Sample records for autonomous bdfig-wind generator

  1. Autonomous Generator for Technical Oxygen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. T. Rosca; V. Stanciu; V. Cimpoiasu; R. Scorei; D. Rosca

    2004-01-01

    The Autonomous Generator of Technical Oxygen(AGTO)has been achieved at ICMET Craiova, in cooperation with ICSI Rm. Valcea. It represents a product finalizing a scientific research theme financed by the romanian Ministry of Education and Research.The AGTO is intended to the brazing, welding and oxygas flame cutting processes, technical fields which can be actually found in all industrial applications. The presented

  2. Incorporating Manual and Autonomous Code Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComas, David

    1998-01-01

    Code can be generated manually or using code-generated software tools, but how do you interpret the two? This article looks at a design methodology that combines object-oriented design with autonomic code generation for attitude control flight software. Recent improvements in space flight computers are allowing software engineers to spend more time engineering the applications software. The application developed was the attitude control flight software for an astronomical satellite called the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP). The MAP flight system is being designed, developed, and integrated at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The MAP controls engineers are using Integrated Systems Inc.'s MATRIXx for their controls analysis. In addition to providing a graphical analysis for an environment, MATRIXx includes an autonomic code generation facility called AutoCode. This article examines the forces that shaped the final design and describes three highlights of the design process: (1) Defining the manual to autonomic code interface; (2) Applying object-oriented design to the manual flight code; (3) Implementing the object-oriented design in C.

  3. Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Thermoelectric Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, J. R.; Knox, A.; Siviter, J.; Montecucco, A.

    2013-07-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are a vital part of the oceanographer's toolbox, allowing long-term measurements across a range of ocean depths of a number of ocean properties such as salinity, fluorescence, and temperature profile. Buoyancy-based gliding, rather than direct propulsion, dramatically reduces AUV power consumption and allows long-duration missions on the order of months rather than hours or days, allowing large distances to be analyzed or many successive analyses of a certain area without the need for retrieval. Recent versions of these gliders have seen the buoyancy variation system change from electrically powered to thermally powered using phase-change materials, however a significant battery pack is still required to power communications and sensors, with power consumption in the region of 250 mW. The authors propose a novel application of a thermoelectric generation system, utilizing the depth-related variation in oceanic temperature. A thermal energy store provides a temperature differential across which a thermoelectric device can generate from repeated dives, with the primary purpose of extending mission range. The system is modeled in Simulink to analyze the effect of variation in design parameters. The system proves capable of generating all required power for a modern AUV.

  4. Motion generation and control for parking an autonomous vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Igor E. Paromtchik; C. Laugier

    1996-01-01

    Practical aspects of motion generation and control for parking a nonholonomic autonomous vehicle are considered. An iterative algorithm for the parallel parking maneuver is proposed. It is based on ultrasonic range data processing. To control the steering angle and longitudinal velocity of the vehicle during the parking maneuver, sinusoidal reference functions are used. To prevent collisions, the maneuver is carried

  5. Advanced Video Guidance Sensor and Next Generation Autonomous Docking Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granade, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    In recent decades, NASA's interest in spacecraft rendezvous and proximity operations has grown. Additional instrumentation is needed to improve manned docking operations' safety, as well as to enable telerobotic operation of spacecraft or completely autonomous rendezvous and docking. To address this need, Advanced Optical Systems, Inc., Orbital Sciences Corporation, and Marshall Space Flight Center have developed the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) under the auspices of the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) program. Given a cooperative target comprising several retro-reflectors, AVGS provides six-degree-of-freedom information at ranges of up to 300 meters for the DART target. It does so by imaging the target, then performing pattern recognition on the resulting image. Longer range operation is possible through different target geometries. Now that AVGS is being readied for its test flight in 2004, the question is: what next? Modifications can be made to AVGS, including different pattern recognition algorithms and changes to the retro-reflector targets, to make it more robust and accurate. AVGS could be coupled with other space-qualified sensors, such as a laser range-and-bearing finder, that would operate at longer ranges. Different target configurations, including the use of active targets, could result in significant miniaturization over the current AVGS package. We will discuss these and other possibilities for a next-generation docking sensor or sensor suite that involve AVGS.

  6. A hybrid microbial dielectric elastomer generator for autonomous robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Iain A.; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; McKay, Thomas; O'Brien, Benjamin; Melhuish, Chris

    2010-04-01

    We are developing a hybrid Dielectric Elastomer Generator (DEG)-Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) energy harvester . The system is for EcoBot, an Autonomous Robot (AR) that currently uses its MFCs to extract electrical energy from biomass, in the form of flies. MFCs, though reliable are slow to store charge. Thus, EcoBot operations are characterized by active periods followed by dormant periods when energy stores recover. Providing an alternate energy harvester such as a DEG, driven by wind or water, could therefore increase active time and also provide high voltage energy for direct use by on-board systems employing dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs). Energy can be harvested from a DEG when work is done on its elastomer membrane.. However, the DEG requires an initial charge and additional charge to compensate for losses due to leakage. The starting charge can be supplied by the EcoBot MFC capacitor. We have developed a self-primer circuit that uses some of the harvested charge to prime the membrane at each cycle. The low voltage MFC initial priming charge was boosted using a voltage converter that was then electrically disconnected. The DEG membrane was cyclically stretched producing charge that replenished leakage losses and energy that could potentially be stored. A further study demonstrated that the DEG with self-primer circuit can boost voltage from very low values without the need for a voltage converter, thus reducing circuit complexity and improving efficiency.

  7. Automated Generation and Assessment of Autonomous Systems Test Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Horvath, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the issues concerning verification and validation testing of autonomous spacecraft routinely culminates in the exploration of anomalous or faulted mission-like scenarios using the work involved during the Dawn mission's tests as examples. Prioritizing which scenarios to develop usually comes down to focusing on the most vulnerable areas and ensuring the best return on investment of test time. Rules-of-thumb strategies often come into play, such as injecting applicable anomalies prior to, during, and after system state changes; or, creating cases that ensure good safety-net algorithm coverage. Although experience and judgment in test selection can lead to high levels of confidence about the majority of a system's autonomy, it's likely that important test cases are overlooked. One method to fill in potential test coverage gaps is to automatically generate and execute test cases using algorithms that ensure desirable properties about the coverage. For example, generate cases for all possible fault monitors, and across all state change boundaries. Of course, the scope of coverage is determined by the test environment capabilities, where a faster-than-real-time, high-fidelity, software-only simulation would allow the broadest coverage. Even real-time systems that can be replicated and run in parallel, and that have reliable set-up and operations features provide an excellent resource for automated testing. Making detailed predictions for the outcome of such tests can be difficult, and when algorithmic means are employed to produce hundreds or even thousands of cases, generating predicts individually is impractical, and generating predicts with tools requires executable models of the design and environment that themselves require a complete test program. Therefore, evaluating the results of large number of mission scenario tests poses special challenges. A good approach to address this problem is to automatically score the results based on a range of metrics. Although the specific means of scoring depends highly on the application, the use of formal scoring - metrics has high value in identifying and prioritizing anomalies, and in presenting an overall picture of the state of the test program. In this paper we present a case study based on automatic generation and assessment of faulted test runs for the Dawn mission, and discuss its role in optimizing the allocation of resources for completing the test program.

  8. For autonomously navigating vehicles, the automatic generation of dense geometric models of the environment is a computation-

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Alonzo

    Page 1 Abstract For autonomously navigating vehicles, the automatic generation of dense geometric perception arise which are practical for autonomous vehicles. 1 Introduction The need for high throughput of autonomous vehicle navigation. Yet, the evidence for this need has not been based on any underlying theory

  9. Three-phase Four-wire Autonomous Wind Energy Conversion System Using Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Puneet K. Goel; Bhim Singh; S. S. Murthy; Shailendra K. Tiwari

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with an autonomous wind energy conversion system employing a permanent magnet synchronous generator feeding three-phase four-wire local loads in stand-alone mode without using a mechanical position sensor. The proposed autonomous wind energy conversion system utilizes two back-to-back connected pulse width modulated insulated gate bipolar transistors based voltage source converters with a battery energy storage system at their

  10. Towards Formal Specification and Generation of Autonomic Policies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy Sterritt; Michael G. Hinchey; James L. Rash; Walt Truszkowski; Christopher A. Rouff; Denis Gracanin

    2005-01-01

    \\u000a Autonomic Computing (AC), self-management based on high level guidance from humans, is increasingly gaining momentum as the\\u000a way forward in designing reliable systems to hide complexity and conquer IT management costs. Effectively, AC may be viewed\\u000a as Policy-Based Self-Management. In this paper we look at the motivation for utilizing NASA requirements-based programming\\u000a technologies for mechanically transforming policies (expressed in restricted

  11. Autonomous Robots, to appear Jan., 2003. Generating Multi-Level Linguistic Spatial Descriptions from Range Sensor

    E-print Network

    Skubic, Marjorie

    Autonomous Robots, to appear Jan., 2003. 1 Generating Multi-Level Linguistic Spatial Descriptions expressions can be generated to describe the spatial relations between a mobile robot and its environment, using readings from a ring of sonar sensors. Our work is motivated by the study of human-robot

  12. Trajectory generator for autonomous vehicles in urban environments Joshue Perez 1 , Jorge Godoy2 , Jorge Villagra2 , Enrique Onieva 3

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Trajectory generator for autonomous vehicles in urban environments Joshu´e P´erez 1 , Jorge Godoy2 trajectory generation approach for autonomous vehicles in urban scenarios, considering para- metric equations , Jorge Villagr´a2 , Enrique Onieva 3 Abstract-- Nowadays, some developments in the vehicle in- dustry

  13. High speed AC generator (7200 RPM, 60 Hz) for autonomous power systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Honorati; F. Caricchi; E. Santini

    1989-01-01

    The authors analyze the features of an electric generator whose angular speed is twice that of the rotating field. Two versions are studied: series- and parallel-connected windings. A technical analysis is presented in order to determine which type of machine to choose for specific applications. The relevant mathematical models are deduced. Self-excitation of the machine feeding an autonomous power system

  14. Parallel Operation of Permanent Magnet Generators in Autonomous Wind Energy Conversion System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Puneet K. Goel; B. Singh; S. S. Murthy; S. K. Tiwari

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with a new Autonomous Wind Energy Conversion System (AWECS) employing parallel operated Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generators (PMSGs) driven by variable speed wind turbines and feeding three-phase four-wire local loads. The proposed system utilizes three Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) based voltage source converters (VSCs) with a battery energy storage system (BESS) at their

  15. Analysis by numerical simulation regarding the stability of the synchronous generator operating in autonomous or grid connected regime

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iosif Szeidert; Marius Biriescu; Lucian Mihet-Popa; Daniel Toader

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the functioning stability problem of the synchronous machine in two cases: autonomous regime and parallel with grid of a certain voltage and frequency. Through numeric simulations, in dynamic regime, there is proved the fact that the synchronous generator (SG) is operating in a stable dynamic regime for any value of the load, in autonomous regime or connected

  16. Systems, methods and apparatus for generation and verification of policies in autonomic computing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Rash, James L. (Inventor); Truszkowski, Walter F. (Inventor); Rouff, Christopher A. (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor); Gracanin, Denis (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Described herein is a method that produces fully (mathematically) tractable development of policies for autonomic systems from requirements through to code generation. This method is illustrated through an example showing how user formulated policies can be translated into a formal mode which can then be converted to code. The requirements-based programming method described provides faster, higher quality development and maintenance of autonomic systems based on user formulation of policies.Further, the systems, methods and apparatus described herein provide a way of analyzing policies for autonomic systems and facilities the generation of provably correct implementations automatically, which in turn provides reduced development time, reduced testing requirements, guarantees of correctness of the implementation with respect to the policies specified at the outset, and provides a higher degree of confidence that the policies are both complete and reasonable. The ability to specify the policy for the management of a system and then automatically generate an equivalent implementation greatly improves the quality of software, the survivability of future missions, in particular when the system will operate untended in very remote environments, and greatly reduces development lead times and costs.

  17. 061212-009 1 Abstract--A new generation of Autonomous Underwater

    E-print Network

    Wood, Stephen L.

    scientific surveys will be performed to test the abilities of the new autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV-- Autonomous Glider, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, AUV, Unmanned Underwater Vehicle, UUV. I. INTRODUCTION ver of autonomous underwater vehicle with integrated sampling equipment that is able to perform a wide

  18. Propagation of internal tides generated near Luzon Strait: Observations from autonomous gliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainville, Luc; Lee, Craig M.; Rudnick, Daniel L.; Yang, Kai-Chieh

    2013-09-01

    The vertical isopycnal displacements associated with internal waves generated by the barotropic tidal currents in the vicinity of Luzon Strait are estimated using measurements collected by autonomous underwater gliders. Nearly 23,000 profiles from Seagliders and Spray gliders, collected during 29 different missions since 2007, are used to estimate the amplitude and phase of the linear semidiurnal and diurnal internal waves in this energetic region, particularly in the previously poorly sampled area near the eastern ridge and on the Pacific side of Luzon Strait. The mean and variability of the internal wave field in the upper 1000 m of the water column are described. The phase progression of internal waves as they propagate away from their generation sites is captured directly. The glider-based observations are used to map the mode-1 semidiurnal and diurnal internal wave fields, providing the baroclinic energy flux over a roughly 600 km × 800 km region based strictly on in situ observations.

  19. The Next Generation of Mars-GRAM and Its Role in the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Ramey, Holly S.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM 2010 is currently being used to develop the onboard atmospheric density estimator that is part of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. In previous versions, Mars-GRAM was less than realistic when used for sensitivity studies for Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) MapYear=0 and large optical depth values, such as tau=3. A comparison analysis has been completed between Mars-GRAM, TES and data from the Planetary Data System (PDS) resulting in updated coefficients for the functions relating density, latitude, and longitude of the sun. The adjustment factors are expressed as a function of height (z), Latitude (Lat) and areocentric solar longitude (Ls). The latest release of Mars-GRAM 2010 includes these adjustment factors that alter the in-put data from MGCM and MTGCM for the Mapping Year 0 (user-controlled dust) case. The greatest adjustment occurs at large optical depths such as tau greater than 1. The addition of the adjustment factors has led to better correspondence to TES Limb data from 0-60 km as well as better agreement with MGS, ODY and MRO data at approximately 90-135 km. Improved simulations utilizing Mars-GRAM 2010 are vital to developing the onboard atmospheric density estimator for the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. Mars-GRAM 2010 was not the only planetary GRAM utilized during phase 1 of this plan; Titan-GRAM and Venus-GRAM were used to generate density data sets for Aerobraking Design Reference Missions. These data sets included altitude profiles (both vertical and along a trajectory), GRAM perturbations (tides, gravity waves, etc.) and provided density and scale height values for analysis by other Autonomous Aero-braking team members.

  20. Automated generation of discrete event controllers for dynamic reconfiguration of autonomous sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, Sarah; Griffin, Christopher; Phoha, Shashi

    2003-12-01

    Autonomous Sensor Networks have the potential for broad applicability to national security, intelligent transportation, industrial production and environmental and hazardous process control. Distributed sensors may be used for detecting bio-terrorist attacks, for contraband interdiction, border patrol, monitoring building safety and security, battlefield surveillance, or may be embedded in complex dynamic systems for enabling fault tolerant operations. In this paper we present algorithms and automation tools for constructing discrete event controllers for complex networked systems that restrict the dynamic behavior of the system according to given specifications. In our previous work we have modeled dynamic system as a discrete event automation whose open loop behavior is represented as a language L of strings generated with the alphabet 'Elipson' of all possible atomic events that cause state transitions in the network. The controlled behavior is represented by a sublanguage K, contained in L, that restricts the behavior of the system according to the specifications of the controller. We have developed the algebraic structure of controllable sublanguages as perfect right partial ideals that satisfy a precontrollability condition. In this paper we develop an iterative algorithm to take an ad hoc specification described using a natural language, and to formulate a complete specification that results in a controllable sublanguage. A supervisory controller modeled as an automaton that runs synchronously with the open loop system in the sense of Ramadge and Wonham is automatically generated to restrict the behavior of the open loop system to the controllable sublanguage. A battlefield surveillance scenario illustrates the iterative evolution of ad hoc specifications for controlling an autonomous sensor network and the generation of a controller that reconfigures the sensor network to dynamically adapt to environmental perturbations.

  1. Autonomous 3D Model Generation of Orbital Debris using Point Cloud Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, Michael Aaron

    A software prototype for autonomous 3D scanning of uncooperatively rotating orbital debris using a point cloud sensor is designed and tested. The software successfully generated 3D models under conditions that simulate some on-orbit orbit challenges including relative motion between observer and target, inconsistent target visibility and a target with more than one plane of symmetry. The model scanning software performed well against an irregular object with one plane of symmetry but was weak against objects with 2 planes of symmetry. The suitability of point cloud sensors and algorithms for space is examined. Terrestrial Graph SLAM is adapted for an uncooperatively rotating orbital debris scanning scenario. A joint EKF attitude estimate and shape similiarity loop closure heuristic for orbital debris is derived and experimentally tested. The binary Extended Fast Point Feature Histogram (EFPFH) is defined and analyzed as a binary quantization of the floating point EFPFH. Both the binary and floating point EPFH are experimentally tested and compared as part of the joint loop closure heuristic.

  2. Plan generation and hard real-time execution with application to safe, autonomous flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Ella Marie

    We address the problem of constructing and executing control plans for safe, fully-autonomous operation within a complex real-time domain where the combination of an incomplete knowledge base, limited computational resources, and hard real-time deadlines precludes the success of traditional planning and scheduling algorithms. To meet hard deadlines with limited computational resources, we employ a stochastic world model to prioritize the state-space during planning, then utilize feedback from the scheduler to set a threshold below which the planner removes unlikely states from consideration in order to generate a schedulable plan. Our probabilistic planning algorithm minimizes domain knowledge size and explicitly provides for the construction of real-time control plans. Although approximate instead of optimal, the representational efficiency gained by our approach makes it a viable alternative to the well-established Markov Decision Process for complex real-time problem domains. When resource limits require plan modification, our heuristic algorithms for communicating task resource utilization information from real-time scheduler to planner provide a novel method for directing the expensive planner backtracking process specifically toward a schedulable plan. The tradeoff in ignoring reachable but unlikely states, as well as allowing incomplete domain knowledge, is that we must now provide explicitly for the detection of and reaction to these "unexpected" states our system may encounter while executing a plan. By detecting such unhandled states and caching contingency plans for events which, though unlikely, could lead to catastrophic failure, we can still guarantee system safety in the probabilistic sense. Ultimately, however, we are still constrained by plan-execution resource limits regardless of the tradeoff algorithms employed. We apply the resultant architecture (CIRCA-II) to simulated autonomous aircraft flight and demonstrate its utility for intelligently making tradeoffs that maximize mission success probability even under adverse circumstances in which other planner/scheduler algorithms would fail. We also describe progress toward fully-automating the University of Michigan Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV). When UAV hardware and low-level control software development are complete, we hope to apply a combination of CIRCA-II and state-of-the-art dynamic model identification algorithms to detect and react in real-time to dangerous in-flight emergencies including engine failure and airframe icing.

  3. Reproducible generation of autonomous malignant sublines from non-tumorogenic murine interleukin 3-dependent mast cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hültner, L; Moeller, J; Dörmer, P

    1986-12-01

    Murine interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent permanent mast cell lines derived from normal mouse bone marrow were established using pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cell conditioned medium (SCM) as a source of IL-3. When propagated continuously in media containing a high concentration of IL-3 (20% SCM or 20 U/ml murine recombinant IL-3 (rIL-3], all the cell lines remained strictly factor-dependent in vitro and non-tumorogenic in vivo. However, we were able to reproducibly generate autonomous sublines from cultures supplemented with low amounts of IL-3 (1% SCM or 2 U/ml rIL-3). Abrogation of exogeneous growth factor dependency was always associated with neoplastic transformation. In newly generated autonomous sublines an autocrine mechanism of growth regulation was evident in vitro. PMID:3492230

  4. Validating a UAV artificial intelligence control system using an autonomous test case generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy; Huber, Justin

    2013-05-01

    The validation of safety-critical applications, such as autonomous UAV operations in an environment which may include human actors, is an ill posed problem. To confidence in the autonomous control technology, numerous scenarios must be considered. This paper expands upon previous work, related to autonomous testing of robotic control algorithms in a two dimensional plane, to evaluate the suitability of similar techniques for validating artificial intelligence control in three dimensions, where a minimum level of airspeed must be maintained. The results of human-conducted testing are compared to this automated testing, in terms of error detection, speed and testing cost.

  5. Continuous non-cell autonomous reprogramming to generate retinal ganglion cells for glaucomatous neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Sowmya; Dravid, Shashank Manohar; Teotia, Pooja; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R; Qiu, Fang; Toris, Carol; Morrison, John; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2015-06-01

    Glaucoma, where the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) carrying the visual signals from the retina to the visual centers in the brain are progressively lost, is the most common cause of irreversible blindness. The management approaches, whether surgical, pharmacological, or neuroprotective do not reverse the degenerative changes. The stem cell approach to replace dead RGCs is a viable option but currently faces several barriers, such as the lack of a renewable, safe, and ethical source of RGCs that are functional and could establish contacts with bona fide targets. To address these barriers, we have derived RGCs from the easily accessible adult limbal cells, reprogrammed to pluripotency by a non-nucleic acid approach, thus circumventing the risk of insertional mutagenesis. The generation of RGCs from the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, also accomplished non-cell autonomously, recapitulated the developmental mechanism, ensuring the predictability and stability of the acquired phenotype, comparable to that of native RGCs at biochemical, molecular, and functional levels. More importantly, the induced RGCs expressed axonal guidance molecules and demonstrated the potential to establish contacts with specific targets. Furthermore, when transplanted in the rat model of ocular hypertension, these cells incorporated into the host RGC layer and expressed RGC-specific markers. Transplantation of these cells in immune-deficient mice did not produce tumors. Together, our results posit retinal progenitors generated from non-nucleic acid-derived iPS cells as a safe and robust source of RGCs for replacing dead RGCs in glaucoma. Stem Cells 2013;33:1743-1758. PMID:25753398

  6. Subsea thermoelectric generators. 1- 10-watt peltier effect prototypes - a step towards autonomous electrical control units at subsea wellheads

    SciTech Connect

    Weid, J.P. von der; Silva, J.A.P. da; Gama, A.L.; Sant'Anna, A.C.

    1994-05-01

    Offshore oil production activities require the operation of underwater hydraulic or electric equipment. The high cost of acquisition and installation of umbilical cables to supply power is leading to the development of independently powered cableless equipment, connected to the surface by the transmission and reception of control signals through the water. As a first step toward these autonomous wellhead control systems, the authors designed and successfully tested in laboratory conditions a thermoelectric generator able to supply at least 10 watts of electric power, extracting it from the temperature difference between the oil and the surrounding water. Hydraulic pumps and pressure accumulators, control electronics, and valve actuators for wellhead control units are all technically solved problems, even for seafloors as deep as 1,000 meters. However, an autonomous underwater wellhead control unit can only be conceived if an energy source is available at the seafloor. The development of a reliable and compact power source is indeed a fundamental step towards autonomous wet Christmas tree valve actuators.

  7. Mobility and Generation of Mosaic Non-Autonomous Transposons by Tn3-Derived Inverted-Repeat Miniature Elements (TIMEs)

    PubMed Central

    Szuplewska, Magdalena; Ludwiczak, Marta; Lyzwa, Katarzyna; Czarnecki, Jakub; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Functional transposable elements (TEs) of several Pseudomonas spp. strains isolated from black shale ore of Lubin mine and from post-flotation tailings of Zelazny Most in Poland, were identified using a positive selection trap plasmid strategy. This approach led to the capture and characterization of (i) 13 insertion sequences from 5 IS families (IS3, IS5, ISL3, IS30 and IS1380), (ii) isoforms of two Tn3-family transposons – Tn5563a and Tn4662a (the latter contains a toxin-antitoxin system), as well as (iii) non-autonomous TEs of diverse structure, ranging in size from 262 to 3892 bp. The non-autonomous elements transposed into AT-rich DNA regions and generated 5- or 6-bp sequence duplications at the target site of transposition. Although these TEs lack a transposase gene, they contain homologous 38-bp-long terminal inverted repeat sequences (IRs), highly conserved in Tn5563a and many other Tn3-family transposons. The simplest elements of this type, designated TIMEs (Tn3 family-derived Inverted-repeat Miniature Elements) (262 bp), were identified within two natural plasmids (pZM1P1 and pLM8P2) of Pseudomonas spp. It was demonstrated that TIMEs are able to mobilize segments of plasmid DNA for transposition, which results in the generation of more complex non-autonomous elements, resembling IS-driven composite transposons in structure. Such transposon-like elements may contain different functional genetic modules in their core regions, including plasmid replication systems. Another non-autonomous element “captured” with a trap plasmid was a TIME derivative containing a predicted resolvase gene and a res site typical for many Tn3-family transposons. The identification of a portable site-specific recombination system is another intriguing example confirming the important role of non-autonomous TEs of the TIME family in shuffling genetic information in bacterial genomes. Transposition of such mosaic elements may have a significant impact on diversity and evolution, not only of transposons and plasmids, but also of other types of mobile genetic elements. PMID:25121765

  8. Mobility and generation of mosaic non-autonomous transposons by Tn3-derived inverted-repeat miniature elements (TIMEs).

    PubMed

    Szuplewska, Magdalena; Ludwiczak, Marta; Lyzwa, Katarzyna; Czarnecki, Jakub; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Functional transposable elements (TEs) of several Pseudomonas spp. strains isolated from black shale ore of Lubin mine and from post-flotation tailings of Zelazny Most in Poland, were identified using a positive selection trap plasmid strategy. This approach led to the capture and characterization of (i) 13 insertion sequences from 5 IS families (IS3, IS5, ISL3, IS30 and IS1380), (ii) isoforms of two Tn3-family transposons--Tn5563a and Tn4662a (the latter contains a toxin-antitoxin system), as well as (iii) non-autonomous TEs of diverse structure, ranging in size from 262 to 3892 bp. The non-autonomous elements transposed into AT-rich DNA regions and generated 5- or 6-bp sequence duplications at the target site of transposition. Although these TEs lack a transposase gene, they contain homologous 38-bp-long terminal inverted repeat sequences (IRs), highly conserved in Tn5563a and many other Tn3-family transposons. The simplest elements of this type, designated TIMEs (Tn3 family-derived Inverted-repeat Miniature Elements) (262 bp), were identified within two natural plasmids (pZM1P1 and pLM8P2) of Pseudomonas spp. It was demonstrated that TIMEs are able to mobilize segments of plasmid DNA for transposition, which results in the generation of more complex non-autonomous elements, resembling IS-driven composite transposons in structure. Such transposon-like elements may contain different functional genetic modules in their core regions, including plasmid replication systems. Another non-autonomous element "captured" with a trap plasmid was a TIME derivative containing a predicted resolvase gene and a res site typical for many Tn3-family transposons. The identification of a portable site-specific recombination system is another intriguing example confirming the important role of non-autonomous TEs of the TIME family in shuffling genetic information in bacterial genomes. Transposition of such mosaic elements may have a significant impact on diversity and evolution, not only of transposons and plasmids, but also of other types of mobile genetic elements. PMID:25121765

  9. Plan generation and hard real-time execution with application to safe, autonomous flight

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ella Marie Atkins

    1999-01-01

    We address the problem of constructing and executing control plans for safe, fully-autonomous operation within a complex real-time domain where the combination of an incomplete knowledge base, limited computational resources, and hard real-time deadlines precludes the success of traditional planning and scheduling algorithms. To meet hard deadlines with limited computational resources, we employ a stochastic world model to prioritize the

  10. Autonomous and Autonomic Swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G.; Rash, James L.; Truszkowski, Walter F.; Rouff, Christopher A.; Sterritt, Roy

    2005-01-01

    A watershed in systems engineering is represented by the advent of swarm-based systems that accomplish missions through cooperative action by a (large) group of autonomous individuals each having simple capabilities and no global knowledge of the group s objective. Such systems, with individuals capable of surviving in hostile environments, pose unprecedented challenges to system developers. Design and testing and verification at much higher levels will be required, together with the corresponding tools, to bring such systems to fruition. Concepts for possible future NASA space exploration missions include autonomous, autonomic swarms. Engineering swarm-based missions begins with understanding autonomy and autonomicity and how to design, test, and verify systems that have those properties and, simultaneously, the capability to accomplish prescribed mission goals. Formal methods-based technologies, both projected and in development, are described in terms of their potential utility to swarm-based system developers.

  11. Autonomously generating operations sequences for a Mars Rover using AI-based planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Rob; Mishkin, Andrew; Estlin, Tara; Chien, Steve; Backes, Paul; Cooper, Brian; Maxwell, Scott; Rabideau, Gregg

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses a proof-of-concept prototype for ground-based automatic generation of validated rover command sequences from highlevel science and engineering activities. This prototype is based on ASPEN, the Automated Scheduling and Planning Environment. This Artificial Intelligence (AI) based planning and scheduling system will automatically generate a command sequence that will execute within resource constraints and satisfy flight rules.

  12. Behavior generation strategy of artificial behavioral system by self-learning paradigm for autonomous robot tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da?larli, Evren; Temelta?, Hakan

    2008-04-01

    In this study, behavior generation and self-learning paradigms are investigated for the real-time applications of multi-goal mobile robot tasks. The method is capable to generate new behaviors and it combines them in order to achieve multi goal tasks. The proposed method is composed from three layers: Behavior Generating Module, Coordination Level and Emotion -Motivation Level. Last two levels use Hidden Markov models to manage dynamical structure of behaviors. The kinematics and dynamic model of the mobile robot with non-holonomic constraints are considered in the behavior based control architecture. The proposed method is tested on a four-wheel driven and four-wheel steered mobile robot with constraints in simulation environment and results are obtained successfully.

  13. Preprint version, final version at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/ 2014 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, Hong Kong, China Semi-autonomous Trajectory Generation for Mobile Robots

    E-print Network

    Preprint version, final version at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/ 2014 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, Hong Kong, China Semi-autonomous Trajectory Generation for Mobile Robots with Integral Haptic-- A new framework for semi-autonomous path plan- ning for mobile robots that extends the classical

  14. Photo-driven autonomous hydrogen generation system based on hierarchically shelled ZnO nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Heejin; Yong, Kijung [Surface Chemistry Laboratory of Electronic Materials, Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Surface Chemistry Laboratory of Electronic Materials, Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-25

    A quantum dot semiconductor sensitized hierarchically shelled one-dimensional ZnO nanostructure has been applied as a quasi-artificial leaf for hydrogen generation. The optimized ZnO nanostructure consists of one dimensional nanowire as a core and two-dimensional nanosheet on the nanowire surface. Furthermore, the quantum dot semiconductors deposited on the ZnO nanostructures provide visible light harvesting properties. To realize the artificial leaf, we applied the ZnO based nanostructure as a photoelectrode with non-wired Z-scheme system. The demonstrated un-assisted photoelectrochemical system showed the hydrogen generation properties under 1 sun condition irradiation. In addition, the quantum dot modified photoelectrode showed 2 mA/cm{sup 2} current density at the un-assisted condition.

  15. Expression of a Humanized Viral 2A-Mediated lux Operon Efficiently Generates Autonomous Bioluminescence in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.; Close, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of autonomous bioluminescence from human cells was previously reported to be impossible, suggesting that all bioluminescent-based mammalian reporter systems must therefore require application of a potentially influential chemical substrate. While this was disproven when the bacterial luciferase (lux) cassette was demonstrated to function in a human cell, its expression required multiple genetic constructs, was functional in only a single cell type, and generated a significantly reduced signal compared to substrate-requiring systems. Here we investigate the use of a humanized, viral 2A-linked lux genetic architecture for the efficient introduction of an autobioluminescent phenotype across a variety of human cell lines. Methodology/Principal Findings The lux cassette was codon optimized and assembled into a synthetic human expression operon using viral 2A elements as linker regions. Human kidney, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines were both transiently and stably transfected with the humanized operon and the resulting autobioluminescent phenotype was evaluated using common imaging instrumentation. Autobioluminescent cells were screened for cytotoxic effects resulting from lux expression and their utility as bioreporters was evaluated through the demonstration of repeated monitoring of single populations over a prolonged period using both a modified E-SCREEN assay for estrogen detection and a classical cytotoxic compound detection assay for the antibiotic Zeocin. Furthermore, the use of self-directed bioluminescent initiation in response to target detection was assessed to determine its amenability towards deployment as fully autonomous sensors. In all cases, bioluminescent measurements were supported with traditional genetic and transcriptomic evaluations. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that the viral 2A-linked, humanized lux genetic architecture successfully produced autobioluminescent phenotypes in all cell lines tested without the induction of cytotoxicity. This autobioluminescent phenotype allowed for repeated interrogation of populations and self-directed control of bioluminescent activation with detection limits and EC50 values similar to traditional reporter systems, making the autobioluminescent cells amenable to automated monitoring and significantly reducing the time and cost required to perform bioluminescent workflows. PMID:24788811

  16. An architecture for the autonomous generation of preference-based trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Jamie

    Numerous techniques exist to optimize aircraft and spacecraft trajectories over cost functions that include terms such as fuel, time, and separation from obstacles. Relative weighting factors can dramatically alter solution characteristics, and engineers often must manually adjust either cost weights or the trajectory itself to obtain desirable solutions. Further, when humans and robots work together, or when humans task robots, they may express their performance expectations in a "fuzzy" natural language fashion, or else as an uncertain range of more or less acceptable values. This work describes a software architecture which accepts both fuzzy linguistic and hard numeric constraints on trajectory performance and, using a trajectory generator provided by the user, automatically constructs trajectories to meet these specifications as closely as possible. The system respects hard constraints imposed by system dynamics or by the user, and will not let the user's preferences interfere with the system and user needs. The architecture's evaluation agent translates these requirements into cost functional weights expected to produce the desired motion characteristics. The quality of the resulting full-state trajectory is then evaluated based on a set of computed trajectory features compared to the specified constraints. If constraints are not met, the cost functional weights are adjusted according to precomputed heuristic equations. Heuristics are not generated in an ad hoc fashion, but are instead the result of a systematic testing of the simulated system under a range of simple conditions. The system is tested in a 2DOF linear and a 6DOF nonlinear domain with a variety of constraints and in the presence of obstacles. Results show that the system consistently meets all hard numeric constraints placed on the trajectory. Desired characteristics are often attainable or else, in those cases where they are discounted in favor of the hard constraints, failed by small margins. Results are discussed as a function of obstacles and of constraints.

  17. Autonomous Pseudomonoids

    E-print Network

    Lopez Franco, Ignacio

    2009-04-25

    for autonomous pseudomonoids 59 4.1 Duals in convolution hom-categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 4.1.1 Opposite and bidual autonomous pseudomonoids . . . . . . 61 4.1.2 Duals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 4.2 Radford...

  18. Autonomic Dysreflexia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you have concerns, talk with your doctor. MEDICAL ALERT CARD Autonomic dysreflexia is a potentially fatal condition ... medical personnel and insist that the card MEDICAL ALERT Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD) A potentially life-threatening condition ...

  19. Automated Coordinator Synthesis for Mission Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    Automated Coordinator Synthesis for Mission Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles S autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) programs to meet evolving requirements and capabilities. The hierarchical architecture for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) that facilitates graphical design and code generation

  20. Universiteit IASintelligent autonomous systems

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for whcih we can find a standard EM algorithm. In the next section we discuss the Gaussian mixture model in Section 6. 2 A simple generative model and EM As generative model consider the Mixture of Gaussians (Mo A Probabilistic Generalization of Kohonen's SOM J.J. Verbeek, N. Vlassis, and B.J.A. Kr¨ose Intelligent Autonomous

  1. Subsea thermoelectric generators. 1- 10-watt peltier effect prototypes - a step towards autonomous electrical control units at subsea wellheads

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. von der Weid; J. A. P. da Silva; A. L. Gama; A. C. SantAnna

    1994-01-01

    Offshore oil production activities require the operation of underwater hydraulic or electric equipment. The high cost of acquisition and installation of umbilical cables to supply power is leading to the development of independently powered cableless equipment, connected to the surface by the transmission and reception of control signals through the water. As a first step toward these autonomous wellhead control

  2. Reconsideration of the autonomous view of language

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eijiro Tsuboi

    1993-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a critical examination of the autonomous view of language espoused in current generative grammar that attributes modular status to the faculty of language which is itself taken to comprise autonomous modular components. Several pieces of supposed evidence for the autonomous thesis are discussed, along with some other related topics, and shown to be critically flawed.

  3. Autonomic Nervous System Activity Distinguishes among Emotions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Ekman; Robert W. Levenson; Wallace V. Friesen

    1983-01-01

    Emotion-specific activity in the autonomic nervous system was generated by constructing facial prototypes of emotion muscle by muscle and by reliving past emotional experiences. The autonomic activity produced distinguished not only between positive and negative emotions, but also among negative emotions. This finding challenges emotion theories that have proposed autonomic activity to be undifferentiated or that have failed to address

  4. Autonomous data transmission apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, O.M.

    1997-03-25

    A autonomous borehole data transmission apparatus is described for transmitting measurement data from measuring instruments at the downhole end of a drill string by generating pressure pulses utilizing a transducer longitudinally responsive to magnetic field pulses caused by electrical pulses corresponding to the measured downhole parameters. 4 figs.

  5. Autonomous data transmission apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M. (4675 W. 3825 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84120)

    1997-01-01

    A autonomous borehole data transmission apparatus for transmitting measurement data from measuring instruments at the downhole end of a drill string by generating pressure pulses utilizing a transducer longitudinally responsive to magnetic field pulses caused by electrical pulses corresponding to the measured downhole parameters.

  6. Compact autonomous explosive-driven pulsed power system based on a capacitive energy storage charged by a high-voltage shock-wave ferromagnetic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkuratov, Sergey I.; Talantsev, Evgueni F.; Baird, Jason; Altgilbers, Larry L.; Stults, Allen H.

    2006-06-01

    A new concept for constructing compact autonomous pulsed power systems is presented. This concept utilizes a high-voltage explosive-driven shock-wave ferromagnetic generator (FMG) as a charging source for capacitive energy storage. It has been experimentally demonstrated that miniature FMGs (22-25cm3 in size and 84-95g in mass) developed for these experiments can be successfully used to charge capacitor banks. The FMGs, containing Nd2Fe14B energy-carrying elements, provided pulsed powers of 35-45kW in times ranging from 10to15?s. A methodology was developed for digital simulation of the operation of the transverse FMG. Experimental results that were obtained are in a good agreement with the results of digital simulations.

  7. Autonomous Soaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Victor P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the autonomous soaring flight of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). It reviews energy sources for UAVs, and two examples of UAV's that used alternative energy sources, and thermal currents for soaring. Examples of flight tests, plans, and results are given. Ultimately, the concept of a UAV harvesting energy from the atmosphere has been shown to be feasible with existing technology.

  8. Autonomous vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meyrowitz, A.L. [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States)] [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States); Blidberg, D.R. [Autonomous Undersea Systems Inst., Lee, NH (United States)] [Autonomous Undersea Systems Inst., Lee, NH (United States); Michelson, R.C. [Georgia Tech Research Inst., Smyrna, GA (United States)] [Georgia Tech Research Inst., Smyrna, GA (United States); [International Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems, Smyrna, GA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    There are various kinds of autonomous vehicles (AV`s) which can operate with varying levels of autonomy. This paper is concerned with underwater, ground, and aerial vehicles operating in a fully autonomous (nonteleoperated) mode. Further, this paper deals with AV`s as a special kind of device, rather than full-scale manned vehicles operating unmanned. The distinction is one in which the AV is likely to be designed for autonomous operation rather than being adapted for it as would be the case for manned vehicles. The authors provide a survey of the technological progress that has been made in AV`s, the current research issues and approaches that are continuing that progress, and the applications which motivate this work. It should be noted that issues of control are pervasive regardless of the kind of AV being considered, but that there are special considerations in the design and operation of AV`s depending on whether the focus is on vehicles underwater, on the ground, or in the air. The authors have separated the discussion into sections treating each of these categories.

