP-PC), and (ii) buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC) and (iii) single donor platelets (apheresis-PC) by different methods. Their quality was assessed using the following parameters: swirling, volume of the platelet concentrate, platelet count, WBC count and pH. Results: A total of 146 platelet concentrates (64 of PRP-PC, 62 of BC-PC and 20 of apheresis-PC) were enrolled in this study. The mean volume of PRP-PC, BC-PC and apheresis-PC was 62.30±22.68 ml, 68.81±22.95 ml and 214.05±9.91 ml and ranged from 22-135 ml, 32-133 ml and 200-251 ml respectively. The mean platelet count of PRP-PC, BC-PC and apheresis-PC was 7.6±2.97 × 1010/unit, 7.3±2.98 × 1010/unit and 4.13±1.32 × 1011/unit and ranged from 3.2 –16.2 × 1010/unit, 0.6-16.4 × 1010/unit and 1.22-8.9 × 1011/unit respectively. The mean WBC count in PRP-PC (n = 10), BC-PC (n = 10) and apheresis-PC (n = 6) units was 4.05±0.48 × 107/unit, 2.08±0.39 × 107/unit and 4.8±0.8 × 106/unit and ranged from 3.4 -4.77 × 107/unit, 1.6-2.7 × 107/unit and 3.2 – 5.2 × 106/unit respectively. A total of 26 units were analyzed for pH changes. Out of these units, 10 each were PRP-PC and BC-PC and 6 units were apheresis-PC. Their mean pH was 6.7±0.26 (mean±SD) and ranged from 6.5 – 7.0 and no difference was observed among all three types of platelet concentrate. Conclusion: PRP-PC and BC-PC units were comparable in terms of swirling, platelet count per unit and pH. As expected, we found WBC contamination to be less in BC-PC than PRP-PC units. Variation in volume was more in BC-PC than PRP-PC units and this suggests that further standardization is required for

  2. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  3. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  4. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  5. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  6. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003669.htm Platelet aggregation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a ...

  7. A microfluidic biochip for complete blood cell counts at the point-of-care

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, U.; Reddy, B.; Damhorst, G.; Sonoiki, O.; Ghonge, T.; Yang, C.; Bashir, R.

    2016-01-01

    Complete blood cell counts (CBCs) are one of the most commonly ordered and informative blood tests in hospitals. The results from a CBC, which typically include white blood cell (WBC) counts with differentials, red blood cell (RBC) counts, platelet counts and hemoglobin measurements, can have implications for the diagnosis and screening of hundreds of diseases and treatments. Bulky and expensive hematology analyzers are currently used as a gold standard for acquiring CBCs. For nearly all CBCs performed today, the patient must travel to either a hospital with a large laboratory or to a centralized lab testing facility. There is a tremendous need for an automated, portable point-of-care blood cell counter that could yield results in a matter of minutes from a drop of blood without any trained professionals to operate the instrument. We have developed microfluidic biochips capable of a partial CBC using only a drop of whole blood. Total leukocyte and their 3-part differential count are obtained from 10 μL of blood after on-chip lysing of the RBCs and counting of the leukocytes electrically using microfabricated platinum electrodes. For RBCs and platelets, 1 μL of whole blood is diluted with PBS on-chip and the cells are counted electrically. The total time for measurement is under 20 minutes. We demonstrate a high correlation of blood cell counts compared to results acquired with a commercial hematology analyzer. This technology could potentially have tremendous applications in hospitals at the bedside, private clinics, retail clinics and the developing world. PMID:26909365

  8. Reticulated platelets: analytical aspects and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Johannes J M L

    2014-08-01

    Reticulated platelets are immature platelets circulating in blood; they reflect the activity of megakaryopoiesis in the bone marrow. Therefore, they can be used as a non-invasive test in patients with thrombocytopenia in various clinical conditions. The preferred method of analysis is by flow cytometry. However, there is an evident lack of analytical standardization, making it difficult to compare results obtained in different laboratories. Currently, two types of hematology analyzers are on the market offering fully automated measurement of reticulated or immature platelets: the high end analyzers manufactured by Sysmex (XE- and XN-series) and Abbott (CELL-DYN Sapphire). Although the methods are essentially different and cannot be used interchangeably, both have been proven to have clinical utility. Reticulated or immature platelet assays are useful for the differential diagnosis of thrombocytopenia and for monitoring bone marrow recovery after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. These assays may aid clinicians in platelet transfusion decisions when recovery from thrombocytopenia is imminent. In addition, preliminary findings indicate that there is a rationale for reticulated or immature platelets for risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes and for monitoring the effect of treatment with antiplatelet drugs in patients with coronary artery diseases. The aim of this paper is to present the present technology available for measuring reticulated platelets as well as an overview of the current status of clinical application. This overview also indicates that more research is needed before reticulated or immature platelet assays can be applied in other clinical conditions than thrombocytopenia and after transplantation. PMID:24807169

  9. Platelets of the Wistar Furth rat have reduced levels of alpha-granule proteins. An animal model resembling gray platelet syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C W; Hutson, N K; Steward, S A; Saito, N; Cramer, E M

    1991-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Furth (WF) strain have hereditary macrothrombocytopenia (large mean platelet volume [MPV] with increased platelet size heterogeneity and reduced platelet count). Ultrastructural studies suggest that this anomaly results from erratic subdivision of megakaryocyte cytoplasm into platelets. In this study, we have examined protein profiles of platelets of WF rats for biochemical abnormalities associated with this anomaly. Marked decreases in protein bands with an Mr of 185, 57, 53, 16, 13, and 8 kd were observed in one-dimensional reduced SDS-PAGE gels in WF platelets compared with platelets of Wistar, Long Evans, and Sprague-Dawley rats. These proteins were released into the supernatant when washed platelets were treated with thrombin suggesting that they were alpha-granule proteins. These abnormalities were not present in offspring of crosses between Wistar Furth and Wistar rats; however, they were present in platelets of offspring with large MPV derived from backcrosses of (WF X Wistar) F1 males to WF females, but not in backcross offspring with normal platelet size. Immunoblotting confirmed decreased levels of thrombospondin, fibrinogen, and platelet factor 4 in WF platelets. Electron microscopic examination revealed that platelet alpha granules were usually smaller in Wistar Furth than in Wistar rats. In addition, immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that the surface connected canalicular system of the large Wistar Furth platelets, contained dense material composed of alpha-granule proteins, not present in Wistar platelets. From these results, we conclude that the Wistar Furth rat platelet phenotype of large mean platelet volume and decreased levels of alpha-granule proteins represents an animal model resembling gray platelet syndrome. The autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance of the large MPV phenotype and platelet alpha-granule protein deficiencies suggests that a component common to both formation of platelet alpha granules, and

  10. Smart and Fast Blood Counting of Trace Volumes of Body Fluids from Various Mammalian Species Using a Compact, Custom-Built Microscope Cytometer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tingjuan; Smith, Zachary J; Lin, Tzu-yin; Carrade Holt, Danielle; Lane, Stephen M; Matthews, Dennis L; Dwyre, Denis M; Hood, James; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    We report an accurate method to count red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells, as well as to determine hemoglobin in the blood of humans, horses, dogs, cats, and cows. Red and white blood cell counts can also be performed on human body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and peritoneal fluid. The approach consists of using a compact, custom-built microscope to record large field-of-view, bright-field, and fluorescence images of samples that are stained with a single dye and using automatic algorithms to count blood cells and detect hemoglobin. The total process takes about 15 min, including 5 min for sample preparation, and 10 min for data collection and analysis. The minimum volume of blood needed for the test is 0.5 μL, which allows for minimally invasive sample collection such as using a finger prick rather than a venous draw. Blood counts were compared to gold-standard automated clinical instruments, with excellent agreement between the two methods as determined by a Bland-Altman analysis. Accuracy of counts on body fluids was consistent with hand counting by a trained clinical lab scientist, where our instrument demonstrated an approximately 100-fold lower limit of detection compared to current automated methods. The combination of a compact, custom-built instrument, simple sample collection and preparation, and automated analysis demonstrates that this approach could benefit global health through use in low-resource settings where central hematology laboratories are not accessible. PMID:26496235

  11. The genetics of normal platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Kunicki, Thomas J; Nugent, Diane J

    2010-10-14

    Genetic and environmental factors contribute to a substantial variation in platelet function seen among normal persons. Candidate gene association studies represent a valiant effort to define the genetic component in an era where genetic tools were limited, but the single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in those studies need to be validated by more objective, comprehensive approaches, such as genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of quantitative functional traits in much larger cohorts of more carefully selected normal subjects. During the past year, platelet count and mean platelet volume, which indirectly affect platelet function, were the subjects of GWAS. The majority of the GWAS signals were located to noncoding regions, a consistent outcome of all GWAS to date, suggesting a major role for mechanisms that alter phenotype at the level of transcription or posttranscriptional modifications. Of 15 quantitative trait loci associated with mean platelet volume and platelet count, one located at 12q24 is also a risk locus for coronary artery disease. In most cases, the effect sizes of individual quantitative trait loci are admittedly small, but the results of these studies have led to new insight into regulators of hematopoiesis and megakaryopoiesis that would otherwise be unapparent and difficult to define. PMID:20610812

  12. Effects of irradiation on platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, G.; Adams, G.A.; Labow, R.S.

    1988-09-01

    Current medical practice involves the irradiation of blood components, including platelet concentrates, before their administration to patients with severe immunosuppression. The authors studied the effect of irradiation on in vitro platelet function and the leaching of plasticizers from the bag, both immediately and after 5 days of storage. The platelet count, white cell count, pH, glucose, lactate, platelet aggregation and release reaction, and serotonin uptake were not altered by the irradiation of random-donor or apheresis units with 2000 rads carried out at 0 and 24 hours and 5 days after collection. The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from the plastic bags followed by the conversion to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was not increased by irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to irradiate platelet concentrates on the day of collection and subsequently store them for at least 5 days while maintaining in vitro function. This procedure could have considerable benefit for blood banks involved in the provision of many platelet products.

  13. Cell counting.

    PubMed

    Phelan, M C; Lawler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents protocols for counting cells using either a hemacytometer or electronically using a Coulter counter. Cell counting with a hemacytometer permits effective discrimination of live from dead cells using trypan blue exclusion. In addition, the procedure is less subject to errors arising from cell clumping or size heterogeneity. Counting cells is more quickly and easily performed using an electronic counter, but live-dead discrimination is unreliable. Cell populations containing large numbers of dead cells and/or cell clumps are difficult to count accurately. In addition, electronic counting requires resetting of the instrument for cell populations of different sizes; heterogeneous populations can give rise to inaccurate counts, and resting and activated cells may require counting at separate settings. In general, electronic cell counting is best performed on fresh peripheral blood cells. PMID:18770655

  14. A more practical therapy for low platelets.

    PubMed

    Torres, G

    1996-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved WinRho as a new treatment for ITP or thrombocytopenic purpura (low blood platelet count) in people with HIV. Current treatment options for ITP include AZT, corticosteroids, immunoglobulin therapy, and splenectomy. Clinical evaluation rates AZT as the best of the options. WinRho treatment will not work on Rh-negative patients or patients with no spleen. The largest WinRho study to date, involving 267 patients, shows a mean platelet increase of 76,000 cells with no adverse effect on CD4 counts or evidence of an acceleration of HIV disease progression. HIV-positive patients had a poorer platelet increase response than HIV-negative patients. PMID:11363379

  15. Geometric complexity is increased in in vitro activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Giorgio

    2015-06-01

    This article investigates the use of computerized fractal analysis for objective characterization of the complexity of platelets in vitro stimulated by low level thrombin (0.02 U mL(-1) ), collected from healthy individuals and observed by means of transmission electron microscopy. Platelet boundaries were extracted by means of automatically image analysis. Local fractal dimension was evaluated by the box-counting technique (measure of geometric complexity of the platelet outline). The results showed that the platelet boundary is fractal when observed by transmission electron microscopy and that, after an in vitro platelet activation test, the shape of platelets present increased geometric complexity in comparison to the no stimulated platelets (P < 0.001), with 100% correct classification. Computerized fractal analysis of platelet shape by transmission electron microscopy can provide accurate, quantitative, data to study platelet activation. The results may play important roles in the evaluation of the platelets status in pathological conditions, like as atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus, where in in vivo activated platelets have been described. PMID:25808036

  16. Enumeration of total aerobic bacteria and Escherichia coli in minced meat and on carcass surface samples with an automated most-probable-number method compared with colony count protocols.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, P; Schopf, E; Smulders, F J M

    2006-10-01

    An automated most-probable-number (MPN) system for the enumeration of total bacterial flora and Escherichia coli was compared with plate count agar and tryptone-bile-glucuronide (TBX) and ColiID (in-house method) agar methodology. The MPN partitioning of sample aliquots was done automatically on a disposable card containing 48 wells of 3 different volumes, i.e., 16 replicates per volume. Bacterial growth was detected by the formation of fluorescent 4-methylumbilliferone. After incubation, the number of fluorescent wells was read with a separate device, and the MPN was calculated automatically. A total of 180 naturally contaminated samples were tested (pig and cattle carcass surfaces, n = 63; frozen minced meat, n = 62; and refrigerated minced meat, n = 55). Plate count agar results and MPN were highly correlated (r = 0.99), with log MPN = -0.25 + 1.05 x log CFU (plate count agar) (n = 163; range, 2.2 to 7.5 log CFU/g or cm2). Only a few discrepancies were recorded. In two samples (1.1%), the differences were > or = 1.0 log; in three samples (1.7%), the differences were > or = 0.5 log. For E. coli, regression analysis was done for all three methods for 80 minced meat samples, which were above the limit of detection (1.0 log CFU/g): log MPN = 0.18 + 0.98 x log CFU (TBX), r = 0.96, and log MPN = -0.02 + 0.99 x log CFU (ColiID), r = 0.99 (range, 1.0 to 4.2 log CFU/g). Four discrepant results were recorded, with differences of > 0.5 but < 1.0 log unit. These results suggest that the automated MPN method described is a suitable and labor-saving alternative to colony count techniques for total bacterial flora and E. coli determination in minced meat or on carcass surfaces. PMID:17066934

  17. Platelet kinetics and scintigraphic imaging in thrombocytopenic malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Karanikas, Georgios; Zedwitz-Liebenstein, Konstantin; Eidherr, Harald; Schuetz, Matthias; Sauerman, Robert; Dudczak, Robert; Winkler, Stefan; Pabinger, Ingrid; Kletter, Kurt

    2004-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common occurrence in acute malaria. It is attributed, among other factors, to excessive splenic platelet pooling and a shortened platelet lifespan. The aim of our study was to evaluate the platelet kinetics and sequestration site by isotopic studies in uncomplicated malaria-induced thrombocytopenia. Seven thrombocytopenic malaria patients (74,000+/-36,000 platelets/ micro l) were included in the study. Autologous (111)In-labeled platelet scintigraphy was performed up to 96 hours (h) post injection (p.i.) to evaluate the platelet sequestration site. Late sequestration for the spleen (S) and the liver (L) was analyzed according to the following activity ratios: S (spleen count on the last day of the platelet lifespan / spleen count at 30 min) and L (liver count on the last day of the platelet lifespan / liver count at 30 min). Additionally, platelet survival studies were performed. A normal late sequestration (S: 0.95+/-0.06 and L: 1.04+/-0.08; normal values, S and L: 1+/-0.2.) was observed in all of our patients. The platelet lifespan was reduced (1 to 4 days; normal range, 7-9 days), recovery was normal (mean, 63+/-6%; normal range, 55-75%), and the turnover rate was enhanced (mean, 95,000+/-80,000/ micro l/day; normal value, 35,000+/-4,500/ micro l/ day). According to the results of scintigraphy, the sequestration site by uncomplicated malaria-induced thrombocytopenia appears to be non-splenic and/or hepatic, yet diffuse. PMID:14983232

  18. Decreased mean platelet volume in panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Göğçegöz Gül, Işıl; Eryılmaz, Gül; Özten, Eylem; Hızlı Sayar, Gökben

    2014-01-01

    Aim The relationship between psychological stress and platelet activation has been widely studied. It is well known that platelets may reflect certain biochemical changes that occur in the brain when different mental conditions occur. Platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is also extensively studied in psychiatry. The mean platelet volume (MPV), the accurate measure of platelet size, has been considered a marker and determinant of platelet function. The aim of the present study was to search for any probable difference in the MPV of subjects with panic disorder (PD). Methods A total of 37 drug-free subjects, aged 18 to 65 years, diagnosed with PD, with or without agoraphobia, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria and 45 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Platelet count and MPV were measured and recorded for each subject. Results There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of female/male ratio, age, or body mass index between the PD group and control group (P=0.91, P=0.82, and P=0.93, respectively). The MPV was found to be significantly lower in the PD group compared with the control group (8.8±0.9 fL vs 9.2±0.8 fL; P=0.02). All the participants had MPV values in the standard range of 6.9–10.8 fL. Conclusion We concluded that abnormalities of the 5-HT1A receptor function in the central nervous system of subjects with a diagnosis of PD are also mirrored in as an alteration in platelet activity. Measurements of platelet activity may be used as a tool for neuropsychiatric and psychopharmacological research and for studying how certain mental diseases and medications affect the central nervous system. PMID:25214790

  19. [Indications and surveillance of platelet transfusions in surgery].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C; Bardiaux, L; Couteret, Y; Devillers, M; Leroy, M; Morel, P; Pouthier-Stein, F; Hervé, P

    1995-01-01

    Surgery, after hematology, is the biggest consumer of homologous platelet concentrates. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent or control bleeding associated with deficiencies in platelet number or function. In surgery, general patterns (in function of pre-surgery platelet count) can be adopted in most of the indications for platelets. In emergency situations, and in some particular cases (related to the patient, the type of operation, etc.), the transfusion procedure depends on the team's experience, the results of the available clinical and biological tests, and the drugs. Strict monitoring is required during the transfusion procedure. The efficacy of the transfusion must be controlled 1 h and 24 hours after the transfusion, and a number of factors must be assessed, namely the immunological impact of the transfusion (on red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and the occurrence of infectious diseases transmitted via transfusion. In addition, for a possible future transfusion, a strategy must be proposed. PMID:7767484

  20. Heparin platelet factor 4 antibody positivity in pseudothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Balcik, Ozlem Sahin; Akdeniz, Derya; Cipil, Handan; Uysal, Sema; Isik, Ayse; Kosar, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) is a laboratory event of platelet clustering related to drugs used for anticoagulation. This condition is engendered by autoantibodies against platelets in usually EDTA-anticoagulated blood. Pseudothrombocytopenia has no clinical significance but when evaluated as true thrombocytopenia, this misconception may lead to unnecessary diagnostic procedures. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis (HITT) is a complication of heparin treatment caused by heparin platelet factor 4 (HPF-4) antibodies, leading to platelet activation and hypercoagulability. In our study, 48 patients with PTCP and 36 healthy volunteers were included. Heparin platelet factor 4 antibody positivity was detected in 12 patients from PTCP group; nobody from control group had. Citrated serum samples and peripheral blood smears showed normal platelet count. Of the 4 patients using heparin derivative, 1 (2.1%) had antibody positivity but without any bleeding symptoms. In conclusion, HPF-4 antibody positivity might be a risk factor for PTCP. Clinicians should be aware of this kind of condition. PMID:21593020

  1. Platelet concentration in platelet concentrates and periodontal regeneration-unscrambling the ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Suchetha, A.; Lakshmi, P.; Bhat, Divya; Mundinamane, Darshan B.; Soorya, K. V.; Bharwani, G. Ashit

    2015-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) and Platelet-rich-fibrin (PRF) are extensively used autologous platelet concentrates in periodontal regeneration, and PRF has a better efficacy as compared to PRP. The rationale for this difference has often been attributed to the difference in the structure of the fibrin matrix. However, the effect of concentration of platelets on the regenerative potential of these concentrates is obscure. Aims: The study was conducted to evaluate and compare, clinically and radiographically, the efficacy of PRF and PRP in the treatment of periodontal endosseous defects and to assess the effect of platelet concentration on periodontal regeneration. Materials and Methods: Twenty intrabony defects were selected and divided into two groups randomly by the coin toss method. Group I received PRP and Group II subjects were treated with PRF. The platelet counts in PRP and PRF were analyzed. Clinical and radiological parameters were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 9 months postoperatively. Statistical Analysis: Kruskal–Wallis Chi-square test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, t-test, and Spearman's rank correlation were used for statistical analysis of data. Results: There was statistically significant improvement in all the parameters in the two groups except in relation to gingival recession. There was a statistically significant difference between the platelet count in Group I and Group II (P = 0.002). Conclusion: PRP and PRF appear to have nearly comparable effects in terms of periodontal regeneration. The concentration of platelets appears to play a paradoxical role in regeneration. The regenerative potential of platelets appears to be optimal within a limited range. PMID:26681857

  2. Effect of circulating epinephrine on platelet function and hematocrit.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, S E; Weder, A B; Egan, B; Neubig, R; Zweifler, A J; Julius, S

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effect of raising arterial plasma epinephrine within the lower pathophysiological concentration range on various indicators of blood platelet function and hematocrit. Epinephrine was raised over 60 minutes by a stepwise increasing intravenous infusion in 40 healthy men aged 20 to 40 years. Platelet count increased progressively with increasing arterial epinephrine to a maximal change of 69 +/- 6 x 10(9)/L in EDTA-anticoagulated blood and a maximal change of 42 +/- 6 x 10(9)/L in acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD)-anticoagulated blood, and the weight of circulating platelets increased by 29% (P < .001). Platelet size increased significantly in EDTA and decreased in ACD, and the difference between EDTA and ACD was significant (P < .0001) for both count and size, suggesting that epinephrine not only recruits platelets into the circulation but also induces some microaggregation in vivo or adhesion ex vivo. Aggregation of platelets in vitro induced by epinephrine decreased (P < .003 for delta optical density and P = .038 for maximal optical density) after epinephrine infusion compared with saline but did not change when stimulated with ADP or collagen. These findings suggest a selective downregulation of the epinephrine-activating mechanisms concomitant with a rise in the platelet content of epinephrine by 81% (P < .001) and no change in the platelet sodium-proton membrane exchange. The release of granular content (beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4) to the circulation in response to epinephrine was not significant. Thus, under acute conditions it seems that the platelets may protect themselves against inappropriate overstimulation by epinephrine. The importance of platelet epinephrine uptake is still unknown, but sodium-proton exchange does not seem to be involved in regulating the effects of circulating epinephrine on platelet function. Epinephrine has a pronounced effect on raising hematocrit (maximal change of 1.74 +/- 0.13 x 10(-2), P < .0001

  3. Enhanced platelet reactivity in pediatric depression: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Can, Mehmet M; Guler, Gamze; Guler, Ekrem; Ozveren, Olcay; Turan, Burak; DiNicolantinio, James J; Kipshidze, Nodar; Serebruany, Victor

    2015-10-01

    Depression is associated with poor prognosis for cardiovascular disease (CVD) including mortality. Among multiple mechanisms linking depression and CVD, changes in platelet reactivity are known to be one of the major confounders of such adverse association. However, there are very limited data in children. Thus, we evaluated some conventional hemostatic indices including whole blood platelet aggregation in patients with documented pediatric depression and compared these data with those obtained from healthy children. The pediatric patients fulfilled criteria for major depression with a minimum score of 19 on the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory Scale. Plasma fibrinogen, D-dimer, platelet count, mean platelet volume, and platelet aggregation induced by ADP and collagen were measured in 67 pediatric patients with depression and matched by age and sex with 78 healthy controls. As expected, the depressed children had significantly higher BECK scales (P = 0.001) compared with the normal subjects. Platelet aggregation induced by ADP and collagen (P = 0.0001 for both) was significantly higher in depressed children. BECK scale scores correlated significantly with platelet aggregation induced by ADP (r = 0.3, P = 0.001) and collagen (r = 0.4, P = 0.01). In contrast, platelet counts, fibrinogen, D-dimer, mean platelet volume, and antithrombin-III levels were almost identical between both groups. Children with depression exhibit mostly intact hemostatic parameters, with the exception of significantly higher platelet activity when compared with healthy controls. These data match well with prior evidence from depressed adults supporting the hypothesis that platelets participate in the pathogenesis of depression. However, beyond pure assessment of platelet activity, other elements including serotonin content and cell receptor changes in pediatric depression should be elucidated before randomized trial(s) can be justified. PMID:25688456

  4. Clinical application of radiolabelled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents papers on the clinical applications of radiolabelled platelets. The papers are grouped into six sections on platelet labelling techniques, radiolabelled platelets in cardiology, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy, platelet scintigraphy in stroke patients, platelet scintigraphy in angiology, and platelet scintigraphy in hematology and other clinical applications, including renal transplant rejection.

  5. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Kottke-Marchant K. Platelet disorders. In: Hsi ED, ed. Hematopathology . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 2. Nichols WL. Von Willebrand disease and hemorrhagic abnormalities of platelet ...

  6. Formulation and Storage of Platelet-Rich Plasma Homemade Product

    PubMed Central

    Giraudo, Laurent; Veran, Julie; Magalon, Jeremy; Coudreuse, Jean-Marie; Magalon, Guy; Dubois, Christophe; Serratrice, Nicolas; Dignat-George, Françoise; Sabatier, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous biotherapy based on platelet-healing properties. Here, we developed a simple and reproducible PRP purification protocol based on two successive centrifugations. We evaluated different centrifugation speeds and time-storage durations on the platelet quantity and quality. Sterility and stability of our PRP homemade product were also performed. We prepared PRP from 54 healthy volunteers. We tested activation state, reactivity, and stability of platelets by flow cytometry using basal and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced P-selectin expression markers; growth factor release after platelet activation by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); platelet aggregation capacity by aggregrometry assays; clot formation and retraction by thromboelastography; and platelet morphology by ultrastructural analysis. About 130 and 250 g successive speed centrifugations further concentrated platelets while preserving their bioactivity during 6 h (after that, platelet functions were significantly altered). In these conditions, we obtained a highly concentrated pure PRP product (with a low leukocyte count) suitable to study platelet properties. To avoid the loss of efficacy, we recommend injecting PRP under 3 h after preparation. PMID:23516671

  7. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  8. Platelet dysfunction in vincristine treated patients.

    PubMed

    Steinherz, P G; Miller, D R; Hilgartner, M W; Schmalzer, E A

    1976-03-01

    Recent revival of interest in the use of vincristine (VCR) for the treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura prompted us to evaluate the platelet function of our patients on VCR. Eighteen patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in remission, and nine children with solid tumours were studied on 80 occasions at different time intervals after their last VCR dose. A mildly elevated threshold for epinephrine-induced second phase aggregation and a delay in the onset of collagen-induced aggregation was found in patients with ALL not on VCR. Vincristine induced unobtainable second phase aggregation to epinephrine in 67%, 38%, 30% and to ADP in 53%, 13%, 33% of the patients 1 week, 2-3 weeks and 4 weeks respectively after administration. The thrombocytopathy was relative, not absolute, since collagen induced aggregation at all times. Platelet counts, uptake and release of serotonin, bleeding times, clot retractions and release of platelet factor 3 were normal. Platelet adhesion was abnormal in five of 12 patients tested. In vitro platelets are a hundred-fold less sensitive to VCR than in vivo. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cyclic guanosine monophosphate and dimethylsulfoxide do not protect platelets from VCR. The exact mechanism by which VCR abolishes second phase aggregation in patients is uncertain. Because of VCR's narrow therapeutic index between thrombocytopenia and thrombocythaemia, the use of VCR should be reserved for life-threatening haematologic disorders when treating non-malignant conditions. PMID:175822

  9. Platelet function and activation in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with subclinical chronic valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, Linda J; Hosgood, Giselle L; French, Anne T; Irwin, Peter J; Shiel, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess platelet closure time (CT), mean platelet component (MPC) concentration, and platelet component distribution width (PCDW) in dogs with subclinical chronic valvular heart disease. ANIMALS 89 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) and 39 control dogs (not CKCSs). PROCEDURES Platelet count, MPC concentration, PCDW, and Hct were measured by use of a hematology analyzer, and CT was measured by use of a platelet function analyzer. Murmur grade and echocardiographic variables (mitral valve regurgitant jet size relative to left atrial area, left atrial-to-aortic diameter ratio, and left ventricular internal dimensions) were recorded. Associations between explanatory variables (sex, age, murmur grade, echocardiographic variables, platelet count, and Hct) and outcomes (CT, MPC concentration, and PCDW) were examined by use of multivariate regression models. RESULTS A model with 5 variables best explained variation in CT (R(2), 0.74), with > 60% of the variance of CT explained by mitral valve regurgitant jet size. The model of best fit to explain variation in MPC concentration included only platelet count (R(2), 0.24). The model of best fit to explain variation in PCDW included platelet count and sex (R(2), 0.25). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, a significant effect of mitral valve regurgitant jet size on CT was consistent with platelet dysfunction. However, platelet activation, as assessed on the basis of the MPC concentration and PCDW, was not a feature of subclinical chronic valvular heart disease in CKCSs. PMID:27463549

  10. Platelet antibody in prolonged remission of childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, R.; Kinney, T.R.; Rosse, W.

    1985-11-01

    Evaluations were performed in 20 patients with childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) who remained in remission longer than 12 months. The mean duration of follow-up from diagnosis was 39 months (range 17 to 87 months). Eleven patients (four girls) in group 1 had an acute course of ITP, defined as platelet count greater than 150 X 10(9)/L within 6 months of diagnosis. Nine patients (five girls) in group 2 had a chronic course, defined as platelet count less than 150 X 10(9)/L for greater than or equal to 1 year or requiring splenectomy in an attempt to control hemorrhagic symptoms. Platelet count and serum (indirect) platelet-associated IgG (PAIgG) levels were normal in all 20 patients at follow-up. Both direct and indirect PAIgG levels were measured using a SVI-monoclonal anti-IgG antiglobulin assay. All had normal direct PAIgG levels, except for one patient in group 1 who had a borderline elevated value of 1209 molecules per platelet. These data suggest that the prevalence of elevated platelet antibodies is low during sustained remission without medication in patients with a history of childhood ITP. These data may be relevant for pregnant women with a history of childhood ITP, with regard to the risk of delivering an infant with thrombocytopenia secondary to transplacental passage of maternal platelet antibody.

  11. The Influence of Haemoglobin A1c Levels on Platelet Aggregation and Platelet Turnover in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Treated with Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Neergaard-Petersen, Søs; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Gregersen, Søren; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperglycaemia may attenuate the antiplatelet effect of aspirin and thereby increase the risk of cardiovascular events. We investigated the influence of increased haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels on platelet aggregation and turnover in a large cohort of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) with type 2 diabetes, prediabetes or no diabetes. Methods In this observational study, we included 865 stable CAD patients on 75 mg aspirin as mono-therapy of whom 242 patients had type 2 diabetes and were receiving antidiabetic drugs. Among 623 patients without diabetes, we classified 303 patients with prediabetes (HbA1c ≥5.7–6.4% [39–47 mmol/mol]) naive to antidiabetic drugs. Platelet aggregation was evaluated by the Multiplate Analyzer using arachidonic acid and collagen and by the VerifyNow Aspirin. Platelet turnover was evaluated by immature platelets using flow cytometry and platelet activation by soluble P-selectin. Results CAD patients with type 2 diabetes had higher platelet aggregation (all p-values <0.01), platelet turnover (immature platelet count, p<0.01) and platelet activation (p<0.001) than patients without diabetes. CAD patients with prediabetes had increased platelet aggregation (p = 0.02) and platelet count (p = 0.02) compared with patients without diabetes. Increased levels of HbA1c correlated positively with increased platelet aggregation using arachidonic acid (r = 0.19, p<0.0001), collagen (r = 0.10, p<0.01) and VerifyNow (r = 0.15, p<0.0001), and with platelet count (r = 0.08, p = 0.01), immature platelet count (r = 0.11, p<0.001) and soluble P-selectin (r = 0.15, p<0.0001). These associations were mainly evident in non-diabetic and prediabetic CAD patients. Conclusions CAD patients with prediabetes and diabetes may have attenuated antiplatelet effect of aspirin compared with CAD patients without diabetes. This may be related to increased platelet count in patients with prediabetes. Increased levels of HbA1c correlated positively

  12. Selective platelet deposition during focal cerebral ischemia in the monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, H.; Crowell, R.M.; Jafar, J.J.; Marmo, F.; Gandhi, Y.; Mosher, J.L.; Le Breton, G.C.

    1986-03-01

    Platelet thrombosis in the microcirculation may play a central role in focal cerebral ischemia. The authors investigated platelet deposition after temporary middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in the monkey. Anesthetized monkeys were infused with autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets and /sup 51/Cr-labeled red cells in order to measure platelet deposition independent of hemorrhage. The right MCA was occluded for 6 hrs with a clip via a trans-orbital approach. Following clip removal, reperfusion was carried out for 45 min after which the animal was sacrificed. Brain samples were assayed for platelet deposition in selected areas of the right and left hemispheres (RH, LH). Net platelet deposition was determined from the excess /sup 111/In counts above that contained in blood (as determined by /sup 51/Cr counts). It was found that ischemia resulted in selective platelet deposition in the area of the occluded MCA, i.e. the RH versus the corresponding areas in the LH. Differences between the RH and the LH were found in the (1) caudate nucleus, (2) internal capsule and (3) putamen. The data suggest that focal ischemia is associated with the activation of platelets in the ischemic area.

  13. Platelet antibody in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombocytopenias

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1980-10-01

    Platelet-associated immunoglobulin was measured by the use of fluorescent anti-1gG antibody. The method is simple, rapid, and sensitive and provides a precise quantitive assay of bound (direct) and free (indirect) 1gG with platelet specificity. We have evaluated this test in 30 normal volunteers and in 50 patients with immune and nonimmune, treated and untreated thrombocytopenias. All patients with immune thrombocytopenias (acute and chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus) having platelet counts < 100,000/..mu..l had elevated levels of platelet-bound 1gG and 86% had also positive results in the indirect assay. All patients with nonimmunological thrombocytopenias showed normal results in the direct and indirect assay of platelet-associated immunoglobulin. In patients studied repeatedly during the course of their illness, an inverse relation was found between platelet count and level of platelet-bound 1gG. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus presented clear exceptions to this rule. Investigations of the absorbability of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies showed that this assay can readily differentiate between these two antibody species and can also identify specificities of alloantibodies.

