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Sample records for autonomous bdfig-wind generator

  1. Next generation autonomous wheelchair control.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Barrett, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Often times the physically challenged, limited to a wheelchair, also have difficulty with vision. In order to help, something must "see" for them. Therefore there must be some way for a wheelchair to know its environment, sense where it is, and where it must go. It also must be able to avoid any obstacles which are not normally part of the environment. An autonomous wheelchair will serve an important role by allowing users more freedom and independence. This design challenge is broken into four major steps: wheelchair control, environment recognition, route planning, and obstacle avoidance. The first step is to reverse engineer a wheelchair and rebuild the controls, which will be the main topic of discussion for this paper. Two big challenges with this step are high power motor control and joystick control. An H-bridge motor interface, controlled by a microprocessor, was designed for the motors. The joystick control is handled with the same microprocessor. PMID:15850119

  2. Incorporating Manual and Autonomous Code Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComas, David

    1998-01-01

    Code can be generated manually or using code-generated software tools, but how do you interpret the two? This article looks at a design methodology that combines object-oriented design with autonomic code generation for attitude control flight software. Recent improvements in space flight computers are allowing software engineers to spend more time engineering the applications software. The application developed was the attitude control flight software for an astronomical satellite called the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP). The MAP flight system is being designed, developed, and integrated at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The MAP controls engineers are using Integrated Systems Inc.'s MATRIXx for their controls analysis. In addition to providing a graphical analysis for an environment, MATRIXx includes an autonomic code generation facility called AutoCode. This article examines the forces that shaped the final design and describes three highlights of the design process: (1) Defining the manual to autonomic code interface; (2) Applying object-oriented design to the manual flight code; (3) Implementing the object-oriented design in C.

  3. Autonomous dielectric elastomer generator using electret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu-Cong, T.; Jean-Mistral, C.; Sylvestre, A.

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers can work as a variable capacitor to convert mechanical energy such as human motion into electrical energy. Nevertheless, scavengers based on dielectric elastomers require a high voltage source to polarize them, which constitutes the major disadvantage of these transducers. We propose here to combine dielectric elastomer with an electret, providing a quasi-permanent potential, thus replacing the high voltage supply. Our new scavenger is fully autonomous, soft, lightweight and low cost. Our structure is made of a dielectric elastomer (Polypower from Danfoss) and an electret developing a potential of -1000V (Teflon from Dupont). The transducer is designed specifically to scavenge energy from human motion. Thus, it works on pure-shear mode with maximum strain of about 50% and it is textured in 3D form because electret is not deformable. The shape of the hybrid structure is critical to insure huge capacitance variation and thus higher scavenged energy. We present in this paper our process for the optimization of the 3D shape that leads us to the developpment and characterization of our first prototype. From an appropriate electromechanical analytical model, an energy density of about 1.48mJ.g-1 is expected on an optimal electrical load. Our new autonomous dielectric generator can produce about 0.55mJ.g-1 on a resistive load, and can further be improved by enhancing the performance of dielectric elastomer such as dielectric permittivity or by increasing the electret potential.

  4. Patellar clonus: an autonomous central generator.

    PubMed

    Walsh, E G; Wright, G W

    1987-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying clonus are considered in relation to current theories. By the use of a lever attached to a printed motor forces have been applied to the upper edge of the patella, a steady stretching force in suitable hemiplegic patients started the clonic oscillations. With rhythmic forces it has been found that the underlying rhythm is very resistant to entrainment. The oscillation provoked by a steady bias is increased in amplitude but unchanged in frequency when inertia is added to the apparatus. The frequency of clonus at the ankle, patella and wrist is similar. These and other considerations lead to the conclusion that clonus is not due to the self re-excitation of stretch reflexes but to an autonomous central generator. PMID:3668572

  5. Autonomous Robots, to appear Jan., 2003. Generating Multi-Level Linguistic Spatial Descriptions from Range Sensor

    E-print Network

    Skubic, Marjorie

    -generated linguistic spatial descriptions may prove useful: 1. Semi-autonomous control of a robot, where control may alternate between varying levels of autonomous robot control and direct human control (i.e., adjustableAutonomous Robots, to appear Jan., 2003. 1 Generating Multi-Level Linguistic Spatial Descriptions

  6. Autonomous quantum thermal machine for generating steady-state entanglement

    E-print Network

    Jonatan Bohr Brask; Nicolas Brunner; Géraldine Haack; Marcus Huber

    2015-11-24

    We discuss a simple quantum thermal machine for the generation of steady-state entanglement between two interacting qubits. The machine is autonomous in the sense that it uses only incoherent interactions with thermal baths, but no source of coherence or external control. By weakly coupling the qubits to thermal baths at different temperatures, inducing a heat current through the system, steady-state entanglement is generated far from thermal equilibrium. Finally, we discuss two possible implementations, using superconducting flux qubits or a semiconductor double quantum dot. Experimental prospects for steady-state entanglement are promising in both systems.

  7. Autonomous quantum thermal machine for generating steady-state entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr Brask, Jonatan; Haack, Géraldine; Brunner, Nicolas; Huber, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    We discuss a simple quantum thermal machine for the generation of steady-state entanglement between two interacting qubits. The machine is autonomous in the sense that it uses only incoherent interactions with thermal baths, but no source of coherence or external control. By weakly coupling the qubits to thermal baths at different temperatures, inducing a heat current through the system, steady-state entanglement is generated far from thermal equilibrium. Finally, we discuss two possible implementations, using superconducting flux qubits or a semiconductor double quantum dot. Experimental prospects for steady-state entanglement are promising in both systems.

  8. Advanced Video Guidance Sensor and Next Generation Autonomous Docking Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granade, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    In recent decades, NASA's interest in spacecraft rendezvous and proximity operations has grown. Additional instrumentation is needed to improve manned docking operations' safety, as well as to enable telerobotic operation of spacecraft or completely autonomous rendezvous and docking. To address this need, Advanced Optical Systems, Inc., Orbital Sciences Corporation, and Marshall Space Flight Center have developed the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) under the auspices of the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) program. Given a cooperative target comprising several retro-reflectors, AVGS provides six-degree-of-freedom information at ranges of up to 300 meters for the DART target. It does so by imaging the target, then performing pattern recognition on the resulting image. Longer range operation is possible through different target geometries. Now that AVGS is being readied for its test flight in 2004, the question is: what next? Modifications can be made to AVGS, including different pattern recognition algorithms and changes to the retro-reflector targets, to make it more robust and accurate. AVGS could be coupled with other space-qualified sensors, such as a laser range-and-bearing finder, that would operate at longer ranges. Different target configurations, including the use of active targets, could result in significant miniaturization over the current AVGS package. We will discuss these and other possibilities for a next-generation docking sensor or sensor suite that involve AVGS.

  9. Generation and Testing of Autonomous Mineral Detectors for Mars Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, M. D.; Gilmore, M. S.; Castaño, R.; Bornstein, B.; Greenwood, J.

    2004-05-01

    Currently Mars missions can collect more data than can be returned. Autonomous systems for data collection, processing and return will aid future Mars rovers in prioritizing and returning geologically important information. We have created a neural net detector that is able to successfully recognize carbonates from Visible/NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra of rocks collected from Mars analog environments (Gilmore et al. JGR 105, 29,223). In order to characterize and improve the detector's sensitivity, we are evaluating the performance of the detector under more realistic Martian environments: 1) carbonate minerals covered with palagonitic dust, and 2) carbonate minerals intimately mixed with basalt and palagonite. Lessons learned will be applied to the generation of additional detectors for minerals of interest (e.g., hydrothermal minerals). Aliquots of Martian Soil Simulant JSC Mars-1 palagonite were sieved to <45 microns and air fall deposited onto a calcite crystal and an adjacent glass slide. Spectra in the Vis/NIR were taken of the calcite after every layer up to a thickness of 270 microns (35 layers) with an Analytical Spectral Devices Field Spec Pro spectrometer operating from 350-2500 nm. The carbonate detector, operating over the range 2000-2400 nm, has an empirically established detection threshold based on training with thousands of synthetic linear combinations of laboratory mineral spectra designed to simulate expected Martian rocks. The detection threshold was reached in this experiment when the dust layer thickness reached 102 -116 microns (78-85% aerial coverage). This corresponds to a real change in the depth of the 2300 nm carbonate band (continuum depth, D= 1- [reflectance at trough center/reflectance at continuum] = ~0.1), and is similar to the detection threshold of the human experimenter. Very thin (~10-20 microns) coatings of palagonite dust had a large effect on the spectral response of the substrate, exemplifying the nonlinear mixing of the two components. We will report on experiments mixing known quantities of carbonate with basalt and palagonite at various grain sizes. We plan to assess the detector's ability to discern and quantify varying amounts of carbonate within the mixtures, and model the spectra as nonlinear mixtures to ascertain if any improvements in the accuracy of the neural net can be achieved. Finally, we will report on the generation and performance of a detector capable of identifying phyllosilicate minerals individually and as a mineral class.

  10. For autonomously navigating vehicles, the automatic generation of dense geometric models of the environment is a computation-

    E-print Network

    Nourbakhsh, Illah

    Page 1 Abstract For autonomously navigating vehicles, the automatic generation of dense geometric perception arise which are practical for autonomous vehicles. 1 Introduction The need for high throughput of autonomous vehicle navigation. Yet, the evidence for this need has not been based on any underlying theory

  11. CLASSIFICATION OF NON-HEAT GENERATING OUTDOOR OBJECTS IN THERMAL SCENES FOR AUTONOMOUS ROBOTS

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Leah B.

    objects. We have used a mobile bot to systematically capture thermal infrared imagery for two categoriesCLASSIFICATION OF NON-HEAT GENERATING OUTDOOR OBJECTS IN THERMAL SCENES FOR AUTONOMOUS ROBOTS describes a physics-based adaptive Bayesian pattern classification model that uses a passive thermal

  12. The Next Generation Autonomous Lawn Mower Rand C. Chandler, Dr. A. Antonio Arroyo, Dr. Michael Nechyba,

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, Eric M.

    The Next Generation Autonomous Lawn Mower Rand C. Chandler, Dr. A. Antonio Arroyo, Dr. Michael and intelligently mow grass in an environment typical of a person's lawn. Unlike its predecessors, this mower, the mower becomes a "lawn maintainer" instead of just a lawnmower. Several sensors will be used as well

  13. Note: Autonomous pulsed power generator based on transverse shock wave depolarization of ferroelectric ceramics.

    PubMed

    Shkuratov, Sergey I; Baird, Jason; Talantsev, Evgueni F

    2010-12-01

    Autonomous pulsed generators utilizing transverse shock wave depolarization (shock front propagates across the polarization vector P(0)) of Pb(Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48))O(3) poled piezoelectric ceramics were designed, constructed, and experimentally tested. It was demonstrated that generators having total volume of 50 cm(3) were capable of producing the output voltage pulses with amplitude up to 43 kV with pulse duration 4 ?s. A comparison of high-voltage operation of transverse and longitudinal shock wave ferroelectric generators is given. PMID:21198057

  14. Autonomic and Apoptotic, Aeronautical and Aerospace Systems, and Controlling Scientific Data Generated Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy (Inventor); Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A self-managing system that uses autonomy and autonomicity is provided with the self-* property of autopoiesis (self-creation). In the event of an agent in the system self-destructing, autopoiesis auto-generates a replacement. A self-esteem reward scheme is also provided and can be used for autonomic agents, based on their performance and trust. Art agent with greater self-esteem may clone at a greater rate compared to the rate of an agent with lower self-esteem. A self-managing system is provided for a high volume of distributed autonomic/self-managing mobile agents, and autonomic adhesion is used to attract similar agents together or to repel dissimilar agents from an event horizon. An apoptotic system is also provided that accords an "expiry date" to data and digital objects, for example, that are available on the internet, which finds usefulness not only in general but also for controlling the loaning and use of space scientific data.

  15. Systems, methods and apparatus for generation and verification of policies in autonomic computing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Rash, James L. (Inventor); Truszkowski, Walter F. (Inventor); Rouff, Christopher A. (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor); Gracanin, Denis (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Described herein is a method that produces fully (mathematically) tractable development of policies for autonomic systems from requirements through to code generation. This method is illustrated through an example showing how user formulated policies can be translated into a formal mode which can then be converted to code. The requirements-based programming method described provides faster, higher quality development and maintenance of autonomic systems based on user formulation of policies.Further, the systems, methods and apparatus described herein provide a way of analyzing policies for autonomic systems and facilities the generation of provably correct implementations automatically, which in turn provides reduced development time, reduced testing requirements, guarantees of correctness of the implementation with respect to the policies specified at the outset, and provides a higher degree of confidence that the policies are both complete and reasonable. The ability to specify the policy for the management of a system and then automatically generate an equivalent implementation greatly improves the quality of software, the survivability of future missions, in particular when the system will operate untended in very remote environments, and greatly reduces development lead times and costs.

  16. Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy Affects Symptom Generation and Brain-Gut Axis

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Christina; Søfteland, Eirik; Gunterberg, Veronica; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Lelic, Dina; Brock, Birgitte; Dimcevski, Georg; Gregersen, Hans; Simrén, Magnus; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Long-term diabetes leads to severe peripheral, autonomous, and central neuropathy in combination with clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. The brain-gut axis thus expresses a neurophysiological profile, and heart rate variability (HRV) can be correlated with clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifteen healthy volunteers and 15 diabetic patients (12 with type 1 diabetes) with severe gastrointestinal symptoms and clinical suspicion of autonomic neuropathy were included. Psychophysics and evoked brain potentials were assessed after painful rectosigmoid electrostimulations, and brain activity was modeled by brain electrical source analysis. Self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms (per the Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Disorder Severity Symptom Index) and quality of life (SF-36 Short Form Survey) were collected. RESULTS Diabetic patients had autonomous neuropathy, evidenced by decreased electrocardiographic R-R interval (P = 0.03) and lower HRV (P = 0.008). Patients were less sensitive to painful stimulation (P = 0.007), had prolonged latencies of evoked potentials (P ? 0.001), and showed diminished amplitude of the N2–P2 component in evoked potentials (P = 0.01). There was a caudoanterior shift of the insular brain source (P = 0.01) and an anterior shift of the cingulate generator (P = 0.01). Insular source location was associated with HRV assessments (all P < 0.02), and the shift (expressed in mm) correlated negatively with physical health (P < 0.001) and positively with nausea (P = 0.03) and postprandial fullness (P = 0.03). Cingulate source shift was correlated negatively with physical health (P = 0.005) and positively with postprandial fullness (P ? 0.001). CONCLUSIONS This study provides evidence for interaction between autonomic neuropathy and peripheral nervous degeneration, as well as changes in dipole sources in diabetic patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. The findings may lead to improved treatment modalities targeting pharmacological neuroprotection or neuromodulation. PMID:24026548

  17. Autonomous Decentralized Control of Supply and Demand by Inverter Based Distributed Generations in Isolated Microgrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiki, Akira; Yokoyama, Akihiko; Baba, Jyunpei; Takano, Tomihiro; Gouda, Takahiro; Izui, Yoshio

    Recently, because of the environmental burden mitigation, energy conservations, energy security, and cost reductions, distributed generations are attracting our strong attention. These distributed generations (DGs) have been already installed to the distribution system, and much more DGs will be expected to be connected in the future. On the other hand, a new concept called “Microgrid” which is a small power supply network consisting of only DGs was proposed and some prototype projects are ongoing in Japan. The purpose of this paper is to develop the three-phase instantaneous valued digital simulator of microgrid consisting of a lot of inverter based DGs and to develop a supply and demand control method in isolated microgrid. First, microgrid is modeled using MATLAB/SIMULINK. We develop models of three-phase instantaneous valued inverter type CVCF generator, PQ specified generator, PV specified generator, PQ specified load as storage battery, photovoltaic generation, fuel cell and inverter load respectively. Then we propose an autonomous decentralized control method of supply and demand in isolated microgrid where storage batteries, fuel cells, photovoltaic generations and loads are connected. It is proposed here that the system frequency is used as a means to control DG output. By changing the frequency of the storage battery due to unbalance of supply and demand, all inverter based DGs detect the frequency fluctuation and change their own outputs. Finally, a new frequency control method in autonomous decentralized control of supply and demand is proposed. Though the frequency is used to transmit the information on the supply and demand unbalance to DGs, after the frequency plays the role, the frequency finally has to return to a standard value. To return the frequency to the standard value, the characteristic curve of the fuel cell is shifted in parallel. This control is carried out corresponding to the fluctuation of the load. The simulation shows that the frequency can be controlled well and has been made clear the effectiveness of the frequency control system.

  18. An Experimental Study on Voltage Compensation Method using Autonomous Decentralized Control of Distributed Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Hirokazu

    When many distributed generators (DGs) are connected to a distribution line, the upward power flow from DGs causes the difficulty in line voltage regulation. As the countermeasure, we propose several methods to control the line voltage by use of DGs' reactive power outputs. These methods using only DGs' reactive power are implemented in an autonomous decentralized way. DGs with the function to estimate the line impedance provide the power system with reactive power according to the estimated impedance value, and regulate the line voltage. We evaluate the effect of the proposed methods for voltage compensation by experimental studies using commercial grid-connected inverters for PV system.

  19. Autonomous hydro, diesel, wind, biogas single or mixed energetical systems with asynchronous generators

    SciTech Connect

    Budisan, N.; Hentea, T.I.

    1995-12-31

    The paper discusses some engineering aspects of the utilization of asynchronous generators in autonomous unconventional single or mixed energy systems: hydro, diesel, wind, and biogas. The authors have built several energy systems with asynchronous generators with variable speed and constant frequency, implemented in wind generator systems in Romania. They have constructed an energy system with constant capacity excited asynchronous generator at Sarata Microhydrostation, Fagaras Mountains (1450 m). In this system the voltage was controlled by varying the speed of the turbine. For systems with uncontrolled hydroturbines the authors investigated constant loaded asynchronous generator with constant capacitive excitation and dump load control. Additionally, they investigated a system based on constant speed asynchronous generator whose voltage is controlled by an original system with continuous variable capacitive excitation. The driving motor is a thermal motor supplied with biogas. The system was developed at the request of the National Institute for Thermal Motors (Bucharest, Romania). The authors present their original proposals for mixed hydro, diesel, wind, biogas energetical systems based on asynchronous generator utilization. Original system structures are presented for resistive loaded systems as well as for resistive-inductive loaded systems. They also present some original schematic diagrams, methods and algorithms for asynchronous generator characteristics calculation. These characteristics are useful in the design of the excitation system, allowing determination of the rated parameter values of its elements. Some examples of asynchronous generator operation characteristics, calculated with these methods, are given in the paper.

  20. Autonomous trajectory generation for mobile robots with non-holonomic and steering angle constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Vasseur, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the trajectory planning of mobile platforms characterized by non-holonomic constraints and constraints on the steering angle and steering angle rate. The approach is based on geometric reasoning and provides deterministic trajectories for all pairs of initial and final configurations (position x, y, and orientation {theta}) of the robot. Furthermore, the method generates trajectories taking into account the forward and reverse mode of motion of the vehicle, or combination of these when complex maneuvering is involved or when the environment is obstructed with obstacles. The trajectory planning algorithm is described, and examples of trajectories generated for a variety of environmental conditions are presented. The generation of the trajectories only takes a few milliseconds of run time on a micro Vax, making the approach quite attractive for use as a real-time motion planner for teleoperated or sensor-based autonomous vehicles in complex environments. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  1. The Next Generation of Mars-GRAM and Its Role in the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Ramey, Holly S.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM 2010 is currently being used to develop the onboard atmospheric density estimator that is part of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. In previous versions, Mars-GRAM was less than realistic when used for sensitivity studies for Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) MapYear=0 and large optical depth values, such as tau=3. A comparison analysis has been completed between Mars-GRAM, TES and data from the Planetary Data System (PDS) resulting in updated coefficients for the functions relating density, latitude, and longitude of the sun. The adjustment factors are expressed as a function of height (z), Latitude (Lat) and areocentric solar longitude (Ls). The latest release of Mars-GRAM 2010 includes these adjustment factors that alter the in-put data from MGCM and MTGCM for the Mapping Year 0 (user-controlled dust) case. The greatest adjustment occurs at large optical depths such as tau greater than 1. The addition of the adjustment factors has led to better correspondence to TES Limb data from 0-60 km as well as better agreement with MGS, ODY and MRO data at approximately 90-135 km. Improved simulations utilizing Mars-GRAM 2010 are vital to developing the onboard atmospheric density estimator for the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. Mars-GRAM 2010 was not the only planetary GRAM utilized during phase 1 of this plan; Titan-GRAM and Venus-GRAM were used to generate density data sets for Aerobraking Design Reference Missions. These data sets included altitude profiles (both vertical and along a trajectory), GRAM perturbations (tides, gravity waves, etc.) and provided density and scale height values for analysis by other Autonomous Aero-braking team members.

  2. On-electrode autonomous current generator for multi-frequency EIT.

    PubMed

    Jivet, I; Dragoi, B

    2008-06-01

    The paper presents an autonomous programmable current generator module for multi-frequency EIT systems. The module incorporates all stages from the sine wave generation with frequency and amplitude tuning, D/A converter and filter, a high output resistance voltage-to-current converter to the associated digital communication and control. The paper presents in depth the original digital quadrature signal generator and the output current generator with a high resistance. The other main blocks of the design use current practice specifications, since recent technological solutions proposed in the literature were found appropriate. The proposed signal generator circuit, characterized by a very low complexity, is analyzed in its capacity to produce multiple accurate signals up to 1 MHz in frequency. The precision output current source uses a modified current conveyor of type CCII with a high output resistance and low distortion. The output current frequency spectrum and linearity parameters obtained in the simulations are also described. The simulation results indicate a good linearity and high output resistance with an acceptable output voltage swing. The calculated performance parameters are validated with simulations, and future work for the prototype fabrication of the IC is outlined. PMID:18544811

  3. A low-cost wireless system for autonomous generation of road safety alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, B.; Harms, T.; Sedigh Sarvestani, S.; Bastianini, F.

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes an autonomous wireless system that generates road safety alerts, in the form of SMS and email messages, and sends them to motorists subscribed to the service. Drivers who regularly traverse a particular route are the main beneficiaries of the proposed system, which is intended for sparsely populated rural areas, where information available to drivers about road safety, especially bridge conditions, is very limited. At the heart of this system is the SmartBrick, a wireless system for remote structural health monitoring that has been presented in our previous work. Sensors on the SmartBrick network regularly collect data on water level, temperature, strain, and other parameters important to safety of a bridge. This information is stored on the device, and reported to a remote server over the GSM cellular infrastructure. The system generates alerts indicating hazardous road conditions when the data exceeds thresholds that can be remotely changed. The remote server and any number of designated authorities can be notified by email, FTP, and SMS. Drivers can view road conditions and subscribe to SMS and/or email alerts through a web page. The subscription-only form of alert generation has been deliberately selected to mitigate privacy concerns. The proposed system can significantly increase the safety of travel through rural areas. Real-time availability of information to transportation authorities and law enforcement officials facilitates early or proactive reaction to road hazards. Direct notification of drivers further increases the utility of the system in increasing the safety of the traveling public.

  4. Automatic generation of modules of object categorization for autonomous mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Many robotic tasks require advanced systems of visual sensing. Robotic systems of visual sensing must be able to solve a number of different complex problems of visual data analysis. Object categorization is one of such problems. In this paper, we propose an approach to automatic generation of computationally effective modules of object categorization for autonomous mobile robots. This approach is based on the consideration of the stack cover problem. In particular, it is assumed that the robot is able to perform an initial inspection of the environment. After such inspection, the robot needs to solve the stack cover problem by using a supercomputer. A solution of the stack cover problem allows the robot to obtain a template for computationally effective scheduling of object categorization. Also, we consider an efficient approach to solve the stack cover problem. In particular, we consider an explicit reduction from the decision version of the stack cover problem to the satisfiability problem. For different satisfiability algorithms, the results of computational experiments are presented.

  5. Design of a hybrid energy-generation system for autonomous kayaks

    E-print Network

    Plumer, Kevin E. (Kevin Edward)

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this research is to design and analyze a series-hybrid energy-production system for an autonomous kayak. Currently these vehicles have limited range due to energy storage in lead acid batteries. Extending the ...

  6. Mobility and Generation of Mosaic Non-Autonomous Transposons by Tn3-Derived Inverted-Repeat Miniature Elements (TIMEs)

    PubMed Central

    Szuplewska, Magdalena; Ludwiczak, Marta; Lyzwa, Katarzyna; Czarnecki, Jakub; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Functional transposable elements (TEs) of several Pseudomonas spp. strains isolated from black shale ore of Lubin mine and from post-flotation tailings of Zelazny Most in Poland, were identified using a positive selection trap plasmid strategy. This approach led to the capture and characterization of (i) 13 insertion sequences from 5 IS families (IS3, IS5, ISL3, IS30 and IS1380), (ii) isoforms of two Tn3-family transposons – Tn5563a and Tn4662a (the latter contains a toxin-antitoxin system), as well as (iii) non-autonomous TEs of diverse structure, ranging in size from 262 to 3892 bp. The non-autonomous elements transposed into AT-rich DNA regions and generated 5- or 6-bp sequence duplications at the target site of transposition. Although these TEs lack a transposase gene, they contain homologous 38-bp-long terminal inverted repeat sequences (IRs), highly conserved in Tn5563a and many other Tn3-family transposons. The simplest elements of this type, designated TIMEs (Tn3 family-derived Inverted-repeat Miniature Elements) (262 bp), were identified within two natural plasmids (pZM1P1 and pLM8P2) of Pseudomonas spp. It was demonstrated that TIMEs are able to mobilize segments of plasmid DNA for transposition, which results in the generation of more complex non-autonomous elements, resembling IS-driven composite transposons in structure. Such transposon-like elements may contain different functional genetic modules in their core regions, including plasmid replication systems. Another non-autonomous element “captured” with a trap plasmid was a TIME derivative containing a predicted resolvase gene and a res site typical for many Tn3-family transposons. The identification of a portable site-specific recombination system is another intriguing example confirming the important role of non-autonomous TEs of the TIME family in shuffling genetic information in bacterial genomes. Transposition of such mosaic elements may have a significant impact on diversity and evolution, not only of transposons and plasmids, but also of other types of mobile genetic elements. PMID:25121765

  7. Welding torch trajectory generation for hull joining using autonomous welding mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hascoet, J. Y.; Hamilton, K.; Carabin, G.; Rauch, M.; Alonso, M.; Ares, E.

    2012-04-01

    Shipbuilding processes involve highly dangerous manual welding operations. Welding of ship hulls presents a hazardous environment for workers. This paper describes a new robotic system, developed by the SHIPWELD consortium, that moves autonomously on the hull and automatically executes the required welding processes. Specific focus is placed on the trajectory control of such a system and forms the basis for the discussion in this paper. It includes a description of the robotic hardware design as well as some methodology used to establish the torch trajectory control.

  8. Intelligent behavior generator for autonomous mobile robots using planning-based AI decision making and supervisory control logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Hitesh K.; Bahl, Vikas; Martin, Jason; Flann, Nicholas S.; Moore, Kevin L.

    2002-07-01

    In earlier research the Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems (CSOIS) at Utah State University (USU) have been funded by the US Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command's (TACOM) Intelligent Mobility Program to develop and demonstrate enhanced mobility concepts for unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs). One among the several out growths of this work has been the development of a grammar-based approach to intelligent behavior generation for commanding autonomous robotic vehicles. In this paper we describe the use of this grammar for enabling autonomous behaviors. A supervisory task controller (STC) sequences high-level action commands (taken from the grammar) to be executed by the robot. It takes as input a set of goals and a partial (static) map of the environment and produces, from the grammar, a flexible script (or sequence) of the high-level commands that are to be executed by the robot. The sequence is derived by a planning function that uses a graph-based heuristic search (A* -algorithm). Each action command has specific exit conditions that are evaluated by the STC following each task completion or interruption (in the case of disturbances or new operator requests). Depending on the system's state at task completion or interruption (including updated environmental and robot sensor information), the STC invokes a reactive response. This can include sequencing the pending tasks or initiating a re-planning event, if necessary. Though applicable to a wide variety of autonomous robots, an application of this approach is demonstrated via simulations of ODIS, an omni-directional inspection system developed for security applications.

  9. AutoNav Mark3: Engineering the Next Generation of Autonomous Onboard Navigation and Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, Joseph Ed; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Eldred, Dan B.; Gaskell, Robert A.; Grasso, Christopher A.; Kennedy, Brian; Kubitscheck, Daniel; Mastrodemos, Nickolaos; Synnott, Stephen. P.; Vaughan, Andrew; Werner, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    The success of JPL's AutoNav system at comet Tempel-1 on July 4, 2005, demonstrated the power of autonomous navigation technology for the Deep Impact Mission. This software is being planned for use as the onboard navigation, tracking and rendezvous system for a Mars Sample Return Mission technology demonstration, and several mission proposals are evaluating its use for rendezvous with, and landing on asteroids. Before this however, extensive re-engineering of AutoNav will take place. This paper describes the AutoNav systems-engineering effort in several areas: extending the capabilities, improving operability, utilizing new hardware elements, and demonstrating the new possibilities of AutoNav in simulations.

  10. Autonomous and Autonomic Swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G.; Rash, James L.; Truszkowski, Walter F.; Rouff, Christopher A.; Sterritt, Roy

    2005-01-01

    A watershed in systems engineering is represented by the advent of swarm-based systems that accomplish missions through cooperative action by a (large) group of autonomous individuals each having simple capabilities and no global knowledge of the group s objective. Such systems, with individuals capable of surviving in hostile environments, pose unprecedented challenges to system developers. Design and testing and verification at much higher levels will be required, together with the corresponding tools, to bring such systems to fruition. Concepts for possible future NASA space exploration missions include autonomous, autonomic swarms. Engineering swarm-based missions begins with understanding autonomy and autonomicity and how to design, test, and verify systems that have those properties and, simultaneously, the capability to accomplish prescribed mission goals. Formal methods-based technologies, both projected and in development, are described in terms of their potential utility to swarm-based system developers.

  11. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications. PMID:26070809

  12. Behavior generation strategy of artificial behavioral system by self-learning paradigm for autonomous robot tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da?larli, Evren; Temelta?, Hakan

    2008-04-01

    In this study, behavior generation and self-learning paradigms are investigated for the real-time applications of multi-goal mobile robot tasks. The method is capable to generate new behaviors and it combines them in order to achieve multi goal tasks. The proposed method is composed from three layers: Behavior Generating Module, Coordination Level and Emotion -Motivation Level. Last two levels use Hidden Markov models to manage dynamical structure of behaviors. The kinematics and dynamic model of the mobile robot with non-holonomic constraints are considered in the behavior based control architecture. The proposed method is tested on a four-wheel driven and four-wheel steered mobile robot with constraints in simulation environment and results are obtained successfully.

  13. Photo-driven autonomous hydrogen generation system based on hierarchically shelled ZnO nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Heejin; Yong, Kijung

    2013-11-25

    A quantum dot semiconductor sensitized hierarchically shelled one-dimensional ZnO nanostructure has been applied as a quasi-artificial leaf for hydrogen generation. The optimized ZnO nanostructure consists of one dimensional nanowire as a core and two-dimensional nanosheet on the nanowire surface. Furthermore, the quantum dot semiconductors deposited on the ZnO nanostructures provide visible light harvesting properties. To realize the artificial leaf, we applied the ZnO based nanostructure as a photoelectrode with non-wired Z-scheme system. The demonstrated un-assisted photoelectrochemical system showed the hydrogen generation properties under 1 sun condition irradiation. In addition, the quantum dot modified photoelectrode showed 2 mA/cm{sup 2} current density at the un-assisted condition.

  14. Preprint version, final version at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/ 2014 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, Hong Kong, China Semi-autonomous Trajectory Generation for Mobile Robots

    E-print Network

    Preprint version, final version at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/ 2014 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, Hong Kong, China Semi-autonomous Trajectory Generation for Mobile Robots with Integral Haptic-- A new framework for semi-autonomous path plan- ning for mobile robots that extends the classical

  15. Intelligent Mission Designer - A novel approach to autonomous trajectory generation and its application to onboard guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, T.; Nakasuka, S.; Shimizu, R.

    An Intelligent Mission Designer is proposed as a novel approach to generate and analyze complicated interplanetary or near-earth mission trajectories. The proposed method employs an intelligent search directed by a knowledge base in order to quickly search and select a family of appropriate trajectories which can carry out a certain mission under some specified constraints. The transfer of obtained knowledge base to another mission analysis is also studied. This new approach is applied to multiple planetary swingby trajectory analysis, and profound improvement in search efficiency is verified. An application of this method to a new-type onboard flexible guidance concept is considered.