  9. Autonomic dysreflexia

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph; McMillan, Colleen; Klassen, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To raise family physicians’ awareness of autonomic dysreflexia (AD) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and to provide some suggestions for intervention. Sources of information MEDLINE was searched from 1970 to July 2011 using the terms autonomic dysreflexia and spinal cord injury with family medicine or primary care. Other relevant guidelines and resources were reviewed and used. Main message Family physicians often lack confidence in treating patients with SCI, see them as complex and time-consuming, and feel undertrained to meet their needs. Family physicians provide a vital component of the health care of such patients, and understanding of the unique medical conditions related to SCI is important. Autonomic dysreflexia is an important, common, and potentially serious condition with which many family physicians are unfamiliar. This article will review the signs and symptoms of AD and offer some acute management options and preventive strategies for family physicians. Conclusion Family physicians should be aware of which patients with SCI are susceptible to AD and monitor those affected by it. Outlined is an approach to acute management. Family physicians play a pivotal role in prevention of AD through education (of the patient and other health care providers) and incorporation of strategies such as appropriate bladder, bowel, and skin care practices and warnings and management plans in the medical chart. PMID:22893332

  10. Note: utilizing Pb(Zr(0.95)Ti(0.05))O3 ferroelectric ceramics to scale down autonomous explosive-driven shock-wave ferroelectric generators.

    PubMed

    Shkuratov, Sergey I; Baird, Jason; Talantsev, Evgueni F

    2012-07-01

    Further miniaturization of recently designed autonomous ferroelectric generators (FEGs) [S. I. Shkuratov, J. Baird, and E. F. Talantsev, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 086107 (2011)], which are based on the effect of explosive-shock-wave depolarization of poled ferroelectrics is achieved. The key miniaturization factor was the utilization of high-energy density Pb(Zr(0.95)Ti(0.05))O(3) (PZT 95/5) ferroelectric ceramics as energy-carrying elements of FEGs instead of the previously used Pb(Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48))O(3) (PZT 52/48). A series of experiments demonstrated that FEGs based on smaller PZT 95/5 ferroelectric elements are capable of producing the same output voltage as those based on PZT 52/48 elements twice as large. It follows from the experimental results that the FEG output voltage is directly proportional to the thickness of PZT 95/5 samples. A comparison of the operation of FEGs based on PZT 95/5 and on PZT 52/48 ferroelectrics is presented. PMID:22852739

  11. Bringing simulation to life: A mixed reality autonomous intersection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Quinlan; Tsz-Chiu Au; Jesse Zhu; Nicolae Stiurca; Peter Stone

    2010-01-01

    Fully autonomous vehicles are technologically feasible with the current generation of hardware, as demonstrated by recent robot car competitions. Dresner and Stone proposed a new intersection control protocol called Autonomous Intersection Management (AIM) and showed that with autonomous vehicles it is possible to make intersection control much more efficient than the traditional control mechanisms such as traffic signals and stop

  12. www.postersession.com Autonomous Underwater Vehicle: Powered Glider

    E-print Network

    Wood, Stephen L.

    printed by www.postersession.com Autonomous Underwater Vehicle: Powered Glider Department of Marine. Stephen Wood, P.E. A new generation of Autonomous Underwater Gliders is currently being developed will be an autonomous powered glider that collects video, acoustic, and physical data, simultaneously obtains water

  13. Multi-thread technology based autonomous underwater vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zheng Qin; Jason Gu

    2010-01-01

    An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is implemented with multi-thread technology under QNX Neutrino Real time Operating System. The hybrid system and autonomous control principle of AUV are introduced. The event generator thread and event analysis and decision making thread are two key threads in the autonomous control system to handle discrete events, which are described in detail. Also the histogram

  14. Auditory Hair Cell-Specific Deletion of p27Kip1 in Postnatal Mice Promotes Cell-Autonomous Generation of New Hair Cells and Normal Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Bradley J.; Liu, Zhiyong; Crabtree, Mark; Coak, Emily; Cox, Brandon C.

    2014-01-01

    Hearing in mammals relies upon the transduction of sound by hair cells (HCs) in the organ of Corti within the cochlea of the inner ear. Sensorineural hearing loss is a widespread and permanent disability due largely to a lack of HC regeneration in mammals. Recent studies suggest that targeting the retinoblastoma (Rb)/E2F pathway can elicit proliferation of auditory HCs. However, previous attempts to induce HC proliferation in this manner have resulted in abnormal cochlear morphology, HC death, and hearing loss. Here we show that cochlear HCs readily proliferate and survive following neonatal, HC-specific, conditional knock-out of p27Kip1 (p27CKO), a tumor suppressor upstream of Rb. Indeed, HC-specific p27CKO results in proliferation of these cells without the upregulation of the supporting cell or progenitor cell proteins, Prox1 or Sox2, suggesting that they remain HCs. Furthermore, p27CKO leads to a significant addition of postnatally derived HCs that express characteristic synaptic and stereociliary markers and survive to adulthood, although a portion of the newly derived inner HCs exhibit cytocauds and lack VGlut3 expression. Despite this, p27CKO mice exhibit normal hearing as measured by evoked auditory brainstem responses, which suggests that the newly generated HCs may contribute to, or at least do not greatly detract from, function. These results show that p27Kip1 actively maintains HC quiescence in postnatal mice, and suggest that inhibition of p27Kip1 in residual HCs represents a potential strategy for cell-autonomous auditory HC regeneration. PMID:25411503

  15. Controlled manipulation using autonomous aerial systems

    E-print Network

    Srikanth, Manohar B. (Manohar Balagatte)

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of the thesis is to design and control Autonomous Aerial Systems, also referred to as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are able to hover and navigate in space using the thrust forces generated by the ...

  16. Nemesis Autonomous Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Lee, Cin-Young; Horvath, Gregory A,; Clement, Bradley J.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized framework has been developed for systems validation that can be applied to both traditional and autonomous systems. The framework consists of an automated test case generation and execution system called Nemesis that rapidly and thoroughly identifies flaws or vulnerabilities within a system. By applying genetic optimization and goal-seeking algorithms on the test equipment side, a "war game" is conducted between a system and its complementary nemesis. The end result of the war games is a collection of scenarios that reveals any undesirable behaviors of the system under test. The software provides a reusable framework to evolve test scenarios using genetic algorithms using an operation model of the system under test. It can automatically generate and execute test cases that reveal flaws in behaviorally complex systems. Genetic algorithms focus the exploration of tests on the set of test cases that most effectively reveals the flaws and vulnerabilities of the system under test. It leverages advances in state- and model-based engineering, which are essential in defining the behavior of autonomous systems. It also uses goal networks to describe test scenarios.

  17. The Autonomic Symptom Profile: a new instrument to assess autonomic symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, G. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Offord, K. P.; Atkinson, E. J.; O'Brien, P. C.; Low, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a new specific instrument called the Autonomic Symptom Profile to measure autonomic symptoms and test its validity. BACKGROUND: Measuring symptoms is important in the evaluation of quality of life outcomes. There is no validated, self-completed questionnaire on the symptoms of patients with autonomic disorders. METHODS: The questionnaire is 169 items concerning different aspects of autonomic symptoms. The Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale (COMPASS) with item-weighting was established; higher scores indicate more or worse symptoms. Autonomic function tests were performed to generate the Composite Autonomic Scoring Scale (CASS) and to quantify autonomic deficits. We compared the results of the COMPASS with the CASS derived from the Autonomic Reflex Screen to evaluate validity. RESULTS: The instrument was tested in 41 healthy controls (mean age 46.6 years), 33 patients with nonautonomic peripheral neuropathies (mean age 59.5 years), and 39 patients with autonomic failure (mean age 61.1 years). COMPASS scores correlated well with the CASS, demonstrating an acceptable level of content and criterion validity. The mean (+/-SD) overall COMPASS score was 9.8 (+/-9) in controls, 25.9 (+/-17.9) in the patients with nonautonomic peripheral neuropathies, and 52.3 (+/-24.2) in the autonomic failure group. Scores of symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and secretomotor dysfunction best predicted the CASS on multiple stepwise regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a questionnaire that measures autonomic symptoms and present evidence for its validity. The instrument shows promise in assessing autonomic symptoms in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies.

  18. Research of autonomous landing control of unmanned combat air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaoyan; Chen, Zongji

    2003-09-01

    This paper is to present a robust controller design method for developing autonomous landing systems of Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV). We first analyze the characteristic of autonomous landing of UCAV, and put forward its landing performance specifications. Structure singular value ?| synthesis is used to develop autonomous landing systems to accurately follow the pre-designed ideal landing track or online generated optimal landing track. The robust performance of system is analyzed. The simulation results demonstrate that the designed autonomous landing system satisfies the performance requirements of autonomous landing of UCAV when there are uncertainties of UCAV aircraft model, measurement noises and exogenous disturbances.

  19. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  20. Autonomous Soaring Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on autonomous soaring flight results for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)'s is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Thermal Soaring Flight Results; 3) Autonomous Dolphin Soaring; and 4) Future Plans.

  1. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemson, Philip T.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2014-09-01

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale-from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems-their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous the Poincaré oscillator with quasi-periodic forcing. In this way we not only discuss and review each method, but also present properties which help to clearly distinguish the three classes of systems when analysed in an inverse approach-from measured, or numerically generated data. In particular, this review provides a framework to tackle inverse problems in these areas and clearly distinguish non-autonomous dynamics from chaos or stochasticity.

  2. The autonomic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Low, P A; Opfer-Gehrking, T L

    1999-06-01

    The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve. PMID:11542437

  3. The autonomic laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve.

  4. Application of Numerical Noise Titration during Autonomic Blockade S Vandeput1

    E-print Network

    of cardiovascular function, analysis of nonlinear dy- namics results in important information too. The nonlinear that nonlinear cardiovascular fluc- tuations are generated by the autonomic nervous system. Suppressing Universiteit Leuven, Belgium Abstract The influence of pharmacological autonomic nervous system interventions

  5. Optimal Control for Autonomous Motor Behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom Erez

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation presents algorithms that allow robots to generate optimal behavior from first principles. Instead of hard-coding every desired behavior, we encode the task as a cost function, and use numerical optimization to find action sequences that can accomplish the task. Using the theoretical framework of optimal control, we develop methods for generating autonomous motor behavior in high-dimensional domains of

  6. Autonomous RF Radiation Package for Various Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Carey; A. J. Wiebe; D. D. Schwindt; L. L. Altgilbers; M. Giesselmann; B. McHale; K. Heinemann

    2005-01-01

    The development of an autonomous RF radiation package for various applications is presented. This work is a coordinated effort to develop a tightly integrated unit, including the batteries, power supply, Marx generator, and plug and play antennas for various applications. ARC technology has designed the Marx generator and its associated high voltage antennas for this effort. Previous work by ARC

  7. A System Perspective on Cognition for Autonomic Computing and Communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arjan J. H. Peddemors; Ignas G. Niemegeers; Henk Eertink; Johan De Heer

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a conceptual view on the incorporation of cognitive processing capabilities in future generation computer systems. We argue that cognition is at the heart of autonomic behavior, and therefore a necessary ingredient for autonomic computing and communication. We introduce a bio- inspired cognitive engine that interacts with and has control over major operating system components, and

  8. Two-Pattern Test Capabilities of Autonomous TPG Circuits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kiyoshi Furuya; Edward J. Mccluskey

    1991-01-01

    Two-pattern test capabilities of autonomous test pattern generator (TPG) circuits for use in built-in self- testing of CMOS circuits are investigated. The TPG circuits treated here are not limited to LFSRs but include arbitrary autonomous linear sequential circuits. Based on the transi- tion matrix of a circuit, a method is shown to analyze how many distinct transitions can occur on

  9. Towards vision-based safe landing for an autonomous helicopter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pedro J. Garcia-pardo; Gaurav S. Sukhatme; James F. Montgomery

    2002-01-01

    Autonomous landing is a challenging problem for aerial robots. An autonomous landing manoeuver depends largely on two capabilities: the decision of where to land and the generation of control signals to guide the vehicle to a safe landing. We focus on the first capability here by presenting a strategy and an underlying fast algorithm as the computer vision basis to

  10. Autonomous landing on Mars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Stevenson; Teresa Morrison; Timothy Murphy

    1990-01-01

    Long communication times between earth and Mars demand autonomous landing capabilities. If high-resolution imagery acquired from an orbiter is available to select and certify a specific safe landing site or sites, navigational updates relative to the surface can be used to achieve the necessary accuracy to land within these certified sites. Autonomous registrations of the orbiter's imagery with photographs of

  11. Modeling Adaptive Autonomous Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pattie Maes

    1993-01-01

    One category of research in Artificial Life is concerned with modeling and building so-called adaptive autonomous agents, which are systems that inhabit a dynamic, unpredictable environment in which they try to satisfy a set of time-dependent goals or motivations. Agents are said to be adaptive if they improve their competence at dealing with these goals based on experience. Autonomous agents

  12. Securing Autonomous Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zia Hayat; Jeff Reeve; Chris Boutle; Martin Field

    The security of an autonomous system, which consists of autonomous entities,2 could be compromised as a result of a physical or electronic attack. The compromise of information assets such as a system's processing base or its communications links could potentially place an enemy ahead in terms of the OODA (Observe, Orient, Decide and Act) loop; it is this aspect of

  13. Novel Microbial Diversity Retrieved by Autonomous Robotic Exploration of the World's Deepest

    E-print Network

    ) is an autonomous underwater vehicle designed to navigate an unexplored environment, generate high-resolution three for autonomous naviga- tion and exploration of unexplored water bodies, a vehicle known as the deep phreaticNovel Microbial Diversity Retrieved by Autonomous Robotic Exploration of the World's Deepest

  14. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  15. Autonomous surveillance for biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Jurdak, Raja; Elfes, Alberto; Kusy, Branislav; Tews, Ashley; Hu, Wen; Hernandez, Emili; Kottege, Navinda; Sikka, Pavan

    2015-04-01

    The global movement of people and goods has increased the risk of biosecurity threats and their potential to incur large economic, social, and environmental costs. Conventional manual biosecurity surveillance methods are limited by their scalability in space and time. This article focuses on autonomous surveillance systems, comprising sensor networks, robots, and intelligent algorithms, and their applicability to biosecurity threats. We discuss the spatial and temporal attributes of autonomous surveillance technologies and map them to three broad categories of biosecurity threat: (i) vector-borne diseases; (ii) plant pests; and (iii) aquatic pests. Our discussion reveals a broad range of opportunities to serve biosecurity needs through autonomous surveillance. PMID:25744760

  16. Vision-based Autonomous Navigation using Moon and Earth images 

    E-print Network

    de Dilectis, Francesco

    2014-12-10

    to give the Orion capsule, the next-generation manned spacecraft currently in development at NASA, a backup autonomous positioning system. Among other missions, Orion is designed to transport a crew to and from the Moon. The presence of individuals...

  17. Planning and Execution for an Autonomous Aerobot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, Daniel M.; Estlin, Tara A.; Schaffer, Steven R.; Chouinard, Caroline M.

    2010-01-01

    The Aerial Onboard Autonomous Science Investigation System (AerOASIS) system provides autonomous planning and execution capabilities for aerial vehicles (see figure). The system is capable of generating high-quality operations plans that integrate observation requests from ground planning teams, as well as opportunistic science events detected onboard the vehicle while respecting mission and resource constraints. AerOASIS allows an airborne planetary exploration vehicle to summarize and prioritize the most scientifically relevant data; identify and select high-value science sites for additional investigation; and dynamically plan, schedule, and monitor the various science activities being performed, even during extended communications blackout periods with Earth.

  18. Autonomous Virtual Mobile Nodes

    E-print Network

    Dolev, Shlomi

    2005-06-15

    This paper presents a new abstraction for virtual infrastructure in mobile ad hoc networks. An AutonomousVirtual Mobile Node (AVMN) is a robust and reliable entity that is designed to cope with theinherent difficulties ...

  19. Autonomous Flight Safety System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James

    2010-01-01

    The Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) is an independent self-contained subsystem mounted onboard a launch vehicle. AFSS has been developed by and is owned by the US Government. Autonomously makes flight termination/destruct decisions using configurable software-based rules implemented on redundant flight processors using data from redundant GPS/IMU navigation sensors. AFSS implements rules determined by the appropriate Range Safety officials.

  20. Systems, methods and apparatus for quiesence of autonomic safety devices with self action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments an autonomic environmental safety device may be quiesced. In at least one embodiment, a method for managing an autonomic safety device, such as a smoke detector, based on functioning state and operating status of the autonomic safety device includes processing received signals from the autonomic safety device to obtain an analysis of the condition of the autonomic safety device, generating one or more stay-awake signals based on the functioning status and the operating state of the autonomic safety device, transmitting the stay-awake signal, transmitting self health/urgency data, and transmitting environment health/urgency data. A quiesce component of an autonomic safety device can render the autonomic safety device inactive for a specific amount of time or until a challenging situation has passed.

  1. Endocrine-Autonomic Linkages.

    PubMed

    Sladek, Celia D; Michelini, Lisete C; Stachenfeld, Nina S; Stern, Javier E; Urban, Janice H

    2015-07-01

    Interaction between the autonomic nervous system and the neuroendocrine system is critical for maintenance of homeostasis in a wide variety of physiological parameters such as body temperature, fluid and electrolyte balance, and blood pressure and volume. The anatomical and physiological mechanisms underlying integration of the neuroendocrine and autonomic mechanisms responsible for eliciting integrated autonomic and neuroendocrine actions are the focus of this article. This includes a focus on the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, because it includes both neuroendocrine neurons and preganglionic autonomic neurons that regulate sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow. The "wired" and "nonwired" mechanisms within PVN that facilitate communication between these neuronal populations are described. The impact of peripheral hormones, specifically the adrenal and gonadal steroids, on the neuroendocrine and autonomic systems is discussed, and exercise is used as a specific example of a physiological challenge/stress that requires precise integration of neuroendocrine and autonomic responses to maintain cardiovascular, fluid, and energy homeostasis. © 2015 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 5:1281-1323, 2015. PMID:26140719

  2. A Case for Real-World Smart Environments: The Development of a Remote Autonomous Energy Aware Monitoring System Using Next Generation Technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas McLauchlan; Nik Bessis

    2011-01-01

    Much work is underway on issues associated with the development of tools and services to reduce worldwide energy consumption. Current trends in energy consumption show clear evidence that it is increasing whilst reserves of carbon based energy are reducing and green technologies for energy generation are yet to prove themselves. In industry, numerous instrument manufacturers support the MODBUS protocol as

  3. 1 Design by Autonomous Learning Design by Autonomous Learning

    E-print Network

    Prabhakar, Sattiraju

    1 Design by Autonomous Learning Design by Autonomous Learning: Modeling Environment for Design Box 123, Broadway NSW 2007, Australia Email: {prabhakar, gjsmith}@socs.uts.edu.au 1. Design by Autonomous Learning An important area of expertise robots can provide is design of artefacts in physical

  4. Architecture of autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Automation of Space Station functions and activities, particularly those involving robotic capabilities with interactive or supervisory human control, is a complex, multi-disciplinary systems design problem. A wide variety of applications using autonomous control can be found in the literature, but none of them seem to address the problem in general. All of them are designed with a specific application in mind. In this report, an abstract model is described which unifies the key concepts underlying the design of automated systems such as those studied by the aerospace contractors. The model has been kept as general as possible. The attempt is to capture all the key components of autonomous systems. With a little effort, it should be possible to map the functions of any specific autonomous system application to the model presented here.

  5. Architecture of autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    Automation of Space Station functions and activities, particularly those involving robotic capabilities with interactive or supervisory human control, is a complex, multi-disciplinary systems design problem. A wide variety of applications using autonomous control can be found in the literature, but none of them seem to address the problem in general. All of them are designed with a specific application in mind. In this report, an abstract model is described which unifies the key concepts underlying the design of automated systems such as those studied by the aerospace contractors. The model has been kept as general as possible. The attempt is to capture all the key components of autonomous systems. With a little effort, it should be possible to map the functions of any specific autonomous system application to the model presented here.

  6. An Autonomous Spacecraft Agent Prototype

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barney Pell; Douglas E. Bernard; Steve A. Chien; Erann Gat; Nicola Muscettola; P. Pandurang Nayak; Michael D. Wagner; Brian C. Williams

    1998-01-01

    . This paper describes the New Millennium Remote Agent (NMRA) architecture for autonomous spacecraft control systems. The architecture supports challenging requirements of the autonomous spacecraft domain not usually addressed in mobile robot architectures, including highly reliable autonomous operations over extended time periods in the presence of tight resource constraints, hard deadlines, limited observability, and concurrent activity. A hybrid architecture, NMRA

  7. Microscale autonomous sensor and communications module

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-03-25

    Various technologies pertaining to a microscale autonomous sensor and communications module are described herein. Such a module includes a sensor that generates a sensor signal that is indicative of an environmental parameter. An integrated circuit receives the sensor signal and generates an output signal based at least in part upon the sensor signal. An optical emitter receives the output signal and generates an optical signal as a function of the output signal. An energy storage device is configured to provide power to at least the integrated circuit and the optical emitter, and wherein the module has a relatively small diameter and thickness.

  8. Autonomous driving goes downtown

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Franke; D. Gavrila; S. Gorzig; F. Lindner; F. Puetzold; C. Wohler

    1998-01-01

    Most computer-vision systems for vehicle guidance are for highway scenarios. Developing autonomous or driver-assistance systems for complex urban traffic poses new algorithmic and system-architecture challenges. To address these issues, the authors introduce their intelligent Stop&Go system and discuss appropriate algorithms and approaches for vision-module control

  9. Universiteit IASintelligent autonomous systems

    E-print Network

    Visser, Arnoud

    and intelligent vehicles. The following architectures are among others mentioned as related work for this LCM approach: the Robotics Operating System (ROS) [18] and the Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems (JAUS for the SI4MS project. One is the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge. In this challenge autonomous vehicles had

  10. Onboard Autonomous Rover Science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca Castano; Tara Estlin; Dan Gaines; Caroline Chouinard; B. Bomstein; Robert C. Anderson; Michael Burl; David Thompson; Andres Castano; Michele Judd

    2007-01-01

    The Onboard Autonomous Science Investigation System (OASIS) was used in the first formal demonstration of closed loop opportunistic detection and reaction during a rover traverse on the FIDO rover at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In addition to hardware demonstrations, the system has been demonstrated and exercised in simulation using the Rover Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (ROAMS) planetary rover simulator, A.

  11. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Maser, Raelene E; Mitchell, Braxton D; Freeman, Roy

    2003-05-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes. Despite its relationship to an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and its association with multiple symptoms and impairments, the significance of DAN has not been fully appreciated. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on the cohort studied and the methods of assessment. In randomly selected cohorts of asymptomatic individuals with diabetes, approximately 20% had abnormal cardiovascular autonomic function. DAN frequently coexists with other peripheral neuropathies and other diabetic complications, but DAN may be isolated, frequently preceding the detection of other complications. Major clinical manifestations of DAN include resting tachycardia, exercise intolerance, orthostatic hypotension, constipation, gastroparesis, erectile dysfunction, sudomotor dysfunction, impaired neurovascular function, "brittle diabetes," and hypoglycemic autonomic failure. DAN may affect many organ systems throughout the body (e.g., gastrointestinal [GI], genitourinary, and cardiovascular). GI disturbances (e.g., esophageal enteropathy, gastroparesis, constipation, diarrhea, and fecal incontinence) are common, and any section of the GI tract may be affected. Gastroparesis should be suspected in individuals with erratic glucose control. Upper-GI symptoms should lead to consideration of all possible causes, including autonomic dysfunction. Whereas a radiographic gastric emptying study can definitively establish the diagnosis of gastroparesis, a reasonable approach is to exclude autonomic dysfunction and other known causes of these upper-GI symptoms. Constipation is the most common lower-GI symptom but can alternate with episodes of diarrhea. Diagnostic approaches should rule out autonomic dysfunction and the well-known causes such as neoplasia. Occasionally, anorectal manometry and other specialized tests typically performed by the gastroenterologist may be helpful. DAN is also associated with genitourinary tract disturbances including bladder and/or sexual dysfunction. Evaluation of bladder dysfunction should be performed for individuals with diabetes who have recurrent urinary tract infections, pyelonephritis, incontinence, or a palpable bladder. Specialized assessment of bladder dysfunction will typically be performed by a urologist. In men, DAN may cause loss of penile erection and/or retrograde ejaculation. A complete workup for erectile dysfunction in men should include history (medical and sexual); psychological evaluation; hormone levels; measurement of nocturnal penile tumescence; tests to assess penile, pelvic, and spinal nerve function; cardiovascular autonomic function tests; and measurement of penile and brachial blood pressure. Neurovascular dysfunction resulting from DAN contributes to a wide spectrum of clinical disorders including erectile dysfunction, loss of skin integrity, and abnormal vascular reflexes. Disruption of microvascular skin blood flow and sudomotor function may be among the earliest manifestations of DAN and lead to dry skin, loss of sweating, and the development of fissures and cracks that allow microorganisms to enter. These changes ultimately contribute to the development of ulcers, gangrene, and limb loss. Various aspects of neurovascular function can be evaluated with specialized tests, but generally these have not been well standardized and have limited clinical utility. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is the most studied and clinically important form of DAN. Meta-analyses of published data demonstrate that reduced cardiovascular autonomic function as measured by heart rate variability (HRV) is strongly (i.e., relative risk is doubled) associated with an increased risk of silent myocardial ischemia and mortality. The determination of the presence of CAN is usually based on a battery of autonomic function tests rather than just on one test. Proceedings from a consensus conference in 1992 recommended that three tests (R-R variation, Valsalva maneuver, and postural blood pressure

  12. Local path control for an autonomous vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winston L. Nelson; Ingeniar J. Cox

    1988-01-01

    A control system for an autonomous robot cart designed to operate in well-structured environments such as offices and factories is described. The onboard navigation system comprises a reference-state generator, an error-feedback controller, and cart-location sensing using odometry. There is a convenient separation between the path guidance and control logic. Under normal operating conditions, the controller ensures that the errors between

  13. Adaptive Flight Control for an Autonomous Unmanned Helicopter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric N. Johnson; Suresh K. Kannany

    For autonomous helicopter flight, it is common to separate the flight control problem into an innerloop that controls attitude and an outerloop that controls the trajectory of the helicopter. The outerloop generates attitude commands that orient the main ro- tor forces appropriately to generate required translational accelerations. Recent work in Neural Network based adaptive flight control may be applied to

  14. AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMALL FIXED WING UAVS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek Kingston; Randal Beard; Timothy McLain; Michael Larsen; Wei Ren

    2003-01-01

    Autonomous unmanned air vehicle ?ight con- trol systems require robust path generation to ac- count for terrain obstructions, weather, and moving threats such as radar, jammers, and unfriendly air- craft. In this paper, we outline a feasible, hierarchal approach for real-time motion planning of small au- tonomous flxed-wing UAVs. The approach divides the trajectory generation into four tasks: waypoint path

  15. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  16. Symptomatic Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias.

    PubMed

    de Coo, Ilse F; Wilbrink, Leopoldine A; Haan, Joost

    2015-08-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are primary headache syndromes that share some clinical features such as a trigeminal distribution of the pain and accompanying ipsilateral autonomic symptoms. By definition, no underlying structural lesion for the phenotype is found. There are, however, many descriptions in the literature of patients with structural lesions causing symptoms that are indistinguishable from those of idiopathic TACs. In this article, we review the recent insights in symptomatic TACs by comparing and categorizing newly published cases. We confirm that symptomatic TACs can have typical phenotypes. It is of crucial importance to identify symptomatic TACs, as the underlying cause will influence treatment and outcome. Our update focuses on when a structural lesion should be sought. PMID:26092512

  17. Multisensor Robotic System For Autonomous Space Maintenance And Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidi, M. A.; Green, W. L.; Chandra, T.; Spears, J.

    1988-10-01

    Space applications can be greatly enhanced by the use of robotics and automation in activities such as orbital inspection and maintenance. Partial autonomy of space systems will enhance safety, reliability, productivity, adaptability, and reduction of overall cost. At the core of a robotics system is the ability to acquire, integrate, and interpret multisensory data to generate appropriate actions to perform a given task. In this paper, we show the feasibility of realistic autonomous space manipulation tasks using multisensory information. This is shown through two experiments involving a Fluid Interchange System and a Module Interchange System. In both cases, autonomous location of the mating element, autonomous location of a guiding light target, mating, and demating of the system are performed. Using the vision, force/torque, proxim-ity, and touch sensors, the Fluid Interchange System and the Module Interchange System experiments were accomplished autonomously and successfully.

  18. What Is Autonomous Search?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Youssef Hamadi; Eric Monfroy; Frédéric Saubion

    2008-01-01

    \\u000a Autonomous search is a particular case of adaptive systems that improve their solving performance by modifying and adjusting\\u000a themselves to the problem at hand, either by self-adaptation or by supervised adaptation. We propose a general definition\\u000a and a taxonomy of search processes with respect to their computation characteristics. For this purpose, we decompose solvers\\u000a into components and their configurations. Some

  19. The autonomous underwater glider \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff Sherman; Russ E. Davis; W. B. Owens; J. Valdes

    2001-01-01

    A small (50-kg, 2-m long) underwater vehicle with operating speeds of 20-30 cm\\/s and ranges up to 6000 km has been developed and field tested. The vehicle is essentially an autonomous profiling float that uses a buoyancy engine to cycle vertically and wings to glide horizontally while moving up and down. Operational control and data relay is provided by GPS

  20. Autonomic Computing: An Overview Manish Parashar1

    E-print Network

    Parashar, Manish

    ]. The Autonomic Computing Paradigm has been inspired by the human autonomic nervous system. Its overarching goal an overview of the architec- ture of the nervous system and use it to motivate the autonomic computing autonomic computing systems and applications. 2 The Autonomic Nervous System The human nervous system is

  1. Autonomic Neuropathy - Diagnosis and Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Prendergast

    Recent research indicates that autonomic neuropathy's most common and life-threatening consequences may be cardiac. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy can affect both heart rate control and cardiovascular dynamics. Add these effects to the already-serious tendency of diabetes to raise blood lipids and you have a condition ripe for disaster. Studies indicate that the onset of later-stage, symptomatic diabetic autonomic neuropathy is associated

  2. Autonomous quantum error correction with superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Kapit, Eliot; Saskin, Samuel; Leung, Nelson; Earnest, Nathan; McKay, David; Koch, Jens; Schuster, David

    2015-03-01

    Quantum error correction is of vital importance for the successful performance of quantum information tasks. Based on recent work, we propose a superconducting circuit with flux-driven Josephson qubits capable of autonomously protecting many-body states against bit-flip errors. Unlike the traditional error correction schemes where feed-back operations are applied conditioned on the measurements, in our circuit, error correction is achieved by tailoring interactions between low-Q resonators (the ``shadow lattice'') and sinusoidally flux-driven qubits. An energetic resonance condition minimizes errors generated by the resonator coupling itself while still allowing for rapid error correction. In this talk, I will introduce our autonomous quantum error correction scheme, and present our fabricated superconducting circuit. I will also discuss preliminary results obtained from our experiments.

  3. Optimum sizing of photovoltaic-energy storage systems for autonomous small islands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. K. Kaldellis; D. Zafirakis; E. Kondili

    2010-01-01

    The electrification of autonomous electrical networks is in most cases described by low quality of electricity available at very high production cost. Furthermore, autonomous electrical networks are subject to strict constraints posing serious limitations on the absorption of RES-based electricity generation. To by-pass these constraints and also secure a more sustainable electricity supply status, the concept of combining photovoltaic power

  4. Autonomous Coordinate Measurement Planning with Work-in-Progress Measurement for TRUE-CNC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hung Ng; Jiancheng Liu; Kazuo Yamazaki; Kazuo Nakanishi; Kazusaku Tezuka; Sun-Kyu Lee

    1998-01-01

    The paper deals with the autonomous programming technology for the high speed coordinate measuring machine (CMM). In order to provide the breakthrough technology to enhance the operability of CMMs to be used for in-line measurement of mechanical parts, a new autonomous programming method which automatically generates a CMM program from the CNC program used for machining of the part is

  5. Autonomous Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siders, Jeffrey A.; Smith, Robert H.

    2004-01-01

    The continued assembly and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) is the cornerstone within NASA's overall Strategic P an. As indicated in NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP), the International Space Station requires Shuttle to fly through at least the middle of the next decade to complete assembly of the Station, provide crew transport, and to provide heavy lift up and down mass capability. The ISTP reflects a tight coupling among the Station, Shuttle, and OSP programs to support our Nation's space goal . While the Shuttle is a critical component of this ISTP, there is a new emphasis for the need to achieve greater efficiency and safety in transporting crews to and from the Space Station. This need is being addressed through the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program. However, the OSP is being designed to "complement" the Shuttle as the primary means for crew transfer, and will not replace all the Shuttle's capabilities. The unique heavy lift capabilities of the Space Shuttle is essential for both ISS, as well as other potential missions extending beyond low Earth orbit. One concept under discussion to better fulfill this role of a heavy lift carrier, is the transformation of the Shuttle to an "un-piloted" autonomous system. This concept would eliminate the loss of crew risk, while providing a substantial increase in payload to orbit capability. Using the guidelines reflected in the NASA ISTP, the autonomous Shuttle a simplified concept of operations can be described as; "a re-supply of cargo to the ISS through the use of an un-piloted Shuttle vehicle from launch through landing". Although this is the primary mission profile, the other major consideration in developing an autonomous Shuttle is maintaining a crew transportation capability to ISS as an assured human access to space capability.

  6. Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estlin, Tara A.; Chien, Steve A.; Castano, Rebecca; Gaines, Daniel M.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Schoolcraft, Josua B.; Oyake, Amalaye; Vaughs, Ashton G.; Torgerson, Jordan L.

    2011-01-01

    The Palomar Adaptive Optics System actively corrects for changing aberrations in light due to atmospheric turbulence. However, the underlying internal static error is unknown and uncorrected by this process. The dedicated wavefront sensor device necessarily lies along a different path than the science camera, and, therefore, doesn't measure the true errors along the path leading to the final detected imagery. This is a standard problem in adaptive optics (AO) called "non-common path error." The Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration (APRC) software suite performs automated sensing and correction iterations to calibrate the Palomar AO system to levels that were previously unreachable.

  7. Toward autonomous spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, L. J.; Calabrese, P. G.; Walsh, M. J.; Owens, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ways in which autonomous behavior of spacecraft can be extended to treat situations wherein a closed loop control by a human may not be appropriate or even possible are explored. Predictive models that minimize mean least squared error and arbitrary cost functions are discussed. A methodology for extracting cyclic components for an arbitrary environment with respect to usual and arbitrary criteria is developed. An approach to prediction and control based on evolutionary programming is outlined. A computer program capable of predicting time series is presented. A design of a control system for a robotic dense with partially unknown physical properties is presented.

  8. Asteroid Exploration with Autonomic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James; Rouff, Christopher; Hinchey, Mike

    2004-01-01

    NASA is studying advanced technologies for a future robotic exploration mission to the asteroid belt. The prospective ANTS (Autonomous Nano Technology Swarm) mission comprises autonomous agents including worker agents (small spacecra3) designed to cooperate in asteroid exploration under the overall authoriq of at least one ruler agent (a larger spacecraft) whose goal is to cause science data to be returned to Earth. The ANTS team (ruler plus workers and messenger agents), but not necessarily any individual on the team, will exhibit behaviors that qualify it as an autonomic system, where an autonomic system is defined as a system that self-reconfigures, self-optimizes, self-heals, and self-protects. Autonomic system concepts lead naturally to realistic, scalable architectures rich in capabilities and behaviors. In-depth consideration of a major mission like ANTS in terms of autonomic systems brings new insights into alternative definitions of autonomic behavior. This paper gives an overview of the ANTS mission and discusses the autonomic properties of the mission.

  9. Autonomous Underwater Gliders Wood, Stephen

    E-print Network

    Wood, Stephen L.

    26 Autonomous Underwater Gliders Wood, Stephen Florida Institute of Technology United States and environmental data gathering capacities. Included in these types are autonomous underwater gliders that have four classes of underwater gliders: 1) those that use mechanical or electrical means of changing

  10. Sensory prediction for autonomous robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryo Saegusa; Francesco Nori; Giulio Sandini; Giorgio Metta; Sophie Sakka

    2007-01-01

    For a complex autonomous robotic system such as a humanoid robot, the learning-based sensory prediction is considered effective to develop a perceptual environment model by itself. We developed a learning system for an autonomous robot to predict the next sensory information from the current sensory information and the expected action. The system we consider contains a learning procedure and a

  11. Evasion Planning for Autonomous Vehicles at Intersections TszChiu Au 1 , ChienLiang Fok 2 , Sriram Vishwanath 2 , Christine Julien 2 , and Peter Stone 1

    E-print Network

    Stone, Peter

    Evasion Planning for Autonomous Vehicles at Intersections Tsz­Chiu Au 1 , Chien­Liang Fok 2 management (AIM) is a new intersection control protocol that exploits the capabilities of autonomous vehicles that autonomous vehicles are feasible with current generation of hardware [1]. Looking ahead to the time when

  12. Autonomous wildfire surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jan S.

    1993-11-01

    Until recently, problems resulting from fires in forests and natural areas were solved on a national rather than international level. This resulted in duplicating research efforts. The Commission of the European Communities (CEC) tries to enhance the cooperation between European countries to stimulate research on the causes and the technological developments for wildfire prevention, detection, and fighting. One result of these efforts has been the start of an international project on the development of a demonstration system that will be used to aid wild land managers and fire fighters in preventing and fighting wild fires. The system will consist of a decision support system and an autonomous wild fire detection system. The basic information that is used by the decision support system is on the one hand a database system with historical, topographical, logistic, meteorological and geographic information and on the other hand `real-time' data from automated cameras and weather sensors. Also, in other large countries outside Europe, such as Canada, the United States and Australia, technological approaches are being developed to reduce hazards as a result of wild fires. In this paper a summary is given on the various problems and solutions in the area of autonomous wild fire detection and surveillance in the CEC and some other parts of the world.

  13. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  14. Autonomous Flight Safety System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Santuro, Steve; Simpson, James; Zoerner, Roger; Bull, Barton; Lanzi, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) is an independent flight safety system designed for small to medium sized expendable launch vehicles launching from or needing range safety protection while overlying relatively remote locations. AFSS replaces the need for a man-in-the-loop to make decisions for flight termination. AFSS could also serve as the prototype for an autonomous manned flight crew escape advisory system. AFSS utilizes onboard sensors and processors to emulate the human decision-making process using rule-based software logic and can dramatically reduce safety response time during critical launch phases. The Range Safety flight path nominal trajectory, its deviation allowances, limit zones and other flight safety rules are stored in the onboard computers. Position, velocity and attitude data obtained from onboard global positioning system (GPS) and inertial navigation system (INS) sensors are compared with these rules to determine the appropriate action to ensure that people and property are not jeopardized. The final system will be fully redundant and independent with multiple processors, sensors, and dead man switches to prevent inadvertent flight termination. AFSS is currently in Phase III which includes updated algorithms, integrated GPS/INS sensors, large scale simulation testing and initial aircraft flight testing.

  15. Autonomous Control of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Towing a Vector Sensor Array

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, Henrik

    Autonomous Control of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Towing a Vector Sensor Array Michael R,arjunab@mit.edu Abstract-- This paper is about the autonomous control of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV the vehicles to adapt their missions and behave autonomously as events unfold. Conversely, practical concerns

  16. A Mission Controller for High Level Control of Autonomous and Semi-Autonomous Underwater

    E-print Network

    Whitcomb, Louis L.