  14. Evaluation of a BED-SIDE platelet function assay: performance and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wei C; Walker, C Ty; Obilby, David; Wash, Mark M; Carville, David G M; Guyer, Kirk E; Bates, Eric R

    2002-01-01

    Platelets have a pivotal role in the initial defense against insult to the vasculature and are also recognized of critical importance in the acute care settings of percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiopulmonary bypass. In these environments both platelet count and function may be markedly compromised. Unfortunately, current assays to evaluate the parameters of platelet count and function are of limited utility for bed-side testing. Moreover, it is suggested that there may be significant inter patient variation in response to antiplatelet therapy that may be exacerbated by other agents (e.g. heparin) that are routinely administered during cardiac intervention. Here we describe a practical, rapid and user-friendly whole blood platelet function assay that has been developed for use in bed-side settings. Platelet agonists were formulated with an anticoagulant and lyophilized in blood collection tubes standardised to receive a l mL fresh whole blood sample. In the presence of an agonist, platelets are activated and interact (aggregate). Using traditional cell counting principles, non-aggregated platelets are counted whereas aggregated platelets are not. The percentage (%) of functional platelets in reference to a baseline tube may then be determined. Results are available within four minutes. Platelet aggregation in whole blood demonstrated good correlation with turbidometric aggregometry for both ADP (r=0.91) and collagen (r=0.88). Moreover, in clinical settings where antiplatelet agents were administered, this rapid, bed-side, platelet function assay demonstrated utility in monitoring patient response to these therapies. This novel bed-side assay of platelet function is extremely suitable for the clinical environment with a rapid turn-around time. In addition, it provides a full haematology profile, including platelet count, and should permit enhancement of transfusion and interventional decisions. PMID:17890800

  15. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  16. Platelets in Lung Biology

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets and the lungs have an intimate relationship. Platelets are anucleate mammalian blood cells that continuously circulate through pulmonary vessels and that have major effector activities in hemostasis and inflammation. The lungs are reservoirs for megakaryocytes, the requisite precursor cell in thrombopoiesis, which is the intricate process by which platelets are generated. Platelets contribute to basal barrier integrity of the alveolar capillaries, which selectively restricts the transfer of water, proteins, and red blood cells out of the vessels. Platelets also contribute to pulmonary vascular repair. Although platelets bolster hemostatic and inflammatory defense of the healthy lung, experimental evidence and clinical evidence indicate that these blood cells are effectors of injury in a variety of pulmonary disorders and syndromes. Newly discovered biological capacities of platelets are being explored in the context of lung defense, disease, and remodeling. PMID:23043249

  17. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  18. Differences in Platelet Function In Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia and Myelodysplasia Compared to Equally Thrombocytopenic Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B.; Frelinger, Andrew L.; Babula, Bracken; Linden, Matthew D.; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R.; Tate, Chinara; Feldman, Eric J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Severe thrombocytopenia is a major risk factor for haemorrhage, and yet platelet function and bleeding risk at low platelet counts are poorly understood because of limitations of platelet function testing at very low platelet counts. Objectives To examine and compare platelet function in severely thrombocytopenic patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplasia (MDS) to patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Methods Whole blood flow cytometric measurement of platelet activation and platelet reactivity to agonists was correlated with the immature platelet fraction (IPF) and bleeding symptoms. Results Compared with patients with ITP, patients with AML/MDS had smaller platelets, lower IPF, and substantially lower platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa and GPIb both with and without addition of ex vivo ADP or TRAP. In both ITP and AML/MDS, increased platelet surface GPIb on circulating platelets and expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa and GPIb on ex vivo activated platelets correlated with a higher IPF. Whereas platelet reactivity was higher for AML/MDS patients with bleeding than those with no bleeding, platelet reactivity was lower for ITP patients with bleeding than those with no bleeding. Conclusions AML/MDS patients have lower in vivo platelet activation and ex vivo platelet reactivity than patients with ITP. The proportion of newly-produced platelets correlates with the expression of platelet surface markers of activation. These differences might contribute to differences in bleeding tendency between AML/MDS and ITP. This study is the first to define differences in platelet function between AML/MDS patients and ITP patients with equivalent degrees of thrombocytopenia. PMID:21920014

  19. Platelet Interaction with Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The interaction of several common strains of bacteria with rabbit or human platelets in vitro has been examined sequentially with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Bacteria were added to platelets in their native plasma or to washed platelets in a balanced salt solution at ratios of about 1:1 or at low bacteria to platelet ratios (down to 1:100). The platelet-bacterial interaction (PBI) was studied with recording nephelometry. Matched samples were fixed for microscopy at various points in the aggregation response. The results support these conclusions: a) Bacteria stimulate platelet aggregation by direct contact and adhesion with the platelet surface. b) Adhesion between the two cell types requires divalent cations, occurs through fusion of normal cell-surface coats and appears identical in the presence or absence of extracellular plasma protein. c) The morphologic transformation of platelets during PBI is identical to that produced by collagen. d) During PBI the bacteria are incorporated into the forming platelet aggregates and reside predominantly intercellularly. e) Phagocytosis of bacteria by a single platelet is very rare. f) Bacteria which have resided within platelet aggregates for one hour are unaltered morphologically. g) PBI occurs even at very low bacterial numbers and produces platelet-bacterial aggregates in small numbers without stimulating generalized platelet aggregation. Methods for concentration of thrombocytopenic plasma and washing human platelets are presented. ImagesFig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 12Fig 13Fig 3Fig 14Fig 4Fig 5 PMID:4632008

  20. A therapeutic-only versus prophylactic platelet transfusion strategy for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Crighton, Gemma L; Wood, Erica M; Stanworth, Simon; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Tinmouth, Alan; Murphy, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether a therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy (platelet transfusions given when patient bleeds) is as effective and safe as a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding usually when the platelet count falls below a given trigger level) in patients with haematological disorders undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. PMID:25722649

  1. Altered arachidonic acid metabolism and platelet size in atopic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Audera, C.; Rocklin, R.; Vaillancourt, R.; Jakubowski, J.A.; Deykin, D.

    1988-03-01

    The release and metabolism of endogenous arachidonic acid (AA) in physiologically activated platelets obtained from 11 atopic patients with allergic rhinitis and/or asthma was compared to that of sex- and age-matched nonatopic controls. Prelabeled (/sup 3/H)AA platelets were stimulated with thrombin or collagen and the amount of free (/sup 3/H)AA and radiolabeled metabolites released were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results obtained indicate that although the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)AA into platelet phospholipids and total release of /sup 3/H-radioactivity upon stimulation were comparable in the two groups, the percentage of /sup 3/H-radioactivity released from platelets as free AA was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in the atopic group. The reduction in free (/sup 3/H)AA was accompanied by an increase (P less than 0.01) in the percentage of /sup 3/H-radioactivity released as cyclooxygenase products in atopic platelets (compared to nonatopic cells) after stimulation with 10 and 25 micrograms/ml collagen. The amount of platelet lipoxygenase product released was comparable between the two groups. Although the blood platelet counts were similar, the mean platelet volume was statistically higher (P less than 0.01) in the atopic group. These results indicate that arachidonic acid metabolism in atopic platelets is altered, the pathophysiological significance of which remains to be clarified.

  2. Agranular platelets as a cardinal feature of ARC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Min; Chang, Hye Kyung; Song, Jae Woo; Koh, Hong; Han, Seok Joo

    2010-05-01

    We aimed to describe abnormal platelet morphology and its clinical significance in infants who were diagnosed with arthrogryposis renal dysfunction and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome. We collected all of the cases of ARC syndrome referred to a single pediatric referral center. In all patients, platelet counts and analysis of platelet morphology were performed with peripheral blood smear specimens. Electron microscopy images were obtained to examine the ultrastructure of the platelets. Over the 12-year period, 12 cases of ARC syndrome were identified. The sex ratio (male:female) was 1:1. The median birth weight was 3.15 kg (range, 2.3 to 3.8 kg). Failure to thrive was observed in all the patients. The major cause of death was recurrent febrile illness and pneumonia. The median age at death was 8.9 months (range, 2.6 to 28.8 kg). Their median body weight at death was 3.1 kg (range, 2.6 to 6.0 kg). Close examination of their peripheral blood smear (n=11) specimens showed large, pale, agranular platelets similar to those seen in gray platelet syndrome. Electron microscopic images of the platelets (n=7) revealed a lack of alpha; granules. Agranular platelets are a common finding in ARC syndrome. Agranular platelets should be considered as a cardinal feature of ARC syndrome and can be useful as a noninvasive diagnostic marker for ARC syndrome. PMID:20224444

  3. Dose of Prophylactic Platelet Transfusions and Prevention of Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Kaufman, Richard M.; Assmann, Susan F.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Gernsheimer, Terry B.; Ness, Paul M.; Brecher, Mark E.; Josephson, Cassandra D.; Konkle, Barbara A.; Woodson, Robert D.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Skerrett, Donna L.; McCrae, Keith R.; Sloan, Steven R.; Uhl, Lynne; George, James N.; Aquino, Victor M.; Manno, Catherine S.; McFarland, Janice G.; Hess, John R.; Leissinger, Cindy; Granger, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We conducted a trial of prophylactic platelet transfusions to evaluate the effect of platelet dose on bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. METHODS We randomly assigned hospitalized patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or chemotherapy for hematologic cancers or solid tumors to receive prophylactic platelet transfusions at a low dose, a medium dose, or a high dose (1.1×1011, 2.2×1011, or 4.4×1011 platelets per square meter of body-surface area, respectively), when morning platelet counts were 10,000 per cubic millimeter or lower. Clinical signs of bleeding were assessed daily. The primary end point was bleeding of grade 2 or higher (as defined on the basis of World Health Organization criteria). RESULTS In the 1272 patients who received at least one platelet transfusion, the primary end point was observed in 71%, 69%, and 70% of the patients in the low-dose group, the medium-dose group, and the high-dose group, respectively (differences were not significant). The incidences of higher grades of bleeding, and other adverse events, were similar among the three groups. The median number of platelets transfused was significantly lower in the low-dose group (9.25×1011) than in the medium-dose group (11.25×1011) or the high-dose group (19.63×1011) (P = 0.002 for low vs. medium, P<0.001 for high vs. low and high vs. medium), but the median number of platelet transfusions given was significantly higher in the low-dose group (five, vs. three in the medium-dose and three in the high-dose group; P<0.001 for low vs. medium and low vs. high). Bleeding occurred on 25% of the study days on which morning platelet counts were 5000 per cubic millimeter or lower, as compared with 17% of study days on which platelet counts were 6000 to 80,000 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Low doses of platelets administered as a prophylactic transfusion led to a decreased number of platelets transfused per patient but an

  4. Platelets and galectins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A major function of platelets is keeping the vascular system intact. Platelet activation at sites of vascular injury leads to the formation of a hemostatic plug. Activation of platelets is therefore crucial for normal hemostasis; however, uncontrolled platelet activation may also lead to the formation of occlusive thrombi that can cause ischemic events. Although they are essential for proper hemostasis, platelet function extends to physiologic processes such as tissue repair, wound remodeling and antimicrobial host defense, or pathologic conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Platelets can be activated by soluble molecules including thrombin, thromboxane A2 (TXA2), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), serotonin or by adhesive extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as von Willebrand factor (vWF) and collagen. Here we describe recent advances in the activation of platelets by non-canonical platelet agonists such as galectins. By acting either in soluble or immobilized form, these glycan-binding proteins trigger all platelet activation responses through modulation of discrete signaling pathways. We also offer new hypotheses and some speculations about the role of platelet-galectin interactions not only in hemostasis and thrombosis but also in inflammation and related diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. PMID:25405160

  5. Automatic Crater Counts on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C.; Brumby, S.; Asphaug, E.; Chamberlain, D.; Engel, T.

    2004-03-01

    We present results of an automated crater counting technique for THEMIS data. Algorithms were developed using GENIE machine learning software. The technique detects craters, generalizes well to new data, and is used to rapidly produce R-plots and statistical data.

  6. Evaluation of reticulated platelets in dogs with breed-related thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Zmigrodzka, M; Guzera, M; Winnicka, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the percentage of reticulated platelets in healthy dogs with breed-related thrombocytopenia. Seventy two dogs, clinically healthy, were enrolled in the study. Blood was collected from the patients and anticoagulated with tripotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (K3-EDTA) and sodium citrate. Platelet count was obtained by an impedance haematology analyser and platelet morphology was evaluated by examination of blood smears. Patients were allocated into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 30 dogs with normal platelet count, whereas group 2 was composed of 42 dogs with thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia was present in both K3-EDTA and citrate blood samples. Patients with thrombocytopenia were divided into two subgroups: the first subgroup included dogs with platelet count in K3-EDTA anticoagulated blood from 100 to 200 x10(9)/L, patients in the second subgroup had a platelet count of less than 100 x10(9)/L. The percentage of young reticulated platelets (RPs) labelled with thiazole orange, and the percentage of platelets coated with platelet surface-associated IgG, were determined in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by a flow cytometer. The mean percentage of RPs in K3-EDTA and citrate PRP was significantly higher in dogs with thrombocytopenia than in dogs with normal platelet count. The mean percentage of RPs was significantly higher in citrate PRP than in K3-EDTA PRP in all groups. The results suggest that idiopathic, asymptomatic thrombocytopenia is not caused by platelet surface-associated IgG. Dogs with breed-related thrombocytopenia have a competent bone marrow. PMID:24724481

  7. Acquired dysfunction due to the circulation of "exhausted" platelets.

    PubMed

    Pareti, F I; Capitanio, A; Mannucci, L; Ponticelli, C; Mannucci, P M

    1980-08-01

    An acquired platelet functional defect was found to be present in eight patients who presented with various clinical conditions--three with renal allograft rejection, three with the hemolytic uremic syndrome or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, one with acute consumption coagulopathy due to an incompatible transfusion and one with systemic lupus erythematosus. They showed defective platelet aggregation and reduced levels of adenine nucleotides and serotonin with abnormal uptake and storage of the amine. The bleeding time was more prolonged than predicted from the platelet count. These abnormalities were strikingly similar to those occurring in patients with congenital storage pool deficiency. The acquired defect is thought to be related to the presence in the circulation of "exhausted" platelets following their in vivo exposure to inducers of the release reaction such as damaged endothelium, thrombin and immune complexes. The bleeding tendency of the underlying diseases might be aggravated by the impairment of platelet function. PMID:7405945

  8. In vivo quantitation of platelet deposition on human peripheral arterial bypass grafts using indium-111-labeled platelets. Effect of dipyridamole and aspirin

    SciTech Connect

    Pumphrey, C.W.; Chesebro, J.H.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Wahner, H.W.; Hollier, L.H.; Pairolero, P.C.; Fuster, V.

    1983-03-01

    Indium-111-labeled autologous platelets, injected 48 hours after operation, were used to evaluate the thrombogenicity of prosthetic material and the effect of platelet inhibitor therapy in vivo. Dacron double-velour (Microvel) aortofemoral artery bifurcation grafts were placed in 16 patients and unilateral polytetrafluoroethylene femoropopliteal grafts were placed in 10 patients. Half the patients in each group received platelet inhibitors before operation (dipyridamole, 100 mg 4 times a day) and after operation (dipyridamole, 75 mg, and acetylsalicylic acid, 325 mg 3 times a day); the rest of the patients served as control subjects. Five-minute scintigrams of the graft region were taken with a gamma camera interfaced with a computer 48, 72, and 96 hours after injection of the labeled platelets. Platelet deposition was estimated from the radioactivities of the grafts and expressed as counts per 100 pixels per microcurie injected. Dipyridamole and aspirin therapy significantly reduced the number of platelets deposited on Dacron grafts and prevented platelet accumulation over 3 days. With the small amount of platelet deposition on polytetrafluoroethylene femoropopliteal artery grafts even in control patients, platelet inhibitor therapy had no demonstrable effect on platelet deposition on these grafts. It is concluded that (1) platelet deposition on vascular grafts in vivo can be quantitated by noninvasive methods, and (2) dipyridamole and aspirin therapy reduced platelet deposition on Dacron aortofemoral artery grafts.

  9. Thrombocytopenia model with minimal manipulation of blood cells allowing whole blood assessment of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann Skipper, Mette; Rubak, Peter; Halfdan Larsen, Ole; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-06-01

    In vitro models of thrombocytopenia are useful research tools. Previously published models have shortcomings altering properties of platelets and other blood components. The aim of the present study was to develop a whole blood method to induce thrombocytopenia with minimal manipulation, and to describe platelet function in induced thrombocytopenia in individuals with healthy platelets. Hirudin anticoagulated blood was obtained from 20 healthy volunteers. One part of the blood was gently centrifuged at 130g for 15 minutes. The platelet-rich plasma was replaced with phosphate-buffered saline to establish thrombocytopenia. Various levels of thrombocytopenia were achieved by combining different volumes of baseline whole blood and thrombocytopenic blood. Platelet counts were measured by flow cytometry (Navios, Beckman Coulter) and routine haematological analyser (Sysmex XE-5000). Platelet function was analysed by impedance aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer, Roche) and by flow cytometry (Navios, Beckman Coulter) using collagen, adenosine diphosphate, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 and ristocetin as agonists. Median baseline platelet count was 227×10(9)/l. The in vitro model yielded median platelet counts at 51×10(9)/l (range 26-93×10(9)/l). We observed minor, yet significant, changes in platelet size and maturity from baseline to modelled thrombocytopenia. In the thrombocytopenic samples, significant and positive linear associations were found between platelet count and platelet aggregation across all agonists (all p-values<0.001). Platelet function assessed by flow cytometry showed minimal alterations in the thrombocytopenic samples. A new whole blood-based model of thrombocytopenia was established and validated. This new model serves as a useful future tool, particularly to explore platelet function in patients with thrombocytopenia. PMID:26555800

  10. Altered platelet indices in dogs with hypothyroidism and cats with hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P; Gompf, R; Schmeitzel, L; Clift, R; Cottrell, M; McDonald, T P

    1993-12-01

    Changes in platelet indices (platelet count and platelet size) and PCV associated with thyroid disease were studied in 7 dogs with hypothyroidism and 21 cats with hyperthyroidism that were admitted to the veterinary teaching hospital. Compared with control (euthyroid) dogs, dogs with hypothyroidism had higher platelet count (P = 0.003), smaller platelet size (P = 0.01), and lower PCV (P = 0.02). Comparison of the group of hyperthyroid cats with a group of similarly aged, clinically normal cats with normal thyroxine values indicated that the group of hyperthyroid cats had significantly (P = 0.03) higher mean platelet size than did control cats, but differences were not found in mean platelet count or PCV. Results of this investigation indicate that the changes in platelet size reported in human beings with thyroid endocrinopathies also are found in animals so-affected. Although the pathogenesis of platelet abnormalities in animals with thyroid derangement is unclear and likely is multifactorial, the observed relation between platelet and erythrocyte production in this group of dogs is consistent with reports of an inverse relation between thrombocytopoiesis and erythropoiesis in iatrogenically hyperthyroid mice and in mice exposed to hypoxia. PMID:8116929

  11. Potential Harm of Prophylactic Platelet Transfusion in Adult Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tau-Hong; Wong, Joshua G. X.; Leo, Yee-Sin; Thein, Tun-Linn; Ng, Ee-Ling; Lee, Linda K.; Lye, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombocytopenia is a hallmark of dengue infection, and bleeding is a dreaded complication of dengue fever. Prophylactic platelet transfusion has been used to prevent bleeding in the management of dengue fever, although the evidence for its benefit is lacking. In adult dengue patients with platelet count <20,000/mm3 without bleeding, we aimed to assess if prophylactic platelet transfusion was effective in reducing clinical bleeding and other outcomes. Method We conducted a retrospective non-randomised observational study of dengue patients with platelet count < 20,000/mm3 without bleeding (except petechiae) admitted to Tan Tock Seng Hospital from January 2005 to December 2008. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes were compared between the non-transfused vs. transfused groups. Outcomes studied were clinical bleeding, platelet increment, hospital length of stay, intensive care unit admission and death. Results Of the 788 patients included, 486 received prophylactic platelet transfusion. There was no significant difference in the presence of clinical bleeding in the two groups (18.2% in non-transfused group vs. 23.5% in transfused group; P = 0.08). Patients in the transfused group took a median of 1 day longer than the non-transfused group to increase their platelet count to 50,000/mm3 or more (3 days vs. 2 days, P <0.0001). The median duration of hospital stay in the non-transfused group was 5 days vs. 6 days in the transfused group (P< 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the proportion requiring ICU admission (non-transfused 0.66% vs. transfused 1.23%, P = 0.44) and death (non-transfused 0% vs. transfused 0.2%, P = 0.43). Conclusion Platelet transfusion in absence of bleeding in adult dengue with platelet count <20,000/mm3 did not reduce bleeding or expedite platelet recovery. There was potential harm by slowing recovery of platelet count to >50,000/mm3 and increasing length of hospitalization. PMID:27015272

  12. An overview of platelet indices for evaluating platelet function in children with scorpion envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Konca, Capan; Tekin, Mehmet; Colak, Pinar; Uckardes, Fatih; Turgut, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between platelet indices and scorpion envenomations (SE). Medical records of 76 children who were hospitalised for scorpion stings in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) between February 2013 and November 2013, and 55 healthy children who were similar to the patient group in terms of age and sex, were analysed retrospectively. The leucocyte (WBC), thrombocyte (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT), platelet distribution width (PDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) values of the 76 children with SE were recorded. These values were compared with the healthy control group. Significantly higher WBC and PDW values were noted in patients with SE in comparison to the controls. Patients with SE had significantly lower mean MPV values compared to the healthy controls (9.03 ± 1.26 compared to 10.43 ± 1.44 fL, respectively; p < 0.001). Although the mean platelet count was slightly elevated in the SE group, no statistically significant difference existed between the two groups (p = 0.097). Furthermore, the mean PCT values in the SE group compared to the control group were slightly decreased, but this decrease was not statistically significant (p = 0.141). A significant inverse correlation existed between the MPV values and the WBC (r = -0.450, p < 0.01) and PLT counts (r = -0.420, p < 0.01). The PLT values were significantly correlated with the PCT values (r = 0.687, p < 0.01). This study demonstrated that SE may lead to several alterations in platelet indices. Significantly lower values of MPV and higher values of PDW were detected in SE patients. However, the increase in the platelet counts and the decrease in the PCT values were not significant. PMID:26417303

  13. An overview of platelet indices for evaluating platelet function in children with scorpion envenomation.

    PubMed

    Konca, Capan; Tekin, Mehmet; Colak, Pinar; Uckardes, Fatih; Turgut, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between platelet indices and scorpion envenomations (SE). Medical records of 76 children who were hospitalised for scorpion stings in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) between February 2013 and November 2013, and 55 healthy children who were similar to the patient group in terms of age and sex, were analysed retrospectively. The leucocyte (WBC), thrombocyte (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT), platelet distribution width (PDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) values of the 76 children with SE were recorded. These values were compared with the healthy control group. Significantly higher WBC and PDW values were noted in patients with SE in comparison to the controls. Patients with SE had significantly lower mean MPV values compared to the healthy controls (9.03 ± 1.26 compared to 10.43 ± 1.44 fL, respectively; p < 0.001). Although the mean platelet count was slightly elevated in the SE group, no statistically significant difference existed between the two groups (p = 0.097). Furthermore, the mean PCT values in the SE group compared to the control group were slightly decreased, but this decrease was not statistically significant (p = 0.141). A significant inverse correlation existed between the MPV values and the WBC (r = -0.450, p < 0.01) and PLT counts (r = -0.420, p < 0.01). The PLT values were significantly correlated with the PCT values (r = 0.687, p < 0.01). This study demonstrated that SE may lead to several alterations in platelet indices. Significantly lower values of MPV and higher values of PDW were detected in SE patients. However, the increase in the platelet counts and the decrease in the PCT values were not significant. PMID:26417303

  14. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  15. Anesthetics and anticoagulants used in the preparation of rat platelet-rich-plasma alter rat platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, S D; Meyers, K M

    1986-04-15

    Aggregation of platelets in heparin- and citrate-anticoagulated platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) from rats anesthetized with methoxyflurane (M), diethyl ether (E), acepromazine/ketamine (A/K), or sodium pentobarbital (P) is described, as are platelet counts. Platelet counts were highest in heparin- or citrate-PRP from E and A/K anesthetized rats. Collagen and arachidonic acid (AA) induced aggregation in heparin-PRP only, and ADP induced greater aggregation in heparin-PRP than in citrate-PRP. Differences between citrate-PRP and heparin-PRP are probably due to citrate inhibition of platelet aggregation, since addition of citrate to heparin-PRP decreased aggregation, while addition of heparin to citrate-PRP did not alter aggregation. Aggregation of hirudin-PRP was slightly less than heparin-PRP. Anesthetics affected rat platelet aggregation: the rank order of the maximal extent of ADP-induced aggregation in citrate-PRP was M greater than E = A/K greater than P, and that for AA and collagen in heparin-PRP was E = A/K greater than M = P. The correlation between the effect of the anesthetics and activation of the sympathoadrenal system is discussed. It appeared that of the commonly used anticoagulants and anesthetics, heparin and methoxyflurane had the least influence on rat platelet aggregation. PMID:3087006

  16. A quantitative method to measure human platelet chemotaxis using indium-111-oxine-labeled gel-filtered platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenhaupt, R.W.; Silberstein, E.B.; Sperling, M.I.; Mayfield, G.

    1982-12-01

    Human blood platelets have been shown to migrate directionally and specifically toward collagen in plasma in vitro. We have developed a new system to monitor this behavior using a linear 7-compartment chamber with /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled gel-filtered platelets. The compartments are separated by various Nuclepore and Millipore filter membranes. Radiolabeled platelets suspended in plasma are placed in the central compartment and the other compartments are filled with platelet-free plasma. When collagen is added to an end compartment, platelets migrate toward that end. The degree of this directed movement or chemotaxis can be measured by counting the radioactivity of the contents of each compartment and then comparing the counts from radiolabeled platelets that have moved to the end that holds the chemotactic inducer with those that have randomly migrated to the opposite end, containing only plasma. This assay system allows quantitative comparisons between the chemotaxis-inducing abilities of different substances and permits the study of soluble materials. Experiments to determine the optimal conditons for the procedure are reported, and the advantages of this new method for the investigation of platelet chemotaxis and the identification of chemotaxins are discussed.

  17. A quantitative method to measure human platelet chemotaxis using /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled gel-filtered platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenhaupt, R.W.; Silberstein, E.B.; Sperling, M.I.; Mayfield, G.

    1982-12-01

    Human blood platelets have been shown to migrate directionally and specifically toward collagen in plasma in vitro. We have developed a new system to monitor this behavior using a linear 7-compartment chamber with /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled gel-filtered platelets. The compartments are separated by various Nuclepore and Millipore filter membranes. Radiolabeled platelets suspended in plasma are placed in the central compartment and the other compartments are filled with platelet-free plasma. When collagen is added to an end compartment, platelets migrate toward that end. The degree of this directed movement or chemotaxis can be measured by counting the radioactivity of the contents of each compartment and then comparing the counts from radiolabeled platelets that have moved to the end that holds the chemotactic inducer with those that have randomly migrated to the opposite end, containing only plasma. This assay system allows quantitative comparisons between the chemotaxis-inducing abilities of different substances and permits the study of soluble materials. Experiments to determine the optimal conditions for the procedure are reported, and the advantages of this new method for the investigation of platelet chemotaxis and the identification of chemotaxins are discussed.

  18. Sources of variability in platelet accumulation on type 1 fibrillar collagen in microfluidic flow assays.

    PubMed

    Neeves, Keith B; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Hansen, Ryan R; Lilly, Jessica J; Venckunaite, Diana; Sumner, Meghan B; Irish, Andrew T; Brodsky, Gary; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Di Paola, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic flow assays (MFA) that measure shear dependent platelet function have potential clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and thrombotic disorders. As a step towards clinical application, the objective of this study was to measure how phenotypic and genetic factors, as well as experimental conditions, affect the variability of platelet accumulation on type 1 collagen within a MFA. Whole blood was perfused over type 1 fibrillar collagen at wall shear rates of 150, 300, 750 and 1500 s⁻¹ through four independent channels with a height of 50 µm and a width of 500 µm. The accumulation of platelets was characterized by the lag time to 1% platelet surface coverage (Lag(T)), the rate of platelet accumulation (V(PLT)), and platelet surface coverage (SC). A cohort of normal donors was tested and the results were correlated to plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels, platelet count, hematocrit, sex, and collagen receptors genotypes. VWF levels were the strongest determinant of platelet accumulation. VWF levels were positively correlated to V(PLT) and SC at all wall shear rates. A longer Lag(T) for platelet accumulation at arterial shear rates compared to venous shear rates was attributed to the time required for plasma proteins to adsorb to collagen. There was no association between platelet accumulation and hematocrit or platelet count. Individuals with the AG genotype of the GP6 gene had lower platelet accumulation than individuals with the AA genotype at 150 s⁻¹ and 300 s⁻¹. Recalcified blood collected into sodium citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) resulted in diminished platelet accumulation compared to CTI alone, suggesting that citrate irreversibly diminishes platelet function. This study the largest association study of MFA in healthy donors (n = 104) and will likely set up the basis for the determination of the normal range of platelet responses in this type of assay. PMID:23355889

  19. Counting Penguins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  20. RBC count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs that can increase the RBC count include: Gentamicin Methyldopa Lower-than-normal numbers of RBCs may be due to: Anemia Bleeding Bone marrow failure (for example, from radiation, toxins, or tumor) Deficiency of a hormone called erythropoietin (caused by ...

  1. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  2. Expression of surface platelet receptors (CD62P and CD41/61) in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO).

    PubMed

    Iwaszko-Simonik, Alicja; Niedzwiedz, Artur; Graczyk, Stanislaw; Slowikowska, Malwina; Pliszczak-Krol, Aleksandra

    2015-03-15

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) is an allergic disease of horses similar to human asthma, which is characterized by airway inflammation and activation of neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets. Platelet activation and an increase in circulating platelet-leukocyte aggregates may lead to airway remodeling. The aim of this study was to investigate platelet status in RAO-affected horses based on the platelet morphology and platelet surface expression of CD41/61 and CD62P. Ten RAO-affected horses and ten healthy horses were included in this study. Blood samples were obtained to determine the platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR). Expression of CD62P and CD41/61 was detected by flow cytometry on activated platelets. The median PLT was significantly reduced in horses with RAO compared to the controls. The MPV and the P-LCR values were significantly higher in RAO horses than controls. Expression of CD41/61 on platelets was increased in RAO horses, while CD62P expression was reduced. This study demonstrated the morphological changes in platelets and expression of platelet surface receptors. Despite the decrease of CD62P expression, the observed increased surface expression of CD41/61 on platelets in horses with RAO may contribute to the formation of platelet aggregates in their respiratory system. PMID:25665521

  3. Decreased platelet function in aortic valve stenosis: high shear platelet activation then inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J. R.; Etherington, M. D.; Brant, J.; Watkins, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To elucidate the mechanism of the bleeding tendency observed in patients with aortic valve stenosis. DESIGN--A prospective study of high and low shear platelet function tests in vitro in normal controls compared with that in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis with a mean (SD) systolic gradient by Doppler of 75 (18) mm Hg before and at least 4 months after aortic valve replacement. SETTING--District general hospital. RESULTS--The patients showed reduced retention in the high shear platelet function tests. (a) Platelet retention in the filter test was 53.6 (12.6)% in patients with aortic valve stenosis and 84.8 (9.6)% in the controls (P < 0.001). (b) Retention in the glass bead column test was 49.8 (19.2) in the patients and 87.4 (8.7) in the controls (P < 0.001). (c) The standard bleeding time was longer in the patients (P < 0.06). Results of the high shear tests (a, b, and c) after aortic valve replacement were within the normal range. The platelet count was low but within the normal range before surgery and increased postoperatively (P < 0.01). There were no differences in the results of standard clotting tests, plasma and intraplatelet von Willebrand's factor, or in 15 platelet aggregation tests using five agonists between patients with aortic valve stenosis and controls. CONCLUSIONS--The high shear haemodynamics of aortic valve stenosis modify platelet function in vivo predisposing to a bleeding tendency. This abnormality of platelet function is detectable only in vitro using high shear tests. The abnormal function is reversed by aortic valve replacement. High shear forces in vitro activate and then inactivate platelets. By the same mechanisms aortic valve stenosis seems to lead to high shear damage in vivo, resulting in a clinically important bleeding tendency in some patients. PMID:8541170

  4. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Sandrock-Lang, Kirstin; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Santoso, Sentot; Zieger, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Inherited platelet disorders may be the cause of bleeding symptoms of varying severity as platelets fail to fulfil their haemostatic role after vessel injury. Platelet disorders may be difficult to diagnose (and are likely to be misdiagnosed) and raise problems in therapy and management. This review explores the clinical and molecular genetic phenotype of several inherited disorders. Inherited platelet disorders can be classified according to their platelet defects: receptor defects (adhesion or aggregation), secretion disorder, and cytoskeleton defects. The best characterized platelet receptor defects are Glanzmann thrombasthenia (integrin αIIbβ3 defect) and Bernard-Soulier syndrome (defect of GPIb/IX/V). Detailed case reports of patients suffering from Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) or Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) showing the bleeding diathesis as well as investigation of platelet aggregation/agglutination and platelet receptor expression will complement this review. In addition, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) as an important defect of δ-granule secretion is extensively described together with a case report of a patient suffering from HPS type 1. PMID:25707719

  5. Platelet Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the clotting process in the body ( in vivo ). A person with normal platelet function test results may still experience excessive bleeding or inappropriate clotting during and after a surgery. Most samples for platelet function testing are only stable for a very short period ...

  6. Platelet Donation (Apheresis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be ideal for a simultaneous platelet and plasma donation. Anyone in need can receive your plasma, it is universal. Only 4% of the U.S. ... can donate up to 24 times per year. Plasma can be collected simultaneously with a platelet donation. ...

  7. [A new separation protocol (DRBCP-F) for automated blood component donation with the MCS 3p cell separator for collection of leukocyte depleted erythrocyte concentrates and plasma].