  16. An architecture for the autonomous generation of preference-based trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Jamie

    Numerous techniques exist to optimize aircraft and spacecraft trajectories over cost functions that include terms such as fuel, time, and separation from obstacles. Relative weighting factors can dramatically alter solution characteristics, and engineers often must manually adjust either cost weights or the trajectory itself to obtain desirable solutions. Further, when humans and robots work together, or when humans task robots, they may express their performance expectations in a "fuzzy" natural language fashion, or else as an uncertain range of more or less acceptable values. This work describes a software architecture which accepts both fuzzy linguistic and hard numeric constraints on trajectory performance and, using a trajectory generator provided by the user, automatically constructs trajectories to meet these specifications as closely as possible. The system respects hard constraints imposed by system dynamics or by the user, and will not let the user's preferences interfere with the system and user needs. The architecture's evaluation agent translates these requirements into cost functional weights expected to produce the desired motion characteristics. The quality of the resulting full-state trajectory is then evaluated based on a set of computed trajectory features compared to the specified constraints. If constraints are not met, the cost functional weights are adjusted according to precomputed heuristic equations. Heuristics are not generated in an ad hoc fashion, but are instead the result of a systematic testing of the simulated system under a range of simple conditions. The system is tested in a 2DOF linear and a 6DOF nonlinear domain with a variety of constraints and in the presence of obstacles. Results show that the system consistently meets all hard numeric constraints placed on the trajectory. Desired characteristics are often attainable or else, in those cases where they are discounted in favor of the hard constraints, failed by small margins. Results are discussed as a function of obstacles and of constraints.

  17. Delayed Dendritic Development in Newly Generated Dentate Granule Cells by Cell-Autonomous Expression of the Amyloid Precursor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, Eduardo M.; Schinder, Alejandro F.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal connectivity and synaptic remodeling are fundamental substrates for higher brain functions. Understanding their dynamics in the mammalian allocortex emerges as a critical step to tackle the cellular basis of cognitive decline that occurs during normal aging and in neurodegenerative disorders. In this work we have designed a novel approach to assess alterations in the dynamics of functional and structural connectivity elicited by chronic cell-autonomous overexpression of the human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP). We have taken advantage of the fact that the hippocampus continuously generates new dentate granule cells (GCs) to probe morphofunctional development of GCs expressing different variants of hAPP in a healthy background. hAPP was expressed together with a fluorescent reporter in neural progenitor cells of the dentate gyrus of juvenile mice by retroviral delivery. Neuronal progeny was analyzed several days post infection (dpi). Amyloidogenic cleavage products of hAPP such as the ?-C terminal fragment (?-CTF) induced a substantial reduction in glutamatergic connectivity at 21 dpi, at which time new GCs undergo active growth and synaptogenesis. Interestingly, this effect was transient, since the strength of glutamatergic inputs was normal by 35 dpi. This delay in glutamatergic synaptogenesis was paralleled by a decrease in dendritic length with no changes in spine density, consistent with a protracted dendritic development without alterations in synapse formation. Finally, similar defects in newborn GC development were observed by overexpression of ?-CTF, a non-amyloidogenic cleavage product of hAPP. These results indicate that hAPP can elicit protracted dendritic development independently of the amyloidogenic processing pathway. PMID:23851186

  18. Automated Coordinator Synthesis for Mission Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    Automated Coordinator Synthesis for Mission Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles S autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) programs to meet evolving requirements and capabilities. The hierarchical architecture for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) that facilitates graphical design and code generation

  19. Autophosphorylation of CaMKK2 generates autonomous activity that is disrupted by a T85S mutation linked to anxiety and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W.; Park, Elizabeth; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Oakhill, Jonathan S.; Issa, Samah M. A.; O’Brien, Matthew T.; Dite, Toby A.; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Wetsel, William C.; Means, Anthony R.; Kemp, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations that reduce expression or give rise to a Thr85Ser (T85S) mutation of Ca2+-CaM-dependent protein kinase kinase-2 (CaMKK2) have been implicated in behavioural disorders such as anxiety, bipolar and schizophrenia in humans. Here we report that Thr85 is an autophosphorylation site that endows CaMKK2 with a molecular memory that enables sustained autonomous activation following an initial, transient Ca2+ signal. Conversely, autophosphorylation of Ser85 in the T85S mutant fails to generate autonomous activity but instead causes a partial loss of CaMKK2 activity. The loss of autonomous activity in the mutant can be rescued by blocking glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) phosphorylation of CaMKK2 with the anti-mania drug lithium. Furthermore, CaMKK2 null mice representing a loss of function model the human behavioural phenotypes, displaying anxiety and manic-like behavioural disturbances. Our data provide a novel insight into CaMKK2 regulation and its perturbation by a mutation associated with behavioural disorders. PMID:26395653

  20. Autophosphorylation of CaMKK2 generates autonomous activity that is disrupted by a T85S mutation linked to anxiety and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Park, Elizabeth; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Oakhill, Jonathan S; Issa, Samah M A; O'Brien, Matthew T; Dite, Toby A; Langendorf, Christopher G; Wetsel, William C; Means, Anthony R; Kemp, Bruce E

    2015-01-01

    Mutations that reduce expression or give rise to a Thr85Ser (T85S) mutation of Ca(2+)-CaM-dependent protein kinase kinase-2 (CaMKK2) have been implicated in behavioural disorders such as anxiety, bipolar and schizophrenia in humans. Here we report that Thr85 is an autophosphorylation site that endows CaMKK2 with a molecular memory that enables sustained autonomous activation following an initial, transient Ca(2+) signal. Conversely, autophosphorylation of Ser85 in the T85S mutant fails to generate autonomous activity but instead causes a partial loss of CaMKK2 activity. The loss of autonomous activity in the mutant can be rescued by blocking glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) phosphorylation of CaMKK2 with the anti-mania drug lithium. Furthermore, CaMKK2 null mice representing a loss of function model the human behavioural phenotypes, displaying anxiety and manic-like behavioural disturbances. Our data provide a novel insight into CaMKK2 regulation and its perturbation by a mutation associated with behavioural disorders. PMID:26395653

  1. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  2. Autonomous data transmission apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M. (4675 W. 3825 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84120)

    1997-01-01

    A autonomous borehole data transmission apparatus for transmitting measurement data from measuring instruments at the downhole end of a drill string by generating pressure pulses utilizing a transducer longitudinally responsive to magnetic field pulses caused by electrical pulses corresponding to the measured downhole parameters.

  3. Autonomous data transmission apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, O.M.

    1997-03-25

    A autonomous borehole data transmission apparatus is described for transmitting measurement data from measuring instruments at the downhole end of a drill string by generating pressure pulses utilizing a transducer longitudinally responsive to magnetic field pulses caused by electrical pulses corresponding to the measured downhole parameters. 4 figs.

  4. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    DOEpatents

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  5. Autonomous Soaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Victor P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the autonomous soaring flight of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). It reviews energy sources for UAVs, and two examples of UAV's that used alternative energy sources, and thermal currents for soaring. Examples of flight tests, plans, and results are given. Ultimately, the concept of a UAV harvesting energy from the atmosphere has been shown to be feasible with existing technology.

  6. Autonomic dysreflexia

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph; McMillan, Colleen; Klassen, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To raise family physicians’ awareness of autonomic dysreflexia (AD) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and to provide some suggestions for intervention. Sources of information MEDLINE was searched from 1970 to July 2011 using the terms autonomic dysreflexia and spinal cord injury with family medicine or primary care. Other relevant guidelines and resources were reviewed and used. Main message Family physicians often lack confidence in treating patients with SCI, see them as complex and time-consuming, and feel undertrained to meet their needs. Family physicians provide a vital component of the health care of such patients, and understanding of the unique medical conditions related to SCI is important. Autonomic dysreflexia is an important, common, and potentially serious condition with which many family physicians are unfamiliar. This article will review the signs and symptoms of AD and offer some acute management options and preventive strategies for family physicians. Conclusion Family physicians should be aware of which patients with SCI are susceptible to AD and monitor those affected by it. Outlined is an approach to acute management. Family physicians play a pivotal role in prevention of AD through education (of the patient and other health care providers) and incorporation of strategies such as appropriate bladder, bowel, and skin care practices and warnings and management plans in the medical chart. PMID:22893332

  7. Autonomous vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meyrowitz, A.L.; Blidberg, D.R.; Michelson, R.C.

    1996-08-01

    There are various kinds of autonomous vehicles (AV`s) which can operate with varying levels of autonomy. This paper is concerned with underwater, ground, and aerial vehicles operating in a fully autonomous (nonteleoperated) mode. Further, this paper deals with AV`s as a special kind of device, rather than full-scale manned vehicles operating unmanned. The distinction is one in which the AV is likely to be designed for autonomous operation rather than being adapted for it as would be the case for manned vehicles. The authors provide a survey of the technological progress that has been made in AV`s, the current research issues and approaches that are continuing that progress, and the applications which motivate this work. It should be noted that issues of control are pervasive regardless of the kind of AV being considered, but that there are special considerations in the design and operation of AV`s depending on whether the focus is on vehicles underwater, on the ground, or in the air. The authors have separated the discussion into sections treating each of these categories.

  8. INL Autonomous Navigation System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-30

    The INL Autonomous Navigation System provides instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The system permits high-speed autonomous navigation including obstacle avoidance, waypoing navigation and path planning in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  9. Dysréflexie autonome

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph; McMillan, Colleen; Klassen, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Sensibiliser davantage les médecins de famille à la dysréflexie autonome (DA) chez les patients victimes d’une lésion médullaire (LM) et proposer certaines interventions. Sources de l’information On a fait une recension dans MEDLINE de 1970 à juillet 2011 à l’aide des expressions en anglais autonomic dysreflexia et spinal cord injury, ainsi que family medicine ou primary care. On a aussi passé en revue et utilisé d’autres ressources et guides de pratique pertinents. Message principal Il arrive souvent que les médecins de famille ne se sentent pas confiants de traiter des patients ayant une LM dont les problèmes sont complexes et exigent beaucoup de temps. Les médecins de famille ont l’impression de n’avoir pas la formation nécessaire pour répondre à leurs besoins. Pourtant, ils offrent une composante essentielle des soins à de tels patients et il est important qu’ils comprennent les problèmes médicaux particuliers aux LM. La dysréflexie autonome est un important et fréquent problème potentiellement sérieux que connaissent mal de nombreux médecins de famille. Cet article passe en revue les signes et les symptômes de la DA et présente certaines options de prise en charge aiguë, ainsi que des stratégies de prévention à l’intention des médecins de famille. Conclusion Les médecins de famille devraient savoir quels patients traumatisés médullaires sont susceptibles d’avoir une DA et surveiller ceux qui sont touchés par ce problème. Une explication est donnée dans cet article quant à l’approche à suivre pour la prise en charge aiguë. Les médecins de famille jouent un rôle essentiel dans la prévention de la DA, notamment par l’éducation (du patient et des autres professionnels de la santé) et la consignation dans le dossier médical de stratégies comme les soins appropriés de la vessie, de l’intestin et de la peau, d’avertissements et de plans de prise en charge.

  10. Autonomous Robotic Monitoring of Underground Cable Systems

    E-print Network

    Mamishev, Alexander

    mobile platforms. The challenges in realizing this vision include electromechanical design of the robot, and autonomous operation. This paper describes the electromechanical and sensing system design of the autonomous infrastructure, namely, generating plants, transmission lines, substations, and distribution networks. A large

  11. Autonomous, waste-free eluent generation and suppression in a single device: electrodialytic eluent reflux for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Kyle R; Riviello, John M

    2014-02-01

    Eluent reflux provides a new approach to suppress and reflux (recover) eluent without the continuous generation of chromatographic waste. The current work utilized a device containing ion exchange membranes at the electrodes, in order to prohibit electrolysis gases from entering the eluent stream. Two resin beds (separated by a membrane stack) were responsible for suppressing incoming eluent and regenerating the suppressed eluent to nearly its original concentration after detection. A greater than expected dilution in the eluent concentration was observed as a result of the minor leakage of potassium ions through the anion membrane stack into the electrode chamber. The incomplete recovery of the eluent was offset by the addition of a three port valve (DRV) to regulate eluent concentration. Over 48 h of continuous operation (192 injections), the device's performance was stable (RSD of 0.21% with the three port valve, compared to RSD 3.73% without). The device was able to operate for up to four weeks using 1L of eluent. Chromatograms showing the reproducibility of the device are presented for anions. PMID:24401425

  12. Autonomous magnetocumulative power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. A.; Sadunov, V. D.; Kazakov, S. A.; Boriskin, A. S.; Golosov, S. N.; Vlasov, Yu. V.; Utenkov, A. A.; Antipov, M. V.; Blinov, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    Helical magnetocumulative generators (MCGs) fed from explosive piezo generators (EPGs) are the most compact power supplies with an output energy of 1-10 kJ. EPGs are successfully coupled with MCGs in the operation mode and in structural parameters; these generators are easy to operate and do not require transformers or commutators. We report on the results of designing an autonomous small-size power supply based on EPGs and MCGs. Owing to bidirectional impact loading of the piezoceramic block of an EPG, the energy at the piezo generator output attains values of ˜25 J and is transferred to the helical MCG with an initial inductance of ˜1000 ?H. The power supply is constructed in the form of a monoblock with a volume of ˜2 dm3 or in the form of two separate devices connected by a high-voltage cable.

  13. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  14. AUTONOMOUS NAVIGATION TROUP FOR COOPERATIVE MODELLING OF UNKNOWN ENVIRONMENTS

    E-print Network

    López-Sánchez, Maite

    AUTONOMOUS NAVIGATION TROUP FOR COOPERATIVE MODELLING OF UNKNOWN ENVIRONMENTS Josep Amat,mantaras@iiia.csic.es} Abstract Based on the information gathered by a set of small autonomous low cost vehicles, the generation, small autonomous vehicles has been developed. These vehicles follow the already classical line of insect

  15. Distributed Task Plan: A Model for Designing Autonomous Mobile Agents

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Minjie

    Distributed Task Plan: A Model for Designing Autonomous Mobile Agents Wei Li Department present DTP (Distributed Task Plan), a model to depict distributed tasks for executions by mobile agents. DTP is composed of autonomous primitives and can generate the autonomous workflow when a mobile agent

  16. Controlled manipulation using autonomous aerial systems

    E-print Network

    Srikanth, Manohar B. (Manohar Balagatte)

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of the thesis is to design and control Autonomous Aerial Systems, also referred to as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are able to hover and navigate in space using the thrust forces generated by the ...

  17. Autonomous Attitude Determination System (AADS). Volume 1: System description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saralkar, K.; Frenkel, Y.; Klitsch, G.; Liu, K. S.; Lefferts, E.; Tasaki, K.; Snow, F.; Garrahan, J.

    1982-01-01

    Information necessary to understand the Autonomous Attitude Determination System (AADS) is presented. Topics include AADS requirements, program structure, algorithms, and system generation and execution.

  18. Nonlinear Moving Horizon Estimation for Combined State and Friction Coefficient Estimation in Autonomous Driving

    E-print Network

    in Autonomous Driving Mario Zanon, Janick V. Frasch and Moritz Diehl Abstract-- Real-time autonomous driving are presented. Keywords : Moving Horizon Estimation, code generation, autonomous driving, road friction Predic- tive Control (MPC) to the control of autonomous vehicles has recently become attractive

  19. Nemesis Autonomous Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Lee, Cin-Young; Horvath, Gregory A,; Clement, Bradley J.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized framework has been developed for systems validation that can be applied to both traditional and autonomous systems. The framework consists of an automated test case generation and execution system called Nemesis that rapidly and thoroughly identifies flaws or vulnerabilities within a system. By applying genetic optimization and goal-seeking algorithms on the test equipment side, a "war game" is conducted between a system and its complementary nemesis. The end result of the war games is a collection of scenarios that reveals any undesirable behaviors of the system under test. The software provides a reusable framework to evolve test scenarios using genetic algorithms using an operation model of the system under test. It can automatically generate and execute test cases that reveal flaws in behaviorally complex systems. Genetic algorithms focus the exploration of tests on the set of test cases that most effectively reveals the flaws and vulnerabilities of the system under test. It leverages advances in state- and model-based engineering, which are essential in defining the behavior of autonomous systems. It also uses goal networks to describe test scenarios.

  20. The Autonomic Symptom Profile: a new instrument to assess autonomic symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, G. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Offord, K. P.; Atkinson, E. J.; O'Brien, P. C.; Low, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a new specific instrument called the Autonomic Symptom Profile to measure autonomic symptoms and test its validity. BACKGROUND: Measuring symptoms is important in the evaluation of quality of life outcomes. There is no validated, self-completed questionnaire on the symptoms of patients with autonomic disorders. METHODS: The questionnaire is 169 items concerning different aspects of autonomic symptoms. The Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale (COMPASS) with item-weighting was established; higher scores indicate more or worse symptoms. Autonomic function tests were performed to generate the Composite Autonomic Scoring Scale (CASS) and to quantify autonomic deficits. We compared the results of the COMPASS with the CASS derived from the Autonomic Reflex Screen to evaluate validity. RESULTS: The instrument was tested in 41 healthy controls (mean age 46.6 years), 33 patients with nonautonomic peripheral neuropathies (mean age 59.5 years), and 39 patients with autonomic failure (mean age 61.1 years). COMPASS scores correlated well with the CASS, demonstrating an acceptable level of content and criterion validity. The mean (+/-SD) overall COMPASS score was 9.8 (+/-9) in controls, 25.9 (+/-17.9) in the patients with nonautonomic peripheral neuropathies, and 52.3 (+/-24.2) in the autonomic failure group. Scores of symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and secretomotor dysfunction best predicted the CASS on multiple stepwise regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a questionnaire that measures autonomic symptoms and present evidence for its validity. The instrument shows promise in assessing autonomic symptoms in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies.

  1. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result of ... these disorders can be life-threatening. Some autonomic nervous system disorders get better when an underlying disease is treated. ...

  2. Autonomous Soaring Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on autonomous soaring flight results for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)'s is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Thermal Soaring Flight Results; 3) Autonomous Dolphin Soaring; and 4) Future Plans.

  3. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemson, Philip T.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2014-09-01

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale-from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems-their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous the Poincaré oscillator with quasi-periodic forcing. In this way we not only discuss and review each method, but also present properties which help to clearly distinguish the three classes of systems when analysed in an inverse approach-from measured, or numerically generated data. In particular, this review provides a framework to tackle inverse problems in these areas and clearly distinguish non-autonomous dynamics from chaos or stochasticity.

  4. The autonomic laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve.

  5. Rover: Autonomous concepts for Mars exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiget, A.; Castets, B.; Chochon, H.; Hayard, M.; Lamarre, H.; Lamothe, A.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a mobile, autonomous vehicle that will be launched towards an unknown planet is considered. The rover significant constraints are: Ariane 5 compatibility, Earth/Mars transfer capability, 1000 km autonomous moving in Mars environment, on board localization, and maximum science capability. Two different types of subsystem were considered: classical subsystems (mechanical and mechanisms, thermal, telecommunications, power, onboard data processing) and robotics subsystem, (perception/navigation, autonomous displacement generation, autonomous localization). The needs of each subsystem were studied in terms of energy and data handling capability, in order to choose an on board architecture which best use the available capability, by means of specialized parts. A compromise must always be done between every subsystem in order to obtain the real need with respect to the goal, for example: between perception/navigation and the motion capability. A compromise must also be found between mechanical assembly and calibration need, which is a real problem.

  6. Endocrine-Autonomic Linkages.

    PubMed

    Sladek, Celia D; Michelini, Lisete C; Stachenfeld, Nina S; Stern, Javier E; Urban, Janice H

    2015-07-01

    Interaction between the autonomic nervous system and the neuroendocrine system is critical for maintenance of homeostasis in a wide variety of physiological parameters such as body temperature, fluid and electrolyte balance, and blood pressure and volume. The anatomical and physiological mechanisms underlying integration of the neuroendocrine and autonomic mechanisms responsible for eliciting integrated autonomic and neuroendocrine actions are the focus of this article. This includes a focus on the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, because it includes both neuroendocrine neurons and preganglionic autonomic neurons that regulate sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow. The "wired" and "nonwired" mechanisms within PVN that facilitate communication between these neuronal populations are described. The impact of peripheral hormones, specifically the adrenal and gonadal steroids, on the neuroendocrine and autonomic systems is discussed, and exercise is used as a specific example of a physiological challenge/stress that requires precise integration of neuroendocrine and autonomic responses to maintain cardiovascular, fluid, and energy homeostasis. PMID:26140719

  7. Precision autonomous underwater navigation

    E-print Network

    Bingham, Brian S. (Brian Steven), 1973-

    2003-01-01

    Deep-sea archaeology, an emerging application of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technology, requires precise navigation and guidance. As science requirements and engineering capabilities converge, navigating in the ...

  8. Autonomous Navigation for Airborne Applications

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jonghyuk "Jon"

    Autonomous Navigation for Airborne Applications Jonghyuk Kim A thesis submitted in fulfillment Navigation for Airborne Applications Autonomous navigation (or localisation) is the process of determining #12;ii Abstract Jonghyuk Kim Doctor of Philosophy The University of Sydney May 2004 Autonomous

  9. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  10. Autonomous multifunctional nanobrushes-autonomous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.; Tius, Marcus A.

    2007-04-01

    In this work, taking advantage of carbon nanotubes' small size, and exceptional mechanical, chemical and electrical properties, we report on a series of nano-synthesis procedures that combine conventional chemical vapor deposition and selective substrate area growth followed by chemical functionalizations to fabricate functionalized nano-brushes from aligned carbon nanotube arrays and chemically selective functional groups. The high aspect ratio and small dimension, mechanical stability and flexibility, surface chemical and adhesive characteristics of carbon nanotubes provide opportunities to create nano-brushes with selected chemical functionalities. The nano-brushes are made from aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube bristles grafted onto long SiC fiber handles in various configurations and functionalized with various chemical functional groups. These nano-brushes can easily be manipulated physically, either manually or with the aid of motors. Here, we explain the autonomous characteristics of the functionalized nano-brushes employing functional chemical groups such that the nano-brush can potentially collect various metal particles, ions, and contaminants from liquid solutions and the air environment, autonomously. These functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube based nano-brushes can work swiftly in both liquid and air environments. With surface modification and functionalization, the nanotube nano-brushes can potentially become a versatile nano-devices in many chemical and biological applications, where they can autonomously pick up the particles they encounter since they can be chemically programmed to function as Autonomous Chemical Nano Robots (ACNR).

  11. Autonomous surveillance for biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Jurdak, Raja; Elfes, Alberto; Kusy, Branislav; Tews, Ashley; Hu, Wen; Hernandez, Emili; Kottege, Navinda; Sikka, Pavan

    2015-04-01

    The global movement of people and goods has increased the risk of biosecurity threats and their potential to incur large economic, social, and environmental costs. Conventional manual biosecurity surveillance methods are limited by their scalability in space and time. This article focuses on autonomous surveillance systems, comprising sensor networks, robots, and intelligent algorithms, and their applicability to biosecurity threats. We discuss the spatial and temporal attributes of autonomous surveillance technologies and map them to three broad categories of biosecurity threat: (i) vector-borne diseases; (ii) plant pests; and (iii) aquatic pests. Our discussion reveals a broad range of opportunities to serve biosecurity needs through autonomous surveillance. PMID:25744760

  12. Vision-based Autonomous Navigation using Moon and Earth images 

    E-print Network

    de Dilectis, Francesco

    2014-12-10

    to give the Orion capsule, the next-generation manned spacecraft currently in development at NASA, a backup autonomous positioning system. Among other missions, Orion is designed to transport a crew to and from the Moon. The presence of individuals...

  13. Autonomous Flight Safety System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James

    2010-01-01

    The Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) is an independent self-contained subsystem mounted onboard a launch vehicle. AFSS has been developed by and is owned by the US Government. Autonomously makes flight termination/destruct decisions using configurable software-based rules implemented on redundant flight processors using data from redundant GPS/IMU navigation sensors. AFSS implements rules determined by the appropriate Range Safety officials.

  14. Planning and Execution for an Autonomous Aerobot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, Daniel M.; Estlin, Tara A.; Schaffer, Steven R.; Chouinard, Caroline M.

    2010-01-01

    The Aerial Onboard Autonomous Science Investigation System (AerOASIS) system provides autonomous planning and execution capabilities for aerial vehicles (see figure). The system is capable of generating high-quality operations plans that integrate observation requests from ground planning teams, as well as opportunistic science events detected onboard the vehicle while respecting mission and resource constraints. AerOASIS allows an airborne planetary exploration vehicle to summarize and prioritize the most scientifically relevant data; identify and select high-value science sites for additional investigation; and dynamically plan, schedule, and monitor the various science activities being performed, even during extended communications blackout periods with Earth.

  15. Advances in Autonomous Robotics Systems, Springer LNSC Volume 8717, (2014), pp 251-262 Humanoid Robot Gait Generator: Foot Steps Calculation

    E-print Network

    Bugmann, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Robot Gait Generator: Foot Steps Calculation for Trajectory Following. Horatio Garton, Guido Bugmann1 foot to the other. This mo- tion can be approximated with that of an inverted pendulum with discrete (left-right) oscillation moves the weight onto one foot (support foot) while the other (swing foot

  16. Systems, methods and apparatus for quiesence of autonomic safety devices with self action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments an autonomic environmental safety device may be quiesced. In at least one embodiment, a method for managing an autonomic safety device, such as a smoke detector, based on functioning state and operating status of the autonomic safety device includes processing received signals from the autonomic safety device to obtain an analysis of the condition of the autonomic safety device, generating one or more stay-awake signals based on the functioning status and the operating state of the autonomic safety device, transmitting the stay-awake signal, transmitting self health/urgency data, and transmitting environment health/urgency data. A quiesce component of an autonomic safety device can render the autonomic safety device inactive for a specific amount of time or until a challenging situation has passed.

  17. Swarm autonomic agents with self-destruct capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments an autonomic entity manages a system by generating one or more stay alive signals based on the functioning status and operating state of the system. In some embodiments, an evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy. The evolvable neural interface receives and generates heartbeat monitor signals and pulse monitor signals that are used to generate a stay alive signal that is used to manage the operations of the synthetic neural system. In another embodiment an asynchronous Alice signal (Autonomic license) requiring valid credentials of an anonymous autonomous agent is initiated. An unsatisfactory Alice exchange may lead to self-destruction of the anonymous autonomous agent for self-protection.

  18. Swarm autonomic agents with self-destruct capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments an autonomic entity manages a system by generating one or more stay alive signals based on the functioning status and operating state of the system. In some embodiments, an evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy. The evolvable neural interface receives and generates heartbeat monitor signals and pulse monitor signals that are used to generate a stay alive signal that is used to manage the operations of the synthetic neural system. In another embodiment an asynchronous Alice signal (Autonomic license) requiring valid credentials of an anonymous autonomous agent is initiated. An unsatisfactory Alice exchange may lead to self-destruction of the anonymous autonomous agent for self-protection.

  19. Autonomous & adaptive oceanographic feature tracking on board autonomous underwater vehicles

    E-print Network

    Petillo, Stephanie Marie

    2015-01-01

    The capabilities of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and their ability to perform tasks both autonomously and adaptively are rapidly improving, and the desire to quickly and efficiently sample the ocean environment ...

  20. 1 Design by Autonomous Learning Design by Autonomous Learning

    E-print Network

    Prabhakar, Sattiraju

    1 Design by Autonomous Learning Design by Autonomous Learning: Modeling Environment for Design Box 123, Broadway NSW 2007, Australia Email: {prabhakar, gjsmith}@socs.uts.edu.au 1. Design by Autonomous Learning An important area of expertise robots can provide is design of artefacts in physical

  1. Architecture of autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    Automation of Space Station functions and activities, particularly those involving robotic capabilities with interactive or supervisory human control, is a complex, multi-disciplinary systems design problem. A wide variety of applications using autonomous control can be found in the literature, but none of them seem to address the problem in general. All of them are designed with a specific application in mind. In this report, an abstract model is described which unifies the key concepts underlying the design of automated systems such as those studied by the aerospace contractors. The model has been kept as general as possible. The attempt is to capture all the key components of autonomous systems. With a little effort, it should be possible to map the functions of any specific autonomous system application to the model presented here.

  2. Architecture of autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Automation of Space Station functions and activities, particularly those involving robotic capabilities with interactive or supervisory human control, is a complex, multi-disciplinary systems design problem. A wide variety of applications using autonomous control can be found in the literature, but none of them seem to address the problem in general. All of them are designed with a specific application in mind. In this report, an abstract model is described which unifies the key concepts underlying the design of automated systems such as those studied by the aerospace contractors. The model has been kept as general as possible. The attempt is to capture all the key components of autonomous systems. With a little effort, it should be possible to map the functions of any specific autonomous system application to the model presented here.

  3. Autonomous Aerobraking for Mars Orbiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, J. L.

    2012-06-01

    Autonomous Aerobraking is a developing technology that will reduce cost and increase flexibility of an aerobraking orbiter around Mars. Currently in its second phase of development, autonomous aerobraking could be implemented for a 2018 Mars orbiter.

  4. Autonomous Navigation for Forest Machines

    E-print Network

    Hellström, Thomas

    Autonomous Navigation for Forest Machines a Pre-Study by Thomas Hellström Department of Computing Science Umeå University Umeå, Sweden 2002-10-18 #12;Autonomous Navigation for Forest Machines ­ a Pre 2002 Thomas Hellström #12;Autonomous Navigation for Forest Machines ­ a Pre-Study 3 Contents EXECUTIVE

  5. OPPORTUNITIES Autonomous Vehicles &

    E-print Network

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    and quantifying the clean technology (cleantech) sector in Central Texas. In order to develop a comprehensiveOPPORTUNITIES Autonomous Vehicles & Connected Mobility Water Management Recycling & Waste Grid" Technologies $2.5 Billion Cleantech contributes $2.5 Billion to Austin's regional GDP. 20

  6. Autonomous Optical Lunar Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, Renato; Crouse, Brian; D'souza, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The performance of optical autonomous navigation is investigated for low lunar orbits and for high elliptical lunar orbits. Various options for employing the camera measurements are presented and compared. Strategies for improving navigation performance are developed and applied to the Orion vehicle lunar mission

  7. Learning for autonomous navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Autonomous off-road navigation of robotic ground vehicles has important applications on Earth and in space exploration. Progress in this domain has been retarded by the limited lookahead range of 3-D sensors and by the difficulty of preprogramming systems to understand the traversability of the wide variety of terrain they can encounter.

  8. Microscale autonomous sensor and communications module

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-03-25

    Various technologies pertaining to a microscale autonomous sensor and communications module are described herein. Such a module includes a sensor that generates a sensor signal that is indicative of an environmental parameter. An integrated circuit receives the sensor signal and generates an output signal based at least in part upon the sensor signal. An optical emitter receives the output signal and generates an optical signal as a function of the output signal. An energy storage device is configured to provide power to at least the integrated circuit and the optical emitter, and wherein the module has a relatively small diameter and thickness.

  9. Autonomous satellite navigation by stellar refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gounley, R.; White, R.; Gai, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes an error analysis of an autonomous navigator using refraction measurements of starlight passing through the upper atmosphere. The analysis is based on a discrete linear Kalman filter. The filter generated steady-state values of navigator performance for a variety of test cases. Results of these simulations show that in low-earth orbit position-error standard deviations of less than 0.100 km may be obtained using only 40 star sightings per orbit.

  10. The autonomous sciencecraft constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, R. L.; Chien, S.; Castano, R.; Rabideau, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) will fly onboard the Air Force TechSat 21 constellation of three spacecraft scheduled for launch in 2006. ASE uses onboard continuous planning, robust task and goal-based execution, model-based mode identification and reconfiguration, and onboard machine learning and pattern recognition to radically increase science return by enabling intelligent downlink selection and autonomous retargeting. In this paper we discuss how these AI technologies are synergistically integrated in a hybrid multi-layer control architecture to enable a virtual spacecraft science agent. Demonstration of these capabilities in a flight environment will open up tremendous new opportunities in planetary science, space physics, and earth science that would be unreachable without this technology.

  11. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary points 1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs) are headaches/facial pains classified together based on:a suspected common pathophysiology involving the trigeminovascular system, the trigeminoparasympathetic reflex and centres controlling circadian rhythms;a similar clinical presentation of trigeminal pain, and autonomic activation. 2. There is much overlap in the diagnostic features of individual TACs. 3. In contrast, treatment response is relatively specific and aids in establishing a definitive diagnosis. 4. TACs are often presentations of underlying pathology; all patients should be imaged. 5. The aim of the article is to provide the reader with a broad introduction to, and an overview of, TACs. The reading list is extensive for the interested reader. PMID:26516482

  12. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  13. Autonomous power expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringer, Mark J.; Quinn, Todd M.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the Autonomous Power System (APS) program is to develop and apply intelligent problem solving and control technologies to the Space Station Freedom Electrical Power Systems (SSF/EPS). The objectives of the program are to establish artificial intelligence/expert system technology paths, to create knowledge based tools with advanced human-operator interfaces, and to integrate and interface knowledge-based and conventional control schemes. This program is being developed at the NASA-Lewis. The APS Brassboard represents a subset of a 20 KHz Space Station Power Management And Distribution (PMAD) testbed. A distributed control scheme is used to manage multiple levels of computers and switchgear. The brassboard is comprised of a set of intelligent switchgear used to effectively switch power from the sources to the loads. The Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) portion of the APS program integrates a knowledge based fault diagnostic system, a power resource scheduler, and an interface to the APS Brassboard. The system includes knowledge bases for system diagnostics, fault detection and isolation, and recommended actions. The scheduler autonomously assigns start times to the attached loads based on temporal and power constraints. The scheduler is able to work in a near real time environment for both scheduling an dynamic replanning.