    A Mission Controller for High Level Control of Autonomous and Semi-Autonomous Underwater Vehicles to provide high-level control for autonomous and semi- autonomous vehicle operation. The mission controller autonomous AUVs, acoustically controlled AUVs and a new class of hybrid vehicle capable of operating both

  17. An industry survey of autonomic infrastructure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Keith Nunez; Gary Mueller

    2009-01-01

    Autonomic Computing is in the initial stage of definition and development. A key step in the development of autonomic systems is the building and adoption of standard middleware or infrastructure. Infrastructure provides the plumbing and support structure for autonomic systems. Key infrastructure components for autonomic systems include hardware and software sensors, standard communication links, protocols including packet and payload, metadata

  18. A real-time guidance system for an autonomous vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Bhatt; D. Gaw; A. Meystel

    1987-01-01

    A real-time system for the control of an autonomous vehicle consisting of a nested hierarchy of control modules is described. The focus is on the PILOT module which provdies the real-time guidance of the system. It is responsible for the generation and tracking of dynamically feasible trajectories which follow the generally planned path and avoid local obstacles. The PILOT operation

  19. Adaptive Flight Control for an Autonomous Unmanned Helicopter

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Eric N.

    Adaptive Flight Control for an Autonomous Unmanned Helicopter Eric N. Johnson and Suresh K. Kannan helicopter flight, it is common to separate the flight control problem into an innerloop that controls attitude and an outerloop that controls the trajectory of the helicopter. The outerloop generates attitude

  20. Heuristic collision-free path planning for an autonomous platform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikolaos G. Bourbakis

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, a heuristic and learning, algorithmic scheme for collision-free navigation is presented. This scheme determines an optimum collision-free navigation path of an autonomous platform by using a ‘trial and error’ process, past navigation knowledge and current information extracted from the generated surrounding environment.

  1. Optimization of autonomous hybrid energy storage system for photovoltaic applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Glavin; Paul K. W. Chan; W. G. Hurley

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous photovoltaic systems require an energy buffer to match the generation with the time distribution of demand, as photovoltaic is time and weather dependent. The Valve Regulated Lead Acid (VRLA) battery is commonly used for photovoltaic storage because of its low cost, low maintenance, and wide availability. A hybrid energy storage system (HESS) integrates the VRLA battery and ultracapacitor, drawing

  2. Dynamics of behavior: Theory and applications for autonomous robot architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Dose; Christoph Engels

    1995-01-01

    Limitations both for the further development as well as for the actual technical application of autonomous robots arise from the lack of a unifying theoretical language. We propose three concepts for such a language: (1) Behaviors are represented by variables, specific constant values of which correspond to task demands; (2) Behaviors are generated as attractors of dynamical systems; (3) Neural

  3. The Wave Glider: A Wave-Powered autonomous marine vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Hine; S. Willcox; G. Hine; T. Richardson

    2009-01-01

    The wave glider is a new autonomous marine vehicle that is unique in its ability to harness ocean wave energy for platform propulsion. This paper provides an overview of the wave glider vehicle's architecture and capabilities, and presents results from the extensive engineering sea trials that we have conducted with several prototype and the current production generations of the vehicle.

  4. Cooperative control for multiple autonomous UAV's searching for targets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Flint Marios; M. Polycarpou; E. Fernandez-Gaucherand

    2002-01-01

    The work presented here is in the area of decision and control for autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Specifically, we formulate the problem of generating near-optimal trajectories to follow in order for several UAVs to cooperatively search for targets in a given area for which some a priori data about target distribution is available. An algorithm that utilizes a model

  5. Autonomous spherical mobile robot for child-development studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    François Michaud; Jean-françois Laplante; Hélène Larouche; Audrey Duquette; Serge Caron; Dominic Létourneau; Patrice Masson

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the design process of a spherical robot capable of autonomous motion, and demonstrates how it can become a tool in child development studies. The robot, named Roball, is capable of intentional self- propelled movements and can generate various interplay situations using motion, messages, sounds, illuminated parts and other sensors. Such capabilities allow Roball to interact with young

  6. Autonomous software: Myth or magic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, A.; Naylor, T.; Saunders, E. S.

    2008-03-01

    We discuss work by the eSTAR project which demonstrates a fully closed loop autonomous system for the follow up of possible micro-lensing anomalies. Not only are the initial micro-lensing detections followed up in real time, but ongoing events are prioritised and continually monitored, with the returned data being analysed automatically. If the ``smart software'' running the observing campaign detects a planet-like anomaly, further follow-up will be scheduled autonomously and other telescopes and telescope networks alerted to the possible planetary detection. We further discuss the implications of this, and how such projects can be used to build more general autonomous observing and control systems.

  7. Autonomous software: Myth or magic?

    E-print Network

    Alasdair Allan; Tim Naylor; Eric S. Saunders

    2008-02-04

    We discuss work by the eSTAR project which demonstrates a fully closed loop autonomous system for the follow up of possible micro-lensing anomalies. Not only are the initial micro-lensing detections followed up in real time, but ongoing events are prioritised and continually monitored, with the returned data being analysed automatically. If the ``smart software'' running the observing campaign detects a planet-like anomaly, further follow-up will be scheduled autonomously and other telescopes and telescope networks alerted to the possible planetary detection. We further discuss the implications of this, and how such projects can be used to build more general autonomous observing and control systems.

  8. Parametrized maneuvers for autonomous vehicles

    E-print Network

    Dever, Christopher W. (Christopher Walden), 1972-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis presents a method for creating continuously parametrized maneuver classes for autonomous vehicles. These classes provide useful tools for motion planners, bundling sets of related vehicle motions based on a ...

  9. Autonomic and Trusted Computing Paradigms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaolin Li; Hui Kang; Patrick Harrington; Johnson Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The emerging autonomic computing technology has been hailed by world-wide researchers and professionals in academia and in- dustry. Besides four key capabilities, well known as self-CHOP, we pro- pose an additional self-regulating capability to explicitly emphasize the policy-driven self-manageability and dynamic policy derivation and en- actment. Essentially, these five capabilities, coined as Self-CHROP, define an autonomic system along with other

  10. Batoid Fishes: Inspiration for the Next Generation of Underwater Robots

    E-print Network

    Fish, Frank

    batoid fishes an ideal platform to emulate in the design of a bio-inspired autonomous underwater vehicle in the next generation of bio-inspired underwater vehicles. Keywords: biomimicry, bioinspired, autonomous into biological form and function and (2) develop bioinspired autonomous underwater vehicles (BAUVs) to im- prove

  11. Resource-Optimal Planning For An Autonomous Planetary Vehicle

    E-print Network

    Della Penna, Giuseppe; Magazzeni, Daniele; Mercorio, Fabio; 10.5121/ijaia.2010.1302

    2010-01-01

    Autonomous planetary vehicles, also known as rovers, are small autonomous vehicles equipped with a variety of sensors used to perform exploration and experiments on a planet's surface. Rovers work in a partially unknown environment, with narrow energy/time/movement constraints and, typically, small computational resources that limit the complexity of on-line planning and scheduling, thus they represent a great challenge in the field of autonomous vehicles. Indeed, formal models for such vehicles usually involve hybrid systems with nonlinear dynamics, which are difficult to handle by most of the current planning algorithms and tools. Therefore, when offline planning of the vehicle activities is required, for example for rovers that operate without a continuous Earth supervision, such planning is often performed on simplified models that are not completely realistic. In this paper we show how the UPMurphi model checking based planning tool can be used to generate resource-optimal plans to control the engine of ...

  12. Innovative thermal energy harvesting for future autonomous applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfray, Stephane

    2013-12-01

    As communicating autonomous systems market is booming, the role of energy harvesting will be a key enabler. As example, heat is one of the most abundant energy sources that can be converted into electricity in order to power circuits. Harvesting systems that use wasted heat open new ways to power autonomous sensors when the energy consumption is low, or to create systems of power generators when the conversion efficiency is high. The combination of different technologies (low power ?-processors, ?-batteries, radio, sensors...) with new energy harvesters compatible with large varieties of use-cases with allow to address this booming market. Thanks to the conjunction of ultra-low power electronic development, 3D technologies & Systems in Package approaches, the integration of autonomous sensors and electronics with ambient energy harvesting will be achievable. The applications are very wide, from environment and industrial sensors to medical portable applications, and the Internet of things may also represent in the future a several billions units market.

  13. Autonomous power system brassboard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merolla, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) brassboard is a 20 kHz power distribution system which has been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. The brassboard exists to provide a realistic hardware platform capable of testing artificially intelligent (AI) software. The brassboard's power circuit topology is based upon a Power Distribution Control Unit (PDCU), which is a subset of an advanced development 20 kHz electrical power system (EPS) testbed, originally designed for Space Station Freedom (SSF). The APS program is designed to demonstrate the application of intelligent software as a fault detection, isolation, and recovery methodology for space power systems. This report discusses both the hardware and software elements used to construct the present configuration of the brassboard. The brassboard power components are described. These include the solid-state switches (herein referred to as switchgear), transformers, sources, and loads. Closely linked to this power portion of the brassboard is the first level of embedded control. Hardware used to implement this control and its associated software is discussed. An Ada software program, developed by Lewis Research Center's Space Station Freedom Directorate for their 20 kHz testbed, is used to control the brassboard's switchgear, as well as monitor key brassboard parameters through sensors located within these switches. The Ada code is downloaded from a PC/AT, and is resident within the 8086 microprocessor-based embedded controllers. The PC/AT is also used for smart terminal emulation, capable of controlling the switchgear as well as displaying data from them. Intelligent control is provided through use of a T1 Explorer and the Autonomous Power Expert (APEX) LISP software. Real-time load scheduling is implemented through use of a 'C' program-based scheduling engine. The methods of communication between these computers and the brassboard are explored. In order to evaluate the features of both the brassboard hardware and intelligent controlling software, fault circuits have been developed and integrated as part of the brassboard. A description of these fault circuits and their function is included. The brassboard has become an extremely useful test facility, promoting artificial intelligence (AI) applications for power distribution systems. However, there are elements of the brassboard which could be enhanced, thus improving system performance. Modifications and enhancements to improve the brassboard's operation are discussed.

  14. Autonomous power system brassboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merolla, Anthony

    1992-10-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) brassboard is a 20 kHz power distribution system which has been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. The brassboard exists to provide a realistic hardware platform capable of testing artificially intelligent (AI) software. The brassboard's power circuit topology is based upon a Power Distribution Control Unit (PDCU), which is a subset of an advanced development 20 kHz electrical power system (EPS) testbed, originally designed for Space Station Freedom (SSF). The APS program is designed to demonstrate the application of intelligent software as a fault detection, isolation, and recovery methodology for space power systems. This report discusses both the hardware and software elements used to construct the present configuration of the brassboard. The brassboard power components are described. These include the solid-state switches (herein referred to as switchgear), transformers, sources, and loads. Closely linked to this power portion of the brassboard is the first level of embedded control. Hardware used to implement this control and its associated software is discussed. An Ada software program, developed by Lewis Research Center's Space Station Freedom Directorate for their 20 kHz testbed, is used to control the brassboard's switchgear, as well as monitor key brassboard parameters through sensors located within these switches. The Ada code is downloaded from a PC/AT, and is resident within the 8086 microprocessor-based embedded controllers. The PC/AT is also used for smart terminal emulation, capable of controlling the switchgear as well as displaying data from them. Intelligent control is provided through use of a T1 Explorer and the Autonomous Power Expert (APEX) LISP software. Real-time load scheduling is implemented through use of a 'C' program-based scheduling engine. The methods of communication between these computers and the brassboard are explored. In order to evaluate the features of both the brassboard hardware and intelligent controlling software, fault circuits have been developed and integrated as part of the brassboard. A description of these fault circuits and their function is included. The brassboard has become an extremely useful test facility, promoting artificial intelligence (AI) applications for power distribution systems.

  15. Autonomous UAV persistent surveillance using bio-inspired strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Isaacs, Jason; Venkateswaran, Sriram; Pham, Tien

    2012-06-01

    A team consisting of Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara, the Army Research Laboratory, the Engineer Research and Development Center, and IBM UK is developing technologies in support of automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous battlefield sensor networks to enhance situational awareness for dismounts and command echelons. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from a sparse network of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous collection routes that are data-driven. Bioinspired techniques for autonomous search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data from heterogeneous sensor networks. The bio-inspired algorithm is based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. Field tests of a bio-inspired system that routed UAVs were conducted in June 2011 at Camp Roberts, CA. The field test results showed that such a system can autonomously detect and locate the source of terrestrial events with very high accuracy and visually verify the event. In June 2011, field tests of the system were completed and include the use of multiple autonomously controlled UAVs, detection and disambiguation of multiple acoustic events occurring in short time frames, optimal sensor placement based on local phenomenology and the use of the International Technology Alliance (ITA) Sensor Network Fabric. The system demonstrated TRL 6 performance in the field at Camp Roberts.

  16. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirovi?, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-04-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  17. Allowing autonomous agents freedom.

    PubMed

    Cronin, A J

    2008-03-01

    Living-donor kidney transplantation is the "gold standard" treatment for many individuals with end-stage renal failure. Superior outcomes for the graft and the transplant recipient have prompted the implementation of new strategies promoting living-donor kidney transplantation, and the number of such transplants has increased considerably over recent years. Living donors are undoubtedly exposed to risk. In his editorial "underestimating the risk in living kidney donation", Walter Glannon suggests that more data on long-term outcomes for living donors are needed to determine whether this risk is permissible and the extent to which physicians and transplant surgeons should promote living-donor kidney transplantation. In this paper I argue that it is not clear that medical professionals have underestimated this risk, nor is it clear that more data on long-term outcomes are needed in order to determine whether it is permissible for individual autonomous agents to expose themselves to this or, indeed, any risk. The global shortage of organs available for transplantation ultimately means that every year thousands of individuals who value their life die needlessly. This is an unacceptable loss of human life. Saving life is one of the most wonderful things an individual can do for another. Promoting any strategy that will assist in saving life and preventing human suffering within acceptable moral limits is legitimate. PMID:18316449

  18. Autonomous Aerobraking at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Jill L.; Tolson, Robert; Cianciolo, Alicia Dwyer; Dec, John

    2002-01-01

    Aerobraking has become a proven approach for orbital missions at Mars. A launch of a 1000 kg class spacecraft on a Delta class booster saves 90% of the post-MOI fuel otherwise required to circularize the orbit. In 1997, Mars Global Surveyor demonstrated the feasibility and Mars 2001 Odyssey completed a nearly trouble free aerobraking phase in January 2002. In 2006, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will also utilize aerobraking. From the flight operations standpoint, however, aerobraking is labor intensive and high risk due to the large density variability in the Mars thermosphere. The maximum rate of aerobraking is typically limited by the maximum allowable temperature of the solar array which is the primary drag surface. Prior missions have used a surrogate variable, usually maximum free stream heat flux, as a basis for performing periapsis altitude corridor control maneuvers. This paper provides an adaptive sequential method for operationally relating measured temperatures to heat flux profile characteristics and performing maneuvers based directly on measured temperatures and atmospheric properties derived from the heat flux profiles. Simulations of autonomous aerobraking are performed using Odyssey mission data.

  19. Autonomous movement of platinum-loaded stomatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Daniela A.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2012-04-01

    Polymer stomatocytes are bowl-shaped structures of nanosize dimensions formed by the controlled deformation of polymer vesicles. The stable nanocavity and strict control of the opening are ideal for the physical entrapment of nanoparticles which, when catalytically active, can turn the stomatocyte morphology into a nanoreactor. Herein we report an approach to generate autonomous movement of the polymer stomatocytes by selectively entrapping catalytically active platinum nanoparticles within their nanocavities and subsequently using catalysis as a driving force for movement. Hydrogen peroxide is free to access the inner stomatocyte cavity, where it is decomposed by the active catalyst (the entrapped platinum nanoparticles) into oxygen and water. This generates a rapid discharge, which induces thrust and directional movement. The design of the platinum-loaded stomatocytes resembles a miniature monopropellant rocket engine, in which the controlled opening of the stomatocytes directs the expulsion of the decomposition products away from the reaction chamber (inner stomatocyte cavity).

  20. Autonomous movement of platinum-loaded stomatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniela A; Nolte, Roeland J M; van Hest, Jan C M

    2012-04-01

    Polymer stomatocytes are bowl-shaped structures of nanosize dimensions formed by the controlled deformation of polymer vesicles. The stable nanocavity and strict control of the opening are ideal for the physical entrapment of nanoparticles which, when catalytically active, can turn the stomatocyte morphology into a nanoreactor. Herein we report an approach to generate autonomous movement of the polymer stomatocytes by selectively entrapping catalytically active platinum nanoparticles within their nanocavities and subsequently using catalysis as a driving force for movement. Hydrogen peroxide is free to access the inner stomatocyte cavity, where it is decomposed by the active catalyst (the entrapped platinum nanoparticles) into oxygen and water. This generates a rapid discharge, which induces thrust and directional movement. The design of the platinum-loaded stomatocytes resembles a miniature monopropellant rocket engine, in which the controlled opening of the stomatocytes directs the expulsion of the decomposition products away from the reaction chamber (inner stomatocyte cavity). PMID:22437710

  1. A Cloud-Assisted Design for Autonomous Driving Swarun Kumar

    E-print Network

    from autonomous vehicles as well as the roadside infrastruc- ture. The cloud assists autonomous- Communications Networks GENERAL TERMS Algorithms, Design, Performance KEYWORDS Autonomous Vehicles, Cloud. Thus, autonomous vehicles need detailed and real-time information about their sur- roundings [11

  2. Towards an Autonomic Cluster Management System (ACMS) with Reflex Autonomicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Hinchey, Mike; Sterritt, Roy

    2005-01-01

    Cluster computing, whereby a large number of simple processors or nodes are combined together to apparently function as a single powerful computer, has emerged as a research area in its own right. The approach offers a relatively inexpensive means of providing a fault-tolerant environment and achieving significant computational capabilities for high-performance computing applications. However, the task of manually managing and configuring a cluster quickly becomes daunting as the cluster grows in size. Autonomic computing, with its vision to provide self-management, can potentially solve many of the problems inherent in cluster management. We describe the development of a prototype Autonomic Cluster Management System (ACMS) that exploits autonomic properties in automating cluster management and its evolution to include reflex reactions via pulse monitoring.

  3. Autonomous inverted helicopter flight via reinforcement learning

    E-print Network

    Ng, Andrew Y.

    Autonomous inverted helicopter flight via reinforcement learning Andrew Y. Ng1 , Adam Coates1 Science Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2 Whirled Air Helicopters, Menlo Park, CA 94025 Abstract. Helicopters have highly stochastic, nonlinear, dynamics, and autonomous helicopter

  4. Autonomous inverted helicopter flight via reinforcement learning

    E-print Network

    Ng, Andrew Y.

    Autonomous inverted helicopter flight via reinforcement learning Andrew Y. Ng 1 , Adam Coates 1 Computer Science Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2 Whirled Air Helicopters, Menlo Park, CA 94025 Abstract. Helicopters have highly stochastic, nonlinear, dynamics, and autonomous helicopter

  5. Parameterized Maneuver Learning for Autonomous Helicopter Flight

    E-print Network

    O'Brien, James F.

    Parameterized Maneuver Learning for Autonomous Helicopter Flight Jie Tang, Arjun Singh, Nimbus aerobatic maneuvers by our autonomous helicopter. I. INTRODUCTION Trajectory following is a fundamental probabilistic model that enabled them to extract an expert helicopter pilot's intended trajectory from multiple

  6. A Robust Compositional Architecture for Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brat, Guillaume; Deney, Ewen; Farrell, Kimberley; Giannakopoulos, Dimitra; Jonsson, Ari; Frank, Jeremy; Bobby, Mark; Carpenter, Todd; Estlin, Tara

    2006-01-01

    Space exploration applications can benefit greatly from autonomous systems. Great distances, limited communications and high costs make direct operations impossible while mandating operations reliability and efficiency beyond what traditional commanding can provide. Autonomous systems can improve reliability and enhance spacecraft capability significantly. However, there is reluctance to utilizing autonomous systems. In part this is due to general hesitation about new technologies, but a more tangible concern is that of reliability of predictability of autonomous software. In this paper, we describe ongoing work aimed at increasing robustness and predictability of autonomous software, with the ultimate goal of building trust in such systems. The work combines state-of-the-art technologies and capabilities in autonomous systems with advanced validation and synthesis techniques. The focus of this paper is on the autonomous system architecture that has been defined, and on how it enables the application of validation techniques for resulting autonomous systems.

  7. AUTONOMIC MULTIMEDIA DELIVERY SERVICES SELF-CONFIGURATION

    E-print Network

    AUTONOMIC MULTIMEDIA DELIVERY SERVICES SELF-CONFIGURATION I. Al-oqily1 , A. Alshtnawi2 , K.M. Al-configuration architecture for multimedia delivery services. Index Terms-- self-configuration, autonomic computing, overlay

  8. Autonomous Intersection Management for Semi-Autonomous Vehicles Tsz-Chiu Au

    E-print Network

    Stone, Peter

    Autonomous Intersection Management for Semi-Autonomous Vehicles Tsz-Chiu Au School of Electrical@cs.utexas.edu Abstract-- Recent advances in autonomous vehicle technology will open the door to highly efficient control protocol designed for fully autonomous vehicles. We, however, anticipate there will be a long

  9. Autonomous hazard detection and avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pien, Homer

    1992-01-01

    During GFY 91, Draper Laboratory was awarded a task by NASA-JSC under contract number NAS9-18426 to study and evaluate the potential for achieving safe autonomous landings on Mars using an on-board autonomous hazard detection and avoidance (AHDA) system. This report describes the results of that study. The AHDA task had four objectives: to demonstrate, via a closed-loop simulation, the ability to autonomously select safe landing sites and the ability to maneuver to the selected site; to identify key issues in the development of AHDA systems; to produce strawman designs for AHDA sensors and algorithms; and to perform initial trade studies leading to better understanding of the effect of sensor/terrain/viewing parameters on AHDA algorithm performance. This report summarizes the progress made during the first year, with primary emphasis on describing the tools developed for simulating a closed-loop AHDA landing. Some cursory performance evaluation results are also presented.

  10. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia sine headache.

    PubMed

    Haane, D Y P; Koehler, P J; Te Lintelo, M P; Peatfield, R

    2011-04-01

    Cluster headache without headache (CH-H) has been described several times. We add three new CH-H patients and a patient with (probable) paroxysmal hemicrania without headache (PH-H). We searched the literature and found some more cases of CH-H and PH-H. CH-H attacks may have a shorter minimal attack duration than CH attacks. We propose the term trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia without headache (TAC-H) for autonomic attacks and/or extracephalic pain or sensory symptoms with an attack duration and distribution and/or response to therapy suggesting one of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, but without accompanying headache. Secondary TAC-H may develop after treatment for painful TAC attacks. We discuss pathophysiological issues, particularly the central role of the hypothalamus and the suggestion that the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) might be triggered by the diencephalic pacemaker without nociceptive activation. PMID:20976466

  11. Recent Advances: Onboard Autonomous Science Investigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, R.; Anderson, R. C.; Judd, M.; Estlin, T.; Gaines, D. M.; Castano, A.; Bornstein, B.; Wagstaff, K.; Stough, T.

    2004-12-01

    The Onboard Autonomous Science Investigation System (OASIS) uses images taken by planetary rovers to automatically assign an importance value to each image. This importance ranking is based on the rocks found in the images. The ranking can be used to establish, onboard, a priority of the data that will be transmitted to Earth, thus increasing the overall quality of bandwidth-constrained, or time-constrained, downlinks. In addition to prioritization, the onboard analysis results can be used to recognize new science opportunities through a "science alert" feature that triggers new rover activities (e.g. acquire an additional image). New science targets and measurements are then generated and added to the rover's task list through a planning and scheduling component of the system. After providing a system overview of OASIS, we describe our recent advances in integrating with and using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's FIDO rover. OASIS can now autonomously perform the following sequence of steps: analyze gray scale imagery to find rocks in the scene (already implemented onboard the rover), extract properties of the rocks, identify rocks with interesting features, re-task the rover to take additional imagery of the identified target and then allow the rover to continue on its original mission. In addition, we will also describe the early 2004 ground test validation of specific OASIS components on JPL Mars Yard image sets and selected Mars Exploration Rover (MER) images.

  12. Command and telemetry in autonomous spacecraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Some major steps are summarized in the evolution of autonomous design features for planetary exploration spacecraft. The control and data architectures for the Viking, Voyager, and Galileo spacecraft are considered. Telemetry and command capabilities are fundamental features of spacecraft design that have been successfully used for autonomous control. Also discussed is the Autonomous Redundancy and Maintenance Management Subsystem (ARMMS) concept. The software approach to autonomous control provides for modifications to the control process or the addition of new operating features during flight operations.

  13. Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle (MARV)

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Spletzer, B.L.; Weber, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has recently developed a 16 cm{sup 3} (1 in{sup 3}) autonomous robotic vehicle which is capable of tracking a single conducting wire carrying a 96 kHz signal. This vehicle was developed to assess the limiting factors in using commercial technology to build miniature autonomous vehicles. Particular attention was paid to the design of the control system to search out the wire, track it, and recover if the wire was lost. This paper describes the test vehicle and the control analysis. Presented in the paper are the vehicle model, control laws, a stability analysis, simulation studies and experimental results.

  14. Progress towards autonomous, intelligent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Henry; Heer, Ewald

    1987-01-01

    An aggressive program has been initiated to develop, integrate, and implement autonomous systems technologies starting with today's expert systems and evolving to autonomous, intelligent systems by the end of the 1990s. This program includes core technology developments and demonstration projects for technology evaluation and validation. This paper discusses key operational frameworks in the content of systems autonomy applications and then identifies major technological challenges, primarily in artificial intelligence areas. Program content and progress made towards critical technologies and demonstrations that have been initiated to achieve the required future capabilities in the year 2000 era are discussed.

  15. Batch Reservations in Autonomous Intersection (Extended Abstract)

    E-print Network

    Au, Tsz-Chiu

    autonomous vehicles are feasible with current or near-future intelligent vehicle technology. Looking ahead of autonomous vehicles we can devise a reservation-based intersection control protocol that is much more Challenge in 2007 showed that fully autonomous vehicles are technologically feasi- ble with contemporary

  16. Autonomous Sonar Classification Using Expert Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald P. Brutzman; Mark A. Compton; Yutaka Kanayama

    1992-01-01

    (408) 656-2149 work, (408) 656-2595 fax Abstract - An expert system can process active sonar returns, perform geometric analysis and autonomously classify detected underwater objects. Autonomous classification of objects is an essential requirement for independent operation by autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Most AUVs are only capable of rudimentary sensor analysis, since standard approaches to evaluation and classification of sonar data

  17. Autonomic function following cervical spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrei Krassioukov

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is commonly associated with devastating paralysis. However, this condition also results in a variety of autonomic dysfunctions, primarily: cardiovascular, broncho-pulmonary, urinary, gastrointestinal, sexual, and thermoregulatory. SCI and the resultant unstable autonomic control are responsible for increased mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory disease among individuals with SCI.Injury level and severity directly correlate to the severity of autonomic

  18. Semiotic oriented autonomous intelligent systems engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodrigo Gonçalves; Ricardo Gudwin

    1998-01-01

    Introduces a first proposal on how to use semiotics in order to improve software engineering methods, when intelligent autonomous systems are targeted. First we investigate the current flaws in software engineering, concerning intelligent autonomous systems. Then we propose a knowledge taxonomy, based on semiotic ideas, aiming at a tool to understand the information domain of intelligent autonomous systems. Further, we

  19. Analysis of the Formation and Autonomous Replication of an Extrachromosomal Mouse Transgene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. I. Nikolaev; L. E. Andreeva

    2004-01-01

    A stable autonomously replicating shuttle transgene, pr8a was, previously isolated from Bombyx mori and characterized. Autonomous replication of pr8a and its derivatives was observed in yeast cells, B. mori embryos, and transgenic mice. To continue the previous studies, transgenic mice of several generations were examined. DNA analysis revealed a course of pr8a rearrangements resulting in extrachromosomal transgene p8-2 of F2

  20. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  1. Structured control for autonomous robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reid G. Simmons

    1994-01-01

    To operate in rich, dynamic environments, autonomous robots must be able to effectively utilize and coordinate their limited physical and computational resources. As complexity increases, it becomes necessary to impose explicit constraints on the control of planning, perception, and action to ensure that unwanted interactions between behaviors do not occur. This paper advocates developing complex robot systems by layering reactive

  2. Integrating Autonomous Heterogeneous Information Sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rex Jakobovits

    1997-01-01

    this paper, most attempts at implementing a multidatabase system have had their handsfull dealing with the heterogeneities of much simpler domains. This is crossoverresearch, combining complex data type management with integration issues [SSU96].This paper is a survey of the existing computer science research approaches to achievinginteroperability between autonomous heterogeneous data sources.B. Schematic Conflicts

  3. Intrusion detection using autonomous agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eugene H. Spafford; Diego Zamboni

    2000-01-01

    AAFID is a distributed intrusion detection architecture and system, developed in CERIAS at Purdue University. AAFID was the first architecture that proposed the use of autonomous agents for doing intrusion detection. With its prototype implementation, it constitutes a useful framework for the research and testing of intrusion detection algo- rithms and mechanisms. We describe the AAFID architecture and the existing

  4. Simulated Visual Perception for Autonomous

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Flower; Burkhard Wünsche; Werner Guesgen

    As the number of robots in the world increases, from automatic vacuum cleaners, to toy robot dogs, to autonomous vehicles for the military, the need for effective algorithms to control these agents is becoming increasingly more important. Conventional path finding techniques have relied on having a representation of the world that could be analysed mathematically to find the best path.

  5. An Autonomous Reliabilit Cloud Comput

    E-print Network

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    An Autonomous Reliabilit Ami Cloud Comput Department of Computing and Informa Abstract--Cloud computing paradigm allo based access to computing and storages s Internet. Since with advances of Cloud. Keywords- Cloud computing; SLA negotiat I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing has transferred the services

  6. Towards an Autonomic Computing Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy Sterritt; David W. Bustard

    2003-01-01

    Autonomic Computing is a promising new concept in system development. It aims to (i) increase reliability by designing systems to be self-protecting and self-healing; and (ii) increase autonomy and performance by enabling systems to adapt to changing circumstances, using self-configuring and self-optimizing mechanisms. This paper discusses the type of system architecture needed to support such objectives.

  7. Towards Autonomously-Powered CRFIDs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shane S. Clark; Jeremy Gummeson; Kevin Fu; Deepak Ganesan

    Batteryless Computational RFID (CRFID) devices pres- ent exciting possibilities for ubiquitous computing ap- plications. Theyrequireminimalmaintenance, arecheap to manufacture, and have small form factors. However, CRFIDs lack autonomy because of the need for constant power from an RFID reader—hindering deployment. In this paper, we propose hybrid power harvesting tech- niques as a mechanism for designing autonomous CR- FIDs. We show that

  8. Autonomous ground vehicle path tracking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff Wit; Carl D. Crane III; David G. Armstrong II

    2004-01-01

    Autonomous ground vehicle navigation requires the integration of many technologies such as path planning, position and orientation sensing, vehicle control, and obstacle avoidance. The work presented here focuses on the control of a nonholonomic ground vehicle as it tracks a given path. A new path tracking technique called ''vector pursuit'' is presented. This new technique is based on the theory

  9. Autonomic Computing: Freedom or a Threat?

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.; Frincke, Deb

    2007-12-01

    No longer is the question whether autonomic computing will gain general acceptance but when. Experts expect autonomic computing to be widely used within 10 years. When it does become mainstream, how will autonomics change system administration and corporations, and will the change be for better or worse? The answer depends on how well we anticipate the limitations of what autonomic systems are suited to do, whether we can collectively address the vulnerabilities of autonomic approaches as we draw upon the advantages, and whether administrators, companies, partners, and users are prepared for the transition. This article presents some design considerations to address the first two issues and some suggested survival techniques for the third.

  10. Autonomous Boolean modeling of gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolar, Joshua; Sun, Mengyang; Cheng, Xianrui

    2014-03-01

    In cases where the dynamical properties of gene regulatory networks are important, a faithful model must include three key features: a network topology; a functional response of each element to its inputs; and timing information about the transmission of signals across network links. Autonomous Boolean network (ABN) models are efficient representations of these elements and are amenable to analysis. We present an ABN model of the gene regulatory network governing cell fate specification in the early sea urchin embryo, which must generate three bands of distinct tissue types after several cell divisions, beginning from an initial condition with only two distinct cell types. Analysis of the spatial patterning problem and the dynamics of a network constructed from available experimental results reveals that a simple mechanism is at work in this case. Supported by NSF Grant DMS-10-68602

  11. Autonomous Vehicle Guidance Using Laser Range Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, James; Jacobus, Charles; Pont, Frank

    1987-01-01

    Range imagery from a laser range imager developed at ERIM to support the DARPA ALV program provides a robust source of information to direct autonomous vehicle movement. Forward looking range imagery is processed into plan view map information of the surrounding environment for guidance and identifying obstacles. Intensity data from the sensor also provides a correlated object reflectivity image. The image processing required to transform the forward looking range data into top down format, and to subsequently find the vehicle path is completed at a nominal two second frame rate. If and when image processing speed is comparable to sensor rate (two frames per second), this would support a vehicle speed of approximately 40 miles per hour. This processing rate is possible using the current generation of Cytocomputer technology and can be further improved by migrating more of the image processing algorithm from a host VAX to the dedicated Cytocomputer processing system.

  12. EMS-Vision: a perceptual system for autonomous vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rudolf Gregor; Michael Lützeler; Martin Pellkofer; K.-H. Siedersberger; Ernst Dieter Dickmanns

    2002-01-01

    The paper gives a survey on the new Expectation- based Multifocal Saccadic Vision (EMS-Vision) system for autonomous vehicle guidance developed at the Universität der Bundeswehr München (UBM). EMS-Vision is the third generation dynamic vision system following the 4-D approach. Its core element is a new camera arrangement, mounted on a high bandwidth pan-tilt head for active gaze control. Central knowledge

  13. Depolymerization-powered autonomous motors using biocompatible fuel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Duan, Wentao; Liu, Lei; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-10-23

    We report the design of autonomous motors powered by the rapid depolymerization reaction of poly(2-ethyl cyanoacrylate) (PECA), an FDA-approved polymer. Motors were fabricated in two different length scales, 3 cm and 300 ?m. The motion of the motors is induced by self-generated surface tension gradients along their bodies. The motors are capable of moving in various media, including salt solutions and artificial serum. PMID:24094034

  14. A 3D laser scanner system for autonomous vehicle navigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesco Maurelli; David Droeschel; Thomas Wisspeintner; Stefan May; Hartmut Surmann

    2009-01-01

    Road segmentation, obstacle detection, situation awareness constitute fundamental tasks for autonomous vehicles in urban environments. This paper describes an end-to-end system capable of generating high-quality 3D point clouds from one or two of the popular LMS200 laser on a continuously moving vehicle. Road segmentation and crossing analysis have been performed on the basis of this newly developed 3D laser scanner.

  15. AUTONOMOUS SPACEBORNE FIRE DETECTION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Oertel; B. Zhukov; K. Briess; E. Lorenz; W. Skrbek; C. Tobehn; A. Ginati; U. Christmann

    Current space-borne sensor systems can be used to generate products of fire susceptibility using time-se- ries of vegetation state, the occurrence and rough lo- cation of active fires using middle and thermal infra- red sensors and smoke and area burned using visible, near and middle infrared sensors. The existing and planned operational space-borne sen- sors are not developed for hot

  16. Developing Autonomic and Secure Virtual Organisations with Chemical Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Alvaro E.; Banâtre, Jean-Pierre; Priol, Thierry

    This paper studies the development of autonomic and secure Virtual Organisations (VOs) when following the chemical-programming paradigm. We have selected the Higher-Order Chemical Language (HOCL) as the representative of the chemical paradigm, due mainly to its generality, its implicit autonomic property, and its potential application to emerging computing paragidms such as Grid computing and service computing. We have advocated the use of aspect-oriented techniques, where autonomicity and security can be seen as cross-cutting concerns impacting the whole system. We show how HOCL can be used to model VOs, exemplified by a VO system for the generation of digital products. We develop patterns for HOCL, including patterns for traditional security properties such as authorisation and secure logs, as well as autonomic properties such as self-protection and self-healing. The patterns are applied to HOCL programs following an aspect-oriented approach, where aspects are modelled as transformation functions that add to a program a cross-cutting concern.

  17. Towards Autonomic ComputingTowards Autonomic ComputingTowards Autonomic Computing Alexander V. Konstantinou

    E-print Network

    Yemini, Yechiam

    functions at design time Change propagation model, language, and analysis Autonomic platform prototype Processes & architecture to effect knowledge Safety & security CISCO SNMPAccess Protocol Fault Analysis IP element & manager language NtpService boolean enabled long reqCount Socket sock JSpoon Runtime JVM Ntp

  18. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, Walter S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Working on the ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations) project I have had the opportunity to add functionality to the physics simulation software known as KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), create a new application allowing WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) creation of KATE schematic files and begin a preliminary design and implementation of a new subsystem that will provide vision services on the IHM (Integrated Health Management) bus. The functionality I added to KATE over the past few months includes a dynamic visual representation of the fluid height in a pipe based on number of gallons of fluid in the pipe and implementing the IHM bus connection within KATE. I also fixed a broken feature in the system called the Browser Display, implemented many bug fixes and made changes to the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

  19. Bursting in Leech Heart Interneurons: Cell-Autonomous and Network-Based Mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Gaudry, Quentin

    Bursting in Leech Heart Interneurons: Cell-Autonomous and Network-Based Mechanisms Gennady S, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 Rhythmic activity within the heartbeat pattern generator of the medicinal leech hypotheses for how these differences arise. We have analyzed the CPG that generates a heartbeat in the leech

  20. Global asymptotical ?-periodicity of a fractional-order non-autonomous neural networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Boshan; Chen, Jiejie

    2015-08-01

    We study the global asymptotic ?-periodicity for a fractional-order non-autonomous neural networks. Firstly, based on the Caputo fractional-order derivative it is shown that ?-periodic or autonomous fractional-order neural networks cannot generate exactly ?-periodic signals. Next, by using the contraction mapping principle we discuss the existence and uniqueness of S-asymptotically ?-periodic solution for a class of fractional-order non-autonomous neural networks. Then by using a fractional-order differential and integral inequality technique, we study global Mittag-Leffler stability and global asymptotical periodicity of the fractional-order non-autonomous neural networks, which shows that all paths of the networks, starting from arbitrary points and responding to persistent, nonconstant ?-periodic external inputs, asymptotically converge to the same nonconstant ?-periodic function that may be not a solution. PMID:26005004

  1. Anti-coherence and coherence resonance induced by nonlinear time delay in autonomous stochastic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Mei, Dong Cheng

    2014-05-01

    An autonomous stochastic system with nonlinear time-delayed feedback is investigated employing the stochastic simulation method. In the autonomous stochastic system with quadratic time-delayed feedback or under positive feedback, the nonlinear delay time fails to possess the role improving the noisy state of the system. In the autonomous stochastic system with cubic time-delayed feedback and under negative feedback, the nonlinear delay time can improve the noisy state, tuning the signal output, and generating incoherence and coherence maximization. We reveal a new kind of anti-coherence and coherence resonance phenomena induced by the nonlinear time delay in the autonomous stochastic system without external periodic force, discussing further the effects of the noise strength, the control parameter, and the feedback strength on anti-coherence and coherence resonance.