    PubMed

    Zeiler, T; Kretschmer, V

    1997-01-01

    Previously published studies on automated blood component donation with the MCS 3p cell separator proved fairly good quality of the collected red blood cells (RBC) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP), with the disadvantage of a low hematocrit of the filtered RBC and a high platelet contamination of the FFP (RBCP-F protocol.) The DRBCP-F protocol was designed to eliminate the above-mentioned disadvantages and to provide 1 unit of leuko-depleted (filtered) RBC, 2 units of FFP, and additionally 1 platelet concentrate (PC) from the buffy coat. Twenty automated blood component collections (2 cycles, Latham bowl at 5,500 rpm, 230 ml isotonic saline for volume balance, PAGGS-M as additive solution) were performed. The RBC were filtered in a closed system after storage at 4 degrees C for 24 h. Blood cell counts and biochemical parameters of the RBC were determined initially and after 49 days. PC were separated from buffy coat after a soft spin. The volume of the RBC amounted to 293 +/- 12 ml (mean +/- SD) with a hematocrit of 0.61 +/- 0.05 l/l. Residual leukocytes after filtration were found to be 0.04 x 10(6) +/- 0.06 per unit. After storage, the following data were obtained: hemolysis 0.38%, ATP 2.1 +/- 0.4 mumol/g Hb, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) 1.4 +/- 0.3 mumol/g Hb, ph 6.3 +/- 0.1, potassium 6.4 mmol per unit, and LDH in the supernatant was 219 U/l. None of the RBC showed bacterial growth after 49 days. The volume of the collected FFP was 398 +/- 32 ml, with 3.4 +/- 3.5 x 10(3) residual platelets and 5 +/- 12 leukocytes per microliter. Platelet concentrates contained 90.2 +/- 32 x 10(9) platelets in 88 +/- 14 ml plasma. Automated blood donation with the DRBCP-F protocol provided RBC with very low residual leukocyte counts, adequate hematocrit and good metabolic status up to 49 days, and FFP with low platelet contamination. The platelet concentrates were even superior to those prepared from whole blood using the buffy coat method. The storable leuko-depleted RBC are

  8. Comparison of different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to insertion of central lines in patients with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Desborough, Michael; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to the insertion of a central line in patients with thrombocytopenia (low platelet count). PMID:26814707

  9. Evaluation of store lesion in platelet obtained by apheresis compared to platelet derived from whole blood and its impact on the in vitro functionality.

    PubMed

    Quintero, M; Núñez, M; Mellado, S; Maldonado, M; Wehinger, S

    2015-12-01

    Platelet units for transfusion purposes are obtained manually from whole blood or by apheresis, in an automated process. In both methods, platelets during storage present a characteristics grouped under the name "storage lesion" that are associated with adverse effects on platelet units. Oxidative stress has been claimed to be one of major causes, leading to activation and apoptosis processes affecting their post transfusion functionality. In this work, we observed an association between apheresis and a reduced presence of oxidative stress and better results in functional markers in stored platelets, compared to manually obtained platelets. Then, apheresis which would ensure a greater number of functional platelets during the 5 days of storage, compared to concentrates obtained from whole blood. PMID:26043812

  10. Effect of thrombopoietin receptor agonists on the apoptotic profile of platelets in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, William Beau; Pinheiro, Mariana P; Boulad, Nayla; Kaplan, David; Edison, Michele N; Psaila, Bethan; Karpoff, Marissa; White, Michael J; Josefsson, Emma C; Kile, Benjamin T; Bussel, James B

    2014-12-01

    Platelet survival depends upon mediators of apoptosis e.g., Bcl-xL, Bax, and Bak, which are regulated by thrombopoietin (TPO)-mediated AKT signaling. Thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R) signaling might decrease platelet and/or megakaryocyte apoptosis and increase the platelet count. This study therefore explored anti-apoptotic effects of TPO-R-agonists in vivo on platelets of patients with immune thrombocytopenia. Patients received eltrombopag or romiplostim for two weeks. Total, immature, and large platelet counts were assessed as were Bcl-xL inhibitor assay; Bcl-xL Western blot; and flow cytometric (FACS) analysis of the AKT-signaling pathway. Eight/ten patients had platelet responses to eltrombopag and all three to romiplostim. Platelet sensitivity to apoptosis by Bcl-xL inhibition was greater in pretreatment patients than controls. This sensitivity normalized after one week of therapy, but surprisingly returned to pretreatment levels at week two. FACS analysis revealed increased AKT-pathway signaling after one week, followed by a decrease at week two. Platelet counts correlated with the Bcl-xL /Bak ratio. Platelet survival may be enhanced by TPO-R-agonists as a transient decrease in platelet sensitivity to apoptosis was accompanied by transient activation of AKT. However, this mechanism has only a short-lived effect. Megakaryocytes and platelets already present at the start of TPO-R-agonist treatment appear to respond differently than those generated de novo. PMID:25132654

  11. Platelet Dynamics during Natural and Pharmacologically Induced Torpor and Forced Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    de Vrij, Edwin L.; Vogelaar, Pieter C.; Goris, Maaike; Houwertjes, Martin C.; Herwig, Annika; Dugbartey, George J.; Boerema, Ate S.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Henning, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Hibernation is an energy-conserving behavior in winter characterized by two phases: torpor and arousal. During torpor, markedly reduced metabolic activity results in inactivity and decreased body temperature. Arousal periods intersperse the torpor bouts and feature increased metabolism and euthermic body temperature. Alterations in physiological parameters, such as suppression of hemostasis, are thought to allow hibernators to survive periods of torpor and arousal without organ injury. While the state of torpor is potentially procoagulant, due to low blood flow, increased viscosity, immobility, hypoxia, and low body temperature, organ injury due to thromboembolism is absent. To investigate platelet dynamics during hibernation, we measured platelet count and function during and after natural torpor, pharmacologically induced torpor and forced hypothermia. Splenectomies were performed to unravel potential storage sites of platelets during torpor. Here we show that decreasing body temperature drives thrombocytopenia during torpor in hamster with maintained functionality of circulating platelets. Interestingly, hamster platelets during torpor do not express P-selectin, but expression is induced by treatment with ADP. Platelet count rapidly restores during arousal and rewarming. Platelet dynamics in hibernation are not affected by splenectomy before or during torpor. Reversible thrombocytopenia was also induced by forced hypothermia in both hibernating (hamster) and non-hibernating (rat and mouse) species without changing platelet function. Pharmacological torpor induced by injection of 5′-AMP in mice did not induce thrombocytopenia, possibly because 5′-AMP inhibits platelet function. The rapidness of changes in the numbers of circulating platelets, as well as marginal changes in immature platelet fractions upon arousal, strongly suggest that storage-and-release underlies the reversible thrombocytopenia during natural torpor. Possibly, margination of platelets

  12. Refractory platelet transfusion in a patient with CD36 deficiency due to pseudothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Lin; Shen, Wei-Dong; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Xin-Huan

    2011-01-01

    Type I CD36 deficiency is defined by the absence of CD36 on both platelets and monocytes. Pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) is characterized by a false reduction in the number of platelets in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-anticoagulated blood. Here we report a rare case of concomitant CD36 deficiency and PTCP. The patient was a 7-year-old boy who suffered comminuted fractures of the left humeral condyle. In the pre-operative examination, he was found to have thrombopenia and assumed to have idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. After immunotherapy and platelet transfusion, the platelet count remained low, suggesting that the patient was refractory to platelet transfusion. Serum was collected for the detection of platelet antibodies, and antibodies against CD36 were found. Flow cytometry verified the absence of CD36 on both the platelets and monocytes of this patient. However, the platelet count was normal when capillary blood smears were analysed; in addition, platelet coagulation was noted under the microscope when EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood was used. The patient underwent surgery without platelet transfusion and recovered uneventfully. PMID:21143025

  13. Viability of platelets following storage in the irradiated state. A pair-controlled study

    SciTech Connect

    Read, E.J.; Kodis, C.; Carter, C.S.; Leitman, S.F.

    1988-09-01

    Gamma irradiation of blood products is a standard practice recommended for the prevention of posttransfusion graft-versus-host disease in susceptible hosts. We studied the effects of irradiation on stored platelet concentrates and evaluated whether platelets could be stored for 5 days in the irradiated state without adverse effects on their viability. Using a pair-controlled design in which each of six normal subjects acted as his or her own control, we compared in vitro storage characteristics and in vivo kinetics of platelet concentrates exposed to 30 Gy and stored for 5 days with those of platelet concentrates simply stored for 5 days without irradiation. Irradiation had no significant effects on in vitro storage characteristics (platelet count, mean platelet volume, pH, and white cell count) or on in vivo kinetics, including initial recovery and mean platelet survival. Using the multiple-hit model, initial recovery was 49.6 +/- 10.8 percent, and mean platelet survival was 5.6 +/- 1.05 days for irradiated concentrates, compared with 51.3 +/- 13.0 percent and 5.9 +/- 0.50 days, respectively, for the unirradiated control concentrates. We conclude that irradiation of platelet concentrates with up to 30 Gy has no effect on their in vivo recovery or survival, and that irradiation administered before storage of platelet concentrates does not interfere with their clinical efficacy.

  14. Inherited thrombocytopenia: novel insights into megakaryocyte maturation, proplatelet formation and platelet lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ben; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Morgan, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study of patients with inherited bleeding problems is a powerful approach in determining the function and regulation of important proteins in human platelets and their precursor, the megakaryocyte. The normal range of platelet counts in the bloodstream ranges from 150 000 to 400 000 platelets per microliter and is normally maintained within a narrow range for each individual. This requires a constant balance between thrombopoiesis, which is primarily controlled by the cytokine thrombopoietin (TPO), and platelet senescence and consumption. Thrombocytopenia can be defined as a platelet count of less than 150 000 per microliter and can be acquired or inherited. Heritable forms of thrombocytopenia are caused by mutations in genes involved in megakaryocyte differentiation, platelet production and platelet removal. In this review, we will discuss the main causative genes known for inherited thrombocytopenia and highlight their diverse functions and whether these give clues on the processes of platelet production, platelet function and platelet lifespan. Additionally, we will highlight the recent advances in novel genes identified for inherited thrombocytopenia and their suggested function. PMID:27025194

  15. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  16. Reticulocyte Count Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reticulocyte Count Related tests: Red Blood Cell Count ; Hemoglobin ; Hematocrit ; Complete Blood Count ; Blood Smear ; Erythropoietin ; Vitamin ... on a complete blood count (CBC) , RBC count , hemoglobin or hematocrit , to help determine the cause To ...

  17. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , White ...

  18. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  19. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  20. Platelet dysfunction-eosinophilia syndrome in parasitized Venezuelan children.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette; Sifontes, Luz Núñez; Feijoo, Rosa; Certad, Gabriela; Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Pocaterra, Leonor; Ferrara, Guiseppe; Giménez, Rita; Torres, Obdulita; Goldstein, Carlos; Bosch, Norma

    2005-08-01

    Platelet dysfunction was detected in six children with purpura and eosinophilia. We conducted clinical evaluations, hematologic and platelet function tests, clotting studies (bleeding time, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, factor XIII, factor VIII, and von Willebrand factor), assays for IgG and IgM antibodies to platelets, and a search for stool parasites. Mild bleeding phenomena (ecchymoses, petechiae, epistaxis, and gingival) were transient. All children showed intestinal parasites and marked eosinophilia (mean count = 2,615.2 cells/muL, 95% confidence interval = 1,259.6-5,429.8). Main abnormalities included prolonged bleeding times (50%) and defective aggregation with collagen (100%) adrenaline (66%), or ADP (66%). Antibodies to platelets were not detected. Anti-parasite therapy reversed the hemorrhagic manifestations and normalized eosinophil counts and platelet alterations. No relationship could be established between excess eosinophils, intensity of bleeding, or type and degree of platelet abnormalities. Thrombocytopathic features mimicked the intrinsic defect of storage pool disease. The possible pathogenic roles of eosinophilia and parasitism are reviewed. This is the first report of this pathologic combination in Latin American children. PMID:16103609

  1. Examination of platelet function in whole blood under dynamic flow conditions with the cone and plate(let) analyzer: effect of erythrocytosis and thrombocytosis.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I; Silver, Richard T; Weksler, Babette B; Yin, Wei; Bernhardt, Bernard; Varon, David

    2007-03-01

    We studied cone and plate(let) analysis (CPA) for evaluating global platelet function in whole blood under arterial flow conditions (approximately 1,800 seconds(-1)). CPA allows direct visualization and quantitation of platelet adhesion (surface coverage [SC]) and determination of average aggregate size (AS) following brief shearing of a small blood sample (3.2% sodium citrate) in plastic wells. By using blood from healthy volunteers manipulated to alter platelet or RBC counts and blood from patients with myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), quantitative and qualitative changes in SC and AS were observed. Thrombocytosis resulted in increased SC, whereas erythrocytosis increased AS. The RBC volume (mean corpuscular volume) had no effect. It is interesting that differences in CPA AS were discerned among subgroups of patients with MPD undergoing different treatment regimens. These studies suggest that CPA platelet deposition patterns may provide novel insight into global platelet function during hemodynamic flow. PMID:17276938

  2. A new technique for quantification of platelet thrombosis on bovine pericardial valve prostheses (Ionescu-Shiley) in calves with indium-111 labeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Solis, E.E.; Mackey, S.; Chesebro, J.H.; Didisheim, P.; Edwards, W.D.; Zollman, P.E.; Kaye, M.P.

    1985-05-01

    Platelet thrombosis on components of tissue valve prosthesis explanted from Holstein calves was quantified with In-111-labeled autologous platelets. Twenty-eight calves were implanted with 25 mm bovine pericardial valve prostheses in mitral annulus and killed 1, 14, 30 and 90 days post-implantation. Twenty-four hours before killing 350-450 ..mu..Ci of autologous In-111 platelets were administered intravenously. Components of the explanted valve were imaged with a gamma camera. Mean (+- SD) value of platelet deposition (PlX10/sup 5//mm/sup 2/) on four sections of each leaflet (free edge: FE, central zone: CZ, flexion zone: FZ, attachment zone: AZ) was calculated from platelet count, radioactivity in blood, leaflet sections and area of leaflet sections. With fibrous ingrowth in sewing ring the tissue valve becomes less thrombogenic at 30 days post-implantation; with increase in calcification platelet thrombosis also increases in central zone of leaflet at 30 and 90 days.

  3. Assessment of omega-fatty-acid-supplemented human platelets for potential improvement in long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Chitra; Stewart, Michael W; Cutting, Mary A; Rothwell, Stephen W

    2002-01-15

    Uptake of omega (omega)-3 fatty acids can influence membrane stability and cell mobility. We investigated the effects of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids on the hemostatic efficacy of human platelets using an in vivo rabbit bleeding model. In vitro assays such as platelet aggregation, vWF bead-mediated ATP release and platelet adhesion to beads (measured by the residual platelet count [RPC] [free platelet count after reacting with the beads]/[baseline platelet count]x 100=%RPC; a high %RPC indicates reduced platelet function) were conducted on platelets treated with 1% fish oil (omega-3); 2% fish oil emulsion or 1% soy oil (omega-6). Oil treatment of platelets reduced the vWF bead-induced ATP release insignificantly. Addition of omega-3 agents reduced physical reactivity (%RPC) with the vWF beads by a factor of 1.2 (oil) and 1.9 (emulsion). The omega-6 oil enhanced reactivity by a factor of 1.7. After washing to remove excess reagent, platelet resuspension was most efficient with the omega-3 emulsion. Platelet function was higher with the omega-3-treated platelets (%RPC=52.3%, omega-3 oil; 63.3%, omega-3 emulsion vs. 85%, omega-6 oil; 82% untreated platelets). Ethyl-palmitate-treated thrombocytopenic rabbits were infused with human platelets. Survival times of the treated platelets, as monitored by flow cytometry (6.2-8.2 h) were comparable to untreated platelets (8.6 h). In the rabbit kidney injury model, blood loss after infusion of the treated platelets was similar to that of saline-infused rabbits (75.3+/-3.4 g). However, platelets washed prior to infusion reduced blood loss to a value comparable to that of fresh platelets (48.3+/-5 g). Furthermore, the presence of the infused platelets at the injury site was clearly visualized using FITC-tagged anti CD42a antibody. Thus, the omega-3-based agents protect the platelets from damage during the washing procedure as demonstrated in vitro by improved platelet resuspension, low %RPC, high stimulus-responsive ATP secretion

  4. Platelet kinetics with indium-111 platelets: comparison with chromium-51 platelets.

    PubMed

    Peters, A M; Lavender, J P

    1983-04-01

    The application of 111In-oxine to platelet labeling has contributed to the understanding of platelet kinetics along three lines: 1. It allows the measurement of new parameters of splenic function, such as the intrasplenic platelet transit time, which has shed new light on the physiology of splenic blood cell handling. 2. It facilitates the measurement of platelet life span in conditions, such as ITP, in which 51Cr may undergo undesirable elution from the platelet as a result of platelet-antibody interaction. 3. It allows the determination of the fate of platelets, that is, the site of platelet destruction in conditions in which reduced platelet life span is associated with abnormal platelet consumption, as a result of either premature destruction of "abnormal" platelets by the RE system, or the consumption (or destruction) of normal platelets after their interaction with an abnormal vasculature. Future research using 111In platelets may yield further valuable information on the control as well as the significance of intrasplenic platelet pooling, on the role of platelets in the development of chronic vascular lesions, and on the sites of platelet destruction in ITP. With regard to the latter, methods will have to be developed for harvesting sufficient platelets representative of the total circulating platelet population from severely thrombocytopenic patients for autologous platelet labeling. This would avoid the use of homologous platelets, which is likely to be responsible for some of the contradictory data relating to the use of radiolabeled platelet studies for the prediction of the response of patients with ITP to splenectomy. PMID:6346489

  5. Increased Mean Platelet Volume in Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Icli, Atilla; Aksoy, Fatih; Nar, Gökay; Kaymaz, Haci; Alpay, Mehmet Fatih; Nar, Rukiye; Guclu, Aydın; Arslan, Akif; Dogan, Abdullah

    2016-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder of lipoprotein metabolism and increases the risk of premature cardiovascular diseases. In patients with FH, platelet function may be activated; however, the extent of this activation and its etiology are unclear. We aimed to evaluate the mean platelet volume (MPV), a marker of platelet activation, in patients with FH. The study group consisted of 164 patients with FH and 160 control patients. Controls were matched for age, gender, hypertension, and smoking. The MPV was significantly higher in patients with FH than in controls (9.2 ± 0.4 vs 7.9 ± 0.6 fL, respectively; P < .001). Platelet count was significantly lower among patients with FH when compared to control patients (259 ± 51 vs 272 ± 56 × 10(3)/L, respectively; P = .03). In linear regression analysis, MPV was independently associated only with total cholesterol (β = .6, 95% confidence interval: 0.004-0.008, P < .001). We have shown that MPV was increased in patients with FH and that it was independently associated with total cholesterol level. PMID:25859052

  6. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  7. An atypical IgM class platelet cold agglutinin induces GPVI-dependent aggregation of human platelets.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Guiu, I M; Martínez-Martinez, I; Martínez, C; Navarro-Fernandez, J; García-Candel, F; Ferrer-Marín, F; Vicente, V; Watson, S P; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Lozano, M L; Rivera, J

    2015-08-01

    Platelet cold agglutinins (PCA) cause pseudothrombocytopenia, spurious thrombocytopenia due to ex vivo platelet clumping, complicating clinical diagnosis, but mechanisms and consequences of PCA are not well defined. Here, we characterised an atypical immunoglobulin (Ig)M PCA in a 37-year-old woman with lifelong bleeding and chronic moderate thrombocytopenia, that induces activation and aggregation of autologous or allogeneic platelets via interaction with platelet glycoprotein (GP)VI. Patient temperature-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia was EDTA-independent, but was prevented by integrin αIIbβ3 blockade. Unstimulated patient platelets revealed elevated levels of bound IgM, increased expression of activation markers (P-selectin and CD63), low GPVI levels and abnormally high thromboxane (TX)A2 production. Patient serum induced temperature- and αIIbβ3-dependent decrease of platelet count in allogeneic donor citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP), but not in PRP from Glanzmann's thrombasthenia or afibrinogenaemia patients. In allogeneic platelets, patient plasma induced shape change, P-selectin and CD63 expression, (14)C-serotonin release, and TXA2 production. Activation was not inhibited by aspirin, cangrelor or blocking anti-Fc receptor (FcγRIIA) antibody, but was abrogated by inhibitors of Src and Syk, and by a soluble GPVI-Fc fusion protein. GPVI-deficient platelets were not activated by patient plasma. These data provide the first evidence for an IgM PCA causing platelet activation/aggregation via GPVI. The PCA activity persisted over a five-year follow-up period, supporting a causative role in patient chronic thrombocytopenia and bleeding. PMID:25994029

  8. Nanotechnology: Platelet mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2015-10-01

    Cloaking drug-loaded nanoparticles with platelet membranes enhances the drugs' abilities to target desired cells and tissues. This technology might improve treatments for cardiovascular and infectious diseases. See Letter p.118

  9. Platelet-delivered therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lyde, R; Sabatino, D; Sullivan, S K; Poncz, M

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed that modified platelets could potentially be used to correct intrinsic platelet defects as well as for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to sights of vascular injury. Ectopic expression of proteins within α-granules prior to platelet activation has been achieved for several proteins, including urokinase, factor (F) VIII, and partially for FIX. Potential uses of platelet-directed therapeutics will be discussed, focusing on targeted delivery of urokinase as a thromboprophylactic agent and FVIII for the treatment of hemophilia A patients with intractable inhibitors. This presentation will discuss new strategies that may be useful in the care of patients with vascular injury as well as remaining challenges and limitations of these approaches. PMID:26149015

  10. Analysis of 15 cases with platelet EDTA-dependent antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zupańska, B; Maślanka, K

    1995-01-01

    In 15 patients with thrombocytopenia EDTA-dependent platelet antibodies (IgM agglutinins active in 20 degrees C) were detected. These antibodies were found in patients with autoimmune diseases, infections and neoplasma as well as in healthy persons (including pregnant woman). In 10 persons pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) was diagnosed since the low platelet counts were found only in EDTA-blood, and the patients did not have bleeding symptoms. In 5 other cases EDTA-dependent antibodies were not the only cause of thrombocytopenia since the low platelet counts were also observed in the citrate-blood and occassionally the bleeding symptoms occurred; in 3 of them in addition autoantibodies were suspected. Due to the proper diagnosis of PTCP, in five patients unnecessary corticotherapy was discontinued, one person avoided splenectomy, in two patients previously postponed surgery was performed and one person could be passed for employment. PMID:8571737

  11. Impaired platelet activation and cAMP homeostasis in MRP4-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Decouture, Benoit; Dreano, Elise; Belleville-Rolland, Tiphaine; Kuci, Orjeta; Dizier, Blandine; Bazaa, Amine; Coqueran, Bérard; Lompre, Anne-Marie; Denis, Cécile V.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Gaussem, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Molecules that reduce the level of cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) in the platelet cytosol, such as adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) secreted from dense granules, trigger platelet activation. Therefore, any change in the distribution and/or availability of cyclic nucleotides or ADP may interfere with platelet reactivity. In this study, we evaluated the role of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4, or ABCC4), a nucleotide transporter, in platelet functions in vivo and in vitro by investigating MRP4-deficient mice. MRP4 deletion resulted in a slight increase in platelet count but had no impact on platelet ultrastructure. In MRP4-deficient mice, the arterial occlusion was delayed and the tail bleeding time was prolonged. In a model of platelet depletion and transfusion mimicking a platelet-specific knockout, mice injected with MRP4−/− platelets also showed a significant increase in blood loss compared with mice injected with wild-type platelets. Defective thrombus formation and platelet activation were confirmed in vitro by studying platelet adhesion to collagen in flow conditions, integrin αIIbβ3 activation, washed platelet secretion, and aggregation induced by low concentrations of proteinase-activated receptor 4–activating peptide, U46619, or ADP. We found no role of MRP4 in ADP dense-granule storage, but MRP4 redistributed cAMP from the cytosol to dense granules, as confirmed by increased vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation in MRP4-deficient platelets. These data suggest that MRP4 promotes platelet aggregation by modulating the cAMP–protein kinase A signaling pathway, suggesting that MRP4 might serve as a target for novel antiplatelet agents. PMID:26316625

  12. Platelets and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Simeone, Paola; Liani, Rossella; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Platelet activation plays a key role in atherothrombosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and increased in vivo platelet activation with enhanced thromboxane (TX) biosynthesis has been reported in patients with impairment of glucose metabolism even in the earlier stages of disease and in the preclinical phases. In this regards, platelets appear as addresses and players carrying and transducing metabolic derangement into vascular injury. The present review critically addresses key pathophysiological aspects including (i) hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and insulin resistance as determinants and predictors of platelet activation, (ii) inflammatory mediators derived from platelets, such as soluble CD40 ligand, soluble CD36, Dickkopf-1 and probably soluble receptor for advanced glycation-end-products (sRAGE), which expand the functional repertoire of platelets from players of hemostasis and thrombosis to powerful amplifiers of inflammation by promoting the release of cytokines and chemokines, cell activation, and cell-cell interactions; (iii) molecular mechanisms underpinning the less-than-expected antithrombotic protection by aspirin (ASA), despite regular antiplatelet prophylaxis at the standard dosing regimen, and (iv) stratification of patients deserving different antiplatelet strategies, based on the metabolic phenotype. Taken together, these pathophysiological aspects may contribute to the development of promising mechanism-based therapeutic strategies to reduce the progression of atherothrombosis in diabetic subjects. PMID:25986598

  13. Platelet activation at the onset of human endotoxemia is undetectable in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Kral, Julia Barbara; Zeitlinger, Markus; Salzmann, Manuel; Jilma, Bernd; Assinger, Alice

    2016-07-01

    Infection induces platelet activation and consumption, which leads to thrombocytopenia, enhances microvascular thrombosis, impairs microcirculation and eventually triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). It is well characterized that endotoxemia results in a pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory state, which favors platelet activation. However the early, direct effects of endotoxemia on platelets have not been investigated so far. Therefore we aimed to determine the early effects of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on platelet function in vivo. In a human endotoxemia model, 15 healthy volunteers were stimulated with LPS (2 ng/kg). Blood was drawn before, 10, 30 and 60 min after LPS challenge and platelet activation analyzed by flow cytometry (GPIIb/IIIa activation, surface CD62P and CD40L, intraplatelet reactive oxygen formation and platelet-leukocyte aggregates) and ELISA (sCD40L, sCD62P and CXCL4). In parallel, blood samples and platelets were spiked with LPS (50 pg/ml) in vitro and monitored over 60 min for the same platelet activation markers. In vitro platelet stimulation with LPS activated platelets independent of the presence of leukocytes and enhanced their adhesion to endothelial cells. In contrast, in vivo no increase in GPIIb/IIIa activation or surface expression of CD62P was observed. However, endotoxemia resulted in a significant drop in platelet count and elevated the plasma CXCL4 levels already 10 min after the LPS challenge. These data indicate that LPS rapidly activates platelets, leading to α-granule release and endothelial adhesion. This might explain the drop in platelet count observed at the onset of endotoxemia. PMID:26764560

  14. Time-Dependent Decay of mRNA and Ribosomal RNA during Platelet Aging and Its Correlation with Translation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Angénieux, Catherine; Maître, Blandine; Eckly, Anita; Lanza, François; Gachet, Christian; de la Salle, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that RNAs are mostly present in the minor population of the youngest platelets, whereas translation in platelets could be biologically important. To attempt to solve this paradox, we studied changes in the RNA content of reticulated platelets, i.e., young cells brightly stained by thiazole orange (TObright), a fluorescent probe for RNAs. We provoked in mice strong thrombocytopenia followed by dramatic thrombocytosis characterized by a short period with a vast majority of reticulated platelets. During thrombocytosis, the TObright platelet count rapidly reached a maximum, after which TOdim platelets accumulated, suggesting that most of the former were converted into the latter within 12 h. Experiments on platelets, freshly isolated or incubated ex vivo at 37°C, indicated that their “RNA content”, here corresponding to the amounts of extracted RNA, and the percentage of TObright platelets were positively correlated. The “RNA Content” normalized to the number of platelets could be 20 to 40 fold higher when 80–90% of the cells were reticulated (20–40 fg/platelet), than when only 5–10% of control cells were TObright (less than 1fg/platelet). TObright platelets, incubated ex vivo at 37°C or transfused into mice, became TOdim within 24 h. Ex vivo at 37°C, platelets lost about half of their ribosomal and beta actin RNAs within 6 hours, and more than 98% of them after 24 hours. Accordingly, fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques confirmed the presence of beta actin mRNAs in most reticulated-enriched platelets, but detected them in only a minor subset of control platelets. In vitro, constitutive translation decreased considerably within less than 6 hours, questioning how protein synthesis in platelets, especially in non-reticulated ones, could have a biological function in vivo. Nevertheless, constitutive transient translation in young platelets under pathological conditions characterized by a dramatic increase in

  15. Effects of different anticoagulants on human platelet size distribution and serotonin (5-HT) induced shape change and uptake kinetics.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, R; Beving, H; Olsson, P

    1985-06-15

    The effect of collecting blood with disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA), citrate (NAC) or acid sodium citrate-dextrose (ACD) as anticoagulants on platelet count and size distribution was investigated. No difference between the three preparations regarding platelet count was found in whole blood. Preparation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) significantly reduced the platelet count in NAC-PRP (p less than 0.01) to a value of 288 X 10(9)/l compared to those of 365 X 10(9)/l and 368 X 10(9)/l in EDTA and ACD blood respectively. A significant shift in the platelet size in EDTA-PRP towards larger cell volumes was observed. There were no differences in the size distribution pattern between NAC-PRP and ACD-PRP in spite of the differences in platelet count. Platelet 5-HT uptake kinetics in EDTA-PRP showed a 50 per cent reduction in both Km and Vmax compared to that in ACD-PRP. The study shows that the receptor mediating 5-HT induced shape change has a direct opposite pH dependence than that of the 5-HT carrier. Interference of receptor-mediated responses in 5-HT uptake studies in human platelets is clearly minimized at a lowered pH. The finding is probably of importance in disorders associated with platelet hyperaggregability. PMID:3927509

  16. Immature platelet fraction measured on the Sysmex XN hemocytometer predicts thrombopoietic recovery after autologous stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Noreen; Klinkenberg, Lieke JJ; Meex, Steven JR; Beckers, Erik AM; de Wit, Norbert CJ; Prinzen, Lenneke

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A period of thrombocytopenia is common after stem cell transplantation (SCT). To prevent serious bleeding complications, prophylactic platelet transfusions are administered. Previous studies have shown that a rise in immature platelets precedes recovery of platelet count. Our aim was to define a cutoff value for immature platelets predicting thrombopoietic recovery within 2 d. Methods Hematological parameters were measured on the Sysmex XN hemocytometer. We calculated reference change values (RCV) for platelets in eight healthy individuals as marker for platelet recovery. To define a cutoff value, we performed ROC analysis using data from 16 autologous SCT patients. Results RCV for platelet concentration was 14.1%. Platelet recovery was observed 13 (median; range 9–31) days after SCT. Increase in immature platelet fraction (IPF) before platelet recovery was seen in all autologous SCT patients. Optimal cutoff IPF was found to be 5.3% for platelet recovery within 2 d (specificity 0.98, sensitivity 0.47, positive predictive value 0.93). Conclusions We identified an optimal cutoff value for IPF 5.3% to predict platelet recovery after autologous SCT within 2 d. Implementing this cutoff value in transfusion strategy may reduce the number of prophylactic platelet transfusions. PMID:24660761

  17. Effects of Nd:YAG laser-heated metal cap on human platelets in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Guo, You-chi

    1993-03-01

    Human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was irradiated in vitro with a fiberoptic Nd:YAG laser-heated metal cap to study its effects on platelets. The energy of the laser was 5 and 10 watts with an irradiation time of 0, 3, 6, and 9 seconds and 14 watts with an irradiation time of 0, 3, 4, and 5 seconds, respectively. The irradiated PRPs were analyzed for platelet count, aggregation reaction, thromboxane (TX)B2 measurement and electron microscopy. Various degrees of decrease in platelet count were observed in all groups. Except the 5Wx3S group, the other groups showed an increase in the maximum aggregation rate of platelets, which corresponded to the enhancement of TXB2 formation. It was also demonstrated by a transmission electron microscopy in 10Wx3S, 10Wx6S, 10Wx9S, 14Wx3S, 14Wx4S, and 14Wx5S energy groups that alpha- and dense-particles in irradiated platelets became sparse in number or even disappeared, less electron density, irregularity in size and shape, and a tendency for these particles to cluster around platelet membranes and open canalicular systems, which dilated apparently. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy depicted the appearance of short and thick pseudopods on the surfaces of some irradiated platelets and an increase in the axis rate in most of the irradiated platelets.

  18. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  19. Platelet decline as a predictor of brain injury in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ragin, Ann B.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Reynolds, Sandra; Miller, Eric; Sacktor, Ned; Selnes, Ola A.; Martin, Eileen; Visscher, Barbara R.; Becker, James T.