  14. Autonomous power expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringer, Mark J.; Quinn, Todd M.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the Autonomous Power System (APS) program is to develop and apply intelligent problem solving and control technologies to the Space Station Freedom Electrical Power Systems (SSF/EPS). The objectives of the program are to establish artificial intelligence/expert system technology paths, to create knowledge based tools with advanced human-operator interfaces, and to integrate and interface knowledge-based and conventional control schemes. This program is being developed at the NASA-Lewis. The APS Brassboard represents a subset of a 20 KHz Space Station Power Management And Distribution (PMAD) testbed. A distributed control scheme is used to manage multiple levels of computers and switchgear. The brassboard is comprised of a set of intelligent switchgear used to effectively switch power from the sources to the loads. The Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) portion of the APS program integrates a knowledge based fault diagnostic system, a power resource scheduler, and an interface to the APS Brassboard. The system includes knowledge bases for system diagnostics, fault detection and isolation, and recommended actions. The scheduler autonomously assigns start times to the attached loads based on temporal and power constraints. The scheduler is able to work in a near real time environment for both scheduling and dynamic replanning.

  15. Advanced Autonomous Systems for Space Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, A. R.; Smith, B. D.; Muscettola, N.; Barrett, A.; Mjolssness, E.; Clancy, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    New missions of exploration and space operations will require unprecedented levels of autonomy to successfully accomplish their objectives. Inherently high levels of complexity, cost, and communication distances will preclude the degree of human involvement common to current and previous space flight missions. With exponentially increasing capabilities of computer hardware and software, including networks and communication systems, a new balance of work is being developed between humans and machines. This new balance holds the promise of not only meeting the greatly increased space exploration requirements, but simultaneously dramatically reducing the design, development, test, and operating costs. New information technologies, which take advantage of knowledge-based software, model-based reasoning, and high performance computer systems, will enable the development of a new generation of design and development tools, schedulers, and vehicle and system health management capabilities. Such tools will provide a degree of machine intelligence and associated autonomy that has previously been unavailable. These capabilities are critical to the future of advanced space operations, since the science and operational requirements specified by such missions, as well as the budgetary constraints will limit the current practice of monitoring and controlling missions by a standing army of ground-based controllers. System autonomy capabilities have made great strides in recent years, for both ground and space flight applications. Autonomous systems have flown on advanced spacecraft, providing new levels of spacecraft capability and mission safety. Such on-board systems operate by utilizing model-based reasoning that provides the capability to work from high-level mission goals, while deriving the detailed system commands internally, rather than having to have such commands transmitted from Earth. This enables missions of such complexity and communication` distances as are not otherwise possible, as well as many more efficient and low cost applications. In addition, utilizing component and system modeling and reasoning capabilities, autonomous systems will play an increasing role in ground operations for space missions, where they will both reduce the human workload as well as provide greater levels of monitoring and system safety. This paper will focus specifically on new and innovative software for remote, autonomous, space systems flight operations. Topics to be presented will include a brief description of key autonomous control concepts, the Remote Agent program that commanded the Deep Space 1 spacecraft to new levels of system autonomy, recent advances in distributed autonomous system capabilities, and concepts for autonomous vehicle health management systems. A brief description of teaming spacecraft and rovers for complex exploration missions will also be provided. New on-board software for autonomous science data acquisition for planetary exploration will be described, as well as advanced systems for safe planetary landings. A new multi-agent architecture that addresses some of the challenges of autonomous systems will be presented. Autonomous operation of ground systems will also be considered, including software for autonomous in-situ propellant production and management, and closed- loop ecological life support systems (CELSS). Finally, plans and directions for the future will be discussed.

  16. Autonomous Command Operations of the WIRE Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walyus, Keith; Prior, Mike; Saylor, Richard

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents operational innovations which will be introduced on NASA's Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) mission. These innovations include an end-to-end design architecture for an autonomous commanding capability for the uplink of command loads during unattended station contacts. The WIRE mission is the fifth and final mission of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Small Explorer (SMEX) series to be launched in March of 1999. Its primary mission is the targeting of deep space fields using an ultra-cooled infrared telescope. Due to its mission design WIRE command loads are large (approximately 40 Kbytes per 24 hours) and must be performed daily. To reduce the cost of mission operations support that would be required in order to uplink command loads, the WIRE Flight Operations Team has implemented all autonomous command loading capability. This capability allows completely unattended operations over a typical two-day weekend period. The key factors driving design and implementation of this capability were: 1) integration with already existing ground system autonomous capabilities and systems, 2) the desire to evolve autonomous operations capabilities based upon previous SMEX operations experience - specifically the TRACE mission, 3) integration with ground station operations - both autonomous and man-tended, 4) low cost and quick implementation, and 5) end-to-end system robustness. A trade-off study was performed to examine these factors in light of the low-cost, higher-risk SMEX mission philosophy. The study concluded that a STOL (Spacecraft Test and Operations Language) based script, highly integrated with other scripts used to perform autonomous operations, was best suited given the budget and goals of the mission. Each of these factors is discussed in addition to use of the TRACE mission as a testbed for autonomous commanding prior to implementation on WIRE. The capabilities implemented on the WIRE mission are an example of a low-cost, robust, and efficient method for autonomous command loading when implemented with other autonomous features of the ground system. They call be used as a design and implementation template by other missions interested in evolving toward autonomous and lower cost operations. Additionally, the WIRE spacecraft will be used as an operational testbed upon completion of its nominal mission later in 1999. One idea being studied is advanced on-board modeling. Advanced on-board modeling techniques will be used to more efficiently display the spacecraft state. This health and safety information could be used by engineers on the ground or could be used by tile spacecraft for its own assessments. Additionally, this same state information could also be input into the event-driven scheduling system, as the scheduling system will need to assess the spacecraft state before undertaking a new activity. Advanced modeling techniques are being evaluated for a number of NASA missions including The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), which is scheduled to launch in 2007.

  17. Development of autonomous grasping and navigating robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Keisuke; Nakayama, Yasuichi

    2015-01-01

    The ability to find and grasp target items in an unknown environment is important for working robots. We developed an autonomous navigating and grasping robot. The operations are locating a requested item, moving to where the item is placed, finding the item on a shelf or table, and picking the item up from the shelf or the table. To achieve these operations, we designed the robot with three functions: an autonomous navigating function that generates a map and a route in an unknown environment, an item position recognizing function, and a grasping function. We tested this robot in an unknown environment. It achieved a series of operations: moving to a destination, recognizing the positions of items on a shelf, picking up an item, placing it on a cart with its hand, and returning to the starting location. The results of this experiment show the applicability of reducing the workforce with robots.

  18. Autonomous land navigation: A demonstration of retrotraverse

    SciTech Connect

    Klarer, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection/avoidance has not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are obstacle-free. The system performs path planning and execution (following) based on maps constructed using the vehicle's navigation system and onboard map-maker. The system configuration allows a map to be generated and stored during teleoperation of the vehicle, which may then be inverted and autonomously followed to perform ''retrotraverse'' back to the path start point. The system software, hardware, and performance data are discussed. 9 refs.

  19. Autonomous quantum error correction with superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Kapit, Eliot; Saskin, Samuel; Leung, Nelson; Earnest, Nathan; McKay, David; Koch, Jens; Schuster, David

    2015-03-01

    Quantum error correction is of vital importance for the successful performance of quantum information tasks. Based on recent work, we propose a superconducting circuit with flux-driven Josephson qubits capable of autonomously protecting many-body states against bit-flip errors. Unlike the traditional error correction schemes where feed-back operations are applied conditioned on the measurements, in our circuit, error correction is achieved by tailoring interactions between low-Q resonators (the ``shadow lattice'') and sinusoidally flux-driven qubits. An energetic resonance condition minimizes errors generated by the resonator coupling itself while still allowing for rapid error correction. In this talk, I will introduce our autonomous quantum error correction scheme, and present our fabricated superconducting circuit. I will also discuss preliminary results obtained from our experiments.

  20. Autonomous Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siders, Jeffrey A.; Smith, Robert H.

    2004-01-01

    The continued assembly and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) is the cornerstone within NASA's overall Strategic P an. As indicated in NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP), the International Space Station requires Shuttle to fly through at least the middle of the next decade to complete assembly of the Station, provide crew transport, and to provide heavy lift up and down mass capability. The ISTP reflects a tight coupling among the Station, Shuttle, and OSP programs to support our Nation's space goal . While the Shuttle is a critical component of this ISTP, there is a new emphasis for the need to achieve greater efficiency and safety in transporting crews to and from the Space Station. This need is being addressed through the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program. However, the OSP is being designed to "complement" the Shuttle as the primary means for crew transfer, and will not replace all the Shuttle's capabilities. The unique heavy lift capabilities of the Space Shuttle is essential for both ISS, as well as other potential missions extending beyond low Earth orbit. One concept under discussion to better fulfill this role of a heavy lift carrier, is the transformation of the Shuttle to an "un-piloted" autonomous system. This concept would eliminate the loss of crew risk, while providing a substantial increase in payload to orbit capability. Using the guidelines reflected in the NASA ISTP, the autonomous Shuttle a simplified concept of operations can be described as; "a re-supply of cargo to the ISS through the use of an un-piloted Shuttle vehicle from launch through landing". Although this is the primary mission profile, the other major consideration in developing an autonomous Shuttle is maintaining a crew transportation capability to ISS as an assured human access to space capability.

  1. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  2. Toward autonomous spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, L. J.; Calabrese, P. G.; Walsh, M. J.; Owens, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ways in which autonomous behavior of spacecraft can be extended to treat situations wherein a closed loop control by a human may not be appropriate or even possible are explored. Predictive models that minimize mean least squared error and arbitrary cost functions are discussed. A methodology for extracting cyclic components for an arbitrary environment with respect to usual and arbitrary criteria is developed. An approach to prediction and control based on evolutionary programming is outlined. A computer program capable of predicting time series is presented. A design of a control system for a robotic dense with partially unknown physical properties is presented.

  3. Experiments in autonomous robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is performing basic research in autonomous robotics for energy-related applications in hazardous environments. The CESAR research agenda includes a strong experimental component to assure practical evaluation of new concepts and theories. An evolutionary sequence of mobile research robots has been planned to support research in robot navigation, world sensing, and object manipulation. A number of experiments have been performed in studying robot navigation and path planning with planar sonar sensing. Future experiments will address more complex tasks involving three-dimensional sensing, dexterous manipulation, and human-scale operations.

  4. Autonomous intelligent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, H.; Holcomb, L.

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) has instituted a 'Systems Autonomy' technology development program aimed at the creation of increasingly sophisticated AI systems. Expert system production will in due course be followed by fully autonomous AI systems capable of the complex mission objectives of the Space Station, as well as of lunar and Martian exploration. AI systems must demonstrate the degree of their autonomy in a real-time operational environment, and then undergo mating to robotics technologies. OAST's Systems Autonomy Program and Robotics Program are discussed with a view to anticipated difficulties in their integration.

  5. Autonomous interplanetary constellation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Cornelius Channing, II

    According to NASA's integrated space technology roadmaps, space-based infrastructures are envisioned as necessary ingredients to a sustained effort in continuing space exploration. Whether it be for extra-terrestrial habitats, roving/cargo vehicles, or space tourism, autonomous space networks will provide a vital communications lifeline for both future robotic and human missions alike. Projecting that the Moon will be a bustling hub of activity within a few decades, a near-term opportunity for in-situ infrastructure development is within reach. This dissertation addresses the anticipated need for in-space infrastructure by investigating a general design methodology for autonomous interplanetary constellations; to illustrate the theory, this manuscript presents results from an application to the Earth-Moon neighborhood. The constellation design methodology is formulated as an optimization problem, involving a trajectory design step followed by a spacecraft placement sequence. Modeling the dynamics as a restricted 3-body problem, the investigated design space consists of families of periodic orbits which play host to the constellations, punctuated by arrangements of spacecraft autonomously guided by a navigation strategy called LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation). Instead of more traditional exhaustive search methods, a numerical continuation approach is implemented to map the admissible configuration space. In particular, Keller's pseudo-arclength technique is used to follow folding/bifurcating solution manifolds, which are otherwise inaccessible with other parameter continuation schemes. A succinct characterization of the underlying structure of the local, as well as global, extrema is thus achievable with little a priori intuition of the solution space. Furthermore, the proposed design methodology offers benefits in computation speed plus the ability to handle mildly stochastic systems. An application of the constellation design methodology to the restricted Earth-Moon system, reveals optimal pairwise configurations for various L1, L2, and L5 (halo, axial, and vertical) periodic orbit families. Navigation accuracies, ranging from O (10+/-1) meters in position space, are obtained for the optimal Earth-Moon constellations, given measurement noise on the order of 1 meter.

  6. Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estlin, Tara A.; Chien, Steve A.; Castano, Rebecca; Gaines, Daniel M.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Schoolcraft, Josua B.; Oyake, Amalaye; Vaughs, Ashton G.; Torgerson, Jordan L.

    2011-01-01

    The Palomar Adaptive Optics System actively corrects for changing aberrations in light due to atmospheric turbulence. However, the underlying internal static error is unknown and uncorrected by this process. The dedicated wavefront sensor device necessarily lies along a different path than the science camera, and, therefore, doesn't measure the true errors along the path leading to the final detected imagery. This is a standard problem in adaptive optics (AO) called "non-common path error." The Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration (APRC) software suite performs automated sensing and correction iterations to calibrate the Palomar AO system to levels that were previously unreachable.

  7. AUTONOMOUS FOREST MACHINES PAST, PRESENT

    E-print Network

    Hellström, Thomas

    1 AUTONOMOUS FOREST MACHINES ­ PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE Thomas Hellström1 , Pär Lärkeryd2 , Tomas.larkeryd@indexator.se (3) Professor, Dept. of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE #12;2 ABSTRACT The feasibility of using autonomous forest vehicles (which can be regarded as logical

  8. Asteroid Exploration with Autonomic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James; Rouff, Christopher; Hinchey, Mike

    2004-01-01

    NASA is studying advanced technologies for a future robotic exploration mission to the asteroid belt. The prospective ANTS (Autonomous Nano Technology Swarm) mission comprises autonomous agents including worker agents (small spacecra3) designed to cooperate in asteroid exploration under the overall authoriq of at least one ruler agent (a larger spacecraft) whose goal is to cause science data to be returned to Earth. The ANTS team (ruler plus workers and messenger agents), but not necessarily any individual on the team, will exhibit behaviors that qualify it as an autonomic system, where an autonomic system is defined as a system that self-reconfigures, self-optimizes, self-heals, and self-protects. Autonomic system concepts lead naturally to realistic, scalable architectures rich in capabilities and behaviors. In-depth consideration of a major mission like ANTS in terms of autonomic systems brings new insights into alternative definitions of autonomic behavior. This paper gives an overview of the ANTS mission and discusses the autonomic properties of the mission.

  9. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  10. Autonomous Flight Safety System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Santuro, Steve; Simpson, James; Zoerner, Roger; Bull, Barton; Lanzi, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) is an independent flight safety system designed for small to medium sized expendable launch vehicles launching from or needing range safety protection while overlying relatively remote locations. AFSS replaces the need for a man-in-the-loop to make decisions for flight termination. AFSS could also serve as the prototype for an autonomous manned flight crew escape advisory system. AFSS utilizes onboard sensors and processors to emulate the human decision-making process using rule-based software logic and can dramatically reduce safety response time during critical launch phases. The Range Safety flight path nominal trajectory, its deviation allowances, limit zones and other flight safety rules are stored in the onboard computers. Position, velocity and attitude data obtained from onboard global positioning system (GPS) and inertial navigation system (INS) sensors are compared with these rules to determine the appropriate action to ensure that people and property are not jeopardized. The final system will be fully redundant and independent with multiple processors, sensors, and dead man switches to prevent inadvertent flight termination. AFSS is currently in Phase III which includes updated algorithms, integrated GPS/INS sensors, large scale simulation testing and initial aircraft flight testing.

  11. Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  12. Mission Operations with an Autonomous Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pell, Barney; Sawyer, Scott R.; Muscettola, Nicola; Smith, Benjamin; Bernard, Douglas E.

    1998-01-01

    The Remote Agent (RA) is an Artificial Intelligence (AI) system which automates some of the tasks normally reserved for human mission operators and performs these tasks autonomously on-board the spacecraft. These tasks include activity generation, sequencing, spacecraft analysis, and failure recovery. The RA will be demonstrated as a flight experiment on Deep Space One (DSI), the first deep space mission of the NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). As we moved from prototyping into actual flight code development and teamed with ground operators, we made several major extensions to the RA architecture to address the broader operational context in which PA would be used. These extensions support ground operators and the RA sharing a long-range mission profile with facilities for asynchronous ground updates; support ground operators monitoring and commanding the spacecraft at multiple levels of detail simultaneously; and enable ground operators to provide additional knowledge to the RA, such as parameter updates, model updates, and diagnostic information, without interfering with the activities of the RA or leaving the system in an inconsistent state. The resulting architecture supports incremental autonomy, in which a basic agent can be delivered early and then used in an increasingly autonomous manner over the lifetime of the mission. It also supports variable autonomy, as it enables ground operators to benefit from autonomy when L'@ey want it, but does not inhibit them from obtaining a detailed understanding and exercising tighter control when necessary. These issues are critical to the successful development and operation of autonomous spacecraft.

  13. Navigation and steering for autonomous virtual humans.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Mubbasir; Badler, Norman I

    2013-05-01

    The ever-increasing applicability of interactive virtual worlds in industry and academia has given rise to the need for robust, versatile autonomous virtual humans to inject life into these environments. There are two fundamental problems that must be addressed to produce functional, purposeful autonomous populaces: (1)Navigation: finding a collision-free global path from an agent's start position to its target in large complex environments, and (2) Steering: moving an agent along the path while avoiding static and dynamic threats such as other agents. In this review, we survey the large body of contributions in steering and navigation for autonomous agents in dynamic virtual worlds. We describe the benefits and limitations of different proposed solutions and identify potential future research directions to meet the needs for the next generation of interactive virtual world applications. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:263-272. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1223 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304204

  14. Evasion Planning for Autonomous Vehicles at Intersections TszChiu Au 1 , ChienLiang Fok 2 , Sriram Vishwanath 2 , Christine Julien 2 , and Peter Stone 1

    E-print Network

    Stone, Peter

    Evasion Planning for Autonomous Vehicles at Intersections Tsz­Chiu Au 1 , Chien­Liang Fok 2 management (AIM) is a new intersection control protocol that exploits the capabilities of autonomous vehicles that autonomous vehicles are feasible with current generation of hardware [1]. Looking ahead to the time when

  15. Autonomous Martian flying rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A remotely programmable, autonomous flying rover is proposed to extensively survey the Martian surface environment. A Mach .3, solar powered, modified flying wing could cover roughly a 2000 mile range during Martian daylight hours. Multiple craft launched from an orbiting mother ship could provide near-global coverage. Each craft is envisioned to fly at about 1 km above the surface and measure atmospheric composition, pressure and temperature, map surface topography, and remotely penetrate the near subsurface looking for water (ice) and perhaps evidence of life. Data collected are relayed to Earth via the orbiting mother ship. Near surface guidance and control capability is an adaptation of current cruise missile technology. A solar powered aircraft designed to fly in the low temperature, low density, carbon dioxide Martian atmosphere near the surface appears feasible.

  16. Autonomous Flying Controls Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis,Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights.

  17. Autonomous river navigation Franklin D. Snydera

    E-print Network

    Collins, Robert T.

    Autonomous river navigation Franklin D. Snydera , Daniel D. Morrisa , Paul H. Haleya , Robert T a boat with fully autonomous navigation, surveillance, and reactive behaviors. Autonomous water of the detection, tracking, mapping and navigation will be presented. Keywords: 3D Computer Vision, Autonomous

  18. A Heuristic Route Planner For Autonomous Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, John F.; Semeco, Antonio C.; Eamsherangkoon, Pipat

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a heuristic route planning system for use in robotic vehicles. The route planner described herein is applicable to a variety of natural terrain ground systems such as autonomous tactical vehicles and mobile robot sentries. The route planner consists of five processing stages: (1) terrain preprocessing, (2) local points-of-interest extraction, (3) postprocessing point reduction, (4) search space criterion graph construction, and (5) heuristic search path generation. Examples of these processing steps are presented and additional system improvements are discussed.

  19. Autonomous software: Myth or magic?

    E-print Network

    Alasdair Allan; Tim Naylor; Eric S. Saunders

    2008-02-04

    We discuss work by the eSTAR project which demonstrates a fully closed loop autonomous system for the follow up of possible micro-lensing anomalies. Not only are the initial micro-lensing detections followed up in real time, but ongoing events are prioritised and continually monitored, with the returned data being analysed automatically. If the ``smart software'' running the observing campaign detects a planet-like anomaly, further follow-up will be scheduled autonomously and other telescopes and telescope networks alerted to the possible planetary detection. We further discuss the implications of this, and how such projects can be used to build more general autonomous observing and control systems.

  20. Cybersecurity for aerospace autonomous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    High profile breaches have occurred across numerous information systems. One area where attacks are particularly problematic is autonomous control systems. This paper considers the aerospace information system, focusing on elements that interact with autonomous control systems (e.g., onboard UAVs). It discusses the trust placed in the autonomous systems and supporting systems (e.g., navigational aids) and how this trust can be validated. Approaches to remotely detect the UAV compromise, without relying on the onboard software (on a potentially compromised system) as part of the process are discussed. How different levels of autonomy (task-based, goal-based, mission-based) impact this remote characterization is considered.

  1. Autonomous Navigation Using Celestial Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Gramling, Cheryl; Leung, Dominic; Belur, Sheela; Long, Anne

    1999-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Enterprises envision frequent low-cost missions to explore the solar system, observe the universe, and study our planet. Satellite autonomy is a key technology required to reduce satellite operating costs. The Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center (GNCC) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) currently sponsors several initiatives associated with the development of advanced spacecraft systems to provide autonomous navigation and control. Autonomous navigation has the potential both to increase spacecraft navigation system performance and to reduce total mission cost. By eliminating the need for routine ground-based orbit determination and special tracking services, autonomous navigation can streamline spacecraft ground systems. Autonomous navigation products can be included in the science telemetry and forwarded directly to the scientific investigators. In addition, autonomous navigation products are available onboard to enable other autonomous capabilities, such as attitude control, maneuver planning and orbit control, and communications signal acquisition. Autonomous navigation is required to support advanced mission concepts such as satellite formation flying. GNCC has successfully developed high-accuracy autonomous navigation systems for near-Earth spacecraft using NASA's space and ground communications systems and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Recently, GNCC has expanded its autonomous navigation initiative to include satellite orbits that are beyond the regime in which use of GPS is possible. Currently, GNCC is assessing the feasibility of using standard spacecraft attitude sensors and communication components to provide autonomous navigation for missions including: libration point, gravity assist, high-Earth, and interplanetary orbits. The concept being evaluated uses a combination of star, Sun, and Earth sensor measurements along with forward-link Doppler measurements from the command link carrier to autonomously estimate the spacecraft's orbit and reference oscillator's frequency. To support autonomous attitude determination and control and maneuver planning and control, the orbit determination accuracy should be on the order of kilometers in position and centimeters per second in velocity. A less accurate solution (one hundred kilometers in position) could be used for acquisition purposes for command and science downloads. This paper provides performance results for both libration point orbiting and high Earth orbiting satellites as a function of sensor measurement accuracy, measurement types, measurement frequency, initial state errors, and dynamic modeling errors.

  2. Onboard Processing and Autonomous Operations on the IPEX Cubesat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Ortega, Kevin; Flatley, Tom; Crum, Gary; Geist, Alessandro; Lin, Michael; Williams, Austin; Bellardo, John; Puig-Suari, Jordi; Stanton, Eric; Yee, Edmond

    2012-01-01

    IPEX is a 1u Cubesat sponsored by NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO), the goals or which are: (1) Flight validate high performance flight computing, (2) Flight validate onboard instrument data processing product generation software, (3) flight validate autonomous operations for instrument processing, (4) enhance NASA outreach and university ties.

  3. Dynamic response and maneuvering strategies of a hybrid autonomous underwater vehicle in hovering

    E-print Network

    Cooney, Lauren Alise

    2009-01-01

    The Odyssey IV autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is the next generation of unmanned subsurface robots from the MIT Sea Grant AUV Laboratory. The Odyssey IV AUV has a novel propulsion system, which includes a pair of ...

  4. Online Planning for Autonomous Running Jumps Over Obstacles in High-Speed Quadrupeds

    E-print Network

    Park, Hae won

    This paper presents a new framework for the generation of high-speed running jumps to clear terrain obstacles in quadrupedal robots. Our methods enable the quadruped to autonomously jump over obstacles up to 40 cm in height ...

  5. State discovery for autonomous learning

    E-print Network

    Ivanov, Yuri A., 1967-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of algorithms for early perceptual learning for an autonomous agent in the presence of feedback. In the framework of associative perceptual learning with indirect supervision, three ...

  6. Autonomous adaptive acoustic relay positioning

    E-print Network

    Cheung, Mei Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of maximizing underwater acoustic data transmission by adaptively positioning an autonomous mobile relay so as to learn and exploit spatial variations in channel performance. The acoustic channel ...

  7. Autonomic Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pintér, Alexandra; Cseh, Domonkos; Sárközi, Adrienn; Illigens, Ben M; Siepmann, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive central neurological disease characterized by inflammation and demyelination. In patients with MS, dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system may present with various clinical symptoms including sweating abnormalities, urinary dysfunction, orthostatic dysregulation, gastrointestinal symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. These autonomic disturbances reduce the quality of life of affected patients and constitute a clinical challenge to the physician due to variability of clinical presentation and inconsistent data on diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and initiation of individualized interdisciplinary and multimodal strategies is beneficial in the management of autonomic dysfunction in MS. This review summarizes the current literature on the most prevalent aspects of autonomic dysfunction in MS and provides reference to underlying pathophysiological mechanisms as well as means of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26213927

  8. Parametrized maneuvers for autonomous vehicles

    E-print Network

    Dever, Christopher W. (Christopher Walden), 1972-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis presents a method for creating continuously parametrized maneuver classes for autonomous vehicles. These classes provide useful tools for motion planners, bundling sets of related vehicle motions based on a ...

  9. Autonomic Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pintér, Alexandra; Cseh, Domonkos; Sárközi, Adrienn; Illigens, Ben M.; Siepmann, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive central neurological disease characterized by inflammation and demyelination. In patients with MS, dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system may present with various clinical symptoms including sweating abnormalities, urinary dysfunction, orthostatic dysregulation, gastrointestinal symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. These autonomic disturbances reduce the quality of life of affected patients and constitute a clinical challenge to the physician due to variability of clinical presentation and inconsistent data on diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and initiation of individualized interdisciplinary and multimodal strategies is beneficial in the management of autonomic dysfunction in MS. This review summarizes the current literature on the most prevalent aspects of autonomic dysfunction in MS and provides reference to underlying pathophysiological mechanisms as well as means of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26213927

  10. Autonomous power system: Integrated scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringer, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) project at NASA Lewis Research Center is designed to demonstrate the abilities of integrated intelligent diagnosis, control and scheduling techniques to space power distribution hardware. The project consists of three elements: the Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) for fault diagnosis, isolation, and recovery (FDIR), the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler (AIPS) to determine system configuration, and power hardware (Brassboard) to simulate a space-based power system. Faults can be introduced into the Brassboard and in turn, be diagnosed and corrected by APEX and AIPS. The Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler controls the execution of loads attached to the Brassboard. Each load must be executed in a manner that efficiently utilizes available power and satisfies all load, resource, and temporal constraints. In the case of a fault situation on the Brassboard, AIPS dynamically modifies the existing schedule in order to resume efficient operation conditions. A database is kept of the power demand, temporal modifiers, priority of each load, and the power level of each source. AIPS uses a set of heuristic rules to assign start times and resources to each load based on load and resource constraints. A simple improvement engine based upon these heuristics is also available to improve the schedule efficiency. This paper describes the operation of the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler as a single entity, as well as its integration with APEX and the Brassboard. Future plans are discussed for the growth of the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler.

  11. Autonomous power system brassboard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merolla, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) brassboard is a 20 kHz power distribution system which has been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. The brassboard exists to provide a realistic hardware platform capable of testing artificially intelligent (AI) software. The brassboard's power circuit topology is based upon a Power Distribution Control Unit (PDCU), which is a subset of an advanced development 20 kHz electrical power system (EPS) testbed, originally designed for Space Station Freedom (SSF). The APS program is designed to demonstrate the application of intelligent software as a fault detection, isolation, and recovery methodology for space power systems. This report discusses both the hardware and software elements used to construct the present configuration of the brassboard. The brassboard power components are described. These include the solid-state switches (herein referred to as switchgear), transformers, sources, and loads. Closely linked to this power portion of the brassboard is the first level of embedded control. Hardware used to implement this control and its associated software is discussed. An Ada software program, developed by Lewis Research Center's Space Station Freedom Directorate for their 20 kHz testbed, is used to control the brassboard's switchgear, as well as monitor key brassboard parameters through sensors located within these switches. The Ada code is downloaded from a PC/AT, and is resident within the 8086 microprocessor-based embedded controllers. The PC/AT is also used for smart terminal emulation, capable of controlling the switchgear as well as displaying data from them. Intelligent control is provided through use of a T1 Explorer and the Autonomous Power Expert (APEX) LISP software. Real-time load scheduling is implemented through use of a 'C' program-based scheduling engine. The methods of communication between these computers and the brassboard are explored. In order to evaluate the features of both the brassboard hardware and intelligent controlling software, fault circuits have been developed and integrated as part of the brassboard. A description of these fault circuits and their function is included. The brassboard has become an extremely useful test facility, promoting artificial intelligence (AI) applications for power distribution systems. However, there are elements of the brassboard which could be enhanced, thus improving system performance. Modifications and enhancements to improve the brassboard's operation are discussed.

  12. Object guided autonomous exploration for mobile robots in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Granda, Carlos; Choudhary, Siddarth; Rogers, John G.; Twigg, Jeff; Murali, Varun; Christensen, Henrik I.

    2014-06-01

    Autonomous mobile robotic teams are increasingly used in exploration of indoor environments. Accurate modeling of the world around the robot and describing the interaction of the robot with the world greatly increases the ability of the robot to act autonomously. This paper demonstrates the ability of autonomous robotic teams to find objects of interest. A novel feature of our approach is the object discovery and the use of it to augment the mapping and navigation process. The generated map can then be decomposed into semantic regions while also considering the distance and line of sight to anchor points. The advantage of this approach is that the robot can return a dense map of the region around an object of interest. The robustness of this approach is demonstrated in indoor environments with multiple platforms with the objective of discovering objects of interest.

  13. Innovative thermal energy harvesting for future autonomous applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfray, Stephane

    2013-12-01

    As communicating autonomous systems market is booming, the role of energy harvesting will be a key enabler. As example, heat is one of the most abundant energy sources that can be converted into electricity in order to power circuits. Harvesting systems that use wasted heat open new ways to power autonomous sensors when the energy consumption is low, or to create systems of power generators when the conversion efficiency is high. The combination of different technologies (low power ?-processors, ?-batteries, radio, sensors...) with new energy harvesters compatible with large varieties of use-cases with allow to address this booming market. Thanks to the conjunction of ultra-low power electronic development, 3D technologies & Systems in Package approaches, the integration of autonomous sensors and electronics with ambient energy harvesting will be achievable. The applications are very wide, from environment and industrial sensors to medical portable applications, and the Internet of things may also represent in the future a several billions units market.

  14. Resource-Optimal Planning For An Autonomous Planetary Vehicle

    E-print Network

    Della Penna, Giuseppe; Magazzeni, Daniele; Mercorio, Fabio; 10.5121/ijaia.2010.1302

    2010-01-01

    Autonomous planetary vehicles, also known as rovers, are small autonomous vehicles equipped with a variety of sensors used to perform exploration and experiments on a planet's surface. Rovers work in a partially unknown environment, with narrow energy/time/movement constraints and, typically, small computational resources that limit the complexity of on-line planning and scheduling, thus they represent a great challenge in the field of autonomous vehicles. Indeed, formal models for such vehicles usually involve hybrid systems with nonlinear dynamics, which are difficult to handle by most of the current planning algorithms and tools. Therefore, when offline planning of the vehicle activities is required, for example for rovers that operate without a continuous Earth supervision, such planning is often performed on simplified models that are not completely realistic. In this paper we show how the UPMurphi model checking based planning tool can be used to generate resource-optimal plans to control the engine of ...