  2. Autonomous Robotic Vehicle Road Following

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darwin T. Kuan; Gary Phipps; A.-CHUAN HSUEH

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of the system architecture of an autonomous vehicle and its real-time adaptive vision system for road-following. The vehicle is a 10-ton armored personnel carrier modified for robotic control. A color transformation that best discriminates road and nonroad regions is derived from labeled data samples. A maximum-likelihood pixel classification technique is then used to classify pixels in

  3. Autonomous Optimization of Business Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus Kress; Detlef Seese

    2009-01-01

    \\u000a In this paper we introduce the intelligent Executable Product Model (iEPM) approach for the autonomous optimization of service\\u000a industry’s business processes. Instead of using a process model, we use an Executable Product Model (EPM). EPMs provide a\\u000a compact representation of the set of possible execution paths of a business process by defining information dependencies instead\\u000a of the order of activities.

  4. Autonomous Guidance, Navigation and Control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Bordano; G. G. McSwain; S. T. Fernandes

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Autonomous Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) Bridging program is reviewed to demonstrate the program plan and GN&C systems for the Space Shuttle. The ascent CN&C system is described in terms of elements such as the general-purpose digital computers, sensors for the navigation subsystem, the guidance-system software, and the flight-control subsystem. Balloon-based and lidar wind soundings are used for

  5. Autonomic cardiovascular regulation in obesity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Laederach-Hofmann; L Mussgay

    2000-01-01

    Obese persons suffer from an increased mortality risk supposedly due to cardiovascular disorders related to either continuously lowered parasympathetic or altered sympa- thetic activation. Our cross-sectional correlation study establishes the relationship between obesity and autonomic regulation as well as salivary cortisol levels. Three patient cohorts were sampled, covering ranges of body mass index (BMI) of 27-32 (n=17), 33-39 (n=13) and

  6. Towards Autonomic Service Provisioning Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michele Mazzucco

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses our experience in building SPIRE, an autonomic system\\u000afor service provision. The architecture consists of a set of hosted Web\\u000aServices subject to QoS constraints, and a certain number of servers used to\\u000arun session-based traffic. Customers pay for having their jobs run, but require\\u000ain turn certain quality guarantees: there are different SLAs specifying charges\\u000afor

  7. Integrated System for Autonomous Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Robert; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Davies, Ashley; Castano, Rebecca; Rabideau, Gregg; Frye, Stuart; Trout, Bruce; Shulman, Seth; Doggett, Thomas; Ip, Felipe; Greeley, Ron; Baker, Victor; Dohn, James; Boyer, Darrell

    2006-01-01

    The New Millennium Program Space Technology 6 Project Autonomous Sciencecraft software implements an integrated system for autonomous planning and execution of scientific, engineering, and spacecraft-coordination actions. A prior version of this software was reported in "The TechSat 21 Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment" (NPO-30784), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 3 (March 2004), page 33. This software is now in continuous use aboard the Earth Orbiter 1 (EO-1) spacecraft mission and is being adapted for use in the Mars Odyssey and Mars Exploration Rovers missions. This software enables EO-1 to detect and respond to such events of scientific interest as volcanic activity, flooding, and freezing and thawing of water. It uses classification algorithms to analyze imagery onboard to detect changes, including events of scientific interest. Detection of such events triggers acquisition of follow-up imagery. The mission-planning component of the software develops a response plan that accounts for visibility of targets and operational constraints. The plan is then executed under control by a task-execution component of the software that is capable of responding to anomalies.

  8. Autonomic Computing: Panacea or Poppycock?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Autonomic Computing arose out of a need for a means to cope with rapidly growing complexity of integrating, managing, and operating computer-based systems as well as a need to reduce the total cost of ownership of today's systems. Autonomic Computing (AC) as a discipline was proposed by IBM in 2001, with the vision to develop self-managing systems. As the name implies, the influence for the new paradigm is the human body's autonomic system, which regulates vital bodily functions such as the control of heart rate, the body's temperature and blood flow-all without conscious effort. The vision is to create selfivare through self-* properties. The initial set of properties, in terms of objectives, were self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protecting, along with attributes of self-awareness, self-monitoring and self-adjusting. This self-* list has grown: self-anticipating, self-critical, self-defining, self-destructing, self-diagnosis, self-governing, self-organized, self-reflecting, and self-simulation, for instance.

  9. INS integrated motion analysis for autonomous vehicle navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry; Bazakos, Mike

    1991-01-01

    The use of inertial navigation system (INS) measurements to enhance the quality and robustness of motion analysis techniques used for obstacle detection is discussed with particular reference to autonomous vehicle navigation. The approach to obstacle detection used here employs motion analysis of imagery generated by a passive sensor. Motion analysis of imagery obtained during vehicle travel is used to generate range measurements to points within the field of view of the sensor, which can then be used to provide obstacle detection. Results obtained with an INS integrated motion analysis approach are reviewed.

  10. The TechSat 21 Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Robert; Knight, Russell; Rabideau, Gregg; Chien, Steve; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Castano, Rebecca; Stough, Timothy; Davies, Ashley

    2004-01-01

    Software has been developed to perform a number of functions essential to autonomous operation in the Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE), which is scheduled to be demonstrated aboard a constellation of three spacecraft, denoted TechSat 21, to be launched by the Air Force into orbit around the Earth in January 2006. A prior version of this software was reported in Software for an Autonomous Constellation of Satellites (NPO-30355), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 11 (November 2002), page 44. The software includes the following components: Algorithms to analyze image data, generate scientific data products, and detect conditions, features, and events of potential scientific interest; A program that uses component-based computational models of hardware to analyze anomalous situations and to generate novel command sequences, including (when possible) commands to repair components diagnosed as faulty; A robust-execution-management component that uses the Spacecraft Command Language (SCL) software to enable event-driven processing and low-level autonomy; and The Continuous Activity Scheduling, Planning, Execution, and Replanning (CASPER) program for replanning activities, including downlink sessions, on the basis of scientific observations performed during previous orbit cycles.

  11. The EO-1 Autonomous Science Agent Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Rob; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Rabideau, Gregg; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Lee, Rachel; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Trout, Bruce; Hengemihle, Jerry; D'Agostino, Jeff; Shulman, Seth; Ungar, Stephen; Brakke, Thomas; Boyer, Darrell; Van Gaasbeck, Jim; Greeley, Ronald; Doggett, Thomas; Baker, Victor; Dohm, James; Ip, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    An Autonomous Science Agent is currently flying onboard the Earth Observing One Spacecraft. This software enables the spacecraft to autonomously detect and respond to science events occurring on the Earth. The package includes software systems that perform science data analysis, deliberative planning, and run-time robust execution. Because of the deployment to a remote spacecraft, this Autonomous Science Agent has stringent constraints of autonomy, reliability, and limited computing resources. We describe these constraints and how they are reflected in our agent architecture.

  12. The Nautilus-Sub Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Eaton; Maurice Bobbitt; Melissa Reid; Garret Jarvis; Scott Frame; John Dowling; Mark Bloechl; Melody Mentzer; Rachid Manseur

    The Nautilus-Sub (NautaSub) Autonomous Underwater Vehicle is designed and developed by a group of undergraduate engineering students at the University of West Florida for the 5th International Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Competition organized and sponsored by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR). The autonomous submarine has the ability to navigate in three

  13. Autonomic testing in healthy subjects – preliminary observations

    PubMed Central

    Chelimsky, Gisela; Ialacci, Sarah; Chelimsky, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic testing is used clinically. Yet, the prevalence of “abnormal” variants in the healthy population have not been reported. We report the results of autonomic testing in healthy females > 18 years, in whom we found decrease or absent sudomotor function in 1–2 locations. These findings should caution physicians in the interpretation of autonomic testing. This report underscores the need of larger studies to determine the prevalence of these findings PMID:23108501

  14. Thermoelectric-Driven Autonomous Sensors for a Biomass Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A.; Astrain, D.; Martínez, A.; Gubía, E.; Sorbet, F. J.

    2013-07-01

    This work presents the design and development of a thermoelectric generator intended to harness waste heat in a biomass power plant, and generate electric power to operate sensors and the required electronics for wireless communication. The first objective of the work is to design the optimum thermoelectric generator to harness heat from a hot surface, and generate electric power to operate a flowmeter and a wireless transmitter. The process is conducted by using a computational model, presented in previous papers, to determine the final design that meets the requirements of electric power consumption and number of transmissions per minute. Finally, the thermoelectric generator is simulated to evaluate its performance. The final device transmits information every 5 s. Moreover, it is completely autonomous and can be easily installed, since no electric wires are required.

  15. Lower cost offshore field development utilizing autonomous vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Frisbie, F.R.; Vie, K.J.; Welch, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The offshore oil and gas industry has the requirement to inspect offshore oil and gas pipelines for scour, corrosion and damage as well as inspect and intervene on satellite production facilities. This task is currently performed with Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) operated from dynamically positioned (DP) offshore supply or diving support boats. Currently, these tasks are expensive due to the high day rates for DP ships and the slow, umbilical impeded, 1 knot inspection rates of the tethered ROVs, Emerging Autonomous Undersea Vehicle (AUV) technologies offer opportunities to perform these same inspection tasks for 50--75% lower cost, with comparable or improved quality. The new generation LAPV (Linked Autonomous Power Vehicles) will operate from fixed facilities such as TLPs or FPFs and cover an operating field 10 kms in diameter.

  16. Cell-autonomous responses in Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Pillich, Helena; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular bacterium causing listeriosis, a food-borne infection with a high mortality rate. The mechanisms and the role of cells and tissular components in generating protective adaptive immune responses are well studied, and cell biological studies provide a detailed understanding of the processes targeted by the bacterial products. Much less is known of the cellular responses activated to limit infection in individual cells when confronted with stress or infection. Eukaryotic cellular responses depend on multitiered homeostatic systems that ensure maintenance of proteostatis, organellar integrity, function and turnover, and overall cellular viability ('the cell-autonomous response'). Here, we review the cell-autonomous responses induced during extracellular and intracellular L. monocytogenes growth and discuss their contribution to limiting infection. PMID:25865195

  17. Autonomous onboard crew operations: A review and developmental approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the literature generated by an intercenter mission approach and consolidation team and their contractors was performed to obtain background information on the development of autonomous operations concepts for future space shuttle and space platform missions. The Boeing 757/767 flight management system was examined to determine the relevance for transfer of the developmental approach and technology to the performance of the crew operations function. In specific, the engine indications and crew alerting system was studied to determine the relevance of this display for the performance of crew operations onboard the vehicle. It was concluded that the developmental approach and technology utilized in the aeronautics industry would be appropriate for development of an autonomous operations concept for the space platform.

  18. Autonomous learning in humanoid robotics through mental imagery.

    PubMed

    Di Nuovo, Alessandro G; Marocco, Davide; Di Nuovo, Santo; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we focus on modeling autonomous learning to improve performance of a humanoid robot through a modular artificial neural networks architecture. A model of a neural controller is presented, which allows a humanoid robot iCub to autonomously improve its sensorimotor skills. This is achieved by endowing the neural controller with a secondary neural system that, by exploiting the sensorimotor skills already acquired by the robot, is able to generate additional imaginary examples that can be used by the controller itself to improve the performance through a simulated mental training. Results and analysis presented in the paper provide evidence of the viability of the approach proposed and help to clarify the rational behind the chosen model and its implementation. PMID:23122490

  19. General autonomic components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Suter, Steve; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Naifeh, Karen

    1986-01-01

    This report refers to a body of investigations directed toward the examination of autonomic nervous system responses to motion sickness. Heart rate, respiration rate, finger pulse volume, and basal skin resistance were measured on 127 men and women before, during, and after exposure to a nauseogenic rotating chair test. Significant changes in all autonomic responses were observed across the tests (p less than .05). Significant differences in autonomic responses among groups divided according to motion sickness susceptibility were also observed (p less than .05). Results suggest that the examination of autonomic responses as an objective indicator of motion sickness malaise is warranted and may contribute to the overall understanding of the syndrome.

  20. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrading, J. Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20 years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in the system. As part of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display of the entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledge base, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  1. Transportation Center Seminar... Envisioning Autonomous Vehicle Pathways through

    E-print Network

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Transportation Center Seminar... Envisioning Autonomous Vehicle Pathways through the Lens of Air Foster St., Evanston Abstract: Autonomous vehicles promise numerous transportation system benefits, from of autonomous vehicle technology showcased by numerous successful tests stands in contrast to the lagging

  2. VECTOR PURSUIT PATH TRACKING FOR AUTONOMOUS GROUND VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    VECTOR PURSUIT PATH TRACKING FOR AUTONOMOUS GROUND VEHICLES By JEFFREY S. WIT A DISSERTATION. Special thanks go to Dr. Crane who gave the author the opportunity to work on the autonomous vehicle................................................................................11 Autonomous Ground Vehicle Applications

  3. A cloud-assisted design for autonomous driving

    E-print Network

    Suresh Kumar, Swarun

    This paper presents Carcel, a cloud-assisted system for autonomous driving. Carcel enables the cloud to have access to sensor data from autonomous vehicles as well as the roadside infrastructure. The cloud assists autonomous ...

  4. An Autonomous Sensor System Architecture for Active Flow and Noise Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M, Jr.; Culliton, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-channel sensor fusion represents a powerful technique to simply and efficiently extract information from complex phenomena. While the technique has traditionally been used for military target tracking and situational awareness, a study has been successfully completed that demonstrates that sensor fusion can be applied equally well to aerodynamic applications. A prototype autonomous hardware processor was successfully designed and used to detect in real-time the two-dimensional flow reattachment location generated by a simple separated-flow wind tunnel model. The success of this demonstration illustrates the feasibility of using autonomous sensor processing architectures to enhance flow control feedback signal generation.

  5. ARCHITECTURAL SUPPORT FOR AUTONOMIC PROTECTION AGAINST STEALTH BY ROOTKIT

    E-print Network

    Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

    ARCHITECTURAL SUPPORT FOR AUTONOMIC PROTECTION AGAINST STEALTH BY ROOTKIT EXPLOITS A Thesis of Technology Nov 2008 #12;ARCHITECTURAL SUPPORT FOR AUTONOMIC PROTECTION AGAINST STEALTH BY ROOTKIT EXPLOITS

  6. Autonomous sensor manager agents (ASMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadciw, Lisa A.

    2004-04-01

    Autonomous sensor manager agents are presented as an algorithm to perform sensor management within a multisensor fusion network. The design of the hybrid ant system/particle swarm agents is described in detail with some insight into their performance. Although the algorithm is designed for the general sensor management problem, a simulation example involving 2 radar systems is presented. Algorithmic parameters are determined by the size of the region covered by the sensor network, the number of sensors, and the number of parameters to be selected. With straight forward modifications, this algorithm can be adapted for most sensor management problems.

  7. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plattsmier, George; Stetson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto- Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the targeted system. It is envisioned that real time requirements tracing will greatly assist the movement of autoprocedures to flight software enhancing the software assurance of auto-procedures and also their acceptance as reliable commanders.

  8. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plattsmier, George I.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto-Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner- TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the targeted system. It is envisioned that real time requirements tracing will greatly assist the movement of autoprocedures to flight software enhancing the software assurance of auto-procedures and also their acceptance as reliable commanders

  9. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Dzenitis, J M; Makarewicz, A J

    2009-01-13

    We developed, tested, and now operate a civilian biological defense capability that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) collects, prepares, reads, analyzes, and reports results of multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed PCR assays using Luminex{copyright} xMAP technology and flow cytometer. The mission we conduct is particularly demanding: continuous monitoring, multiple threat agents, high sensitivity, challenging environments, and ultimately extremely low false positive rates. Here, we introduce the mission requirements and metrics, show the system engineering and analysis framework, and describe the progress to date including early development and current status.

  10. Autonomously managed electrical power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    The electric power systems for future spacecraft such as the Space Station will necessarily be more sophisticated and will exhibit more nearly autonomous operation than earlier spacecraft. These new power systems will be more reliable and flexible than their predecessors offering greater utility to the users. Automation approaches implemented on various power system breadboards are investigated. These breadboards include the Hubble Space Telescope power system test bed, the Common Module Power Management and Distribution system breadboard, the Autonomusly Managed Power System (AMPS) breadboard, and the 20 kilohertz power system breadboard. Particular attention is given to the AMPS breadboard. Future plans for these breadboards including the employment of artificial intelligence techniques are addressed.

  11. A locomotion control method for autonomous vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Kanayama; A. Nilipour; Charles Anthony Lelm

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a locomotion control method for autonomous vehicles. The main difficulties in controlling an autonomous vehicle lie in the fact that vehicles usually have three degrees of freedom in position and orientation in spite of having only two degrees of freedom for motion control. To use any find of path for vehicle navigation, the authors control a vehicle

  12. Using Policies to Drive Autonomic Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raphael M. Bahati; Michael A. Bauer; Elvis M. Vieira; O. K. Baek; Chang-Won Ahn

    2006-01-01

    Required or desired behavior of systems and applications can be expressed in terms of management policies. Such policies can in turn be used to express expected operational characteristics of these systems and possible management actions. We feel that policies can provide the kinds of directives best used for flexible autonomic management systems. The effective use of policies in autonomic management

  13. Intrinsic Motivation Systems for Autonomous Mental Development

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , active learning. 1 The challenge of autonomous mental develop- ment All humans develop in an autonomous, hafner}@csl.sony.fr http://www.csl.sony.fr Abstract Exploratory activities seem to be intrinsically rewarding for children and crucial for their cognitive development. Can a machine be endowed

  14. HEADLAND TURNING CONTROL METHOD SIMULATION OF AUTONOMOUS

    E-print Network

    HEADLAND TURNING CONTROL METHOD SIMULATION OF AUTONOMOUS AGRICULTRUAL MACHINE BASED ON IMPROVED@scau.edu.cn Abstract: According to the features of headland turning, new path planning and headland turning control algorithms for autonomous agricultural machine were presented in this paper. The turning path planning

  15. Segway to the future [autonomous mobile robot

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Voth

    2005-01-01

    The robotic mobility platform (RMP) has a small footprint, a zero turning radius, the ability to move over diverse terrains, and the capacity to carry up to 100 pounds. DARPA funded Segway's RMP development as part of its mobile autonomous robot software project and challenged researchers to create solutions for operating autonomous mobile robots in dynamic, unstructured environments. That challenge

  16. Hierarchical control of small autonomous helicopters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher P. Sanders; Paul A. DeBitetto; Eric Feron; Hon Fai Vuong; Nancy Leveson

    1998-01-01

    Autonomous air vehicles have numerous applications, all of which require the vehicle to have stable and accurate control of its motion. In the paper, a hierarchical control system for small autonomous helicopters is described. The control system consists of four components: a navigation filter, an inner-loop hover control system, a waypoint guidance system, and a ground-based flight manager. All four

  17. Autonomous Helicopter Aerobatics through Apprenticeship Learning

    E-print Network

    Bejerano, Gill

    Autonomous Helicopter Aerobatics through Apprenticeship Learning Pieter Abbeel1 , Adam Coates2 and Andrew Y. Ng2 Abstract Autonomous helicopter flight is widely regarded to be a highly challenging control problem. Despite this fact, human experts can reliably fly helicopters through a wide range of maneuvers

  18. A visual odometer for autonomous helicopter flight

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Omead Amidi; Takeo Kanade; Keisuke Fujita

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a visual odometer for autonomous helicopter flight. The odometer estimates helicopter position by visually locking on to and tracking ground objects. The paper describes the philosophy behind the odometer as well as its tracking algorithm and implementation. The paper concludes by presenting test flight data of the odometer's performance on-board indoor and outdoor prototype autonomous helicopters.

  19. Adaptive Trajectory Control for Autonomous Helicopters

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Eric N.

    Adaptive Trajectory Control for Autonomous Helicopters Eric N. Johnson and Suresh K. Kannan School-0150 For autonomous helicopter flight, it is common to separate the flight control problem into an inner loop that controls attitude and an outer loop that controls the translational trajectory of the helicopter

  20. LEARNING TO DRIVE: PERCEPTION FOR AUTONOMOUS CARS

    E-print Network

    Thrun, Sebastian

    LEARNING TO DRIVE: PERCEPTION FOR AUTONOMOUS CARS A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT and other preventable causes. Au- tonomous or highly aware cars have the potential to positively impact tens of millions of people. Building an autonomous car is not easy. Although the absolute number of traf- fic

  1. Autonomous Vehicle Following Using a Robotic Driver

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas Wong; Christopher Chambers; K. Stol; R. Halkyard

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the development of autonomous control of a passenger vehicle for vehicle following using a robotic driver. The aim is to have a modular and transferable device that can autonomously control a standard passenger car. The robot controls the car in the same way as a human driver, by rotating the steering wheel and pushing the pedals. No

  2. Autonomous buoyancy-driven underwater gliders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russ E. Davis; Charles C. Eriksen; Clayton P. Jones

    2002-01-01

    A class of small (50 kg, 2 m length), reusable autonomous underwater vehicles capable of operating at speeds of 20-30 cm\\/s with ranges several thousand kilometers and durations of months has been developed and tested. The vehicles, essentially autonomous profiling floats with wings, execute sawtooth patterns between the surface, where they are located and communicate to shore, and depths of

  3. Autonomous landmark tracking orbit determination strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. K.; Cheng, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, an orbit determination strategy is described that is fully autonomous and relies on a computer-based crater detection and identification algorithm that is suitable for both automation of the ground based navigation system and autonomous spacecraft based navigation.

  4. The asymptotic stability of nonlinear autonomous systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gustav S. Christensen; Mehrdad Saif

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a new general method is developed by means of which one can ascertain whether a nonlinear autonomous system is asymptotically stable. The method is essentially an extension to nonlinear systems of a theorem developed earlier by the first author for linear autonomous systems. Necessary and sufficient conditions are specified, the satisfaction of which guarantees that the system

  5. Intrinsic Adaptation in Autonomous Recurrent Neural Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dimitrije Markovi?; Claudius Gros

    2012-01-01

    A massively recurrent neural network responds on one side to input stimuli and is autonomously active, on the other side, in the absence of sensory inputs. Stimuli and information processing depend crucially on the qualia of the autonomous-state dynamics of the ongoing neural activity. This default neural activity may be dynamically structured in time and space, showing regular, synchronized, bursting,

  6. Autonomous Software Michael Rovatsos Gerhard Weiss

    E-print Network

    Rovatsos, Michael

    its complexity on its own. The spectrum of primary attributes associated with autonomous softwareAutonomous Software Michael Rovatsos Gerhard Weiss Institut f¨ur Informatik, Technische Universit¨at M¨unchen 85748 Garching, Germany {rovatsos,weissg}@in.tum.de Abstract Industrial-strength software

  7. Docking for an autonomous ocean sampling network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hanumant Singh; James G. Bellingham; Franz Hover; S. Lemer; Bradley A. Moran; Keith von der Heydt; Dana Yoerger

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the issues associated with docking autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) operating within an Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network (AOSN). We present a system based upon an acoustic ultrashort baseline system that allows the AUV to approach the dock from any direction. A passive latch on the AUV and a pole on the dock accomplish the task of

  8. Sustainable and autonomic space exploration missions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy Sterritt; Mike Hinchey; Christopher Rouff; James Rash; Walt Truszkowski

    2006-01-01

    Visions for future space exploration have long term science missions in sight, resulting in the need for sustainable missions. Survivability is a critical property of sustainable systems and may be addressed through autonomicity, an emerging paradigm for self-management of future computer-based systems based on inspiration from the human autonomic nervous system. This paper examines some of the ongoing research efforts

  9. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-11-30

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are avilable to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions.

  10. New Small Autonomous Schools District Policy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Unified School District, CA.

    Inspired by the gains in student achievement realized by the small schools movement in New York City, the Oakland Unified School District (California) has proposed creating a network of 10 new, small autonomous (NSA) schools over the next 3 years. School size will range between 250 and 500 students, depending on grade level. "Autonomous" means…

  11. Planning Flight Paths of Autonomous Aerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulczycki, Eric; Elfes, Alberto; Sharma, Shivanjli

    2009-01-01

    Algorithms for planning flight paths of autonomous aerobots (robotic blimps) to be deployed in scientific exploration of remote planets are undergoing development. These algorithms are also adaptable to terrestrial applications involving robotic submarines as well as aerobots and other autonomous aircraft used to acquire scientific data or to perform surveying or monitoring functions.

  12. Defining Autonomic Computing: A Software Engineering Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Lin; Alexander Macarthur; John Leaney

    2005-01-01

    As a rapidly growing field, autonomic computing is a promising new approach for developing large scale distributed systems. However, while the vision of achieving self-management in computing systems is well established, the field still lacks a commonly accepted definition of 'what' an autonomic computing system is. Without a common definition to dictate the direction of development, it is not possible

  13. A cognitive system for autonomous robotic welding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georg Schroth; Ingo Stork; Klaus Diepold

    2009-01-01

    Currently, there is a high demand for autonomous industrial production systems. This paper outlines the development of a cognitive system for autonomous robotic welding. This system is based on dimensionality reduction techniques and Support Vector Machines, allowing the system to learn to separate between acceptable and unacceptable welding results within one batch, and to transfer this ability to a batch

  14. Digital Libraries and Autonomous Citation Indexing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Lawrence; C. Lee Giles; Kurt D. Bollacker

    1999-01-01

    The World Wide Web is revolutionizing the way that researchers access scientific information. Articles are increasingly being made available on the homepages of authors or institutions, at journal Web sites, or in online archives. However, scientific information on the Web is largely disorganized. This article introduces the creation of digital libraries incorporating Autonomous Citation Indexing (ACI). ACI autonomously creates citation

  15. How do Autonomous Agents Solve Social Dilemmas?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akira Ito

    1996-01-01

    This paper explores the problem of cooperation of autonomous agents. Why it is important for autonomous agents to solve social dilemma problems is explained. They must be solved in a way that does not restrict the autonomy of agents. For that purpose, a social sanction by the disclosure of information is proposed. Agents were made to play the Prisoner's Dilemma

  16. The Techsat-21 Autonomous Sciencecraft Constellation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Chien; Rob Sherwood; Michael Burl; Russell Knight; Gregg Rabideau

    2005-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Constellation flight demonstration (ASC) will fly onboard the Air Force's TechSat-21 constellation (an unclassified mission scheduled for launch in 2004). ASC will use onboard science analysis, replanning, robust execution, model- based estimation and control, and formation flying to radically increase science return by enabling intelligent downlink selection and autonomous retargeting. Demonstration of these capabilities in a flight

  17. Autonomous Mine Detection Sensors (AMDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navish, Frank, III; May, Michael

    2006-05-01

    The Autonomous Mine Detection Sensors (AMDS) program is developing a prototype autonomous mine-detection sensor suite designed to be mounted on a small robotic platform that can find buried anti-personnel mines. Over the past two years, CyTerra Corp. and NIITEK, Inc. have developed complementary senor suites using a variety of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor configurations. The AMDS program is also working with industry and academia to develop automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms. This paper provides a brief overview of evaluations that have been performed at Army facilities. Probability of Detection (Pd) and Probability of False Alarm (Pfa) results are provided for signal-to-noise type detection algorithms and also for promising pattern classification and neural network algorithms that were developed by Duke University, the University of Missouri-Columbia, and the University of Florida. After an evaluation in October 2005, both contractors' sensors performed comparably (about 90% Pd and 40% Pfa) against low-metal anti-personnel mines at an Army test site seeded with typical clutter. In some cases, university-developed pattern classification and neural network algorithms have reduced the Pfa by a factor of two against these clutter sets.

  18. Multi-agent autonomous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dohm, James (Inventor); Tarbell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A multi-agent autonomous system for exploration of hazardous or inaccessible locations. The multi-agent autonomous system includes simple surface-based agents or craft controlled by an airborne tracking and command system. The airborne tracking and command system includes an instrument suite used to image an operational area and any craft deployed within the operational area. The image data is used to identify the craft, targets for exploration, and obstacles in the operational area. The tracking and command system determines paths for the surface-based craft using the identified targets and obstacles and commands the craft using simple movement commands to move through the operational area to the targets while avoiding the obstacles. Each craft includes its own instrument suite to collect information about the operational area that is transmitted back to the tracking and command system. The tracking and command system may be further coupled to a satellite system to provide additional image information about the operational area and provide operational and location commands to the tracking and command system.

  19. Autonomous oscillations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during batch cultures on trehalose.

    PubMed

    Jules, Matthieu; François, Jean; Parrou, Jean Luc

    2005-03-01

    We report that autonomous oscillations, which usually happen in aerobic glucose-limited continuous cultures of yeast at low dilution rate, were also observed in trehalose discontinuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This unexpected oscillatory behaviour was therefore examined using fast Fourier transformation of online gas measurements. This robust mathematical analysis underlined the existence of two types of oscillation. The first was found to be linked to the cell cycle because (a) the periodicity corresponded to a fraction of the generation time and (b) the oscillations were accompanied by a transient increase in the budding index, mobilization of storage carbohydrates, and fermentative activity. Moreover, these oscillations occurred in a range of specific growth rates between 0.04 and 0.15 h(-1). All these criteria were consistent with the cell-cycle-related metabolic oscillations observed in the same range of growth rates in glucose-limited continuous cultures. The second type were short-period respiratory oscillations, independent of the specific growth rate. Both types of oscillation were found to take place consecutively and/or simultaneously during batch culture on trehalose. In addition, mobilization of intracellular trehalose emerged as a key parameter for the sustainability of these autonomous oscillations as they were no longer observed in a mutant defective in neutral trehalase activity. We propose that batch culture on trehalose may be an excellent device for further investigation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie autonomous oscillations in yeast. PMID:15752364

  20. Autonomous Control Capabilities for Space Reactor Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Richard T.; Neal, John S.; Brittain, C. Ray; Mullens, James A.

    2004-02-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, is investigating a possible Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, which would conduct in-depth studies of three of the moons of Jupiter by using a space reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power for more than a decade. Terrestrial nuclear power plants rely upon varying degrees of direct human control and interaction for operations and maintenance over a forty to sixty year lifetime. In contrast, an SRPS is intended to provide continuous, remote, unattended operation for up to fifteen years with no maintenance. Uncertainties, rare events, degradation, and communications delays with Earth are challenges that SRPS control must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design. In this paper, we describe an autonomous control concept for generic SRPS designs. The formulation of an autonomous control concept, which includes identification of high-level functional requirements and generation of a research and development plan for enabling technologies, is among the technical activities that are being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Space Reactor Technology Program in support of the NASA's Project Prometheus. The findings from this program are intended to contribute to the successful realization of the JIMO mission.

  1. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ruel Edwin

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990 the Autonomous Rendezvous & Docking (AR&D) system was first demonstrated for members of NASA's Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware from the Cruise Missile and Advanced Centaur Avionics systems. The object was to show that all the accuracy, reliability and operational requirements established for a space craft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed system. The rapid prototyping capabilities of the Advanced Avionics Systems Development Laboratory were used to evaluate the proposed system in a real time, hardware in the loop simulation of the rendezvous and docking reference mission. The simulation permits manual, supervised automatic and fully autonomous operations to be evaluated. It is also being upgraded to be able to test an Autonomous Approach and Landing (AA&L) system. The AA&L and AR&D systems are very similar. Both use inertial guidance and control systems supplemented by GPS. Both use an Image Processing System (IPS), for target recognition and tracking. The IPS includes a general purpose multiprocessor computer and a selected suite of sensors that will provide the required relative position and orientation data. Graphic displays can also be generated by the computer, providing the astronaut / operator with real-time guidance and navigation data with enhanced video or sensor imagery.

  2. Motion coordination of multiple autonomous vehicles in a spatiotemporal flowfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Cameron Kai

    The long-term goal of this research is to provide theoretically justified control strategies to operate autonomous vehicles in spatiotemporal flowfields. The specific objective of this dissertation is to use estimation and nonlinear control techniques to generate decentralized control algorithms that enable motion coordination for multiple autonomous vehicles while operating in a time-varying flowfield. A cooperating team of vehicles can benefit from sharing data and tasking responsibilities. Many existing control algorithms promote collaboration of autonomous vehicles. However, these algorithms often fail to account for the degradation of control performance caused by flowfields. This dissertation presents decentralized multivehicle coordination algorithms designed for operation in a spatially or temporally varying flowfield. Each vehicle is represented using a Newtonian particle traveling in a plane at constant speed relative to the flow and subject to a steering control. Initially, we assume the flowfield is known and describe algorithms that stabilize a circular formation in a time-varying spatially nonuniform flow of moderate intensity. These algorithms are extended by relaxing the assumption that the flow is known: the vehicles dynamically estimate the flow and use that estimate in the control. We propose a distributed estimation and control algorithm comprising a consensus filter to share information gleaned from noisy position measurements, and an information filter to reconstruct a spatially varying flowfield. The theoretical results are illustrated with numerical simulations of circular formation control and validated in outdoor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) flight tests.

  3. The role of the autonomic nervous system in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hawksley, Jack; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Nagai, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder, consisting of multiple involuntary movements (motor tics) and one or more vocal (phonic) tics. It affects up to one percent of children worldwide, of whom about one third continue to experience symptoms into adulthood. The central neural mechanisms of tic generation are not clearly understood, however recent neuroimaging investigations suggest impaired cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical activity during motor control. In the current manuscript, we will tackle the relatively under-investigated role of the peripheral autonomic nervous system, and its central influences, on tic activity. There is emerging evidence that both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activity influences tic expression. Pharmacological treatments which act on sympathetic tone are often helpful: for example, Clonidine (an alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist) is often used as first choice medication for treating TS in children due to its good tolerability profile and potential usefulness for co-morbid attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder. Clonidine suppresses sympathetic activity, reducing the triggering of motor tics. A general elevation of sympathetic tone is reported in patients with TS compared to healthy people, however this observation may reflect transient responses coupled to tic activity. Thus, the presence of autonomic impairments in patients with TS remains unclear. Effect of autonomic afferent input to cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit will be discussed schematically. We additionally review how TS is affected by modulation of central autonomic control through biofeedback and Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS). Biofeedback training can enable a patient to gain voluntary control over covert physiological responses by making these responses explicit. Electrodermal biofeedback training to elicit a reduction in sympathetic tone has a demonstrated association with reduced tic frequency. VNS, achieved through an implanted device that gives pulsatile electrical stimulation to the vagus nerve, directly modulates afferent interoceptive signals. The potential efficacy of biofeedback/VNS in TS and the implications for understanding the underlying neural mechanisms of tics will be discussed. PMID:26074752

  4. Flight Control System Development for the BURRO Autonomous UAV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbourne, Jason D.; Frost, Chad R.; Tischler, Mark B.; Ciolani, Luigi; Sahai, Ranjana; Tomoshofski, Chris; LaMontagne, Troy; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Developing autonomous flying vehicles has been a growing field in aeronautical research within the last decade and will continue into the next century. With concerns about safety, size, and cost of manned aircraft, several autonomous vehicle projects are currently being developed; uninhabited rotorcraft offer solutions to requirements for hover, vertical take-off and landing, as well as slung load transportation capabilities. The newness of the technology requires flight control engineers to question what design approaches, control law architectures, and performance criteria apply to control law development and handling quality evaluation. To help answer these questions, this paper documents the control law design process for Kaman Aerospace BURRO project. This paper will describe the approach taken to design control laws and develop math models which will be used to convert the manned K-MAX into the BURRO autonomous rotorcraft. With the ability of the K-MAX to lift its own weight (6000 lb) the load significantly affects the dynamics of the system; the paper addresses the additional design requirements for slung load autonomous flight. The approach taken in this design was to: 1) generate accurate math models of the K-MAX helicopter with and without slung loads, 2) select design specifications that would deliver good performance as well as satisfy mission criteria, and 3) develop and tune the control system architecture to meet the design specs and mission criteria. An accurate math model was desired for control system development. The Comprehensive Identification from Frequency Responses (CIFER(R)) software package was used to identify a linear math model for unloaded and loaded flight at hover, 50 kts, and 100 kts. The results of an eight degree-of-freedom CIFER(R)-identified linear model for the unloaded hover flight condition are presented herein, and the identification of the two-body slung-load configuration is in progress.

  5. Net Traveler: A Framework for Autonomic Web Services Collaboration, Orchestration and Choreography in E-Government Information Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hillary Caituiro-monge; Manuel Rodriguez-martinez

    2004-01-01

    Next-generation Government Information Systems will integrate large amounts of heterogeneous data sources located on distributed networks like the Internet. We present Net Traveler which is a framework for web services collaboration, orchestration and choreography in peer-to-peer autonomic environments. The main feature of our new approach is the elimination of a central coordination site running the queries and the autonomic query

  6. Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Communication (DATAC) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novacki, Stanley M., III

    1987-01-01

    In order to accommodate the increasing number of computerized subsystems aboard today's more fuel efficient aircraft, the Boeing Co. has developed the DATAC (Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Control) bus to minimize the need for point-to-point wiring to interconnect these various systems, thereby reducing total aircraft weight and maintaining an economical flight configuration. The DATAC bus is essentially a local area network providing interconnections for any of the flight management and control systems aboard the aircraft. The task of developing a Bus Monitor Unit was broken down into four subtasks: (1) providing a hardware interface between the DATAC bus and the Z8000-based microcomputer system to be used as the bus monitor; (2) establishing a communication link between the Z8000 system and a CP/M-based computer system; (3) generation of data reduction and display software to output data to the console device; and (4) development of a DATAC Terminal Simulator to facilitate testing of the hardware and software which transfer data between the DATAC's bus and the operator's console in a near real time environment. These tasks are briefly discussed.

  7. Curiosity's Autonomous Surface Safing Behavior Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, Tracy A.; Manning, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The safing routines on all robotic deep-space vehicles are designed to put the vehicle in a power and thermally safe configuration, enabling communication with the mission operators on Earth. Achieving this goal is made a little more difficult on Curiosity because the power requirements for the core avionics and the telecommunication equipment exceed the capability of the single power source, the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator. This drove the system design to create an operational mode, called "sleep mode", where the vehicle turns off most of the loads in order to charge the two Li-ion batteries. The system must keep the vehicle safe from over-heat and under-heat conditions, battery cell failures, under-voltage conditions, and clock failures, both while the computer is running and while the system is sleeping. The other goal of a safing routine is to communicate. On most spacecraft, this simply involves turning on the receiver and transmitter continuously. For Curiosity, Earth is above the horizon only a part of the day for direct communication to the Earth, and the orbiter overpass opportunities only occur a few times a day. The design must robustly place the Rover in a communicable condition at the correct time. This paper discusses Curiosity's autonomous safing behavior and describes how the vehicle remains power and thermally safe while sleeping, as well as a description of how the Rover communicates with the orbiters and Earth at specific times.

  8. An autonomous structural health monitoring solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherston, Carol A.; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys; Lees, Jonathan; Eaton, Mark; Pearson, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Combining advanced sensor technologies, with optimised data acquisition and diagnostic and prognostic capability, structural health monitoring (SHM) systems provide real-time assessment of the integrity of bridges, buildings, aircraft, wind turbines, oil pipelines and ships, leading to improved safety and reliability and reduced inspection and maintenance costs. The implementation of power harvesting, using energy scavenged from ambient sources such as thermal gradients and sources of vibration in conjunction with wireless transmission enables truly autonomous systems, reducing the need for batteries and associated maintenance in often inaccessible locations, alongside bulky and expensive wiring looms. The design and implementation of such a system however presents numerous challenges. A suitable energy source or multiple sources capable of meeting the power requirements of the system, over the entire monitoring period, in a location close to the sensor must be identified. Efficient power management techniques must be used to condition the power and deliver it, as required, to enable appropriate measurements to be taken. Energy storage may be necessary, to match a continuously changing supply and demand for a range of different monitoring states including sleep, record and transmit. An appropriate monitoring technique, capable of detecting, locating and characterising damage and delivering reliable information, whilst minimising power consumption, must be selected. Finally a wireless protocol capable of transmitting the levels of information generated at the rate needed in the required operating environment must be chosen. This paper considers solutions to some of these challenges, and in particular examines SHM in the context of the aircraft environment.