    2012-01-01

    An association between platelet decline and increased risk of progression to dementia has been observed in an advanced HIV infection cohort study. This investigation evaluated the prognostic significance of platelet decline for dementia, for psychomotor slowing and for brain injury, as quantified in vivo, in a much larger population of HIV+ men. Platelet counts and neurocognitive data were available from biannual visits of 2,125 HIV+ men participating in the prospective, Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) from 1984 to 2009. Brain volumetric data were also available from an imaging substudy of 83 seropositive participants aged 50 and older. The association of platelet counts with neurocognitive outcome was assessed using Cox proportional hazard models where change in platelet count from baseline was a time-updated variable. Marked platelet decline was associated with increased risk of dementia in univariate analysis (HR=2.5, 95%CI=1.8 – 3.5), but not after adjustment for CD4 cell count, HIV viral load, age, study site, hemoglobin, race, education, smoking and alcohol use (HR=1.4, 95%CI=0.78-2.5). Platelet decline did not predict psychomotor slowing in either univariate (HR=0.79, 95%CI=0.58-1.08) or multivariate (HR=1.10, 95%CI=0.73-1.67) analyses. Analysis of brain volumetric data, however, indicated a relationship between platelet decline and reduced gray matter volume fraction in univariate (p=0.06) and in multivariate (p<0.05) analyses. Platelet decline was not an independent predictor of dementia or psychomotor slowing, after adjusting for stage of disease. Findings from a structural brain imaging substudy of older participants, however, support a possible relationship between platelet decline and reduced gray matter. PMID:21956288

  20. Baseline platelet indices and bleeding after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Huczek, Zenon; Kochman, Janusz; Kowara, Michal Krzysztof; Wilimski, Radoslaw; Scislo, Piotr; Scibisz, Anna; Rymuza, Bartosz; Andrzejewska, Renata; Stanecka, Paulina; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2015-07-01

    Bleeding complications are frequent and independently predict mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). It has been demonstrated that certain platelet parameters are indicative of platelet reactivity. We sought to determine the possible correlation between simple platelet indices and bleeding complications in patients undergoing TAVI. Platelet indices--platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width and plateletcrit--were measured in 110 consecutive patients on the day preceding TAVI. In-hospital bleeding events after TAVI were assessed according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 classification as any bleeding, major and life-threatening bleeding (MLTB) and need for transfusion. By receiver-operating characteristic analysis, only MPV was able to distinguish between patients with and without any bleeding [area under the curve (AUC) 0.629, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.531-0.719, P = 0.0342], MLTB (AUC 0.730, 95% CI 0.637-0.811, P = 0.0004) and need for transfusion (AUC 0.660, 95% CI 0.563-0.747, P = 0.0045). By multivariate logistic regression, high MPV (>10.6) and low platelet distribution width (<14.8) were associated with increased risk of any bleeding [odds ratio (OR) 4.08, 95% CI 1.66-10.07, P = 0.0022; and OR 3.82, 95% CI 1.41-10.36, P = 0.0084, respectively] and MLTB (OR 10.76, 95% CI 3.05-38, P = 0.0002; and OR 8.46, 95% CI 1.69-42.17, P = 0.0092, respectively). Additionally, high MPV independently correlated with the need for transfusion (OR 4.11, 95% CI 1.71-9.86, P = 0.0016). Larger and less heterogenic platelets may be associated with increased risk of short-term bleeding complications after TAVI. PMID:25811449

  1. Successful treatment of ibrutinib-associated central nervous system hemorrhage with platelet transfusion support.

    PubMed

    Seiter, Karen; Stiefel, Michael F; Barrientos, Jacqueline; Shaikh, Azfar; Ahmed, Nasir; Baskind, Paul; Liu, Delong

    2016-01-01

    Ibrutinib is a novel targeted therapy for B-cell malignancies. Hemorrhagic events were reported in the original trials, however the mechanism of bleeding is just being elucidated. Recent studies have demonstrated platelet dysfunction as a mechanism of bleeding. Currently we report two patients who developed life-threatening central nervous system hemorrhage while receiving ibrutinib for chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma, respectively. Both patients improved rapidly after platelet transfusions even though their platelet counts were normal or only mildly reduced at the time of hemorrhage. We suggest that platelet transfusions can ameliorate the platelet dysfunction defect of ibrutinib and can support the patient through the critical period until new platelet production occurs. PMID:27583253

  2. Successful treatment of ibrutinib-associated central nervous system hemorrhage with platelet transfusion support

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Michael F.; Barrientos, Jacqueline; Shaikh, Azfar; Ahmed, Nasir; Baskind, Paul; Liu, Delong

    2016-01-01

    Ibrutinib is a novel targeted therapy for B-cell malignancies. Hemorrhagic events were reported in the original trials, however the mechanism of bleeding is just being elucidated. Recent studies have demonstrated platelet dysfunction as a mechanism of bleeding. Currently we report two patients who developed life-threatening central nervous system hemorrhage while receiving ibrutinib for chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma, respectively. Both patients improved rapidly after platelet transfusions even though their platelet counts were normal or only mildly reduced at the time of hemorrhage. We suggest that platelet transfusions can ameliorate the platelet dysfunction defect of ibrutinib and can support the patient through the critical period until new platelet production occurs. PMID:27583253

  3. [Effects of lysine clonixinate on platelet function. Comparison with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents].

    PubMed

    Kramer, E H; Sassetti, B; Kaminker, A J; De Los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Di Girolamo, G

    2001-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of action of non steroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) consists of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. This explains many of the pharmacological effects and adverse events observed in medical practice. Administration of NSAIDs to patients with hemostatic disorders or perioperative conditions entails the risk of bleeding due to inhibition of platelet function. This study deals with platelet changes induced by lysine clonixinate vs diclofenac, ibuprofen and aspirin in classical tests such as platelet count, platelet factor 3 (PF3) activity and platelet aggregation with various inductors and more recent procedures such as P-selectin measurement by flow cytometry. Unlike control drugs, lysine clonixinate did not induce changes in platelet count or function when administered to healthy volunteers at the commonly used therapeutic doses. PMID:11474878

  4. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  5. Concentration of platelets and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma from Goettingen minipigs.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Pascal; Grassmann, Jan-Peter; Thelen, Simon; Wild, Michael; Sager, Martin; Windolf, Joachim; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2014-01-01

    In minipigs little is known about the concentration of growth factors in plasma, despite their major role in several patho-physiological processes such as healing of fractures. This prompted us to study the concentration of platelets and selected growth factors in plasma and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation of sixteen Goettingen minipigs. Platelet concentrations increased significantly in PRP in comparison to native blood plasma. Generally, significant increase in the concentration of all growth factors tested was observed in the PRP in comparison to the corresponding plasma or serum. Five of the plasma samples examined contained detectable levels of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2) whereas eleven of the plasma or serum samples contained minimal amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-bb) respectively. On the other hand variable concentrations of bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) were measured in all plasma samples. In contrast, all PRP samples contained significantly increased amounts of growth factors. The level of BMP-2, BMP-7, TGF-β1, VEGF and PDGF-bb increased by 17.6, 1.5, 7.1, 7.2 and 103.3 fold, in comparison to the corresponding non-enriched preparations. Moreover significant positive correlations were found between platelet count and the concentrations of BMP-2 (r=0.62, p<0.001), TGF-β1 (r=0.85, p<0.001), VEGF (r=0.46, p<0.01) and PDGF-bb (r=0.9, p<0.001). Our results demonstrate that selected growth factors are present in the platelet-rich plasma of minipigs which might thus serve as a source of autologous growth factors. PMID:26504722

  6. Study of Basic Coagulation Parameters among HIV Patients in Correlation to CD4 Counts and ART Status

    PubMed Central

    Manimaran, D; Rachakatla, Praveen; Bharathi, K; Afroz, Tameem; Sagar, Radha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is known to cause coagulation abnormalities by various mechanism, especially during its late course. Aim The objective of this study was to analyse platelet count, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time among HIV infected patients and to analyse these parameters with respect to their CD4 count and ART status. Materials and Methods A case control study was conducted with 120 HIV infected patients and 40 normal individuals. The blood samples were collected after obtaining consent from the subjects. The blood samples were processed for platelet count, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time and CD4 count. The results were tabulated and analysed with statistical package. Results The platelet count was significantly decreased in HIV infected patients compared to controls. Though HIV patients with CD4 count less than 200cells/mm3 showed a decreased platelet count compared to those with CD4 count greater than 200cells/mm3, it was not statistically significant. Prothrombin Time (PT) and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) was significantly prolonged in HIV patients, but only aPTT showed significant inverse correlation with CD4 count. None of the parameters showed statistical significance on comparing HIV patients on ART with those not on ART. Conclusion Basic coagulation tests like platelet count, PT and especially aPTT can be used as prospective screening test to assess severity in HIV patients in resource limited settings where CD4 count is not available. PMID:27437222

  7. Polyphosphate, Platelets, and Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Richard J.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2015-01-01

    While we have understood the basic outline of the enzymes and reactions that make up the traditional blood coagulation cascade for many years, recently our appreciation of the complexity of these interactions has greatly increased. This has resulted in unofficial “revisions” of the coagulation cascade to include new amplification pathways and connections between the standard coagulation cascade enzymes, as well as the identification of extensive connections between the immune system and the coagulation cascade. The discovery that polyphosphate is stored in platelet dense granules and is secreted during platelet activation has resulted in a recent burst of interest in the role of this ancient molecule in human biology. Here we review the increasingly complex role of platelet polyphosphate in hemostasis, thrombosis, and inflammation that has been uncovered in recent years, as well as novel therapeutics centered on modulating polyphosphate’s roles in coagulation and inflammation. PMID:25976958

  8. Multicentre standardisation of a clinical grade procedure for the preparation of allogeneic platelet concentrates from umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Rebulla, Paolo; Pupella, Simonetta; Santodirocco, Michele; Greppi, Noemi; Villanova, Ida; Buzzi, Marina; De Fazio, Nicola; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Background In addition to a largely prevalent use for bleeding prophylaxis, platelet concentrates from adult blood have also been used for many years to prepare platelet gels for the repair of topical skin ulcers. Platelet gel can be obtained by activation of fresh, cryopreserved, autologous or allogeneic platelet concentrates with calcium gluconate, thrombin and/or batroxobin. The high content of tissue regenerative factors in cord blood platelets and the widespread availability of allogeneic cord blood units generously donated for haematopoietic transplant but unsuitable for this use solely because of low haematopoietic stem cell content prompted us to develop a national programme to standardise the production of allogeneic cryopreserved cord blood platelet concentrates (CBPC) suitable for later preparation of clinical-grade cord blood platelet gel. Materials and methods Cord blood units collected at public banks with total nucleated cell counts <1.5×109, platelet count >150×109/L and volume >50 mL, underwent soft centrifugation within 48 hours of collection. Platelet-rich plasma was centrifuged at high speed to obtain a CBPC with target platelet concentration of 800–1,200×109/L, which was cryopreserved, without cryoprotectant, below −40 °C. Results During 14 months, 13 banks produced 1,080 CBPC with mean (± standard deviation) volume of 11.4±4.4 mL and platelet concentration of 1,003±229×109/L. Total platelet count per CBPC was 11.3±4.9×109. Platelet recovery from cord blood was 47.7±17.8%. About one-third of cord blood units donated for haematopoietic transplant could meet the requirements for preparation of CBPC. The cost of preparation was € 160.92/CBPC. About 2 hours were needed for one technician to prepare four CBPC. Discussion This study yielded valuable scientific and operational information regarding the development of clinical trials using allogeneic CBPC. PMID:26509822

  9. Approaches to synthetic platelet analogs.

    PubMed

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Tian, Lewis L; Pan, Victor; McCrae, Keith R; Mitragotri, Samir; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is routinely used for treating bleeding complications in patients with hematologic or oncologic clotting disorders, chemo/radiotherapy-induced myelosuppression, trauma and surgery. Currently, these transfusions mostly use allogeneic platelet concentrates, while products like lyophilized platelets, cold-stored platelets and infusible platelet membranes are under investigation. These natural platelet-based products pose considerable risks of contamination, resulting in short shelf-life (3-5 days). Recent advances in pathogen reduction technologies have increased shelf-life to ~7 days. Furthermore, natural platelets are short in supply and also cause several biological side effects. Hence, there is significant clinical interest in platelet-mimetic synthetic analogs that can allow long storage-life and minimum side effects. Accordingly, several designs have been studied which decorate synthetic particles with motifs that promote platelet-mimetic adhesion or aggregation. Recent refinement in this design involves combining the adhesion and aggregation functionalities on a single particle platform. Further refinement is being focused on constructing particles that also mimic natural platelet's shape, size and elasticity, to influence margination and wall-interaction. The optimum design of a synthetic platelet analog would require efficient integration of platelet's physico-mechanical properties and biological functionalities. We present a comprehensive review of these approaches and provide our opinion regarding the future directions of this research. PMID:23092864

  10. Radioimmunoassay of factor V in human plasma and platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, P.B.; Eide, L.L.; Bowie, E.J.W.; Mann, K.G.

    1982-07-01

    Homogeneous, single-chain human factor V was used to develop a double antibody competition radioimmunoassay to measure factor V concentrations in plasma and platelets. Standard curves were constructed that allow for the detection of as little as 20 ng factor V/ml of plasma. Normal factor V concentrations range from 4 to 14 ..mu..g/ml of plasma with an average value of 7.0 +/- 2.0 ..mu..g/ml (n = 64). No correlation was observed between antigen levels and age or sex. The radioimmunoassay data are consistent with factor V clotting assays, providing freshly drawn plasma is used in the bioassay. Radioimmunoassay of washed platelets indicate that 0.63-1.93 ..mu..g of factor V is present per 2.5 X 10/sup 8/ platelets (6412-14128 molecules of factor V per platelet). When normalized to individual hematocrits and platelet count, the data indicated that platelets contribute approximately 18%-25% of the factor V found in whole blood. In addition, two individuals with functionally deficient factor V were examined and found to be deficient in both antigen and activity.

  11. A radiolabeled antiglobulin test for crossmatching platelet transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Kickler, T.S.; Braine, H.G.; Ness, P.M.; Koester, A.; Bias, W.

    1983-02-01

    Despite the use of HLA-matched platelets for alloimmunized recipients, transfusion failures occur. In order to reduce these failures, researchers investigated the use of a radiolabeled antiglobulin technique for platelet crossmatching. The principle of the test is that of an indirect Coombs test using /sup 125/I labeled goat anti-human IgG. Incompatibility is determined by calculating a radioactivity antiglobulin test (RAGT) index. Using this technique, researchers performed 89 crossmatches on 19 leukemic or aplastic patients who were refractory to random donor platelets and receiving varying degrees of HLA-matched platelets. Effectiveness of the transfusion was assessed from the posttransfusion corrected platelet count increment (CCI) determined at 1 and 20 hr. When the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI at 1 lhr was 17,570 +/- 7003/cu mm, n . 55. When the RAGT index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 4237 +/- 4100/cu mm, n . 34. At 20 hr when the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI was 8722 +/- 3143/cu mm, n . 33, and when the index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 571 +/- 1286/cu mm, n . 23. Using this technique, one false negative resulted. Nine positive crossmatches with good increments at 1 hr were found; at 20 hr, however, the survival of these units was zero. These data suggest that this method is a useful adjunct in the selection of platelets in the refractory patient.

  12. Inherited Platelet Function Disorders: Algorithms for Phenotypic and Genetic Investigation.

    PubMed

    Gresele, Paolo; Bury, Loredana; Falcinelli, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs) manifest with mucocutaneous bleeding and are frequently difficult to diagnose due to their heterogeneity, the complexity of the platelet activation pathways and a lack of standardization of the platelet function laboratory assays and of their use for this purpose. A rational diagnostic approach to IPFDs should follow an algorithm where clinical examination and a stepwise laboratory evaluation play a crucial role. A streamlined panel of laboratory tests, with consecutive steps of increasing level of complexity, allows the phenotypic characterization of most IPFDs. A first-line diagnosis of a significant fraction of the IPFD may be made also at nonspecialized centers by using relatively simple tests, including platelet count, peripheral blood smear, light transmission aggregometry, measurement of platelet granule content and release, and the expression of glycoproteins by flow cytometry. Some of the most complex, second- and third-step tests may be performed only in highly specialized laboratories. Genotyping, including the widespread application of next-generation sequencing, has enabled discovery in the last few years of several novel genes associated with platelet disorders and this method may eventually become a first-line diagnostic approach; however, a preliminary clinical and laboratory phenotypic characterization nowadays still remains crucial for diagnosis of IPFDs. PMID:26962877

  13. Platelet and coagulation factors in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Borsey, D Q; Prowse, C V; Gray, R S; Dawes, J; James, K; Elton, R A; Clarke, B F

    1984-01-01

    Plasma beta-thromboglobulin, platelet factor 4, fibrinogen, fibrinopeptide A, antithrombin III, factor VIII related antigen, alpha 2-macroglobulin, platelet count, and total glycosylated haemoglobin were measured in three well matched groups of subjects: non-diabetic controls, diabetics without retinopathy, and diabetics with proliferative retinopathy. beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 concentrations were significantly higher in the diabetics with retinopathy than in the controls and platelet factor 4 was also increased in the diabetics without retinopathy compared with controls. Fibrinogen concentration was raised in diabetics without retinopathy compared with controls, diabetics with retinopathy compared with controls, and diabetics with retinopathy compared with those without. Fibrinopeptide A concentration did not differ significantly between groups. Antithrombin III levels were increased in diabetics with retinopathy compared with controls, and in diabetics with retinopathy compared with those without. Factor VIII related antigen values were higher in both the diabetic groups when compared with the controls. Fibrinopeptide A concentration correlated with both beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 in each of the three groups. Haemostatic abnormalities in diabetes have been shown, although a hypercoagulable state has not been confirmed. These changes in platelet and coagulation function may be secondary to the development of microvascular disease and their role in the pathogenesis of retinopathy remains uncertain. PMID:6202721

  14. Increased mean platelet volume in patients with panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kokacya, Mehmet Hanifi; Copoglu, Umit Sertan; Kivrak, Yüksel; Ari, Mustafa; Sahpolat, Musa; Ulutas, Kemal Türker

    2015-01-01

    Objective The relationship between platelet activation and psychiatric disorders has been shown in previous work. Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a measure of platelet size and a good indicator of platelet activity, which increases in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It is known that anxiety is a considerable factor in the etiology of mortality in CVDs. The aim of the present study was to investigate any probable difference in the MPV of patients with panic disorder (PD). Methods Sixty-one drug-free patients, aged 18–65 years and diagnosed with PD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, were included in the study, along with 63 healthy age- and sex-matched volunteers. The body mass index (BMI) was calculated and MPV measured for each subject. Results The MPV was found to be higher in the PD group compared to the control group (P=0.004). There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of platelet count or BMI. Conclusion Alterations in platelet activity may be a reflection of abnormal 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 1A receptor function in the central nervous system of subjects with a diagnosis of PD. These findings may elucidate the relationship between CVDs and PD. The findings of the present study suggest that MPV is increased in PD patients. PMID:26508858

  15. Human platelet lysate as a promising growth-stimulating additive for culturing of stem cells and other cell types.

    PubMed

    Shanskii, Ya D; Sergeeva, N S; Sviridova, I K; Kirakozov, M S; Kirsanova, V A; Akhmedova, S A; Antokhin, A I; Chissov, V I

    2013-11-01

    We compared the composition and biological activity of fetal calf serum and platelet lysate from donor platelet concentrate. In platelet lysate, the concentrations of alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine, and mineral metabolism parameters were lower, while parameters of lipid and protein metabolism were higher than in fetal calf serum. The concentrations of growth factors (platelet-derived (AA, AB, BB), vascular endothelial, insulin-like, and transforming growth factor β) in platelet lysate 1.7-148.7-fold surpassed the corresponding parameters in fetal calf serum. After replacement of fetal calf serum with platelet lysate in the culture medium (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%), the count of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on day 7 (in comparison with day 1) increased by 154.8, 206.6, 228.2, 367.7, and 396.5%, respectively. Thus, platelet lysate can be an adequate non-xenogenic alternative for fetal calf serum. PMID:24319712

  16. A Comparison of Automated and Manual Surveys of Small Craters in Elysium Planitia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Brumby, S. P.; Asphaug, E.

    2005-03-01

    In this study we compare automated crater counts against expert manual counts in MOC images of Elysium Planitia. We find that the accuracy of our automated crater counts are comparable to expert manual counts, and are useful in culling large datasets for images that merit expert examination.

  17. Reticulated platelets as a marker of platelet recovery after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Michur, H; Maślanka, K; Szczepiński, A; Mariańska, B

    2008-12-01

    Reticulated platelets (RP) are the youngest forms of platelets in blood and reflect the rate of bone marrow platelet production. In the present study, we used flow cytometric analysis to determine the percentage of RPs in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We investigated 10 patients after transplantation from HLA identical siblings: five with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), four with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and one patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Of the patients examined, four patients underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and six patients underwent peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. It was observed that the initially reduced percentage of RPs (2.9 +/- 1.7%; mean +/- SD) was significantly higher (P = 0.0109) in all patients (13.6 +/- 6.4%) in the following 10-26 days. The RP percentage peak preceded the recovery of peripheral platelet count up to 45.6 x 10(9)/l on average by 3 days. We found no difference in RP% between the AML and CML patients but we did observe that in CML patients the RP percentage increased on average 7 days earlier than in AML patients. The elevated RP percentage reflects increased bone marrow regeneration and can be considered an additional marker of thrombopoietic recovery in the patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:18983304

  18. Effectiveness of Pooled Platelet Transfusion in Concordant and Discordant Groups among Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chowdappa, Vijaya; Masamatti, Smita Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dengue affects more than 50 million people per year and is one of the most common causes of severe thrombocytopaenia. Thrombocytopaenia is a common complication of dengue and other viral fevers apart from malaria, typhoid, leptospirosis, leukaemia and megaloblastic anaemia. A platelet count of <20,000/μl is characteristically seen in dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue fever. It results from immune complex mediated platelet destruction or bone marrow suppression. Severe thrombocytopaenia <10,000/μl is one of the indications for prophylactic platelet transfusion therapy to prevent haemorrhage. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of transfusion of ABO compatible and ABO incompatible pooled platelet units in severe thrombocytopaenia cases. Materials and Methods In this study ABO compatible and incompatible pooled platelet units were transfused to serologically confirmed dengue cases having thrombocytopaenia with or without bleeding manifestations. Each of the adult patients received 4-6 units of pooled platelet concentrates prepared from random donor whole blood suspended in plasma for severe thrombocytopaenia. Pre and post transfusion platelet counts were compared. Children aged less than 12 years, pregnant women and patients with splenomegaly those on ayurvedic and homeopathic therapy, recipients of packed red cells on the same day of platelet transfusion and recipients of multiple platelet transfusions within 24 hours were excluded from the study. Results The median post transfusion platelet increments (PPI) and corrected count increments (CCI) at 4hour post transfusion were 25,000/μL (5,000-80,000/μL) and 18,000/μL (range 8,000/μL- 47,500/μL) respectively among the responders. Median PPI and CCI at 24 hours were 45,000/μL and 28,863/μL among the responders. The median CCI at 4 hour post transfusion among the non-responders was 850/μL and at 24hours was 1,425/μL. At 24 hours responders showed significantly higher PPI as compared to non

  19. Use of platelet transfusions prior to lumbar punctures or epidural anaesthesia for the prevention of complications in people with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Ingram, Callum; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to the insertion of a lumbar puncture or epidural anaesthesia in people with thrombocytopenia (low platelet count). PMID:27057148

  20. Effects of platelet inhibitors on propyl gallate-induced platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hongyan; Kovics, Richard; Jackson, Van; Remick, Daniel G

    2004-04-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) is a platelet agonist characterized by inducing platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activity. The mechanisms of platelet activation following PG stimulation were examined by pre-incubating platelets with well-defined platelet inhibitors using platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, activated plasma clotting time, and annexin V binding by flow cytometry. PG-induced platelet aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple proteins were substantially abolished by aspirin, apyrase, and abciximab (c7E3), suggesting that PG is associated with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase 1, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, respectively. The phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal enzyme pp60(c-src) increased following PG stimulation, but was blunted by pre-incubation of platelets with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3, suggesting that tyrosine kinase is important for the signal transduction of platelet aggregation. Propyl gallate also activates platelet factor 3 by decreasing the platelet coagulation time and increasing platelet annexin V binding. Platelet incubation with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3 did not alter PG-induced platelet coagulation and annexin V binding. The results suggest that platelet factor 3 activation and membrane phosphotidylserine expression were not involved with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. PG is unique in its ability to stimulate platelet aggregation and coagulation simultaneously, and platelet inhibitors in this study affect only platelet aggregation but not platelet coagulation. PMID:15060414

  1. Platelets are dominant contributors to hypercoagulability after injury

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Chin, Theresa L.; Ghasabyan, Arsen; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Wohlauer, Max V.; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.; Sauaia, Angela

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease has a high incidence following trauma, but debate remains regarding optimal prophylaxis. Thrombelastography (TEG) has been suggested to be optimal in guiding prophylaxis. Thus, we designed a phase II randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that TEG-guided prophylaxis with escalating low–molecular weight heparin (LMWH), followed by antiplatelet therapy would reduce VTE incidence. METHODS Surgical intensive care unit trauma patients (n = 50) were randomized to receive 5,000 IU of LMWH daily (control) or to TEG-guided prophylaxis, up to 5,000 IU twice daily with the addition of aspirin, and were followed up for 5 days. In vitro studies were also conducted in which apheresis platelets were added to blood from healthy volunteers (n = 10). RESULTS Control (n = 25) and TEG-guided prophylaxis (n = 25) groups were similar in age, body mass index, Injury Severity Score, and male sex. Fibrinogen levels and platelet counts did not differ, and increased LMWH did not affect clot strength between the control and study groups. The correlation of clot strength (G value) with fibrinogen was stronger on Days 1 and 2 but was superseded by platelet count on Days 3, 4, and 5. There was also a trend in increased platelet contribution to clot strength in patients receiving increased LMWH. In vitro studies demonstrated apheresis platelets significantly increased clot strength (7.19 ± 0.35 to 10.34 ± 0.29), as well as thrombus generation (713.86 ± 12.19 to 814.42 ± 7.97) and fibrin production (274.03 ± 15.82 to 427.95 ± 16.58). CONCLUSION Increased LMWH seemed to increase platelet contribution to clot strength early in the study but failed to affect the overall rise clot strength. Over time, platelet count had the strongest correlation with clot strength, and in vitro studies demonstrated that increased platelet counts increase fibrin production and thrombus generation. In sum, these data suggest an important role for

  2. Association Between High Platelet Indices and Proteinuria in Patients With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Ihsan; Bulut, Mesudiye; Dede, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to determine the association between platelet indices including plateletcrit (PCT), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and proteinuria associated with hypertension (HT) as well as the relative power of each to predict proteinuria. Methods The study included 223 patients (68 men and 155 women) with primary HT. PCT, MPV, PDW, and proteinuria levels were measured. The patients were divided into two groups according to proteinuria status based on 24-hr urinary protein excretion: proteinuria (+) group (15 men and 40 women) and proteinuria (-) group (53 men and 115 women). Results The mean and SD of platelet count, PDW, PCT, and MPV were 278.8±49.6×109/L, 13.5±1.8%, 0.31±0.07%, and 11.3±2.6 fL, respectively. The mean platelet count, PCT, MPV, and PDW were significantly higher in the proteinuria (+) group than in the proteinuria (-) group (P<0.05); there were no significant differences in the other blood parameters between the two groups. The platelet count, PCT, MPV, and PDW were independent risk factors predictive of proteinuria according to a stepwise regression analysis of PDW, PCT, and MPV. PCT was the strongest independent predictor of proteinuria. Conclusions The platelet indices PCT, PDW, and MPV were significantly higher in patients with proteinuria than in those without it. Among these three indices, PCT was the strongest predictor of proteinuria. PMID:26354352

  3. Full blood count and haemozoin-containing leukocytes in children with malaria: diagnostic value and association with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Hänscheid, Thomas; Längin, Matthias; Lell, Bertrand; Pötschke, Marc; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Kremsner, Peter G; Grobusch, Martin P

    2008-01-01

    Background Diligent and correct laboratory diagnosis and up-front identification of risk factors for progression to severe disease are the basis for optimal management of malaria. Methods Febrile children presenting to the Medical Research Unit at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital (HAS) in Lambaréné, Gabon, were assessed for malaria. Giemsa-stained thick films for qualitative and quantitative diagnosis and enumeration of malaria pigment, or haemozoin (Hz)-containing leukocytes (PCL) were performed, and full blood counts (FBC) were generated with a Cell Dyn 3000® instrument. Results Compared to standard light microscopy of Giemsa-stained thick films, diagnosis by platelet count only, by malaria pigment-containing monocytes (PCM) only, or by pigment-containing granulocytes (PCN) only yielded sensitivities/specificities of 92%/93%; 96%/96%; and 85%/96%, respectively. The platelet count was significantly lower in children with malaria compared to those without (p < 0.001), and values showed little overlap between groups. Compared to microscopy, scatter flow cytometry as applied in the Cell-Dyn 3000® instrument detected significantly more patients with PCL (p < 0.01). Both PCM and PCN numbers were higher in severe versus non-severe malaria yet reached statistical significance only for PCN (p < 0.0001; PCM: p = 0.14). Of note was the presence of another, so far ill-defined pigment-containing group of phagocytic cells, identified by laser-flow cytometry as lymphocyte-like gated events, and predominantly found in children with malaria-associated anaemia. Conclusion In the age group examined in the Lambaréné area, platelets are an excellent adjuvant tool to diagnose malaria. Pigment-containing leukocytes (PCL) are more readily detected by automated scatter flow cytometry than by microscopy. Automated Hz detection by an instrument as used here is a reliable diagnostic tool and correlates with disease severity. However, clinical usefulness as a prognostic tool is limited

  4. Complement activation on platelets correlates with a decrease in circulating immature platelets in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B

    2010-02-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacological therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (P < 0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes. PMID:19925495

  5. Complement Activation on Platelets Correlates with a Decrease in Circulating Immature Platelets in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Peerschke, Ellinor I.B.; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 × 109/L) (p = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count less than 100K/μl) (p= 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacologic therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (p <0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes. PMID:19925495

  6. Platelet Apoptosis in Adult Immune Thrombocytopenia: Insights into the Mechanism of Damage Triggered by Auto-Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Goette, Nora P; Glembotsky, Ana C; Lev, Paola R; Grodzielski, Matías; Contrufo, Geraldine; Pierdominici, Marta S; Espasandin, Yesica R; Riveros, Dardo; García, Alejandro J; Molinas, Felisa C; Heller, Paula G; Marta, Rosana F

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms leading to decreased platelet count in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are heterogeneous. This study describes increased platelet apoptosis involving loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), caspase 3 activation (aCasp3) and phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization in a cohort of adult ITP patients. Apoptosis was not related to platelet activation, as PAC-1 binding, P-selectin exposure and GPIb-IX internalization were not increased. Besides, ITP platelets were more sensitive to apoptotic stimulus in terms of aCasp3. Incubation of normal platelets with ITP plasma induced loss of ΔΨm, while PS exposure and aCasp3 remained unaltered. The increase in PS exposure observed in ITP platelets could be reproduced in normal platelets incubated with ITP plasma by adding normal CD3+ lymphocytes to the system as effector cells. Addition of leupeptin -a cathepsin B inhibitor- to this system protected platelets from apoptosis. Increased PS exposure was also observed when normal platelets and CD3+ lymphocytes were incubated with purified IgG from ITP patients and was absent when ITP plasma was depleted of auto-antibodies, pointing to the latter as responsible for platelet damage. Apoptosis was present in platelets from all patients carrying anti-GPIIb-IIIa and anti-GPIb auto-antibodies but was absent in the patient with anti-GPIa-IIa auto-antibodies. Platelet damage inversely correlated with platelet count and decreased during treatment with a thrombopoietin receptor agonist. These results point to a key role for auto-antibodies in platelet apoptosis and suggest that antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity is the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. PMID:27494140

  7. Platelet Apoptosis in Adult Immune Thrombocytopenia: Insights into the Mechanism of Damage Triggered by Auto-Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Goette, Nora P.; Glembotsky, Ana C.; Lev, Paola R.; Grodzielski, Matías; Contrufo, Geraldine; Pierdominici, Marta S.; Espasandin, Yesica R.; Riveros, Dardo; García, Alejandro J.; Molinas, Felisa C.; Heller, Paula G.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms leading to decreased platelet count in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are heterogeneous. This study describes increased platelet apoptosis involving loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), caspase 3 activation (aCasp3) and phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization in a cohort of adult ITP patients. Apoptosis was not related to platelet activation, as PAC-1 binding, P-selectin exposure and GPIb-IX internalization were not increased. Besides, ITP platelets were more sensitive to apoptotic stimulus in terms of aCasp3. Incubation of normal platelets with ITP plasma induced loss of ΔΨm, while PS exposure and aCasp3 remained unaltered. The increase in PS exposure observed in ITP platelets could be reproduced in normal platelets incubated with ITP plasma by adding normal CD3+ lymphocytes to the system as effector cells. Addition of leupeptin -a cathepsin B inhibitor- to this system protected platelets from apoptosis. Increased PS exposure was also observed when normal platelets and CD3+ lymphocytes were incubated with purified IgG from ITP patients and was absent when ITP plasma was depleted of auto-antibodies, pointing to the latter as responsible for platelet damage. Apoptosis was present in platelets from all patients carrying anti-GPIIb-IIIa and anti-GPIb auto-antibodies but was absent in the patient with anti-GPIa-IIa auto-antibodies. Platelet damage inversely correlated with platelet count and decreased during treatment with a thrombopoietin receptor agonist. These results point to a key role for auto-antibodies in platelet apoptosis and suggest that antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity is the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. PMID:27494140

  8. Therapeutic efficacy and safety of platelets treated with a photochemical process for pathogen inactivation: the SPRINT Trial.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Jeffrey; Vesole, David H; Benjamin, Richard J; Slichter, Sherrill J; Pineda, Alvaro; Snyder, Edward; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Lopez-Plaza, Ileana; Coutre, Steven; Strauss, Ronald G; Goodnough, Lawrence T; Fridey, Joy L; Raife, Thomas; Cable, Ritchard; Murphy, Scott; Howard, Frank; Davis, Kathryn; Lin, Jin-Sying; Metzel, Peyton; Corash, Laurence; Koutsoukos, Antonis; Lin, Lily; Buchholz, Donald H; Conlan, Maureen G

    2004-09-01

    We report a transfusion trial of platelets photochemically treated for pathogen inactivation using the synthetic psoralen amotosalen HCl. Patients with thrombocytopenia were randomly assigned to receive either photochemically treated (PCT) or conventional (control) platelets for up to 28 days. The primary end point was the proportion of patients with World Health Organization (WHO) grade 2 bleeding during the period of platelet support. A total of 645 patients (318 PCT and 327 control) were evaluated. The primary end point, the incidence of grade 2 bleeding (58.5% PCT versus 57.5% control), and the secondary end point, the incidence of grade 3 or 4 bleeding (4.1% PCT versus 6.1% control), were equivalent between the 2 groups (P =.001 by noninferiority). The mean 1-hour posttransfusion platelet corrected count increment (CCI) (11.1 x 10(3) PCT versus 16.0 x 10(3) control), average number of days to next platelet transfusion (1.9 PCT versus 2.4 control), and number of platelet transfusions (8.4 PCT versus 6.2 control) were different (P <.001). Transfusion reactions were fewer following PCT platelets (3.0% PCT versus 4.4% control; P =.02). The incidence of grade 2 bleeding was equivalent for PCT and conventional platelets, although posttransfusion platelet count increments and days to next transfusion were decreased for PCT compared with conventional platelets. PMID:15138160

  9. Remission and platelet responses with romiplostim in primary immune thrombocytopenia: final results from a phase 2 study.