  15. Quantifying Emergent Behavior of Autonomous Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martius, Georg; Olbrich, Eckehard

    2015-10-01

    Quantifying behaviors of robots which were generated autonomously from task-independent objective functions is an important prerequisite for objective comparisons of algorithms and movements of animals. The temporal sequence of such a behavior can be considered as a time series and hence complexity measures developed for time series are natural candidates for its quantification. The predictive information and the excess entropy are such complexity measures. They measure the amount of information the past contains about the future and thus quantify the nonrandom structure in the temporal sequence. However, when using these measures for systems with continuous states one has to deal with the fact that their values will depend on the resolution with which the systems states are observed. For deterministic systems both measures will diverge with increasing resolution. We therefore propose a new decomposition of the excess entropy in resolution dependent and resolution independent parts and discuss how they depend on the dimensionality of the dynamics, correlations and the noise level. For the practical estimation we propose to use estimates based on the correlation integral instead of the direct estimation of the mutual information using the algorithm by Kraskov et al. (2004) which is based on next neighbor statistics because the latter allows less control of the scale dependencies. Using our algorithm we are able to show how autonomous learning generates behavior of increasing complexity with increasing learning duration.

  16. Autonomous Navigation by a Mobile Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance; Aghazarian, Hrand

    2005-01-01

    ROAMAN is a computer program for autonomous navigation of a mobile robot on a long (as much as hundreds of meters) traversal of terrain. Developed for use aboard a robotic vehicle (rover) exploring the surface of a remote planet, ROAMAN could also be adapted to similar use on terrestrial mobile robots. ROAMAN implements a combination of algorithms for (1) long-range path planning based on images acquired by mast-mounted, wide-baseline stereoscopic cameras, and (2) local path planning based on images acquired by body-mounted, narrow-baseline stereoscopic cameras. The long-range path-planning algorithm autonomously generates a series of waypoints that are passed to the local path-planning algorithm, which plans obstacle-avoiding legs between the waypoints. Both the long- and short-range algorithms use an occupancy-grid representation in computations to detect obstacles and plan paths. Maps that are maintained by the long- and short-range portions of the software are not shared because substantial localization errors can accumulate during any long traverse. ROAMAN is not guaranteed to generate an optimal shortest path, but does maintain the safety of the rover.

  17. Autonomous landing guidance program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, John A.

    1996-05-01

    The Autonomous Landing Guidance program is partly funded by the US Government under the Technology Reinvestment Project. The program consortium consists of avionics and other equipment vendors, airlines and the USAF. A Sextant Avionique HUD is used to present flight symbology in cursive form as well as millimeter wave radar imagery from Lear Astronics equipment and FLIR Systems dual-channel, forward-looking, infrared imagery. All sensor imagery is presented in raster form. A future aim is to fuse all imagery data into a single presentation. Sensor testing has been accomplished in a Cessna 402 operated by the Maryland Advanced Development Laboratory. Development testing is under way in a Northwest Airlines simulator equipped with HUD and image simulation. Testing is also being carried out using United Airlines Boeing 727 and USAF C-135C (Boeing 707) test aircraft. The paper addresses the technology utilized in sensory and display systems as well as modifications made to accommodate the elements in the aircraft. Additions to the system test aircraft include global positioning systems, inertial navigation systems and extensive data collection equipment. Operational philosophy and benefits for both civil and military users are apparent. Approach procedures have been developed allowing use of Category 1 ground installations in Category 3 conditions.

  18. Is paramecium swimming autonomic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Toplosky, Norman; Hansen, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We seek to explore if the swimming of paramecium has an underlying autonomic mechanism. Such robotic elements may be useful in capturing the disturbance field in an environment in real time. Experimental evidence is emerging that motion control neurons of other animals may be present in paramecium as well. The limit cycle determined using analog simulation of the coupled nonlinear oscillators of olivo-cerebellar dynamics (ieee joe 33, 563-578, 2008) agrees with the tracks of the cilium of a biological paramecium. A 4-motor apparatus has been built that reproduces the kinematics of the cilium motion. The motion of the biological cilium has been analyzed and compared with the results of the finite element modeling of forces on a cilium. The modeling equates applied torque at the base of the cilium with drag, the cilium stiffness being phase dependent. A low friction pendulum apparatus with a multiplicity of electromagnetic actuators is being built for verifying the maps of the attractor basin computed using the olivo-cerebellar dynamics for different initial conditions. Sponsored by ONR 33.

  19. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirovi?, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-04-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  20. Simple autonomous Mars walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.

    1989-01-01

    Under a contract with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Martin Marietta has developed several alternative rover concepts for unmanned exploration of the planet Mars. One of those concepts, the 'Walking Beam', is the subject of this paper. This concept was developed with the goal of achieving many of the capabilities of more sophisticated articulated-leg walkers with a much simpler, more robust, less computationally demanding and more power efficient design. It consists of two large-base tripods nested one within the other which alternately translate with respect to each other along a 5-meter beam to propel the vehicle. The semiautonomous navigation system relies on terrain geometry sensors and tacticle feedback from each foot to autonomously select a path which avoids hazards along a route designated from earth. Both mobility and navigation features of this concept are discussed including a top-level description of the vehicle's physical characteristics, deployment strategy, mobility elements, sensor suite, theory of operation, navigation and control processes, and estimated performance.

  1. Autonomous Mission Operations Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy David

    2014-01-01

    As light time delays increase, the number of such situations in which crew autonomy is the best way to conduct the mission is expected to increase. However, there are significant open questions regarding which functions to allocate to ground and crew as the time delays increase. In situations where the ideal solution is to allocate responsibility to the crew and the vehicle, a second question arises: should the activity be the responsibility of the crew or an automated vehicle function? More specifically, we must answer the following questions: What aspects of mission operation responsibilities (Plan, Train, Fly) should be allocated to ground based or vehicle based planning, monitoring, and control in the presence of significant light-time delay between the vehicle and the Earth?How should the allocated ground based planning, monitoring, and control be distributed across the flight control team and ground system automation? How should the allocated vehicle based planning, monitoring, and control be distributed between the flight crew and onboard system automation?When during the mission should responsibility shift from flight control team to crew or from crew to vehicle, and what should the process of shifting responsibility be as the mission progresses? NASA is developing a roadmap of capabilities for Autonomous Mission Operations for human spaceflight. This presentation will describe the current state of development of this roadmap, with specific attention to in-space inspection tasks that crews might perform with minimum assistance from the ground.

  2. Autonomous UAV persistent surveillance using bio-inspired strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Isaacs, Jason; Venkateswaran, Sriram; Pham, Tien

    2012-06-01

    A team consisting of Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara, the Army Research Laboratory, the Engineer Research and Development Center, and IBM UK is developing technologies in support of automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous battlefield sensor networks to enhance situational awareness for dismounts and command echelons. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from a sparse network of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous collection routes that are data-driven. Bioinspired techniques for autonomous search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data from heterogeneous sensor networks. The bio-inspired algorithm is based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. Field tests of a bio-inspired system that routed UAVs were conducted in June 2011 at Camp Roberts, CA. The field test results showed that such a system can autonomously detect and locate the source of terrestrial events with very high accuracy and visually verify the event. In June 2011, field tests of the system were completed and include the use of multiple autonomously controlled UAVs, detection and disambiguation of multiple acoustic events occurring in short time frames, optimal sensor placement based on local phenomenology and the use of the International Technology Alliance (ITA) Sensor Network Fabric. The system demonstrated TRL 6 performance in the field at Camp Roberts.

  3. A power autonomous monopedal robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, Benjamin T.; Pratt, Jerry E.

    2006-05-01

    We present the design and initial results of a power-autonomous planar monopedal robot. The robot is a gasoline powered, two degree of freedom robot that runs in a circle, constrained by a boom. The robot uses hydraulic Series Elastic Actuators, force-controllable actuators which provide high force fidelity, moderate bandwidth, and low impedance. The actuators are mounted in the body of the robot, with cable drives transmitting power to the hip and knee joints of the leg. A two-stroke, gasoline engine drives a constant displacement pump which pressurizes an accumulator. Absolute position and spring deflection of each of the Series Elastic Actuators are measured using linear encoders. The spring deflection is translated into force output and compared to desired force in a closed loop force-control algorithm implemented in software. The output signal of each force controller drives high performance servo valves which control flow to each of the pistons of the actuators. In designing the robot, we used a simulation-based iterative design approach. Preliminary estimates of the robot's physical parameters were based on past experience and used to create a physically realistic simulation model of the robot. Next, a control algorithm was implemented in simulation to produce planar hopping. Using the joint power requirements and range of motions from simulation, we worked backward specifying pulley diameter, piston diameter and stroke, hydraulic pressure and flow, servo valve flow and bandwidth, gear pump flow, and engine power requirements. Components that meet or exceed these specifications were chosen and integrated into the robot design. Using CAD software, we calculated the physical parameters of the robot design, replaced the original estimates with the CAD estimates, and produced new joint power requirements. We iterated on this process, resulting in a design which was prototyped and tested. The Monopod currently runs at approximately 1.2 m/s with the weight of all the power generating components, but powered from an off-board pump. On a test stand, the eventual on-board power system generates enough pressure and flow to meet the requirements of these runs and we are currently integrating the power system into the real robot. When operated from an off-board system without carrying the weight of the power generating components, the robot currently runs at approximately 2.25 m/s. Ongoing work is focused on integrating the power system into the robot, improving the control algorithm, and investigating methods for improving efficiency.

  4. Development of Methodology for Programming Autonomous Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erol, Kutluhan; Levy, Renato; Lang, Lun

    2004-01-01

    A brief report discusses the rationale for, and the development of, a methodology for generating computer code for autonomous-agent-based systems. The methodology is characterized as enabling an increase in the reusability of the generated code among and within such systems, thereby making it possible to reduce the time and cost of development of the systems. The methodology is also characterized as enabling reduction of the incidence of those software errors that are attributable to the human failure to anticipate distributed behaviors caused by the software. A major conceptual problem said to be addressed in the development of the methodology was that of how to efficiently describe the interfaces between several layers of agent composition by use of a language that is both familiar to engineers and descriptive enough to describe such interfaces unambivalently

  5. Autonomous movement of platinum-loaded stomatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Daniela A.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2012-04-01

    Polymer stomatocytes are bowl-shaped structures of nanosize dimensions formed by the controlled deformation of polymer vesicles. The stable nanocavity and strict control of the opening are ideal for the physical entrapment of nanoparticles which, when catalytically active, can turn the stomatocyte morphology into a nanoreactor. Herein we report an approach to generate autonomous movement of the polymer stomatocytes by selectively entrapping catalytically active platinum nanoparticles within their nanocavities and subsequently using catalysis as a driving force for movement. Hydrogen peroxide is free to access the inner stomatocyte cavity, where it is decomposed by the active catalyst (the entrapped platinum nanoparticles) into oxygen and water. This generates a rapid discharge, which induces thrust and directional movement. The design of the platinum-loaded stomatocytes resembles a miniature monopropellant rocket engine, in which the controlled opening of the stomatocytes directs the expulsion of the decomposition products away from the reaction chamber (inner stomatocyte cavity).

  6. Autonomous movement of platinum-loaded stomatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniela A; Nolte, Roeland J M; van Hest, Jan C M

    2012-04-01

    Polymer stomatocytes are bowl-shaped structures of nanosize dimensions formed by the controlled deformation of polymer vesicles. The stable nanocavity and strict control of the opening are ideal for the physical entrapment of nanoparticles which, when catalytically active, can turn the stomatocyte morphology into a nanoreactor. Herein we report an approach to generate autonomous movement of the polymer stomatocytes by selectively entrapping catalytically active platinum nanoparticles within their nanocavities and subsequently using catalysis as a driving force for movement. Hydrogen peroxide is free to access the inner stomatocyte cavity, where it is decomposed by the active catalyst (the entrapped platinum nanoparticles) into oxygen and water. This generates a rapid discharge, which induces thrust and directional movement. The design of the platinum-loaded stomatocytes resembles a miniature monopropellant rocket engine, in which the controlled opening of the stomatocytes directs the expulsion of the decomposition products away from the reaction chamber (inner stomatocyte cavity). PMID:22437710

  7. Autonomous mobile robots: Vehicles with cognitive control

    SciTech Connect

    Meystel, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book explores a new rapidly developing area of robotics. It describes the state-of-the-art intelligence control, applied machine intelligence, and research and initial stages of manufacturing of autonomous mobile robots. A complete account of the theoretical and experimental results obtained during the last two decades together with some generalizations on Autonomous Mobile Systems are included in this book. Contents: Introduction; Requirements and Specifications; State-of-the-art in Autonomous Mobile Robots Area; Structure of Intelligent Mobile Autonomous System; Planner, Navigator; Pilot; Cartographer; Actuation Control; Computer Simulation of Autonomous Operation; Testing the Autonomous Mobile Robot; Conclusions; Bibliography.

  8. Towards an Autonomic Cluster Management System (ACMS) with Reflex Autonomicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Hinchey, Mike; Sterritt, Roy

    2005-01-01

    Cluster computing, whereby a large number of simple processors or nodes are combined together to apparently function as a single powerful computer, has emerged as a research area in its own right. The approach offers a relatively inexpensive means of providing a fault-tolerant environment and achieving significant computational capabilities for high-performance computing applications. However, the task of manually managing and configuring a cluster quickly becomes daunting as the cluster grows in size. Autonomic computing, with its vision to provide self-management, can potentially solve many of the problems inherent in cluster management. We describe the development of a prototype Autonomic Cluster Management System (ACMS) that exploits autonomic properties in automating cluster management and its evolution to include reflex reactions via pulse monitoring.

  9. ?-Synuclein in cutaneous autonomic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ningshan; Gibbons, Christopher H.; Lafo, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop a cutaneous biomarker for Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Twenty patients with PD and 14 age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent examinations, autonomic testing, and skin biopsies at the distal leg, distal thigh, and proximal thigh. ?-Synuclein deposition and the density of intraepidermal, sudomotor, and pilomotor nerve fibers were measured. ?-Synuclein deposition was normalized to nerve fiber density (the ?-synuclein ratio). Results were compared with examination scores and autonomic function testing. Results: Patients with PD had a distal sensory and autonomic neuropathy characterized by loss of intraepidermal and pilomotor fibers (p < 0.05 vs controls, all sites) and morphologic changes to sudomotor nerve fibers. Patients with PD had greater ?-synuclein deposition and higher ?-synuclein ratios compared with controls within pilomotor nerves and sudomotor nerves (p < 0.01, all sites) but not sensory nerves. Higher ?-synuclein ratios correlated with Hoehn and Yahr scores (r = 0.58–0.71, p < 0.01), with sympathetic adrenergic function (r = ?0.40 to ?0.66, p < 0.01), and with parasympathetic function (r = ?0.66 to ?0.77, p > 0.01). Conclusions: We conclude that ?-synuclein deposition is increased in cutaneous sympathetic adrenergic and sympathetic cholinergic fibers but not sensory fibers of patients with PD. Higher ?-synuclein deposition is associated with greater autonomic dysfunction and more advanced PD. These data suggest that measures of ?-synuclein deposition in cutaneous autonomic nerves may be a useful biomarker in patients with PD. PMID:24089386

  10. Algorithmic Solution for Autonomous Vision-Based O -Road Navigation

    E-print Network

    Kolesnik, Marina

    Algorithmic Solution for Autonomous Vision-Based O -Road Navigation Marina Kolesnika, Gerhard A vision based navigation system is a basic tool to provide autonomous operations of unmanned vehicles for autonomous outdoor navigation. Keywords: Autonomous Navigation, Stereo Reconstruction, Vehicle, Stereo

  11. Planning and Implementing Trajectories for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles to

    E-print Network

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Planning and Implementing Trajectories for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles to Track Evolving Ocean and Gaurav S. Sukhatme1 Abstract Path planning and trajectory design for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs California coastal ocean. Keywords Algal bloom, autonomous glider, autonomous underwater vehicles, feature

  12. Autonomous hazard detection and avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pien, Homer

    1992-01-01

    During GFY 91, Draper Laboratory was awarded a task by NASA-JSC under contract number NAS9-18426 to study and evaluate the potential for achieving safe autonomous landings on Mars using an on-board autonomous hazard detection and avoidance (AHDA) system. This report describes the results of that study. The AHDA task had four objectives: to demonstrate, via a closed-loop simulation, the ability to autonomously select safe landing sites and the ability to maneuver to the selected site; to identify key issues in the development of AHDA systems; to produce strawman designs for AHDA sensors and algorithms; and to perform initial trade studies leading to better understanding of the effect of sensor/terrain/viewing parameters on AHDA algorithm performance. This report summarizes the progress made during the first year, with primary emphasis on describing the tools developed for simulating a closed-loop AHDA landing. Some cursory performance evaluation results are also presented.

  13. Continuous observation planning for autonomous exploration

    E-print Network

    Hasegawa, Bradley R

    2004-01-01

    Many applications of autonomous robots depend on the robot being able to navigate in real world environments. In order to navigate or path plan, the robot often needs to consult a map of its surroundings. A truly autonomous ...

  14. Issues in autonomous mobile sensor networks 

    E-print Network

    Dharne, Avinash Gopal

    2009-05-15

    Autonomous mobile sensor networks consist of a number of autonomous mobile robots equipped with various sensors and tasked with a common mission. This thesis considers the topology control of such an ad hoc mobile sensor network. In particular, I...

  15. Adaptive sampling in autonomous marine sensor networks

    E-print Network

    Eickstedt, Donald Patrick

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, an innovative architecture for real-time adaptive and cooperative control of autonomous sensor platforms in a marine sensor network is described in the context of the autonomous oceanographic network scenario. ...

  16. A Robust Compositional Architecture for Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brat, Guillaume; Deney, Ewen; Farrell, Kimberley; Giannakopoulos, Dimitra; Jonsson, Ari; Frank, Jeremy; Bobby, Mark; Carpenter, Todd; Estlin, Tara

    2006-01-01

    Space exploration applications can benefit greatly from autonomous systems. Great distances, limited communications and high costs make direct operations impossible while mandating operations reliability and efficiency beyond what traditional commanding can provide. Autonomous systems can improve reliability and enhance spacecraft capability significantly. However, there is reluctance to utilizing autonomous systems. In part this is due to general hesitation about new technologies, but a more tangible concern is that of reliability of predictability of autonomous software. In this paper, we describe ongoing work aimed at increasing robustness and predictability of autonomous software, with the ultimate goal of building trust in such systems. The work combines state-of-the-art technologies and capabilities in autonomous systems with advanced validation and synthesis techniques. The focus of this paper is on the autonomous system architecture that has been defined, and on how it enables the application of validation techniques for resulting autonomous systems.

  17. SPACECRAFT LOCALIZATION VIA ANGLE MEASUREMENTS FOR AUTONOMOUS

    E-print Network

    Garulli, Andrea

    SPACECRAFT LOCALIZATION VIA ANGLE MEASUREMENTS FOR AUTONOMOUS NAVIGATION IN DEEP SPACE MISSIONS deals with spacecraft autonomous navigation in deep space missions. The considered problem requirement for this type of missions. Localization of spacecrafts is usually very accurate when GPS range

  18. Autonomous Intersection Management for Semi-Autonomous Vehicles Tsz-Chiu Au

    E-print Network

    Stone, Peter

    Autonomous Intersection Management for Semi-Autonomous Vehicles Tsz-Chiu Au School of Electrical@cs.utexas.edu Abstract-- Recent advances in autonomous vehicle technology will open the door to highly efficient control protocol designed for fully autonomous vehicles. We, however, anticipate there will be a long

  19. Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle (MARV)

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Spletzer, B.L.; Weber, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has recently developed a 16 cm{sup 3} (1 in{sup 3}) autonomous robotic vehicle which is capable of tracking a single conducting wire carrying a 96 kHz signal. This vehicle was developed to assess the limiting factors in using commercial technology to build miniature autonomous vehicles. Particular attention was paid to the design of the control system to search out the wire, track it, and recover if the wire was lost. This paper describes the test vehicle and the control analysis. Presented in the paper are the vehicle model, control laws, a stability analysis, simulation studies and experimental results.

  20. Progress towards autonomous, intelligent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Henry; Heer, Ewald

    1987-01-01

    An aggressive program has been initiated to develop, integrate, and implement autonomous systems technologies starting with today's expert systems and evolving to autonomous, intelligent systems by the end of the 1990s. This program includes core technology developments and demonstration projects for technology evaluation and validation. This paper discusses key operational frameworks in the content of systems autonomy applications and then identifies major technological challenges, primarily in artificial intelligence areas. Program content and progress made towards critical technologies and demonstrations that have been initiated to achieve the required future capabilities in the year 2000 era are discussed.

  1. Autonomous artificial nanomotor powered by sunlight

    PubMed Central

    Balzani, Vincenzo; Clemente-León, Miguel; Credi, Alberto; Ferrer, Belén; Venturi, Margherita; Flood, Amar H.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2006-01-01

    Light excitation powers the reversible shuttling movement of the ring component of a rotaxane between two stations located at a 1.3-nm distance on its dumbbell-shaped component. The photoinduced shuttling movement, which occurs in solution, is based on a “four-stroke” synchronized sequence of electronic and nuclear processes. At room temperature the deactivation time of the high-energy charge-transfer state obtained by light excitation is ?10 ?s, and the time period required for the ring-displacement process is on the order of 100 ?s. The rotaxane behaves as an autonomous linear motor and operates with a quantum efficiency up to ?12%. The investigated system is a unique example of an artificial linear nanomotor because it gathers together the following features: (i) it is powered by visible light (e.g., sunlight); (ii) it exhibits autonomous behavior, like motor proteins; (iii) it does not generate waste products; (iv) its operation can rely only on intramolecular processes, allowing in principle operation at the single-molecule level; (v) it can be driven at a frequency of 1 kHz; (vi) it works in mild environmental conditions (i.e., fluid solution at ambient temperature); and (vii) it is stable for at least 103 cycles. PMID:16432207

  2. Autonomous Mobile Robot System for Long Distance

    E-print Network

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Autonomous Mobile Robot System for Long Distance Outdoor Navigation in University Campus Shoichi:maeyama@roboken.is.tsukuba.ac.jp Keywords : Development of an autonomous mobile robot, Outdoor navigation and Execution monitor. Abstract We are developing a self-contained and autonomous mo- bile robot to navigate itself in our university campus

  3. Modeling Visual Landmark Navigation with Autonomous Agents

    E-print Network

    Moeller, Ralf

    Modeling Visual Landmark Navigation with Autonomous Agents Dimitrios Lambrinos1 , Ralf Moller1, the autonomous agents approach 3], to gain additional insights into the navigation behavior of Cataglyphis. Lambrinos, M. Maris, H. Kobayashi, T. Labhart, R. Pfeifer, and R. Wehner. An autonomous agent navigating

  4. Autonomous Driving using Road Safety Rules

    E-print Network

    Soatto, Stefano

    Autonomous Driving using Road Safety Rules Pratik Chaudhari Joint work with Luis I. Reyes Castro, Several megabytes of data / sec. Pratik C. () Autonomous Driving using Road Safety Rules August 30, 2013 1 are expected to follow human driving rules Pratik C. () Autonomous Driving using Road Safety Rules August 30

  5. TECHNOLOGY NEEDS FOR AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    TECHNOLOGY NEEDS FOR AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES Gwyn Griffiths Ocean Technology Division that may not lie on the critical path to making autonomous underwater vehicles a commercial success. For, construction and operation of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for scientific and commercial purposes

  6. Glider and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Observing Systems

    E-print Network

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    - 1 - Glider and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Observing Systems G. Griffiths Southampton. INTRODUCTION Gliders and propeller-driven autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are examples of how advances of the autonomous vehicle per se. AUVs and gliders have been proposed as components of coastal and open ocean

  7. > 070131-073Autonomous Surface Vehicle

    E-print Network

    Marques, Eduardo R. B.

    > 070131-073Autonomous Surface Vehicle for Network Centric Operations H. Ferreira-The design and development of the Swordfish Autonomous Surface Vehicle (ASV) system is discussed. Swordfish. In another configuration, Swordfish mounts a docking station for the autonomous underwater vehicle Isurus

  8. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in epilepsy (small) and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS). In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g., syncope), or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of epileptic seizures is largely overlooked. Emotional stimuli such as anxiety and stress are potent causes of seizures and tic activity in epilepsy and TS, respectively. This manuscript will describe a possible neural mechanism by which afferent autonomic projections linked to cognition and behavior influence central thalamo-cortical regulation, which appears to be an important means for controlling both seizure and tic activity. It also summarizes the link between the integrity of the default mode network and autonomic regulation in patients with epilepsy as well as the link between impaired motor control and autonomic regulation in patients with TS. Two neurological conditions; epilepsy and TS were chosen, as seizures and tics represent parameters that can be easily measured to investigate influences of autonomic functions. The EDA biofeedback approach is anticipated to gain a strong position within the next generation of treatment for epilepsy, as a non-invasive technique with minimal side effects. This approach also takes advantage of the current practical opportunity to utilize growing digital health technology. PMID:26441491

  9. Cloud and Autonomic Computing Center

    E-print Network

    Gelfond, Michael

    » Microseismology and inverse scattering » Modeling cancer tissue growth and targeted drug delivery » AtmosphericCloud and Autonomic Computing Center A New Industry/University Cooperative Research Center Site of Computer Science Areas of expertise » Cloud computing storage systems » Data management and data centers

  10. The Functioning of Autonomous Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, V. Pala Prasada; Rao, Digumarti Bhaskara

    2012-01-01

    The college gets separated from the university, though not completely, when it is an autonomous college, which is practice in India. Academic package will become flexible and the decision-making is internalized, changes and updating could be easily carried out, depending on the need as reflected from the feedback taken from alumni, user sectors,…

  11. Autonomous Ground Vehicle Path Tracking

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Autonomous Ground Vehicle Path Tracking Jeff Wit Wintec, Inc. 104 Research Road, Building 9738 vehicle navigation requires the integration of many technologies such as path planning, position of a nonholonomic ground vehicle as it tracks a given path. A new path tracking technique called ``vector pursuit

  12. An Autonomous Reliabilit Cloud Comput

    E-print Network

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    An Autonomous Reliabilit Ami Cloud Comput Department of Computing and Informa Abstract--Cloud computing paradigm allo based access to computing and storages s Internet. Since with advances of Cloud. Keywords- Cloud computing; SLA negotiat I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing has transferred the services

  13. Computing architecture for autonomous microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-09-29

    A computing architecture that facilitates autonomously controlling operations of a microgrid is described herein. A microgrid network includes numerous computing devices that execute intelligent agents, each of which is assigned to a particular entity (load, source, storage device, or switch) in the microgrid. The intelligent agents can execute in accordance with predefined protocols to collectively perform computations that facilitate uninterrupted control of the microgrid.

  14. Autonomous Sailing Robot for Oceanographic

    E-print Network

    Lherminier, Pascale

    ASAROME Autonomous Sailing Robot for Oceanographic MEasurements Clément PETRES Institut des sensor system: GPS, IMU, omni-directional camera, sonar, hydrophones, loch, wind vane, anemometer and obstacle avoidance - Dynamic adaptation to wind variations and obstacle detection - Real-time on-board

  15. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  16. Linguistic geometry for autonomous navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Stilman, B.

    1995-09-01

    To discover the inner properties of human expert heuristics, which were successful in a certain class of complex control systems, we develop a formal theory, the Linguistic Geometry. This paper reports two examples of application of Linguistic Geometry to autonomous navigation of aerospace vehicles that demonstrate dramatic search reduction.

  17. An Autonomous Spacecraft Agent Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pell, Barney; Bernard, Douglas E.; Chien, Steve A.; Gat, Erann; Muscettola, Nicola; Nayak, P. Pandurang; Wagner, Michael D.; Williams, Brian C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the New Millennium Remote Agent (NMRA) architecture for autonomous spacecraft control systems. This architecture integrates traditional real-time monitoring and control with constraint-based planning and scheduling, robust multi-threaded execution, and model-based diagnosis and reconfiguration.

  18. Towards Fully Autonomous Visual Navigation

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    Towards Fully Autonomous Visual Navigation Joss Knight Brasenose College Robotics Research Group of simultaneous localisation and mapping using the Extended Kalman Filter, which is a highly general and exible for a successfully operating localisation #12;lter are established, and the ability of the Extended Kalman Filter

  19. Towards Fully Autonomous Visual Navigation

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    Towards Fully Autonomous Visual Navigation Joss Knight Brasenose College Robotics Research Group and mapping using the Extended Kalman Filter, which is a highly general and flexible localisation methodology localisation filter are established, and the ability of the Extended Kalman Filter to achieve

  20. Navigation path planning for autonomous aircraft - Voronoi diagram approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krozel, Jimmy; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1990-01-01

    The present technique for generating a search graph depicting topologically unique paths around mountain boundaries at constant altitudes involves a description of mountain boundaries as polygons; the search graph is then generated on the basis of a geometric construct. All nodes and arcs of the search graph are guaranteed to lie in free space, thereby ensuring an autonomous aircraft's avoidance of mountain obstacles. The solution path is generated by searching the graph for the optimal path from a start location to a finish location.

  1. Autonomous Boolean modeling of gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolar, Joshua; Sun, Mengyang; Cheng, Xianrui

    2014-03-01

    In cases where the dynamical properties of gene regulatory networks are important, a faithful model must include three key features: a network topology; a functional response of each element to its inputs; and timing information about the transmission of signals across network links. Autonomous Boolean network (ABN) models are efficient representations of these elements and are amenable to analysis. We present an ABN model of the gene regulatory network governing cell fate specification in the early sea urchin embryo, which must generate three bands of distinct tissue types after several cell divisions, beginning from an initial condition with only two distinct cell types. Analysis of the spatial patterning problem and the dynamics of a network constructed from available experimental results reveals that a simple mechanism is at work in this case. Supported by NSF Grant DMS-10-68602

  2. Automated Behavior Generation for Unmanned Ground Vehicles Using

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Satyandra K.

    Automated Behavior Generation for Unmanned Ground Vehicles Using Virtual Environments Satyandra K for automated generation of behaviors and maneuvers using simulations for autonomous UGVs ­ Behaviors Controller Parameters UGV System Architecture #12;Manually generating these libraries takes a long time! Any

  3. [Acute Sensory Neuropathies and Acute Autonomic Neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Koike, Haruki

    2015-11-01

    From the perspective of neuropathies with an acute onset mimicking that of Guillain-Barr? syndrome (GBS), cases with profound sensory and/or autonomic impairment without any significant weakness have been reported. Although the possibility of infectious or toxic etiologies should be carefully excluded, immune mechanisms similar to those in GBS are suggested to be involved in these so-called acute sensory neuropathies and acute autonomic neuropathies. The types of neuropathy include those with predominant sensory manifestations, predominant autonomic manifestations such as autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy, and both sensory and autonomic manifestations such as acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Neuronopathy in the sensory and/or autonomic ganglia (i.e., ganglionopathy) has been commonly suggested in patients with these types of neuropathies. The presence of Anti-GD1b antibodies has been reported in some of the patients with acute sensory neuropathy with deep sensory impairment, whereas anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies are reported to be present in half of the patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. The discovery of anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies significantly expanded the spectrum of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. This is because some of the patients with chronic progression mimicking neurodegenerative diseases such as pure autonomic failure were positive for these antibodies. In contrast, pathologically significant autoantibodies have not been identified in acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathogenesis and the spectrum of these types of neuropathies. PMID:26560953

  4. 3-D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiley, Michael F.; Carmer, Dwayne C.; Pont, W. F.

    1991-01-01

    A sophisticated 3D laser radar sensor simulation, developed and applied to the task of autonomous hazard detection and avoidance, is presented. This simulation includes a backward ray trace to sensor subpixels, incoherent subpixel integration, range dependent noise, sensor point spread function effects, digitization noise, and AM-CW modulation. Specific sensor parameters, spacecraft lander trajectory, and terrain type have been selected to generate simulated sensor data.

  5. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, Walter S.

    2012-01-01

    The Simulation Software, KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), is used to demonstrate the automatic identification of faults in a system. The ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operation) project uses KATE to monitor and find faults in the loading of the cryogenics int o a vehicle fuel tank. The KATE software interfaces with the IHM (Integrated Health Management) systems bus to communicate with other systems that are part of ACLO. One system that KATE uses the IHM bus to communicate with is AIS (Advanced Inspection System). KATE will send messages to AIS when there is a detected anomaly. These messages include visual inspection of specific valves, pressure gauges and control messages to have AIS open or close manual valves. My goals include implementing the connection to the IHM bus within KATE and for the AIS project. I will also be working on implementing changes to KATE's Ul and implementing the physics objects in KATE that will model portions of the cryogenics loading operation.