  9. Secure, Autonomous, Intelligent Controller for Integrating Distributed Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the infrastructure and protocols necessary to enable near-real-time commanding, access to space-based assets, and the secure interoperation between sensor webs owned and controlled by various entities. Select terrestrial and aeronautics-base sensor webs will be used to demonstrate time-critical interoperability between integrated, intelligent sensor webs both terrestrial and between terrestrial and space-based assets. For this work, a Secure, Autonomous, Intelligent Controller and knowledge generation unit is implemented using Virtual Mission Operation Center technology.

  10. Apoptosis and Self-Destruct: A Contribution to Autonomic Agents?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy Sterritt; Michael G. Hinchey

    2004-01-01

    Autonomic Computing (AC), a self-managing systems initiative based on the biological metaphor of the autonomic nervous system, is increasingly gaining momentum as the way forward in designing reliable systems. Agent technologies have been identified as a key enabler for engineering autonomicity in systems, both in terms of retrofitting autonomicity into legacy systems and designing new systems. The AC initiative provides

  11. A Hybrid Controller for Autonomous Vehicles Driving on Automated Highways

    E-print Network

    Girault, Alain

    A Hybrid Controller for Autonomous Vehicles Driving on Automated Highways Alain Girault a aInria Rh of the hybrid control of autonomous vehicles driving on automated highways. Vehicles are autonomous, so they do, we extend this first result to a lane of autonomous vehicles. Third, we prove that if all

  12. Autonomous Off-Road Driving in the DARPA Grand Challenge

    E-print Network

    Soatto, Stefano

    learned from two years of autonomous vehicle develop- ment. Autonomous navigation in the off road was offered for the individual or team that could build an autonomous ground vehicle capable of traversing to accelerate research and development in autonomous ground vehicles." No vehicle was able to travel more than

  13. Design Requirements for Autonomous Multivehicle Surface-Underwater Operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian S. Bingham; Eric F. Prechtl; Richard A. Wilson

    2009-01-01

    Future autonomous marine missions will depend on the seamless coordination of autonomous vehicles: unmanned surface vehicles (USVs), unmanned under- water vehicles (UUVs) and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Such coordination will enable important inter-vehicle applications such as autonomous refueling, high-throughput data transfer and periodic maintenance to extend the mission length. A critical enabling capability is the autonomous capture, retrieval and de-

  14. ASTRA 2008 Workshop Autonomous Over-The-Horizon Rover Navigation

    E-print Network

    Rekleitis, Ioannis

    ASTRA 2008 Workshop Autonomous Over-The-Horizon Rover Navigation Erick Dupuis, Ioannis Rekleitis campaigns of the Canadian Space Agency's autonomous rover navigation research. In particular, results for integrated system tests whereby the rover travelled autonomously and semi-autonomously beyond its sensing

  15. Towards Autonomic Communication Mechanisms for Service Composability Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Magedanz; José A. Lozano; Florian Schreiner; Fabricio Gouveia; Juan M. González

    2008-01-01

    The Autonomic Communication Forum dedicates itself to leverage innovative mechanisms in order to provide new levels of integrated autonomicity to a future self-managed networks and network elements. Current trends in networking technologies are applying Services Oriented Architecture (SOA) principles and concepts. Trying to improve the SOA capacities with the autonomic principles, the Autonomic Communications Forum (ACF) has created the Service

  16. Reconstruction of 3-D road geometry from images for autonomous land vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kanatani; K. Watanabe

    1990-01-01

    A novel algorithm for reconstructing 3-D road geometry from images is presented for the purpose of autonomously navigating land vehicles. The reconstruction is based on an idealized road model: a road is assumed to be generated by a horizontal line segment of a fixed length sweeping in the scene. The constraints that ideal road images must satisfy are expressed as

  17. Implementing neural soft- and hardware on the autonomous mini-robot Khepera

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Loffler; J. Klahold; U. Heittmann; U. Witkowski; U. Ruckert

    1999-01-01

    The applicability of neural networks to generate complex behaviour on autonomous systems is demonstrated both at soft- and hardware-level. In particular, the emergence of simple behaviors based on the Braitenberg approach, adaptive sensor calibration by self-organizing maps with a comparison between off- and online learning and a visualisation tool for a posteriori analysis are shown. It is also envisaged to

  18. Abstract--This paper presents technology for performing autonomous commanding of a planetary rover. Through the

    E-print Network

    Schaffer, Steven

    Abstract--This paper presents technology for performing autonomous commanding of a planetary rover provides capabilities for the automated generation of a rover activity plan based on science priorities software, other dynamic decision-making such as modifying the rover activity plan in response to problems

  19. Towards a Framework for Autonomic Security Simon N. Foley and Hongbin Zhou

    E-print Network

    Foley, Simon

    Towards a Framework for Autonomic Security Protocols Simon N. Foley and Hongbin Zhou Boole Centre for Research in Informatics, Department of Computer Science, University College, Cork, Ireland. {s-the-fly generate security protocols. When principals wish to interact then, rather than offering each other a fixed

  20. Modelling and simulation of an autonomous variable speed micro hydropower station

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ansel; B. Robyns

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the modelling of an autonomous variable speed micro hydropower station is presented. It is composed of a doubly fed induction generator linked mechanically and electrically to a permanent magnet synchronous machine which may recover or supply the slip power and which feeds the DFIG with its magnetizing reactive power leading to classical capacitor removing. The model lies

  1. A Double-Blind Atropine Trial for Active Learning of Autonomic Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Jeffrey R.; Burr, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe a human physiology laboratory class measuring changes in autonomic function over time in response to atropine. Students use themselves as subjects, generating ownership and self-interest in the learning as well as directly experiencing the active link between physiology and pharmacology in people. The class is designed to…

  2. Autonomous Fault Detection in Self-Healing Systems: Comparing Hidden Markov Models and Artificial Neural

    E-print Network

    Dobson, Simon

    Autonomous Fault Detection in Self-Healing Systems: Comparing Hidden Markov Models and Artificial of the art by allowing self-healing systems to detect faults with greater autonomy than existing]: Heuristic methods--Plan execution, formation, and generation Keywords self-healing systems; fault detection

  3. Autonomous Infrastructure for Observatory Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, R.

    This is an era of rapid change from ancient human-mediated modes of astronomical practice to a vision of ever larger time domain surveys, ever bigger "big data", to increasing numbers of robotic telescopes and astronomical automation on every mountaintop. Over the past decades, facets of a new autonomous astronomical toolkit have been prototyped and deployed in support of numerous space missions. Remote and queue observing modes have gained significant market share on the ground. Archives and data-mining are becoming ubiquitous; astroinformatic techniques and virtual observatory standards and protocols are areas of active development. Astronomers and engineers, planetary and solar scientists, and researchers from communities as diverse as particle physics and exobiology are collaborating on a vast range of "multi-messenger" science. What then is missing?

  4. Autonomous Guidance, Navigation and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bordano, A. J.; Mcswain, G. G.; Fernandes, S. T.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Autonomous Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) Bridging program is reviewed to demonstrate the program plan and GN&C systems for the Space Shuttle. The ascent CN&C system is described in terms of elements such as the general-purpose digital computers, sensors for the navigation subsystem, the guidance-system software, and the flight-control subsystem. Balloon-based and lidar wind soundings are used for operations assessment on the day of launch, and the guidance software is based on dedicated units for atmospheric powered flight, vacuum powered flight, and abort-specific situations. Optimization of the flight trajectories is discussed, and flight-control responses are illustrated for wavelengths of 500-6000 m. Alternate sensors are used for load relief, and adaptive GN&C systems based on alternate gain synthesis are used for systems failures.

  5. Autonomous Guidance, Navigation and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordano, A. J.; McSwain, G. G.; Fernandes, S. T.

    The NASA Autonomous Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) Bridging program is reviewed to demonstrate the program plan and GN&C systems for the Space Shuttle. The ascent CN&C system is described in terms of elements such as the general-purpose digital computers, sensors for the navigation subsystem, the guidance-system software, and the flight-control subsystem. Balloon-based and lidar wind soundings are used for operations assessment on the day of launch, and the guidance software is based on dedicated units for atmospheric powered flight, vacuum powered flight, and abort-specific situations. Optimization of the flight trajectories is discussed, and flight-control responses are illustrated for wavelengths of 500-6000 m. Alternate sensors are used for load relief, and adaptive GN&C systems based on alternate gain synthesis are used for systems failures.

  6. Testbed for an autonomous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok K.; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    In previous works we have defined a general architectural model for autonomous systems, which can easily be mapped to describe the functions of any automated system (SDAG-86-01), and we illustrated that model by applying it to the thermal management system of a space station (SDAG-87-01). In this note, we will further develop that application and design the detail of the implementation of such a model. First we present the environment of our application by describing the thermal management problem and an abstraction, which was called TESTBED, that includes a specific function for each module in the architecture, and the nature of the interfaces between each pair of blocks.

  7. Autonomous Medical Care for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Polk, J. D.; Hines, John W.; Nall, Marsha M.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of Autonomous Medical Care (AMC) is to ensure a healthy, well-performing crew which is a primary need for exploration. The end result of this effort will be the requirements and design for medical systems for the CEV, lunar operations, and Martian operations as well as a ground-based crew health optimization plan. Without such systems, we increase the risk of medical events occurring during a mission and we risk being unable to deal with contingencies of illness and injury, potentially threatening mission success. AMC has two major components: 1) pre-flight crew health optimization and 2) in-flight medical care. The goal of pre-flight crew health optimization is to reduce the risk of illness occurring during a mission by primary prevention and prophylactic measures. In-flight autonomous medical care is the capability to provide medical care during a mission with little or no real-time support from Earth. Crew medical officers or other crew members provide routine medical care as well as medical care to ill or injured crew members using resources available in their location. Ground support becomes telemedical consultation on-board systems/people collect relevant data for ground support to review. The AMC system provides capabilities to incorporate new procedures and training and advice as required. The on-board resources in an autonomous system should be as intelligent and integrated as is feasible, but autonomous does not mean that no human will be involved. The medical field is changing rapidly, and so a challenge is to determine which items to pursue now, which to leverage other efforts (e.g. military), and which to wait for commercial forces to mature. Given that what is used for the CEV or the Moon will likely be updated before going to Mars, a critical piece of the system design will be an architecture that provides for easy incorporation of new technologies into the system. Another challenge is to determine the level of care to provide for each mission type. The level of care refers to the amount and type of care one will render based on perceived need and ability. This is in contrast to the standard of care which is the benchmark by which that care is provided. There are certainly some devices and procedures that have unique microgravity or partial gravity requirements such that terrestrial methods will not work. For example, performing CPR on Mars cannot be done in exactly the same way as on Earth because the reduced gravity causes too large a reduction in the forces available for effective compression of the chest. Likewise, fluid behavior in microgravity may require a specialized water filtration and mixing system for the creation of intravenous fluids. This paper will outline the drivers for the design of the medical care systems, prioritization and planning techniques, key system components, and long term goals.

  8. Towards Autonomic Service Provisioning Systems

    E-print Network

    Mazzucco, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses our experience in building SPIRE, an autonomic system for service provision. The architecture consists of a set of hosted Web Services subject to QoS constraints, and a certain number of servers used to run session-based traffic. Customers pay for having their jobs run, but require in turn certain quality guarantees: there are different SLAs specifying charges for running jobs and penalties for failing to meet promised performance metrics. The system is driven by an utility function, aiming at optimizing the average earned revenue per unit time. Demand and performance statistics are collected, while traffic parameters are estimated in order to make dynamic decisions concerning server allocation and admission control. Different utility functions are introduced and a number of experiments aiming at testing their performance are discussed. Results show that revenues can be dramatically improved by imposing suitable conditions for accepting incoming traffic; the proposed system performs well ...

  9. Development of Autonomous Aerobraking (Phase 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Powell, Richard W.; Prince, Jill L.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center received a request from Mr. Daniel Murri (NASA Technical Fellow for Flight Mechanics) to develop an autonomous aerobraking capability. An initial evaluation for all phases of this assessment was approved to proceed at the NESC Review Board meeting. The purpose of phase 1 of this study was to provide an assessment of the feasibility of autonomous aerobraking. During this phase, atmospheric, aerodynamic, and thermal models for a representative spacecraft were developed for both the onboard algorithm known as Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software, and a ground-based "truth" simulation developed for testing purposes. The results of the phase 1 assessment are included in this report.

  10. Pure autonomic failure with cold induced sweating.

    PubMed

    Idiaquez, Juan; Fadic, Ricardo; Verdugo, Renato; Idiaquez, Juan F; Iodice, Valeria; Low, David A; Mathias, C J; Lombardi, Raffaela; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Pure autonomic failure (PAF) is a progressive autonomic neurodegenerative disorder. Cold induced sweating occurred in syndromes with mutations in CRLF1 and CLCF1 genes and in a case of cervical dissection. A patient with PAF developed sweating induced by cool ambient temperatures. He had severe orthostatic hypotension, abnormal cardiovagal reflexes, and paradoxical sweating in the upper trunk at a room temperature of 18°C. Skin biopsy showed involvement of somatic epidermal unmyelinated nerve fibers. Quantitative sensory testing showed abnormal thresholds to all thermal modalities. Possible mechanisms include cold induced noradrenaline release in remaining autonomic innervation and a supersensitive sudomotor response. PMID:23511064

  11. Autonomous observatories for the Antarctic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. S.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Storey, J. W. V.

    2013-01-01

    Antarctic astronomical site-testing has been conducted using autonomous self-powered observatories for more than a decade (the AASTO at South Pole, the AASTINO at Dome C, and PLATO at Dome A/Dome F). More recently autonomous (PLATO) observatories have been developed and deployed to support small-scale scientific instruments, such as HEAT, a 0.6 m aperture terahertz telescope at Ridge A, and AST3, a 0.5 m optical telescope array at Dome A. This paper reviews the evolution of autonomous Antarctic astronomical observatories, and discusses the requirements and implications for observatories that will be needed for future larger-scale facilities.

  12. Development of Autonomous Aerobraking - Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Phase 1 of the Development of Autonomous Aerobraking (AA) Assessment investigated the technical capability of transferring the processes of aerobraking maneuver (ABM) decision-making (currently performed on the ground by an extensive workforce and communicated to the spacecraft via the deep space network) to an efficient flight software algorithm onboard the spacecraft. This document describes Phase 2 of this study, which was a 12-month effort to improve and rigorously test the AA Development Software developed in Phase 1. Aerobraking maneuver; Autonomous Aerobraking; Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software; Deep Space Network; NASA Engineering and Safety Center

  13. Development of a Commercially Viable, Modular Autonomous Robotic Systems for Converting any Vehicle to Autonomous Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, David W.; Grabbe, Robert D.; Marzwell, Neville I.

    1994-01-01

    A Modular Autonomous Robotic System (MARS), consisting of a modular autonomous vehicle control system that can be retrofit on to any vehicle to convert it to autonomous control and support a modular payload for multiple applications is being developed. The MARS design is scalable, reconfigurable, and cost effective due to the use of modern open system architecture design methodologies, including serial control bus technology to simplify system wiring and enhance scalability. The design is augmented with modular, object oriented (C++) software implementing a hierarchy of five levels of control including teleoperated, continuous guidepath following, periodic guidepath following, absolute position autonomous navigation, and relative position autonomous navigation. The present effort is focused on producing a system that is commercially viable for routine autonomous patrolling of known, semistructured environments, like environmental monitoring of chemical and petroleum refineries, exterior physical security and surveillance, perimeter patrolling, and intrafacility transport applications.

  14. Onboard Autonomous Corrections for Accurate IRF Pointing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, J. L.; Betto, M.; Denver, T.

    2002-05-01

    Over the past decade, the Noise Equivalent Angle (NEA) of onboard attitude reference instruments, has decreased from tens-of-arcseconds to the sub-arcsecond level. This improved performance is partly due to improved sensor-technology with enhanced signal to noise ratios, partly due to improved processing electronics which allows for more sophisticated and faster signal processing. However, the main reason for the increased precision, is the application of onboard autonomy, which apart from simple outlier rejection also allows for removal of "false positive" answers, and other "unexpected" noise sources, that otherwise would degrade the quality of the measurements (e.g. discrimination between signals caused by starlight and ionizing radiation). The utilization of autonomous signal processing has also provided the means for another onboard processing step, namely the autonomous recovery from lost in space, where the attitude instrument without a priori knowledge derive the absolute attitude, i.e. in IRF coordinates, within fractions of a second. Combined with precise orbital state or position data, the absolute attitude information opens for multiple ways to improve the mission performance, either by reducing operations costs, by increasing pointing accuracy, by reducing mission expendables, or by providing backup decision information in case of anomalies. The Advanced Stellar Compass's (ASC) is a miniature, high accuracy, attitude instrument which features fully autonomous operations. The autonomy encompass all direct steps from automatic health checkout at power-on, over fully automatic SEU and SEL handling and proton induced sparkle removal, to recovery from "lost in space", and optical disturbance detection and handling. But apart from these more obvious autonomy functions, the ASC also features functions to handle and remove the aforementioned residuals. These functions encompass diverse operators such as a full orbital state vector model with automatic cloud filtered GPS updates, a world time clock, astrometric correction tables, and a attitude output transform system, that allow the ASC to deliver the spacecraft attitude relative to the Inertial Reference Frame (IRF) in realtime. This paper describes the operations of the onboard autonomy of the ASC, which in realtime removes the residuals from the attitude measurements, whereby a timely IRF attitude at arcsecond level, is delivered to the AOCS (or sent to ground). A discussion about achievable robustness and accuracy is given, and compared to inflight results from the operations of the two Advanced Stellar Compass's (ASC), which are flying in LEO onboard the German geo-potential research satellite CHAMP. The ASC's onboard CHAMP are dual head versions, i.e. each processing unit is attached to two star camera heads. The dual head configuration is primarily employed to achieve a carefree AOCS control with respect to the Sun, Moon and Earth, and to increase the attitude accuracy, but it also enables onboard estimation and removal of thermal generated biases.

  15. Brain stem auditory evoked potentials in patients with multiple system atrophy with progressive autonomic failure (Shy-Drager syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Prasher, D; Bannister, R

    1986-01-01

    Brain stem potentials from three groups of patients, namely those with pure progressive autonomic failure, Parkinson's disease and multisystem atrophy with progressive autonomic failure (Shy-Drager syndrome) were compared with each other and a group of normal subjects. In virtually all the patients with multisystem atrophy with progressive autonomic failure the brain stem potentials were abnormal in contrast to normal findings with Parkinson's disease. The closely associated group of patients with progressive autonomic failure alone also revealed no abnormalities of the BAEP. This separation of the two groups, Parkinson's disease and progressive autonomic failure from multisystem atrophy with progressive autonomic failure is important clinically as multiple system atrophy of the Shy-Drager type has extra-pyramidal features closely resembling Parkinsonism or a late onset cerebellar degeneration. From the abnormalities of the brain stem response in multisystem atrophy with progressive autonomic failure, it is clear that some disruption of the auditory pathway occurs in the ponto-medullary region as in nearly all patients there is a significant delay or reduction in the amplitude of components of the response generated beyond this region. The most likely area involved is the superior olivary complex. Images PMID:3958741

  16. Autonomous adaptive environmental assessment and feature tracking via autonomous underwater vehicles

    E-print Network

    Petillo, Stephanie Marie

    In the underwater environment, spatiotemporally dynamic environmental conditions pose challenges to the detection and tracking of hydrographic features. A useful tool in combating these challenge is Autonomous Adaptive ...

  17. Design of a minimalist autonomous robotic vehicle

    E-print Network

    Spadafora, Mark (Mark A.)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate design alternatives for the creation of a minimalist autonomous robotic vehicle, based on the Ford Escape. The work builds on prior work performed by the MIT DARPA Urban Challenge ...

  18. Human inspiration for autonomous vehicle tactics

    E-print Network

    Beaton, Jonathan Scott

    2006-01-01

    Tactical control is needed in environments characterized by uncertainty and continuous, dynamic change. Given the likelihood of time constraints and high risks associated with poor tactical choices, current autonomous ...

  19. System Engineering of Autonomous Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Johnson, Stephen B.; Trevino, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Human exploration of the solar system requires fully autonomous systems when travelling more than 5 light minutes from Earth. This autonomy is necessary to manage a large, complex spacecraft with limited crew members and skills available. The communication latency requires the vehicle to deal with events with only limited crew interaction in most cases. The engineering of these systems requires an extensive knowledge of the spacecraft systems, information theory, and autonomous algorithm characteristics. The characteristics of the spacecraft systems must be matched with the autonomous algorithm characteristics to reliably monitor and control the system. This presents a large system engineering problem. Recent work on product-focused, elegant system engineering will be applied to this application, looking at the full autonomy stack, the matching of autonomous systems to spacecraft systems, and the integration of different types of algorithms. Each of these areas will be outlined and a general approach defined for system engineering to provide the optimal solution to the given application context.

  20. XAUV : modular high maneuverability autonomous underwater vehicle

    E-print Network

    Walker, Daniel G. (Daniel George)

    2009-01-01

    The design and construction of a modular test bed autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is analyzed. Although a relatively common stacked-hull design is used, the state of the art is advanced through an aggressive power ...

  1. Multimodal interaction with an autonomous forklift

    E-print Network

    Correa, Andrew Thomas

    We describe a multimodal framework for interacting with an autonomous robotic forklift. A key element enabling effective interaction is a wireless, handheld tablet with which a human supervisor can command the forklift ...

  2. Exploring Mars via Autonomously Networked Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, E. J.; Burleigh, S. C.; Clare, L. P.; Torgerson, J. L.; Wagstaff, K. L.

    2012-06-01

    Enabling multiple assets to coordinate their activities autonomously via space networking techniques can significantly improve the way we explore Mars by enabling collaborative observations to improve science return and flexibility to reduce risk.

  3. Physics-Aware Planning for Autonomous Robots

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Satyandra K.

    ;Overview Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) Autonomous operations in complex environments require combination using machine learning and simulation Simulation Environment #12;USV Simulation · Test done on boat acceleration Initial State USV Simulation Model Speed Up Developed high-fidelity simulation model

  4. Orexin links emotional stress to autonomic functions.

    PubMed

    Kuwaki, Tomoyuki

    2011-04-26

    We studied autonomic functions in orexin-deficient mice and found abnormalities in the emotional state-dependent adjustment of the central autonomic regulation on circulation and respiration. These are summarized as follows. 1) Orexin-deficient mice exposed to a stressor exhibited an attenuated fight-or-flight response, including increases in respiration and blood pressure and stress-induced analgesia. 2) Stimulation to the amygdala (AMG) or the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), both of which are implicated in the stress-induced autonomic responses, induced long-lasting cardiorespiratory excitation in wild-type mice but not in the orexin neuron-ablated mice. Hence, it is likely that the orexin system is one of the essential modulators required for orchestrating the neural circuits controlling autonomic functions and emotional behaviors. PMID:20813590

  5. A flexible design framework for autonomous mowing

    E-print Network

    Kraft, Justin (Justin A.)

    2011-01-01

    This work outlines the creation of a flexible design framework for autonomous mowing to meet changing customer needs and functionality across a spectrum of applications from residential areas to sport complexes. The thesis ...

  6. Autonomous Organization-Based Adaptive Information Systems

    E-print Network

    Deloach, Scott A.

    Autonomous Organization-Based Adaptive Information Systems Eric Matson Department of Computer. To be successful, a battlefield information system must provide a continuous flow of information and thus tolerance information systems using an organizational model. We introduce our organizational model

  7. A Comparison of Autonomic Decision Making Techniques

    E-print Network

    Maggio, Martina

    2011-04-01

    Autonomic computing systems are capable of adapting their behavior and resources thousands of times a second to automatically decide the best way to accomplish a given goal despite changing environmental conditions and ...

  8. Path planning methods for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Yi?it, Konuralp

    2011-01-01

    From naval operations to ocean science missions, the importance of autonomous vehicles is increasing with the advances in underwater robotics technology. Due to the dynamic and intermittent underwater environment and the ...

  9. Advancing Autonomous Operations Technologies for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruzen, Craig; Thompson, Jerry Todd

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of implementing advanced autonomous technologies supporting operations of future NASA missions. The ability for crewed, uncrewed and even ground support systems to be capable of mission support without external interaction or control has become essential as space exploration moves further out into the solar system. The push to develop and utilize autonomous technologies for NASA mission operations stems in part from the need to reduce operations cost while improving and increasing capability and safety. This paper will provide examples of autonomous technologies currently in use at NASA and will identify opportunities to advance existing autonomous technologies that will enhance mission success by reducing operations cost, ameliorating inefficiencies, and mitigating catastrophic anomalies.

  10. Autonomous thruster failure recovery for underactuated spacecraft

    E-print Network

    Pong, Christopher Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Thruster failures historically account for a large percentage of failures that have occurred on orbit. Therefore, autonomous thruster failure detection, isolation, and recovery (FDIR) is an essential component to any robust ...

  11. Behavior learning and evolution of collective autonomous mobile robots based on reinforcement learning and distributed genetic algorithms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyo-Byung Jun; Kwee-Bo Sim

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we present the reinforcement learning and distributed genetic algorithm based behavior learning of the distributed autonomous mobile robots. The internal reinforcement signal for the reinforcement learning is generated by fuzzy inference, and dynamic recurrent neural networks are used as action generation module. We adopt the distributed genetic algorithms for the cooperative behavior emergence. We show the validity

  12. Autonomous vehicle control using AI techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Keirsey, D.; Mitchell, J.; Bullock, B.; Nussmeier, T.; Tseng, D.

    1983-11-01

    A review of early work on a project for developing autonomous vehicle control technology is presented. The primary goal of this effort is the development of a generic capability that can be specialized to a wide range of DOD applications. Project emphasis is on development of the fundamental AI-based technology required by autonomous systems and the implementation of a testbed environment to evaluate and demonstrate the system capabilities. 10 references.

  13. Autonomous support for microorganism research in space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Fleet; J. D. Smith; D. M. Klaus; M. W. Luttges

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary design for performing on orbit, autonomous research on microorganisms and cultured cells\\/tissues is presented. The payload is designed to be compatible with the COMercial Experiment Transporter (COMET), an orbiter middeck locker interface and with Space Station Freedom. Uplink\\/downlink capabilities and sample return through controlled reentry are available for all carriers. Autonomous testing activities are preprogrammed with in-flight reprogrammability.

  14. Fully autonomous mobile mini-robot

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roland Buechi; Daniel Rohrer; Christian Schmid; Roland Siegwart

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, many new designs of micro robots have been developed. Miniaturization is a challenge and most mechanisms designed up to now are not autonomous, i.e. they don't have their intelligence and\\/or power supply on board. A new fully autonomous miniature mobile robot has been designed in our lab in a final year project. It has been programmed to

  15. The Techsat-21 autonomous space science agent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve A. Chien; Rob Sherwood; Gregg Rabideau; Rebecca Castano; Ashley Davies; Michael C. Burl; Russell Knight; Timothy M. Stough; Joseph Roden; Paul Zetocha; Ross Wainwright; Pete Klupar; Jim Van Gaasbeck; Pat Cappelaere; Dean Oswald

    2002-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) will fly onboard the Air Force TechSat-21 constellation of three spacecraft scheduled for launch in 2004. ASE uses onboard continuous planning, robust task and goal-based execution, model-based mode identification and reconfiguration, and onboard machine learning and pattern recognition to radically increase science return by enabling intelligent downlink selection and autonomous retargeting. In this paper we

  16. Tele-robotic/autonomous control using controlshell

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.C.; Hurd, R.L.; Couture, S.

    1996-12-10

    A tele-robotic and autonomous controller architecture for waste handling and sorting has been developed which uses tele-robotics, autonomous grasping and image processing. As a starting point, prior work from LLNL and ORNL was restructured and ported to a special real-time development environment. Significant improvements in collision avoidance, force compliance, and shared control aspects were then developed. Several orders of magnitude improvement were made in some areas to meet the speed and robustness requirements of the application.

  17. Autonomic Computing - A Means of Achieving Dependability?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy Sterritt; David W. Bustard

    2003-01-01

    Autonomic Computing is emerging a s a significant new approach to the design o f computing systems. Its goal is the development of systems that are self- configuring, self-healing, self-protecting and self- optimizing. Dependability is a long-standing d esirable property of all computer-based systems. The purpose of this paper is to consider how Autonomic Computing can provide a framework for

  18. Autonomous control systems - Architecture and fundamental issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antsaklis, P. J.; Passino, K. M.; Wang, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchical functional autonomous controller architecture is introduced. In particular, the architecture for the control of future space vehicles is described in detail; it is designed to ensure the autonomous operation of the control system and it allows interaction with the pilot and crew/ground station, and the systems on board the autonomous vehicle. The fundamental issues in autonomous control system modeling and analysis are discussed. It is proposed to utilize a hybrid approach to modeling and analysis of autonomous systems. This will incorporate conventional control methods based on differential equations and techniques for the analysis of systems described with a symbolic formalism. In this way, the theory of conventional control can be fully utilized. It is stressed that autonomy is the design requirement and intelligent control methods appear at present, to offer some of the necessary tools to achieve autonomy. A conventional approach may evolve and replace some or all of the `intelligent' functions. It is shown that in addition to conventional controllers, the autonomous control system incorporates planning, learning, and FDI (fault detection and identification).

  19. Autonomous Repair Fault Tolerant Dynamic Reconfigurable Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Kentaro; Kouyama, Shin'ichi; Izumi, Tomonori; Ochi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yukihiro

    Recently, reconfigurable devices are widely used in the fields of small amount production and trial production. They are also expected to be utilized in such mission-critical fields as space development, because system update and pseudo-repair can be achieved remotely by reconfiguring. However, in the case of conventional reconfigurable devices, configuration memory upsets caused by radiation and alpha particles reconfigure the device unpredictably, resulting in fatal system failures. Therefore, a reconfigurable device with high fault-tolerance against configuration upsets is required. In this paper, we propose an architecture of a fault-tolerant reconfigurable device that autonomously repairs configuration upsets by itself without interrupting system operations. The device consists of a 2D array of “Autonomous-Repair Cells” each of which repairs its upsets autonomously. The architecture has a scalability in fault tolerance; a finer-grained Autonomous-Repair Cell provides higher fault-tolerance. To determine the architecture, we analyze four autonomous repair techniques of the cell experimentally. Then, two autonomous repair techniques, simple multiplexing (S.M.) and memory multiplexing (M.M.), are applied; the former to programmable logics and the latter to cell-to-cell routing resources. Through evaluation, we show that proposed device achieves more than 10 years average lifetime against configuration upsets even in a severe situation such as a satellite orbit.

  20. Autonomic networks and network-enabled capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillings, James

    2004-07-01

    Changes in the nature of battlespace information services, combined with the drive to digitization, are raising expectations of the ability of network-centric systems to provide information throughput and timeliness. At a level often abstracted from the systems perspective, it becomes necessary to consider the nature of the underlying network and its ability to adapt, recover, and organise in the face of increasing demands and non-optimal environments. Without this consideration, it may be that the capabilities of the underlying network act to restrict the exploitation of Network-Enabled Capability. Autonomic networks and autonomic computing are being presented as a possible aid to sustaining critical infrastructures of dynamic nodes. Although the focus of much commercial activity, autonomic networks are also believed to have relevance in the military environment and, most importantly, in supporting emerging battlespace information systems and digitization initiatives. Albeit well understood in biological contexts, autonomic principles have yet to be proven in commercial technological environments and, more importantly, in the context of military demands. Derived from this, key issues relate to the true nature of autonomic networks, the benefits accruing from such networks, and those challenges compounded by increasing demands from the ongoing development of military technology and digitization trends. This paper presents an examination of the demands made by the evolution of battlespace information services, some of the applicable technologies to address those demands, and examines the state of current and emerging technology to determine the perceived nature of autonomic networks in the context of Network-Enabled Capability.

  1. Advancing Autonomous Operations for Deep Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Angie T.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Starting in Jan 2012, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) Project began to investigate the ability to create and execute "single button" crew initiated autonomous activities [1]. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) designed and built a fluid transfer hardware test-bed to use as a sub-system target for the investigations of intelligent procedures that would command and control a fluid transfer test-bed, would perform self-monitoring during fluid transfers, detect anomalies and faults, isolate the fault and recover the procedures function that was being executed, all without operator intervention. In addition to the development of intelligent procedures, the team is also exploring various methods for autonomous activity execution where a planned timeline of activities are executed autonomously and also the initial analysis of crew procedure development. This paper will detail the development of intelligent procedures for the NASA MSFC Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) as well as the autonomous plan execution capabilities being investigated. Manned deep space missions, with extreme communication delays with Earth based assets, presents significant challenges for what the on-board procedure content will encompass as well as the planned execution of the procedures.

  2. Autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy: a theoretical framework for muscle reflex involvement

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Scott A.; Downey, Ryan M.; Williamson, Jon W.; Mizuno, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically inherited disorders whose most prominent clinical feature is progressive degeneration of skeletal muscle. In several forms of the disease, the function of cardiac muscle is likewise affected. The primary defect in this group of diseases is caused by mutations in myocyte proteins important to cellular structure and/or performance. That being stated, a growing body of evidence suggests that the development of autonomic dysfunction may secondarily contribute to the generation of skeletal and cardio-myopathy in muscular dystrophy. Indeed, abnormalities in the regulation of both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity have been reported in a number of muscular dystrophy variants. However, the mechanisms mediating this autonomic dysfunction remain relatively unknown. An autonomic reflex originating in skeletal muscle, the exercise pressor reflex, is known to contribute significantly to the control of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity when stimulated. Given the skeletal myopathy that develops with muscular dystrophy, it is logical to suggest that the function of this reflex might also be abnormal with the pathogenesis of disease. As such, it may contribute to or exacerbate the autonomic dysfunction that manifests. This possibility along with a basic description of exercise pressor reflex function in health and disease are reviewed. A better understanding of the mechanisms that possibly underlie autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy may not only facilitate further research but could also lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. PMID:24600397

  3. Autonomous synergic control of nanomotors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meihan; Hou, Ruizheng; Cheng, Juan; Loh, Iong Ying; Sreelatha, Sarangapani; Tey, Ju Nie; Wei, Jun; Wang, Zhisong

    2014-02-25

    Control is a hallmark of machines; effective control over a nanoscale system is necessary to turn it into a nanomachine. Nanomotors from biology often integrate a ratchet-like passive control and a power-stroke-like active control, and this synergic active-plus-passive control is critical to efficient utilization of energy. It remains a challenge to integrate the two differing types of control in rationally designed nanomotor systems. Recently a light-powered track-walking DNA nanomotor was developed from a bioinspired design principle that has the potential to integrate both controls. However, it is difficult to separate experimental signals for either control due to a tight coupling of both controls. Here we present a systematic study of the motor and new derivatives using different fluorescence labeling schemes and light operations. The experimental data suggest that the motor achieves the two controls autonomously through a mechanics-mediated symmetry breaking. This study presents an experimental validation for the bioinspired design principle of mechanical breaking of symmetry for synergic ratchet-plus-power stroke control. Augmented by mechanical and kinetic modeling, this experimental study provides mechanistic insights that may help advance molecular control in future nanotechnological systems. PMID:24422493

  4. Autonomic dysregulation in headache patients.

    PubMed

    Gass, Jason J; Glaros, Alan G

    2013-12-01

    To analyze autonomic nervous system activity in headache subjects, measurements of heart rate variability (HRV), skin temperature, skin conductance, and respiration were compared to a matched control group. HRV data were recorded in time and frequency domains. Subjects also completed self-report questionnaires assessing psychological distress, fatigue, and sleep dysfunction. Twenty-one headache and nineteen control subjects participated. In the time domain, the number of consecutive R-to-R intervals that varied by more than 50 ms and the standard deviation of the normalized R-to-R intervals, both indices of parasympathetic nervous system activity, were significantly lower in the headache group than the control group. Groups did not differ statistically on HRV measures in the frequency domain. Self-report measures showed significantly increased somatization, hostility, anxiety, symptom distress, fatigue, and sleep problems in the headache group. The results suggest headache subjects have increased sympathetic nervous system activity and decreased parasympathetic activity compared to non-headache control subjects. Headaches subjects also showed greater emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep problems. The results indicate an association between headaches and cardiovascular functioning suggestive of sympathetic nervous system activation in this sample of mixed migraine and tension-type headache sufferers. PMID:23912525

  5. Is acting on delusions autonomous?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the question of autonomy in delusional disorders is investigated using a phenomenological approach. I refer to the distinction between freedom of intentional action, and freedom of the will, and develop phenomenological descriptions of lived autonomy, taking into account the distinction between a pre-reflective and a reflective type. Drawing on a case report, I deliver finely-grained phenomenological descriptions of lived autonomy and experienced self-determination when acting on delusions. This analysis seeks to demonstrate that a person with delusions can be described as responsible for her behaviour on a ‘framed’ level (level of freedom of intentional action), even though she is not autonomous on a higher (‘framing’) level (level of freedom of the will), if, and only if, the goods of agency for herself and others are respected. In these cases the person with delusions is very nearly comparable to people in love, who are also not free to choose their convictions, and who could also be rightly held responsible for the behaviour flowing from their convictions. PMID:24125114

  6. Autonomous intelligent cruise control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baret, Marc; Bomer, Thierry T.; Calesse, C.; Dudych, L.; L'Hoist, P.

    1995-01-01

    Autonomous intelligent cruise control (AICC) systems are not only controlling vehicles' speed but acting on the throttle and eventually on the brakes they could automatically maintain the relative speed and distance between two vehicles in the same lane. And more than just for comfort it appears that these new systems should improve the safety on highways. By applying a technique issued from the space research carried out by MATRA, a sensor based on a charge coupled device (CCD) was designed to acquire the reflected light on standard-mounted car reflectors of pulsed laser diodes emission. The CCD is working in a unique mode called flash during transfer (FDT) which allows identification of target patterns in severe optical environments. It provides high accuracy for distance and angular position of targets. The absence of moving mechanical parts ensures high reliability for this sensor. The large field of view and the high measurement rate give a global situation assessment and a short reaction time. Then, tracking and filtering algorithms have been developed in order to select the target, on which the equipped vehicle determines its safety distance and speed, taking into account its maneuvering and the behaviors of other vehicles.

  7. Autonomic healing of polymer composites.

    PubMed

    White, S R; Sottos, N R; Geubelle, P H; Moore, J S; Kessler, M R; Sriram, S R; Brown, E N; Viswanathan, S

    2001-02-15

    Structural polymers are susceptible to damage in the form of cracks, which form deep within the structure where detection is difficult and repair is almost impossible. Cracking leads to mechanical degradation of fibre-reinforced polymer composites; in microelectronic polymeric components it can also lead to electrical failure. Microcracking induced by thermal and mechanical fatigue is also a long-standing problem in polymer adhesives. Regardless of the application, once cracks have formed within polymeric materials, the integrity of the structure is significantly compromised. Experiments exploring the concept of self-repair have been previously reported, but the only successful crack-healing methods that have been reported so far require some form of manual intervention. Here we report a structural polymeric material with the ability to autonomically heal cracks. The material incorporates a microencapsulated healing agent that is released upon crack intrusion. Polymerization of the healing agent is then triggered by contact with an embedded catalyst, bonding the crack faces. Our fracture experiments yield as much as 75% recovery in toughness, and we expect that our approach will be applicable to other brittle materials systems (including ceramics and glasses). PMID:11236987

  8. Self-Consciousness and Self-Presentation: Being Autonomous Versus Appearing Autonomous

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry R. Schlenker; Michael F. Weigold

    1990-01-01

    Privately self-conscious people may resist social pressures because (a) they tune out the social matrix and express their beliefs irrespective of how they make them appear to an audience (the social obliviousness hypothesis) or (b) they prefer to create an identity of being autonomous and will monitor and control their self-presentations to construct this image for audiences (the autonomous identity

  9. Assessment and evaluation of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies with autonomic and neurophysiological examinations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Max J. Hilz

    2002-01-01

    The five different types of the rare hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are classified by their mode of inheritance, pathology, natural history, biochemical, neurophysiologic and autonomic abnormalities. Clinically, the different types of HSANs can be identified by a detailed history and examination and 'bedside' tests of sympathetic or parasympathetic function such as active standing, metronomic breathing or the Valsalva

  10. TrustworthyNetworkingProgram Autonomous System IsolationAutonomous System Isolation

    E-print Network

    Trajkovic, Ljiljana

    researchers characterize the design space: risks, mitigation techniques and deployment costs. ­ Expedite1 TrustworthyNetworkingProgram Autonomous System IsolationAutonomous System Isolation Under BGP@nist.gov, dougm@nist.gov November 9, 2005November 9, 2005 This research was supported by the Department

  11. Implementing autonomous crowds in a computer generated feature film 

    E-print Network

    Patterson, John Andre

    2006-04-12

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 A. Crosstown Express . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 B. Train Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 C. Minions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 VI CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE WORK.... C. Minions The next major hurdle for the crowd system was the final fight sequence in Madame Gasket?s chop shop. This sequence used even more agents than the train station sequence, although there were fewer shots. The main challenge in the chop shop...