    PubMed

    Newland, Adrian; Godeau, Bertrand; Priego, Victor; Viallard, Jean-Francois; López Fernández, María F; Orejudos, Amelia; Eisen, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In anecdotal reports, some patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) maintained platelet counts after discontinuing romiplostim. Here, we examined rates of platelet response (≥50 × 10(9) /l), remission, splenectomy and adverse events in patients with primary ITP duration ≤6 months who were treated with romiplostim for ≤12 months. The starting dose of romiplostim was 1 μg/kg; concomitant and rescue treatments were permitted to maintain platelet counts. Patients with platelet counts ≥50 × 10(9) /l at the end of 12 months entered a dose taper in which the romiplostim dose was decreased as long as platelet counts were maintained. Remission (platelet count ≥50 × 10(9) /l for 24 consecutive weeks with no ITP treatments) was evaluated in patients once romiplostim was discontinued. Over the 12 months, a high response rate (>90%) was observed. Platelet response occurred quickly (median, ~2 weeks) and was observed for a cumulative median of 11 months. Remission was observed in 24 patients (32%); there were no significantly predictors of remission. Most (20/24) patients had remission start before the forced taper. No new safety signals were identified. Thus, in patients with early-stage ITP, romiplostim was well tolerated and induced rapid responses, with remission occurring in approximately one-third of patients (NCT01143038, Amgen 20080435). PMID:26537623

  10. Platelet transport in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Le Goff, Anne; Blin, Antoine; Pujos, Justine; Magniez, Aurélie; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Blood platelets are small enucleated cells responsible for the arrest of bleeding. These cells have the ability to tether and translocate on injured vascular endothelium, thanks to a specific interaction between a receptor of their membrane and a protein expressed by the cells composing the inner wall of the vessel, the von Willebrand factor (VWF). Others cells have such abilities of rolling. Leucocytes, for example, translocate on surface due to a specific interaction between selectin molecules and their respective glycoprotein ligands. These kinds of cells present two modes of transport: they can either be advected by the flux, or translocate on surfaces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions. Our work consists first in studying experimentally the transport of platelets along a microchannel and then in modeling this particular cell transport. Due to these two modes of transport along a channel, platelets adhering to the surface are not equally distributed along the channel axis. We describe the evolution of the density of platelets with time and distance.

  11. Avian leucocyte counting using the hemocytometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dein, F.J.; Wilson, A.; Fischer, D.; Langenberg, P.

    1994-01-01

    Automated methods for counting leucocytes in avian blood are not available because of the presence of nucleated erythrocytes and thrombocytes. Therefore, total white blood cell counts are performed by hand using a hemocytometer. The Natt and Herrick and the Unopette methods are the most common stain and diluent preparations for this procedure. Replicate hemocytometer counts using these two methods were performed on blood from four birds of different species. Cells present in each square of the hemocytometer were counted. Counting cells in the corner, side, or center hemocytometer squares produced statistically equivalent results; counting four squares per chamber provided a result similar to that obtained by counting nine squares; and the Unopette method was more precise for hemocytometer counting than was the Natt and Herrick method. The Unopette method is easier to learn and perform but is an indirect process, utilizing the differential count from a stained smear. The Natt and Herrick method is a direct total count, but cell identification is more difficult.

  12. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Rapidly Destructive Coxarthrosis in a Patient with Severe Platelet Deficiency due to Liver Cirrhosis and Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Hama, Shunpei; Inori, Fumiaki; Momose, Dai; Konishi, Sadahiko

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly destructive coxarthrosis (RDC) causes rapid and extreme destruction of the hip joint, which was reported by Postel and Kerboull. RDC is commonly unilateral and occurs mostly in elderly women. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a low platelet count that is the result of both immune-mediated platelet destruction and suppression of platelet production. In patients with ITP undergoing surgery, bleeding associated with a low preoperative platelet count can lead to unsuccessful outcomes. To the best of our knowledge, there has been only one report describing total hip arthroplasty (THA) for patients with ITP and there have been no reports of THA for RDC with a very low platelet count due to liver cirrhosis (LC) and ITP. We report the case of a patient who had right RDC and a very low platelet count due to LC and ITP in whom THA was successfully performed. Furthermore, this case was also unique in that her platelet count increased after THA. THA for right RDC might resolve ITP by relieving inflammation of the right hip since her platelet count recovered after THA. PMID:26064742

  13. Platelets are versatile cells: New discoveries in hemostasis, thrombosis, immune responses, tumor metastasis and beyond.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohong Ruby; Zhang, Dan; Oswald, Brigitta Elaine; Carrim, Naadiya; Wang, Xiaozhong; Hou, Yan; Zhang, Qing; Lavalle, Christopher; McKeown, Thomas; Marshall, Alexandra H; Ni, Heyu

    2016-12-01

    Platelets are small anucleate blood cells generated from megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and cleared in the reticuloendothelial system. At the site of vascular injury, platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation constitute the first wave of hemostasis. Blood coagulation, which is initiated by the intrinsic or extrinsic coagulation cascades, is the second wave of hemostasis. Activated platelets can also provide negatively-charged surfaces that harbor coagulation factors and markedly potentiate cell-based thrombin generation. Recently, deposition of plasma fibronectin, and likely other plasma proteins, onto the injured vessel wall has been identified as a new "protein wave of hemostasis" that may occur even earlier than the first wave of hemostasis, platelet accumulation. Although no experimental evidence currently exists, it is conceivable that platelets may also contribute to this protein wave of hemostasis by releasing their granule fibronectin and other proteins that may facilitate fibronectin self- and non-self-assembly on the vessel wall. Thus, platelets may contribute to all three waves of hemostasis and are central players in this critical physiological process to prevent bleeding. Low platelet counts in blood caused by enhanced platelet clearance and/or impaired platelet production are usually associated with hemorrhage. Auto- and allo-immune thrombocytopenias such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia may cause life-threatening bleeding such as intracranial hemorrhage. When triggered under pathological conditions such as rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, excessive platelet activation and aggregation may result in thrombosis and vessel occlusion. This may lead to myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke, the major causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Platelets are also involved in deep vein thrombosis and thromboembolism, another leading cause of mortality. Although fibrinogen has been

  14. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  15. The mechanism behind the effect of ALG on platelets in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Henricsson, A; Husberg, B; Bergentz, S E

    1977-01-01

    Antilymphocyte globulin (ALG) and antiplatelet globulin (APG) were injected in dogs whose autologous platelets were labelled with 51Cr. APG injection resulted in almost complete and irreversible disappearance of labelled platelets. ALG produced thrombocytopenia of the same degree, but this was to a large extent reversible. After injection of ALG the platelets were reversibly trapped in the lung during the time when platelet count in peripheral blood was low. Such trapping was not seen after administration of APG. This suggests an antiplatelet mechanism of ALG quite different from that of APG. Platelet-absorbed ALG and non-platelet-absorbed ALG produced thrombocytopenia of the same degree and pattern, making it less likely that the thrombocytopenia was caused by specific platelet antibodies. Also platelet-absorbed APG induced thrombocytopenia, but this was reversible and 'ALG-like'. The mechanism behind the platelet reaction after an ALG injection is well explained in terms of complement C3 adherence and/or Fc receptor-induced aggregation. PMID:589869

  16. Platelet satellitism: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural morphology of platelet-polymorph (platelet-polymorphonuclear leukocyte) rosettes was investigated in EDTA-anticoagulated blood obtained from two patients who exhibited the phenomenon of platelet satellitism. Most of the platelet profiles were attached to the polymorph surface by broad areas of contact. Examination of these broad areas of contact at high magnification revealed an intercellular material of low electron density. This material appeared to form strands, which bridged the intercellular space and spanned the entire area formed by the apposing plasma membranes. Phagocytosis of entire platelets was only observed in 1 case. The platelet profiles that participated in rosette formation revealed a large number of glycogen particles, compared with unattached platelets. Ultrastructural examination of "stress" platelets obtained from five normal subjects treated with steroids similarly showed a large number of glycogen particles, although no rosette formation or phagocytosis of platelets was observed. The etiology of platelet satellitism is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7223859

  17. Dietary manipulation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Bachmair, E M; Ostertag, L M; Zhang, X; de Roos, B

    2014-11-01

    Activated platelets contribute to plaque formation within blood vessels in the early and late stages of atherogenesis, and therefore they have been proposed as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Anti-platelet drugs, such as aspirin, are now the most prescribed pharmacological treatment in Europe. Certain dietary bioactives also beneficially affect platelet function, and with less side effects, albeit that effects are generally more subtle. Therefore, consumption of dietary bioactives could play a role in the prevention of atherothrombotic vascular disease. Here we review the efficacy of dietary treatment strategies, especially those involving certain dietary fatty acids and polyphenols, to modulate platelet function in healthy subjects or in patients with cardiovascular disease. Variation in study populations, small study sizes and lack of comparability between methods to assess platelet function currently limit robust evidence on the efficacy of dietary bioactives in healthy subjects or specific patient groups. Also, limited knowledge of the metabolism of dietary bioactives, and therefore of the bioavailability of bioactive ingredients, restricts our ability to identify the most effective dietary regimes to improve platelet function. Implementation of uniform point-of-care tests to assess platelet function, and enhanced knowledge of the efficacy by which specific dietary compounds and their metabolites affect platelet function, may enable the identification of functional anti-platelet ingredients that are eligible for a health claim, or combined treatment strategies, including both pharmacological anti-platelet treatment as well as dietary intervention, to tackle atherothrombotic vascular disease. PMID:24858060

  18. Comparative of three methods (ELIZA, MAIPA and flow cytometry) to determine anti-platelet antibody in children with ITP.

    PubMed

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Khalili, Ghader; Tajic, Nader; Shamsian, Bi Bi Shahin; Hamidpour, Rafie

    2014-01-01

    Immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpurea (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the increased anti-platelet antibodies in the patient's sera and decreased platelets in the blood circulation. This study has determined and characterized the antiplatelet glycoproteins in children with ITP. Thirty eight children, who were hospitalized with clinical signs of ITP in Mofid Children Hospital (Tehran, Iran) during 18 months, went under our clinical studies in a research project. ELISA, Flow cytometry and MAIPA (Monoclonal Antibody Immobilization of Platelet Antigens) methods were employed to determine serum anti-platelet antibodies level. The anti-platelet antibodies level above mean + 3SD of control group was assumed as positive. The platelet counts ranged between 2 × 10(9)/L and 100 × 10(9)/L. Among the patients 63.5% of them were anti-platelet antibodies positive with ELISA method. Results of platelet lysate method showed that 51.7% of patients had antibodies against platelet antigens. Antibody against platelet GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX and GPIa/IIa using MAIPA method were 48%, 54% and 25% respectively. In flow cytometry 62% of patients showed anti-platelet antibodies. The comparison of three methods shows that since MAIPA is the specific method for the detection of very small amount of antibody against glycoprotein antigens, it has the advantage of differentiating between immune and non-immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:25755908

  19. Comparative of three methods (ELIZA, MAIPA and flow cytometry) to determine anti-platelet antibody in children with ITP

    PubMed Central

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Khalili, Ghader; Tajic, Nader; Shamsian, Bi Bi Shahin; Hamidpour, Rafie

    2014-01-01

    Immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpurea (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the increased anti-platelet antibodies in the patient’s sera and decreased platelets in the blood circulation. This study has determined and characterized the antiplatelet glycoproteins in children with ITP. Thirty eight children, who were hospitalized with clinical signs of ITP in Mofid Children Hospital (Tehran, Iran) during 18 months, went under our clinical studies in a research project. ELISA, Flow cytometry and MAIPA (Monoclonal Antibody Immobilization of Platelet Antigens) methods were employed to determine serum anti-platelet antibodies level. The anti-platelet antibodies level above mean + 3SD of control group was assumed as positive. The platelet counts ranged between 2 × 109/L and 100 × 109/L. Among the patients 63.5% of them were anti-platelet antibodies positive with ELISA method. Results of platelet lysate method showed that 51.7% of patients had antibodies against platelet antigens. Antibody against platelet GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX and GPIa/IIa using MAIPA method were 48%, 54% and 25% respectively. In flow cytometry 62% of patients showed anti-platelet antibodies. The comparison of three methods shows that since MAIPA is the specific method for the detection of very small amount of antibody against glycoprotein antigens, it has the advantage of differentiating between immune and non-immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:25755908

  20. Principles and methods for automated palynology.

    PubMed

    Holt, K A; Bennett, K D

    2014-08-01

    Pollen grains are microscopic so their identification and quantification has, for decades, depended upon human observers using light microscopes: a labour-intensive approach. Modern improvements in computing and imaging hardware and software now bring automation of pollen analyses within reach. In this paper, we provide the first review in over 15 yr of progress towards automation of the part of palynology concerned with counting and classifying pollen, bringing together literature published from a wide spectrum of sources. We consider which attempts offer the most potential for an automated palynology system for universal application across all fields of research concerned with pollen classification and counting. We discuss what is required to make the datasets of these automated systems as acceptable as those produced by human palynologists, and present suggestions for how automation will generate novel approaches to counting and classifying pollen that have hitherto been unthinkable. PMID:25180326

  1. Longitudinal effects of menopausal hormone treatments on platelet characteristics and cell-derived microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M.; Lahr, Brian D.; Bailey, Kent R.; Heit, John A.; Harman, S. Mitchell; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Activated platelets serve as a catalyst for thrombin generation and a source of vasoactive and mitogenic factors affecting vascular remodeling. Oral menopausal hormone treatments (MHT) may carry greater thrombotic risk than transdermal products. This study compared effects of oral and transdermal MHT on platelet characteristics, platelet proteins, and platelet-derived microvesicles (MV) in recently menopausal women. Platelets and MV were prepared from blood of a subset of women (n = 117) enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study prior to and after 48 months of treatment with either oral conjugated equine estrogen (0.45 mg/day), transdermal 17β-estradiol (50 µg/day), each with intermittent progesterone (200 mg/day for 12 days a month), or placebo pills and patch. Platelet count and expression of platelet P-selectin and fibrinogen receptors were similar across groups. An aggregate measure of 4-year change in vasoactive and mitogenic factors in platelet lysate, by principle component analysis, indicated significantly lower values in both MHT groups compared to placebo. Increases in numbers of tissue factor positive and platelet-derived MV were significantly greater in the transdermal compared to placebo group. MHT was associated with significantly reduced platelet content of vasoactive and mitogenic factors representing a potential mechanism by which MHT may affect vascular remodeling. Various hormonal compositions and doses of MHT could differentially regulate nuclear transcription in bone marrow megakaryocytes and non-genomic pathways in circulating platelets thus determining numbers and characteristics of circulating MV. Thrombotic risk associated with oral MHT most likely involves liver-derived inflammatory/coagulation proteins rather than circulating platelets per se. PMID:25856160

  2. Longitudinal effects of menopausal hormone treatments on platelet characteristics and cell-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Miller, Virginia M; Lahr, Brian D; Bailey, Kent R; Heit, John A; Harman, S Mitchell; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Activated platelets serve as a catalyst for thrombin generation and a source of vasoactive and mitogenic factors affecting vascular remodeling. Oral menopausal hormone treatments (MHT) may carry greater thrombotic risk than transdermal products. This study compared effects of oral and transdermal MHT on platelet characteristics, platelet proteins, and platelet-derived microvesicles (MV) in recently menopausal women. Platelets and MV were prepared from blood of a subset of women (n = 117) enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study prior to and after 48 months of treatment with either oral conjugated equine estrogen (0.45 mg/day), transdermal 17β-estradiol (50 µg/day), each with intermittent progesterone (200 mg/day for 12 days a month), or placebo pills and patch. Platelet count and expression of platelet P-selectin and fibrinogen receptors were similar across groups. An aggregate measure of 4-year change in vasoactive and mitogenic factors in platelet lysate, by principle component analysis, indicated significantly lower values in both MHT groups compared to placebo. Increases in numbers of tissue factor positive and platelet-derived MV were significantly greater in the transdermal compared to placebo group. MHT was associated with significantly reduced platelet content of vasoactive and mitogenic factors representing a potential mechanism by which MHT may affect vascular remodeling. Various hormonal compositions and doses of MHT could differentially regulate nuclear transcription in bone marrow megakaryocytes and non-genomic pathways in circulating platelets thus determining numbers and characteristics of circulating MV. Thrombotic risk associated with oral MHT most likely involves liver-derived inflammatory/coagulation proteins rather than circulating platelets per se. PMID:25856160

  3. Essential roles for platelets during neutrophil-dependent or lymphocyte-mediated defense against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Dongxia; Sun, Chengming; Bao, Cuixia; Yi, Maoli; Xing, Li; Luo, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes including the immune response against infection. More than 200 whole blood samples from patients and healthy controls were run in the System XE-5000 analyzer, and plasma fractions were separated for the following tests by ELISA, Luminex and light scattering. We describe two mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function against various bacterial pathogens based on increased mean platelet volume in gram-positive bacterial infections and increased platelet counts in gram-negative bacterial infections. Gram-negative bacteria activate platelets to recruit neutrophils, which participate in the immune response against infection. During this process, fractalkine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α and platelet-activating factor were higher in patients infected with Escherichia coli; additionally, giant platelets were observed under the microscope. Meanwhile, we found that platelets played a different role in gram-positive bacterial infections. Specifically, they could actively adhere to gram-positive bacteria in circulation and transfer them to immune sites to promote antibacterial lymphocyte expansion. During this process, complement C3 and factor XI were more highly expressed in patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus; additionally, we detected more small platelets under the microscope. Platelets participate in the immune response against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, although the mechanisms differ. These results will help us understand the complex roles of platelets during infections, and direct our use of antibiotics based on clinical platelet data. PMID:26588444

  4. IgG+ platelets in the marmoset: their induction, maintenance, and survival

    SciTech Connect

    Gengozian, N.; McLaughlin, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    Immunization of marmosets with platelets from another species of marmoset leads to antibody formation to the donor platelets, deposition of IgG on the host's platelets, and thrombocytopenia. This disease closely resembles posttransfusion purpura of man, which may develop after one or two transfusions of whole blood. The mode of immunization in the marmoset was found to be important: intravenous (i.v.) inoculations were without effect, while intramuscular (i.m.) immunizations led to the disease. Intramuscular inoculations were characterized by formation of 7S antibodies, as measured by indirect immunofluorescent (IF) and complement-dependent platelet cytotoxicity (PC) tests; in contrast, i.v. immunizations, while leading to 7S antibodies by the IF test, yielded only 19S antibodies reactive in the PC assay. The titers were also consistently higher with i.m. immunizations. Antibody was not limited to the donor platelets, but auto- or host-type reactivity was also present; this antibody was in very low titer and could be found only when the animal was thrombocytopenic. A primary finding was the ability to maintain increased deposition of IgG on the host's platelets in the absence of thrombocytopenia by biweekly or monthly inoculations of the donor platelet antigen. The amount of IgG found on platelets of normal and immunized marmosets was comparable to that reported for normal humans and patients with cinical immune thrombocytopenia. Finally, platelet survival studies in animals with IgG+ platelets and normal platelet counts indicated a rapid turnover, suggesting operation of a compensatory mechanism to maintain platelet levels.

  5. Platelet Immobilization on Supported Phospholipid Bilayers for Single Platelet Studies.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Eva; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-08-23

    The worldwide cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemic is of grave concern. A major role in the etiology of CVDs is played by the platelets (thrombocytes). Platelets are anuclear cell fragments circulating in the blood. Their primary function is to catalyze clot formation, limiting traumatic blood loss in the case of injury. The same process leads to thrombosis in the case of CVDs, which are commonly managed with antiplatelet therapy. Platelets also have other, nonhemostatic functions in wound healing, inflammation, and tissue regeneration. They play a role in the early stages of atherosclerosis and the spread of cancer through metastases. Much remains to be learned about the regulation of these diverse platelet functions under physiological and pathological conditions. Breakthroughs in this regard are expected to come from single platelet studies and systems approaches. The immobilization of platelets at surfaces is advantageous for developing such approaches, but platelets are activated when they come in contact with foreign surfaces. In this work, we develop and validate a protocol for immobilizing platelets on supported lipid bilayers without activation due to immobilization. Our protocol can therefore be used for studying platelets with a wide variety of surface-sensitive techniques. PMID:27438059

  6. New gene functions in megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation

    PubMed Central

    Gieger, Christian; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Cvejic, Ana; Tang, Weihong; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Elling, Ulrich; Goodall, Alison H.; Labrune, Yann; Lopez, Lorna M.; Mägi, Reedik; Meacham, Stuart; Okada, Yukinori; Pirastu, Nicola; Sorice, Rossella; Teumer, Alexander; Voss, Katrin; Zhang, Weihua; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bis, Joshua C.; Ellinghaus, David; Gögele, Martin; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langenberg, Claudia; Kovacs, Peter; O’Reilly, Paul F.; Shin, So-Youn; Esko, Tõnu; Hartiala, Jaana; Kanoni, Stavroula; Murgia, Federico; Parsa, Afshin; Stephens, Jonathan; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Allayee, Hooman; Attwood, Antony; Balkau, Beverley; Bastardot, François; Basu, Saonli; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bomba, Lorenzo; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cambien, François; Chambers, John C.; Cucca, Francesco; D’Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Boer, Rudolf A.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Erdmann, Jeanette; Evans, David M.; Falchi, Mario; Feng, Wei; Folsom, Aaron R.; Frazer, Ian H.; Gibson, Quince D.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hammond, Chris; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hersch, Micha; Illig, Thomas; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Jolley, Jennifer; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Lumley, Thomas; Mangino, Massimo; Maschio, Andrea; Leach, Irene Mateo; McKnight, Barbara; Memari, Yasin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nauck, Matthias; Navis, Gerjan; Nöthlings, Ute; Nolte, Ilja M.; Porteous, David J.; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Pullat, Janne; Ring, Susan M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ruggiero, Daniela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sala, Cinzia; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Schlessinger, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, James; Smith, Nicholas L.; Snieder, Harold; Starr, John M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Taylor, Kent; Tenesa, Albert; Thein, Swee Lay; Tönjes, Anke; Uda, Manuela; Ulivi, Sheila; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Visscher, Peter M.; Völker, Uwe; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yang, Tsun-Po; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zitting, Paavo; Bradley, John R.; Dedoussis, George V.; Gasparini, Paolo; Hazen, Stanley L.; Metspalu, Andres; Pirastu, Mario; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Zwaginga, Jaap-Jan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Deary, Ian J.; Franke, Andre; Froguel, Philippe; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Martin, Nicholas G.; Meisinger, Christa; Psaty, Bruce M.; Spector, Timothy D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N.; Ciullo, Marina; Deloukas, Panos; Greinacher, Andreas; Jupe, Steve; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Khadake, Jyoti; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Penninger, Josef; Prokopenko, Inga; Stemple, Derek; Toniolo, Daniela; Wernisch, Lorenz; Sanna, Serena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Rendon, Augusto; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Soranzo, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and are essential for maintaining haemostasis. Their count and volume are tightly controlled within narrow physiological ranges, but there is only limited understanding of the molecular processes controlling both traits. Here we carried out a high-powered meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in up to 66,867 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 68 genomic loci reliably associated with platelet count and volume mapping to established and putative novel regulators of megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation. These genes show megakaryocyte-specific gene expression patterns and extensive network connectivity. Using gene silencing in Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster, we identified 11 of the genes as novel regulators of blood cell formation. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of novel gene functions controlling fate-determining events during megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation, providing a new example of successful translation of GWAS to function. PMID:22139419

  7. Platelets in Inflammation and Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nording, Henry M.; Seizer, Peter; Langer, Harald F.

    2015-01-01

    Platelets contribute to processes beyond thrombus formation and may play a so far underestimated role as an immune cell in various circumstances. This review outlines immune functions of platelets in host defense, but also how they may contribute to mechanisms of infectious diseases. A particular emphasis is placed on the interaction of platelets with other immune cells. Furthermore, this article outlines the features of atherosclerosis as an inflammatory vascular disease highlighting the role of platelet crosstalk with cellular and soluble factors involved in atheroprogression. Understanding, how platelets influence these processes of vascular remodeling will shed light on their role for tissue homeostasis beyond intravascular thrombosis. Finally, translational implications of platelet-mediated inflammation in atherosclerosis are discussed. PMID:25798138

  8. Pulmonary Platelet Thrombi and Vascular Pathology in Acute Chest Syndrome in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anea, Ciprian B.; Lyon, Matthew; Lee, Itia; Gonzales, Joyce N.; Adeyemi, Amidat; Falls, Greer; Kutlar, Abdullah; Brittain, Julia E.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests a role for platelets in sickle cell disease (SCD). Despite the pro-inflammatory, occlusive nature of platelets, a role for platelets in acute chest syndrome (ACS), however, remains understudied. To provide evidence and potentially describe contributory factors for a putative link between ACS and platelets, we performed an autopsy study of 20 SCD cases – 10 of whom died from ACS and 10 whose deaths were not ACS-related. Pulmonary histopathology and case history were collected. We discovered that disseminated pulmonary platelet thrombi were present in 3 out of 10 of cases with ACS, but none of the matched cases without ACS. Those cases with detected thrombi were associated with significant deposition of endothelial vWF and detection of large vWF aggregates adhered to endothelium. Potential clinical risk factors were younger age and higher platelet count at presentation. However, we also noted a sharp and significant decline in platelet count prior to death in each case with platelet thrombi in the lungs. In this study, neither hydroxyurea use nor perimortem transfusion was associated with platelet thrombi. Surprisingly, in all cases, there was profound pulmonary artery remodeling with both thrombotic and proliferative pulmonary plexiform lesions. The severity of remodeling was not associated with a severe history of ACS, or hydroxyurea use, but was inversely correlated with age. We thus provide evidence of undocumented presence of platelet thrombi in cases of fatal ACS describe clinical correlates. We also provide novel correlates of pulmonary remodeling in SCD. PMID:26492581

  9. Bubble-induced platelet aggregation in a rat model of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Vallée, Nicolas; Bourdon, Lionel

    2009-12-01

    Previous studies have highlighted that bubble-induced platelet aggregation is a predictor index of decompression sickness (DCS) severity in animals and bubble formation after a single air dive in humans. The present study attempted to investigate plasmatic indexes of the coagulation system and platelet activation in our rat model of DCS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one experimental group with a hyperbaric exposure and one control group maintained at atmospheric pressure. Rats were compressed to 1,000 kPa (90 m saltwater) for 45 min while breathing air. The onset of death time and DCS symptoms were recorded during a 30-min observed period after rats had surfaced. Plasmatic indexes were platelet factor 4 (PF4) for platelet activation, soluble glycoprotein V (sGPV) for thrombin generation, and thrombin-antithrombin complexes for the coagulation system. Blood samples for a platelet count and markers were taken 3 wk before the experimental protocol and within the 30 min after rats had surfaced. We confirmed a correlation between the percent fall in platelet count and DCS severity. Plasmatic levels of sGPV and PF4 were significantly increased after the hyperbaric exposure, with no change in the control group. The present study confirms platelet consumption as a potential index for evaluating decompression stress and DCS severity. The results point to the participation of thrombin generation in the coagulation cascade and platelet activation in bubble-induced platelet aggregation. In our animal model of DCS, the results cannot prejudge the mechanisms of platelet activation between bubble-induced vessel wall injury and bubble-blood component interactions. PMID:19850726

  10. Platelet function in dogs with bacterial infections and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Abid, Monia; Kalbantner, Kerstin; Mischke, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of bacterial infections or leishmaniasis on primary haemostasis in dogs. Capillary bleeding time, automatic platelet function analysis (PFA-100), turbidimetric platelet aggregation, impedance aggregometry, platelet count and, in addition, the haematocrit were investigated in 25 dogs with bacterial infections or leishmaniasis . Results of these diseased dogs were compared to the control group and additionally classified into two subgroups based on criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (groups "SIRS" and "Non-SIRS"). Dogs with infections had a significantly prolonged closure time of the PFA-100 using both cartridges (e. g., collagen/ADP: 83 [55-301] vs. 65 [47-99 s; median [minimum-maximum]; p < 0.0001), a significant decrease in maximal aggregation of the turbidimetric aggregometry (e. g., ADP-induced: 45.2 ± 26.8 vs. 67.3 ± 21.8%; mean ± SD; P = 0.003), a significant increase of collagen-induced impedance aggregometry and a significant suppression of arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry. An enhanced collagen-induced impedance aggregation was the only significant difference between subgroups "SIRS"and "Non-SIRS". In conclusion, although individual tests indicate enhanced platelet aggregation, most of the in vitro tests revealed a normal to moderately reduced functionality. The reduced aggregabiity may partly indicate preactivation of platelets. PMID:26281441

  11. Performance of automated slidemakers and stainers in a working laboratory environment – routine operation and quality control

    PubMed Central

    SIMSON, E; GASCON-LEMA, M G; BROWN, D L

    2010-01-01

    The automated slidemaker/stainers of the four Beckman Coulter LH755 hematology systems in our laboratory are operated as analyzers, with similar requirements for setup, maintenance and quality control. A study was performed to confirm that these slide maker/stainers in routine use produce peripheral blood films that are completely satisfactory for microscopy and without cells, particularly abnormal cells, being pulled to the edges or sides of the film outside the usual working area. One hundred and thirty-nine automated blood films that had been produced during routine operation were compared with well-prepared manual films from the same patients. None of the films was unacceptable for microscopy. The distributions of normal white cell types within the counting areas of automated films compared with manual films, for all 139 samples for WBC from 1.0 to 352.8 × 109/l; for blasts and promyelocytes in the 65 samples in which they occurred and for nucleated red blood cells in the 58 samples in which they occurred all fell within the expected limits of 200 cell differential counts of CLSI H20-A. Red cell morphology and the occurrence of WBC clumps, platelet clumps and smudge cells were comparable between the automated and manual films of all samples. We conclude that automated slidemaker/stainers, as typified by those of the Beckman Coulter LH755 system, are capable of producing blood films comparable with well-prepared manual films in routine laboratory use; and that the maintenance and quality control procedures used in our laboratory ensure consistent high quality performance from these systems. PMID:19220552

  12. Description of a double centrifugation tube method for concentrating canine platelets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficiency of platelet-rich plasma preparations by means of a double centrifugation tube method to obtain platelet-rich canine plasma at a concentration at least 4 times higher than the baseline value and a concentration of white blood cells not exceeding twice the reference range. A complete blood count was carried out for each sample and each concentrate. Whole blood samples were collected from 12 clinically healthy dogs (consenting blood donors). Blood was processed by a double centrifugation tube method to obtain platelet concentrates, which were then analyzed by a flow cytometry haematology system for haemogram. Platelet concentration and white blood cell count were determined in all samples. Results Platelet concentration at least 4 times higher than the baseline value and a white blood cell count not exceeding twice the reference range were obtained respectively in 10 cases out of 12 (83.3%) and 11 cases out of 12 (91.6%). Conclusions This double centrifugation tube method is a relatively simple and inexpensive method for obtaining platelet-rich canine plasma, potentially available for therapeutic use to improve the healing process. PMID:23876182

  13. Effects of cigarette smoking on morphological features of platelets in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Ghahremanfard, Farahnaz; Semnani, Vahid; Ghorbani, Raheb; Malek, Farhad; Behzadfar, Ali; Zahmatkesh, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effects of cigarette smoking on thrombocytopoiesis and some platelet morphological parameters in healthy male smokers. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 542 consecutive healthy men (aged 20 to 88 years), referred to the laboratory of Fatemieh Hospital, Semnan, Iran, between November 2011 and November 2012 for checking up were enrolled. The subjects were divided into 2 groups of smokers (n=258 with frequency of 10 or more cigarette per day with more than 12 months duration of smoking) and non-smokers (n=284). The blood samples were extracted to examine values of platelet indices using an ABX Micros 60 cell counter. Results: Comparing platelet indices across smokers and non-smokers showed that the mean platelet count was statistically significantly higher in adult smokers than in nonsmokers (264.1 ± 81.2/µl versus 247.7 ± 83.9/µl, p=0.021), while the mean plateletcrit value was contrarily lower in the adult smokers (18.0 ± 12.0% versus 25.0 ± 10.0%, p<0.001). Other platelet indicators were not discrepant between the smokers and non-smokers. Conclusion: Cigarette smoking in healthy individuals results in significant and considerable effects on platelet morphological indices. The mean platelet count is significantly increased, and plateletcrit values are reduced, compared with non-smoking status. PMID:26108590

  14. Relationship between Altered Platelet Morphological Parameters and Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Tolga; Yilmaz, Ahu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether platelet morphology or function is altered in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). Methods. This prospective study enrolled 85 healthy controls (HCs) (group 1) and 262 patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients were subclassified into three groups according to ocular findings: no DR (group 2; n = 88); nonproliferative DR (group 3; n = 88), and proliferative DR (group 4; n = 86). Mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), platelet large cell ratio (PLCR), plateletcrit (PCT) values, and platelet count were measured in the studied groups. Results. MPV, PDW, and PLCR levels were significantly altered in groups 2–4 compared with HCs (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.05). Compared with group 2, both DR groups had higher MPV and PDW levels, with a significant difference between groups 2 and 4 for both MPV (p = 0.036) and PDW (p = 0.006). PLCR correlated with retinopathy stage, but no significant difference was found between the DR groups. Platelet count and PCT values were not significantly different between the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion. Our findings suggest an association between mean platelet indices (MPI) (i.e., MPV, PDW, and PLCR) and DR stage. Therefore, MPI could be a beneficial prognostic marker of DR in patients with T2DM. PMID:27190641

  15. Human blood platelets at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, D. MACN.; Ausprunk, D.; Blevins, D.; Chao, F. C.; Curby, W.

    1987-01-01

    A set of freshly collected and separated human platelet suspensions were transported, in three types of plastic containers, on a 6 day, 2 hr mission of the orbiter Columbia to study the effect of prolonged exposure of human blood cells to microgravity. A controlled environment at a temperature of 22 + or - 1 deg with air flow was provided and another set of samples held on the ground acted as controls. Paired comparisons of platelets at ug versus controls at lxg revealed superior platelet survival at microgravity. When viewed in terms of plastic type, ug platelets in containers fabricated from PVC-TOTM displayed the best overall postflight viability.