  6. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, Walter S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Working on the ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations) project I have had the opportunity to add functionality to the physics simulation software known as KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), create a new application allowing WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) creation of KATE schematic files and begin a preliminary design and implementation of a new subsystem that will provide vision services on the IHM (Integrated Health Management) bus. The functionality I added to KATE over the past few months includes a dynamic visual representation of the fluid height in a pipe based on number of gallons of fluid in the pipe and implementing the IHM bus connection within KATE. I also fixed a broken feature in the system called the Browser Display, implemented many bug fixes and made changes to the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

  7. Autonomic neuropathy in Fabry disease: a prospective study using the Autonomic Symptom Profile and cardiovascular autonomic function tests

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fabry patients have symptoms and signs compatible with autonomic dysfunction. These symptoms and signs are considered to be due to impairment of the peripheral nervous system, but findings indicative of autonomic neuropathy in other diseases, such as orthostatic intolerance and male sexual dysfunction, are infrequently reported in Fabry disease. The aim of our study was to investigate autonomic symptoms and cardiovascular autonomic function in a large cohort of male and female Fabry patients. Methods Forty-eight Fabry patients (15 male, 30 treated with enzyme replacement therapy) and 48 sex- and age-matched controls completed a questionnaire on autonomic symptoms (the Autonomic Symptom Profile). Thirty-six Fabry patients underwent cardiovascular function tests. Results The Autonomic Symptom Profile revealed a significantly higher sum score in Fabry patients than in healthy control subjects (22 versus 12), but a relatively low score compared to patients with proven autonomic neuropathy. Fabry patients scored worse than healthy controls in the orthostatic intolerance domain. Scores in the male sexual dysfunction domain were comparable between healthy controls and male Fabry patients. The cardiovascular autonomic function tests revealed only mild abnormalities in seven patients. None of these seven patients showed more than one abnormal test result. Enzyme replacement therapy was not associated with less severe disease, lower ASP scores or less frequent abnormal cardiovascular function test results. Conclusions Male sexual function and autonomic control of the cardiovascular system are nearly normal in Fabry patients, which cast doubt on the general accepted assumption that autonomic neuropathy is the main cause of symptoms and signs compatible with autonomic dysfunction in Fabry disease. Possibly, end-organ damage plays a key role in the development of symptoms and signs in Fabry patients. An exceptional kind of autonomic neuropathy is another but less likely explanation. PMID:20529242

  8. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Heung Yong; Baek, Hong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed. PMID:26706915

  9. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Heung Yong; Baek, Hong Sun; Park, Tae Sun

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed. PMID:26706915

  10. Advances in Autonomous Systems for Missions of Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, A. R.; Smith, B. D.; Briggs, G. A.; Hieronymus, J.; Clancy, D. J.

    New missions of space exploration will require unprecedented levels of autonomy to successfully accomplish their objectives. Both inherent complexity and communication distances will preclude levels of human involvement common to current and previous space flight missions. With exponentially increasing capabilities of computer hardware and software, including networks and communication systems, a new balance of work is being developed between humans and machines. This new balance holds the promise of meeting the greatly increased space exploration requirements, along with dramatically reduced design, development, test, and operating costs. New information technologies, which take advantage of knowledge-based software, model-based reasoning, and high performance computer systems, will enable the development of a new generation of design and development tools, schedulers, and vehicle and system health monitoring and maintenance capabilities. Such tools will provide a degree of machine intelligence and associated autonomy that has previously been unavailable. These capabilities are critical to the future of space exploration, since the science and operational requirements specified by such missions, as well as the budgetary constraints that limit the ability to monitor and control these missions by a standing army of ground- based controllers. System autonomy capabilities have made great strides in recent years, for both ground and space flight applications. Autonomous systems have flown on advanced spacecraft, providing new levels of spacecraft capability and mission safety. Such systems operate by utilizing model-based reasoning that provides the capability to work from high-level mission goals, while deriving the detailed system commands internally, rather than having to have such commands transmitted from Earth. This enables missions of such complexity and communications distance as are not otherwise possible, as well as many more efficient and low cost applications. One notable example of such missions are those to explore for the existence of water on planets such as Mars and the moons of Jupiter. It is clear that water does not exist on the surfaces of such bodies, but may well be located at some considerable depth below the surface, thus requiring a subsurface drilling capability. Subsurface drilling on planetary surfaces will require a robust autonomous control and analysis system, currently a major challenge, but within conceivable reach of planned technology developments. This paper will focus on new and innovative software for remote, autonomous, space systems flight operations, including flight test results, lessons learned, and implications for the future. An additional focus will be on technologies for planetary exploration using autonomous systems and astronaut-assistance systems that employ new spoken language technology. Topics to be presented will include a description of key autonomous control concepts, illustrated by the Remote Agent program that commanded the Deep Space 1 spacecraft to new levels of system autonomy, recent advances in distributed autonomous system capabilities, and concepts for autonomous vehicle health management systems. A brief description of teaming spacecraft and rovers for complex exploration missions will also be provided. New software for autonomous science data acquisition for planetary exploration will also be described, as well as advanced systems for safe planetary landings. Current results of autonomous planetary drilling system research will be presented. A key thrust within NASA is to develop technologies that will leverage the capabilities of human astronauts during planetary surface explorations. One such technology is spoken dialogue interfaces, which would allow collaboration with semi-autonomous agents that are engaged in activities that are normally accomplished using language, e.g., astronauts in space suits interacting with groups of semi-autonomous rovers and other astronauts. This technology will be described and discussed in the context of future exploration m

  11. Autonomous spacecraft maintenance study group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, M. H.; Low, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    A plan to incorporate autonomous spacecraft maintenance (ASM) capabilities into Air Force spacecraft by 1989 is outlined. It includes the successful operation of the spacecraft without ground operator intervention for extended periods of time. Mechanisms, along with a fault tolerant data processing system (including a nonvolatile backup memory) and an autonomous navigation capability, are needed to replace the routine servicing that is presently performed by the ground system. The state of the art fault handling capabilities of various spacecraft and computers are described, and a set conceptual design requirements needed to achieve ASM is established. Implementations for near term technology development needed for an ASM proof of concept demonstration by 1985, and a research agenda addressing long range academic research for an advanced ASM system for 1990s are established.

  12. Autonomic Computing: Panacea or Poppycock?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Autonomic Computing arose out of a need for a means to cope with rapidly growing complexity of integrating, managing, and operating computer-based systems as well as a need to reduce the total cost of ownership of today's systems. Autonomic Computing (AC) as a discipline was proposed by IBM in 2001, with the vision to develop self-managing systems. As the name implies, the influence for the new paradigm is the human body's autonomic system, which regulates vital bodily functions such as the control of heart rate, the body's temperature and blood flow-all without conscious effort. The vision is to create selfivare through self-* properties. The initial set of properties, in terms of objectives, were self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protecting, along with attributes of self-awareness, self-monitoring and self-adjusting. This self-* list has grown: self-anticipating, self-critical, self-defining, self-destructing, self-diagnosis, self-governing, self-organized, self-reflecting, and self-simulation, for instance.

  13. Integrated System for Autonomous Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Robert; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Davies, Ashley; Castano, Rebecca; Rabideau, Gregg; Frye, Stuart; Trout, Bruce; Shulman, Seth; Doggett, Thomas; Ip, Felipe; Greeley, Ron; Baker, Victor; Dohn, James; Boyer, Darrell

    2006-01-01

    The New Millennium Program Space Technology 6 Project Autonomous Sciencecraft software implements an integrated system for autonomous planning and execution of scientific, engineering, and spacecraft-coordination actions. A prior version of this software was reported in "The TechSat 21 Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment" (NPO-30784), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 3 (March 2004), page 33. This software is now in continuous use aboard the Earth Orbiter 1 (EO-1) spacecraft mission and is being adapted for use in the Mars Odyssey and Mars Exploration Rovers missions. This software enables EO-1 to detect and respond to such events of scientific interest as volcanic activity, flooding, and freezing and thawing of water. It uses classification algorithms to analyze imagery onboard to detect changes, including events of scientific interest. Detection of such events triggers acquisition of follow-up imagery. The mission-planning component of the software develops a response plan that accounts for visibility of targets and operational constraints. The plan is then executed under control by a task-execution component of the software that is capable of responding to anomalies.

  14. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified, which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention, and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss, and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population. PMID:25520703

  15. Semi autonomous mine detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Few; Roelof Versteeg; Herman Herman

    2010-04-01

    CMMAD is a risk reduction effort for the AMDS program. As part of CMMAD, multiple instances of semi autonomous robotic mine detection systems were created. Each instance consists of a robotic vehicle equipped with sensors required for navigation and marking, a countermine sensors and a number of integrated software packages which provide for real time processing of the countermine sensor data as well as integrated control of the robotic vehicle, the sensor actuator and the sensor. These systems were used to investigate critical interest functions (CIF) related to countermine robotic systems. To address the autonomy CIF, the INL developed RIK was extended to allow for interaction with a mine sensor processing code (MSPC). In limited field testing this system performed well in detecting, marking and avoiding both AT and AP mines. Based on the results of the CMMAD investigation we conclude that autonomous robotic mine detection is feasible. In addition, CMMAD contributed critical technical advances with regard to sensing, data processing and sensor manipulation, which will advance the performance of future fieldable systems. As a result, no substantial technical barriers exist which preclude – from an autonomous robotic perspective – the rapid development and deployment of fieldable systems.

  16. Autonomous Exploration via Regions of Interest Robert Grabowski, Pradeep Khosla and Howie Choset

    E-print Network

    Choset, Howie

    . Autonomous exploration is a recursive process that utilizes the relationship between sensing and movement and processed to direct the movements of the robot to further generate new information. Ultimately, the success on developing a global map and assessing the free-space of that map to generate plans for moving the robots

  17. Path planning strategies for autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Kevin Kent

    Several key issues involved with the planning and executing of optimally generated paths for autonomous vehicles are addressed. Two new path planning algorithms are developed, and examined, which effectively minimize replanning as unmapped hazards are encountered. The individual algorithms are compared via extensive simulation. The search strategy results are implemented and tested using the University of Colorado's autonomous vehicle test-bed, RoboCar, and results show the advantages of solving the single-destination all-paths problem for autonomous vehicle path planning. Both path planners implement a graph search methodology incorporating dynamic programming that solves the single-destination shortest-paths problem. Algorithm 1, termed DP for dynamic programming, searches a state space where each state represents a potential vehicle location in a breadth-first fashion expanding from the goal to all potential start locations in the state space. Algorithm 2, termed DP*, couples the heuristic search power of the well-known A* search procedure (Nilsson-80) with the dynamic programming principle applied to graph searching to efficiently make use of overlapping subproblems. DP* is the primary research contribution of the work contained within this thesis. The advantage of solving the single-destination shortest-paths problem is that the entire terrain map is solved in terms of reaching a specified goal. Therefore, if the robot is diverted from the pre-planned path, an alternative path is already computed. The search algorithms are extended to include a probabilistic approach using empirical loss functions to incorporate terrain map uncertainties into the path considering terrain planning process. The results show the importance of considering terrain uncertainty. If the map representation ignores uncertainty by marking any area with less than perfect confidence as unpassable or assigns it the worst case rating, then the paths are longer than intuitively necessary. A hierarchical software control architecture is introduced that uses as the main guidance function an arbitration-based scheme which is able to efficiently and robustly integrate disparate sensor data. The flexibility provided by such an architecture allows for very easy integration of any type of environmental sensing device into the path planning algorithm.

  18. The EO-1 Autonomous Science Agent Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Rob; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Rabideau, Gregg; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Lee, Rachel; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Trout, Bruce; Hengemihle, Jerry; D'Agostino, Jeff; Shulman, Seth; Ungar, Stephen; Brakke, Thomas; Boyer, Darrell; Van Gaasbeck, Jim; Greeley, Ronald; Doggett, Thomas; Baker, Victor; Dohm, James; Ip, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    An Autonomous Science Agent is currently flying onboard the Earth Observing One Spacecraft. This software enables the spacecraft to autonomously detect and respond to science events occurring on the Earth. The package includes software systems that perform science data analysis, deliberative planning, and run-time robust execution. Because of the deployment to a remote spacecraft, this Autonomous Science Agent has stringent constraints of autonomy, reliability, and limited computing resources. We describe these constraints and how they are reflected in our agent architecture.

  19. Sustainable and Autonomic Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G.; Sterritt, Roy; Rouff, Christopher; Rash, James L.; Truszkowski, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Visions for future space exploration have long term science missions in sight, resulting in the need for sustainable missions. Survivability is a critical property of sustainable systems and may be addressed through autonomicity, an emerging paradigm for self-management of future computer-based systems based on inspiration from the human autonomic nervous system. This paper examines some of the ongoing research efforts to realize these survivable systems visions, with specific emphasis on developments in Autonomic Policies.

  20. Attainability of Carnot efficiency with autonomous engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Naoto

    2015-11-01

    The maximum efficiency of autonomous engines with a finite chemical potential difference is investigated. We show that, without a particular type of singularity, autonomous engines cannot attain the Carnot efficiency. This singularity is realized in two ways: single particle transports and the thermodynamic limit. We demonstrate that both of these ways actually lead to the Carnot efficiency in concrete setups. Our results clearly illustrate that the singularity plays a crucial role in the maximum efficiency of autonomous engines.

  1. Autonomous, teleoperated, and shared control of robot systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This paper illustrates how different modes of operation such as bilateral teleoperation, autonomous control, and shared control can be described and implemented using combinations of modules in the SMART robot control architecture. Telerobotics modes are characterized by different ``grids`` of SMART icons, where each icon represents a portion of run-time code that implements a passive control law. By placing strict requirements on the module`s input-output behavior and using scattering theory to develop a passive sampling technique, a flexible, expandable telerobot architecture is achieved. An automatic code generation tool for generating SMART systems is also described.

  2. 3D flyable curves for an autonomous aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestaoui, Yasmina

    2012-11-01

    The process of conducting a mission for an autonomous aircraft includes determining the set of waypoints (flight planning) and the path for the aircraft to fly (path planning). The autonomous aircraft is an under-actuated system, having less control inputs than degrees of freedom and has two nonholonomic (non integrable) kinematic constraints. Consequently, the set of feasible trajectories will be restricted and the problem of trajectory generation becomes more complicated than a simple interpolation. Care must be taken in the selection of the basic primitives to respect the kinematic and dynamic limitations. The topic of this paper is trajectory generation using parametric curves. The problem can be formulated as follows: to lead the autonomous aircraft from an initial configuration qi to a final configuration qf in the absence of obstacles, find a trajectory q(t) for 0 ?t ? T. The trajectory can be broken down into a geometric path q(s), s being the curvilinear abscissa and s=s(t) a temporal function. In 2D the curves fall into two categories: • Curves whose coordinates have a closed form expressions, for example B-splines, quintic polynomials or polar splines. • Curves whose curvature is a function of their arc length for example clothoids, cubic spirals, quintic or intrinsic splines. Some 3D solutions will be presented in this paper and their effectiveness discussed towards the problem in hand.

  3. A testbed for a unified teleoperated-autonomous dual-arm robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, S.; Lee, T.; Tso, K.; Backes, P.; Lloyd, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a complete robot control facility built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as part of NASA a telerobotics program to develop a state-of-the-art robot control environment for laboratory based space-like experiments. This system, which is now fully operational, has the following features: separation of the computing facilities into local and remote sites, autonomous motion generation in joint or Cartesian coordinates, dual-arm force reflecting teleoperation with voice interaction between the operator and the robots, shared control between the autonomously generated motions and operator controlled teleoperation, and dual-arm coordinated trajectory generation. The system has been used to carry out realistic experiments such as the exchange of an Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU), bolt turning, and door opening, using a mixture of autonomous actions and teleoperation, with either a single arm or two cooperating arms.

  4. Information for Successful Interaction with Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Johnson, Kathy A.

    2003-01-01

    Interaction in heterogeneous mission operations teams is not well matched to classical models of coordination with autonomous systems. We describe methods of loose coordination and information management in mission operations. We describe an information agent and information management tool suite for managing information from many sources, including autonomous agents. We present an integrated model of levels of complexity of agent and human behavior, which shows types of information processing and points of potential error in agent activities. We discuss the types of information needed for diagnosing problems and planning interactions with an autonomous system. We discuss types of coordination for which designs are needed for autonomous system functions.

  5. General autonomic components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Suter, Steve; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Naifeh, Karen

    1986-01-01

    This report refers to a body of investigations directed toward the examination of autonomic nervous system responses to motion sickness. Heart rate, respiration rate, finger pulse volume, and basal skin resistance were measured on 127 men and women before, during, and after exposure to a nauseogenic rotating chair test. Significant changes in all autonomic responses were observed across the tests (p less than .05). Significant differences in autonomic responses among groups divided according to motion sickness susceptibility were also observed (p less than .05). Results suggest that the examination of autonomic responses as an objective indicator of motion sickness malaise is warranted and may contribute to the overall understanding of the syndrome.

  6. Autonomic Computing for Spacecraft Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhenping; Savkli, Cetin; Jones, Lori

    2007-01-01

    Autonomic computing for spacecraft ground systems increases the system reliability and reduces the cost of spacecraft operations and software maintenance. In this paper, we present an autonomic computing solution for spacecraft ground systems at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), which consists of an open standard for a message oriented architecture referred to as the GMSEC architecture (Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center), and an autonomic computing tool, the Criteria Action Table (CAT). This solution has been used in many upgraded ground systems for NASA 's missions, and provides a framework for developing solutions with higher autonomic maturity.

  7. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: KSC Autonomous Test Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrading, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    The KSC Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20+ years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in. the system, As part.of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display ofthe entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledgebase, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  8. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrading, J. Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20 years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in the system. As part of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display of the entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledge base, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  9. Designing HumanDesigning Human--CenteredCentered Autonomous AgentsAutonomous Agents

    E-print Network

    Kortenkamp, David

    -Autonomous Autonomy Level Selector User Interface Plant #12;6Dr. Gregory A. Dorais, NASA Ames Research Center DrDesigning HumanDesigning Human--CenteredCentered Autonomous AgentsAutonomous Agents Gregory Dorais on software systems l Existing NASA HCA applications l Summary #12;3Dr. Gregory A. Dorais, NASA Ames Research

  10. Lower cost offshore field development utilizing autonomous vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Frisbie, F.R.; Vie, K.J.; Welch, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The offshore oil and gas industry has the requirement to inspect offshore oil and gas pipelines for scour, corrosion and damage as well as inspect and intervene on satellite production facilities. This task is currently performed with Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) operated from dynamically positioned (DP) offshore supply or diving support boats. Currently, these tasks are expensive due to the high day rates for DP ships and the slow, umbilical impeded, 1 knot inspection rates of the tethered ROVs, Emerging Autonomous Undersea Vehicle (AUV) technologies offer opportunities to perform these same inspection tasks for 50--75% lower cost, with comparable or improved quality. The new generation LAPV (Linked Autonomous Power Vehicles) will operate from fixed facilities such as TLPs or FPFs and cover an operating field 10 kms in diameter.

  11. Autonomous decision-making: a data mining approach.

    PubMed

    Kusiak, A; Kern, J A; Kernstine, K H; Tseng, B T

    2000-12-01

    The researchers and practitioners of today create models, algorithms, functions, and other constructs defined in abstract spaces. The research of the future will likely be data driven. Symbolic and numeric data that are becoming available in large volumes will define the need for new data analysis techniques and tools. Data mining is an emerging area of computational intelligence that offers new theories, techniques, and tools for analysis of large data sets. In this paper, a novel approach for autonomous decision-making is developed based on the rough set theory of data mining. The approach has been tested on a medical data set for patients with lung abnormalities referred to as solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). The two independent algorithms developed in this paper either generate an accurate diagnosis or make no decision. The methodolgy discussed in the paper depart from the developments in data mining as well as current medical literature, thus creating a variable approach for autonomous decision-making. PMID:11206812

  12. Using Planning, Scheduling and Execution for Autonomous Mars Rover Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estlin, Tara A.; Gaines, Daniel M.; Chouinard, Caroline M.; Fisher, Forest W.; Castano, Rebecca; Judd, Michele J.; Nesnas, Issa A.

    2006-01-01

    With each new rover mission to Mars, rovers are traveling significantly longer distances. This distance increase raises not only the opportunities for science data collection, but also amplifies the amount of environment and rover state uncertainty that must be handled in rover operations. This paper describes how planning, scheduling and execution techniques can be used onboard a rover to autonomously generate and execute rover activities and in particular to handle new science opportunities that have been identified dynamically. We also discuss some of the particular challenges we face in supporting autonomous rover decision-making. These include interaction with rover navigation and path-planning software and handling large amounts of uncertainty in state and resource estimations. Finally, we describe our experiences in testing this work using several Mars rover prototypes in a realistic environment.

  13. Thermoelectric-Driven Autonomous Sensors for a Biomass Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A.; Astrain, D.; Martínez, A.; Gubía, E.; Sorbet, F. J.

    2013-07-01

    This work presents the design and development of a thermoelectric generator intended to harness waste heat in a biomass power plant, and generate electric power to operate sensors and the required electronics for wireless communication. The first objective of the work is to design the optimum thermoelectric generator to harness heat from a hot surface, and generate electric power to operate a flowmeter and a wireless transmitter. The process is conducted by using a computational model, presented in previous papers, to determine the final design that meets the requirements of electric power consumption and number of transmissions per minute. Finally, the thermoelectric generator is simulated to evaluate its performance. The final device transmits information every 5 s. Moreover, it is completely autonomous and can be easily installed, since no electric wires are required.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE On this page: Description Genetic changes ... November 2012 What is hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE? Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type ...

  15. Object detection and tracking for autonomous navigation in dynamic environments

    E-print Network

    Schindler, Konrad

    Object detection and tracking for autonomous navigation in dynamic environments Andreas Ess detection · tracking · dynamic path planning 1 Introduction Autonomous navigation of robots and cars significant challenges, and autonomous navigation in such circumstances is a largely unsolved problem. One

  16. Can Planning and Reactive Systems Realize Autonomous GMDJapan Research Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Zimmer, Uwe

    Can Planning and Reactive Systems Realize Autonomous Navigation * Maki Habib GMD­Japan Research facing navigation autonomous mobile robot need addressed stem from, incomplete uncertain knowledge to autonomous systems have function effectively while navigating interacting unknown, unstructured dynamic

  17. VECTOR PURSUIT PATH TRACKING FOR AUTONOMOUS GROUND VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    part of the tasks required for autonomous navigation. Other project members have addressed the remaining tasks. Therefore, thanks go to those who have worked on the autonomous navigation project, both................................................................................................19 Autonomous Ground Vehicle Navigation Architecture..............................................20

  18. A cloud-assisted design for autonomous driving

    E-print Network

    Suresh Kumar, Swarun

    This paper presents Carcel, a cloud-assisted system for autonomous driving. Carcel enables the cloud to have access to sensor data from autonomous vehicles as well as the roadside infrastructure. The cloud assists autonomous ...

  19. An Autonomous Sensor System Architecture for Active Flow and Noise Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M, Jr.; Culliton, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-channel sensor fusion represents a powerful technique to simply and efficiently extract information from complex phenomena. While the technique has traditionally been used for military target tracking and situational awareness, a study has been successfully completed that demonstrates that sensor fusion can be applied equally well to aerodynamic applications. A prototype autonomous hardware processor was successfully designed and used to detect in real-time the two-dimensional flow reattachment location generated by a simple separated-flow wind tunnel model. The success of this demonstration illustrates the feasibility of using autonomous sensor processing architectures to enhance flow control feedback signal generation.

  20. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plattsmier, George; Stetson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto- Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the targeted system. It is envisioned that real time requirements tracing will greatly assist the movement of autoprocedures to flight software enhancing the software assurance of auto-procedures and also their acceptance as reliable commanders.

  1. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plattsmier, George I.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto-Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner- TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the targeted system. It is envisioned that real time requirements tracing will greatly assist the movement of autoprocedures to flight software enhancing the software assurance of auto-procedures and also their acceptance as reliable commanders

  2. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Dzenitis, J M; Makarewicz, A J

    2009-01-13

    We developed, tested, and now operate a civilian biological defense capability that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) collects, prepares, reads, analyzes, and reports results of multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed PCR assays using Luminex{copyright} xMAP technology and flow cytometer. The mission we conduct is particularly demanding: continuous monitoring, multiple threat agents, high sensitivity, challenging environments, and ultimately extremely low false positive rates. Here, we introduce the mission requirements and metrics, show the system engineering and analysis framework, and describe the progress to date including early development and current status.

  3. Autonomously managed electrical power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    The electric power systems for future spacecraft such as the Space Station will necessarily be more sophisticated and will exhibit more nearly autonomous operation than earlier spacecraft. These new power systems will be more reliable and flexible than their predecessors offering greater utility to the users. Automation approaches implemented on various power system breadboards are investigated. These breadboards include the Hubble Space Telescope power system test bed, the Common Module Power Management and Distribution system breadboard, the Autonomusly Managed Power System (AMPS) breadboard, and the 20 kilohertz power system breadboard. Particular attention is given to the AMPS breadboard. Future plans for these breadboards including the employment of artificial intelligence techniques are addressed.

  4. Bringing Simulation to Life: A Mixed Reality Autonomous Intersection Michael Quinlan, TszChiu Au, Jesse Zhu, Nicolae Stiurca, Peter Stone

    E-print Network

    Stone, Peter

    Bringing Simulation to Life: A Mixed Reality Autonomous Intersection Michael Quinlan, Tsz­Chiu Au, Jesse Zhu, Nicolae Stiurca, Peter Stone Abstract--- Fully autonomous vehicles are technologically fea­ sible with the current generation of hardware, as demonstrated by recent robot car competitions. Dresner

  5. Bringing Simulation to Life: A Mixed Reality Autonomous Intersection Michael Quinlan, Tsz-Chiu Au, Jesse Zhu, Nicolae Stiurca, Peter Stone

    E-print Network

    Stone, Peter

    Bringing Simulation to Life: A Mixed Reality Autonomous Intersection Michael Quinlan, Tsz-Chiu Au, Jesse Zhu, Nicolae Stiurca, Peter Stone Abstract-- Fully autonomous vehicles are technologically fea- sible with the current generation of hardware, as demonstrated by recent robot car competitions. Dresner

  6. AUTONOMOUS QUADCOPTER VIDEOGRAPHER REY R. COAGUILA

    E-print Network

    Sukthankar, Gita Reese

    AUTONOMOUS QUADCOPTER VIDEOGRAPHER by REY R. COAGUILA B.S. Universidad Peruana de Ciencias years, the interest in quadcopters as a robotics platform for autonomous photography has increased.e. a quadcopter capable of capturing good footage of a specific subject. In order to obtain this footage

  7. Planning Flight Paths of Autonomous Aerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulczycki, Eric; Elfes, Alberto; Sharma, Shivanjli

    2009-01-01

    Algorithms for planning flight paths of autonomous aerobots (robotic blimps) to be deployed in scientific exploration of remote planets are undergoing development. These algorithms are also adaptable to terrestrial applications involving robotic submarines as well as aerobots and other autonomous aircraft used to acquire scientific data or to perform surveying or monitoring functions.

  8. Autonomous landmark tracking orbit determination strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. K.; Cheng, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, an orbit determination strategy is described that is fully autonomous and relies on a computer-based crater detection and identification algorithm that is suitable for both automation of the ground based navigation system and autonomous spacecraft based navigation.

  9. Autonomous Forest Vehicles: Historic, envisioned, and

    E-print Network

    Hellström, Thomas

    Autonomous Forest Vehicles: Historic, envisioned, and state-of-the-art Thomas Hellström Pär Lärkeryd Tomas Nordfjell Ola Ringdahl ABSTRACT The feasibility of using autonomous forest vehicles (which can be regarded as logical developments in the ongoing auto- mation of forest machines),the systems

  10. Fusion of Redundant Autonomous Sensors for Navigation

    E-print Network

    Lenstra, Arjen K.

    Fusion of Redundant Autonomous Sensors for Navigation Geodetic Engineering Laboratory Web Research Objective: To develop a low-cost autonomous navigation system that can operate in GPS : topo.epfl.ch Contact: yannick.stebler@epfl.ch The goal of navigation is to estimate the position

  11. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-11-30

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are avilable to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions.

  12. Autonomous Construction with Compliant Building Material

    E-print Network

    Hirche, Sandra

    robot builds a protective barrier by means of compliant pockets (i.e., filled bags). We present advantage of compliant pockets for autonomous construction. The control algorithm guides the robot to build- bags, and foam, respectively. 3. The autonomous robots that build the structure, in terms

  13. New Small Autonomous Schools District Policy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Unified School District, CA.

    Inspired by the gains in student achievement realized by the small schools movement in New York City, the Oakland Unified School District (California) has proposed creating a network of 10 new, small autonomous (NSA) schools over the next 3 years. School size will range between 250 and 500 students, depending on grade level. "Autonomous" means…

  14. Autonomic Physiological Response Patterns Related to Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melis, Cor; van Boxtel, Anton

    2007-01-01

    We examined autonomic physiological responses induced by six different cognitive ability tasks, varying in complexity, that were selected on the basis of on Guilford's Structure of Intellect model. In a group of 52 participants, task performance was measured together with nine different autonomic response measures and respiration rate. Weighted…

  15. Robust Mission Execution for Autonomous Urban Driving

    E-print Network

    Choset, Howie

    Robust Mission Execution for Autonomous Urban Driving Christopher R. BAKER a,1, David I. FERGUSON b, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract. We describe a multi-modal software system for executing navigation missions to autonomously execute a series of navigation missions in a simplified urban environment consisting of roads

  16. Multi-agent autonomous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dohm, James (Inventor); Tarbell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A multi-agent autonomous system for exploration of hazardous or inaccessible locations. The multi-agent autonomous system includes simple surface-based agents or craft controlled by an airborne tracking and command system. The airborne tracking and command system includes an instrument suite used to image an operational area and any craft deployed within the operational area. The image data is used to identify the craft, targets for exploration, and obstacles in the operational area. The tracking and command system determines paths for the surface-based craft using the identified targets and obstacles and commands the craft using simple movement commands to move through the operational area to the targets while avoiding the obstacles. Each craft includes its own instrument suite to collect information about the operational area that is transmitted back to the tracking and command system. The tracking and command system may be further coupled to a satellite system to provide additional image information about the operational area and provide operational and location commands to the tracking and command system.

  17. Autonomous perturbations of LISA orbits

    E-print Network

    Giuseppe Pucacco; Massimo Bassan; Massimo Visco

    2010-09-24

    We investigate autonomous perturbations on the orbits of LISA, namely the effects produced by fields that can be expressed only in terms of the position, but not of time in the Hill frame. This first step in the study of the LISA orbits has been the subject of recent papers which implement analytical techniques based on a "post-epicyclic" approximation in the Hill frame to find optimal unperturbed orbits. The natural step forward is to analyze the perturbations to purely Keplerian orbits. In the present work a particular emphasis is put on the tidal field of the Earth assumed to be stationary in the Hill frame. An accurate interpretation of the global structure of the perturbed solution sheds light on possible implications on injection in orbit when the time base-line of the mission is longer than that assumed in previous papers. Other relevant classes of autonomous perturbations are those given by the corrections to the Solar field responsible for a slow precession and a global stationary field, associated to sources like the interplanetary dust or a local dark matter component. The inclusion of simple linear contributions in the expansion of these fields produces secular solutions that can be compared with the measurements and possibly used to evaluate some morphological property of the perturbing components.

  18. Autonomic reflexes in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Lagercrantz, H; Edwards, D; Henderson-Smart, D; Hertzberg, T; Jeffery, H

    1990-01-01

    Some autonomic nervous reflexes often tested in adult medicine have been studied in 21 preterm infants (25-37 gestational weeks). The aim was to develop such tests for preterm infants and see if there were any differences in babies with recurrent apnea and bradycardia and babies who had been exposed to sympathicolytic drugs before birth. To test sympathetic nervous activity the peripheral vascular resistance was measured before and during 45 degrees of head-up tilting. To test parasympathetic nervous activity the degree of bradycardia was measured in response to cold face test (application of an ice-cube on the fore-head) and laryngeal stimulation with saline. Finally the heart rate changes after a sudden noise (85 dB) were studied as an indicator of both sympathetic and vagal activity. The peripheral resistance was found to be relatively low in these preterm infants, particularly in some infants tested at the postnatal age of about two months. Heart rate and mean blood pressure did not change during tilting, while the peripheral resistance increased significantly mainly due to lowered limb blood flow. The median decrease of the heart rate during the cold face test was 20.0% and during laryngeal receptor stimulation 23.7%. The sudden noise usually caused a biphasic heart rate response. An autonomic nervous reflex score was calculated and found to be negative (parasympathetic) in infants with recurrent prolonged apnea and bradycardia and positive in infants with clinical signs of increased sympathetic nervous activity. PMID:2239264

  19. Autonomic Management for Multi-agent Systems

    E-print Network

    Salih, Nadir K; Viju, PG K; Mohamed, Abdelmotalib A

    2011-01-01

    Autonomic computing is a computing system that can manage itself by self-configuration, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protection. Researchers have been emphasizing the strong role that multi agent systems can play progressively towards the design and implementation of complex autonomic systems. The important of autonomic computing is to create computing systems capable of managing themselves to a far greater extent than they do today. With the nature of autonomy, reactivity, sociality and pro-activity, software agents are promising to make autonomic computing system a reality. This paper mixed multi-agent system with autonomic feature that completely hides its complexity from users/services. Mentioned Java Application Development Framework as platform example of this environment, could applied to web services as front end to users. With multi agent support it also provides adaptability, intelligence, collaboration, goal oriented interactions, flexibility, mobility and persistence in software systems

  20. Autonomous power system intelligent diagnosis and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringer, Mark J.; Quinn, Todd M.; Merolla, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) project at NASA Lewis Research Center is designed to demonstrate the abilities of integrated intelligent diagnosis, control, and scheduling techniques to space power distribution hardware. Knowledge-based software provides a robust method of control for highly complex space-based power systems that conventional methods do not allow. The project consists of three elements: the Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) for fault diagnosis and control, the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler (AIPS) to determine system configuration, and power hardware (Brassboard) to simulate a space based power system. The operation of the Autonomous Power System as a whole is described and the responsibilities of the three elements - APEX, AIPS, and Brassboard - are characterized. A discussion of the methodologies used in each element is provided. Future plans are discussed for the growth of the Autonomous Power System.