  12. Low altitude threat evasive trajectory generation for autonomous aerial vehicles

    E-print Network

    Pettit, Ryan L. (Ryan Louis), 1978-

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, high altitude unmanned aerial vehicles have been used to great success in combat operations, providing both reconnaissance as well as weapon launch platforms for time critical targets. Interest is now ...

  13. Trajectory Generation and Path Planning for Autonomous Aerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Shivanjli; Kulczycki, Eric A.; Elfes, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents global path planning algorithms for the Titan aerobot based on user defined waypoints in 2D and 3D space. The algorithms were implemented using information obtained through a planner user interface. The trajectory planning algorithms were designed to accurately represent the aerobot's characteristics, such as minimum turning radius. Additionally, trajectory planning techniques were implemented to allow for surveying of a planar area based solely on camera fields of view, airship altitude, and the location of the planar area's perimeter. The developed paths allow for planar navigation and three-dimensional path planning. These calculated trajectories are optimized to produce the shortest possible path while still remaining within realistic bounds of airship dynamics.

  14. Autonomous Rovers for Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresina, John; Dorais, Gregory; Golden, Keith; Washington, Richard; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Autonomous rovers are a critical element for the success of human exploration of Mars. The robotic tasks required for human presence on Mars are beyond the ability of current rovers; these tasks include emplacement and maintenance of a habitat, fuel production facility, and power generator, landing-site scouting, and mining. These tasks are required before and also during human presence; the ability of rovers to offload work from the human explorers will enable the humans to accomplish their mission. The capacity for these tasks will be realized by significant advancement toward full rover autonomy and, in particular, by overcoming current rover mission limitations in the areas of robust operation, resource utilization, and failure recovery. The Pathfinder mission demonstrated the potential for robotic Mars exploration, but at the same time indicated clearly the need for more rover autonomy. The highly interactive, ground-intensive control with significant downtime limited the effectiveness of the Sojourner rover. Advances in rover offer increased rover productivity without risk to rover safety. We are developing an integrated on-board executive architecture that incorporates robust operation, resource utilization, and failure recovery. This work draws from our experience with the architecture for the Deep Space One autonomy experiment, with enhancements in the area of ensuring robust operation in the face of unpredictable, complex environments, such as what a rover encounters on Mars. Our ultimate goal is to provide a complete agent architecture for rover autonomy. The complete architecture will include long-range mission and path planning, self-diagnosis and fault recovery, and continual monitoring and adjustment of execution resources. The architecture will enable robust operation over long ranges of time and distance, performing complex tasks in a planned and opportunistic manner, and serving as an intelligent, capable tool for human explorers.

  15. Autonomous planetary rover at Carnegie Mellon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, William; Kanade, Takeo; Mitchell, Tom

    1990-01-01

    This report describes progress in research on an autonomous robot for planetary exploration. In 1989, the year covered by this report, a six-legged walking robot, the Ambler, was configured, designed, and constructed. This configuration was used to overcome shortcomings exhibited by existing wheeled and walking robot mechanisms. The fundamental advantage of the Ambler is that the actuators for body support are independent of those for propulsion; a subset of the planar joints propel the body, and the vertical actuators support and level the body over terrain. Models of the Ambler's dynamics were developed and the leveling control was studied. An integrated system capable of walking with a single leg over rugged terrain was implemented and tested. A prototype of an Ambler leg is suspended below a carriage that slides along rails. To walk, the system uses a laser scanner to find a clear, flat foothold, positions the leg above the foothold, contacts the terrain with the foot, and applies force enough to advance the carriage along the rails. Walking both forward and backward, the system has traversed hundreds of meters of rugged terrain including obstacles too tall to step over, trenches too deep to step in, closely spaced rocks, and sand hills. In addition, preliminary experiments were conducted with concurrent planning and execution, and a leg recovery planner that generates time and power efficient 3D trajectories using 2D search was developed. A Hero robot was used to demonstrate mobile manipulation. Indoor tasks include collecting cups from the lab floor, retrieving printer output, and recharging when its battery gets low. The robot monitors its environment, and handles exceptional conditions in a robust fashion, using vision to track the appearance and disappearance of cups, onboard sonars to detect imminent collisions, and monitors to detect the battery level.

  16. Autonomic Involvement in Subacute and Chronic Immune-Mediated Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Anna; Stancanelli, Claudia; Vita, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic function can be impaired in many disorders in which sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric arms of the autonomic nervous system are affected. Signs and symptoms of autonomic involvement are related to impairment of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, urogenital, thermoregulatory, sudomotor, and pupillomotor autonomic functions. Availability of noninvasive, sensitive, and reproducible tests can help to recognize these disorders and to better understand specific mechanisms of some, potentially treatable, immune-mediated autonomic neuropathies. This paper describes autonomic involvement in immune-mediated neuropathies with a subacute or chronic course. PMID:23853716

  17. Ultra-Fast Physical Generation of Random Numbers Using Hybrid Boolean Networks

    E-print Network

    David P. Rosin; Damien Rontani; Daniel J. Gauthier

    2013-04-17

    We describe a high-speed physical random number generator based on a hybrid Boolean network with autonomous and clocked logic gates, realized on a reconfigurable chip. The autonomous logic gates are arranged in a bidirectional ring topology and generate broadband chaos. The clocked logic gates receive input from the autonomous logic gates so that random numbers are generated physically that pass standard randomness tests without further post-processing. The large number of logic gates on reconfigurable chips allows for parallel generation of random numbers, as demonstrated by our implementation of 128 physical random number generators that achieve a real-time bit rate of 12.8 Gbit/s.

  18. Improved autonomous star identification algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Li-Yan; Xu, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Jing-Rong

    2015-06-01

    The log–polar transform (LPT) is introduced into the star identification because of its rotation invariance. An improved autonomous star identification algorithm is proposed in this paper to avoid the circular shift of the feature vector and to reduce the time consumed in the star identification algorithm using LPT. In the proposed algorithm, the star pattern of the same navigation star remains unchanged when the stellar image is rotated, which makes it able to reduce the star identification time. The logarithmic values of the plane distances between the navigation and its neighbor stars are adopted to structure the feature vector of the navigation star, which enhances the robustness of star identification. In addition, some efforts are made to make it able to find the identification result with fewer comparisons, instead of searching the whole feature database. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition rate and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the LPT algorithm and the modified grid algorithm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172138 and 61401340), the Open Research Fund of the Academy of Satellite Application, China (Grant No. 2014_CXJJ-DH_12), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. JB141303 and 201413B), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013JQ8040), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20130203120004), and the Xi’an Science and Technology Plan, China (Grant. No CXY1350(4)).

  19. Autonomous Rovers for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Corin; Bresina, John; Golden, Keith; Smith, David E.; Smith, Trey; Washington, Richard; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Rovers will play a critical role in the exploration of Mars. Near-term mission plans call for long traverses over unknown terrain, robust navigation and instrument placement, and reliable operations for extended periods of time. Longer-term missions may visit multiple science sites in a single day and perform opportunistic science data collection, as well as complex scouting, construction, and maintenance tasks in preparation for an eventual human presence. The Pathfinder mission demonstrated the potential for robotic Mars exploration but at the same time indicated the need for more rover autonomy. The highly ground-intensive control with infrequent communication and high latency limited the effectiveness of the Sojourner rover. When failures occurred, Sojourner often sat idle for extended periods of time, awaiting further commands from earth. In future missions, the tasks will be more complex and extended; hence there will be even more situations where things do not go exactly as planned. Significant advances in rover autonomy are needed to cope with increasing task complexity and greater execution uncertainty. Towards this end, we have designed an on-board executive architecture that incorporates robust operation, resource utilization, and failure recovery. In addition, we have designed ground tools to produce and refine contingent schedules that take advantage of the on-board architecture's flexible execution characteristics. Together, the on-board executive and the ground tools constitute an integrated rover autonomy architecture. This work draws from our experience with the Deep Space One autonomy experiment, with enhancements to ensure robust operation in the face of the unpredictable, complex environment that the rover will encounter on Mars. The rover autonomy architecture is currently being developed and deployed on the Marsokhod rover platform at NASA Ames Research Center. The capabilities of the rover autonomy architecture to support autonomous operations will be demonstrated concretely in upcoming field tests.

  20. Diabetic Autonomic Imbalance and Glycemic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neural imbalance is a severe complication of long-term diabetes patients and may progress to diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). The prevalence of DAN is reported to be between 20 and 70%, depending on the studies. The pathogenesis of DAN remains unresolved. However, emerging evidence suggests that glycemic variability (GV) may be associated with autonomic imbalance in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. As symptoms are initially weak and uncharacteristic, the condition often remains undiagnosed until late manifestations present themselves. Predominant symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, gastroparesis, involuntary diarrhea, postural hypotension, voiding difficulties, and sexual dysfunction. Analyzing the patterns of heart rate variability carries the potential for detection of autonomic imbalance in the subclinical and asymptomatic stages. In this context, GV may affect the sympathovagal balance by increasing oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines. Establishing a GV risk profile could therefore be important in determining risk factors in diabetes patients. This review addresses the issues above and in particular the possible association between diabetic autonomic imbalance and GV. PMID:23063048

  1. Algorithmic solution for autonomous vision-based off-road navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnik, Marina; Paar, Gerhard; Bauer, Arnold; Ulm, Michael

    1998-07-01

    A vision based navigation system is a basic tool to provide autonomous operations of unmanned vehicles. For offroad navigation that means that the vehicle equipped with a stereo vision system and perhaps a laser ranging device shall be able to maintain a high level of autonomy under various illumination conditions and with little a priori information about the underlying scene. The task becomes particularly important for unmanned planetary exploration with the help of autonomous rovers. For example in the LEDA Moon exploration project currently under focus by the European Space Agency (ESA), during the autonomous mode the vehicle (rover) should perform the following operations: on-board absolute localization, elevation model (DEM) generation, obstacle detection and relative localization, global path planning and execution. Focus of this article is a computational solution for fully autonomous path planning and path execution. An operational DEM generation method based on stereoscopy is introduced. Self-localization on the DEM and robust natural feature tracking are used as basic navigation steps, supported by inertial sensor systems. The following operations are performed on the basis of stereo image sequences: 3D scene reconstruction, risk map generation, local path planning, camera position update during the motion on the basis of landmarks tracking, obstacle avoidance. Experimental verification is done with the help of a laboratory terrain mockup and a high precision camera mounting device. It is shown that standalone tracking using automatically identified landmarks is robust enough to give navigation data for further stereoscopic reconstruction of the surrounding terrain. Iterative tracking and reconstruction leads to a complete description of the vehicle path and its surrounding with an accuracy high enough to meet the specifications for autonomous outdoor navigation.

  2. Decentralized cooperative trajectory estimation for autonomous underwater vehicles

    E-print Network

    Paull, Liam

    Autonomous agents that can communicate and make relative measurements of each other can improve their collective localization accuracies. This is referred to as cooperative localization (CL). Autonomous underwater vehicle ...

  3. Robust distributed planning strategies for autonomous multi-agent teams

    E-print Network

    Ponda, Sameera S

    2012-01-01

    The increased use of autonomous robotic agents, such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and ground rovers, for complex missions has motivated the development of autonomous task allocation and planning methods that ensure ...

  4. Decentralized planning for autonomous agents cooperating in complex missions

    E-print Network

    Whitten, Andrew (Andrew Koo)

    2010-01-01

    Planning for autonomous vehicles remains an important and challenging research topic. This thesis focuses on decentralized planning for autonomous agents performing complex missions. These types of missions often involve ...

  5. Sensor modeling for the virtual autonomous navigation environment

    E-print Network

    Liu, Linda Y.

    The Virtual Autonomous Navigation Environment (VANE) is a high fidelity, physics-based simulation process that produces realistic simulated sensor output for use in the development and testing of Autonomous Mobility Systems ...

  6. Implementation of GPS based trajectory control of an autonomous sailboat

    E-print Network

    Wirekoh, Jackson O

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous robotic systems are increasingly becoming a major component of modern society. In order to gain a better understanding of the capabilities of these autonomous systems, experimentation was conducted using a ...

  7. Good Experimental Methodologies and Simulation in Autonomous Mobile Robotics

    E-print Network

    Amigoni, Francesco

    Good Experimental Methodologies and Simulation in Autonomous Mobile Robotics Francesco Amigoni and Viola Schiaffonati Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Laboratory, Dipartimento di Elettronica e to characterize analytically, as it is often the case in autonomous mobile robotics. Although their importance

  8. Autonomic SoC node Florian Kluge,1

    E-print Network

    Ungerer, Theo

    concurrent to the hard-real-time application thread. KEYWORDS: Autonomic computing, organic computing systems. Our solution is to fulfill the Autonomic and Organic Computing (AC/OC) and the hard- real

  9. Interception algorithm for autonomous vehicles with imperfect information

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Randal E

    2005-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles often operate in environments with imperfect information. This thesis addresses the case of a system of autonomous vehicles and sensors attempting to intercept a moving object of interest that arrives ...

  10. An Expert System for Autonomous Spacecraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Rob; Chien, Steve; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Rabideau, Gregg

    2005-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE), part of the New Millennium Space Technology 6 Project, is flying onboard the Earth Orbiter 1 (EO-1) mission. The ASE software enables EO-1 to autonomously detect and respond to science events such as: volcanic activity, flooding, and water freeze/thaw. ASE uses classification algorithms to analyze imagery onboard to detect chang-e and science events. Detection of these events is then used to trigger follow-up imagery. Onboard mission planning software then develops a response plan that accounts for target visibility and operations constraints. This plan is then executed using a task execution system that can deal with run-time anomalies. In this paper we describe the autonomy flight software and how it enables a new paradigm of autonomous science and mission operations. We will also describe the current experiment status and future plans.

  11. [HIV-1 associated autonomic dysfunction (HIVAD)].

    PubMed

    Malessa, R; Ohrmann, P; Agelink, M W; Brockmeyer, N H; Diener, H C

    1996-02-01

    In a controlled prospective study we used peripheral autonomic surface potentials (PASP) and an autonomic test battery (valsalva, 30:15 ratio, deep breathing, sustained handgrip, Schellong test) to evaluate HIV-1 associated autonomic dysfunction (HIVAD) in 38 HIV-seropositive patients. Criteria of exclusion were drug or alcohol abuse, concurrent infections, neoplasms, wasting syndrome and neurotoxic medication. We found increased PASP onset latencies and lower PASP amplitudes even in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients (p < 0.0125, Bonferroni corrected p-value). A mild or marked HIVAD was detected in 21% of the patients each. Heart rate and blood pressure responses were similarly affected. HIVAD was not related to HIV-1 associated changes in sural and tibial nerve conduction parameters. Our data suggest that HIVAD is a frequent complication of HIV-1 infection and that HIV-1 plays a direct role in its pathogenesis. Sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS appear to be similarly affected. PMID:8851296

  12. Self-healing for Autonomic Pervasive Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Shameem; Ahamed, Sheikh I.; Sharmin, Moushumi; Hasan, Chowdhury S.

    To ensure smooth functioning of numerous handheld devices anywhere anytime, the importance of a self-healing mechanism cannot be overlooked. This is one of the main challenges to growing autonomic pervasive computing. Incorporation of efficient fault detection and recovery in the device itself is the ultimate quest but there is no existing selfhealing scheme for devices running in autonomic pervasive computing environments that can be claimed as the ultimate solution. Moreover, the highest degree of transparency, security and privacy should also be maintained. In this book chapter, an approach to develop a self-healing service for autonomic pervasive computing is presented. The self-healing service has been developed and integrated into the middleware named MARKS+ (Middleware Adaptability for Resource discovery, Knowledge usability, and Self-healing). The self-healing approach has been evaluated on a test bed of PDAs. An application has been developed by using the service. The evaluation results are also presented in this book chapter.

  13. Software control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; DeAnda, Juan R.; Fox, Richard K.; Meng, Xiannong

    1999-07-01

    The Strategic-Tactical-Execution Software Control Architecture (STESCA) is a tri-level approach to controlling autonomous vehicles. Using an object-oriented approach, STESCA has been developed as a generalization of the Rational Behavior Model (RBM). STESCA was initially implemented for the Phoenix Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (Naval Postgraduate School -- Monterey, CA), and is currently being implemented for the Pioneer AT land-based wheeled vehicle. The goals of STESCA are twofold. First is to create a generic framework to simplify the process of creating a software control architecture for autonomous vehicles of any type. Second is to allow for mission specification system by 'anyone' with minimal training to control the overall vehicle functionality. This paper describes the prototype implementation of STESCA for the Pioneer AT.

  14. Subclinical autonomic dysfunction in patients with ?-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Stamboulis, Elefterios; Vlachou, Nikoleta; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Andrikopoulou, Athina; Arvaniti, Chrisa; Tsivgoulis, Athanasios; Athanasiadis, Dimitrios; Tsiodras, Sotirios; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Triantafyllidi, Heleni; Drossou-Servou, Marouso; Loutradi-Anagnostou, Aphrodite; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2012-06-01

    We electrophysiologically evaluated the autonomic function (AF) in a consecutive series of patients with beta-thalassemia and in normal individuals. Six quantitative autonomic function tests (AFTs) were used: tilt test, hand grip test and sympathetic skin response for sympathetic function; R-R interval, inspiration-expiration difference and 30/15 ratio for parasympathetic function. The prevalence of impaired AF was higher in beta-thalassemia patients (13%, n = 5) than in control subjects (0%, n = 0; p = 0.026). Subclinical autonomic dysfunction appeared to be more prevalent in beta-thalassemia patients compared to controls in our series. Further independent validation of this finding is required in larger cohorts of beta-thalassemia patients. PMID:22170296

  15. Terrain modelling and motion planning for an autonomous exploration rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, F.; Benoliel, S.; Faugeras, O.; Grandjean, P.; Hayard, M.; Simeon, T.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of planetary exploration missions using rovers, the French national agency CNES, with a consortium of European laboratories and industrial concerns, has initiated the Eureka project, 'Illustration of an Autonomous Robot for the Exploration of Space' (IARES). IARES is a demonstrator composed of a rover and a ground station, linked by telemetry and telecommand. It is aimed at verifying, on earth, robotic concepts developed by the RISP group of French laboratories (LAAS, INRIA, CERT, LETI) to perform scientific missions such as autonomous terrain sample collecting over large areas. To cope with the actual needs of planet exploration, IARES suitability is assessed through constraints on limited bandwidth, time delay and on-board resources. This autonomy relies heavily on robust onboard trajectory generation capabilities. This paper presents the main functions of the IARES navigation sub-system and shows how they are combined to allow movement in Mars-like environments. Section 2 gives an overall description of the IARES system. Section 3 details the functions of the Navigation sub-system, and finally, section 4 illustrates with a simple example the use of these functions.

  16. Why Computer-Based Systems Should be Autonomic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss why computer-based systems should be autonomic, where autonomicity implies self-managing, often conceptualized in terms of being self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing, self-protecting and self-aware. We look at motivations for autonomicity, examine how more and more systems are exhibiting autonomic behavior, and finally look at future directions.

  17. Lessons Learned from Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.; Sherwood, Rob; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Rabideau, Gregg; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Trout, Bruce; D'Agostino, Jeff; Shulman, Seth; Boyer, Darrell; Hayden, Sandra; Sweet, Adam; Christa, Scott

    2005-01-01

    An Autonomous Science Agent has been flying onboard the Earth Observing One Spacecraft since 2003. This software enables the spacecraft to autonomously detect and responds to science events occurring on the Earth such as volcanoes, flooding, and snow melt. The package includes AI-based software systems that perform science data analysis, deliberative planning, and run-time robust execution. This software is in routine use to fly the EO-l mission. In this paper we briefly review the agent architecture and discuss lessons learned from this multi-year flight effort pertinent to deployment of software agents to critical applications.

  18. Autonomous scheduling technology for Earth orbital missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a dynamic autonomous system (DYASS) of resources for the mission support of near-Earth NASA spacecraft is discussed and the current NASA space data system is described from a functional perspective. The future (late 80's and early 90's) NASA space data system is discussed. The DYASS concept, the autonomous process control, and the NASA space data system are introduced. Scheduling and related disciplines are surveyed. DYASS as a scheduling problem is also discussed. Artificial intelligence and knowledge representation is considered as well as the NUDGE system and the I-Space system.

  19. NEURON: enabling autonomicity in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Zafeiropoulos, Anastasios; Gouvas, Panagiotis; Liakopoulos, Athanassios; Mentzas, Gregoris; Mitrou, Nikolas

    2010-01-01

    Future Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) will be ubiquitous, large-scale networks interconnected with the existing IP infrastructure. Autonomic functionalities have to be designed in order to reduce the complexity of their operation and management, and support the dissemination of knowledge within a WSN. In this paper a novel protocol for energy efficient deployment, clustering and routing in WSNs is proposed that focuses on the incorporation of autonomic functionalities in the existing approaches. The design of the protocol facilitates the design of innovative applications and services that are based on overlay topologies created through cooperation among the sensor nodes. PMID:22399931

  20. Sensorpedia: Information Sharing Across Autonomous Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL; Resseguie, David R [ORNL; Tomkins-Tinch, Christopher H [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The concept of adapting social media technologies is introduced as a means of achieving information sharing across autonomous sensor systems. Historical examples of interoperability as an underlying principle in loosely-coupled systems is compared and contrasted with corresponding tightly-coupled, integrated systems. Examples of ad hoc information sharing solutions based on Web 2.0 social networks, mashups, blogs, wikis, and data tags are presented and discussed. The underlying technologies of these solutions are isolated and defined, and Sensorpedia is presented as a formalized application for implementing sensor information sharing across large-scale enterprises with incompatible autonomous sensor systems.

  1. CMU's autonomous helicopter explores new territory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, J.

    1998-10-01

    In the summer of 1998, several members of Carnegie Mellon University's (CMUs) Autonomous Helicopter Project team joined NASA on a multidisciplinary expedition to the Canadian Arctic's Haughton Crater. NASA was willing to travel to such a remote corner of the globe because of its similarity to an even more remote locale - Mars. Researchers are studying the 23-million-year-old meteorite impact crater in the hope of learning more about Mars's environment. While there, they also tested a number of technologies that will enable future exploration of Mars, including CMU's autonomous helicopter.

  2. Autonomic Regulation Therapy in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Una; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2015-08-01

    Autonomic regulation therapy (ART) is a rapidly emerging therapy in the management of congestive heart failure secondary to systolic dysfunction. Modulation of the cardiac neuronal hierarchy can be achieved with bioelectronics modulation of the spinal cord, cervical vagus, baroreceptor, or renal nerve ablation. This review will discuss relevant preclinical and clinical research in ART for systolic heart failure. Understanding mechanistically what is being stimulated within the autonomic nervous system by such device-based therapy and how the system reacts to such stimuli is essential for optimizing stimulation parameters and for the future development of effective ART. PMID:26054327

  3. Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Chirold

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work towards technology that will result in an autonomous landing on the lunar surface, that will avoid the hazards of lunar landing. In October 2005, the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters assigned the development of new technologies to support the return to the moon. One of these was Autonomous Precision Landing and Hazard Detection and Avoidance Technology now known as ALHAT ALHAT is a lunar descent and landing GNC technology development project led by Johnson Space Center (JSC) with team members from Langley Research Center (LaRC), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Draper Laboratories (CSDL) and the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL)

  4. Autonomous Environment-Monitoring Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hand, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Autonomous environment-monitoring networks (AEMNs) are artificial neural networks that are specialized for recognizing familiarity and, conversely, novelty. Like a biological neural network, an AEMN receives a constant stream of inputs. For purposes of computational implementation, the inputs are vector representations of the information of interest. As long as the most recent input vector is similar to the previous input vectors, no action is taken. Action is taken only when a novel vector is encountered. Whether a given input vector is regarded as novel depends on the previous vectors; hence, the same input vector could be regarded as familiar or novel, depending on the context of previous input vectors. AEMNs have been proposed as means to enable exploratory robots on remote planets to recognize novel features that could merit closer scientific attention. AEMNs could also be useful for processing data from medical instrumentation for automated monitoring or diagnosis. The primary substructure of an AEMN is called a spindle. In its simplest form, a spindle consists of a central vector (C), a scalar (r), and algorithms for changing C and r. The vector C is constructed from all the vectors in a given continuous stream of inputs, such that it is minimally distant from those vectors. The scalar r is the distance between C and the most remote vector in the same set. The construction of a spindle involves four vital parameters: setup size, spindle-population size, and the radii of two novelty boundaries. The setup size is the number of vectors that are taken into account before computing C. The spindle-population size is the total number of input vectors used in constructing the spindle counting both those that arrive before and those that arrive after the computation of C. The novelty-boundary radii are distances from C that partition the neighborhood around C into three concentric regions (see Figure 1). During construction of the spindle, the changing spindle radius is denoted by h. It is the final value of h, reached before beginning construction on the next spindle, that is denoted by r. During construction of a spindle, if a new vector falls between C and the inner boundary, the vector is regarded as completely familiar and no action is taken. If the new vector falls into the region between the inner and outer boundaries, it is considered unusual enough to warrant the adjustment of C and r by use of the aforementioned algorithms, but not unusual enough to be considered novel. If a vector falls outside the outer boundary, it is considered novel, in which case one of several appropriate responses could be initiation of construction of a new spindle.

  5. Robust Hybrid Control for Autonomous Vehicle Motion Planning

    E-print Network

    Sontag, Eduardo

    Robust Hybrid Control for Autonomous Vehicle Motion Planning Emilio Frazzoli 1 Munther A. Dahleh 2 Eric Feron 3 Abstract The operation of an autonomous vehicle in an unknown, dynamic environment and reachability. For the case of autonomous vehicles, we provide su cient conditions to guarantee reachability

  6. Distributed Collaborative Controlled Autonomous Vehicle Systems over Wireless Networks

    E-print Network

    Baras, John S.

    Distributed Collaborative Controlled Autonomous Vehicle Systems over Wireless Networks Hua Chen, it is desirable yet challenging to develop net- worked systems of autonomous vehicles and sensors in dynamic planning of a group of autonomous vehicles in an adversarial environment. We propose distributed algorithms

  7. Guidance Based Collision Avoidance of Coordinated Nonholonomic Autonomous Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Guidance Based Collision Avoidance of Coordinated Nonholonomic Autonomous Vehicles Xianbo Xiang, as coordinated and cooperative autonomous vehicles can be operated at sea, on land, in the air, in space control; in [3], this method is proposed for two underwater autonomous vehicles (AUVs) following two

  8. GIBBS SAMPLER-BASED PATH PLANNING FOR AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Baras, John S.

    GIBBS SAMPLER-BASED PATH PLANNING FOR AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES: CONVERGENCE ANALYSIS Wei Xi Xiaobo Tan: Markov random fields; Gibbs sampler; Decentralized control; Autonomous vehicles; Convergence 1, autonomous unmanned vehicles (AUVs) are ex- pected to cooperatively perform dangerous or ex- plorative tasks

  9. Autonomous vehicle guidance using analog VLSI neuromorphic sensors

    E-print Network

    Autonomous vehicle guidance using analog VLSI neuromorphic sensors Giacomo Indiveri and Paul step towards the design of a fully autonomous vehicle that will safely navigate using only inputs from of compact low-power autonomous systems. We describe such a system, consisting of a mobile robot equipped

  10. RAVON --The Robust Autonomous Vehicle for Off-road Navigation

    E-print Network

    Berns, Karsten

    RAVON -- The Robust Autonomous Vehicle for Off-road Navigation C. Armbrust, T. Braun, T. Föhst, M Lab at the University of Kaiserslautern started the development of an entirely autonomous vehicle, the Robust Autonomous Vehicle for Off-road Navigation (see figure 1). A sophisticated hazard detection

  11. COOPERATIVE PATH-PLANNING FOR AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES USING DYNAMIC

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Emmanuel

    COOPERATIVE PATH-PLANNING FOR AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES USING DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING 1 Matthew Flint, Marios@ececs.uc.edu Abstract: It is shown how to model a cooperative path planning system for multiple autonomous air vehicles of uncertainty and constraints on movement and computational power. Keywords: Agent, Autonomous Vehicle, Co

  12. A Hybrid Controller for Autonomous Vehicles Driving on Automated Highways #

    E-print Network

    Girault, Alain

    A Hybrid Controller for Autonomous Vehicles Driving on Automated Highways # Alain Girault a a Inria the problem of the hybrid control of autonomous vehicles driving on automated highways. Vehicles with its leading vehicle. Second, we extend this first result to a lane of autonomous vehicles. Third, we

  13. GENETIC ALGORITHMS FOR A SINGLE-TRACK VEHICLE AUTONOMOUS PILOT

    E-print Network

    Vrajitoru, Dana

    GENETIC ALGORITHMS FOR A SINGLE-TRACK VEHICLE AUTONOMOUS PILOT Dana Vrajitoru Intelligent Systems algorithms to an autonomous pilot designed for motorized single-track vehicles (motorcycles). The pilot-agents, autonomous pilot. 1 #12;1 Introduction Single track vehicles (STV) present somewhat different challenges than

  14. A GLOBAL ROAD SCENE ANALYSIS SYSTEM FOR AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A GLOBAL ROAD SCENE ANALYSIS SYSTEM FOR AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES F. Jurie, P. Martinet, J. Gallice L Research on autonomous vehicle navigation from imagery acquired from a vehicle mounted camera are being an on-board camera. 1.1. The PSA-LASMEA autonomous vehicle The foundations of our work were presented

  15. Opportunistic Communications for Networked Controlled Systems of Autonomous Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Baras, John S.

    Opportunistic Communications for Networked Controlled Systems of Autonomous Vehicles Hua Chen of communication connectivity in networks of autonomous vehicles. It is difficult to overcome deep fading from time of autonomous vehicles with energy con- sumption and total operation time constraints in an adversarial

  16. HIERARCHICAL SEARCH STRATEGY FOR A TEAM OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    HIERARCHICAL SEARCH STRATEGY FOR A TEAM OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES Jorge Silva Alberto Speranzon Jo-Robot Systems, Simplex Algorithm, Discrete-Event Systems, Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). 1. INTRODUCTION field, we desire to coordinate the motions of a group of autonomous vehicles with sensing and very

  17. Robust Hybrid Control for Autonomous Vehicle Motion Planning

    E-print Network

    Feron, Eric

    Robust Hybrid Control for Autonomous Vehicle Motion Planning Emilio Frazzoli Munther A. Dahleh y Eric Feron z Abstract The operation of an autonomous vehicle in an unknown, dynamic environment, to the design, development and operation of autonomous aerial, underwater, and ground vehicles. The possibility

  18. Applications of HUGIN to Diagnosis and Control of Autonomous Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Applications of HUGIN to Diagnosis and Control of Autonomous Vehicles Anders L. Madsen1 and Uffe B of HUGIN to solve problems related to diag- nosis and control of autonomous vehicles. The application of diagnosis and con- trol of autonomous vehicles. Based on the HUGIN tool, limited memory influence diagrams

  19. A MOOS MODULE FOR MONITORING ENERGY USAGE OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Idaho, University of

    A MOOS MODULE FOR MONITORING ENERGY USAGE OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES Anthony Kanago, Kevin Roos, James--Tracking the energy usage of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and making accurate data available provides make better decisions regarding resource allocation. I. INTRODUCTION The adoption of autonomous vehicle

  20. Multi-Agent Autonomous Pilot for Motorcycles Dana Vrajitoru

    E-print Network

    Vrajitoru, Dana

    . Introduction The autonomous pilots are an important aspect of devel- oping the vehicles of the future-agent autonomous pilot using perceptual informa- tion. The application aims to control the vehicle in a non to make decisions. In this paper we introduce a simulation of a vehicle with a multi-agent autonomous

  1. Optical Delineation of Benthic Habitat Using an Autonomous

    E-print Network

    Moline, Mark

    Optical Delineation of Benthic Habitat Using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Mark A. Moline. Autonomous underwater vehicles AUVs with active propulsion are especially well suited for studies . Autonomous underwater vehicles AUVs are especially well suited for studies of the coastal ocean because

  2. The autonomic nervous system and Dretske on phenomenal consciousness

    E-print Network

    Ryder, Dan

    1 The autonomic nervous system and Dretske on phenomenal consciousness Dan Ryder1 and C.B. Martin2, the autonomic nervous system (ANS) ought to be conscious - but of course it's not. In this paper, we'll describe a counterexample - the autonomic nervous system - which shows at least that representationalists have a lot of work

  3. State estimation for autonomous flight in cluttered environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacob Willem Langelaan

    2006-01-01

    Safe, autonomous operation in complex, cluttered environments is a critical challenge facing autonomous mobile systems. The research described in this dissertation was motivated by a particularly difficult example of autonomous mobility: flight of a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) through a forest. In cluttered environments (such as forests or natural and urban canyons) signals from navigation beacons such as GPS

  4. Autonomous Shopping Cart Platform for People with Mobility Impairments

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Autonomous Shopping Cart Platform for People with Mobility Impairments Luca Marchetti1 and Daniele the problem of designing an autonomous shopping cart. We assume that the shopping cart is set-up on a unicycle exemplified by a mobile robot that follows the user. An autonomous shopping cart is a simple application

  5. Remote controlling an autonomous car with an iPhone

    E-print Network

    Rojas, Raúl

    Remote controlling an autonomous car with an iPhone Miao Wang, Tinosch Ganjineh B-10-02 March 2010 #12;Remote controlling an autonomous car with an iPhone Miao Wang, Tinosch Ganjineh Free University" is a com- pletely autonomous car developed by the Free University of Berlin which is capable of unmanned

  6. RESEARCH Open Access Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost

    E-print Network

    Herr, Hugh

    RESEARCH Open Access Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost of human walking during load. In this study, the design and testing of an autonomous leg exoskeleton is presented. The aim of the device developed exoskeletons. Methods: We developed an autonomous battery powered exoskeleton that is capable

  7. Autonomous stationkeeping of geosynchronous satellites using a GPS receiver

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. Chao; H. Bernstein; W. H. Boyce; R. J. Perkins

    1992-01-01

    Many space missions are considering the use of a GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver as a means of onboard autonomous ephemeris determination due to its portability, accuracy and low cost. A feasibility study on autonomous stationkeeing using a GPS receiver has been performed. This paper describes three strategies for autonomous stationkeeping with onboard GPS measurements. Algorithms are developed and accuracies

  8. Vulnerability Assessment in Autonomic Networks and Services: A Survey

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Vulnerability Assessment in Autonomic Networks and Services: A Survey Mart´in Barr`ere, R security attacks. We focus in this survey on the assessment of vulnerabilities in autonomic environments to fully integrate this process into the autonomic management plane. Index Terms--Vulnerability assessment

  9. Chronic cervical spinal cord injury and autonomic hyperreflexia in rats

    E-print Network

    Schramm, Lawrence P.

    Chronic cervical spinal cord injury and autonomic hyperreflexia in rats JOHN W. OSBORN, ROBERT F cervical spinal cord injury and autonomic hyperreflexia in rats. Am. J. Physiol. 258(Regulatory Integra spinal cord injury are proneto acute, marked,hypertensive episodes,i.e., autonomic hyperreflexia

  10. Emergence as a General Architecture for Distributed Autonomic Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom De Wolf; Tom Holvoet

    Today's systems are becoming more and more complex, i.e. dis- tributed, situated, open, and dynamic. Autonomic computing aims to deal with the complexity autonomously. Hence, distributed auto- nomic computing systems tend to consist out of autonomous entities because of the increased distribution. This increased complexity and autonomy makes it dicult to build systems with a global coherent behaviour as a

  11. Research issues in autonomous control of tactical UAVs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Chandler; M. Pachter

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes the enabling technologies for an autonomous tactical unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Current technologies are adequate for semi-autonomous UAVs that operate in a relatively structured environment. For tactical UAVs in a rapidly changing uncertain environment the present techniques are inadequate. The essence of autonomous control is rapid in-flight replanning under uncertainty. This is cast as a large optimization

  12. BENEFITS OF AUTONOMOUS SELFING UNDER UNPREDICTABLE POLLINATOR ENVIRONMENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Kalisz; Donna W. Vogler

    2003-01-01

    Pollinator unpredictability favors evolutionary shifts from outcrossing to autonomous selfing, which provides reproductive assurance. Our goal was to quantify the reproductive assurance benefit of autonomous selfing and the stochastic nature of pollinator- mediated pollen receipt using three wild populations of the annual species Collinsia verna (Scrophulariaceae) over three years. The timing of autonomous self-pollination in C. verna ranges from competing

  13. Experiments in remote monitoring and control of autonomous underwater vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Kim; B. A. Moran; J. J. LeonardL; J. G. Bellingham; S. T. Tuohy

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes research on remote monitoring and control of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). This work is part of a larger effort to create autonomous ocean sampling networks (AOSN), a new concept for collecting synoptic oceanographic data. AOSN is based on the operation of small, low cost autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) within an array of moorings that provide communication and

  14. Autonomous navigation and guidance for pinpoint lunar soft landing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiangyu Huang; Dayi Wang

    2007-01-01

    An autonomous navigation and guidance system scheme for pinpoint lunar soft landing is studied in this paper. First, the descriptions of outline of lunar soft landing process are provided. Second, a GNC system scheme for lunar soft landing spacecraft is described. Third, the autonomous navigation based on measurement-updated IMU for lunar soft landing is presented. Fourth, the autonomous explicit guidance

  15. Research of Autonomous landing control of unmanned combat air vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaoyan Li; Zongji Chen

    2003-01-01

    This paper is to present a robust controller design method for developing autonomous landing systems of Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV). We first analyze the characteristic of autonomous landing of UCAV, and put forward its landing performance specifications. Structure singular value mu| synthesis is used to develop autonomous landing systems to accurately follow the pre-designed ideal landing track or online

  16. Animating Autonomous Pedestrians A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment

    E-print Network

    Mohri, Mehryar

    for fully autonomous multi­human simulation in large urban environments. Our pedestrian model is entirely­time simulation can be achieved for well over a thousand autonomous pedestrians. With each pedestrian under his/her own autonomous control, the self­animated characters imbue the virtual world with liveliness, social

  17. Control architectures for autonomous underwater vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimon P. Valavanis; Denis Gracanin; Maja Matijasevic; Ramesh Kolluru; Georgios A. Demetriou

    1997-01-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) share common control problems with other air, land, and water unmanned vehicles. In addition to requiring high-dimensional and computationally intensive sensory data for real-time mission execution, power and communication limitations in an underwater environment make it more difficult to develop a control architecture for an AUV. In this article, the four types of control architectures being

  18. Autonomous biomorphic robots as platforms for sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Tilden, M.; Hasslacher, B.; Mainieri, R.; Moses, J.