  16. Overview of platelet physiology and laboratory evaluation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G M

    1999-06-01

    Appropriate laboratory testing for the platelet-type bleeding disorders hinges on an adequate assessment in the history and physical examination. Patients with histories and screening laboratory results consistent with coagulation disorders (hemophilia, disseminated intravascular coagulation) are not appropriate candidates for platelet function testing. In contrast, patients with a lifelong history of platelet-type bleeding symptoms and perhaps a positive family history of bleeding would be appropriate for testing. Figure 6 depicts one strategy to evaluate these patients. Platelet morphology can easily be evaluated to screen for two uncommon qualitative platelet disorders: Bernard-Soulier syndrome (associated with giant platelets) and gray platelet syndrome, a subtype of storage pool disorder in which platelet granulation is morphologically abnormal by light microscopy. If the bleeding disorder occurred later in life (no bleeding with surgery or trauma early in life), the focus should be on acquired disorders of platelet function. For those patients thought to have an inherited disorder, testing for vWD should be done initially because approximately 1% of the population has vWD. The complete vWD panel (factor VIII coagulant activity, vWf antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity) should be performed because many patients will have abnormalities of only one particular panel component. Patients diagnosed with vWD should be classified using multimeric analysis to identify the type 1 vWD patients likely to respond to DDAVP. If vWD studies are normal, platelet aggregation testing should be performed, ensuring that no antiplatelet medications have been ingested at least 1 week before testing. If platelet aggregation tests are normal and if suspicion for an inherited disorder remains high, vWD testing should be repeated. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia may require bone marrow examination to exclude primary hematologic disorders. If future studies with thrombopoietin assays

  17. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  18. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states. PMID:27228656

  19. The involvement of platelets and the coronary vasculature in collagen-induced sudden death in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mallarkey, G; Smith, G M

    1985-02-18

    The mechanism of collagen-induced sudden death in rabbits was studied by measuring blood pressure (BP), heart rate, ECG, the continuous platelet count and the plasma levels of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and 6-keto prostaglandin F1a (6-keto PGF1a). Death was preceded by myocardial ischaemia and a sharp fall in BP which occurred before any fall in platelet count was observed. The calcium entry blockers (CEBS), verapamil, nifedipine and PY 108-068 protected the rabbits from sudden death without any significant effect on the decrease in the platelet count or increase in plasma TXB2 levels. 6-keto PGF1a could not be detected in any plasma samples. Indomethacin and tri-sodium citrate also protected the rabbits but significantly reduced the fall in platelet count and plasma TXB2. In vitro studies on isolated aortae indicated that verapamil non-specifically inhibited vasoconstriction induced by KCl, adrenaline and U46619 (a thromboxane agonist). It is concluded that CEBS physiologically antagonize the vasoconstricting actions of platelet-derived substances and that it is coronary vasoconstriction that is primarily the cause of death. PMID:3992523

  20. White blood cell and platelet indices as prognostic markers in patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mantas, Dimitrios; Kostakis, Ioannis D.; Machairas, Nikolaos; Markopoulos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that oncogenesis is associated with systemic inflammation. The present study investigated white blood cell and platelet indices, whose values change during the inflammatory response, in women with invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Preoperatively obtained white blood cell and platelet counts from 53 patients with early breast cancer, who developed systemic metastases over a mean follow-up period of 65 months, were analyzed and compared with those of a matching control group formed of 37 patients with the same characteristics, who remained recurrence-free during the same time period. Patients who developed distant metastasis had a significantly higher mean platelet volume and lower neutrophil count than patients who did not present with distant metastasis. Furthermore, time to distant metastasis development was longer in patients with a lower mean platelet volume, whilst patients with a lower neutrophil count had a shorter systemic disease-free time interval. However, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that these parameters provided moderate accuracy in predicting which patients may develop distant metastasis. No differences were detected between patient groups regarding additional parameters. Patients who developed systemic disease during a mean follow-up period of 65 months were observed to have an increased mean platelet volume and decreased neutrophil count preoperatively. These results indicate that such parameters may be of prognostic value in patients with breast cancer. Studies with a larger number of patients are required to further investigate this hypothesis. PMID:27446480

  1. Aminoglycosides prevent and dissociate the aggregation of platelets in patients with EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, S; Shiojima, I; Tanigawa, T; Nakahara, K

    1997-12-01

    Although EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (EDTA-PTCP) is of practical importance because failure to recognize this clinical entity may result in misdiagnosis and subsequent mismanagement of the patients, the pathophysiological nature of EDTA-PTCP remains unknown. To develop an effective way to evaluate the platelet counts in patients with EDTA-PTCP, we introduced aminoglycosides-supplemented anticoagulating agents. When kanamycin was pre-supplemented with EDTA for anticoagulating blood samples from EDTA-PTCP patients there was no significant change in the platelet counts and the morphology of blood cells after 150 min of incubation at room temperature. Furthermore, when kanamycin was added to EDTA-anticoagulated blood samples from EDTA-PTCP patients within 30 min after blood withdrawal, rapid dissociation of platelets without apparent morphological changes of blood cells was observed, and complete blood cell counts as well as the histogram patterns were almost the same as those examined immediately after blood sampling. The dissociation of aggregated platelets was also detected when other antibiotics were used, although it was associated with some extent of morphological changes of blood cells. These findings indicate that the supplementation of aminoglycosides either before or after blood sampling is a useful method for the diagnosis EDTA-PTCP and for the evaluation of platelet counts in patients with EDTA-PTCP. PMID:9432027

  2. Evaluation of mean platelet volume, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and platelet/lymphocyte ratio in advanced stage endometriosis with endometrioma

    PubMed Central

    Yavuzcan, Ali; Çağlar, Mete; Üstün, Yusuf; Dilbaz, Serdar; Özdemir, İsmail; Yıldız, Elif; Özkara, Atilla; Kumru, Selahattin

    2013-01-01

    Objective We compared the preoperative values of mean platelet volume (MPV) and peripheral systemic inflammatory response (SIR) markers (neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and platelet/lymphocyte ratio) between patients with advanced-stage (stage 3/4) endometriosis having endometrioma (OMA) and patients with a non-neoplastic adnexal mass other than endometrioma (non-OMA). Material and Methods Patients who underwent operations with the pre-diagnosis of infertility or adnexal mass and who underwent laparoscopic tubal ligation were included. Results Haemoglobin levels, leucocyte count, platelet count, neutrophil count and lymphocyte count were not significantly different between patients with advanced stage endometriosis having OMA, patients with non-OMA and patients in the control group (p=0.970, p=0.902, p=0.373, p=0.501 and p=0.463, respectively). Patients with stage 3/4 endometriosis having OMA, patients with non-OMA and control patients were also not significantly different in terms of MPV (p=0.836), neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (p=0.555) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) (p=0.358). Preoperative cancer antigen 125 (Ca-125) levels were significantly higher in patients with OMA (p=0.006). Mean size of the OMAs was significantly lower than non-OMAs (p=0.000). Conclusion It is very important to determine advanced stage endometriosis and OMAs during preoperative evaluation in order to inform patients and plan an appropriate surgical approach. We demonstrate that MPV, NLR and PLR values are not useful for this purpose in patients with advanced stage endometriosis that are proven to develop severe inflammation at either the cellular or molecular level. PMID:24592108

  3. Response to platelet-activating factor in human platelets stored and aged in plasma. Decrease in aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.D.; Morrison, W.J.; Klachko, D.M.

    1989-07-01

    Human platelet concentrates were stored in polyolefin bags at 22 to 24 degrees C on a horizontal shaker for up to 8 days. At different intervals, aliquots of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were removed aseptically and five variables, i.e., platelet counts, morphology, platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and (3H)PAF binding to platelet receptors, were studied. The number of platelets did not change during the 8 days of storage. Scanning electron microscopy of the platelets revealed a gradual morphologic change from biconcave flat discs to irregular, crenated forms. The PAF-induced aggregation of platelets declined with time of storage. A decrease to 50 percent of the Day 1 aggregatory response to PAF was evident on Day 2, and there was a further decline to about 20 percent by Day 6. Similarly, PAF receptor-coupled phosphoinositide turnover, as monitored by 32P incorporation into individual phosphoinositides, decreased dramatically with storage. After 2 to 3 days of storage, the phosphoinositide turnover was reduced to 50 percent of the original response, and it continued to decline to about 25 percent of original response by Day 5 or 6. The binding of (3H)PAF to washed human platelets indicated subtle changes between Days 2 and 4, which became more noticeable by Day 6. These results have raised the possibility of changes in the number of the receptors and/or their affinity for the ligand during storage. We conclude that although the number of platelets was maintained during storage for 8 days, a general deterioration of their responses to PAF occurred at the levels of cell surface receptor, transmembrane signaling (phosphoinositide turnover), and response (aggregation).

  4. Genomics of platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Westbury, S K; Mumford, A D

    2016-07-01

    Genetic diagnosis in families with inherited platelet disorders (IPD) is not performed widely because of the genetic heterogeneity of this group of disorders and because in most cases, it is not possible to select single candidate genes for analysis using clinical and laboratory phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has revolutionized the scale and cost-effectiveness of genetic testing, and has emerged as a valuable tool for IPD. This review examines the potential utility of NGS as a diagnostic tool to streamline detection of causal variants in known IPD genes and as a vehicle for new gene discovery. PMID:27405671

  5. Thromboelastometric Monitoring of the Hemostatic Effect of Platelet Concentrates Transfusion in Thrombocytopenic Children Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Cristina; Cadamuro, Janne; Jones, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic platelet concentrates transfusion represents a therapeutic choice in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. This prospective, non-interventional study evaluated the effects of platelet concentrates transfusion on thromboelastometric parameters of platelet function in 36 transfusion occasions for 11 thrombocytopenic children undergoing chemotherapy. Pre- and posttransfusion (1-2 hours) blood samples were analyzed using standard coagulation tests and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) measurements (EXTEM and FIBTEM tests). Platelet component of the clot was calculated based on the EXTEM and FIBTEM maximum clot elasticity (MCE) results. After transfusion, mean platelet count increased from 16.5 × 109/L to 43.0 × 109/L (P < .001) and platelet component increased from 34.1 to 73.0 (P < .001). Statistically significant increases for posttransfusion EXTEM parameters A10, A20, and maximum clot firmness (MCF) were observed compared to pretransfusion values (P < .001). The EXTEM α-angle values increased posttransfusion (P < .05). The FIBTEM measurements were comparable pre- and posttransfusion. The study showed that platelet concentrates transfusion in thrombocytopenic children undergoing chemotherapy improves platelet-related coagulation pattern. PMID:25525046

  6. Platelet Proteome Analysis Reveals Integrin-dependent Aggregation Defects in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes*

    PubMed Central

    Fröbel, Julia; Cadeddu, Ron-Patrick; Hartwig, Sonja; Bruns, Ingmar; Wilk, Christian M.; Kündgen, Andrea; Fischer, Johannes C.; Schroeder, Thomas; Steidl, Ulrich G.; Germing, Ulrich; Lehr, Stefan; Haas, Rainer; Czibere, Akos

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding complications are a significant clinical problem in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes even at sufficient platelet counts (>50,000/μl). However, the underlying pathology of this hemorrhagic diathesis is still unknown. Here, we analyzed the platelet proteome of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes by quantitative two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometric protein identification. Proteins identified with lower concentrations, such as Talin-1, Vinculin, Myosin-9, Filmain-A, and Actin play critical roles in integrin αIIbβ3 signaling and thus platelet aggregation. Despite normal agonist receptor expression, calcium flux, and granule release upon activation, the activation capacity of integrin αIIbβ3 was diminished in myelodysplastic syndrome platelets. Förster resonance energy transfer analysis showed a reduced co-localization of Talin-1 to the integrin's β3-subunit, which is required for receptor activation and fibrinogen binding. In addition, platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen was incomplete, and platelet aggregation assays confirmed a general defect in integrin-dependent platelet aggregation in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Our data provide novel aspects on the molecular pathology of impaired platelet function in myelodysplastic syndromes and suggest a mechanism of defective integrin αIIbβ3 signaling that may contribute to the hemorrhagic diathesis observed in these patients. PMID:23382103

  7. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  8. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  9. Platelets: production, morphology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate, discoid cells, roughly 2-3 μm in diameter that function primarily as regulators of hemostasis, but also play secondary roles in angiogensis and innate immunity. Although human adults contain nearly one trillion platelets in circulation that are turned over every 8-10 days, our understanding of the mechanisms involved in platelet production is still incomplete. Platelets stem from large (30-100 μm) nucleated cells called megakaryocytes that reside primarily in the bone marrow. During maturation megakaryocytes extend long proplatelet elongations into sinusoidal blood vessels from which platelets ultimately release. During this process, platelets develop a number of distinguishable structural elements including: a delimited plasma membrane; invaginations of the surface membrane that form the open canalicular system (OCS); a closed-channel network of residual endoplasmic reticulum that form the dense tubular system (DTS); a spectrin-based membrane skeleton; an actin-based cytoskeletal network; a peripheral band of microtubules; and numerous organelles including α-granules, dense-granules, peroxisomes, lysosomes, and mitochondria. Proplatelet elongation and platelet production is an elaborate and complex process that defines the morphology and ultrastructure of circulating platelets, and is critical in understanding their increasingly numerous and varied biological functions. PMID:22918725

  10. Biologic nanoparticles and platelet reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M; Hunter, Larry W; Chu, Kevin; Kaul, Vivasvat; Squillace, Phillip D; Lieske, John C; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2009-01-01

    Aim Nanosized particles (NPs) enriched in hydroxyapatite and protein isolated from calcified human tissue accelerate occlusion of endothelium-denuded arteries when injected intravenously into rabbits. Since platelet aggregation and secretory processes participate in normal hemostasis, thrombosis and vascular remodeling, experiments were designed to determine if these biologic NPs alter specific platelet functions in vitro. Methods Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from citrate anticoagulated human blood. Platelet aggregation and ATP secretion were monitored in response to thrombin receptor agonists peptide (10 μM) or convulxin (50 μg/ml) prior to and following 15 min incubation with either control solution, human-derived NPs, bovine-derived NPs or crystals of hydroxyapatite at concentrations of 50 and 150 nephelometric turbidity units. Results Incubation of platelets for 15 min with either human- or bovine-derived NPs reduced aggregation induced by thrombin receptor activator peptide and convulxin in a concentration-dependent manner. Hydroxyapatite caused a greater inhibition than either of the biologically derived NPs. Human-derived NPs increased ATP secretion by unstimulated platelets during the 15 min incubation period. Conclusion Effects of bovine-derived and hydroxyapatite NPs on basal release of ATP were both time and concentration dependent. These results suggest that biologic NPs modulate both platelet aggregation and secretion. Biologically derived NPs could modify platelet responses within the vasculature, thereby reducing blood coagulability and the vascular response to injury. PMID:19839809

  11. The use of platelet indices, plateletcrit, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width in emergency non-traumatic abdominal surgery: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Budak, Yasemin Ustundag; Polat, Murat; Huysal, Kagan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet indices (PI) — plateletcrit, mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) — are a group of derived platelet parameters obtained as a part of the automatic complete blood count. Emerging evidence suggests that PIs may have diagnostic and prognostic value in certain diseases. This study aimed to summarize the current scientific knowledge on the potential role of PIs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients having emergency, non-traumatic abdominal surgery. In December 2015, we searched Medline/PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar to identify all articles on PIs. Overall, considerable evidence suggests that PIs are altered with acute appendicitis. Although the role of PI in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen remains uncertain, low MPV might be useful in acute appendicitis and acute mesenteric ischemia, with high MPV predicting poor prognosis in acute mesenteric ischemia. The current lack of consistency and technical standards in studies involving PIs should be regarded as a serious limitation to comparing these studies. Further large, multicentre prospective studies concurrently collecting data from different ethnicities and genders are needed before they can be used in routine clinical practice. PMID:27346963

  12. The use of platelet indices, plateletcrit, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width in emergency non-traumatic abdominal surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Budak, Yasemin Ustundag; Polat, Murat; Huysal, Kagan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet indices (PI) -- plateletcrit, mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) -- are a group of derived platelet parameters obtained as a part of the automatic complete blood count. Emerging evidence suggests that PIs may have diagnostic and prognostic value in certain diseases. This study aimed to summarize the current scientific knowledge on the potential role of PIs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients having emergency, non-traumatic abdominal surgery. In December 2015, we searched Medline/PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar to identify all articles on PIs. Overall, considerable evidence suggests that PIs are altered with acute appendicitis. Although the role of PI in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen remains uncertain, low MPV might be useful in acute appendicitis and acute mesenteric ischemia, with high MPV predicting poor prognosis in acute mesenteric ischemia. The current lack of consistency and technical standards in studies involving PIs should be regarded as a serious limitation to comparing these studies. Further large, multicentre prospective studies concurrently collecting data from different ethnicities and genders are needed before they can be used in routine clinical practice. PMID:27346963

  13. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the...

  14. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the...

  15. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the...

  16. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the...

  17. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the...

  18. Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Brian J.; Seroyer, Shane T.; Filardo, Giuseppe; Bajaj, Sarvottam; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may affect soft tissue healing via growth factors released after platelet degranulation. Because of this potential benefit, clinicians have begun to inject PRP for the treatment of tendon, ligament, muscle, and cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was performed for studies relating to PRP, growth factors, and soft tissue injuries from 1990 to 2010. Relevant references from these studies were also retrieved. Results: Soft tissue injury is a major source of disability that may often be complicated by prolonged and incomplete recovery. Numerous growth factors may potentiate the healing and regeneration of tendons and ligaments. The potential benefits of biologically enhanced healing processes have led to a recent interest in the use of PRP in orthopaedic sports medicine. There has been widespread anecdotal use of PRP for muscle strains, tendinopathy, and ligament injuries and as a surgical adjuvant to rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and meniscal or labral repairs. Although the fascination with this emerging technology has led to a dramatic increase in its use, scientific data supporting this use are still in their infancy. Conclusions: The literature is replete with studies on the basic science of growth factors and their relation to the maintenance, proliferation, and regeneration of various tissues and tissue-derived cells. Despite the promising results of several animal studies, well-controlled human studies are lacking. PMID:23015939

  19. Platelet-Related Variants Identified by Exomechip Meta-analysis in 157,293 Individuals.

    PubMed

    Eicher, John D; Chami, Nathalie; Kacprowski, Tim; Nomura, Akihiro; Chen, Ming-Huei; Yanek, Lisa R; Tajuddin, Salman M; Schick, Ursula M; Slater, Andrew J; Pankratz, Nathan; Polfus, Linda; Schurmann, Claudia; Giri, Ayush; Brody, Jennifer A; Lange, Leslie A; Manichaikul, Ani; Hill, W David; Pazoki, Raha; Elliot, Paul; Evangelou, Evangelos; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Gao, He; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Mathias, Rasika A; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Burt, Amber; Crosslin, David R; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nikus, Kjell; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Kähönen, Mika; Raitoharju, Emma; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Cushman, Mary; Zakai, Neil A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Raffield, Laura M; Quarells, Rakale; Willer, Cristen J; Peloso, Gina M; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Liu, Dajiang J; Deloukas, Panos; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fornage, Myriam; Richard, Melissa; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Rioux, John D; Dube, Marie-Pierre; de Denus, Simon; Lu, Yingchang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Smith, Albert Vernon; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Torstenson, Eric S; Liu, Yongmei; Tracy, Russell P; Rotter, Jerome I; Rich, Stephen S; Highland, Heather M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Li, Jin; Lange, Ethan; Wilson, James G; Mihailov, Evelin; Mägi, Reedik; Hirschhorn, Joel; Metspalu, Andres; Esko, Tõnu; Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Nalls, Mike A; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Engström, Gunnar; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Waterworth, Dawn M; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey D; Floyd, James S; Bartz, Traci M; Rice, Kenneth M; Psaty, Bruce M; Starr, J M; Liewald, David C M; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Greinacher, Andreas; Völker, Uwe; Thiele, Thomas; Völzke, Henry; van Rooij, Frank J A; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Ganesh, Santhi K; Kathiresan, Sekar; Faraday, Nauder; Auer, Paul L; Reiner, Alex P; Lettre, Guillaume; Johnson, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Platelet production, maintenance, and clearance are tightly controlled processes indicative of platelets' important roles in hemostasis and thrombosis. Platelets are common targets for primary and secondary prevention of several conditions. They are monitored clinically by complete blood counts, specifically with measurements of platelet count (PLT) and mean platelet volume (MPV). Identifying genetic effects on PLT and MPV can provide mechanistic insights into platelet biology and their role in disease. Therefore, we formed the Blood Cell Consortium (BCX) to perform a large-scale meta-analysis of Exomechip association results for PLT and MPV in 157,293 and 57,617 individuals, respectively. Using the low-frequency/rare coding variant-enriched Exomechip genotyping array, we sought to identify genetic variants associated with PLT and MPV. In addition to confirming 47 known PLT and 20 known MPV associations, we identified 32 PLT and 18 MPV associations not previously observed in the literature across the allele frequency spectrum, including rare large effect (FCER1A), low-frequency (IQGAP2, MAP1A, LY75), and common (ZMIZ2, SMG6, PEAR1, ARFGAP3/PACSIN2) variants. Several variants associated with PLT/MPV (PEAR1, MRVI1, PTGES3) were also associated with platelet reactivity. In concurrent BCX analyses, there was overlap of platelet-associated variants with red (MAP1A, TMPRSS6, ZMIZ2) and white (PEAR1, ZMIZ2, LY75) blood cell traits, suggesting common regulatory pathways with shared genetic architecture among these hematopoietic lineages. Our large-scale Exomechip analyses identified previously undocumented associations with platelet traits and further indicate that several complex quantitative hematological, lipid, and cardiovascular traits share genetic factors. PMID:27346686

  20. Platelet-Rich Plasma and Platelet Gel: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Peter A.M.; Knape, Johannes T.A.; Weibrich, Gernot; Schönberger, Jacques P.A.M.; Hoffmann, Johannes; Overdevest, Eddy P.; Box, Henk A.M.; van Zundert, André

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Strategies to reduce blood loss and transfusion of allogeneic blood products during surgical procedures are important in modern times. The most important and well-known autologous techniques are preoperative autologous predonation, hemodilution, perioperative red cell salvage, postoperative wound blood autotransfusion, and pharmacologic modulation of the hemostatic process. At present, new developments in the preparation of preoperative autologous blood component therapy by whole blood platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) sequestration have evolved. This technique has been proven to reduce the number of allogeneic blood transfusions during open heart surgery and orthopedic operations. Moreover, platelet gel and fibrin sealant derived from PRP and PPP mixed with thrombin, respectively, can be exogenously applied to tissues to promote wound healing, bone growth, and tissue sealing. However, to our disappointment, not many well-designed scientific studies are available, and many anecdotic stories exist, whereas questions remain to be answered. We therefore decided to study perioperative blood management in more detail with emphasis on the application and production of autologous platelet gel and the use of fibrin sealant. This review addresses a large variety of aspects relevant to platelets, platelet-rich plasma, and the application of platelet gel. In addition, an overview of recent animal and human studies is presented. PMID:16921694

  1. The Big Pumpkin Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplestone-Loomis, Lenny

    1981-01-01

    Pumpkin seeds are counted after students convert pumpkins to jack-o-lanterns. Among the activities involved, pupils learn to count by 10s, make estimates, and to construct a visual representation of 1,000. (MP)

  2. Effectiveness of Two Methods for Preparation of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma: An Experimental Study in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Maria J. H.; Messora, Michel R.; Furlaneto, Flávia A. C.; Fucini, Stephen E.; Bosco, Alvaro F.; Garcia, Valdir G.; Deliberador, Tatiana M.; de Melo, Luiz G. N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the quantity and quality of platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) samples prepared using either the single- or the double-centrifugation protocol. Methods: Ten adult white New Zealand rabbits were used. Ten ml of blood were drawn from each animal via cardiac puncture. Each blood sample was divided into two equal parts for PRP preparation: 5 ml of blood were centrifuged according to a single-centrifugation protocol (Group I), and 5 ml were centrifuged according to a double-centrifugation protocol (Group II). Manual platelet counts were performed on the whole blood and PRP samples of each group. Smears were also done on all samples in order to see the morphology of the platelets. The data obtained in the manual platelet count were submitted to statistical analysis (repeated measures ANOVA, Tukey, P<.05). Results: The average whole blood platelet count was 446,389/μl. The PRP samples in Group II presented an average platelet amount significantly higher than that of Group I (1,986,875 ± 685,020/μl and 781,875 ± 217,693/μl, respectively). The PRP smears from Group II were the only one to present platelets with altered morphology (75% of the smears). A few lymphocytes with increased cytoplasm were observed in the PRP smears of both Groups I (25% of the smears) and II (62.5% of the smears). Conclusions: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the double-centrifugation protocol resulted in higher platelet concentrations than did the single-centrifugation protocol. However, the double-centrifugation protocol caused alterations in platelet morphology and was more sensitive to small processing errors. PMID:20922159

  3. The role of mean platelet volume predicting acute exacerbations of cystic fibrosis in children

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Pιnar; Tuncel, Tuba; Olmez, Duygu; Babayigit, Arzu; Karaman, Ozkan; Uzuner, Nevin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between acute exacerbations and the mean platelet volume (MPV) trend in children with cystic fibrosis (CF), to predict the exacerbations. METHODS: A total of 46 children with CF and 37 healthy children were enrolled in the study. White blood cell count (WBC), hemoglobin level, platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were retrospectively recorded. RESULTS: Our study population consisted of 25 (54.3%) males and 21 (45.7%) females with CF and 20 (54.0%) males and 17 (46.0%) females in the healthy control group. The mean age of the CF patients was 6.32 ± 4.9 years and that of the healthy subjects was 7.02 ± 3.15 years. In the acute exacerbation period of CF, the MPV values were lower and WBC and platelet counts were higher than those in the healthy controls (P = 0.00, P = 0.00, P = 0.00, respectively). Besides, in acute exacerbation, the MPV values were lower and the WBC count was higher than the values in the non-exacerbation period (P 0= 0.01, P = 0.00, respectively). In the non-exacerbation period MPV was lower and platelet count was higher when compared to healthy subjects (P = 0.02, P = 0.04, respectively). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that MPV might be used as a simple, cost effective, diagnostic, predictive indicator for platelet activation in pediatric CF patients related to chronic inflammation, which might be helpful to discriminate or estimate exacerbations. PMID:21977069

  4. Slow Coronary Flow Phenomenon and Increased Platelet Volume Indices

    PubMed Central

    Seyyed-Mohammadzad, Mir Hossein; Kerachian, Abdollah; Eskandari, Ramin; Rezaei, Yousef

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives We sought to determine the relationship between mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and platelet larger cell ratio (P-LCR) with slow coronary flow (SCF). Subjects and Methods Eighty participants who underwent coronary angiography were divided into two groups, 50 participants with SCF as case group, and 30 with normal coronary flow (NCF) as control group. Baseline characteristics and laboratory data were collected before angiography. Results Platelet volume indices MPV (10.8±1.2 fL), PDW (14.5±2.2 fL), and P-LCR (30.5±8.1%) in the SCF group were significantly (p<0.05) higher than those (10.1±0.9 fL, 13.2±1.8 fL, and 26.8±6.8%, respectively) in the NCF group. The patients with three SCF arteries had significantly higher platelet volume indices compared to those with NCF arteries; however, the patients with one SCF artery did not. Based on linear regression model, MPV, PDW, and P-LCR were independent predictors of mean infarction frame counting (TFC). In multivariate analysis, MPV {odds ratio (OR)=32.393, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.189-882.606, p=0.039} and P-LCR (OR=0.566, 95% CI=0.330-0.937, p=0.028) were independent predictors of SCF. Conclusion Platelet volume indices MPV, PDW, and P-LCR were associated with both the presence and extent of SCF. PMID:25469142

  5. Improved Aerobic Colony Count Technique for Hydrophobic Grid Membrane Filters

    PubMed Central

    Parrington, Lorna J.; Sharpe, Anthony N.; Peterkin, Pearl I.

    1993-01-01

    The AOAC International official action procedure for performing aerobic colony counts on hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) uses Trypticase soy-fast green FCF agar (FGA) incubated for 48 h. Microbial growths are various shades of green on a pale green background, which can cause problems for automated as well as manual counting. HGMFs which had been incubated 24 or 48 h at 35°C on Trypticase soy agar were flooded underneath with 1 to 2 ml of 0.1% triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) solution by simply lifting one corner of the filter while it was still on the agar and adding the reagent. Microbial growths on HGMFs were counted after color had been allowed to develop for 15 min at room temperature. With representative foods, virtually all colonies stained pink to red. Automated electronic counts made by using the MI-100 HGMF Interpreter were easier and more reliable than control HGMF counts made by the AOAC International official action procedure. Manual counting was easier as well because of increased visibility of the microbial growths. Except in the case of dairy products, 24-h TTC counts did not differ significantly from 48-h FGA counts, whereas the FGA counts at 24 h were always significantly lower, indicating that for many food products the HGMF TTC flooding method permits aerobic colony counts to be made after 24 h. PMID:16349033

  6. Platelet storage media.

    PubMed

    Gulliksson, H

    2014-10-01

    Present platelet storage media often designated platelet additive solutions (PAS) basically contain acetate, citrate and phosphate and recently also potassium and magnesium. However, there seems to be an increasing interest in developing PASs that can be used also after further reduction of residual plasma content below 15-20% plasma. Inclusion of glucose but also calcium and bicarbonate in such solutions have been suggested to improve platelet (PLT) storage, especially when plasma content is reduced to very low levels. Results from a limited number of studies using novel PAS alternatives have been presented during the last years, such as InterSol-G, PAS-5, M-sol, PAS-G and SAS. Most of them are experimental solutions. The combined results presented in those studies suggest that presence of glucose may be necessary during PLT storage, primarily to maintain ATP at acceptable levels. At plasma inclusion below 15-20%, the content of glucose will generally be too low to support PLT metabolism for more than a few days making glucose addition in PAS necessary. Significant effects associated with presence of calcium was observed in PLTs stored in PAS with 5% inclusion but not with 20-35% plasma inclusion, suggesting that the content of plasma could be of importance. Bicarbonate only seems to be of importance for pH regulation, primarily when plasma inclusion is reduced to about 5%. Reduction in rate of glycolysis was observed in some PAS alternatives containing potassium and magnesium but not in others. Differences in pH or in concentrations of the various compounds included in PAS may be possible explanations. Additionally, novel PAS containing glucose, calcium and bicarbonate does not seem to be associated with improved in vitro results as compared to SSP+ or CompoSol when PLTs are stored with 35% plasma inclusion. The results would then also suggest that excess of glucose in novel PAS environment may not be associated with additional positive effects on PLT metabolism

  7. Shiga toxin binds to activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S A; Polanowska-Grabowska, R K; Fujii, J; Obrig, T; Gear, A R L

    2004-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is associated with acute renal failure in children and can be caused by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli. Thrombocytopenia and formation of renal thrombi are characteristic of HUS, suggesting that platelet activation is involved in its pathogenesis. However, whether Shiga toxin directly activates platelets is controversial. The present study evaluates if potential platelet sensitization during isolation by different procedures influences platelet interaction with Shiga toxin. Platelets isolated from sodium citrate anticoagulated blood were exposed during washing to EDTA and higher g forces than platelets prepared from acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) plasma. Platelet binding of Stx was significantly higher in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets. Binding of Stx was also increased with ACD-derived platelets when activated with thrombin (1 U mL-1) and exposure of the Gb3 Stx receptor was detected only on platelets subjected to EDTA, higher g forces or thrombin. EDTA-exposed platelets lost their normal discoid shape and were larger. P-selectin (CD62P) exposure was significantly increased in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets, suggesting platelet activation. Taken together, these results suggest that direct binding of Stx occurs only on 'activated' platelets rather than on resting platelets. The ability of Stx to interact with previously activated platelets may be an important element in understanding the pathogenesis of HUS. PMID:15009469

  8. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  9. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  10. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-03-01

    Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  11. Simple tube centrifugation for processing platelet-rich plasma in the horse

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Robin L.; Sink, Carolyn A.; Werre, Stephen R.; Weinstein, Nicole M.; Dahlgren, Linda A.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the quality and bacteriologic safety of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) produced by 3 simple, inexpensive tube centrifugation methods and a commercial system. Citrated equine blood collected from 26 normal horses was processed by 4 methods: blood collection tubes centrifuged at 1200 and 2000 × g, 50-mL conical tube, and a commercial system. White blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC), and platelet counts and mean platelet volume (MPV) were determined for whole blood and PRP, and aerobic and anaerobic cultures were performed. Mean platelet concentrations ranged from 1.55- to 2.58-fold. The conical method yielded the most samples with platelet concentrations greater than 2.5-fold and within the clinically acceptable range of > 250 000 platelets/λL. White blood cell counts were lowest with the commercial system and unacceptably high with the blood collection tubes. The conical tube method may offer an economically feasible and comparatively safe alternative to commercial PRP production systems. PMID:23729823

  12. Reduced platelet-mediated and enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis in experimentally induced diabetes in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Colwell, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Studies of fibrinolytic activity in diabetes mellitus have produced conflicting results. This may be a result of methodologic insensitivity or of variable contributions of the different blood components to whole blood fibrinolysis. To explore these two possibilities, the authors used a sensitive solid-phase radiometric assay to examine the fibrinolytic activity of whole blood, platelet-rich plasma, leukocytes, and platelet- and leukocyte-poor plasma prepared from control rats and rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes at various times after induction of diabetes. Fibrinolytic activity of whole blood from diabetic rats after 7 days was significantly reduced, and remained reduced after longer durations of diabetes up to 28 days. Platelet-rich plasma from diabetic rats had decreased fibrinolytic activity, which followed the same time course of changes as in whole blood. The platelet contribution to whole blood fibrinolysis was further reduced in vivo after 14 days of diabetes by a reduced whole blood platelet count. In contrast, fibrinolytic activity of leukocytes from diabetic rats became enhanced after 7 days of diabetes. After 49 days of diabetes, the whole blood leukocyte count was reduced, and in vivo would offset the enhanced activity. Plasma fibrinolytic activity was small compared with that of whole blood and was unaltered in diabetic rats. The authors conclude that altered platelet function contributes to decreased fibrinolytic activity of whole blood in diabetic rats, and that this may be partially offset by enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis.