  1. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ruel Edwin

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990 the Autonomous Rendezvous & Docking (AR&D) system was first demonstrated for members of NASA's Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware from the Cruise Missile and Advanced Centaur Avionics systems. The object was to show that all the accuracy, reliability and operational requirements established for a space craft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed system. The rapid prototyping capabilities of the Advanced Avionics Systems Development Laboratory were used to evaluate the proposed system in a real time, hardware in the loop simulation of the rendezvous and docking reference mission. The simulation permits manual, supervised automatic and fully autonomous operations to be evaluated. It is also being upgraded to be able to test an Autonomous Approach and Landing (AA&L) system. The AA&L and AR&D systems are very similar. Both use inertial guidance and control systems supplemented by GPS. Both use an Image Processing System (IPS), for target recognition and tracking. The IPS includes a general purpose multiprocessor computer and a selected suite of sensors that will provide the required relative position and orientation data. Graphic displays can also be generated by the computer, providing the astronaut / operator with real-time guidance and navigation data with enhanced video or sensor imagery.

  2. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ruel Edwin

    In November 1990 the Autonomous Rendezvous & Docking (AR&D) system was first demonstrated for members of NASA's Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware from the Cruise Missile and Advanced Centaur Avionics systems. The object was to show that all the accuracy, reliability and operational requirements established for a space craft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed system. The rapid prototyping capabilities of the Advanced Avionics Systems Development Laboratory were used to evaluate the proposed system in a real time, hardware in the loop simulation of the rendezvous and docking reference mission. The simulation permits manual, supervised automatic and fully autonomous operations to be evaluated. It is also being upgraded to be able to test an Autonomous Approach and Landing (AA&L) system. The AA&L and AR&D systems are very similar. Both use inertial guidance and control systems supplemented by GPS. Both use an Image Processing System (IPS), for target recognition and tracking. The IPS includes a general purpose multiprocessor computer and a selected suite of sensors that will provide the required relative position and orientation data. Graphic displays can also be generated by the computer, providing the astronaut / operator with real-time guidance and navigation data with enhanced video or sensor imagery.

  3. Compact, autonomous, multi-mission synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Thomas J.; Wilson, Michael L.; Madsen, David; Knight, Chad; Jensen, Mark D.; Partridge, Darin C.; Addario, Mike

    2013-05-01

    The utilization of unmanned aerial systems (UASs) for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) applications continues to increase and unmanned systems have become a critical asset in current and future battlespaces. With the development of medium-to-low altitude, rapidly deployable aircraft platforms, the ISR community has seen an increasing push to develop ISR sensors and systems with real-time mission support capabilities. This paper describes the design and development of the RASAR (Real-time, Autonomous, Synthetic Aperture Radar) sensor system and presents demonstration flight test results. RASAR is a modular, multi-band (L and X) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging sensor designed for self-contained, autonomous, real-time operation with mission flexibility to support a wide range of ISR needs within the size, weight and power constraints of Group III UASs. SAR waveforms are generated through direct digital synthesis enabling arbitrary waveform notching to enable operations in cluttered RF environments. RASAR is capable of simultaneous dual-channel receive to enable polarization based target discrimination. The sensor command and control and real-time image formation processing are designed to enable integration of RASAR into larger, multi-intelligence system of systems. The multi-intelligence architecture and a demonstration of real-time autonomous cross-cueing of a separate optical sensor will be presented.

  4. Autonomous Control Capabilities for Space Reactor Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Richard T.; Neal, John S.; Brittain, C. Ray; Mullens, James A.

    2004-02-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, is investigating a possible Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, which would conduct in-depth studies of three of the moons of Jupiter by using a space reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power for more than a decade. Terrestrial nuclear power plants rely upon varying degrees of direct human control and interaction for operations and maintenance over a forty to sixty year lifetime. In contrast, an SRPS is intended to provide continuous, remote, unattended operation for up to fifteen years with no maintenance. Uncertainties, rare events, degradation, and communications delays with Earth are challenges that SRPS control must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design. In this paper, we describe an autonomous control concept for generic SRPS designs. The formulation of an autonomous control concept, which includes identification of high-level functional requirements and generation of a research and development plan for enabling technologies, is among the technical activities that are being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Space Reactor Technology Program in support of the NASA's Project Prometheus. The findings from this program are intended to contribute to the successful realization of the JIMO mission.

  5. Autonomous Control Capabilities for Space Reactor Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard T.; Neal, John S.; Brittain, C. Ray; Mullens, James A.

    2004-02-04

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, is investigating a possible Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, which would conduct in-depth studies of three of the moons of Jupiter by using a space reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power for more than a decade. Terrestrial nuclear power plants rely upon varying degrees of direct human control and interaction for operations and maintenance over a forty to sixty year lifetime. In contrast, an SRPS is intended to provide continuous, remote, unattended operation for up to fifteen years with no maintenance. Uncertainties, rare events, degradation, and communications delays with Earth are challenges that SRPS control must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design. In this paper, we describe an autonomous control concept for generic SRPS designs. The formulation of an autonomous control concept, which includes identification of high-level functional requirements and generation of a research and development plan for enabling technologies, is among the technical activities that are being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Space Reactor Technology Program in support of the NASA's Project Prometheus. The findings from this program are intended to contribute to the successful realization of the JIMO mission.

  6. Scheduling lessons learned from the Autonomous Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringer, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) project at NASA LeRC is designed to demonstrate the applications of integrated intelligent diagnosis, control, and scheduling techniques to space power distribution systems. The project consists of three elements: the Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) for Fault Diagnosis, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR); the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler (AIPS) to efficiently assign activities start times and resources; and power hardware (Brassboard) to emulate a space-based power system. The AIPS scheduler was tested within the APS system. This scheduler is able to efficiently assign available power to the requesting activities and share this information with other software agents within the APS system in order to implement the generated schedule. The AIPS scheduler is also able to cooperatively recover from fault situations by rescheduling the affected loads on the Brassboard in conjunction with the APEX FDIR system. AIPS served as a learning tool and an initial scheduling testbed for the integration of FDIR and automated scheduling systems. Many lessons were learned from the AIPS scheduler and are now being integrated into a new scheduler called SCRAP (Scheduler for Continuous Resource Allocation and Planning). This paper will service three purposes: an overview of the AIPS implementation, lessons learned from the AIPS scheduler, and a brief section on how these lessons are being applied to the new SCRAP scheduler.

  7. The role of the autonomic nervous system in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hawksley, Jack; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Nagai, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder, consisting of multiple involuntary movements (motor tics) and one or more vocal (phonic) tics. It affects up to one percent of children worldwide, of whom about one third continue to experience symptoms into adulthood. The central neural mechanisms of tic generation are not clearly understood, however recent neuroimaging investigations suggest impaired cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical activity during motor control. In the current manuscript, we will tackle the relatively under-investigated role of the peripheral autonomic nervous system, and its central influences, on tic activity. There is emerging evidence that both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activity influences tic expression. Pharmacological treatments which act on sympathetic tone are often helpful: for example, Clonidine (an alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist) is often used as first choice medication for treating TS in children due to its good tolerability profile and potential usefulness for co-morbid attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder. Clonidine suppresses sympathetic activity, reducing the triggering of motor tics. A general elevation of sympathetic tone is reported in patients with TS compared to healthy people, however this observation may reflect transient responses coupled to tic activity. Thus, the presence of autonomic impairments in patients with TS remains unclear. Effect of autonomic afferent input to cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit will be discussed schematically. We additionally review how TS is affected by modulation of central autonomic control through biofeedback and Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS). Biofeedback training can enable a patient to gain voluntary control over covert physiological responses by making these responses explicit. Electrodermal biofeedback training to elicit a reduction in sympathetic tone has a demonstrated association with reduced tic frequency. VNS, achieved through an implanted device that gives pulsatile electrical stimulation to the vagus nerve, directly modulates afferent interoceptive signals. The potential efficacy of biofeedback/VNS in TS and the implications for understanding the underlying neural mechanisms of tics will be discussed. PMID:26074752

  8. Flight Control System Development for the BURRO Autonomous UAV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbourne, Jason D.; Frost, Chad R.; Tischler, Mark B.; Ciolani, Luigi; Sahai, Ranjana; Tomoshofski, Chris; LaMontagne, Troy; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Developing autonomous flying vehicles has been a growing field in aeronautical research within the last decade and will continue into the next century. With concerns about safety, size, and cost of manned aircraft, several autonomous vehicle projects are currently being developed; uninhabited rotorcraft offer solutions to requirements for hover, vertical take-off and landing, as well as slung load transportation capabilities. The newness of the technology requires flight control engineers to question what design approaches, control law architectures, and performance criteria apply to control law development and handling quality evaluation. To help answer these questions, this paper documents the control law design process for Kaman Aerospace BURRO project. This paper will describe the approach taken to design control laws and develop math models which will be used to convert the manned K-MAX into the BURRO autonomous rotorcraft. With the ability of the K-MAX to lift its own weight (6000 lb) the load significantly affects the dynamics of the system; the paper addresses the additional design requirements for slung load autonomous flight. The approach taken in this design was to: 1) generate accurate math models of the K-MAX helicopter with and without slung loads, 2) select design specifications that would deliver good performance as well as satisfy mission criteria, and 3) develop and tune the control system architecture to meet the design specs and mission criteria. An accurate math model was desired for control system development. The Comprehensive Identification from Frequency Responses (CIFER(R)) software package was used to identify a linear math model for unloaded and loaded flight at hover, 50 kts, and 100 kts. The results of an eight degree-of-freedom CIFER(R)-identified linear model for the unloaded hover flight condition are presented herein, and the identification of the two-body slung-load configuration is in progress.

  9. Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Communication (DATAC) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novacki, Stanley M., III

    1987-01-01

    In order to accommodate the increasing number of computerized subsystems aboard today's more fuel efficient aircraft, the Boeing Co. has developed the DATAC (Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Control) bus to minimize the need for point-to-point wiring to interconnect these various systems, thereby reducing total aircraft weight and maintaining an economical flight configuration. The DATAC bus is essentially a local area network providing interconnections for any of the flight management and control systems aboard the aircraft. The task of developing a Bus Monitor Unit was broken down into four subtasks: (1) providing a hardware interface between the DATAC bus and the Z8000-based microcomputer system to be used as the bus monitor; (2) establishing a communication link between the Z8000 system and a CP/M-based computer system; (3) generation of data reduction and display software to output data to the console device; and (4) development of a DATAC Terminal Simulator to facilitate testing of the hardware and software which transfer data between the DATAC's bus and the operator's console in a near real time environment. These tasks are briefly discussed.

  10. Curiosity's Autonomous Surface Safing Behavior Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, Tracy A.; Manning, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The safing routines on all robotic deep-space vehicles are designed to put the vehicle in a power and thermally safe configuration, enabling communication with the mission operators on Earth. Achieving this goal is made a little more difficult on Curiosity because the power requirements for the core avionics and the telecommunication equipment exceed the capability of the single power source, the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator. This drove the system design to create an operational mode, called "sleep mode", where the vehicle turns off most of the loads in order to charge the two Li-ion batteries. The system must keep the vehicle safe from over-heat and under-heat conditions, battery cell failures, under-voltage conditions, and clock failures, both while the computer is running and while the system is sleeping. The other goal of a safing routine is to communicate. On most spacecraft, this simply involves turning on the receiver and transmitter continuously. For Curiosity, Earth is above the horizon only a part of the day for direct communication to the Earth, and the orbiter overpass opportunities only occur a few times a day. The design must robustly place the Rover in a communicable condition at the correct time. This paper discusses Curiosity's autonomous safing behavior and describes how the vehicle remains power and thermally safe while sleeping, as well as a description of how the Rover communicates with the orbiters and Earth at specific times.

  11. See and avoidance behaviors for autonomous navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dah-Jye; Beard, Randal W.; Merrell, Paul C.; Zhan, Pengcheng

    2004-12-01

    Recent advances in many multi-discipline technologies have allowed small, low-cost fixed wing unmanned air vehicles (UAV) or more complicated unmanned ground vehicles (UGV) to be a feasible solution in many scientific, civil and military applications. Cameras can be mounted on-board of the unmanned vehicles for the purpose of scientific data gathering, surveillance for law enforcement and homeland security, as well as to provide visual information to detect and avoid imminent collisions for autonomous navigation. However, most current computer vision algorithms are highly complex computationally and usually constitute the bottleneck of the guidance and control loop. In this paper, we present a novel computer vision algorithm for collision detection and time-to-impact calculation based on feature density distribution (FDD) analysis. It does not require accurate feature extraction, tracking, or estimation of focus of expansion (FOE). Under a few reasonable assumptions, by calculating the expansion rate of the FDD in space, time-to-impact can be accurately estimated. A sequence of monocular images is studied, and different features are used simultaneously in FDD analysis to show that our algorithm can achieve a fairly good accuracy in collision detection. In this paper we also discuss reactive path planning and trajectory generation techniques that can be accomplished without violating the velocity and heading rate constraints of the UAV.

  12. An autonomous structural health monitoring solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherston, Carol A.; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys; Lees, Jonathan; Eaton, Mark; Pearson, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Combining advanced sensor technologies, with optimised data acquisition and diagnostic and prognostic capability, structural health monitoring (SHM) systems provide real-time assessment of the integrity of bridges, buildings, aircraft, wind turbines, oil pipelines and ships, leading to improved safety and reliability and reduced inspection and maintenance costs. The implementation of power harvesting, using energy scavenged from ambient sources such as thermal gradients and sources of vibration in conjunction with wireless transmission enables truly autonomous systems, reducing the need for batteries and associated maintenance in often inaccessible locations, alongside bulky and expensive wiring looms. The design and implementation of such a system however presents numerous challenges. A suitable energy source or multiple sources capable of meeting the power requirements of the system, over the entire monitoring period, in a location close to the sensor must be identified. Efficient power management techniques must be used to condition the power and deliver it, as required, to enable appropriate measurements to be taken. Energy storage may be necessary, to match a continuously changing supply and demand for a range of different monitoring states including sleep, record and transmit. An appropriate monitoring technique, capable of detecting, locating and characterising damage and delivering reliable information, whilst minimising power consumption, must be selected. Finally a wireless protocol capable of transmitting the levels of information generated at the rate needed in the required operating environment must be chosen. This paper considers solutions to some of these challenges, and in particular examines SHM in the context of the aircraft environment.

  13. Autonomous Infrastructure for Observatory Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, R.

    This is an era of rapid change from ancient human-mediated modes of astronomical practice to a vision of ever larger time domain surveys, ever bigger "big data", to increasing numbers of robotic telescopes and astronomical automation on every mountaintop. Over the past decades, facets of a new autonomous astronomical toolkit have been prototyped and deployed in support of numerous space missions. Remote and queue observing modes have gained significant market share on the ground. Archives and data-mining are becoming ubiquitous; astroinformatic techniques and virtual observatory standards and protocols are areas of active development. Astronomers and engineers, planetary and solar scientists, and researchers from communities as diverse as particle physics and exobiology are collaborating on a vast range of "multi-messenger" science. What then is missing?

  14. An Autonomous Flight Safety System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, James B.; Lanzi, Raymond J.

    2007-01-01

    The Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) being developed by NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center s Wallops Flight Facility and Kennedy Space Center has completed two successful developmental flights and is preparing for a third. AFSS has been demonstrated to be a viable architecture for implementation of a completely vehicle based system capable of protecting life and property in event of an errant vehicle by terminating the flight or initiating other actions. It is capable of replacing current human-in-the-loop systems or acting in parallel with them. AFSS is configured prior to flight in accordance with a specific rule set agreed upon by the range safety authority and the user to protect the public and assure mission success. This paper discusses the motivation for the project, describes the method of development, and presents an overview of the evolving architecture and the current status.

  15. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Werner

    2014-08-01

    An external reference system suitable for deep space navigation can be defined by fast spinning and strongly magnetized neutron stars, called pulsars. Their beamed periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. The unique properties of pulsars make clear already today that such a navigation system will have its application in future astronautics. We will describe the basic principle of spacecraft navigation using pulsars and report on the current development status of this novel technology.

  16. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation With Pulsars

    E-print Network

    Becker, Werner; Jessner, Axel

    2013-01-01

    An external reference system suitable for deep space navigation can be defined by fast spinning and strongly magnetized neutron stars, called pulsars. Their beamed periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. The unique properties of pulsars make clear already today that such a navigation system will have its application in future astronautics. In this paper we describe the basic principle of spacecraft navigation using pulsars and report on the current development status of this novel technology.

  17. Autonomous navigation using lunar beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, A. R.; Ellis, J.; French, J.; Null, G.; Yunck, T.; Wu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of using lunar beacon signal transmission for on-board navigation for earth satellites and near-earth spacecraft is described. The system would require powerful transmitters on the earth-side of the moon's surface and black box receivers with antennae and microprocessors placed on board spacecraft for autonomous navigation. Spacecraft navigation requires three position and three velocity elements to establish location coordinates. Two beacons could be soft-landed on the lunar surface at the limits of allowable separation and each would transmit a wide-beam signal with cones reaching GEO heights and be strong enough to be received by small antennae in near-earth orbit. The black box processor would perform on-board computation with one-way Doppler/range data and dynamical models. Alternatively, GEO satellites such as the GPS or TDRSS spacecraft can be used with interferometric techniques to provide decimeter-level accuracy for aircraft navigation.

  18. Digital autonomous terminal access communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novacki, S.

    1987-01-01

    A significant problem for the Bus Monitor Unit is to identify the source of a given transmission. This problem arises from the fact that the label which identifies the source of the transmission as it is put into the bus is intercepted by the Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Communications (DATAC) terminal and removed from the transmission. Thus, a given subsystem will see only data associated with a label and never the identifying label itself. The Bus Monitor must identify the source of the transmission so as to be able to provide some type of error identification/location in the event that some problem with the data transmission occurs. Steps taken to alleviate this problem by modifications to the DATAC terminal are discussed.

  19. APDS: Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R G; Brown, S; Burris, L; Colston, B; Jones, L; Makarewicz, T; Mariella, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Milanovich, F; Masarabadi, S; Venkateswaran, K; Marshall, G; Olson, D; Wolcott, D

    2002-02-14

    An early warning system to counter bioterrorism, the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) continuously monitors the environment for the presence of biological pathogens (e.g., anthrax) and once detected, it sounds an alarm much like a smoke detector warns of a fire. Long before September 11, 2001, this system was being developed to protect domestic venues and events including performing arts centers, mass transit systems, major sporting and entertainment events, and other high profile situations in which the public is at risk of becoming a target of bioterrorist attacks. Customizing off-the-shelf components and developing new components, a multidisciplinary team developed APDS, a stand-alone system for rapid, continuous monitoring of multiple airborne biological threat agents in the environment. The completely automated APDS samples the air, prepares fluid samples in-line, and performs two orthogonal tests: immunoassay and nucleic acid detection. When compared to competing technologies, APDS is unprecedented in terms of flexibility and system performance.

  20. Autonomous Medical Care for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Polk, J. D.; Hines, John W.; Nall, Marsha M.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of Autonomous Medical Care (AMC) is to ensure a healthy, well-performing crew which is a primary need for exploration. The end result of this effort will be the requirements and design for medical systems for the CEV, lunar operations, and Martian operations as well as a ground-based crew health optimization plan. Without such systems, we increase the risk of medical events occurring during a mission and we risk being unable to deal with contingencies of illness and injury, potentially threatening mission success. AMC has two major components: 1) pre-flight crew health optimization and 2) in-flight medical care. The goal of pre-flight crew health optimization is to reduce the risk of illness occurring during a mission by primary prevention and prophylactic measures. In-flight autonomous medical care is the capability to provide medical care during a mission with little or no real-time support from Earth. Crew medical officers or other crew members provide routine medical care as well as medical care to ill or injured crew members using resources available in their location. Ground support becomes telemedical consultation on-board systems/people collect relevant data for ground support to review. The AMC system provides capabilities to incorporate new procedures and training and advice as required. The on-board resources in an autonomous system should be as intelligent and integrated as is feasible, but autonomous does not mean that no human will be involved. The medical field is changing rapidly, and so a challenge is to determine which items to pursue now, which to leverage other efforts (e.g. military), and which to wait for commercial forces to mature. Given that what is used for the CEV or the Moon will likely be updated before going to Mars, a critical piece of the system design will be an architecture that provides for easy incorporation of new technologies into the system. Another challenge is to determine the level of care to provide for each mission type. The level of care refers to the amount and type of care one will render based on perceived need and ability. This is in contrast to the standard of care which is the benchmark by which that care is provided. There are certainly some devices and procedures that have unique microgravity or partial gravity requirements such that terrestrial methods will not work. For example, performing CPR on Mars cannot be done in exactly the same way as on Earth because the reduced gravity causes too large a reduction in the forces available for effective compression of the chest. Likewise, fluid behavior in microgravity may require a specialized water filtration and mixing system for the creation of intravenous fluids. This paper will outline the drivers for the design of the medical care systems, prioritization and planning techniques, key system components, and long term goals.

  1. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Werner; Bernhardt, Mike G.; Jessner, Axel

    2013-11-01

    An external reference system suitable for deep space navigation can be defined by fast spinning and strongly magnetized neutron stars, called pulsars. Their beamed periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. ?e unique properties of pulsars make clear already today that such a navigation system will have its application in future astronautics. In this paper we describe the basic principle of spacecraft navigation using pulsars and report on the current development status of this novel technology.

  2. Wireless autonomous device data transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammel, Jr., David W. (Inventor); Cain, James T. (Inventor); Mickle, Marlin H. (Inventor); Mi, Minhong (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of communicating information from a wireless autonomous device (WAD) to a base station. The WAD has a data element having a predetermined profile having a total number of sequenced possible data element combinations. The method includes receiving at the WAD an RF profile transmitted by the base station that includes a triggering portion having a number of pulses, wherein the number is at least equal to the total number of possible data element combinations. The method further includes keeping a count of received pulses and wirelessly transmitting a piece of data, preferably one bit, to the base station when the count reaches a value equal to the stored data element's particular number in the sequence. Finally, the method includes receiving the piece of data at the base station and using the receipt thereof to determine which of the possible data element combinations the stored data element is.

  3. Machine intelligence for autonomous manipulation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    Survey of the present technological development status of machine intelligence for autonomous manipulation in the U.S., Japan, USSR, and England. The extent of task-performance autonomy is examined that machine intelligence gives the manipulator by eliminating the need for a human operator to close continuously the control loop, or to rewrite control programs for each different task. Surveyed research projects show that the development of some advanced automation systems for manipulator control are within the state of the art. Yet, many more realistic breadboard systems and experimental work are needed before further progress can be made in the design of advanced automation systems for manipulator control suitable for new major practical applications. Specific research areas of promise are pointed out.

  4. Autonomous navigation system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, David J.; Few, Douglas A.

    2009-09-08

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The instructions repeat, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon based on the robot's current velocity, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, testing for an event horizon intrusion by determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon, and adjusting rotational and translational velocity of the robot accordingly. If the event horizon intrusion occurs, rotational velocity is modified by a proportion of the current rotational velocity reduced by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle and translational velocity is modified by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle. If no event horizon intrusion occurs, translational velocity is set as a ratio of a speed factor relative to a maximum speed.

  5. Autonomous caregiver following robotic wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, E. Venkata; Sivaramalingam, Sethurajan; Vignesh, A. Sri; Vasanth, Elanthendral; Joans, S. Mary

    2011-12-01

    In the last decade, a variety of robotic/intelligent wheelchairs have been proposed to meet the need in aging society. Their main research topics are autonomous functions such as moving toward some goals while avoiding obstacles, or user-friendly interfaces. Although it is desirable for wheelchair users to go out alone, caregivers often accompany them. Therefore we have to consider not only autonomous functions and user interfaces but also how to reduce caregivers' load and support their activities in a communication aspect. From this point of view, we have proposed a robotic wheelchair moving with a caregiver side by side based on the MATLAB process. In this project we discussing about robotic wheel chair to follow a caregiver by using a microcontroller, Ultrasonic sensor, keypad, Motor drivers to operate robot. Using camera interfaced with the DM6437 (Davinci Code Processor) image is captured. The captured image are then processed by using image processing technique, the processed image are then converted into voltage levels through MAX 232 level converter and given it to the microcontroller unit serially and ultrasonic sensor to detect the obstacle in front of robot. In this robot we have mode selection switch Automatic and Manual control of robot, we use ultrasonic sensor in automatic mode to find obstacle, in Manual mode to use the keypad to operate wheel chair. In the microcontroller unit, c language coding is predefined, according to this coding the robot which connected to it was controlled. Robot which has several motors is activated by using the motor drivers. Motor drivers are nothing but a switch which ON/OFF the motor according to the control given by the microcontroller unit.

  6. Scalable autonomous operations of unmanned assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghun

    Although there have been great theoretical advances in the region of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) autonomy, applications of those theories into real world are still hesitated due to unexpected disturbances. Most of UAVs which are currently used are mainly, strictly speaking, Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPA) since most works related with the flight control, sensor data analysis, and decision makings are done by human operators. To increase the degree of autonomy, many researches are focused on developing Unmanned Autonomous Aerial Vehicle (UAAV) which can takeoff, fly to the interested area by avoiding unexpected obstacles, perform various missions with decision makings, come back to the base station, and land on by itself without any human operators. To improve the performance of UAVs, the accuracies of position and orientation sensors are enhanced by integrating a Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) or a solar compass to a UAV; Position sensor accuracy of a GPS sensor on a UAV is improved by referencing the position of a UGV which is calculated by using three GPS sensors and Weighted Centroid Localization (WCL) method; Orientation sensor accuracy is improved as well by using Three Pixel Theorem (TPT) and integrating a solar compass which composed of nine light sensors to a magnetic compass. Also, improved health management of a UAV is fulfilled by developing a wireless autonomous charging station which uses four pairs of transmitter and receiver magnetic loops with four robotic arms. For the software aspect, I also analyze the error propagation of the proposed mission planning hierarchy to achieve the safest size of the buffer zone. In addition, among seven future research areas regarding UAV, this paper mainly focuses on developing algorithms of path planning, trajectory generation, and cooperative tactics for the operations of multiple UAVs using GA based multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (mTSP) which is solved by dividing into m number of Traveling Salesman Problems (TSP) using two region division methods such as Uniform Region Division (URD) and K-means Voronoi Region Division (KVRD). The topic of the maximum fuel efficiency is also dealt to ensure the minimum amount fuel consumption to perform surveillance on a given region using multiple UAVs. Last but not least, I present an application example of cattle roundup with two UAVs and two animals using the feedback linearization controller.

  7. Autonomous Vehicle Video Aided Navigation Coupling INS and Video Approaches

    E-print Network

    Hoff, William A.

    Autonomous Vehicle Video Aided Navigation ­ Coupling INS and Video Approaches Chris Baker1 , Chris due to its heavy dependence on image texture. Our approach to autonomous vehicle navigation exploits problem to any autonomous vehicle system. Many autonomous navigation systems today rely on the consistent

  8. Autonomous Off-Road Driving in the DARPA Grand Challenge

    E-print Network

    Soatto, Stefano

    Autonomous Off-Road Driving in the DARPA Grand Challenge Eagle Jones, Brian Fulkerson, and Emilio-speed autonomous driving in the structured highway environment for years. However, it is clear learned from two years of autonomous vehicle develop- ment. Autonomous navigation in the off road

  9. Secure, Autonomous, Intelligent Controller for Integrating Distributed Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the infrastructure and protocols necessary to enable near-real-time commanding, access to space-based assets, and the secure interoperation between sensor webs owned and controlled by various entities. Select terrestrial and aeronautics-base sensor webs will be used to demonstrate time-critical interoperability between integrated, intelligent sensor webs both terrestrial and between terrestrial and space-based assets. For this work, a Secure, Autonomous, Intelligent Controller and knowledge generation unit is implemented using Virtual Mission Operation Center technology.

  10. Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2012-02-28

    The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

  11. Development of Autonomous Aerobraking (Phase 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Powell, Richard W.; Prince, Jill L.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center received a request from Mr. Daniel Murri (NASA Technical Fellow for Flight Mechanics) to develop an autonomous aerobraking capability. An initial evaluation for all phases of this assessment was approved to proceed at the NESC Review Board meeting. The purpose of phase 1 of this study was to provide an assessment of the feasibility of autonomous aerobraking. During this phase, atmospheric, aerodynamic, and thermal models for a representative spacecraft were developed for both the onboard algorithm known as Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software, and a ground-based "truth" simulation developed for testing purposes. The results of the phase 1 assessment are included in this report.

  12. Autonomous underwater pipeline monitoring navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Byrel; Mahmoudian, Nina; Meadows, Guy

    2014-06-01

    This paper details the development of an autonomous motion-control and navigation algorithm for an underwater autonomous vehicle, the Ocean Server IVER3, to track long linear features such as underwater pipelines. As part of this work, the Nonlinear and Autonomous Systems Laboratory (NAS Lab) developed an algorithm that utilizes inputs from the vehicles state of the art sensor package, which includes digital imaging, digital 3-D Sidescan Sonar, and Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers. The resulting algorithms should tolerate real-world waterway with episodic strong currents, low visibility, high sediment content, and a variety of small and large vessel traffic.

  13. Development of Autonomous Aerobraking - Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Phase 1 of the Development of Autonomous Aerobraking (AA) Assessment investigated the technical capability of transferring the processes of aerobraking maneuver (ABM) decision-making (currently performed on the ground by an extensive workforce and communicated to the spacecraft via the deep space network) to an efficient flight software algorithm onboard the spacecraft. This document describes Phase 2 of this study, which was a 12-month effort to improve and rigorously test the AA Development Software developed in Phase 1. Aerobraking maneuver; Autonomous Aerobraking; Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software; Deep Space Network; NASA Engineering and Safety Center

  14. The NASA/Army Autonomous Rotorcraft Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalley, M.; Freed, M.; Takahashi, M.; Christian, D.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Schulein, G.; Harris, R.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Ames Research Center Autonomous Rotorcraft Project (ARP) is presented. The project brings together several technologies to address NASA and US Army autonomous vehicle needs, including a reactive planner for mission planning and execution, control system design incorporating a detailed understanding of the platform dynamics, and health monitoring and diagnostics. A candidate reconnaissance and surveillance mission is described. The autonomous agent architecture and its application to the candidate mission are presented. Details of the vehicle hardware and software development are provided.

  15. Development of a Commercially Viable, Modular Autonomous Robotic Systems for Converting any Vehicle to Autonomous Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, David W.; Grabbe, Robert D.; Marzwell, Neville I.

    1994-01-01

    A Modular Autonomous Robotic System (MARS), consisting of a modular autonomous vehicle control system that can be retrofit on to any vehicle to convert it to autonomous control and support a modular payload for multiple applications is being developed. The MARS design is scalable, reconfigurable, and cost effective due to the use of modern open system architecture design methodologies, including serial control bus technology to simplify system wiring and enhance scalability. The design is augmented with modular, object oriented (C++) software implementing a hierarchy of five levels of control including teleoperated, continuous guidepath following, periodic guidepath following, absolute position autonomous navigation, and relative position autonomous navigation. The present effort is focused on producing a system that is commercially viable for routine autonomous patrolling of known, semistructured environments, like environmental monitoring of chemical and petroleum refineries, exterior physical security and surveillance, perimeter patrolling, and intrafacility transport applications.

  16. Control of Inverter-Connected Sources in Autonomous Microgrids Ian A. Hiskens Eric M. Fleming

    E-print Network

    Abstract-- The use of distributed generation is growing steadily, motivating a need for flexible regulates the inverter terminal voltage and the active power delivered to the AC system, and takes, autonomous operation, and re-synchronization with the main grid. Keywords: Microgrid dynamics, inverter

  17. Verification of Periodically Controlled Hybrid Systems: Application to An Autonomous Vehicle

    E-print Network

    Murray, Richard M.

    the deviation from the planned path gets too large. Finally, to protect the vehicle steering system, Alice's low of the planner-controller subsystem of an autonomous ground vehicle. Geometric properties of planner generated obstacle avoidance subsystem (ROA) and the relatively slowly reacting path plan- ner. The planner

  18. A Double-Blind Atropine Trial for Active Learning of Autonomic Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Jeffrey R.; Burr, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe a human physiology laboratory class measuring changes in autonomic function over time in response to atropine. Students use themselves as subjects, generating ownership and self-interest in the learning as well as directly experiencing the active link between physiology and pharmacology in people. The class is designed to…

  19. HiFi+: A Monitoring Virtual Machine for Autonomic Distributed Management

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yongge

    and management system. Next-generation distributed management systems need not only monitor the network events requests, in order to analyze the received events and initiate customized monitoring or management programsHiFi+: A Monitoring Virtual Machine for Autonomic Distributed Management Ehab Al-Shaer, Bin Zhang

  20. Applied Mechanics Krister Wolff, PhD, Chalmers Univ. of Tech.Autonomous Agents 2008

    E-print Network

    Wolff, Krister

    Univ. of Tech.Autonomous Agents 2008 Machine intelligence · Scientific field founded in the 1950s · The goal of Machine intelligence: "Generate machines capable of displaying human-level intelligence is the human. [Computing machinery and intelligence] copyrighted image #12;Applied Mechanics © Krister Wolff

  1. Landmark-based Matching Algorithm for Cooperative Mapping by Autonomous Robots

    E-print Network

    Choset, Howie

    with humans and other robots, purposeful navigation and mapping capabilities arise as key requirements 2 on the perception of these features, each robot is capable of generating and updating a topologicalmapaugmentedLandmark-based Matching Algorithm for Cooperative Mapping by Autonomous Robots Goksel Dedeoglu

  2. Abstract --We are developing autonomous underwater vehicles for exploration and inspection tasks. Our objectives are to

    E-print Network

    and to generate motion commands for the robot.[2] Underwater, we will use stereo cameras and again apply feature. Our objectives are to enable these submersible robots to autonomously search in reg- ular patterns for the robot. We propose to use feedback from the motion of the visual feature as reinforcement in a net- work

  3. Meiotic Transmission of an In VitroAssembled Autonomous Maize Minichromosome

    E-print Network

    Copenhaver, Gregory P.

    are generated in yeast (yeast artificial chromosomes) and human fibrosarcoma cells (human artificial chromosomes. These autonomous minichromosomes are convenient for manipulating and delivering DNA segments containing multiple genes. In contrast, commercial production of transgenic crops relies on methods that integrate one

  4. Autonomous adaptive environmental assessment and feature tracking via autonomous underwater vehicles

    E-print Network

    Petillo, Stephanie Marie

    In the underwater environment, spatiotemporally dynamic environmental conditions pose challenges to the detection and tracking of hydrographic features. A useful tool in combating these challenge is Autonomous Adaptive ...