    1996-10-01

    The idea of building autonomous robots that can carry out complex and nonrepetitive tasks is an old one, so far unrealized in any meaningful hardware. Tilden has shown recently that there are simple, processor-free solutions to building autonomous mobile machines that continuously adapt to unknown and hostile environments, are designed primarily to survive, and are extremely resistant to damage. These devices use smart mechanics and simple (low component count) electronic neuron control structures having the functionality of biological organisms from simple invertebrates to sophisticated members of the insect and crab family. These devices are paradigms for the development of autonomous machines that can carry out directed goals. The machine then becomes a robust survivalist platform that can carry sensors or instruments. These autonomous roving machines, now in an early stage of development (several proof-of-concept prototype walkers have been built), can be developed so that they are inexpensive, robust, and versatile carriers for a variety of instrument packages. Applications are immediate and many, in areas as diverse as prosthetics, medicine, space, construction, nanoscience, defense, remote sensing, environmental cleanup, and biotechnology.

  19. Fuzzy logic techniques for autonomous vehicle navigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Driankov; A. Saffiotti

    1999-01-01

    Abstract: IntroductionThe goal of autonomous mobile robotics is to build physical systems that canmove purposefully and without human intervention in unmodified environments--- that is, in real-world environments that have not been specificallyengineered for the robot. The development of techniques for autonomousnavigation constitutes one of the major trends in the current research onrobotics. This trend is motivated by the current gap

  20. An intelligent system for an autonomous vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandre M. Parodi; John J. Nitao; Louis S. McTamaney

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes an intelligent full-size autonomous vehicle system which simultaneously performs multiple constraint path planning from a DMA data base and goal properties list, obstacle avoidance, and road following. Path planning and obstacle avoidance were successfully demonstrated in March 1985; road following will be demonstrated in February 1986. These results are made possible by the coupling of several procedural

  1. Path Planning for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clément Pêtrès; Yan Pailhas; Pedro Patrón; Yvan R. Petillot; Jonathan Evans

    2007-01-01

    Efficient path planning algorithms are a crucial issue for modern autonomous underwater vehicles. Classical path planning algorithms in artificial intelligence are not designed to deal with wide continuous environments prone to currents. We present a novel Fast Marching based approach to address the following issues. First, we develop an algorithm we call FM* to efficiently extract a continuous path from

  2. An architecture for reflexive autonomous vehicle control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David W. Payton

    1986-01-01

    We describe a software architecture to support the planning and control requirements of an autonomous land vehicle. This architecture is designed specifically to handle diverse terrain with maximal speed, efficacy and versatility through the use of a library of reflexive strategies specialized to particular needs. A hierarchy of control is built in which lower level modules perform tasks requiring greatest

  3. Terrain models for an autonomous land vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daryl T. Lawton; Tod S. Levitt; Chris McConnell; J. Glicksman

    1986-01-01

    We present an architecture for terrain recognition for an autonomous land vehicle. Basic components of this are a set of data bases for generic object models, perceptual structures, temporary memory for the instantiation of object and relational hypothesis, and a long term memory for storing stable hypothesis which are affixed to the terrain representation. Different inference processes operate over these

  4. Dynamic motion planning of autonomous vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zvi Shiller; Yu-Rwei Gwo

    1991-01-01

    A method for planning the motions of autonomous vehicles moving on general terrains is presented that obtains the geometric path and vehicle speeds that minimize motion time considering vehicle dynamics, terrain topography, obstacles, and surface mobility. The terrain is represented by a smooth cubic B patch, and the geometric path consists of a B spline curve mapped to the surface.

  5. Cooperative control of autonomous underwater vehicles. 

    E-print Network

    Savage, Elizabeth

    2004-09-30

    The proposed project is the simulation of a system to search for air vehicles which have splashed-down in the ocean. The system comprises a group of 10+ autonomous underwater vehicles, which cooperate in order to locate the aircraft. The search...

  6. Autonomous Thermal Control System Omid Ardakanian

    E-print Network

    Waterloo, University of

    Autonomous Thermal Control System Omid Ardakanian David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science in space heating and cooling. Specifically, we use decision making to control the temperature of a building the thermal control prob- lem because it takes time to warm up a house. 2. Related Work Energy resource

  7. Autonomous metal detector robot with monitoring system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hirzi Mohd Ishak; Herdawatie Abdul Kadir; Lim Chain Fat; Mohd Helmy Abd Wahab

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on a monitoring system that uses Global Positioning system (GPS) for an autonomous metal detector robot. The robot movements can be monitored from the computer through a graphical user interface. The main considerations involved in developing the system include controlling the GPS receiver to start the data collection operation, filtering and processing the data to prepare for

  8. Pandora: Autonomous Urban Robotic Reconnaissance System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hagen Schempf; Edward Mutschler; C. Piepgras; J. Warwick; Brian Chemel; Scott K. Boehmke; William Crowley; Robert Fuchs; J. Guyot

    1999-01-01

    Urban settings represent a challenging environment for teleoperated and autonomous robot systems. We present a new design for a highly terrain adaptable robot system, detailing the major mechanical, electrical and control systems. The Pandora robot system is a tracked robot system with self-contained computing, power and wireless communications systems. A sensor suite including stereoscopic and panospheric cameras, light-strippers and acoustic

  9. Coordination and control of multiple autonomous vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Brock; David J. Montana; Andrew Z. Ceranowicz

    1992-01-01

    The DARPA SIMNET project allows hundreds of soldiers to train together in a virtual air, land, and sea environment through a network of interactive simulators. In addition to the manned simulators, the virtual environment is also populated by a large number of autonomous vehicles called semi-automated forces, which are controlled by an operator at a single workstation. The authors address

  10. Adaptive Trajectory Control for Autonomous Helicopters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric N. Johnson; Suresh K. Kannany

    2005-01-01

    For autonomous helicopter ?ight, it is common to separate the ?ight control problem into an inner loop that controls attitude and an outer loop that controls the translational trajectory of the helicopter. In previous work, dynamic inversion and neural-network-based adaptation was used to increase performance of the attitude control system and the method of pseudocontrol hedging (PCH) was used to

  11. Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control

    E-print Network

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control Hoam Chung and S. Shankar Sastry for teams of helicopters. However, the potential for accidents is greatly increased when helicopter teams to the problem of helicopter formations comprised of heterogenous vehicles. The disturbance attenuation property

  12. Multisensor navigation system for an autonomous helicopter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joerg S. Dittrich; Eric N. Johnson

    2002-01-01

    Autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) require avionics systems that enable them to maintain a stable attitude and to follow a desired flight path. This paper considers the design and development of such an avionics system that provides navigational and terrain information to the flight computer of a rotorcraft UAV. The process includes the design and testing of flight hardware and

  13. Onmidirectional vision for an autonomous helicopter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Hrabar; Gaurav S. Sukhatme

    2003-01-01

    We present the design and implementation of an omnidirectionalvision system used for sideways-looking sensingon an autonomous helicopter. To demonstrate the capabilitiesof the system, a visual servoing task was designedwhich required the helicopter to locate and move towardsthe centroid of a number of visual targets. Results are presentedshowing that the task was successfully completedby a Pioneer ground robot equipped with the

  14. Tele-autonomous Guidance for Mobile Robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Borenstein; Y. Koren

    A new technique for the remote guidance of fast mobile robots has been developed and implemented. With this method, the mobile robot follows the general direction prescribed by an operator. However, if the robot encounters an obstacle, it autonomously avoids collision with that obstacle while trying to match the prescribed direction as closely as possible. This novel implementation of shared

  15. Scalable Service Migration in Autonomic Network Environments

    E-print Network

    Stavrakakis, Ioannis

    Autonomic Network Architecture (ANA) (IST-27489) and the IST-FET project SOCIAL- NETS (IST-217141), funded by the European Commission. Konstantinos Oikonomou is with the Department of Informatics, Ionian University, Corfu-mail: okon@ionio.gr. Ioannis Stavrakakis is with the Department of Informatics and Telecommu- nications

  16. Predictive control approach to autonomous vehicle steering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tamas Keviczky; Paolo Falcone; Francesco Borrelli; Jahan Asgari; Davor Hrovat

    2006-01-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) approach to active steering is presented for autonomous vehicle systems. The controller is designed to stabilize a vehicle along a desired path while rejecting wind gusts and fulfilling its physical constraints. Simulation results of a side wind rejection scenario and a double lane change maneuver on slippery surfaces show the benefits of the systematic control

  17. Robotany : autonomous vehicles that care for houseplants

    E-print Network

    Cinnamon, Sara Elizabeth, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Robotany is a system of autonomous robots that act on behalf of houseplants that rest on top of their chassis. Their duty is to do what plants would if they had the gift of mobility - namely to seek out sunlight or water ...

  18. Standard Exemplars for Autonomic Computing Concepts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Bustard; Saadah Hassan; David McSherry; Steven Walmsley

    2006-01-01

    Illustrations are general aids to communication, with those that are particularly effective becoming standard exemplars. For instance, in the computing domain, frequent reference is made to lift controllers, automated bank teller machines, and car parks. So far, there are few equivalent illustrations for autonomic systems. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the requirements for standard exemplars, propose one

  19. Towards automatic verification of autonomous systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reid Simmons; Charles Pecheur; Grama Srinivasan

    2000-01-01

    While autonomous systems offer great promise in terms of capability and flexibility, their reliability is particularly hard to assess. This paper describes research to apply formal verification methods to languages used to develop autonomy software. In particular, we describe tools that automatically convert autonomy software into formal models that are then verified using model checking. This approach has been applied

  20. ODYSSEUS: An Autonomous Mobile Robot (extended abstract)

    E-print Network

    Thrun, Sebastian

    ODYSSEUS: An Autonomous Mobile Robot (extended abstract) R. Simmons, S. Thrun, C. Athanassiou, J. Cheng L. Chrisman, R. Goodwin, G.­T. Hsu, H. Wan School of Computer Science Carnegie­Mellon University is employed to plan for exceptions (e.g. dynamic obstacles, such as walking humans) in advance. 1 Odysseus

  1. Genetic algorithms for autonomous robot navigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theodore W. Manikas; Kaveh Ashenayi; Roger L. Wainwright

    2007-01-01

    Engineers and scientists use instrumentation and measurement equipment to obtain information for specific environments, such as temperature and pressure. This task can be performed manually using portable gauges. However, there are many instances in which this approach may be impractical; when gathering data from remote sites or from potentially hostile environments. In these applications, autonomous navigation methods allow a mobile

  2. Fully autonomous mobile mini-robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buechi, Roland; Rohrer, Daniel; Schmid, Christian; Siegwart, Roland Y.

    1995-12-01

    In recent years, many new designs of micro robots have been developed. Miniaturization is a challenge and most mechanisms designed up to now are not autonomous, i.e. they don't have their intelligence and/or power supply on board. A new fully autonomous miniature mobile robot has been designed in our lab in a final year project. It has been programmed to follow a black line printed on the ground. An autonomous mechatronic system consists at least of a sensor, an actuator, a microprocessor to provide intelligence and a power supply. In our case, the robot's intelligence is based on a PIC16C71 microcontroller that controls its movement. To follow a black line, an infrared emitter and two receivers are placed at the front of the robot. As actuators, two watch motors are used. The gears of the watch's second hand are directly used as wheels to move the system. Two small batteries supply the energy to the motors and the microprocessor as well. The technical details of the mini mobile robot are as follows: dimensions: 20 mm * 8 mm * 15 mm; velocity: 40 mm/s; power consumption: 6 mW. This low power consumption allows the system to move autonomous for about 8 - 10 hours.

  3. Connectionism, Symbol Grounding, and Autonomous Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georg Dorffner; Erich Prem

    1993-01-01

    In this position paper we would like to lay out our view on the importance of grounding andsituatedness for cognitive science. Furthermore we would like to suggest that both aspectsbecome relevant almost automatically if one consequently pursues the original ideas fromconnectionism. Finally we discuss the relevance of grounding for theories of meaning andthe possible contribution of symbol grounding for autonomous

  4. Comparative anatomy of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan

    2011-11-16

    This short review aims to point out the general anatomical features of the autonomic nervous systems of non-mammalian vertebrates. In addition it attempts to outline the similarities and also the increased complexity of the autonomic nervous patterns from fish to tetrapods. With the possible exception of the cyclostomes, perhaps the most striking feature of the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is the similarity between the vertebrate classes. An evolution of the complexity of the system can be seen, with the segmental ganglia of elasmobranchs incompletely connected longitudinally, while well developed paired sympathetic chains are present in teleosts and the tetrapods. In some groups the sympathetic chains may be reduced (dipnoans and caecilians), and have yet to be properly described in snakes. Cranial autonomic pathways are present in the oculomotor (III) and vagus (X) nerves of gnathostome fish and the tetrapods, and with the evolution of salivary and lachrymal glands in the tetrapods, also in the facial (VII) and glossopharyngeal (IX) nerves. PMID:20444653

  5. Towards fully autonomous driving: Systems and algorithms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jesse Levinson; Jake Askeland; Jan Becker; Jennifer Dolson; David Held; Soeren Kammel; J. Zico Kolter; Dirk Langer; Oliver Pink; Vaughan Pratt; Michael Sokolsky; Ganymed Stanek; David Stavens; Alex Teichman; Moritz Werling; Sebastian Thrun

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve autonomous operation of a vehicle in urban situations with unpredictable traffic, several realtime systems must interoperate, including environment perception, localization, planning, and control. In addition, a ro- bust vehicle platform with appropriate sensors, computational hardware, networking, and software infrastructure is essential. We previously published an overview of Junior, Stanford's entry in the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge.(1)

  6. Autonomic adjustments to exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    Autonomic nervous system adjustments to the heart and blood vessels are necessary for mediating the cardiovascular responses required to meet the metabolic demands of working skeletal muscle during exercise. These demands are met by precise exercise intensity-dependent alterations in sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity. The purpose of this review is to examine the contributions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems in mediating specific cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses to exercise. These changes in autonomic outflow are regulated by several neural mechanisms working in concert, including central command (a feed forward mechanism originating from higher brain centers), the exercise pressor reflex (a feed-back mechanism originating from skeletal muscle), the arterial baroreflex (a negative feed-back mechanism originating from the carotid sinus and aortic arch), and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors (a feed-back mechanism from stretch receptors located in the heart and lungs). In addition, arterial chemoreceptors and phrenic afferents from respiratory muscles (i.e., respiratory metaboreflex) are also capable of modulating the autonomic responses to exercise. Our goal is to provide a detailed review of the parasympathetic and sympathetic changes that occur with exercise distinguishing between the onset of exercise and steady-state conditions, when appropriate. In addition, studies demonstrating the contributions of each of the aforementioned neural mechanisms to the autonomic changes and ensuing cardiac and/or vascular responses will be covered. PMID:25880502

  7. The Morpheus ultramodular autonomous underwater vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel M. Smith; P. Edgar An; Ken Holappa; James Whitney; Aaron Burns; Kevin Nelson; Eric Heatzig; Olaf Kempfe; David Kronen; Tom Pantelakis; Ed Henderson; Richard Dunn; Stanley E. Dunn

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Marine Systems Lab at Florida Atlantic University has developed a new ultramodular plastic mini autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), called the Morpheus, for littoral military and coastal oceanographic sampling, survey, and mapping. The name Morpheus was chosen because the Greek god Morpheus could change shape or \\

  8. Semi-Autonomous Intersection Management (Extended Abstract)

    E-print Network

    Au, Tsz-Chiu

    - tures such as adaptive cruise control to make reservations in AIM. We propose a method for vehicles cruise control systems and lane departure warning systems have become widely available as optional@cs.utexas.edu ABSTRACT Autonomous Intersection Management (AIM) is a reservation-based intersection control protocol

  9. Robots in Human Environments: Basic Autonomous Capabilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oussama Khatib; K. Yokoi; Oliver Brock; K. Chang; A. Casal

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses the basic capabilities needed to enable robots to operate in human-populated environments for accomplishing both autonomous tasks and human-guided tasks. These capabilities are key to many new emerging robotic applications in service, construc- tion, field, underwater, and space. An important characteristic of these robots is the \\

  10. Issues in autonomous mobile sensor networks 

    E-print Network

    Dharne, Avinash Gopal

    2009-05-15

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1. Network Modeling and Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2. Robot Localization Using Fuzzy Logic . . . . . . . . . . . 8 B. Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 II MODELING AND CONTROL OF AUTONOMOUS MOBILE... . . . . . 14 B. Main Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 III APPLICATION OF RESULTS TO DESIGN OF FORCE-LAWS : : 31 IV ROBOT LOCALIZATION USING FUZZY LOGIC : : : : : : : : : 36 A. Global Position Estimation...

  11. Implementing Feedback Control for Efficient Autonomic Solutions

    E-print Network

    Pallis, George

    is challenging, since the volatility of the environment and the noise insert local optima and non- linearities Computer 2003) · This implies: System Assessment Monitoring Action #12;12 Feedback Control · How1 Implementing Feedback Control for Efficient Autonomic Solutions on the Grid Rizos Sakellariou

  12. Outlier rejection for autonomous acoustic navigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerome Vaganay; John J. Leonard; James G. Bellingham

    1996-01-01

    Navigation is a critical requirement for the operation of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). In this paper we present acoustic navigation results for the Odyssey II AUV obtained by using a Kalman filter that integrates dead-reckoning with acoustic range measurements made to an array of acoustic beacons pre-deployed in the operating environment. Because spurious acoustic measurements due to multipath propagation are

  13. Progress toward autonomous ocean sampling networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas B. Curtin; James G. Bellingham

    2009-01-01

    The goals of the Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network (AOSN) are reviewed and progress toward those goals is assessed based on results of recent, major field experiments. Major milestones include the automated control of multiple, mobile sensors for weeks using spatial coverage metrics and the transition from engineering a reliable data stream to managing the complexities of decision-making based on the

  14. An Autonomous Submersible Designed for Software Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James G. Bellingham; Robert Beaton; M. Triantafyllou; Landy Shupe

    1989-01-01

    ABSTRAeT An autonomous submersible is being used at h4IT Sea Grant as a platform for exploring approaches to mission planning. The vehicle is small, measuring less than three feet long and weighing 62 lbs. Layered control, which has been implemented for land vehicles at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, will be used to give the vehicle the capability required to

  15. UAV Autonomous Operations for Airborne Science Missions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven S. Wegener; Susan M. Schoenung; Joe Totah; Don Sullivan; Jeremy Frank; Francis Enomoto; Chad Frost; Colin Theodore

    Autonomous UAV science missions hold great promise for improving the productivity of airborne science research and applications. Potential UAV science missions have been reviewed and common autonomy needs have been identified. Preliminary efforts to craft an Intelligent Mission Management architecture for observational autonomy are evolving. Three science missions, along with the architecture, the technology needs and operational requirements for autonomy

  16. Electrically actuated thrusters for autonomous underwater vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Ishak; N. A. A. Manap; M. S. Ahmad; M. R. Arshad

    2010-01-01

    This paper is to present the design, development and prototyping of an electrically actuated thruster as a direct drive propulsion system based on a 3-phase permanent magnet brushless machine for an autonomous underwater vehicle. The non-linear design and analysis of the permanent magnet brushless motor are entirely performed in 2-d finite element method. The motor is then coupled directly to

  17. Social Odometry in Populations of Autonomous Robots

    E-print Network

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    Social Odometry in Populations of Autonomous Robots ´Alvaro Guti´errez1 , Alexandre Campo2 {acampo,fsantos,cpinciro,mdorigo}@ulb.ac.be Abstract. The improvement of odometry systems in collective online social form of odometry is shown to allow a group of robots to both increase the quality

  18. Autonomous distant visual silhouetting of satellites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John McInroy; Lawrence Robertson; R. Erwin

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops a new technique useful for the autonomous distant visual silhouetting of satellites. New statistical straight line snakes (SSLS) prove efficient in finding the silhouette, even in the unilluminated case. The silhouette is composed of straight line segments, which are easy to calculate, fit the straight lines inherent in man-made objects, and lend themselves to further processing (pose

  19. Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chirold D. Epp; Edward A. Robertson; T. Brady

    2008-01-01

    The ALHAT project is funded by NASA to develop an integrated AGNC (autonomous guidance, navigation and control) hardware and software system capable of detecting and avoiding surface hazards and guiding humans and cargo safely, precisely and repeatedly to designated lunar landing sites. There are important interdependencies driving the design of a lunar landing system including such things as lander hazard

  20. ADAPTIVE TRAJECTORY BASED CONTROL FOR AUTONOMOUS HELICOPTERS

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Eric N.

    ADAPTIVE TRAJECTORY BASED CONTROL FOR AUTONOMOUS HELICOPTERS Suresh K. Kannan1 and Eric N. Johnson2, attitude and angular rate commands. The outerloop however augments an attitude correction, that allows tracking of position and velocity in addition to attitude and angular rate. Nomenclature quaternion

  1. Environmental Data Collection Using Autonomous Wave Gliders

    E-print Network

    sea conditions Bulk flux estimates 2-D wave spectra Water temperature profile Autonomous Temperature Relative Humidity Campbell Scientific Temperature Probe Model 109SS Sea water temperature Garmin model ­AIRMAR PB200 weather station Pressure, Temperature, Wind Speed and Direction 10 min averaged

  2. Integrating the autonomous subsystems management process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, Barry R.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which the ranking of the Space Station Module Power Management and Distribution testbed may be achieved and an individual subsystem's internal priorities may be managed within the complete system are examined. The application of these results in the integration and performance leveling of the autonomously managed system is discussed.

  3. AUTONOMOUS BURIED PIPE DETECTION USING NEURAL NETWORKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An autonomous pipe detection algorithm using two independent Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) in two dimensional GPR data has been developed. And a pipe orientation estimation method has been discussed. The first neural network, called step-l ANN, was trained with a waveform reflected from a pipe in...

  4. Deriving Safety Requirements for Autonomous Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Alexander; Tim Kelly; Nicola Herbert

    In any safety engineering effort, deriving safety requirements is a key activity. Doing this for autonomous systems (AS) is challenging. However, several existing techniques can be pulled together to create a reasonable approach The risk of interaction between implemented requirements remains a concern, as does ambiguity about the appropriate boundary of the AS system. We believe these issues can be

  5. APDS: the autonomous pathogen detection system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin J. Hindson; Anthony J. Makarewicz; Ujwal S. Setlur; Bruce D. Henderer; Mary T. McBride; John M. Dzenitis

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and tested a fully autonomous pathogen detection system (APDS) capable of continuously monitoring the environment for airborne biological threat agents. The system was developed to provide early warning to civilians in the event of a bioterrorism incident and can be used at high profile events for short-term, intensive monitoring or in major public buildings or transportation nodes

  6. APDS: The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B Hindson; A Makarewicz; U Setlur; B Henderer; M McBride; J Dzenitis

    2004-01-01

    We have developed and tested a fully autonomous pathogen detection system (APDS) capable of continuously monitoring the environment for airborne biological threat agents. The system was developed to provide early warning to civilians in the event of a bioterrorism incident and can be used at high profile events for short-term, intensive monitoring or in major public buildings or transportation nodes

  7. Autonomous Systems Design A Human Centric Paradox

    E-print Network

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    Harrier VSTOL recovery to ship · Global Hawk strategic surveillance UAV · Rosetta comet interception · Triples effective sensor resolution · Single image electronically re- assembled on ground · Maintains wide-recovery to a Ship · Autonomous recovery and landing on a ship · Pilot initiates and gives permission to proceed

  8. Autonomous power electronic interfaces between microgrids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandeep Bala; Giri Venkataramanan

    2009-01-01

    The use of back-to-back (BTB) voltage source converters (VSCs) to interface large scale asynchronous ac power systems is well established. BTB VSCs also provide a convenient means to interface small scale microgrids and the utility power grid. The relatively small size of such interfaces and broad scale of their application would mandate autonomous fast operation based on the health of

  9. Multiple independent autonomous hydraulic oscillators driven by a common gravity head.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Self-switching microfluidic circuits that are able to perform biochemical experiments in a parallel and autonomous manner, similar to instruction-embedded electronics, are rarely implemented. Here, we present design principles and demonstrations for gravity-driven, integrated, microfluidic pulsatile flow circuits. With a common gravity head as the only driving force, these fluidic oscillator arrays realize a wide range of periods (0.4?s-2?h) and flow rates (0.10-63??l?min(-1)) with completely independent timing between the multiple oscillator sub-circuits connected in parallel. As a model application, we perform systematic, parallel analysis of endothelial cell elongation response to different fluidic shearing patterns generated by the autonomous microfluidic pulsed flow generation system. PMID:26073884

  10. Apoptosis and Self-Destruct: A Contribution to Autonomic Agents?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Autonomic Computing (AC), a self-managing systems initiative based on the biological metaphor of the autonomic nervous system, is increasingly gaining momentum as the way forward in designing reliable systems. Agent technologies have been identified as a key enabler for engineering autonomicity in systems, both in terms of retrofitting autonomicity into legacy systems and designing new systems. The AC initiative provides an opportunity to consider other biological systems and principles in seeking new design strategies. This paper reports on one such investigation; utilizing the apoptosis metaphor of biological systems to provide a dynamic health indicator signal between autonomic agents.

  11. The Autonomic Brain: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis for Central Processing of Autonomic Function

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Karin; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is of paramount importance for daily life. Its regulatory action on respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, endocrine, and many other systems is controlled by a number of structures in the CNS. While the majority of these nuclei and cortices have been identified in animal models, neuroimaging studies have recently begun to shed light on central autonomic processing in humans. In this study, we used activation likelihood estimation to conduct a meta-analysis of human neuroimaging experiments evaluating central autonomic processing to localize (1) cortical and subcortical areas involved in autonomic processing, (2) potential subsystems for the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS, and (3) potential subsystems for specific ANS responses to different stimuli/tasks. Across all tasks, we identified a set of consistently activated brain regions, comprising left amygdala, right anterior and left posterior insula and midcingulate cortices that form the core of the central autonomic network. While sympathetic-associated regions predominate in executive- and salience-processing networks, parasympathetic regions predominate in the default mode network. Hence, central processing of autonomic function does not simply involve a monolithic network of brain regions, instead showing elements of task and division specificity. PMID:23785162

  12. Systems, methods and apparatus for modeling, specifying and deploying policies in autonomous and autonomic systems using agent-oriented software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Penn, Joaquin (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments, an agent-oriented specification modeled with MaCMAS, is analyzed, flaws in the agent-oriented specification modeled with MaCMAS are corrected, and an implementation is derived from the corrected agent-oriented specification. Described herein are systems, method and apparatus that produce fully (mathematically) tractable development of agent-oriented specification(s) modeled with methodology fragment for analyzing complex multiagent systems (MaCMAS) and policies for autonomic systems from requirements through to code generation. The systems, method and apparatus described herein are illustrated through an example showing how user formulated policies can be translated into a formal mode which can then be converted to code. The requirements-based programming systems, method and apparatus described herein may provide faster, higher quality development and maintenance of autonomic systems based on user formulation of policies.

  13. Navigation strategies for multiple autonomous mobile robots moving in formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. K. C.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of deriving navigation strategies for a fleet of autonomous mobile robots moving in formation is considered. Here, each robot is represented by a particle with a spherical effective spatial domain and a specified cone of visibility. The global motion of each robot in the world space is described by the equations of motion of the robot's center of mass. First, methods for formation generation are discussed. Then, simple navigation strategies for robots moving in formation are derived. A sufficient condition for the stability of a desired formation pattern for a fleet of robots each equipped with the navigation strategy based on nearest neighbor tracking is developed. The dynamic behavior of robot fleets consisting of three or more robots moving in formation in a plane is studied by means of computer simulation.

  14. The role of anticipation in adaptive embodied autonomous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prem, Erich

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the role that anticipation plays in adaptive autonomous systems. The emphasis will be on epistemological consequences of adaptation in practical robotic systems as they are currently developed in the new field of embodied artificial intelligence. The autonomy of physical robots is peculiar, because it consists in behavioral autonomy as well as epistemic autonomy. While the former is a problem that is often addressed, the latter poses difficult foundational questions for the field. We study the role that anticipation plays in this context. It is argued that embodied systems are a particularly interesting case for the study of epistemic autonomy. This is due to the fact that the adaptation process in robots generates a special form of representation that indicates the outcome of interaction and thus can support action selection schemes. The role of these representations and their epistemic and ontological consequences for the system as well as epistemological consequences for system observers are investigated.

  15. Autonomous kinematic calibration for robot with force sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongbo; Xiong, Youlun

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents an autonomous calibration procedure for identifying robot geometric parameters using a wrist force sensor, which guides the robot end effector to track the section contour of an accurately cylindrical workpiece and to find its center. The information from the wrist sensor is needed to determine the motion direction for the end effector and to generate control strategy (hybrid control law of position and force), meanwhile the force vector is required to correct the deformation of the manipulator, which maps in turn into the joint differential vector. The system of constraint equation is in fact nonlinear, and can be linearized for the constraint surface of the cylinder. Simulation has been performed for a PUMA 760 robot and the result shows that the robot positioning accuracy can be improved to the level of the repeatability by the proposed calibration method.

  16. The Conductor of the Autonomic Orchestra

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron I.

    2012-01-01

    Bad bedfellows – autonomic dysfunction, inflammation, and diabetes! Are they related? How? Evidence suggests the activation of inflammatory cytokines like IL-6 and TNF? in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and that the inflammatory change correlates with abnormalities in sympathovagal balance. Dysfunction of the autonomic system predicts cardiovascular risk and sudden death in patients with type 2 diabetes. It occurs in prediabetes, providing opportunities for early intervention. The importance of recognizing autonomic dysfunction as a predictor of morbidity and mortality with intensification of treatment suggests that all patients with type 2 diabetes at onset, and those with type 1 diabetes after 5?years should be screened for autonomic imbalance. These tests can be performed at the bedside with real time output of information – within the scope of the practicing physician – facilitates diagnosis and allows the application of sound strategies for management. The window of opportunity for aggressive control of all the traditional risk factors for cardiovascular events or sudden death with intensification of therapy is with short duration diabetes, the absence of cardiovascular disease, and a history of severe hypoglycemic events. To this list we can now add autonomic dysfunction and neuropathy, which have become the most powerful predictors of risk for mortality. It seems prudent that practitioners should be encouraged to become familiar with this information and apply risk stratification in clinical practice. After all, how difficult is it to ask patients “do you have numb feet?” and to determine their heart rate variability – it could be lifesaving. Ultimately methods to reset the hypothalamus and the inflammatory cascade are needed if we are to impact the care of patients with this compendium of conditions. PMID:22737143

  17. Autonomic Nervous System and Immune System Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, MJ; Ganta, CK

    2015-01-01

    The present review assesses the current state of literature defining integrative autonomic-immune physiological processing, focusing on studies that have employed electrophysiological, pharmacological, molecular biological and central nervous system experimental approaches. Central autonomic neural networks are informed of peripheral immune status via numerous communicating pathways, including neural and non-neural. Cytokines and other immune factors affect the level of activity and responsivity of discharges in sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves innervating diverse targets. Multiple levels of the neuraxis contribute to cytokine-induced changes in efferent parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve outflows, leading to modulation of peripheral immune responses. The functionality of local sympathoimmune interactions depends on the microenvironment created by diverse signaling mechanisms involving integration between sympathetic nervous system neurotransmitters and neuromodulators; specific adrenergic receptors; and the presence or absence of immune cells, cytokines and bacteria. Functional mechanisms contributing to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway likely involve novel cholinergic-adrenergic interactions at peripheral sites, including autonomic ganglion and lymphoid targets. Immune cells express adrenergic and nicotinic receptors. Neurotransmitters released by sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve endings bind to their respective receptors located on the surface of immune cells and initiate immune-modulatory responses. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the autonomic nervous system are instrumental in orchestrating neuroimmune processes, although additional studies are required to understand dynamic and complex adrenergic-cholinergic interactions. Further understanding of regulatory mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous, parasympathetic nervous, and immune systems is critical for understanding relationships between chronic disease development and immune-associated changes in autonomic nervous system function. PMID:24944034

  18. Visual servoing of an autonomous helicopter in urban areas using feature tracking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis Mejias; Srikanth Saripalli; Pascual Campoy; Gaurav S. Sukhatme

    2006-01-01

    We present the design and implementation of a vision-based feature tracking system for an autonomous helicopter. Visual sensing is used for estimating the position and velocity of features in the image plane (urban features like windows) in order to generate velocity references for the flight control. These visual-based references are\\u000athen combined with GPS-positioning references to navigate towards these features

  19. A rapid path planner for autonomous ground vehicle using section collision detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhe Leng; Min-zhou Dong; Gang-qi Dong; Jie Yan

    2009-01-01

    Rapid path planner plays an important role in autonomous ground vehicle (AGV) operation. Depending on the non-holonomic kinematics\\u000a constraints of AGV, its path planning problem is discussed. Since rapidly-exploring random tree (RRT) can directly take non-holonomic\\u000a constraints into consideration, it is selected to solve this problem. By applying extra constraints on the movement, the generation\\u000a of new configuration in RRT

  20. Autonomous Robot Path Planning Based on Swarm Intelligence and Stream Functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chengyu Hu; Xiangning Wu; Qingzhong Liang; Yongji Wang

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses a new approach to navigate mobile robot in static or dynamic surroundings based on particle swarm optimization\\u000a (PSO) and stream functions (or potential flows). Stream functions, which are introduced from hydrodynamics, are employed to\\u000a guide the autonomous robot to evade the obstacles. PSO is applied to generate each optimal step from initial position to the\\u000a goal location;

  1. Self-powered autonomous wireless sensor node using vibration energy harvesting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Torah; P. Glynne-Jones; M. Tudor; T. O'Donnell; S. Roy; S. Beeby

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the development and implementation of an energy aware autonomous wireless condition monitoring sensor system (ACMS) powered by ambient vibrations. An electromagnetic (EM) generator has been designed to harvest sufficient energy to power a radio-frequency (RF) linked accelerometer-based sensor system. The ACMS is energy aware and will adjust the measurement\\/transmit duty cycle according to the available energy; this

  2. Characterization of autonomous thyroid adenoma: metabolism, gene expression, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Deleu, S; Allory, Y; Radulescu, A; Pirson, I; Carrasco, N; Corvilain, B; Salmon, I; Franc, B; Dumont, J E; Van Sande, J; Maenhaut, C

    2000-02-01

    Fifty-one in vivo characterized autonomous single adenomas have been studied for functional parameters in vitro, for gene and protein expression and for pathology, and have been systematically compared to the corresponding extratumoral quiescent tissue. The adenomas were characterized by a high level of iodide trapping that corresponds to a high level of Na+ /iodide symporter gene expression, a high thyroperoxidase mRNA and protein content, and a low H2O2 generation. This explains the iodide metabolism characteristics demonstrated before, ie, the main cause of the "hot" character of the adenomas is their increased iodide transport. The adenomas spontaneously secreted higher amounts of thyroid hormone than the quiescent tissue and in agreement with previous in vivo data, this secretion could be further enhanced by thyrotropin (TSH). Inositol uptake was also increased but there was no spontaneous increase of the generation of inositol phosphates and this metabolism could be further activated by TSH. These positive responses to TSH are in agreement with the properties of TSH-stimulated thyroid cells in vitro and in vivo. They are compatible with the characteristics of mutated TSH receptors whose constitutive activation accounts for the majority of autonomous thyroid adenomas in Europe. The number of cycling cells, as evaluated by MIB-1 immunolabeling was low but increased in comparison with the corresponding quiescent tissue or normal tissue. The cycling cells are observed mainly at the periphery; there was very little apoptosis. Both findings account for the slow growth of these established adenomas. On the other hand, by thyroperoxidase immunohistochemistry, the whole lesion appeared hyperfunctional, which demonstrates a dissociation of mitogenic and functional stimulations. Thyroglobulin, TSH receptor, and E-cadherin mRNA accumulations were not modified in a consistent way, which confirms the near-constitutive expression of the corresponding genes in normal differentiated tissue. On the contrary, early immediate genes expressions (c-myc, NGF1B, egr 1, genes of the fos and jun families) were decreased. This may be explained by the proliferative heterogeneity of the lesion and the previously described short, biphasic expression of these genes when induced by mitogenic agents. All the characteristics of the autonomous adenomas can therefore be explained by the effect of the known activating mutations of genes coding for proteins of the TSH cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) cascade, all cells being functionally activated while only those at the periphery multiply. The reason of this heterogeneity is unknown. PMID:10718549

  3. Autonomous micromotor based on catalytically pneumatic behavior of balloon-like MnO(x)-graphene crumples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueli; Wu, Guan; Lan, Tian; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-11

    A novel autonomous micromotor, based on catalytically pneumatic behaviour of balloon-like MnOx-graphene crumples, has been synthesized via an ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method. Through catalytic decomposition of H2O2 into O2, the gas accumulated in a confined space and was released to generate a strong force to push the micromotor. PMID:24854005

  4. Autonomous and Autonomic Systems: A Paradigm for Future Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walter F.; Hinchey, Michael G.; Rash, James L.; Rouff, Christopher A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA increasingly will rely on autonomous systems concepts, not only in the mission control centers on the ground, but also on spacecraft and on rovers and other assets on extraterrestrial bodies. Automomy enables not only reduced operations costs, But also adaptable goal-driven functionality of mission systems. Space missions lacking autonomy will be unable to achieve the full range of advanced mission objectives, given that human control under dynamic environmental conditions will not be feasible due, in part, to the unavoidably high signal propagation latency and constrained data rates of mission communications links. While autonomy cost-effectively supports accomplishment of mission goals, autonomicity supports survivability of remote mission assets, especially when human tending is not feasible. Autonomic system properties (which ensure self-configuring, self-optimizing self-healing, and self-protecting behavior) conceptually may enable space missions of a higher order into any previously flown. Analysis of two NASA agent-based systems previously prototyped, and of a proposed future mission involving numerous cooperating spacecraft, illustrates how autonomous and autonomic system concepts may be brought to bear on future space missions.

  5. Autonomous laser accelerometer for platforms and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkoumian, Baghrat V.

    2007-10-01

    New laser accelerometer is presented. Proved method consists in the using of standing wave of coherent radiation in the linear resonator as the sensitive element of the accelerated movement measurement. There are not in new accelerometer named autonomous resonatory device (ARD) any matter parameters altering during movement of the resonator, attached with object to be measured. It provides the best accuracy in the measurements. Volume part of generalized function of eikonal for rectangle laser resonator is derived. Imaginary quantity of the eikonal provides the visible altering of amplitude of interacting field of baghron in space. Optical schemes of the prototypes are presented. ARD can be applied as measuring transducers for control of movement in demanded operating regions and it provides autonomous measurement of acceleration of actual motion at free falling of object as against to all other accelerometers.

  6. Autonomous Instrument Placement for Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, P. Chris; Maimone, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous Instrument Placement (AutoPlace) is onboard software that enables a Mars Exploration Rover to act autonomously in using its manipulator to place scientific instruments on or near designated rock and soil targets. Prior to the development of AutoPlace, it was necessary for human operators on Earth to plan every motion of the manipulator arm in a time-consuming process that included downlinking of images from the rover, analysis of images and creation of commands, and uplinking of commands to the rover. AutoPlace incorporates image analysis and planning algorithms into the onboard rover software, eliminating the need for the downlink/uplink command cycle. Many of these algorithms are derived from the existing groundbased image analysis and planning algorithms, with modifications and augmentations for onboard use.

  7. Autonomous Flight Safety System Road Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James C.; Zoemer, Roger D.; Forney, Chris S.

    2005-01-01

    On February 3, 2005, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) conducted the first Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) test on a moving vehicle -- a van driven around the KSC industrial area. A subset of the Phase III design was used consisting of a single computer, GPS receiver, and UPS antenna. The description and results of this road test are described in this report.AFSS is a joint KSC and Wallops Flight Facility project that is in its third phase of development. AFSS is an independent subsystem intended for use with Expendable Launch Vehicles that uses tracking data from redundant onboard sensors to autonomously make flight termination decisions using software-based rules implemented on redundant flight processors. The goals of this project are to increase capabilities by allowing launches from locations that do not have or cannot afford extensive ground-based range safety assets, to decrease range costs, and to decrease reaction time for special situations.