  13. Changes in platelet morphology and function during 24 hours of storage.

    PubMed

    Braune, S; Walter, M; Schulze, F; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2014-01-01

    For in vitro studies assessing the interaction of platelets with implant materials, common and standardized protocols for the preparation of platelet rich plasma (PRP) are lacking, which may lead to non-matching results due to the diversity of applied protocols. Particularly, the aging of platelets during prolonged preparation and storage times is discussed to lead to an underestimation of the material thrombogenicity. Here, we study the influence of whole blood- and PRP-storage times on changes in platelet morphology and function. Blood from apparently healthy subjects was collected according to a standardized protocol and examined immediately after blood collection, four hours and twenty four hours later. The capability of platelets to adhere and form stable aggregates (PFA100, closure time) was examined in sodium citrate anticoagulated whole blood (WB) using the agonists equine type I collagen and epinephrine bitartrate (collagen/epinephrine) as well as equine type I collagen and adenosine-5'-diphosphate (collagen/ADP). Circulating platelets were quantified at each time point. Morphology of platelets and platelet aggregates were visualized microscopically and measured using an electric field multi-channel counting system (CASY). The percentage of activated platelets was assessed by means of P-selectin (CD62P) expression of circulating platelets. Furthermore, platelet factor 4 (PF4) release was measured in platelet poor plasma (PPP) at each time point. Whole blood PFA100 closure times increased after stimulation with collagen/ADP and collagen/epinephrine. Twenty four hours after blood collection, both parameters were prolonged pathologically above the upper limit of the reference range. Numbers of circulating platelets, measured in PRP, decreased after four hours, but no longer after twenty four hours. Mean platelet volumes (MPV) and platelet large cell ratios (P-LCR, 12 fL - 40 fL) decreased over time. Immediately after blood collection, no debris or platelet

  14. Platelet Function During Hypothermia in Experimental Mock Circulation.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Stevens, Kris; Kicken, Cécile; Simons, Antoine; Marcus, Abraham; Lancé, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in platelet function are a common finding in surgical procedures involving cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia. Although the combined impact of hypothermia and artificial circulation on platelets has been studied before, the ultimate strategy to safely minimize the risk for bleeding and thrombosis is yet unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a mock circulation loop to study the impact of hypothermia for platelet-related hemostatic changes. Venous blood was collected from healthy adult humans (n = 3). Closed mock circulation loops were assembled, each consisting of a centrifugal pump, an oxygenator with integrated heat exchanger, and a hardshell venous reservoir. The experiment started with the mock circulation temperature set at 37°C (T0 [0 h]). Cooling was then initiated at T1 (+2 h), where temperature was adjusted from 37°C to 32°C. Hypothermia was maintained from T2 (+4 h) to T3 (+28 h). From that point in time, rewarming from 32°C to 37°C was initiated with similar speed as cooling. From time point T4 (+30 h), normothermia (37°C) was maintained until the experiment ended at T5 (+32 h). Blood samples were analyzed in standard hematological tests: light transmission aggregometry (LTA) (arachidonic acid [AA], adenosine diphosphate [ADP], collagen [COL], thrombin-receptor-activating-peptide-14 [TRAP]), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) (AA, ADP, COL, TRAP), and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) (EXTEM, FIBTEM, PLTEM). Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count decrease more substantially during temperature drop (37-32°C) than during hypothermia maintenance. Hb and Hct continue to follow this trend during active rewarming (32-37°C). PC increase from the moment active rewarming was initiated. None of the values return to the initial values. LTA values demonstrate a similar decrease in aggregation after stimulation with the platelet agonists between the start of the mock circulation and the start of cooling. Except

  15. Storage of platelets in additive solutions: a new method for storage using sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Gulliksson, H; Sallander, S; Pedajas, I; Christenson, M; Wiechel, B

    1992-06-01

    The in vitro effect of 6-day storage of platelets prepared from 6 pooled buffy coat (BC) units and stored in a platelet storage medium containing approximately 40 percent CPD-plasma and 60 percent platelet additive solution (PAS) was evaluated. PAS is composed of sodium and potassium chloride, citrate, phosphate, and mannitol. The total count of platelets per pooled unit included in the in vitro studies (n = 25) was 376 +/- 59 x 10(9) (mean +/- SD). The present study included three steps. 1. Evaluation of platelet storage in one (n = 7) and two (n = 6) 1000-mL polyolefin containers using PAS. During storage in one container, significantly lower values were found for pH, pO2, glucose, ATP, and the ratio of ATP to AMP+ADP+ATP. The values for mean platelet volume, pCO2, lactate, and extracellular adenylate kinase activity were significantly higher. These results indicate that storage in only one polyolefin container is not appropriate for maintaining satisfactory platelet quality. During storage in two polyolefin containers, a remarkably decreased lactate production (0.07 +/- 0.02 mmol/day/10(11) platelets) was noted. 2. PAS was substituted for saline during 6-day storage in two 1000-mL polyolefin containers (n = 12). The composition of the platelet preparations was the same in all other respects. Similar in vitro results were noted with PAS and saline, which indicated that PAS has no specific effect on the storage of platelets different from that of saline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1626346

  16. Bubble-induced aggregation of platelets: effects of gas species, proteins, and decompression.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, T; Klausen, H; Lie, R T; Holmsen, H

    1993-06-01

    We show that bubbles containing different gases (N2, He, Ne, Ar, or an O2-CO2-N2 mixture) are equally potent platelet agonists. The synergistic effect of different platelet antagonists does not seem to be affected by the type of gas in the bubbles. In contrast to aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), bubbles cause only a weak response in gel-filtered platelets (GFP), i.e., comparison of aggregation in protein-rich and protein-poor platelet suspensions may shed light on the role of different plasma proteins. Extracellular fibrinogen promotes bubble-induced platelet aggregation similar to known physiologic agonists, whereas albumin counteracts this aggregation. Bubble-induced aggregation is inhibited in GFP-fibrinogen by 2-deoxy-D-glucose plus antimycin A, suggesting dependency on ATP generation in the platelets and evidence for direct exposure of the "cryptic" fibrinogen receptor by bubbles. Hyperbaric compression and subsequent rapid, inadequate decompression of PRP caused little change in the aggregation response to gas bubbles and epinephrine at 1 bar, but reduced the response to ADP. Bubbles tended not to form before the surface film was broken. Pressure-induced aggregation was apparently metabolically active and not due to passive agglutination; electron microscopic studies and PRP with added glutaraldehyde did not show platelet activation, clumping, or reduced platelet count. In contrast to aggregation caused by pressure, bubble-induced aggregation in PRP at 1 bar (after treatment in the pressure chamber) was nearly completely inhibited by theophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor that increases intracellular platelet cyclic AMP. PMID:8392414

  17. Glycans and the platelet life cycle.

    PubMed

    Li, Renhao; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Falet, Hervé

    2016-09-01

    Platelet numbers are intricately regulated to avoid spontaneous bleeding or arterial occlusion and organ damage. The growth factor thrombopoietin (TPO) drives platelet biogenesis by inducing megakaryocyte production. A recent study in mice identified a feedback mechanism by which clearance of aged, desialylated platelets stimulates TPO synthesis by hepatocytes. This new finding generated renewed interest in platelet clearance mechanisms. Here, different established and emerging mechanisms of platelet senescence and clearance will be reviewed with specific emphasis on the role of posttranslational modifications. PMID:27135356

  18. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    PubMed

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non

  19. Quantitation of platelet and fibrinogen-fibrin deposition on components of tissue valves (Ionescu-Shiley) in calves

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Solis, E.; Lenker, J.; Tidwell, C.; Mackey, S.; Didisheim, P.; Kaye, M.P.

    1986-07-01

    With /sup 111/In-labeled platelets and /sup 125/I-labeled bovine fibrinogen, regional mapping of platelet and fibrinogen deposition on leaflets and sewing rings was obtained. Ten Holstein calves received 25-mm mitral valves (ISLM) and were killed 1, 14, and 30 days after implantation. Twenty-four hours before the calves were killed, 350 to 450 microCi of /sup 111/In-labeled platelets and 200 to 250 microCi of /sup 125/I-labeled bovine fibrinogen were administered intravenously. The components of the tissue valves, i.e., three leaflets and sewing rings, were separated. Each leaflet was cut into four sections: free edge, central zone, flexion zone, and attachment zone. From the radioactivity in blood, leaflet zones, sewing rings, area of leaflet zones, platelet count, and fibrinogen level in blood, the mean regional density of adherent platelets, fibrinogen-fibrin, and fibrinogen/platelet were calculated. The density of platelets and fibrinogen deposited on the components of the valves decreases with time postimplantation. The number of fibrinogen molecules per platelet is fivefold to 20-fold higher than that of the receptor concentration on platelets on leaflet zones, suggesting the heterogeneity of fibrinogen-fibrin in thrombus and components of the valve.

  20. Effect of Drotrecogin alfa (activated) on platelet receptor expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schuerholz, Tobias; Friedrich, Lars; Marx, Gernot; Kornau, Ines; Sümpelmann, Robert; Scheinichen, Dirk

    2007-08-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem in critically ill patients, which is associated with increased mortality. Recently, Drotrecogin alfa (activated) (recombinant human activated protein C (APC)) was shown to reduce mortality in patients with severe sepsis. Only minimal effect of APC on coagulation markers was demonstrated. Nevertheless, low platelet count was identified as a risk factor for bleeding with use of this drug. We conducted this study to evaluate possible influence of APC on in vitro expression of platelet receptors at therapeutic and supra-therapeutic concentrations. Blood samples of volunteers and patients with severe sepsis were adjusted with APC to final concentrations of 0.045 microg mL(-1) APC (APC-45, therapeutic dose) and 0.225 microg mL(-1) APC (APC-225, five-fold therapeutic dose), respectively. The activation of platelets was mediated by two different agonists. APC had no significant influence on platelet activation, with or without stimulation at both concentrations. In group APC-225, CD62P showed a non-significant decrease. This in vitro study demonstrates that therapeutic plasma concentrations of Drotrecogin alfa (activated) have neither influence on expression of platelet activation markers nor on platelet-granulocyte complexes in blood of volunteers and patients with severe sepsis. Thus, a direct drug-platelet interaction seems unlikely. PMID:17654307

  1. [Studies of platelet aggregation in six cases of EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Shimasaki, A; Kato, T; Ozaki, Y

    1994-06-01

    Peripheral blood count was performed by a Coulter Model S Plus STKR on six pseudothrombocytopenia patients (age: 16-70, 2 men and 4 women) using three different anticoagulants. Treatment with ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA, 1 mg/ml) or sodium heparin (25 U/ml) aggregated platelets, but sodium citrate (3.8%, 1:9) had no effect. Smear examination revealed much platelet clumping but the satellite phenomenon was not present. No specific pattern was elucidated concerning cell size distribution curves between treatment by EDTA and heparin. Theophylline (10 mg/ml) and prostaglandin I2 (1 microM) inhibited EDTA-induced platelet aggregation but aspirin (1.8 mM) did not. On the other hand, these three substances inhibited heparin-induced platelet aggregation. These findings, taken together, suggested that EDTA and heparin initiated platelet activation and EDTA-induced platelet aggregation might be a process unrelated to thromboxane A2 production. Heparin may not be a suitable anticoagulant since it aggregates platelets of some healthy individuals. PMID:8078186

  2. Platelet aggregability and in vivo platelet deposition in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease--evaluation by indium-111-platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Isaka, Y.; Kimura, K.; Uehara, A.; Hashikawa, K.; Mieno, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Handa, N.; Nakabayashi, S.; Imaizumi, M.; Kamada, T. )

    1989-12-15

    In ischemic cerebrovascular disease, it is not clear whether platelet function in vitro actually reflects the situation in vivo. Using indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as a method for detecting platelet activation in vivo, we tried to elucidate this problem. Twenty eight patients with chronic stage of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and 17 control subjects were examined. Platelet scintigrams were positive in 9 of 28 patients in CVD, while all were negative in control. A comparison of the results obtained from qualitative platelet imaging and platelet aggregability was performed to evaluate whether threshold aggregation concentration (TAC) grade differed across the three groups (control, CVD patients without platelet deposition and CVD patients with platelet deposition). CVD patients with platelet deposition showed a higher TAC than those patients who did not show platelet deposition (P less than 0.05) or control subjects without platelet deposition (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that some patients in chronic stages of CVD may have active platelet deposition on carotid atheromatous lesions, and presence of platelet deposition in vivo could contribute to reduce platelet reactivity in peripheral blood.

  3. Platelet aggregability and in vivo platelet deposition in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease--evaluation by indium-111-platelet scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Y; Kimura, K; Uehara, A; Hashikawa, K; Mieno, M; Matsumoto, M; Handa, N; Nakabayashi, S; Imaizumi, M; Kamada, T

    1989-12-15

    In ischemic cerebrovascular disease, it is not clear whether platelet function in vitro actually reflects the situation in vivo. Using indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as a method for detecting platelet activation in vivo, we tried to elucidate this problem. Twenty eight patients with chronic stage of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and 17 control subjects were examined. Platelet scintigrams were positive in 9 of 28 patients in CVD, while all were negative in control. A comparison of the results obtained from qualitative platelet imaging and platelet aggregability was performed to evaluate whether threshold aggregation concentration (TAC) grade differed across the three groups (control, CVD patients without platelet deposition and CVD patients with platelet deposition). CVD patients with platelet deposition showed a higher TAC than those patients who did not show platelet deposition (P less than 0.05) or control subjects without platelet deposition (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that some patients in chronic stages of CVD may have active platelet deposition on carotid atheromatous lesions, and presence of platelet deposition in vivo could contribute to reduce platelet reactivity in peripheral blood. PMID:2633402

  4. Assessment of platelet activation in several different anticoagulants by the Advia 120 Hematology System, fluorescence flow cytometry, and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahnadi, Charaf E; Sabrinah Chapman, E; Lépine, Mariette; Okrongly, David; Pujol-Moix, Nuria; Hernández, Angel; Boughrassa, Faiza; Grant, Andrew M

    2003-11-01

    granules than platelets in CTAD. We conclude that CTAD demonstrates in vitro platelet activation inhibition and may be useful in stabilizing ex vivo platelet activation. The novel platelet activation parameter, MPC, measured by an automated routine hematology system, using customized proprietary software, may be used in conjunction with CTAD, a stabilizing anticoagulant, to measure the ex vivo platelet activation state in whole blood specimens. TEM studies verify shape modifications and simultaneous retention of intracellular granules at early post-venipuncture time periods in CTAD specimens. PMID:14597991

  5. Myeloperoxidase induces the priming of platelets.

    PubMed

    Kolarova, H; Klinke, A; Kremserova, S; Adam, M; Pekarova, M; Baldus, S; Eiserich, J P; Kubala, L

    2013-08-01

    The release of myeloperoxidase (MPO) from polymorphonuclear neutrophils is a hallmark of vascular inflammation and contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular inflammatory processes. However, the effects of MPO on platelets as a contributory mechanism in vascular inflammatory diseases remain unknown. Thus, MPO interaction with platelets and its effects on platelet function were examined. First, dose-dependent binding of MPO (between 1.7 and 13.8nM) to both human and mouse platelets was observed. This was in direct contrast to the absence of MPO in megakaryocytes. MPO was localized both on the surface of and inside platelets. Cytoskeleton inhibition did not prevent MPO localization inside the three-dimensional platelet structure. MPO peroxidase activity was preserved upon the MPO binding to platelets. MPO sequestered in platelets catabolized NO, documented by the decreased production of NO (on average, an approximately 2-fold decrease). MPO treatment did not affect the viability of platelets during short incubations; however, it decreased platelet viability after long-term storage for 7 days (an approximately 2-fold decrease). The activation of platelets by MPO was documented by an MPO-mediated increase in the expression of surface platelet receptors P-selectin and PECAM-1 (of about 5 to 20%) and the increased formation of reactive oxygen species (of about 15 to 200%). However, the activation was only partial, as MPO did not induce the aggregation of platelets nor potentiate platelet response to classical activators. Nor did MPO induce a significant release of the content of granules. The activation of platelets by MPO was connected with increased MPO-treated platelet interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (an approximately 1.2-fold increase) in vitro. In conclusion, it can be suggested that MPO can interact with and activate platelets, which can induce priming of platelets, rather than the classical robust activation of platelets. This can contribute to the

  6. Automation or De-automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlach, Igor; Wessel, Oliver

    2008-09-01

    In the global automotive industry, for decades, vehicle manufacturers have continually increased the level of automation of production systems in order to be competitive. However, there is a new trend to decrease the level of automation, especially in final car assembly, for reasons of economy and flexibility. In this research, the final car assembly lines at three production sites of Volkswagen are analysed in order to determine the best level of automation for each, in terms of manufacturing costs, productivity, quality and flexibility. The case study is based on the methodology proposed by the Fraunhofer Institute. The results of the analysis indicate that fully automated assembly systems are not necessarily the best option in terms of cost, productivity and quality combined, which is attributed to high complexity of final car assembly systems; some de-automation is therefore recommended. On the other hand, the analysis shows that low automation can result in poor product quality due to reasons related to plant location, such as inadequate workers' skills, motivation, etc. Hence, the automation strategy should be formulated on the basis of analysis of all relevant aspects of the manufacturing process, such as costs, quality, productivity and flexibility in relation to the local context. A more balanced combination of automated and manual assembly operations provides better utilisation of equipment, reduces production costs and improves throughput.

  7. Process automation

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs.

  8. Improved light microscopy counting method for accurately counting Plasmodium parasitemia and reticulocytemia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Caeul; Pereira, Ligia; Shardul, Pritish; Mascarenhas, Anjali; Maki, Jennifer; Rixon, Jordan; Shaw-Saliba, Kathryn; White, John; Silveira, Maria; Gomes, Edwin; Chery, Laura; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Duraisingh, Manoj T

    2016-08-01

    Even with the advances in molecular or automated methods for detection of red blood cells of interest (such as reticulocytes or parasitized cells), light microscopy continues to be the gold standard especially in laboratories with limited resources. The conventional method for determination of parasitemia and reticulocytemia uses a Miller reticle, a grid with squares of different sizes. However, this method is prone to errors if not used correctly and counts become inaccurate and highly time-consuming at low frequencies of target cells. In this report, we outline the correct guidelines to follow when using a reticle for counting, and present a new counting protocol that is a modified version of the conventional method for increased accuracy in the counting of low parasitemias and reticulocytemias. Am. J. Hematol. 91:852-855, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27074559

  9. Inhibition of Platelet Aggregation by the Leaf Extract of Carica papaya During Dengue Infection: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Chinnappan, Shobia; Ramachandrappa, Vijayakumar Shettikothanuru; Tamilarasu, Kadhiravan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Pillai, Agiesh Kumar Balakrishna; Rajendiran, Soundravally

    2016-04-01

    Dengue cases were reported to undergo platelet activation and thrombocytopenia by a poorly understood mechanism. Recent studies suggested that Carica papaya leaf extract could recover the platelet count in dengue cases. However, no studies have attempted to unravel the mechanism of the plant extract in platelet recovery. Since there are no available drugs to treat dengue and considering the significance of C. papaya in dengue treatment, the current study aimed to evaluate two research questions: First one is to study if the C. papaya leaf extract exerts its action directly on platelets and second one is to understand if the extract can specifically inhibit the platelet aggregation during dengue viral infection. Sixty subjects with dengue positive and 60 healthy subjects were recruited in the study. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma were prepared from both the dengue-infected and healthy control blood samples. Effect of the leaf extract obtained from C. papaya leaves was assessed on plasma obtained as well as platelets collected from both healthy and dengue-infected individuals. Platelet aggregation was significantly reduced when leaf extract preincubated with dengue plasma was added into control PRP, whereas no change in aggregation when leaf extract incubated-control plasma was added into control PRP. Upon direct addition of C. papaya leaf extract, both dengue PRP and control PRP showed a significant reduction in platelet aggregation. Within the dengue group, PRP from severe and nonsevere cases showed a significant decrease in aggregation without any difference between them. From the study, it is evident that C. papaya leaf extract can directly act on platelet. The present study, the first of its kind, found that the leaf extract possesses a dengue-specific neutralizing effect on dengue viral-infected plasma that may exert a protective role on platelets. PMID:26910599

  10. Effects of lead exposure on the status of platelet indices in workers involved in a lead-acid battery manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Barman, Tapu; Kalahasthi, Ravibabu; Rajmohan, H R

    2014-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effect of Pb exposure on the status of platelet indices in workers exposed to Pb during lead-acid battery plant process. Platelet indices and blood lead levels (BLLs) were determined in 429 male workers. BLLs were determined by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Platelet indices in the samples were quantified by using the Sysmex KX-21 hematology analyzer. The levels of platelet count (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT) and mean platelet mass (MPM) were significantly decreased and platelet distribution width (PDW), platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR) and mean platelet volume were increased with an increase in BLLs. The results of linear multiple regression analysis showed that the platelet count (β -0.143, P=0.005), PCT (β -0.115, P=0.023) and MPM (β -0.110, P=0.030) were negatively associated with BLLs and P-LCR (β 0.122, P=0.016) was positively associated with BLLs. The variable of body mass index showed a positive association with PCT (β 0.105, P=0.032) and MPM (β 0.101, P=0.039). The results of the study may indicate that lead exposure may impair coagulation function through endothelial tissue injury and reduction of nitric oxide. PMID:24849799

  11. Micro-concentration Lipopolysaccharide as a Novel Stimulator of Megakaryocytopoiesis that Synergizes with IL-6 for Platelet Production

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Xie, Jun; Wang, Xuejun; Zou, Bingcheng; Yu, Yin; Jing, Tao; Zhang, Songmei; Zhang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces platelet activation and enhances platelet sensitivity to aggregation, which might alter platelet counts. We found that serial doses of micro-concentration LPS significantly increased the platelet count in mice treated with kanamycin, along with increased expression of IL-6 compared with IL-3 and TPO in megakaryocytes obtained from the mouse bone morrow following LPS administration. Furthermore, LPS at lower levels ranging plus IL-6 effectively stimulated CFU-MK formation and increased CD41 expression and megakaryocyte polyploidization. Meanwhile, there was a sustained rise in the percentage of reticulated platelets in the whole blood in response to low-dosage LPS combined with IL-6. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that the administration of LPS combined with IL-6 substantially enhanced the number of circulating platelets in normal and thrombocytopenic mice. Notably, the optimal LPS concentration in combination with IL-6 might be a novel stimulator of TLR4 and IL-6R expression in Dami cell lines, which initially occurs through TLR4-IL-6R crosstalk and then involves the activation of NF-κB and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. These data suggest a new paradigm for the regulation of megakaryocytopoiesis and platelet production via a synergistic effect of LPS and IL-6, which has the potential to be used for the design of new therapies. PMID:26330186

  12. Automation pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An important concept of the Action Information Management System (AIMS) approach is to evaluate office automation technology in the context of hands on use by technical program managers in the conduct of human acceptance difficulties which may accompany the transition to a significantly changing work environment. The improved productivity and communications which result from application of office automation technology are already well established for general office environments, but benefits unique to NASA are anticipated and these will be explored in detail.

  13. Automated Urinalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Information from NASA Tech Briefs assisted DiaSys Corporation in the development of the R/S 2000 which automates urinalysis, eliminating most manual procedures. An automatic aspirator is inserted into a standard specimen tube, the "Sample" button is pressed, and within three seconds a consistent amount of urine sediment is transferred to a microscope. The instrument speeds up, standardizes, automates and makes urine analysis safer. Additional products based on the same technology are anticipated.

  14. Counting Sheep in Basque

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Frank P.

    1975-01-01

    Demonstrates the interplay of a cognitive system, the Basque numerative system, and a behavioral one, counting sheep. The significant features of the Basque numerative system are analyzed; then it is shown how use of these features facilitates the counting of sheep on open ranges by Basque sheep farmers in California. (Author/RM)

  15. The Makah Counting Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinn, Arlington A., Jr.

    The first edition of the counting workbook centers around the numbers from 1 to 100 and focuses on number and set concepts. The workbook introduces the Makah spelling of each number and reinforces the spelling with exercises such as matching words to numbers, writing the words, counting symbols, and circling the correct number. Spaced throughout…

  16. Complexities of Counting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stake, Bernadine Evans

    This document focuses on one child's skip counting methods. The pupil, a second grade student at Steuben School, in Kankakee, Illinois, was interviewed as she made several attempts at counting twenty-five poker chips on a circular piece of paper. The interview was part of a larger study of "Children's Conceptions of Number and Numeral," funded by…

  17. Effects of the new glycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin on platelet function and blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Agnelli, G; Longetti, M; Guerciolini, R; Menichetti, F; Grasselli, S; Boldrini, F; Bucaneve, G; Nenci, G G; Del Favero, A

    1987-01-01

    Teicoplanin, a new glycopeptide antibiotic, is structurally related to ristocetin, an antibiotic known to induce human platelet agglutination and, thus, thrombocytopenia and thromboembolic side effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of teicoplanin on platelet function in vitro and ex vivo and on blood coagulation ex vivo. In the in vitro studies, spontaneous platelet aggregation; platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, and ristocetin; and the release of beta-thromboglobulin from platelets were assessed. Platelets from healthy subjects were incubated with teicoplanin at final concentrations of 100, 1,500, 5,000, and 10,000 micrograms/ml. The maximal achievable concentration with therapeutic doses is 100 micrograms/ml. When compared with saline, teicoplanin at concentrations of 100 and 1,500 micrograms/ml had no effect on platelet function, but at concentrations of 5,000 and 10,000 micrograms/ml, it induced greater spontaneous platelet aggregation (P less than 0.01) and inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, and ristocetin (P less than 0.01). Teicoplanin at concentrations of 100, 1,500, and 5,000 micrograms/ml did not induce the release of beta-thromboglobulin, in contrast to teicoplanin at a concentration of 10,000 micrograms/ml and ristocetin at a concentration of 1.5 mg/ml (P less than 0.01). In the ex vivo studies, platelet count, bleeding time, plasma beta-thromboglobulin, platelet aggregation induced by ADP, ristocetin, and epinephrine, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin clotting time, and serum fibrinogen degradation products were evaluated at days 0, 3, and 6 and at 72 h after the end of therapy. All subjects completed the study without evidence of side effects. When compared with the pretreatment values, none of the values from these assays showed a significant change at any time during and after treatment. We concluded that platelet function and blood coagulation are not affected by

  18. Using a Filtration Technique to Isolate Platelet Free Plasma for Assaying Pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    TOLOUIAN, RAMIN; CONNERY, SEAN M.; O’NEILL, W. CHARLES; GUPTA, AJAY

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Vascular calcification (VC) is a strong prognostic marker of mortality from cardiovascular disease. Extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) is a critical inhibitor of vascular calcification and it has been reported that hemodialysis patients have reduced plasma PPi levels, suggesting that altered PPi metabolism could contribute to VC in hemodialysis patients. Platelets are rich in PPi and release of PPi from platelets during storage or processing of plasma can lead to falsely elevated plasma PPi levels. To prepare plasma samples that are suitable for measuring PPi levels, ultracentrifugation has been used to remove platelets. Consequently, plasma PPi measurements have been limited to research laboratories since the majority of clinical laboratories do not have access to an ultracentrifuge. The purpose of the present study was to test the validity of an improved method of preparing platelet free plasma that uses filtration with a 300,000 Dalton molecular weight cut-off filter to exclude platelets, while minimizing their release of PPi. Methods In 20 maintenance hemodialysis patients, PPi levels were measured in plasma samples prepared by the conventional technique of low-speed centrifugation to remove red and white blood cells versus a novel filtration technique. Results Plasma prepared by filtration had significantly lower platelet counts (0 vs. 3 – 7 103/μL) and PPi levels (1.39 ± 0.30 μM vs. 2.74 ± 1.19 μM; mean ± SD, p < 0.01). Conclusions The filtration method appears effective in excluding platelets without causing trauma to platelets and can be used by clinical laboratories to prepare platelet-depleted plasma for PPi measurement. PMID:23289181

  19. Comparison of the effect of calcium gluconate and batroxobin on the release of transforming growth factor beta 1 in canine platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical use of autologous platelet concentrates (also known as platelet-rich plasma) on the field of regenerative therapy, in the last decade has been the subject of several studies especially in equine medicine and surgery. The objectives of this study was: 1) to describe and compare the cellular population in whole blood, lower fraction (A) and upper fraction (B) of platelet concentrates, 2) to measure and compare the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration in plasma and both platelet concentrates after be activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate and, 3) to determine correlations between cell counts in platelet concentrates and concentrations of TGF-β1. Blood samples were taken from 16 dogs for complete blood count, plasma collection and platelet concentrates preparation. The platelet concentrates (PC) were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). The Platelet concentrates were analyzed by hemogram. After activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate, TGF-β1 concentration was determined in supernatants of platelet concentrates and plasma. Results There were differences statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the platelet count and leukocyte count and TGF-β1 concentration between whole blood, plasma and both platelet concentrates. A significant correlation was found between the number of platelets in both platelet concentrates and TGF-β1 concentration. Platelet collection efficiency was 46.34% and 28.16% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. TGF-β1 concentration efficiency for PC activated with calcium gluconate was 47.75% and 31.77%, for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. PC activated with batroxobin plus CG showed 46.87% and 32.24% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. Conclusions The methodology used in this study allows the concentration of a number of platelets and TGF-β1 that might be acceptable for a biological

  20. Preparation of small volume, leuko and erythrocyte very poor platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Valbonesi, M; Angelini, G; Malfanti, L; Lercari, G; Fella, M; Calderisi, S; Anselmo, A; Balistreri, M

    1986-05-01

    Recently developed automated discontinuous flow centrifuge (DFC) separators can produce leuko- and erythrocyte-poor platelet concentrates (PC). According to general experience with these machines it is difficult to obtain more than 4 X 10(11) platelets, though a second program set up by Coffe et al. appears to produce PC containing approximately 5 X 10(11) platelets suspended in a plasma volume of 390 ml. At our center we employed a new Dideco cell separator equipped with the surge pump and a technique developed for the production of small volume, RBC and WBC-very poor PC. In 60 routine procedures we obtained the following results: mean processing time 87 +/- 11 minutes; final volume of PC 136 +/- 19 ml, with a mean platelet yield of 5.21 X 10(11) platelets. WBC contamination was 1.8 X 10(8) (93% lymphocytes) and RBC were 3.1 X 10(8). Plasma volume as well as WBC and RBC contamination were reduced by recirculating PC after the 6th pass. The demand for single donor platelet concentrates (PC) is increasing progressively. Recently developed automated cell separators can produce leukocyte (WBC) and erythrocyte (RBC) poor PC. With these machines it may be difficult to obtain PC containing at least 4 X 10(11) platelets and less than 1 X 10(9) leukocytes (1, 2, 3) since donor variables such as hematocrit, precounts, buffy coat formation and initial plasma light transmission are of paramount importance for the efficiency of the program. At our center a prototype discontinuous flow centrifuge (DFC) cell separator equipped with the surge pump was studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3733246

  1. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  2. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  3. Cathepsin G-Dependent Modulation of Platelet Thrombus Formation In Vivo by Blood Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Faraday, Nauder; Schunke, Kathryn; Saleem, Sofiyan; Fu, Juan; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Morrell, Craig; Dore, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are consistently associated with arterial thrombotic morbidity in human clinical studies but the causal basis for this association is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that neutrophils modulate platelet activation and thrombus formation in vivo in a cathepsin G-dependent manner. Neutrophils enhanced aggregation of human platelets in vitro in dose-dependent fashion and this effect was diminished by pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G activity and knockdown of cathepsin G expression. Tail bleeding time in the mouse was prolonged by a cathepsin G inhibitor and in cathepsin G knockout mice, and formation of neutrophil-platelet conjugates in blood that was shed from transected tails was reduced in the absence of cathepsin G. Bleeding time was highly correlated with blood neutrophil count in wildtype but not cathepsin G deficient mice. In the presence of elevated blood neutrophil counts, the anti-thrombotic effect of cathepsin G inhibition was greater than that of aspirin and additive to it when administered in combination. Both pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence prolonged the time for platelet thrombus to form in ferric chloride-injured mouse mesenteric arterioles. In a vaso-occlusive model of ischemic stroke, inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence improved cerebral blood flow, reduced histologic brain injury, and improved neurobehavioral outcome. These experiments demonstrate that neutrophil cathepsin G is a physiologic modulator of platelet thrombus formation in vivo and has potential as a target for novel anti-thrombotic therapies. PMID:23940756

  4. Platelet-rich plasma as treatment for persistent ocular epithelial defects.

    PubMed

    Ronci, Corrado; Ferraro, Angelo Salvatore; Lanti, Alessandro; Missiroli, Filippo; Sinopoli, Silvia; Del Proposto, Gianpaolo; Cipriani, Chiara; De Felici, Cecilia; Ricci, Federico; Ciotti, Marco; Cudillo, Laura; Arcese, William; Adorno, Gaspare

    2015-06-01

    Platelet- rich plasma (PRP) exhibits regenerative proprieties in wound healing but the biochemical mechanisms are unclear. In this study, autologous PRP with a mean value of 338 × 10(3) platelets/µL was used to treat corneal lesions of different aetiology, while homologous PRP with 1 × 10(6) platelets/µL was used to treat cornel lesions induced by a graft versus host disease. The impact of platelet count on the levels of PDGF AA and BB, VEGF, and EGF in the two PRPs was evaluated after a cycle of freezing/thawing. Treated corneal lesions healed or improved. The levels of PDGF AA and BB, VEGF, and EGF in the autologous PRP raised from 296 ± 61; 201.8 ± 24; 53 ± 14 and 8.9 ± 2 to 1017 ± 253; 924.7 ± 222; 101 ± 46.5 and 174 ± 15.5 pg/mL, while in the homologous PRP were 3.4, 4.5, 3.2 and 2 folds higher, respectively. High level of platelet counts seems not required to treat corneal lesions. PMID:25728718

  5. Platelet participation in the pathogenesis of dermonecrosis induced by Loxosceles gaucho venom.

    PubMed

    Tavares, F L; Peichoto, M E; Marcelino, J R; Barbaro, K C; Cirillo, M C; Santoro, M L; Sano-Martins, I S

    2016-06-01

    Loxosceles gaucho spider venom induces in vitro platelet activation and marked thrombocytopenia in rabbits. Herein, we investigated the involvement of platelets in the development of the dermonecrosis induced by L. gaucho venom, using thrombocytopenic rabbits as a model. L. gaucho venom evoked a drop in platelet and neutrophil counts 4 h after venom injection. Ecchymotic areas at the site of venom inoculation were noticed as soon as 4 h in thrombocytopenic animals but not in animals with initial normal platelet counts. After 5 days, areas of scars in thrombocytopenic animals were also larger, evidencing the marked development of lesions in the condition of thrombocytopenia. Histologically, local hemorrhage, collagen fiber disorganization, and edema were more severe in thrombocytopenic animals. Leukocyte infiltration, predominantly due to polymorphonuclears, was observed in the presence or not of thrombocytopenia. Thrombus formation was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry at the microvasculature, and it occurred even under marked thrombocytopenia. Taken together, platelets have an important role in minimizing not only the hemorrhagic phenomena but also the inflammatory and wound-healing processes, suggesting that cutaneous loxoscelism may be aggravated under thrombocytopenic conditions. PMID:26253591

  6. Romiplostim promotes platelet recovery in a mouse model of multicycle chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Patricia L; Wei, Ping; Buck, Keri; Sinclair, Angus M; Eschenberg, Michael; Sasu, Barbra; Molineux, Graham

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia can lead to chemotherapy treatment delays or dose reductions. The ability of romiplostim, a thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetic, to promote platelet recovery in a mouse model of multicycle chemotherapy/radiation therapy (CRT)-induced thrombocytopenia was examined. In humans, an inverse relationship between platelet counts and endogenous TPO (eTPO) concentration exists. In a CRT mouse model, eTPO was not elevated during the first 5 days after CRT treatment (the "eTPO gap"), then increased to a peak 10 days after each CRT treatment in an inverse relationship to platelet counts seen in humans. To bridge the eTPO gap, mice were treated with 10-1,000 μg/kg of romiplostim on day 0, 1, or 2 after CRT. In some mice, the romiplostim dose was approximately divided over 3 days. Platelet recovery occurred faster with romiplostim in most conditions tested. Romiplostim doses of ≥100 μg/kg given on day 0 significantly lessened the platelet nadir. Fractionating the dose over 3 days did not appear to confer a large advantage. These data may provide a rationale for clinical studies of romiplostim in chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. PMID:25754671

  7. Genetics Home Reference: gray platelet syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to play a role in the formation of alpha-granules, which are sacs inside platelets that contain ... injury that causes bleeding, the proteins stored in alpha-granules help platelets stick to one another to ...