  5. XAUV : modular high maneuverability autonomous underwater vehicle

    E-print Network

    Walker, Daniel G. (Daniel George)

    2009-01-01

    The design and construction of a modular test bed autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is analyzed. Although a relatively common stacked-hull design is used, the state of the art is advanced through an aggressive power ...

  6. Macroeconomics with Intelligent Autonomous Peter Howitt

    E-print Network

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Macroeconomics with Intelligent Autonomous Agents Peter Howitt Brown University June 1, 2007 Paper-foundation, which is to say almost all models that one sees in mainstream macroeconomic theory, are "agent

  7. Design considerations for engineering Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Shah, Vikrant P. (Vikrant Pankaj)

    2007-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) have been established as a viable tool for Oceanographic Sciences. Being untethered and independent, AUVs fill the gap in Ocean Exploration left by the existing manned submersible and ...

  8. Autonomous Flight in Unknown Indoor Environments

    E-print Network

    Bachrach, Abraham Galton

    This paper presents our solution for enabling a quadrotor helicopter, equipped with a laser rangefinder sensor, to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. While these capabilities are ...

  9. Path planning methods for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Yi?it, Konuralp

    2011-01-01

    From naval operations to ocean science missions, the importance of autonomous vehicles is increasing with the advances in underwater robotics technology. Due to the dynamic and intermittent underwater environment and the ...

  10. System Engineering of Autonomous Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Johnson, Stephen B.; Trevino, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Human exploration of the solar system requires fully autonomous systems when travelling more than 5 light minutes from Earth. This autonomy is necessary to manage a large, complex spacecraft with limited crew members and skills available. The communication latency requires the vehicle to deal with events with only limited crew interaction in most cases. The engineering of these systems requires an extensive knowledge of the spacecraft systems, information theory, and autonomous algorithm characteristics. The characteristics of the spacecraft systems must be matched with the autonomous algorithm characteristics to reliably monitor and control the system. This presents a large system engineering problem. Recent work on product-focused, elegant system engineering will be applied to this application, looking at the full autonomy stack, the matching of autonomous systems to spacecraft systems, and the integration of different types of algorithms. Each of these areas will be outlined and a general approach defined for system engineering to provide the optimal solution to the given application context.

  11. Multimodal interaction with an autonomous forklift

    E-print Network

    Correa, Andrew Thomas

    We describe a multimodal framework for interacting with an autonomous robotic forklift. A key element enabling effective interaction is a wireless, handheld tablet with which a human supervisor can command the forklift ...

  12. A Primer on Autonomous Aerial Vehicle Design.

    PubMed

    Coppejans, Hugo H G; Myburgh, Herman C

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of research currently being done on autonomous micro-aerial vehicles (MAV), such as quadrotor helicopters or quadcopters. The ability to create a working autonomous MAV depends mainly on integrating a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) solution with the rest of the system. This paper provides an introduction for creating an autonomous MAV for enclosed environments, aimed at students and professionals alike. The standard autonomous system and MAV automation are discussed, while we focus on the core concepts of SLAM systems and trajectory planning algorithms. The advantages and disadvantages of using remote processing are evaluated, and recommendations are made regarding the viability of on-board processing. Recommendations are made regarding best practices to serve as a guideline for aspirant MAV designers. PMID:26633410

  13. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System by Phillip Low, MD NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. ... Us Global Medical Knowledge Veterinary Edition © 2015 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., ...

  14. A Perception-Driven Autonomous Urban Vehicle

    E-print Network

    Teller, Seth

    July 2008 Journal of Field Robotics 25(10), 727­774 (2008) C 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Published of Field Robotics--2008 This paper describes the architecture and implementation of an autonomous passenger

  15. Human inspiration for autonomous vehicle tactics

    E-print Network

    Beaton, Jonathan Scott

    2006-01-01

    Tactical control is needed in environments characterized by uncertainty and continuous, dynamic change. Given the likelihood of time constraints and high risks associated with poor tactical choices, current autonomous ...

  16. Autonomous thruster failure recovery for underactuated spacecraft

    E-print Network

    Pong, Christopher Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Thruster failures historically account for a large percentage of failures that have occurred on orbit. Therefore, autonomous thruster failure detection, isolation, and recovery (FDIR) is an essential component to any robust ...

  17. Preparing a Nation for Autonomous Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    Preparing a Nation for Autonomous Vehicles Opportunities, Barriers and Policy Recommendations. Ironically, he never drove a car during his lifetime. The Father of Traffic Safety, an avid horseback rider

  18. A flexible design framework for autonomous mowing

    E-print Network

    Kraft, Justin (Justin A.)

    2011-01-01

    This work outlines the creation of a flexible design framework for autonomous mowing to meet changing customer needs and functionality across a spectrum of applications from residential areas to sport complexes. The thesis ...

  19. Advancing Autonomous Operations Technologies for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruzen, Craig; Thompson, Jerry Todd

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of implementing advanced autonomous technologies supporting operations of future NASA missions. The ability for crewed, uncrewed and even ground support systems to be capable of mission support without external interaction or control has become essential as space exploration moves further out into the solar system. The push to develop and utilize autonomous technologies for NASA mission operations stems in part from the need to reduce operations cost while improving and increasing capability and safety. This paper will provide examples of autonomous technologies currently in use at NASA and will identify opportunities to advance existing autonomous technologies that will enhance mission success by reducing operations cost, ameliorating inefficiencies, and mitigating catastrophic anomalies.

  20. Autonomous aerobatic maneuvering of miniature helicopters

    E-print Network

    Gavrilets, Vladislav, 1975-

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, I present an experimentally proven control methodology for the autonomous execution of aerobatic maneuvers with small-scale helicopters, and a low-order dynamic model which adequately describes a miniature ...

  1. Acupuncture Effect and Central Autonomic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian-Qian; Shi, Guang-Xia; Xu, Qian; Wang, Jing; Liu, Cun-Zhi; Wang, Lin-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is a therapeutic technique and part of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Acupuncture has clinical efficacy on various autonomic nerve-related disorders, such as cardiovascular diseases, epilepsy, anxiety and nervousness, circadian rhythm disorders, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and subfertility. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that acupuncture can control autonomic nerve system (ANS) functions including blood pressure, pupil size, skin conductance, skin temperature, muscle sympathetic nerve activities, heart rate and/or pulse rate, and heart rate variability. Emerging evidence indicates that acupuncture treatment not only activates distinct brain regions in different kinds of diseases caused by imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic activities, but also modulates adaptive neurotransmitter in related brain regions to alleviate autonomic response. This review focused on the central mechanism of acupuncture in modulating various autonomic responses, which might provide neurobiological foundations for acupuncture effects. PMID:23762116

  2. Design of a minimalist autonomous robotic vehicle

    E-print Network

    Spadafora, Mark (Mark A.)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate design alternatives for the creation of a minimalist autonomous robotic vehicle, based on the Ford Escape. The work builds on prior work performed by the MIT DARPA Urban Challenge ...

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF AUTONOMOUS AIR MONITORING THROUGH ROBOTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project included modifying an existing teleoperated robot to include autonomous navigation, large object avoidance, and air monitoring and demonstrating that prototype robot system in indoor and outdoor environments. An existing teleoperated "Surveyor" robot developed by ARD...

  4. Tele-robotic/autonomous control using controlshell

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.C.; Hurd, R.L.; Couture, S.

    1996-12-10

    A tele-robotic and autonomous controller architecture for waste handling and sorting has been developed which uses tele-robotics, autonomous grasping and image processing. As a starting point, prior work from LLNL and ORNL was restructured and ported to a special real-time development environment. Significant improvements in collision avoidance, force compliance, and shared control aspects were then developed. Several orders of magnitude improvement were made in some areas to meet the speed and robustness requirements of the application.

  5. Cooperative control of autonomous underwater vehicles. 

    E-print Network

    Savage, Elizabeth

    2004-09-30

    COOPERATIVE CONTROL OF AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES A Thesis by ELIZABETH SAVAGE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2003 Major Subject...: Aerospace Engineering COOPERATIVE CONTROL OF AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES A Thesis by ELIZABETH SAVAGE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by...

  6. Autonomous navigation ability: FIDO test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, E.; Maurette, M.

    2000-01-01

    The FIDO platform of the JPL has been used to evaluate the ability of autonomous obstacle avoidance developed by JPL and CNES autonomous long range path planning. The test results show that only a very small amount of energy and computing time is used to implement autonomy and that the capabilities of the rover are fully used, allowing a much longer daily traverse than purely ground-planned strategies.

  7. Autonomous vehicle control using AI techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Keirsey, D.; Mitchell, J.; Bullock, B.; Nussmeier, T.; Tseng, D.

    1983-11-01

    A review of early work on a project for developing autonomous vehicle control technology is presented. The primary goal of this effort is the development of a generic capability that can be specialized to a wide range of DOD applications. Project emphasis is on development of the fundamental AI-based technology required by autonomous systems and the implementation of a testbed environment to evaluate and demonstrate the system capabilities. 10 references.

  8. Advancing Autonomous Operations for Deep Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Angie T.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Starting in Jan 2012, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) Project began to investigate the ability to create and execute "single button" crew initiated autonomous activities [1]. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) designed and built a fluid transfer hardware test-bed to use as a sub-system target for the investigations of intelligent procedures that would command and control a fluid transfer test-bed, would perform self-monitoring during fluid transfers, detect anomalies and faults, isolate the fault and recover the procedures function that was being executed, all without operator intervention. In addition to the development of intelligent procedures, the team is also exploring various methods for autonomous activity execution where a planned timeline of activities are executed autonomously and also the initial analysis of crew procedure development. This paper will detail the development of intelligent procedures for the NASA MSFC Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) as well as the autonomous plan execution capabilities being investigated. Manned deep space missions, with extreme communication delays with Earth based assets, presents significant challenges for what the on-board procedure content will encompass as well as the planned execution of the procedures.

  9. Redundant manipulator techniques for partially decentralized path planning and control of a platoon of autonomous vehicles.

    PubMed

    Stilwell, Daniel J; Bishop, Bradley E; Sylvester, Caleb A

    2005-08-01

    An approach to real-time trajectory generation for platoons of autonomous vehicles is developed from well-known control techniques for redundant robotic manipulators. The partially decentralized structure of this approach permits each vehicle to independently compute its trajectory in real-time using only locally generated information and low-bandwidth feedback generated by a system exogenous to the platoon. Our work is motivated by applications for which communications bandwidth is severely limited, such for platoons of autonomous underwater vehicles. The communication requirements for our trajectory generation approach are independent of the number of vehicles in the platoon, enabling platoons composed of a large number of vehicles to be coordinated despite limited communication bandwidth. PMID:16128465

  10. Autonomous Commanding of the WIRE Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prior, Mike; Walyus, Keith; Saylor, Rick

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the end-to-end design architecture for an autonomous commanding capability to be used on the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) mission for the uplink of command loads during unattended station contacts. The WIRE mission is the fifth and final mission of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Small Explorer (SMEX) series to be launched in March of 1999. Its primary mission is the targeting of deep space fields using an ultra-cooled infrared telescope. Due to its mission design WIRE command loads are large (approximately 40 Kbytes per 24 hours) and must be performed daily. To reduce the cost of mission operations support that would be required in order to uplink command loads, the WIRE Flight Operations Team has implemented an autonomous command loading capability. This capability allows completely unattended operations over a typical two- day weekend period. The key factors driving design and implementation of this capability were: 1) Integration with already existing ground system autonomous capabilities and systems, 2) The desire to evolve autonomous operations capabilities based upon previous SMEX operations experience 3) Integration with ground station operations - both autonomous and man-tended, 4) Low cost and quick implementation, and 5) End-to-end system robustness. A trade-off study was performed to examine these factors in light of the low-cost, higher-risk SMEX mission philosophy. The study concluded that a STOL (Spacecraft Test and Operations Language) based script, highly integrated with other scripts used to perform autonomous operations, was best suited given the budget and goals of the mission. Each of these factors is discussed to provide an overview of the autonomous operations capabilities implemented for the mission. The capabilities implemented on the WIRE mission are an example of a low-cost, robust, and efficient method for autonomous command loading when implemented with other autonomous features of the ground system. They can be used as a design and implementation template by other small satellite missions interested in evolving toward autonomous and lower cost operations.

  11. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control mechanisms: diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Mullen, T. J.; Cohen, R. J.; Freeman, R.

    1999-01-01

    We applied cardiovascular system identification (CSI) to characterize closed-loop cardiovascular regulation in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). The CSI method quantitatively analyzes beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize four physiological coupling mechanisms, two of which are autonomically mediated (the heart rate baroreflex and the coupling of respiration, measured in terms of ILV, to heart rate) and two of which are mechanically mediated (the coupling of ventricular contraction to the generation of the ABP wavelet and the coupling of respiration to ABP). We studied 37 control and 60 diabetic subjects who were classified as having minimal, moderate, or severe DAN on the basis of standard autonomic tests. The autonomically mediated couplings progressively decreased with increasing severity of DAN, whereas the mechanically mediated couplings were essentially unchanged. CSI identified differences between the minimal DAN and control groups, which were indistinguishable based on the standard autonomic tests. CSI may provide a powerful tool for assessing DAN.

  12. Autonomous Soaring Using Reinforcement Learning for Trajectory Generation

    E-print Network

    Valasek, John

    to determine the thermal center6 · Depenbusch and Langelaan (2010) implement receding horizon control ­ UAS has low-level feedback control ­ Thermal location is known · Dynamic sailplane model implemented-integral-derivative (PID) ­ Pitch controlled by state feedback regulator · Near thermal, different controller used

  13. Trajectory Generation and Path Planning for Autonomous Aerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Shivanjli; Kulczycki, Eric A.; Elfes, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents global path planning algorithms for the Titan aerobot based on user defined waypoints in 2D and 3D space. The algorithms were implemented using information obtained through a planner user interface. The trajectory planning algorithms were designed to accurately represent the aerobot's characteristics, such as minimum turning radius. Additionally, trajectory planning techniques were implemented to allow for surveying of a planar area based solely on camera fields of view, airship altitude, and the location of the planar area's perimeter. The developed paths allow for planar navigation and three-dimensional path planning. These calculated trajectories are optimized to produce the shortest possible path while still remaining within realistic bounds of airship dynamics.

  14. Implementing autonomous crowds in a computer generated feature film 

    E-print Network

    Patterson, John Andre

    2006-04-12

    . In particular, Mitch Kopelman designed the crowd system at Blue Sky Studios and got it on its feet. Rob Cavaleri was also instrumental in the early design and development of the system and the user interface. Of course, I would also like to thank Ergun Akleman... Sky Studios on the film ?Robots? which was released in theaters on March 11, 2005. Blue Sky Studios was purchased by Fox Feature Films in 1997 with the intention that the studio would produce visual effects for movies made at other studios. This plan...

  15. Bifurcation and Enhancement of Autonomous-Non-Autonomous Retrotransposon Partnership through LTR Swapping in Soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although non-autonomous LTR-retrotransposons lacking significant protein coding domains have been identified in eukaryotes, how they interact with their autonomous partners to maintain transpositional activity during host genome evolution is poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive analysis o...

  16. AUTONOMOUS MOBILE BUOY (A-M-B) COASTAL & LAGOON: autonomous monitoring and sampling

    E-print Network

    Wood, Stephen L.

    AUTONOMOUS MOBILE BUOY (A-M-B) COASTAL & LAGOON: autonomous monitoring and sampling PI: Stephen to aid in establishing a permanent flexible network of environmental sensors in the Indian River Lagoon and companies, for example the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Ft Pierce, Florida (Indian River Lagoon

  17. CSE 4360 / 5364 -Autonomous Robots Project 1: Robot Navigation CSE 4360 / 5364 -Autonomous Robots

    E-print Network

    Huber, Manfred

    of the position of the robot using only internal sensors) for the Lego Robots can be relatively impreciseCSE 4360 / 5364 - Autonomous Robots Project 1: Robot Navigation CSE 4360 / 5364 - Autonomous Robots Project 1- Spring 2014 Due Date: March 25 2014, 5:00 pm Navigating a known Obstacle Course with the Lego

  18. Onboard autonomous mineral detectors for Mars rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, M. S.; Bornstein, B.; Castano, R.; Merrill, M.; Greenwood, J.

    2005-12-01

    Mars rovers and orbiters currently collect far more data than can be downlinked to Earth, which reduces mission science return; this problem will be exacerbated by future rovers of enhanced capabilities and lifetimes. We are developing onboard intelligence sufficient to extract geologically meaningful data from spectrometer measurements of soil and rock samples, and thus to guide the selection, measurement and return of these data from significant targets at Mars. Here we report on techniques to construct mineral detectors capable of running on current and future rover and orbital hardware. We focus on carbonate and sulfate minerals which are of particular geologic importance because they can signal the presence of water and possibly life. Sulfates have also been discovered at the Eagle and Endurance craters in Meridiani Planum by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity and at other regions on Mars by the OMEGA instrument aboard Mars Express. We have developed highly accurate artificial neural network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) based detectors capable of identifying calcite (CaCO3) and jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6) in the visible/NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra of both laboratory specimens and rocks in Mars analogue field environments. To train the detectors, we used a generative model to create 1000s of linear mixtures of library end-member spectra in geologically realistic percentages. We have also augmented the model to include nonlinear mixing based on Hapke's models of bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy. Both detectors perform well on the spectra of real rocks that contain intimate mixtures of minerals, rocks in natural field environments, calcite covered by Mars analogue dust, and AVIRIS hyperspectral cubes. We will discuss the comparison of ANN and SVM classifiers for this task, technical challenges (weathering rinds, atmospheric compositions, and computational complexity), and plans for integration of these detectors into both the Coupled Layer Architecture for Robotic Autonomy (CLARAty) system and the Onboard Autonomous Science Investigation System (OASIS) at JPL.

  19. Autonomous planetary rover at Carnegie Mellon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, William; Kanade, Takeo; Mitchell, Tom

    1990-01-01

    This report describes progress in research on an autonomous robot for planetary exploration. In 1989, the year covered by this report, a six-legged walking robot, the Ambler, was configured, designed, and constructed. This configuration was used to overcome shortcomings exhibited by existing wheeled and walking robot mechanisms. The fundamental advantage of the Ambler is that the actuators for body support are independent of those for propulsion; a subset of the planar joints propel the body, and the vertical actuators support and level the body over terrain. Models of the Ambler's dynamics were developed and the leveling control was studied. An integrated system capable of walking with a single leg over rugged terrain was implemented and tested. A prototype of an Ambler leg is suspended below a carriage that slides along rails. To walk, the system uses a laser scanner to find a clear, flat foothold, positions the leg above the foothold, contacts the terrain with the foot, and applies force enough to advance the carriage along the rails. Walking both forward and backward, the system has traversed hundreds of meters of rugged terrain including obstacles too tall to step over, trenches too deep to step in, closely spaced rocks, and sand hills. In addition, preliminary experiments were conducted with concurrent planning and execution, and a leg recovery planner that generates time and power efficient 3D trajectories using 2D search was developed. A Hero robot was used to demonstrate mobile manipulation. Indoor tasks include collecting cups from the lab floor, retrieving printer output, and recharging when its battery gets low. The robot monitors its environment, and handles exceptional conditions in a robust fashion, using vision to track the appearance and disappearance of cups, onboard sonars to detect imminent collisions, and monitors to detect the battery level.

  20. Improved autonomous star identification algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Li-Yan; Xu, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Jing-Rong

    2015-06-01

    The log-polar transform (LPT) is introduced into the star identification because of its rotation invariance. An improved autonomous star identification algorithm is proposed in this paper to avoid the circular shift of the feature vector and to reduce the time consumed in the star identification algorithm using LPT. In the proposed algorithm, the star pattern of the same navigation star remains unchanged when the stellar image is rotated, which makes it able to reduce the star identification time. The logarithmic values of the plane distances between the navigation and its neighbor stars are adopted to structure the feature vector of the navigation star, which enhances the robustness of star identification. In addition, some efforts are made to make it able to find the identification result with fewer comparisons, instead of searching the whole feature database. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition rate and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the LPT algorithm and the modified grid algorithm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172138 and 61401340), the Open Research Fund of the Academy of Satellite Application, China (Grant No. 2014_CXJJ-DH_12), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. JB141303 and 201413B), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013JQ8040), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20130203120004), and the Xi’an Science and Technology Plan, China (Grant. No CXY1350(4)).

  1. Compact Autonomous Hemispheric Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Werne, Thomas A.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Walch, Marc J.; Staehle, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Solar System Exploration camera implementations to date have involved either single cameras with wide field-of-view (FOV) and consequently coarser spatial resolution, cameras on a movable mast, or single cameras necessitating rotation of the host vehicle to afford visibility outside a relatively narrow FOV. These cameras require detailed commanding from the ground or separate onboard computers to operate properly, and are incapable of making decisions based on image content that control pointing and downlink strategy. For color, a filter wheel having selectable positions was often added, which added moving parts, size, mass, power, and reduced reliability. A system was developed based on a general-purpose miniature visible-light camera using advanced CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) imager technology. The baseline camera has a 92 FOV and six cameras are arranged in an angled-up carousel fashion, with FOV overlaps such that the system has a 360 FOV (azimuth). A seventh camera, also with a FOV of 92 , is installed normal to the plane of the other 6 cameras giving the system a > 90 FOV in elevation and completing the hemispheric vision system. A central unit houses the common electronics box (CEB) controlling the system (power conversion, data processing, memory, and control software). Stereo is achieved by adding a second system on a baseline, and color is achieved by stacking two more systems (for a total of three, each system equipped with its own filter.) Two connectors on the bottom of the CEB provide a connection to a carrier (rover, spacecraft, balloon, etc.) for telemetry, commands, and power. This system has no moving parts. The system's onboard software (SW) supports autonomous operations such as pattern recognition and tracking.

  2. Autonomous Multi-sensor Coordination: The Science Goal Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koratkar, Anuradha; Jung, John; Geiger, Jenny; Grosvenor, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    Next-generation science and exploration systems will employ new observation strategies that will use multiple sensors in a dynamic environment to provide high quality monitoring, self-consistent analyses and informed decision making. The Science Goal Monitor (SGM) is a prototype software tool being developed to explore the nature of automation necessary to enable dynamic observing of earth phenomenon. The tools being developed in SGM improve our ability to autonomously monitor multiple independent sensors and coordinate reactions to better observe the dynamic phenomena. The SGM system enables users to specify events of interest and how to react when an event is detected. The system monitors streams of data to identify occurrences of the key events previously specified by the scientist/user. When an event occurs, the system autonomously coordinates the execution of the users desired reactions between different sensors. The information can be used to rapidly respond to a variety of fast temporal events. Investigators will no longer have to rely on after-the-fact data analysis to determine what happened. Our paper describes a series of prototype demonstrations that we have developed using SGM and NASA's Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite and Earth Observing Systems Aqua/Terra spacecrafts MODIS instrument. Our demonstrations show the promise of coordinating data from different sources, analyzing the data for a relevant event, autonomously updating and rapidly obtaining a follow-on relevant image. SGM is being used to investigate forest fires, floods and volcanic eruptions. We are now identifying new earth science scenarios that will have more complex SGM reasoning. By developing and testing a prototype in an operational environment, we are also establishing and gathering metrics to gauge the success of automating science campaigns.

  3. Shh-mediated degradation of Hhip allows cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous Shh signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Lina; Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Roelink, Henk

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is a highly regulated and critical process for development. Several negative feedback mechanisms are in place, including the Shh-induced upregulation of Hedgehog interacting protein (Hhip). Hhip sequesters Shh, leading to a non-cell autonomous inhibition of the pathway. Hhip over-expression has a severe effect on neural tube development, raising the question why normal sites of Hhip expression have a seemingly unimpaired response to Shh. Here we show that while Hhip is able to leave its sites of synthesis to inhibit Shh non-cell autonomously, activation of Smoothened (Smo) drastically increases Hhip internalization and degradation cell autonomously. Although Hhip is unable to cell autonomously inhibit the consequences of Smo activation, it can inhibit the Shh response non-cell autonomously. Our data provide a mechanism by which the Shh ligand can activate the response and negate cell autonomous effects of Hhip, while Hhip can still induce non-cell autonomous inhibition. PMID:25215859

  4. Advanced avionics concepts: Autonomous spacecraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A large increase in space operations activities is expected because of Space Station Freedom (SSF) and long range Lunar base missions and Mars exploration. Space operations will also increase as a result of space commercialization (especially the increase in satellite networks). It is anticipated that the level of satellite servicing operations will grow tenfold from the current level within the next 20 years. This growth can be sustained only if the cost effectiveness of space operations is improved. Cost effectiveness is operational efficiency with proper effectiveness. A concept is presented of advanced avionics, autonomous spacecraft control, that will enable the desired growth, as well as maintain the cost effectiveness (operational efficiency) in satellite servicing operations. The concept of advanced avionics that allows autonomous spacecraft control is described along with a brief description of each component. Some of the benefits of autonomous operations are also described. A technology utilization breakdown is provided in terms of applications.

  5. On-Orbit Autonomous Assembly from Nanosatellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchison, Luke S.; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The On-Orbit Autonomous Assembly from Nanosatellites (OAAN) project will demonstrate autonomous control algorithms for rendezvous and docking maneuvers; low-power reconfigurable magnetic docking technology; and compact, lightweight and inexpensive precision relative navigation using carrier-phase differential (CD) GPS with a three-degree of freedom ground demonstration. CDGPS is a specific relative position determination method that measures the phase of the GPS carrier wave to yield relative position data accurate to.4 inch (1 centimeter). CDGPS is a technology commonly found in the surveying industry. The development and demonstration of these technologies will fill a current gap in the availability of proven autonomous rendezvous and docking systems for small satellites.

  6. Autonomic dysreflexia and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matias, Ana Catarina; Rocha, João; Cerqueira, Maria Emília; Pereira, João Manuel

    2013-05-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge in patients who had a spinal cord injury above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow resulting in a sudden increase in blood pressure. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to a clinicoradiologic entity characterized by headache, consciousness impairment, visual disturbances, seizures, and posterior transient changes on neuroimaging (cerebral vasogenic edema). Hypertension is a common cause of PRES. The authors describe two case reports of patients with tetraplegia who developed PRES after an autonomic dysreflexia episode. One of them had recurrence of PRES in a similar clinical context. The authors discuss further aspects of PRES and its recurrence, which seems to be unusual particularly after autonomic dysreflexia. PMID:23117272

  7. Lessons learned from the Autonomous Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringer, Mark J.; Quinn, Todd M.; Merolla, Anthony

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) project at the NASA Lewis Research Center is designed to demonstrate the applications of integrated intelligent diagnosis, control and scheduling techniques to space power distribution systems. The project consists of three elements: the Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) for Fault Diagnosis, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR); the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler (AIPS) to efficiently assign activities start times and resources; and power hardware (Brassboard) to emulate a space-based power system. The APS project had been through one design iteration. Each of the three elements of the APS project has been designed, tested, and integrated into a complete working system. After these three portions were completed, an evaluation period was initiated. Each piece of the system was critiqued based on individual performance as well as the ability to interact with the other portions of the APS project. These critiques were then used to determine guidelines for new and improved components of the APS system.

  8. Autonomous Deep-Space Optical Navigation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This project will advance the Autonomous Deep-space navigation capability applied to Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) system by testing it on hardware, particularly in a flight processor, with a goal of limited testing in the Integrated Power, Avionics and Software (IPAS) with the ARCM (Asteroid Retrieval Crewed Mission) DRO (Distant Retrograde Orbit) Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) scenario. The technology, which will be harnessed, is called 'optical flow', also known as 'visual odometry'. It is being matured in the automotive and SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) applications but has yet to be applied to spacecraft navigation. In light of the tremendous potential of this technique, we believe that NASA needs to design a optical navigation architecture that will use this technique. It is flexible enough to be applicable to navigating around planetary bodies, such as asteroids.

  9. Lessons learned from the autonomous power system

    SciTech Connect

    Ringer, M.J.; Quinn, T.M.; Merolla, A. . NASA Lewis Research Center Group)

    1993-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) project at the NASA Lewis Research Center is designed to demonstrate the applications of integrated intelligent diagnosis, control and scheduling techniques to space power distribution systems. The project consists of three elements: the Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) for Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR); the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler (AIPS) to efficiently assign activities start times and resources; and power hardware (Brassboard) to emulate a space-based power system. The APS project has been through one design iteration. Each of the three elements of the APS project has been designed, tested, and integrated into a complete working system. After these three portions were completed, an evaluation period was initiated. Each piece of the system was critiqued based on individual performance as well as ability to interact with the other portions of the APS project. These critiques were then used to determine guidelines for new and improved components of the APS system.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (often shortened to HSAN2 ) On this ... 2011 What is HSAN2? Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSAN2) is a condition that primarily ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V (often shortened to HSAN5 ) On this ... 2011 What is HSAN5? Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V (HSAN5) is a condition that primarily ...

  12. Frontiers of Physically Intelligent Agents: Autonomous Systems For Defense

    E-print Network

    Frontiers of Physically Intelligent Agents: Autonomous Systems For Defense: A Revolution of the potential benefits associated with autonomous systems both in the conduct of warfare) not unlike gunpowder, the long bow, the rifled bullet, the aircraft carrier, etc. Indeed

  13. CATALOG OF ORBIT DETERMINATION RESULTS FOR LINKED, AUTONOMOUS,

    E-print Network

    Born, George

    CATALOG OF ORBIT DETERMINATION RESULTS FOR LINKED, AUTONOMOUS, INTERPLANETARY SATELLITE ORBIT for Astrodynamics Research University of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309 Revised 3 Feb 2006 #12;CATALOG OF ORBIT DETERMINATION RESULTS FOR LINKED, AUTONOMOUS, INTERPLANETARY SATELLITE ORBIT NAVIGATION (Li

  14. Robust distributed planning strategies for autonomous multi-agent teams

    E-print Network

    Ponda, Sameera S

    2012-01-01

    The increased use of autonomous robotic agents, such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and ground rovers, for complex missions has motivated the development of autonomous task allocation and planning methods that ensure ...

  15. Tethered Payload Control from an Autonomous Helicopter James E. May

    E-print Network

    Kochersberger, Kevin

    Tethered Payload Control from an Autonomous Helicopter James E. May Thesis submitted to the Faculty Copyright 2010, James E. May #12;Tethered Payload Control from an Autonomous Helicopter James E. May

  16. Lane Localization for Autonomous Model Cars Lukas Maischak

    E-print Network

    Ziegler, Günter M.

    Lane Localization for Autonomous Model Cars Lukas Maischak B-14-03 July 2014 FACHBEREICH MATHEMATIK.2.4 Localization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 4.3 Navigation of autonomous, "self- driving" cars. Imagine that car accidents caused by human error

  17. Sensor modeling for the virtual autonomous navigation environment

    E-print Network

    Liu, Linda Y.

    The Virtual Autonomous Navigation Environment (VANE) is a high fidelity, physics-based simulation process that produces realistic simulated sensor output for use in the development and testing of Autonomous Mobility Systems ...

  18. To the Bookstore! Autonomous Wheelchair Navigation in an Urban Environment

    E-print Network

    Spletzer, John R.

    To the Bookstore! Autonomous Wheelchair Navigation in an Urban Environment Corey Montella, Timothy, Nourbakhsh proposed to demonstrate autonomous outdoor navigation from Corey Montella Lehigh University, 27 Perkins, John Spletzer and Michael Sands Abstract In this paper, we demonstrate reliable navigation

  19. Hard-real-time resource management for autonomous spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes tickets, a computational mechanism for hard-real-time autonomous resource management. Autonomous spacecraftcontrol can be considered abstractly as a computational process whose outputs are spacecraft commands.