  8. Performance Simulation of Autonomous Solar Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yanping; Strikwerda, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of a new type of autonomous solar navigation system is analyzed in this paper. Such efficient autonomous navigation systems will reduce operation costs and alleviate the Deep Space Network workload in future space missions. The method is demonstrated by applying it to the STEREO mission. Orbit determination is simulated through the use of the mission-defined trajectory profile and solar angular data acquired by the on-board science instruments currently being considered. The study shows that the orbit solution derived by this new type of solar navigation system can satisfy the mission's navigation requirements; the position uncertainties obtained in the simulations are well below the mission allowable values, and are comparable to the results obtained with the conventional Doppler tracking system in some cases.

  9. Autonomous Fock state stabilization by reservoir engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, E.; Vlastakis, B.; Heeres, R.; Vool, U.; Leghtas, Z.; Frunzio, L.; Kirchmair, G.; Mirrahimi, M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2014-03-01

    Quantum computing requires the ability to create and maintain quantum states. However, due to persistent coupling to the environment a quantum state suffers from decoherence. In order to fight decoherence physicists have come up with different approaches such as circuit based quantum error correction and reservoir engineering. Here we present a reservoir engineering scheme which autonomously stabilizes Fock states in a superconducting waveguide cavity. We will discuss how a vertical transmon qubit is used as a nonlinear coupler between two superconducting waveguide cavities. This nonlinear coupling creates a direct, strong-dispersive interaction between the two cavities. We utilize this interaction to autonomously stabilize Fock states by applying classical continuous wave drives. We present preliminary experimental results. Work supported by ARO and IARPA.

  10. Autonomous RPRV Navigation, Guidance and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Donald E.; Myers, Thomas T.; Zellner, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Dryden Flight Research Center has the responsibility for flight testing of advanced remotely piloted research vehicles (RPRV) to explore highly maneuverable aircraft technology, and to test advanced structural concepts, and related aeronautical technologies which can yield important research results with significant cost benefits. The primary purpose is to provide the preliminary design of an upgraded automatic approach and landing control system and flight director display to improve landing performance and reduce pilot workload. A secondary purpose is to determine the feasibility of an onboard autonomous navigation, orbit, and landing capability for safe vehicle recovery in the event of loss of telemetry uplink communication with the vehicles. The current RPRV approach and landing method, the proposed automatic and manual approach and autoland system, and an autonomous navigation, orbit, and landing system concept which is based on existing operational technology are described.

  11. Multiple Autonomous Discrete Event Controllers for Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, Timothy C.

    2003-01-01

    The Multiple Autonomous Discrete Event Controllers for Constellations (MADECC) project is an effort within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Information Systems Division to develop autonomous positioning and attitude control for constellation satellites. It will be accomplished using traditional control theory and advanced coordination algorithms developed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). This capability will be demonstrated in the discrete event control test-bed located at JHU/APL. This project will be modeled for the Leonardo constellation mission, but is intended to be adaptable to any constellation mission. To develop a common software architecture. the controllers will only model very high-level responses. For instance, after determining that a maneuver must be made. the MADECC system will output B (Delta)V (velocity change) value. Lower level systems must then decide which thrusters to fire and for how long to achieve that (Delta)V.

  12. Autonomously moving nanorods at a viscous interface.

    PubMed

    Dhar, P; Fischer, Th M; Wang, Y; Mallouk, T E; Paxton, W F; Sen, A

    2006-01-01

    We study the autonomous motion of catalytic nanorods in Gibbs monolayers. The catalytic activity of the rods on a hydrogen peroxide aqueous subphase gives rise to anomalous translational and rotational diffusion. The rods perform a Levy-walk superdiffusive motion that can be decomposed into thermal orientation fluctuations and an active motion of the rods with a constant velocity along their long axis. Since interfacial dissipation increases relative to bulk phase dissipation when miniaturizing the size of objects moving in the interface, the autonomous nanorods allow for precise measurements of surface shear viscosities as low as a few nN s/m. The cross over from active motion toward passive diffusion when increasing the surfactant concentration is explained by a loss of friction asymmetry of the rods. PMID:16402789

  13. Receding horizon control of autonomous aerial vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Bellingham; Arthur Richards

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to trajectory optimization for autonomous fixed-wing aerial vehicles performing large-scale maneuvers. The main result is a planner which designs nearly minimum time planar trajectories to a goal, constrained by no-fly zones and the vehicle's maximum speed and turning rate. Mixed-Integer Linear Programming (MILP) is used for the optimization, and is well suited to trajectory

  14. Trends in biorobotic autonomous undersea vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Promode R. Bandyopadhyay

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of biorobotic autonomous undersea vehicle (AUV) as a focus for discipline-integrated research in the context of underwater propulsion and maneuvering is considered within the confines of the Biorobotics Program in the Office of Naval Research. The significant advances in three disciplines, namely the biology-inspired high-lift unsteady hydrodynamics, artificial muscle technology and neuroscience-based control, are discussed in an effort

  15. A beacon navigation method for autonomous vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CLARE D. MCGILLEM; T. S. Rappaport

    1989-01-01

    A method for navigating autonomous vehicles is presented. Based on the three-point problem from land surveying, this navigational technique makes use of angular measurements between fixed beacon pairs. Extremely accurate position information can be obtained over a large area with simple trigonometric or analytic geometry calculations. Typical worst-case errors are of the order of 10 cm throughout a 2500 m2

  16. Cooperative Control for Autonomous Air Vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Passino; Marios Polycarpou; David Jacques; Meir Pachter; Yang Liu; Yanli Yang; Matt Flint; Michael Baum

    The main objective of this research is to develop and evaluate the performance of strategies for cooperative control of autonomous\\u000a air vehicles that seek to gather information about a dynamic target environment, evade threats, and coordinate strikes against\\u000a targets. The air vehicles are equipped with sensors to view a limited region of the environment they are visiting, and are\\u000a able

  17. Continuous-curvature paths for autonomous vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winston Nelson

    1989-01-01

    The paths followed by autonomously guided vehicles (AGVs) are generally made up of line and circular-arc segments. For most AGVs, the steering functions required to keep the position and heading of the cart continuously aligned with such paths have discontinuities at the line-arc-line transitions points, because the curvature of the path is discontinuous at these points. For applications where continuous-curvature

  18. Autonomous Modal Parameter Estimation: Statisical Considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Allemang; A. W. Phillips; D. L. Brown

    \\u000a Autonomous modal parameter estimations may involve sorting a large number of possible solutions to develop one consistent\\u000a estimate of the modal parameters (frequency, damping, mode shape, and modal scaling). Once the final, consistent estimate\\u000a of modal parameters is established, this estimate can be compared to related solutions from the larger set of solutions to\\u000a develop statistical attributes for the final,

  19. Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Conference, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This document consists of the presentation submitted at the Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (ARD) Conference. It contains three volumes: ARD hardware technology; ARD software technology; and ARD operations. The purpose of this conference is to identify the technologies required for an on orbit demonstration of the ARD, assess the maturity of these technologies, and provide the necessary insight for a quality assessment of the programmatic management, technical, schedule, and cost risks.

  20. Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Conference, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This document consists of the presentation submitted at the Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (ARD) Conference. The document contains three volumes: ARD hardware technology; ARD software technology; and ARD operations. The purpose of this conference is to identify the technologies required for an on orbit demonstration of ARD, assess the maturity of these technologies, and provide the necessary insight for a quality assessment of programmatic management, technical, schedule, and cost risks.

  1. GRAPHIC illustrations of autonomic computing concepts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David W. Bustard; Sa’adah Hassan; David Mcsherry; Steven Walmsley

    2007-01-01

    Illustrations are general aids to communication, with those that are particularly effective becoming standard exemplars. In\\u000a the computing domain, for instance, frequent reference is made to lift controllers, automated bank teller machines, and car\\u000a parks. So far, there are few equivalent illustrations for autonomic systems. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the requirements\\u000a for standard exemplars, propose an

  2. Autonomous Navigation System Based on GPS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhaoxiang Liu; Gang Liu

    2007-01-01

    An autonomous navigation system based on GPS was developed. The system was composed of the under-controlling part and the\\u000a decision-making part; the two parts communicated with each other via wireless data transmission modules. The under-controlling\\u000a part included the ARM7 microprocessor, the wireless data transmission module, the GPS receiver and the mobile quadricycle.\\u000a The decision-making part included the laptop and the

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan Ziegler

    2001-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is associated with a markedly reduced quality of life and poor prognosis. The manifestations\\u000a of DAN cause multiple symptoms and involve the 1) cardiovascular system: resting tachycardia, reduced heart rate variability\\u000a and circadian rhythm of heart rate and blood pressure, painless myocardial ischemia\\/ infarction, orthostatic hypotension,\\u000a exercise intolerance, perioperative instability, sudden death; 2) respiratory system: reduced

  4. Adaptive autonomous underwater vehicles for littoral surveillance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephanie Kemna; Michael J. Hamilton; David T. Hughes; Kevin D. LePage

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) have gained more interest in recent years for military as well as civilian applications.\\u000a One potential application of AUVs is for the purpose of undersea surveillance. As research into undersea surveillance using\\u000a AUVs progresses, issues arise as to how an AUV acquires, acts on, and shares information about the undersea battle space.\\u000a These issues naturally touch

  5. [Headache in autonomic-vascular dystonia].

    PubMed

    Kukhtevich, I I; Zhivotoshchuk, V S

    1989-01-01

    The clinical variants of headaches were observed in 83 patients with autonomic vascular dystonia. The diagnostic table was designed to differentiate between the latter and migraine. Bulbar conjunctiva and retinal microcirculation studies revealed multiple morphological and hemodynamic changes. These were especially marked during painful paroxysms. The substantial increase in red blood cell aggregation rates was observed within the entire headache exacerbation. The data provide grounds for using adrenergic blockers, antiaggregatory and venotonic drugs in these conditions. PMID:2609821

  6. Autonomic nervous system function in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrich, J; Schmitz, T; Saft, C; Postert, T; Kraus, P; Epplen, J; Przuntek, H; Agelink, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether Huntington's disease (HD) affects autonomic nervous system (ANS) functioning. Methods: Twenty patients with HD who had positive genetic test results underwent standardised ANS function tests including sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) of the hands and feet, measurements of heart rate variability (HRV), both during five minutes of resting and deep respiration, and an orthostatic blood pressure test. Patients were classified according to the motor subscale of the unified Huntington's disease rating scale (UHDRS; mean (SD) score 26.4 (13.6)) and divided into two subgroups: UHDRS <25 points (early stages, E-HD) and UHDRS ?25 points (mid stages, M-HD). Autonomic indices were compared with those obtained for a group of well matched healthy controls (n=60). Results: Overall, patients showed lower HRV indices than controls. Multivariate analysis with the independent factor of "group" (controls, E-HD, M-HD) showed a significant group effect on both the high frequency power (F=4.32, p=0.017) and the coefficient of variation (F=4.23, p=0.018), indicating a significant reduction in vagal modulation in the M-HD group. There was a shift in autonomic neurocardiac balance towards sympathetic predominance in the M-HD group compared with controls (F=2.89, p=0.062). Moreover, we found an inverse correlation between the severity of clinical HD symptoms (assessed by the UHDRS) and the modulation of cardiovagal activity (p=0.028). Vagal dysregulation was present in two patients; one of them also showed a pathological blood pressure test and a latency prolongation in the SSRs of the hands. Two other patients had pathologically reduced SSR amplitudes. Only patients of the M-HD group were affected. Conclusion: Autonomic dysfunction is present even in the middle stages of HD and affects both the sympathetic and parasympathetic branch of the ANS. PMID:12023413

  7. MARVIN siegt im Millennial Event: Autonome Flugroboter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musial, Marek; Brandenburg, Uwe Wolfgang; Hommel, Günter

    2002-01-01

    Der fliegende Roboter MARVIN ist ein mit Bordrechner und Sensoren aufgerüsteter Modellhelikopter, der in Funkverbindung mit einer bodengestützten Rechneranlage autonom operiert. Er wurde zwischen 1997 und 2000 in Projekt-Lehr-veranstaltungen an der TU Berlin gebaut. MARVIN schlug in einem internationalen Wettbewerb für fliegende Roboter die nordamerikanische Konkurrenz. Die für MARVIN neu entworfene Technik könnte für zahlreiche Aufgaben kommerziell eingesetzt werden. Doch die Entwicklung zur industriellen Serienreife scheiterte bislang an wirtschaftlichen und gesetzlichen Hemmnissen.

  8. Autonomous Spacecraft Communication Interface for Load Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; May, Ryan D.; Morris, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based controllers can remain in continuous communication with spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) with near-instantaneous communication speeds. This permits near real-time control of all of the core spacecraft systems by ground personnel. However, as NASA missions move beyond LEO, light-time communication delay issues, such as time lag and low bandwidth, will prohibit this type of operation. As missions become more distant, autonomous control of manned spacecraft will be required. The focus of this paper is the power subsystem. For present missions, controllers on the ground develop a complete schedule of power usage for all spacecraft components. This paper presents work currently underway at NASA to develop an architecture for an autonomous spacecraft, and focuses on the development of communication between the Mission Manager and the Autonomous Power Controller. These two systems must work together in order to plan future load use and respond to unanticipated plan deviations. Using a nominal spacecraft architecture and prototype versions of these two key components, a number of simulations are run under a variety of operational conditions, enabling development of content and format of the messages necessary to achieve the desired goals. The goals include negotiation of a load schedule that meets the global requirements (contained in the Mission Manager) and local power system requirements (contained in the Autonomous Power Controller), and communication of off-plan disturbances that arise while executing a negotiated plan. The message content is developed in two steps: first, a set of rapid-prototyping "paper" simulations are preformed; then the resultant optimized messages are codified for computer communication for use in automated testing.

  9. Visual Planning for Autonomous Mobile Robot Navigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio Marín-hernández; Michel Devy; Víctor Ayala-ramírez

    2005-01-01

    \\u000a For autonomous mobile robots following a planned path, self-localization is a very important task. Cumulative errors derived\\u000a from the different noisy sensors make it absolutely necessary. Absolute robot localization is commonly made measuring relative\\u000a distance from the robot to previously learnt landmarks on the environment. Landmarks could be interest points, colored objects,\\u000a or rectangular regions as posters or emergency signs,

  10. Autonomous navigation for structured exterior environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pletta, J B

    1993-12-01

    The Telemanaged Mobile Security Station (TMSS) was developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the role of mobile robotics in exterior perimeter security systems. A major feature of the system is its capability to perform autonomous patrols of the security site`s network of roads. Perimeter security sites are well known, structured environments; the locations of the roads, buildings, and fences are relatively static. A security robot has the advantage of being able to learn its new environment prior to autonomous travel. The TMSS robot combines information from a microwave beacon system and on-board dead reckoning sensors to determine its location within the site. The operator is required to teleoperate the robot in a teach mode over all desired paths before autonomous operations can commence. During this teach phase, TMSS stores points from its position location system at two meter intervals. This map data base is used for planning paths and for reference during path following. Details of the position location and path following systems will be described along with system performance and recommendations for future enhancements.

  11. SOLON: An autonomous vehicle mission planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudziak, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The State-Operator Logic Machine (SOLON) Planner provides an architecture for effective real-time planning and replanning for an autonomous vehicle. The highlights of the system, which distinguish it from other AI-based planners that have been designed previously, are its hybrid application of state-driven control architecture and the use of both schematic representations and logic programming for the management of its knowledge base. SOLON is designed to provide multiple levels of planning for a single autonomous vehicle which is supplied with a skeletal, partially-specified mission plan at the outset of the vehicle's operations. This mission plan consists of a set of objectives, each of which will be decomposable by the planner into tasks. These tasks are themselves comparatively complex sets of actions which are executable by a conventional real-time control system which does not perform planning but which is capable of making adjustments or modifications to the provided tasks according to constraints and tolerances provided by the Planner. The current implementation of the SOLON is in the form of a real-time simulation of the Planner module of an Intelligent Vehicle Controller (IVC) on-board an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). The simulation is embedded within a larger simulator environment known as ICDS (Intelligent Controller Development System) operating on a Symbolics 3645/75 computer.

  12. Gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumor of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed N.; Al-Garni, Ayed A.; Al-Momen, Sami A.; Al-Nahawi, Mamdouh; Abu Subaih, Jawad

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 32 Final Diagnosis: Gastrintestinal Autonomic Nerve Tumor (GANT) Symptoms: anemia • anorexia • fatigue • fever • hearburn • nausea • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumors (GANT) are extremely rare tumors that are related to gastrointestinal autonomic nervous plexuses. They are distinguished from stromal tumors by their unique ultrastructural features. Hence, their diagnosis is usually made on electron microscopy and immunohistochemical analyses. Although they are apparently slow-growing tumors, they run an aggressive clinical course and often associated with poor prognosis which eventually leads to death. Case Report: We report on a case of gastric GANT in a young female who was treated surgically by total gastrectomy. The disease, however ran an aggressive course with the development of distant (nodal, liver, lung, adrenal and musculo-skeletal) metastases two months after the radical resection. Conclusions: We believe this could be the first reported case of adrenal and musculo-skeletal metastases from gastric GANT soon after the radical gastric resection. PMID:24454975

  13. Autonomic correlates of physical and moral disgust.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Cristina; Mancini, Francesco; Petrocchi, Nicola; Medea, Barbara; Couyoumdjian, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    Given that the hypothesis of a common origin of physical and moral disgust has received sparse empirical support, this study aimed to shed light on the subjective and autonomic signatures of these two facets of the same emotional response. Participants (20 men, 20 women) were randomly assigned to physical or moral disgust induction by the use of audio scripts while their electrocardiogram was continuously recorded. Affect ratings were obtained before and after the induction. Time and frequency domain heart rate variability (HRV) measures were obtained. After controlling for disgust sensitivity (DS-R) and obsessive-compulsive (OCI-R) tendencies, both scripts elicited disgust but whereas the physical script elicited a feeling of dirtiness, the moral script evoked more indignation and contempt. The disgust-induced subjective responses were associated with opposite patterns of autonomic reactivity: enhanced activity of the parasympathetic nervous system without concurrent changes in heart rate (HR) for physical disgust and decreased vagal tone and increased HR and autonomic imbalance for moral disgust. Results suggest that immorality relies on the same biological root of physical disgust only in subjects with obsessive compulsive tendencies. Disgust appears to be a heterogeneous response that varies based on the individuals' contamination-based appraisal. PMID:23684734

  14. Autonomous materials with controlled toughening and healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael E.; Lin, Yirong; Sodano, Henry A.

    2010-11-01

    Biological systems exhibit many advanced sensory and healing traits that can be applied to the design of modern material systems. The foremost goal for the development of future adaptive structures is to provide materials capable of autonomously adapting in order to impede damage progression and, subsequently, heal the damaged region. Here, a novel autonomous material system is devised using shape memory polymers (SMPs), which employ a fiber optic network, functioning both as a damage detection sensor and thermal stimulus delivery system. This system mimics the advanced sensory system as well as toughening and healing mechanisms found in human bones. By incorporating both methods into this material, the resulting autonomous system is able to increase toughness by 11 times over the original material. In addition to toughening, the shape memory effect can be used to close the crack and upon reloading of the toughened SMP specimen to failure, the system demonstrates a 96% strength recovery of the virgin strength. Following crack closure the new material system has 4.9 times more toughness than the un-toughened specimen even through it has been strained four times past its virgin failure strain.

  15. New solutions for autonomous control and navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkoumian, Baghrat V.

    2005-10-01

    The most precise navigation systems are commonly based on at least 3 laser gyros and 3 mechanical accelerometers, based on moving or tensioned elements. Laser gyro's "dead zone" guides to existence of additive subsystems, and mechanical accelerometer accumulate the "error of zero" and does not measure during the free fall of an object. Here is found that dead zone on laser gyro characteristics is a result of the precession of momentum of pulse of ring baghron. The necessity of precise laser gyro tuning in Alert city, Canada, is discussed. The method to minimize the precession and to avoid the dead zone on the output characteristics is proposed. Therewith new solutions for autonomous control and navigation are discussed. Here is proposed the autonomous unit of sensors of irregular movement without moving parts and without ring laser resonators, disposed motionless on the object to be measured, based on unique unified 6 mini modules of the autonomous resonatory devices (ARD's). Another new solution could be computer 3D-mouse without pad and with 3 independent outputs for each axis of irregular movement, or the gear of control, which could be arranged in the marker or pen. ARD theory, the experiments and testing are discussed.

  16. Autonomous Circuitry for Substrate Exploration in Freely Moving Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Berni, Jimena; Pulver, Stefan R.; Griffith, Leslie C.; Bate, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Many organisms, from bacteria to human hunter-gatherers, use specialized random walk strategies to explore their environment. Such behaviors are an efficient stratagem for sampling the environment and usually consist of an alternation between straight runs and turns that redirect these runs. Drosophila larvae execute an exploratory routine of this kind that consists of sequences of straight crawls, pauses, turns, and redirected crawls. Central pattern generating networks underlying rhythmic movements are distributed along the anteroposterior axis of the nervous system. The way in which the operation of these networks is incorporated into extended behavioral routines such as substrate exploration has not yet been explored. In particular, the part played by the brain in dictating the sequence of movements required is unknown. Results We report the use of a genetic method to block synaptic activity acutely in the brain and subesophageal ganglia (SOG) of larvae during active exploratory behavior. We show that the brain and SOG are not required for the normal performance of an exploratory routine. Alternation between crawls and turns is an intrinsic property of the abdominal and/or thoracic networks. The brain modifies this autonomous routine during goal-directed movements such as those of chemotaxis. Nonetheless, light avoidance behavior can be mediated in the absence of brain activity solely by the sensorimotor system of the abdomen and thorax. Conclusions The sequence of movements for substrate exploration is an autonomous capacity of the thoracic and abdominal nervous system. The brain modulates this exploratory routine in response to environmental cues. PMID:22940472

  17. Towards Autonomous Agriculture: Automatic Ground Detection Using Trinocular Stereovision

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Giulio; Milella, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous driving is a challenging problem, particularly when the domain is unstructured, as in an outdoor agricultural setting. Thus, advanced perception systems are primarily required to sense and understand the surrounding environment recognizing artificial and natural structures, topology, vegetation and paths. In this paper, a self-learning framework is proposed to automatically train a ground classifier for scene interpretation and autonomous navigation based on multi-baseline stereovision. The use of rich 3D data is emphasized where the sensor output includes range and color information of the surrounding environment. Two distinct classifiers are presented, one based on geometric data that can detect the broad class of ground and one based on color data that can further segment ground into subclasses. The geometry-based classifier features two main stages: an adaptive training stage and a classification stage. During the training stage, the system automatically learns to associate geometric appearance of 3D stereo-generated data with class labels. Then, it makes predictions based on past observations. It serves as well to provide training labels to the color-based classifier. Once trained, the color-based classifier is able to recognize similar terrain classes in stereo imagery. The system is continuously updated online using the latest stereo readings, thus making it feasible for long range and long duration navigation, over changing environments. Experimental results, obtained with a tractor test platform operating in a rural environment, are presented to validate this approach, showing an average classification precision and recall of 91.0% and 77.3%, respectively.

  18. Task analysis of autonomous on-road driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Anthony J.; Horst, John A.; Schlenoff, Craig I.; Aha, David W.

    2004-12-01

    The Real-time Control System (RCS) Methodology has evolved over a number of years as a technique to capture task knowledge and organize it into a framework conducive to implementation in computer control systems. The fundamental premise of this methodology is that the present state of the task activities sets the context that identifies the requirements for all of the support processing. In particular, the task context at any time determines what is to be sensed in the world, what world model states are to be evaluated, which situations are to be analyzed, what plans should be invoked, and which behavior generation knowledge is to be accessed. This methodology concentrates on the task behaviors explored through scenario examples to define a task decomposition tree that clearly represents the branching of tasks into layers of simpler and simpler subtask activities. There is a named branching condition/situation identified for every fork of this task tree. These become the input conditions of the if-then rules of the knowledge set that define how the task is to respond to input state changes. Detailed analysis of each branching condition/situation is used to identify antecedent world states and these, in turn, are further analyzed to identify all of the entities, objects, and attributes that have to be sensed to determine if any of these world states exist. This paper explores the use of this 4D/RCS methodology in some detail for the particular task of autonomous on-road driving, which work was funded under the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Mobile Autonomous Robot Software (MARS) effort (Doug Gage, Program Manager).

  19. Metatranscriptomic analysis of autonomously collected and preserved marine bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Ottesen, Elizabeth A; Marin, Roman; Preston, Christina M; Young, Curtis R; Ryan, John P; Scholin, Christopher A; DeLong, Edward F

    2011-01-01

    Planktonic microbial activity and community structure is dynamic, and can change dramatically on time scales of hours to days. Yet for logistical reasons, this temporal scale is typically under-sampled in the marine environment. In order to facilitate higher-resolution, long-term observation of microbial diversity and activity, we developed a protocol for automated collection and fixation of marine microbes using the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) platform. The protocol applies a preservative (RNALater) to cells collected on filters, for long-term storage and preservation of total cellular RNA. Microbial samples preserved using this protocol yielded high-quality RNA after 30 days of storage at room temperature, or onboard the ESP at in situ temperatures. Pyrosequencing of complementary DNA libraries generated from ESP-collected and preserved samples yielded transcript abundance profiles nearly indistinguishable from those derived from conventionally treated replicate samples. To demonstrate the utility of the method, we used a moored ESP to remotely and autonomously collect Monterey Bay seawater for metatranscriptomic analysis. Community RNA was extracted and pyrosequenced from samples collected at four time points over the course of a single day. In all four samples, the oxygenic photoautotrophs were predominantly eukaryotic, while the bacterial community was dominated by Polaribacter-like Flavobacteria and a Rhodobacterales bacterium sharing high similarity with Rhodobacterales sp. HTCC2255. However, each time point was associated with distinct species abundance and gene transcript profiles. These laboratory and field tests confirmed that autonomous collection and preservation is a feasible and useful approach for characterizing the expressed genes and environmental responses of marine microbial communities. PMID:21716310

  20. The nature of the autonomic dysfunction in multiple system atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Samir M.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    The concept that multiple system atrophy (MSA, Shy-Drager syndrome) is a disorder of the autonomic nervous system is several decades old. While there has been renewed interest in the movement disorder associated with MSA, two recent consensus statements confirm the centrality of the autonomic disorder to the diagnosis. Here, we reexamine the autonomic pathophysiology in MSA. Whereas MSA is often thought of as "autonomic failure", new evidence indicates substantial persistence of functioning sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves even in clinically advanced disease. These findings help explain some of the previously poorly understood features of MSA. Recognition that MSA entails persistent, constitutive autonomic tone requires a significant revision of our concepts of its diagnosis and therapy. We will review recent evidence bearing on autonomic tone in MSA and discuss their therapeutic implications, particularly in terms of the possible development of a bionic baroreflex for better control of blood pressure.

  1. Multi-organ autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Both pathologic and clinical studies of autonomic pathways have expanded the concept of Parkinson disease (PD) from a movement disorder to a multi-level widespread neurodegenerative process with non-motor features spanning several organ systems. This review integrates neuropathologic findings and autonomic physiology in PD as it relates to end organ autonomic function. Symptoms, pathology and physiology of the cardiovascular, skin/sweat gland, urinary, gastrointestinal, pupillary and neuroendocrine systems can be probed by autopsy, biopsy and non-invasive electrophysiological techniques in vivo which assess autonomic anatomy and function. There is mounting evidence that PD affects a chain of neurons in autonomic pathways. Consequently, autonomic physiology may serve as a window into non-motor PD progression and allow the development of mechanistically based treatment strategies for several non-motor features of PD. End-organ physiologic markers may be used to inform a model of PD pathophysiology and non-motor progression. PMID:20851033

  2. Methods of determining complete sensor requirements for autonomous mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of determining complete sensor requirements for autonomous mobility of an autonomous system includes computing a time variation of each behavior of a set of behaviors of the autonomous system, determining mobility sensitivity to each behavior of the autonomous system, and computing a change in mobility based upon the mobility sensitivity to each behavior and the time variation of each behavior. The method further includes determining the complete sensor requirements of the autonomous system through analysis of the relative magnitude of the change in mobility, the mobility sensitivity to each behavior, and the time variation of each behavior, wherein the relative magnitude of the change in mobility, the mobility sensitivity to each behavior, and the time variation of each behavior are characteristic of the stability of the autonomous system.

  3. Novel Microbial Diversity Retrieved by Autonomous Robotic Exploration of the World's Deepest Vertical Phreatic Sinkhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahl, Jason W.; Fairfield, Nathaniel; Harris, J. Kirk; Wettergreen, David; Stone, William C.; Spear, John R.

    2010-03-01

    The deep phreatic thermal explorer (DEPTHX) is an autonomous underwater vehicle designed to navigate an unexplored environment, generate high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) maps, collect biological samples based on an autonomous sampling decision, and return to its origin. In the spring of 2007, DEPTHX was deployed in Zacatón, a deep (˜318 m), limestone, phreatic sinkhole (cenote) in northeastern Mexico. As DEPTHX descended, it generated a 3-D map based on the processing of range data from 54 onboard sonars. The vehicle collected water column samples and wall biomat samples throughout the depth profile of the cenote. Post-expedition sample analysis via comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a wealth of microbial diversity. Traditional Sanger gene sequencing combined with a barcoded-amplicon pyrosequencing approach revealed novel, phylum-level lineages from the domains Bacteria and Archaea; in addition, several novel subphylum lineages were also identified. Overall, DEPTHX successfully navigated and mapped Zacatón, and collected biological samples based on an autonomous decision, which revealed novel microbial diversity in a previously unexplored environment.

  4. Autonomous In-Situ Resources Prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dissly, R. W.; Buehler, M. G.; Schaap, M. G.; Nicks, D.; Taylor, G. J.; Castano, R.; Suarez, D.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will describe the concept of an autonomous, intelligent, rover-based rapid surveying system to identify and map several key lunar resources to optimize their ISRU (In Situ Resource Utilization) extraction potential. Prior to an extraction phase for any target resource, ground-based surveys are needed to provide confirmation of remote observation, to quantify and map their 3-D distribution, and to locate optimal extraction sites (e.g. ore bodies) with precision to maximize their economic benefit. The system will search for and quantify optimal minerals for oxygen production feedstock, water ice, and high glass-content regolith that can be used for building materials. These are targeted because of their utility and because they are, or are likely to be, variable in quantity over spatial scales accessible to a rover (i.e., few km). Oxygen has benefits for life support systems and as an oxidizer for propellants. Water is a key resource for sustainable exploration, with utility for life support, propellants, and other industrial processes. High glass-content regolith has utility as a feedstock for building materials as it readily sinters upon heating into a cohesive matrix more readily than other regolith materials or crystalline basalts. Lunar glasses are also a potential feedstock for oxygen production, as many are rich in iron and titanium oxides that are optimal for oxygen extraction. To accomplish this task, a system of sensors and decision-making algorithms for an autonomous prospecting rover is described. One set of sensors will be located in the wheel tread of the robotic search vehicle providing contact sensor data on regolith composition. Another set of instruments will be housed on the platform of the rover, including VIS-NIR imagers and spectrometers, both for far-field context and near-field characterization of the regolith in the immediate vicinity of the rover. Also included in the sensor suite are a neutron spectrometer, ground-penetrating radar, and an instrumented cone penetrometer for subsurface assessment. Output from these sensors will be evaluated autonomously in real-time by decision-making software to evaluate if any of the targeted resources has been detected, and if so, to quantify their abundance. Algorithms for optimizing the mapping strategy based on target resource abundance and distribution are also included in the autonomous software. This approach emphasizes on-the-fly survey measurements to enable efficient and rapid prospecting of large areas, which will improve the economics of ISRU system approaches. The mature technology will enable autonomous rovers to create in-situ resource maps of lunar or other planetary surfaces, which will facilitate human and robotic exploration.

  5. Autonomic nervous system responses as performance indicators among volleyball players

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Collet; R. Roure; G. Delhomme; A. Dittmar; H. Rada; E. Vernet-Maury

    1999-01-01

    Complex motor skills require planning and programming before execution. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is thought to\\u000a transcribe these central operations at the peripheral level: a motor act is thought to be simultaneously programmed by central\\u000a and autonomic nervous structures. The aim of this study was to verify that autonomic responses reflect the quality of central\\u000a motor programming leading to

  6. A Proposal of Autonomous Robotic Systems Educative Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ierache, Jorge; Garcia-Martinez, Ramón; de Giusti, Armando

    This work presents our experiences in the implementation of a laboratory of autonomous robotic systems applied to the training of beginner and advanced students doing a degree course in Computer Engineering., taking into account the specific technologies, robots, autonomous toys, and programming languages. They provide a strategic opportunity for human resources formation by involving different aspects which range from the specification elaboration, modeling, software development and implementation and testing of an autonomous robotic system.

  7. Navigation and slope detection system design for autonomous mobile robot

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boyu Wei; Junyao Gao; Kejie Li; Hu Chen

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous mobile robot navigation is a hot research field in recent years. We design a four-tracked autonomous mobile robot with a main-controller based on ARM s3c2410 and sub-controller based on ATmega128. The navigation system consists of GPS, INS, ultrasonic and infrared sensors. The used of the GPS and inertial navigation system for autonomous mobile robot makes its navigation precision and

  8. Autonomic dysfunction in chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ramesh K. Khurana; Marvin M. Schuster

    1998-01-01

    Fifteen tests were used to assess adrenergic, non-vagal cholinergic, and cardiovagal functions in 11 patients with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP). The three aims of this study were: 1) to ascertain the presence of and spectrum of autonomic involvement; 2) to assess the level of autonomic dysfunction; and 3) to compare the results of autonomic function tests with gastrointestinal motility patterns.Gastrointestinal

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Families Resources for Health Professionals What glossary definitions help with understanding HSAN2? acids ; apnea ; apoptosis ; autonomic nervous system ; autosomal ; autosomal recessive ; ...

  10. An Almost Global Tracking Control Scheme for Maneuverable Autonomous Vehicles and its

    E-print Network

    Chyba, Monique

    1 An Almost Global Tracking Control Scheme for Maneuverable Autonomous Vehicles and its control problem of tracking a desired continuous trajectory for a maneuverable autonomous vehicle. While applications of this control scheme include autonomous aerial and underwater vehicles, we focus

  11. Multiple Vehicle Coordination and Cooperative Estimation for Target Tracking with Applications to Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Systems

    E-print Network

    Morgansen, Kristi

    to Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Systems Benjamin Triplett A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment to Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Systems Benjamin Triplett Chair of the Supervisory Committee: Assistant. Coordinated target tracking, in which several pursuit autonomous pursuit vehicles follow and maintain state

  12. Abstract-Homing and navigation capabilities are essential for many Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract- Homing and navigation capabilities are essential for many Autonomous Underwater Vehicle INTRODUCTION Actually, there is a real challenge on application of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, particularly and manned submersibles, and more recently for navigation of Autonomous underwater vehicles [1

  13. Formation Flight of Swarms of Autonomous Vehicles In Obstructed Environments Using Vector Field Navigation

    E-print Network

    Lum, Christopher

    Formation Flight of Swarms of Autonomous Vehicles In Obstructed Environments Using Vector Field using multiple autonomous vehicles in real time. I. INTRODUCTION A large portion of missions tasked inter- vehicle collision and environmental obstructions. A modular, autonomous algorithm which increases

  14. Autonomous adaptation and collaboration of unmanned vehicles for tracking submerged contacts

    E-print Network

    Privette, Andrew Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous operations are vital to future naval operations. Unmanned systems, including autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and autonomous surface vehicles (ASVs), are anticipated to play a key role for critical tasks ...

  15. ALI (Autonomous Lunar Investigator): Revolutionary Approach to Exploring the Moon with Addressable Reconfigurable Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Rilee, M. L.; Floyd, S. R.

    2005-03-01

    Addressable Reconfigurable Technology (ART), conceived for future ANTS (Autonomous Nanotechnology Swarm) Architectures, is now implemented as Autonomous Lunar Investigator (ALI) rovers, a mission concept allowing autonomous exploration of the lunar farside and poles within 10 years.

  16. Autonomous and autonomic systems: a paradigm for future space exploration missions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walter F. Truszkowski; Michael G. Hinchey; James L. Rash; Christopher A. Rouff

    2006-01-01

    More and more, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will rely on concepts from autonomous systems not only in mission control centers on the ground, but also on spacecraft and on rovers and other space assets on extraterrestrial bodies. Autonomy facilitates not only reduced operations costs, but also adaptable goal-driven functionality of mission systems. Space missions lacking autonomy will

  17. Compromising algorithmicity and plasticity in autonomous agent control architectures : The autonomous cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elpida Tzafestas

    1995-01-01

    While algorithmic autonomous agent control architectures demonstrate high efficiency, they suffer from network structure rigidity that shows in the liability to crucial errors. On the other hand, the redundancy inherent i n most connectionist architectures allows for continuous s elf-organization that compensates for limited scale local neuron failures. In this article, we a re investigating the relation between algorithmicity and

  18. A design strategy for autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forster, Pete

    1989-01-01

    Some solutions to crucial issues regarding the competent performance of an autonomously operating robot are identified; namely, that of handling multiple and variable data sources containing overlapping information and maintaining coherent operation while responding adequately to changes in the environment. Support for the ideas developed for the construction of such behavior are extracted from speculations in the study of cognitive psychology, an understanding of the behavior of controlled mechanisms, and the development of behavior-based robots in a few robot research laboratories. The validity of these ideas is supported by some simple simulation experiments in the field of mobile robot navigation and guidance.

  19. Autonomic care platform for optimizing query performance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As the amount of information in electronic health care systems increases, data operations get more complicated and time-consuming. Intensive Care platforms require a timely processing of data retrievals to guarantee the continuous display of recent data of patients. Physicians and nurses rely on this data for their decision making. Manual optimization of query executions has become difficult to handle due to the increased amount of queries across multiple sources. Hence, a more automated management is necessary to increase the performance of database queries. The autonomic computing paradigm promises an approach in which the system adapts itself and acts as self-managing entity, thereby limiting human interventions and taking actions. Despite the usage of autonomic control loops in network and software systems, this approach has not been applied so far for health information systems. Methods We extend the COSARA architecture, an infection surveillance and antibiotic management service platform for the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), with self-managed components to increase the performance of data retrievals. We used real-life ICU COSARA queries to analyse slow performance and measure the impact of optimizations. Each day more than 2 million COSARA queries are executed. Three control loops, which monitor the executions and take action, have been proposed: reactive, deliberative and reflective control loops. We focus on improvements of the execution time of microbiology queries directly related to the visual displays of patients’ data on the bedside screens. Results The results show that autonomic control loops are beneficial for the optimizations in the data executions in the ICU. The application of reactive control loop results in a reduction of 8.61% of the average execution time of microbiology results. The combined application of the reactive and deliberative control loop results in an average query time reduction of 10.92% and the combination of reactive, deliberative and reflective control loops provides a reduction of 13.04%. Conclusions We found that by controlled reduction of queries’ executions the performance for the end-user can be improved. The implementation of autonomic control loops in an existing health platform, COSARA, has a positive effect on the timely data visualization for the physician and nurse. PMID:24160892

  20. Pipeline inspection using an autonomous underwater vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Egeskov, P.; Bech, M. [Maridan Aps., Hoersholm (Denmark); Bowley, R. [TSS Ltd., Weston-on-the-Green (United Kingdom); Aage, C. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Ocean Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Pipeline inspection can be carried out by means of small Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), operating either with a control link to a surface vessel, or totally independently. The AUV offers an attractive alternative to conventional inspection methods where Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) or paravanes are used. A flatfish type AUV ``MARTIN`` (Marine Tool for Inspection) has been developed for this purpose. The paper describes the proposed types of inspection jobs to be carried out by ``MARTIN``. The design and construction of the vessel, its hydrodynamic properties, its propulsion and control systems are discussed. The pipeline tracking and survey systems, as well as the launch and recovery systems are described.