  8. Effect of photodynamic therapy on mouse platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuannong; Chi, Shunji; Deng, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hua; Liang, Junlin; Ha, Xian-wen

    1993-06-01

    Normal mice received hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) i.v. prior to red light irradiation and the platelet-rich plasma was prepared and irradiated by red light. The platelets were processed for EM examination and stereological analysis. It was shown the 16 hrs after irradiation almost all platelets were necrotized; 8 hours after irradiation about one fourth of the platelets were necrotized and the remaining were considerably damaged. Immediately after irradiation a small number of platelets became necrotic and most other platelets were swollen and deformated, showing significantly increased mean area, perimeter and short axis, and mean cell volume and cell surface area. The findings indicate that platelets are highly sensitive to PDT action and can be directly and rapidly damaged by PDT even in the absence of vascular endothelial cells. The early platelet photoactivation may play an important role in the initiation of early vascular damage and microcirculatory alterations induced by PDT in vivo.

  9. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  10. CD8(+) T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8(+) T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8(+) splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8(+) splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8(+) splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  11. Comparative evaluation of antiplatelet effect of lycopene with aspirin and the effect of their combination on platelet aggregation: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sawardekar, Swapna B.; Patel, Tejal C.; Uchil, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The objective was to compare antiplatelet effect of lycopene with aspirin and to study effect of combination of the two on platelet aggregation in vitro, using platelets from healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: Platelets were harvested; platelet count of platelet-rich plasma adjusted to 2.5 Χ 105/μL. Aspirin (140 μmol/L) and lycopene (4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 μmol/L) were studied in vitro against adenosine-5’- diphosphate (ADP) (2.5 μM/L) and collagen Results: All the concentrations of lycopene (4–12 μmol/L) exhibited reduction in maximum platelet aggregation induced by aggregating agents ADP and collagen (P < 0.01 vs. vehicle) and were comparable with aspirin. Lycopene at concentration 10 μmol/L showed maximum platelet inhibition (47.05% ± 19.56%) against ADP, whereas lycopene at concentration 8 μmol/L showed maximum platelet inhibition (54.26% ± 30.71%) against collagen. Four μmol/L of lycopene combined with 140 μmol/L and 70 μmol/L aspirin showed greater inhibition of platelets as compared to aspirin 140 μmol/L alone, against both ADP and collagen. Conclusion: The study favorably compares lycopene and aspirin with respect to their antiplatelet activities against ADP and collagen. Lycopene can be considered as a potential target for modifying the thrombotic and pro-inflammatory events associated with platelet activation. PMID:26997718

  12. Kinetics and sites of destruction of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a quantitative study

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns, A.D.; Loetter, M.G.; Badenhorst, P.N.; de Kock, F.; Pieters, H.; Herbst, C.; van Reenen, O.R.; Kotze, H.; Minnaar, P.C.

    1982-04-01

    Kinetics and quantification of the sites of destruction of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled autologous platelets were investigated in eight patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. The mean platelet count was 17 +/- 9 X 10(9)/liter; platelets were separated by differential centrifugation and labeled with 5.6 +/- 2.5 MBq /sup 111/In. Whole body and organ /sup 111/In-platelet distribution was quantitated with a scintillation camera and a computer-assisted imaging system acquisition matrix. Areas of interest were selected with the computer and organ /sup 111/In-radioactivity expressed as a percentage of whole body activity. Mean platelet survival was 49.5 +/- 29.6 hr and the survival curves were exponential. Equilibrium percentage organ /sup 111/In-radioactivity was (normal values in parentheses): spleen 33.7 +/- 8.8 (31.1 +/- 10.2); liver 16.1 +/- 9.5 (13.1 +/- 1.3); thorax 22.8 +/- 3.7 (28.2 +/- 5.6). Percentage organ /sup 111/In-activity at the time when labeled platelets had disappeared from the circulation was: spleen 44.5 +/- 16.4 (40 +/- 16); liver 16.0 +/- 11.5 (32.4 +/- 7.2); thorax 19.7 +/- 6.0 (17.7 +/- 10.3). Thorax activity corresponds to bone marrow radioactivity. Three patterns of platelet sequestration were evident. Three patients had mainly splenic sequestration, two mainly hepatic sequestration, and three diffuse reticuloendothelial system sequestration with a major component of platelets destroyed in the bone marrow. Splenectomy was performed in two patients. The pattern of /sup 111/In-platelet sequestration was not predictive of response of glucocorticoid therapy or indicative of the necessity for splenectomy. Quantitative /sup 111/In-labeled autologous platelet kinetic studies provide a new tool for the investigation of platelet disorders.U

  13. New treatment for low platelets.

    PubMed

    Grodeck, B

    1995-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved WinRho SD, a new treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). A clinical trial in children with acute ITP found that WinRho SD is as effective as IVIG or prednisone, but less expensive and dramatically easier to administer. WinRho SD is the first polyclonal antibody product shown to increase platelets in ITP patients. Platelets usually rise within one to two days and peak within seven to fourteen days after initial therapy. On average, platelet levels are maintained for approximately thirty days. Each year, 50,000 people nationally suffer from ITP as a complication of HIV infection, while another 18,000 manifest the disease as a primary condition. PMID:11362579

  14. Megakaryocyte rupture for acute platelet needs

    PubMed Central

    Stritt, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Circulating platelets were thought to arise solely from the protrusion and fragmentation of megakaryocyte cytoplasm. Now, Nishimura et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201410052) show that platelet release from megakaryocytes can be induced by interleukin-1α (IL-1α) via a new rupture mechanism, which yields higher platelet numbers, occurs independently of the key regulator of megakaryopoiesis thrombopoietin, and may occur during situations of acute platelet need. PMID:25963815

  15. Megakaryocyte rupture for acute platelet needs.

    PubMed

    Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stritt, Simon

    2015-05-11

    Circulating platelets were thought to arise solely from the protrusion and fragmentation of megakaryocyte cytoplasm. Now, Nishimura et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201410052) show that platelet release from megakaryocytes can be induced by interleukin-1α (IL-1α) via a new rupture mechanism, which yields higher platelet numbers, occurs independently of the key regulator of megakaryopoiesis thrombopoietin, and may occur during situations of acute platelet need. PMID:25963815

  16. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  17. Sublattice counting and orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Orlando, Domenico; Reffert, Susanne

    2010-06-01

    Abelian orbifolds of mathbb{C}3 are known to be encoded by hexagonal brane tilings. To date it is not known how to count all such orbifolds. We fill this gap by employing number theoretic techniques from crystallography, and by making use of Polya's Enumeration Theorem. The results turn out to be beautifully encoded in terms of partition functions and Dirichlet series. The same methods apply to counting orbifolds of any toric non-compact Calabi-Yau singularity. As additional examples, we count the orbifolds of the conifold, of the L aba theories, and of mathbb{C}4.

  18. Antiplatelet drugs in patients with enhanced platelet turnover: biomarkers versus platelet function testing.

    PubMed

    Freynhofer, Matthias K; Gruber, Susanne C; Grove, Erik L; Weiss, Thomas W; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2015-08-31

    Platelets are key players in atherothrombosis. Antiplatelet therapy comprising aspirin alone or with P2Y12-inhibitors are effective for prevention of atherothrombotic complications. However, there is interindividual variability in the response to antiplatelet drugs, leaving some patients at increased risk of recurrent atherothrombotic events. Several risk factors associated with high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), including elevated platelet turnover, have been identified. Platelet turnover is adequately estimated from the fraction of reticulated platelets. Reticulated platelets are young platelets, characterised by residual messenger RNA. They are larger, haemostatically more active and there is evidence that platelet turnover is a causal and prognostic factor in atherothrombotic disease. Whether platelet turnover per se represents a key factor in pathogenesis, progression and prognosis of atherothrombotic diseases (with focus on acute coronary syndromes) or whether it merely facilitates insufficient platelet inhibition will be discussed in this state-of-the art review. PMID:26272640

  19. Risk Factors and Impact of Secondary Failure of Platelet Recovery After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Yu; Kanda, Junya; Gomyo, Ayumi; Hayakawa, Jin; Komiya, Yusuke; Harada, Naonori; Kameda, Kazuaki; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Ishihara, Yuko; Kawamura, Koji; Sakamoto, Kana; Sato, Miki; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Kimura, Shun-Ichi; Kikuchi, Misato; Nakasone, Hideki; Kako, Shinichi; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2016-09-01

    Secondary failure of platelet recovery (SFPR), a late decrease in the platelet count after primary platelet recovery that is not due to relapse or graft rejection, occasionally occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk factors and impact of SFPR on transplantation outcomes are not well known in the clinical setting. Therefore, we retrospectively evaluated 184 adult patients who underwent their first allogeneic HSCT and achieved primary platelet recovery. The cumulative incidence of SFPR, defined as a decrease in the platelet count to below 20,000/µL for more than 7 days, was 12.2% at 3 years, with a median onset of 81 days (range, 39 to 729) after HSCT. Among patients who developed SFPR (n = 23), 19 (82.6%) showed recovery to a sustained platelet count of more than 20,000/µL without transfusion support, and the median duration of SFPR was 23 days (range, 7 to 1048 days). A multivariate analysis showed that in vivo T cell depletion (hazard ratio [HR], 6.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.31 to 20.7; P < .001), grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (HR, 3.99; 95% CI, 1.52 to 10.5; P = .005), and the use of ganciclovir or valganciclovir (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.05 to 7.77; P = .039) were associated with an increased risk for SFPR. The occurrence of SFPR as a time-dependent covariate was significantly associated with inferior overall survival (HR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.18 to 4.46; P = .015) in a multivariate analysis. These findings may help to improve the management and treatment strategy for SFPR. PMID:27288954

  20. Multiscale model of platelet translocation and collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiwei; Mody, Nipa A.; King, Michael R.

    2013-07-01

    The tethering of platelets on the injured vessel surface mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) - Von Willebrand factor (vWF) bonds, as well as the interaction between flowing platelets and adherent platelets, are two key events that take place immediately following blood vessel injury. This early-stage platelet deposition and accumulation triggers the initiation of hemostasis, a self-defensive mechanism to prevent the body from excessive blood loss. To understand and predict this complex process, one must integrate experimentally determined information on the mechanics and biochemical kinetics of participating receptors over very small time frames (1-1000 μs) and length scales (10-100 nm), to collective phenomena occurring over seconds and tens of microns. In the present study, a unique three dimensional multiscale computational model, Platelet Adhesive Dynamics (PAD), was applied to elucidate the unique physics of (i) a non-spherical, disk-shaped platelet interacting and tethering onto the damaged vessel wall followed by (ii) collisional interactions between a flowing platelet with a downstream adherent platelet. By analyzing numerous simulations under different physiological conditions, we conclude that the platelet's unique spheroid-shape provides heterogeneous, orientation-dependent translocation (rolling) behavior which enhances cell-wall interactions. We also conclude that platelet-platelet near field interactions are critical for cell-cell communication during the initiation of microthrombi. The PAD model described here helps to identify the physical factors that control the initial stages of platelet capture during this process.

  1. New Horizons in Platelets Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Saboor, Muhammad; Moinuddin, Moinuddin; Ilyas, Samina

    2013-01-01

    Platelet flow cytometry is an emerging tool in diagnostic and therapeutic hematology. It is eminently suited to study the expression of platelet surface receptors both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. It can serve as a useful marker for the documentation of in vivo platelet activation, and thus, fore-warn the risk of thromboembolism in patients with diabetes mellitus, coronary syndromes, peripheral vascular diseases, and pre-eclampsia. This technique can also be extended to study and compare the effect of various antiplatelet drugs on the level of activation of platelets and to establish any dose-effect relationship of these drugs. Topographical localization of platelet granules and study of platelet-platelet and platelet-leukocyte interaction is also possible by this procedure. All these parameters serve as pointers towards the presence of activated platelets in the circulation with its thromboembolic consequences. This is a simple reliable and cost effective technique which has a wide application in the diagnosis of various inherited and acquired platelet disorders. Study of platelet cluster of differentiation (CD) markers in various inherited disorders i.e. Bernard Soulier’s disease, von Willebrand disease, Glanzman’s disease, and Grey platelet syndrome may help categories the molecular lesions in these oft under-studied disorders. PMID:23983579

  2. Habitat automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swab, Rodney E.

    1992-01-01

    A habitat, on either the surface of the Moon or Mars, will be designed and built with the proven technologies of that day. These technologies will be mature and readily available to the habitat designer. We believe an acceleration of the normal pace of automation would allow a habitat to be safer and more easily maintained than would be the case otherwise. This document examines the operation of a habitat and describes elements of that operation which may benefit from an increased use of automation. Research topics within the automation realm are then defined and discussed with respect to the role they can have in the design of the habitat. Problems associated with the integration of advanced technologies into real-world projects at NASA are also addressed.

  3. Mechanism of platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor and microparticle formation under high shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Reininger, Armin J.; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Schumann, Hannah; Specht, Hanno M.; Schramm, Wolfgang; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe here the mechanism of platelet adhesion to immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF) and subsequent formation of platelet-derived microparticles mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) under high shear stress. As visualized in whole blood perfused in a flow chamber, platelet attachment to VWF involved one or few membrane areas of 0.05 to 0.1 μm2 that formed discrete adhesion points (DAPs) capable of resisting force in excess of 160 pN. Under the influence of hydrodynamic drag, membrane tethers developed between the moving platelet body and DAPs firmly adherent to immobilized VWF. Continued stretching eventually caused the separation of many such tethers, leaving on the surface tube-shaped or spherical microparticles with a diameter as low as 50 to 100 nm. Adhesion receptors (GPIbα, αIIbβ3) and phosphatidylserine were expressed on the surface of these microparticles, which were procoagulant. Shearing platelet-rich plasma at the rate of 10 000 s–1 in a cone-and-plate viscosimeter increased microparticle counts up to 55-fold above baseline. Blocking the GPIb-VWF interaction abolished microparticle generation in both experimental conditions. Thus, a biomechanical process mediated by GPIbα-VWF bonds in rapidly flowing blood may not only initiate platelet arrest onto reactive vascular surfaces but also generate procoagulant microparticles that further enhance thrombus formation. PMID:16449527

  4. Effects on platelet function of combination etoposide and carboplatin chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, P; Properzi, E; Pisani, M; Clerico, A; Schiavetti, A; Lenti, L; Pulcinelli, F M; Ferroni, P; Gazzaniga, P P

    1998-01-01

    The effects of a therapeutic course of the combination of carboplatin and etoposide on platelet function have been evaluated in 10 pediatric patients with brain tumors. Platelet count, in vitro aggregation tests, P-selectin expression and agonist-induced ATP release were evaluated before, and 7 and 15 days after one cycle of chemotherapy. The analysis of the results demonstrated the presence of an in vitro platelet aggregation defect in response to collagen and arachidonic acid in all patients 7 days after therapy. A concomitant decrease of collagen- and arachidonic acid-induced ATP release was also observed. Both platelet aggregation and ATP release returned to baseline values 15 days after chemotherapy administration. Conversely, in vitro platelet aggregation and secretion induced by ADP and epinephrine were unaltered by carboplatin and etoposide administration. Furthermore, P-selectin expression was negative at baseline and did not change after chemotherapy. These results support the hypothesis that combination etoposide and carboplatin chemotherapy in pediatric patients is responsible for possible disturbances in biochemical pathways required for platelet secretion and aggregation. PMID:16793755

  5. [Diagnosis of inherited diseases of platelet function. Interdisciplinary S2K guideline of the Permanent Paediatric Committee of the Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research (GTH e. V.)].

    PubMed

    Knöfler, R; Eberl, W; Schulze, H; Bakchoul, T; Bergmann, F; Gehrisch, S; Geisen, C; Gottstein, S; Halimeh, S; Harbrecht, U; Kappert, G; Kirchmaier, C; Kehrel, B; Lösche, W; Krause, M; Mahnel, R; Meyer, O; Pilgrimm, A K; Pillitteri, D; Rott, H; Santoso, S; Siegemund, A; Schambeck, C; Scheer, M; Schmugge, M; Scholl, T; Strauss, G; Zieger, B; Zotz, R; Hermann, M; Streif, W

    2014-01-01

    Congenital disorders of platelet function are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are often not detected until bleeding occurs. In clinical settings only a few methods have proven to be useful for identification and classification of inherited platelet disorders. For a rational diagnostic approach, a stepwise algorithm is recommended. Patient history and clinical investigation are mandatory. Von Willebrand disease and other coagulation disorders should always be ruled out prior to specific platelet testing. Platelet count, size, volume (MPV) and morphology may guide further investigations. The PFA-100® CT is suited for screening for severe platelet defects. Platelet aggregometry allows assessment of multiple aspects of platelet function. Flow cytometry enables diagnosis of thrombasthenia Glanzmann, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and storage pool defects. Molecular genetics may confirm a putative diagnosis or pave the way for identifying new defects. We present an unabridged version of the interdisciplinary guideline. PMID:24903476

  6. Storage of platelets in earth orbit. Effect of gravity and the formulation of plastic storage containers on platelet IgG and C3.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, I O; Odgren, P R; Teno, R A; Jacobson, M S; Surgenor, D M

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the effects of gravitational force and three different plastic formulations of the storage bags on the quality of stored platelets by measuring the changes in platelet-associated immunoglobulin G (IgG) and two antigenic markers of the third component of human complement (C3), C3d and C3c. Pooled platelets were stored in parallel at microgravity (MG) and on the ground (1 g) using three different plastic polymers: (1) polyvinylchloride (PVC) plasticized with di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP); (2) PVC plasticized with trioctyl trimellitate (TOTM), and (3) unplasticized polyolefin (PO). The IgG and C3 were quantified by an automated antiglobulin consumption test in freeze/thaw disrupted platelets (total IgG or C3). The baseline values for platelet associated IgG and C3, measured after 2.5 days of storage at 1 g just prior to the launch, fell within the normal range. Following an additional 6.5 day storage, platelets stored at MG had accumulated significantly less C3d than those stored at 1 g, suggesting that MG storage was beneficial. Specific plastic formulations also exerted a significant effect on the accumulation of these immunoproteins, the effect being particularly pronounced at MG. The smallest increases of IgG and C3 were seen in platelets stored in TOTM and the largest in those stored in DEHP. It is possible that further studies at MG would permit a clear characterization of the effects of other independent storage variables. PMID:2781740

  7. Inventory count strategies.

    PubMed

    Springer, W H

    1996-02-01

    An important principle of accounting is that asset inventory needs to be correctly valued to ensure that the financial statements of the institution are accurate. Errors is recording the value of ending inventory in one fiscal year result in errors to published financial statements for that year as well as the subsequent fiscal year. Therefore, it is important that accurate physical counts be periodically taken. It is equally important that any system being used to generate inventory valuation, reordering or management reports be based on consistently accurate on-hand balances. At the foundation of conducting an accurate physical count of an inventory is a comprehensive understanding of the process coupled with a written plan. This article presents a guideline of the physical count processes involved in a traditional double-count approach. PMID:10165241

  8. Calorie count - Alcoholic beverages

    MedlinePlus

    ... want to watch how much you drink. Cocktails mixed with soda, cream, or ice cream can have especially high calorie counts. If you find you are having trouble cutting back on alcohol , talk with your doctor. Here is a list ...

  9. Counting Knights and Knaves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin,Oscar; Roberts, Gerri M.

    2013-01-01

    To understand better some of the classic knights and knaves puzzles, we count them. Doing so reveals a surprising connection between puzzles and solutions, and highlights some beautiful combinatorial identities.

  10. [Automatic platelets numbering with citrate as anticoagulant: is the result valid?].

    PubMed

    Védy, Serge; Boom, Bruno; Perez, Pascale; Schillinger, Sarah; Ragot, Céline; Bakkouch, Sylvie; Puyhardy, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Platelets count is usually realised on EDTA anticoagulant. This one is sometimes able to generate platelets agregats. That is the reason why the first thing to do encountering thrombopenia is to check for agregats on blood thin smear. In case of positive result, a control can be asked using another anticoagulant. The most used is sodium citrate. A correction has to be applied to the automat result because blood is diluted in anticoagulant. But no one says those haematological automats are exact on citrate as they are on EDTA. That's what we wanted to check. PMID:21896411

  11. Particular RNA fragments as promoters of leukocyte and platelet formation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Beljanski, M; Plawecki, M

    1979-01-01

    Under well-defined conditions, ribosomal RNA from Escherichia coli is fragmented by pancreatic ribonuclease, leading to the appearance of particular RNA fragments. Some of these fragments act as primers for in vitro replication of DNA extracted from blood-cell and platelet-forming tissues. In experimental rabbits they restore in a rapid and harmless way normal circulating leukocyte and platelet levels when these have been drastically decreased by various chemotherapeutic agents mainly used in anticancer therapy. Imbalance between polynuclear and lymphocyte count provoked in rabbits by cyclophosphamide can be rapidly corrected by treating the animal with active RNA fragments. PMID:381069

  12. Platelet uptake of serotonin (5-HT) during ethanol withdrawal in male alcoholics

    SciTech Connect

    Neiman, J.; Beving, H.; Malmgren, R.

    1987-06-15

    Changes in the kinetic variables of the platelet serotonin uptake, Km and Vmax, were studied in 7 male alcoholics, admitted for detoxification and in sex- and age-matched volunteers. On admission the alcoholics had lower Km values than reference subjects (p less than 0.05). During detoxification the Km values normalized. Vmax was normal throughout the study in spite of the changes in platelet count. The results of the study suggest that the affinity of serotonin to its uptake receptor is transiently increased after a period of heavy drinking.

  13. Exploratory studies of extended storage of apheresis platelets in a platelet additive solution (PAS).

    PubMed

    Slichter, Sherrill J; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bailey, S Lawrence; Bolgiano, Doug

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the poststorage viability of apheresis platelets stored for up to 18 days in 80% platelet additive solution (PAS)/20% plasma, 117 healthy subjects donated platelets using the Haemonetics MCS+, COBE Spectra (Spectra), or Trima Accel (Trima) systems. Control platelets from the same subjects were compared with their stored test PAS platelets by radiolabeling their stored and control platelets with either (51)chromium or (111)indium. Trima platelets met Food and Drug Administration poststorage platelet viability criteria for only 7 days vs almost 13 days for Haemonetics platelets; ie, platelet recoveries after these storage times averaged 44 ± 3% vs 49 ± 3% and survivals were 5.4 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.3 days, respectively. The differences in storage duration are likely related to both the collection system and the storage bag. The Spectra and Trima platelets were hyperconcentrated during collection, and PAS was added, whereas the Haemonetics platelets were elutriated with PAS, which may have resulted in less collection injury. When Spectra and Trima platelets were stored in Haemonetics' bags, poststorage viability was significantly improved. Platelet viability is better maintained in vitro than in vivo, allowing substantial increases in platelet storage times. However, implementation will require resolution of potential bacterial overgrowth during storage. PMID:24258816

  14. Loss of 5-hydroxytryptamine from mammalian circulating labelled platelets

    PubMed Central

    Osim, E. E.; Wyllie, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    1. Platelets were obtained from three species of animal: rats, rabbits and dogs. They were labelled with 111In oxine to tag individual platelets and with 14C-labelled 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Doubly labelled platelets from rabbits and dogs were returned to their donors; in the case of rats the platelets were injected intravenously into other, identical rats. At time intervals from 2 to 64 hr, blood samples were drawn and platelets were collected. 111In and 14C were separately counted. In some experiments animals received the 5-HT precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) I.P. (for rats and rabbits) or subcutaneously (for dogs) in a dose of 20 mg/kg daily to accelerate synthesis of 5-HT. 2. 111In disappeared in approximately an exponential fashion in all experiments and the rate of disappearance was not affected by treatment with 5-HTP. The half-life for 111In in four control rats was 18·7 hr and in five rats treated with 5-HTP was 17·8 hr. In rabbits the half-life was 20·4 hr for eight control and 21·2 hr for seven treated with 5-HTP. In the dogs the half-life was 21·0 hr for control and 27·7 hr for experiments with 5-HTP. In control rats, the 14C behaved like the 111In. However, in control rabbits the half-life for 14C was 38·0 hr which is significantly longer than for 111In (P < 0·005). 14C also disappeared more slowly than the 111In in the dogs. 3. In all species treatment with 5-HTP accelerated the disappearance of the 14C approximately three-fold. This was not a reserpine-like effect because the platelets contained more, not less 5-HT than usual. 4. In an attempt to discover the fate of 5-HT disappearing from circulating platelets, experiments were made in which platelets from one rat were doubly labelled, and were then injected into two other rats from the identical strain; one of the recipients received daily I.P. injections of 20 mg/kg of 5-HTP. The other rat in each pair acted as a control. 5. Results from twelve control rats showed that the 14C

  15. HCC size: platelets, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase and alkaline phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brian I.; Guerra, Vito

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombocytopenia is a cirrhosis surrogate, which is associated with HCC development. Aims To compare clinical characteristics of HCC in presence and absence of thrombocytopenia. Methods Baseline clinical data of a large cohort of randomly presenting, biopsy-proven HCC patients was examined for phenotypic patterns, after ordering by tumor size and sub-division into tumor size terciles. Results Small size tercile I patients had lowest platelet counts. Patients with higher platelets within each size tercile had lowest bilirubin and PT and higher GGTP and ALKP levels. When patients with similar platelet and bilirubin levels were compared, AFP, GGTP and ALKP were significantly increased in patients with larger tumors and in presence of PVT. Large size tercile III patients without thrombocytopenia, had larger tumors, higher GGTP and ALKP and lower bilirubin levels than patients with thrombocytopenia. Conclusions Thrombocytopenia occurred in 40.7% of patients with smaller tumors, but only 11.3% with larger tumors. Patients without thrombocytopenia had elevated GGTP and ALKP and lower bilirubin levels, regardless of tumor size, but they also had larger tumors within the large tumor tercile. PMID:23988857

  16. Mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    Platelets have multiple functions beyond their roles in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelets support liver regeneration, which is required after partial hepatectomy and acute or chronic liver injury. Although it is widely assumed that platelets stimulate liver regeneration by local excretion of mitogens stored within platelet granules, definitive evidence for this is lacking, and alternative mechanisms deserve consideration. In-depth knowledge of mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration may lead to new therapeutic strategies to treat patients with failing regenerative responses. PMID:27297793

  17. Adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation of human platelets in flow through tubes. I. Measurement of concentration and size of single platelets and aggregates.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, D N; Spain, S; Goldsmith, H L

    1989-01-01

    A double infusion flow system and particle sizing technique were developed to study the effect of time and shear rate on adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation in Poiseuille flow. Citrated platelet-rich plasma, PRP, and 2 microM ADP were simultaneously infused into a 40-microliters cylindrical mixing chamber at a fixed flow ratio, PRP/ADP = 9:1. After rapid mixing by a rotating magnetic stirbar, the platelet suspension flowed through 1.19 or 0.76 mm i.d. polyethylene tubing for mean transit times, t, from 0.1 to 86 s, over a range of mean tube shear rate, G, from 41.9 to 1,000 s-1. Known volumes of suspension were collected into 0.5% buffered glutaraldehyde, and all particles in the volume range 1-10(5) microns 3 were counted and sized using a model ZM particle counter (Coulter Electronics Inc., Hialeah, FL) and a logarithmic amplifier. The decrease in the single platelet concentration served as an overall index of aggregation. The decrease in the total particle concentration was used to calculate the collision capture efficiency during the early stages of aggregation, and aggregate growth was followed by changes in the volume fraction of particles of successively increasing size. Preliminary results demonstrate that both collision efficiency and particle volume fraction reveal important aspects of the aggregation process not indicated by changes in the single platelet concentration alone. PMID:2605298

  18. Splenic release of platelets contributes to increased circulating platelet size and inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Ming; Moore, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Li-Ping; Su, Yidan; Tsai, Alan; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Ming; Lambert, Gavin W; Kiriazis, Helen; Gao, Wei; Dart, Anthony M; Du, Xiao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is characterized by a rapid increase in circulating platelet size but the mechanism for this is unclear. Large platelets are hyperactive and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We determined mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet-monocyte conjugation (PMC) using blood samples from patients, and blood and the spleen from mice with AMI. We further measured changes in platelet size, PMC, cardiac and splenic contents of platelets and leucocyte infiltration into the mouse heart. In AMI patients, circulating MPV and PMC increased at 1-3 h post-MI and MPV returned to reference levels within 24 h after admission. In mice with MI, increases in platelet size and PMC became evident within 12 h and were sustained up to 72 h. Splenic platelets are bigger than circulating platelets in normal or infarct mice. At 24 h post-MI, splenic platelet storage was halved whereas cardiac platelets increased by 4-fold. Splenectomy attenuated all changes observed in the blood, reduced leucocyte and platelet accumulation in the infarct myocardium, limited infarct size and alleviated cardiac dilatation and dysfunction. AMI-induced elevated circulating levels of adenosine diphosphate and catecholamines in both human and the mouse, which may trigger splenic platelet release. Pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme, β1-adrenergic receptor or platelet P2Y12 receptor reduced platelet abundance in the murine infarct myocardium albeit having diverse effects on platelet size and PMC. In conclusion, AMI evokes release of splenic platelets, which contributes to the increase in platelet size and PMC and facilitates myocardial accumulation of platelets and leucocytes, thereby promoting post-infarct inflammation. PMID:27129192

  19. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  20. Automating Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  1. Automated dispenser

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.M.; Stalnaker, N.D.

    1989-04-06

    An automated dispenser having a conventional pipette attached to an actuating cylinder through a flexible cable for delivering precise quantities of a liquid through commands from remotely located computer software. The travel of the flexible cable is controlled by adjustable stops and a locking shaft. The pipette can be positioned manually or by the hands of a robot. 1 fig.

  2. A prospective microbiologic surveillance program to detect and prevent the transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets.

    PubMed

    Yomtovian, R; Lazarus, H M; Goodnough, L T; Hirschler, N V; Morrissey, A M; Jacobs, M R

    1993-01-01

    After two patients received bacterially contaminated platelet transfusions, a prospective surveillance program was instituted to perform Gram staining and microbiologic culturing of platelets at the time of transfusion. In 12 months, 3141 random-donor platelet pools (prepared from 14,481 units) and 2476 single-donor apheresis units were cultured. All single-donor apheresis units were sterile, but 6 (0.19%) of the random-donor pools were found to be bacterially contaminated, with 1 unit of 5 in the pool being the source in each case. Contaminants were Staphylococcus epidermidis (4 cases), Bacillus cereus (1), and Staphylococcus aureus (1) at counts of 0.5 x 10(2) to 10(11) colony-forming units per mL in platelet pools and 10(3) to 10(13) colony-forming units per mL in source units. The contamination rate for units transfused at < or = 4 days (1.8/10,000) was significantly lower than that at 5 days (11.9/10,000; p < 0.05), as was the magnitude of contamination (p < 0.05). Use of the pretransfusion Gram stain on 4- and 5-day-old platelet pools was 100 percent sensitive (4/4 true positives) and 99.93 percent specific (1 false positive) in detecting contaminated pools. These data define the extent and magnitude of platelet bacterial contamination and demonstrate the efficacy of the pretransfusion Gram stain on platelet units stored for 4 and 5 days in preventing the transfusion of heavily contaminated units. It is concluded that the risk of platelet contamination is related to the duration of component storage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8259595

  3. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  4. Numerical simulation of platelet margination in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The adhesion of platelets to vascular walls is the first step in clotting. This process critically depends on the preferential concentration of platelets near walls. The presence of red blood cells, which are the predominant blood constituents, is known to affect the steady state platelet concentration and the dynamic platelet margination, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood to-day. We use a direct numerical simulation to study the platelet margination process, with particular emphasis on the Stokesian hydrodynamic interactions among red cells, platelets, and vessel walls. Well-known mechanical models are used for the shearing and bending stiffness of red cell membranes, and the stiffer platelets are modeled as rigid discoids. A boundary integral formulation is used to solve the flow field, where the numerical solution procedure is accelerated by a parallel O(N N) smooth particle-mesh Ewald method. The effects of