  20. Fast shadow detection for urban autonomous driving applications

    E-print Network

    Park, Sooho

    This paper presents shadow detection methods for vision-based autonomous driving in an urban environment. Shadows misclassified as objects create problems in autonomous driving applications. Real-time efficient algorithms ...

  1. Docking Among Independent and Autonomous CONRO Self-Reconfigurable Robots

    E-print Network

    Shen, Wei-Min

    Docking Among Independent and Autonomous CONRO Self-Reconfigurable Robots Michael Rubenstein modules. Keywords- self-reconfigurable robots, autonomous docking, remote sensor alignement, compliant engineering systems that must dynamically change their structures for various purposes. Generally speaking

  2. Autonomous Ultrasonic Indoor Tracking System Junhui Zhao, Yongcai Wang

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yongcai

    Autonomous Ultrasonic Indoor Tracking System Junhui Zhao, Yongcai Wang NEC Labs, Beijing, China {zhaojunhui,wangyongcai}@research.nec.com.cn Abstract This paper proposes the Autonomous Ultrasonic Indoor high accuracy ranging, low cost, safety, and imperceptibility. However, conventional ultrasonic

  3. A System for Epigenetic Concept Development through Autonomous Associative Learning

    E-print Network

    Grabowski, Laura M. - Department of Computer Science, University of Texas

    A System for Epigenetic Concept Development through Autonomous Associative Learning Laura M theories, or are they collections of features? Are concepts objects, or behavioral abilities? Differences as the process by which the system achieves robust adaptive, anticipatory, autonomous behavior, entailing

  4. Decentralized planning for autonomous agents cooperating in complex missions

    E-print Network

    Whitten, Andrew (Andrew Koo)

    2010-01-01

    Planning for autonomous vehicles remains an important and challenging research topic. This thesis focuses on decentralized planning for autonomous agents performing complex missions. These types of missions often involve ...

  5. Interception algorithm for autonomous vehicles with imperfect information

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Randal E

    2005-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles often operate in environments with imperfect information. This thesis addresses the case of a system of autonomous vehicles and sensors attempting to intercept a moving object of interest that arrives ...

  6. Implementation of GPS based trajectory control of an autonomous sailboat

    E-print Network

    Wirekoh, Jackson O

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous robotic systems are increasingly becoming a major component of modern society. In order to gain a better understanding of the capabilities of these autonomous systems, experimentation was conducted using a ...

  7. A SIMULATION AND REGRESSION TESTING FRAMEWORK FOR AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Cavusoglu, Cenk

    A SIMULATION AND REGRESSION TESTING FRAMEWORK FOR AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES by CHRISTIAN KURTZ MILLER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.3 Vehicle Simulation and Testing Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3 Design visualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 4 Simulated Autonomous Agents 51 4

  8. Decentralized cooperative trajectory estimation for autonomous underwater vehicles

    E-print Network

    Paull, Liam

    Autonomous agents that can communicate and make relative measurements of each other can improve their collective localization accuracies. This is referred to as cooperative localization (CL). Autonomous underwater vehicle ...

  9. Good Experimental Methodologies and Simulation in Autonomous Mobile Robotics

    E-print Network

    Amigoni, Francesco

    Good Experimental Methodologies and Simulation in Autonomous Mobile Robotics Francesco Amigoni and Viola Schiaffonati Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Laboratory, Dipartimento di Elettronica e to characterize analytically, as it is often the case in autonomous mobile robotics. Although their importance

  10. Evolutionary strategy for achieving autonomous navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    1999-01-01

    An approach is presented for the evolutionary development of supervised autonomous navigation capabilities for small 'backpackable' ground robots, in the context of a DARPA- sponsored program to provide robotic support to small units of dismounted warfighters. This development approach relies on the implementation of a baseline visual serving navigation capability, including tools to support operator oversight and override, which is then enhanced with semantically referenced commands and a mission scripting structure. As current and future machine perception techniques are able to automatically designate visual serving goal points, this approach should provide a natural evolutionary pathway to higher levels of autonomous operation and reduced requirements for operator intervention.

  11. Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Chirold

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work towards technology that will result in an autonomous landing on the lunar surface, that will avoid the hazards of lunar landing. In October 2005, the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters assigned the development of new technologies to support the return to the moon. One of these was Autonomous Precision Landing and Hazard Detection and Avoidance Technology now known as ALHAT ALHAT is a lunar descent and landing GNC technology development project led by Johnson Space Center (JSC) with team members from Langley Research Center (LaRC), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Draper Laboratories (CSDL) and the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL)

  12. Road boundary detection for autonomous vehicle navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.S.; Kushner, T.R.; LeMoigne, J.J.; Waxman, A.M.

    1986-03-01

    The Computer Vision Laboratory at the University Maryland for the past year has been developing a computer vision system for autonomous ground navigation of roads and road networks for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Strategic Computing Program. The complete system runs on a VAX 11/785, but certain parts of it have been reimplemented on a VICOM image processing sysem for experimentation on an autonomous vehicle built for the Martin Marietta Corp., Aerospace Division, in Denver, Colorado. A brief overview is given of the principal software components of the system and the VICOM implementation in detail.

  13. Sensorpedia: Information Sharing Across Autonomous Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Bryan L; Resseguie, David R; Tomkins-Tinch, Christopher H

    2009-01-01

    The concept of adapting social media technologies is introduced as a means of achieving information sharing across autonomous sensor systems. Historical examples of interoperability as an underlying principle in loosely-coupled systems is compared and contrasted with corresponding tightly-coupled, integrated systems. Examples of ad hoc information sharing solutions based on Web 2.0 social networks, mashups, blogs, wikis, and data tags are presented and discussed. The underlying technologies of these solutions are isolated and defined, and Sensorpedia is presented as a formalized application for implementing sensor information sharing across large-scale enterprises with incompatible autonomous sensor systems.

  14. Autonomic Regulation Therapy in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Una; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2015-08-01

    Autonomic regulation therapy (ART) is a rapidly emerging therapy in the management of congestive heart failure secondary to systolic dysfunction. Modulation of the cardiac neuronal hierarchy can be achieved with bioelectronics modulation of the spinal cord, cervical vagus, baroreceptor, or renal nerve ablation. This review will discuss relevant preclinical and clinical research in ART for systolic heart failure. Understanding mechanistically what is being stimulated within the autonomic nervous system by such device-based therapy and how the system reacts to such stimuli is essential for optimizing stimulation parameters and for the future development of effective ART. PMID:26054327

  15. Autonomous scheduling technology for Earth orbital missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a dynamic autonomous system (DYASS) of resources for the mission support of near-Earth NASA spacecraft is discussed and the current NASA space data system is described from a functional perspective. The future (late 80's and early 90's) NASA space data system is discussed. The DYASS concept, the autonomous process control, and the NASA space data system are introduced. Scheduling and related disciplines are surveyed. DYASS as a scheduling problem is also discussed. Artificial intelligence and knowledge representation is considered as well as the NUDGE system and the I-Space system.

  16. Knowledge-based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Carrie L.; Brown, Barbara L.

    1991-01-01

    Mathematical models of system components have long been used to allow simulators to predict system behavior to various stimuli. Recent efforts to monitor, diagnose, and control real-time systems using component models have experienced similar success. NASA Kennedy is continuing the development of a tool for implementing real-time knowledge-based diagnostic and control systems called KATE (Knowledge based Autonomous Test Engineer). KATE is a model-based reasoning shell designed to provide autonomous control, monitoring, fault detection, and diagnostics for complex engineering systems by applying its reasoning techniques to an exchangeable quantitative model describing the structure and function of the various system components and their systemic behavior.

  17. Design of an autonomous exterior security robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Scott D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the requirements and preliminary design of robotic vehicle designed for performing autonomous exterior perimeter security patrols around warehouse areas, ammunition supply depots, and industrial parks for the U.S. Department of Defense. The preliminary design allows for the operation of up to eight vehicles in a six kilometer by six kilometer zone with autonomous navigation and obstacle avoidance. In addition to detection of crawling intruders at 100 meters, the system must perform real-time inventory checking and database comparisons using a microwave tags system.

  18. NEURON: Enabling Autonomicity in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zafeiropoulos, Anastasios; Gouvas, Panagiotis; Liakopoulos, Athanassios; Mentzas, Gregoris; Mitrou, Nikolas

    2010-01-01

    Future Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) will be ubiquitous, large-scale networks interconnected with the existing IP infrastructure. Autonomic functionalities have to be designed in order to reduce the complexity of their operation and management, and support the dissemination of knowledge within a WSN. In this paper a novel protocol for energy efficient deployment, clustering and routing in WSNs is proposed that focuses on the incorporation of autonomic functionalities in the existing approaches. The design of the protocol facilitates the design of innovative applications and services that are based on overlay topologies created through cooperation among the sensor nodes. PMID:22399931

  19. Autonomous operations through onboard artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, R. L.; Chien, S.; Castano, R.; Rabideau, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) will fly onboard the Air Force TechSat 21 constellation of three spacecraft scheduled for launch in 2006. ASE uses onboard continuous planning, robust task and goal-based execution, model-based mode identification and reconfiguration, and onboard machine learning and pattern recognition to radically increase science return by enabling intelligent downlink selection and autonomous retargeting. Demonstration of these capabilities in a flight environment will open up tremendous new opportunities in planetary science, space physics, and earth science that would be unreachable without this technology.

  20. Ultra-Fast Physical Generation of Random Numbers Using Hybrid Boolean Networks

    E-print Network

    David P. Rosin; Damien Rontani; Daniel J. Gauthier

    2013-04-17

    We describe a high-speed physical random number generator based on a hybrid Boolean network with autonomous and clocked logic gates, realized on a reconfigurable chip. The autonomous logic gates are arranged in a bidirectional ring topology and generate broadband chaos. The clocked logic gates receive input from the autonomous logic gates so that random numbers are generated physically that pass standard randomness tests without further post-processing. The large number of logic gates on reconfigurable chips allows for parallel generation of random numbers, as demonstrated by our implementation of 128 physical random number generators that achieve a real-time bit rate of 12.8 Gbit/s.

  1. Why Computer-Based Systems Should be Autonomic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss why computer-based systems should be autonomic, where autonomicity implies self-managing, often conceptualized in terms of being self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing, self-protecting and self-aware. We look at motivations for autonomicity, examine how more and more systems are exhibiting autonomic behavior, and finally look at future directions.

  2. GROVER: An autonomous vehicle for ice sheet research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisca, G. O.; Robertson, M. E.; Marshall, H.; Koenig, L.; Comberiate, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Goddard Remotely Operated Vehicle for Exploration and Research or Greenland Rover (GROVER) is a science enabling autonomous robot specifically designed to carry a low-power, large bandwidth radar for snow accumulation mapping over the Greenland Ice Sheet. This new and evolving technology enables reduced cost and increased safety for polar research. GROVER was field tested at Summit, Greenland in May 2013. The robot traveled over 30 km and was controlled both by line of sight wireless and completely autonomously with commands and telemetry via the Iridium Satellite Network, from Summit as well as remotely from Boise, Idaho. Here we describe GROVER's unique abilities and design. The software stack features a modular design that can be adapted for any application that requires autonomous behavior, reliable communications using different technologies and low level control of peripherals. The modules are built to communicate using the publisher-subscriber design pattern to maximize data-reuse and allow for graceful failures at the software level, along with the ability to be loaded or unloaded on-the-fly, enabling the software to adopt different behaviors based on power constraints or specific processing needs. These modules can also be loaded or unloaded remotely for servicing and telemetry can be configured to contain any kind of information being generated by the sensors or scientific instruments. The hardware design protects the electronic components and the control system can change functional parameters based on sensor input. Power failure modes built into the hardware prevent the vehicle from running out of energy permanently by monitoring voltage levels and triggering software reboots when the levels match pre-established conditions. This guarantees that the control software will be operational as soon as there is enough charge to sustain it, giving the vehicle increased longevity in case of a temporary power loss. GROVER demonstrates that autonomous rovers can be a revolutionary tool for data collection, and that both the technology and the software are available and ready to be implemented to create scientific data collection platforms.

  3. Autonomous Unobtrusive Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Taati, Babak; Mihailidis, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The current diagnosis process of dementia is resulting in a high-percentage of cases with delayed detection. To address this problem, in this paper we explore the feasibility of autonomously detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the older adult population. We implement a signal processing approach equipped with a machine learning paradigm to process and analyze real world data acquired using home-based unobtrusive sensing technologies. Using the sensor and clinical data pertaining to 97 subjects, acquired over an average period of 3 years, a number of measures associated with the subjects' walking speeds and general activity in the home were calculated. Different time spans of these measures were used to generate feature vectors to train and test two machine learning algorithms namely support vector machines and random forests. We were able to autonomously detect MCI in older adults with an area under the ROC curve of 0.97 and an area under the precision-recall curve of 0.93 using a time window of 24 weeks. This work is of great significance since it can potentially assist in the early detection of cognitive impairment in older adults. PMID:25585407

  4. Robust and Opportunistic Autonomous Science for a Potential Titan Aerobot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, Daniel M.; Estlin, Tara; Schaffer, Steve; Castano, Rebecca; Elfes, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    We are developing onboard planning and execution technologies to provide robust and opportunistic mission operations for a potential Titan aerobot. Aerobot have the potential for collecting a vast amount of high priority science data. However, to be effective, an aerobot must address several challenges including communication constraints, extended periods without contact with Earth, uncertain and changing environmental conditions, maneuverability constraints and potentially short-lived science opportunities. We are developing the AerOASIS system to develop and test technology to support autonomous science operations for a potential Titan Aerobot. The planning and execution component of AerOASIS is able to generate mission operations plans that achieve science and engineering objectives while respecting mission and resource constraints as well as adapting the plan to respond to new science opportunities. Our technology leverages prior work on the OASIS system for autonomous rover exploration. In this paper we describe how the OASIS planning component was adapted to address the unique challenges of a Titan Aerobot and we describe a field demonstration of the system with the JPL prototype aerobot.

  5. Towards a New Architecture for Autonomous Data Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzi, T. J.; Roudier, Y.; Apvrille, L.

    2015-08-01

    A new generation of UAVs is coming that will help improve the situational awareness and assessment necessary to ensure quality data collection, especially in difficult conditions like natural disasters. Operators should be relieved from time-consuming data collection tasks as much as possible and at the same time, UAVs should assist data collection operations through a more insightful and automated guidance thanks to advanced sensing capabilities. In order to achieve this vision, two challenges must be addressed though. The first one is to achieve a sufficient autonomy, both in terms of navigation and of interpretation of the data sensed. The second one relates to the reliability of the UAV with respect to accidental (safety) or even malicious (security) risks. This however requires the design and development of new embedded architectures for drones to be more autonomous, while mitigating the harm they may potentially cause. We claim that the increased complexity and flexibility of such platforms requires resorting to modelling, simulation, or formal verification techniques in order to validate such critical aspects of the platform. This paper first discusses the potential and challenges faced by autonomous UAVs for data acquisition. The design of a flexible and adaptable embedded UAV architecture is then addressed. Finally, the need for validating the properties of the platform is discussed. Our approach is sketched and illustrated with the example of a lightweight drone performing 3D reconstructions out of the combination of 2D image acquisition and a specific motion control.

  6. Autonomous Satellite Operations Via Secure Virtual Mission Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Pasciuto, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The science community is interested in improving their ability to respond to rapidly evolving, transient phenomena via autonomous rapid reconfiguration, which derives from the ability to assemble separate but collaborating sensors and data forecasting systems to meet a broad range of research and application needs. Current satellite systems typically require human intervention to respond to triggers from dissimilar sensor systems. Additionally, satellite ground services often need to be coordinated days or weeks in advance. Finally, the boundaries between the various sensor systems that make up such a Sensor Web are defined by such things as link delay and connectivity, data and error rate asymmetry, data reliability, quality of service provisions, and trust, complicating autonomous operations. Over the past ten years, researchers from the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), General Dynamics, Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL), Cisco, Universal Space Networks (USN), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Naval Research Laboratory, the DoD Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) Office, and others have worked collaboratively to develop a virtual mission operations capability. Called VMOC (Virtual Mission Operations Center), this new capability allows cross-system queuing of dissimilar mission unique systems through the use of a common security scheme and published application programming interfaces (APIs). Collaborative VMOC demonstrations over the last several years have supported the standardization of spacecraft to ground interfaces needed to reduce costs, maximize space effects to the user, and allow the generation of new tactics, techniques and procedures that lead to responsive space employment.

  7. Terrain modelling and motion planning for an autonomous exploration rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, F.; Benoliel, S.; Faugeras, O.; Grandjean, P.; Hayard, M.; Simeon, T.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of planetary exploration missions using rovers, the French national agency CNES, with a consortium of European laboratories and industrial concerns, has initiated the Eureka project, 'Illustration of an Autonomous Robot for the Exploration of Space' (IARES). IARES is a demonstrator composed of a rover and a ground station, linked by telemetry and telecommand. It is aimed at verifying, on earth, robotic concepts developed by the RISP group of French laboratories (LAAS, INRIA, CERT, LETI) to perform scientific missions such as autonomous terrain sample collecting over large areas. To cope with the actual needs of planet exploration, IARES suitability is assessed through constraints on limited bandwidth, time delay and on-board resources. This autonomy relies heavily on robust onboard trajectory generation capabilities. This paper presents the main functions of the IARES navigation sub-system and shows how they are combined to allow movement in Mars-like environments. Section 2 gives an overall description of the IARES system. Section 3 details the functions of the Navigation sub-system, and finally, section 4 illustrates with a simple example the use of these functions.

  8. Autonomous Demand Response in Heterogeneous Smart Grid Topologies

    E-print Network

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    1 Autonomous Demand Response in Heterogeneous Smart Grid Topologies Hamed Narimani and Hamed demand response systems in heterogeneous smart grid topologies. Keywords: Autonomous demand response of autonomous demand response systems in smart grids. is usually a convex function of the aggregate load. Based

  9. Good Experimental Methodologies for Autonomous Robotics: From Theory to Practice

    E-print Network

    Amigoni, Francesco

    systems employed in factories, the role of standardized experimental evaluation in autonomous robotics hasChapter 3 Good Experimental Methodologies for Autonomous Robotics: From Theory to Practice methodologies has recently taken place in the autonomous robotics community. Workshops have been orga- nized

  10. An Autonomous Vehicle Navigation System using Panoramic Machine Vision Techniques

    E-print Network

    Spacek, Libor

    An Autonomous Vehicle Navigation System using Panoramic Machine Vision Techniques Kevin Rushant@essex.ac.uk Keywords: Horizon, panoramic images, autonomous vehicle navigation. Abstract This paper describes a navigation system for an autonomous farm vehicle using machine vision techniques applied to panoramic images

  11. A Primateinspired Autonomous Navigation Algorithm Using the Cognitive Mechanism of

    E-print Network

    A Primate­inspired Autonomous Navigation Algorithm Using the Cognitive Mechanism of Mental Rotation on autonomous navigation has been made, the natural world o#ers interesting examples of navigational techniques in navigation. This paper explores how mental rotation can be used in navigation by developing an autonomous

  12. Autonomous Navigation Results from the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission

    E-print Network

    Autonomous Navigation Results from the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission Mark Maimone, Andrew, on the surface of Mars. Several autonomous navigation capabilities were employed in space for the first time navigate autonomously using stereo vision for local terrain mapping and a local, reactive planning

  13. Autonomous Geocaching: Navigation and Goal Finding in Outdoor Domains

    E-print Network

    Bowling, Michael

    Autonomous Geocaching: Navigation and Goal Finding in Outdoor Domains James Neufeld University Geocaching is a human recreational activity in which par- Cite as: Autonomous Geocaching: Navigation and Goal, Alberta bowling@cs.ualberta.ca ABSTRACT This paper describes an autonomous robot system designed to solve

  14. RAVON --The Robust Autonomous Vehicle for Off-road Navigation

    E-print Network

    Berns, Karsten

    RAVON -- The Robust Autonomous Vehicle for Off-road Navigation C. Armbrust, T. Braun, T. Föhst, M, the Robust Autonomous Vehicle for Off-road Navigation (see figure 1). A sophisticated hazard detection-road Navigation 2 Figure 1: The autonomous off-road robot RAVON 1.1 The need for autonomy During the recent years

  15. Autonomous Industrial Vehicles: From the Laboratory to the Factory Floor

    E-print Network

    of an autonomous indoor navigation system 9 10:45 AM 11:00 AMIvica, Zdenko Kovaci University of Zagreb, CroatiaWORKSHOP Autonomous Industrial Vehicles: From the Laboratory to the Factory Floor 1 IEEE 6 10:00 AM 10:15 AMDaniel Theobald Vecna Autonomous vehicles in industrial and/or hospital

  16. Real-Time Hierarchical POMDPs for Autonomous Robot Navigation

    E-print Network

    Trahanias, Panos

    Real-Time Hierarchical POMDPs for Autonomous Robot Navigation Amalia Foka and Panos Trahanias-HPOMDP). The RN-HPOMDP is utilized as a unified framework for autonomous robot navigation in dynamic environments The autonomous robot navigation problem has been studied thoroughly by the robotics research community over

  17. Long distance outdoor navigation of an autonomous mobile robot

    E-print Network

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Long distance outdoor navigation of an autonomous mobile robot by playback of Perceived Route Map of an autonomous mo- bile robot for long distance outdoor navigation in our university campus. We propose how developed an experimental robot system and conducted experiments of autonomous navigation using PRM in our

  18. Acousticbased room discrimination for the navigation of autonomous mobile robots

    E-print Network

    Zimmer, Uwe

    Acoustic­based room discrimination for the navigation of autonomous mobile robots Guido Tesch, Uwe signals are not used for the navigation of autonomous mobile robots. Nonetheless, they are the second best navigation tasks. In autonomous mobile robotics, this level of exploration is typically done by using

  19. Can Planning and Reactive Systems Realize an Autonomous Navigation*

    E-print Network

    Zimmer, Uwe

    Can Planning and Reactive Systems Realize an Autonomous Navigation* Maki K. Habib GMD: The major challenges facing navigation of an autonomous mobile robot and need to be addressed are stem from). These issues are fundamental to autonomous systems that have to function effectively while navigating

  20. Bayesian Controller for a Novel Semi-Autonomous Navigation Concept

    E-print Network

    Bayesian Controller for a Novel Semi-Autonomous Navigation Concept Xavier Perrin Ricardo- autonomous navigation where a mobile robot evolves au- tonomously under the monitoring of a human user the execution of a task. Instead of providing navigational commands, like in current semi-autonomous systems

  1. Autonomous Indoor Robot Navigation Using Sketched Maps and Routes

    E-print Network

    Teschner, Matthias

    Autonomous Indoor Robot Navigation Using Sketched Maps and Routes Federico Boniardi Abhinav Valada Wolfram Burgard Gian Diego Tipaldi Autonomous Intelligent Systems Group, University of Freiburg, Germany to impart coarse prior information about the scene to a robot, thereby enabling it to perform autonomous

  2. Autonomous Indoors Navigation using a Small-Size Quadrotor

    E-print Network

    Teschner, Matthias

    Autonomous Indoors Navigation using a Small-Size Quadrotor Slawomir Grzonka Giorgio Grisetti Wolfram Burgard Autonomous Systems Lab, Department of Computer Science University of Freiburg, D-79110 increasing research on the devel- opment of autonomous flying vehicles. Whereas most of the proposed

  3. Paper AAS 05-399 LINKED, AUTONOMOUS, INTERPLANETARY

    E-print Network

    Born, George

    Paper AAS 05-399 LINKED, AUTONOMOUS, INTERPLANETARY SATELLITE ORBIT NAVIGATION (LiAISON) Keric Hill 05-399 LINKED, AUTONOMOUS, INTERPLANETARY SATELLITE ORBIT NAVIGATION (LiAISON) Keric Hill determination using SST data. We propose a new method of interplanetary navigation called Linked, Autonomous

  4. Moving Horizon Observation for Autonomous Operation of Agricultural Vehicles*

    E-print Network

    in a predictive control framework for autonomous driving of a sensor-equipped tractor using a (nonlinear) rigid-world data from an autonomously driving tractor in this paper. The extended vehicle model merges dynamicMoving Horizon Observation for Autonomous Operation of Agricultural Vehicles* Janick V. Frasch1

  5. A Cloud-Assisted Design for Autonomous Driving Swarun Kumar

    E-print Network

    A Cloud-Assisted Design for Autonomous Driving Swarun Kumar MIT CSAIL swarun@mit.edu Shyamnath of Carcel on a state-of-the- art autonomous driving system in an outdoor testbed including an autonomous, a cloud-assisted system for au- tonomous driving. Carcel enables the cloud to have access to sensor data

  6. Building Strong Semi-Autonomous Systems Shlomo Zilberstein

    E-print Network

    Zilberstein, Shlomo

    growing attention since Google re- vealed its autonomous car. The car can complete an en- tire trip to stop (should not be ignored). To be success- ful, autonomous cars operating in an environment populatedBuilding Strong Semi-Autonomous Systems Shlomo Zilberstein School of Computer Science University

  7. Managing Uncertainty in Sound based Control for an Autonomous Helicopter

    E-print Network

    Hopgood, Adrian

    research us- ing a multi-purpose, small and low cost autonomous helicopter platform (Flyper). WeManaging Uncertainty in Sound based Control for an Autonomous Helicopter Benjamin N. Passow, Mario an overview of our proposed system. I. INTRODUCTION Autonomous helicopters have been well studied in the past

  8. Searching with an Autonomous Robot Sandor P. Fekete

    E-print Network

    Fekete, Sándor P.

    Searching with an Autonomous Robot S´andor P. Fekete Department of Mathematical Optimization TU.9 [ Computing Methodologies ]: Artificial Intelli- gence Robotics [Autonomous Vehicles] General Terms Algorithms-dimensional laser scan- ning, autonomous mobile robots, Kurt3D. 1. INTRODUCTION We demonstrate how one

  9. Author's personal copy Robotics and Autonomous Systems 59 (2011) 296309

    E-print Network

    Gross, Horst-Michael

    2011-01-01

    Author's personal copy Robotics and Autonomous Systems 59 (2011) 296­309 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Robotics and Autonomous Systems journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/robot Attention the autonomous use of mobile robots in complex public and home environments. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. TOWARDS A RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS FOR AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    TOWARDS A RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS FOR AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES Gwyn Griffithsa and Art 2005, at Fimbulisen on the edge of the Antarctic ice cap, an autonomous underwater vehicle set out, as it precluded recovery of Autosub. With increasing scientific interest in using autonomous underwater vehicles

  11. Color machine vision for autonomous vehicles Shashi D. Buluswar

    E-print Network

    Draper, Bruce A.

    Color machine vision for autonomous vehicles Shashi D. Buluswar Bruce A. Draper Dept. of Computer vehicles, Machine learning in computer vision. Abstract Color can be a useful feature in autonomous vehicle, and recognition of miscellaneous scene objects. Unfortunately, few existing autonomous vehicle systems use color

  12. Applications of HUGIN to Diagnosis and Control of Autonomous Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Applications of HUGIN to Diagnosis and Control of Autonomous Vehicles Anders L. Madsen1 and Uffe B of HUGIN to solve problems related to diag- nosis and control of autonomous vehicles. The application of diagnosis and con- trol of autonomous vehicles. Based on the HUGIN tool, limited memory influence diagrams

  13. A Hybrid Controller for Autonomous Vehicles Driving on Automated Highways #

    E-print Network

    Girault, Alain

    A Hybrid Controller for Autonomous Vehicles Driving on Automated Highways # Alain Girault a a Inria the problem of the hybrid control of autonomous vehicles driving on automated highways. Vehicles with its leading vehicle. Second, we extend this first result to a lane of autonomous vehicles. Third, we

  14. GENETIC ALGORITHMS FOR A SINGLE-TRACK VEHICLE AUTONOMOUS PILOT

    E-print Network

    Vrajitoru, Dana

    GENETIC ALGORITHMS FOR A SINGLE-TRACK VEHICLE AUTONOMOUS PILOT Dana Vrajitoru Intelligent Systems algorithms to an autonomous pilot designed for motorized single-track vehicles (motorcycles). The pilot-agents, autonomous pilot. 1 #12;1 Introduction Single track vehicles (STV) present somewhat different challenges than

  15. Leaving and returning to harbour with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    E-print Network

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    Leaving and returning to harbour with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle G Griffiths, S D McPhail, R. #12;Leaving and returning to harbour with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle G Griffiths 1 , S D Mc Introduction Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) have been under development by the military and civilian

  16. Evolution-Based Path Planning and Management for Autonomous Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Evolution-Based Path Planning and Management for Autonomous Vehicles Brian J. Capozzi of Washington Abstract Evolution-Based Path Planning and Management for Autonomous Vehicles by Brian J. Capozzi paths for an autonomous vehicle through a number of different static and dynamic envi- ronments

  17. Robust Hybrid Control for Autonomous Vehicle Motion Planning

    E-print Network

    Feron, Eric

    Robust Hybrid Control for Autonomous Vehicle Motion Planning Emilio Frazzoli Munther A. Dahleh y Eric Feron z Abstract The operation of an autonomous vehicle in an unknown, dynamic environment, to the design, development and operation of autonomous aerial, underwater, and ground vehicles. The possibility

  18. HIERARCHICAL SEARCH STRATEGY FOR A TEAM OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    HIERARCHICAL SEARCH STRATEGY FOR A TEAM OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES Jorge Silva Alberto Speranzon Jo-Robot Systems, Simplex Algorithm, Discrete-Event Systems, Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). 1. INTRODUCTION field, we desire to coordinate the motions of a group of autonomous vehicles with sensing and very

  19. REPORT ON THE LAW RELATING TO AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    REPORT ON THE LAW RELATING TO AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES Prepared by E D Brown Professor relating to autonomous underwater vehicles. AUV operations are sufficiently novel that guidance and as they appertain to an autonomous vehicle engaged in marine scientific research, such as Autosub. Nevertheless

  20. Occupancy Based Map Searching Using Heterogeneous Teams of Autonomous Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Occupancy Based Map Searching Using Heterogeneous Teams of Autonomous Vehicles Christopher W. Lum for searching using a team of heterogeneous autonomous vehicles. The team members maintain a world model which, Rolf T. Rysdyk, and Anawat Pongpunwattana Autonomous Flight Systems Laboratory University

  1. Autonomous vehicle guidance using analog VLSI neuromorphic sensors

    E-print Network

    Autonomous vehicle guidance using analog VLSI neuromorphic sensors Giacomo Indiveri and Paul step towards the design of a fully autonomous vehicle that will safely navigate using only inputs from of compact low-power autonomous systems. We describe such a system, consisting of a mobile robot equipped

  2. On the Reliability of the Autosub Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    E-print Network

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    1 On the Reliability of the Autosub Autonomous Underwater Vehicle G. GRIFFITHS, N. W. MILLARD, S. D. Abstract As autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) enter operational service an assessment involved the autonomous nature of the vehicle. Rather, faults were typical of those that occur with any

  3. Control algorithms for autonomous robot navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1985-09-20

    This paper examines control algorithm requirements for autonomous robot navigation outside laboratory environments. Three aspects of navigation are considered: navigation control in explored terrain, environment interactions with robot sensors, and navigation control in unanticipated situations. Major navigation methods are presented and relevance of traditional human learning theory is discussed. A new navigation technique linking graph theory and incidental learning is introduced.

  4. An Algorithm for Autonomous Formation Obstacle Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Yunior I.

    The level of human interaction with Unmanned Aerial Systems varies greatly from remotely piloted aircraft to fully autonomous systems. In the latter end of the spectrum, the challenge lies in designing effective algorithms to dictate the behavior of the autonomous agents. A swarm of autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles requires collision avoidance and formation flight algorithms to negotiate environmental challenges it may encounter during the execution of its mission, which may include obstacles and chokepoints. In this work, a simple algorithm is developed to allow a formation of autonomous vehicles to perform point to point navigation while avoiding obstacles and navigating through chokepoints. Emphasis is placed on maintaining formation structures. Rather than breaking formation and individually navigating around the obstacle or through the chokepoint, vehicles are required to assemble into appropriately sized/shaped sub-formations, bifurcate around the obstacle or negotiate the chokepoint, and reassemble into the original formation at the far side of the obstruction. The algorithm receives vehicle and environmental properties as inputs and outputs trajectories for each vehicle from start to the desired ending location. Simulation results show that the algorithm safely routes all vehicles past the obstruction while adhering to the aforementioned requirements. The formation adapts and successfully negotiates the obstacles and chokepoints in its path while maintaining proper vehicle separation.

  5. Autonomous biomorphic robots as platforms for sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Tilden, M.; Hasslacher, B.; Mainieri, R.; Moses, J.

    1996-10-01

    The idea of building autonomous robots that can carry out complex and nonrepetitive tasks is an old one, so far unrealized in any meaningful hardware. Tilden has shown recently that there are simple, processor-free solutions to building autonomous mobile machines that continuously adapt to unknown and hostile environments, are designed primarily to survive, and are extremely resistant to damage. These devices use smart mechanics and simple (low component count) electronic neuron control structures having the functionality of biological organisms from simple invertebrates to sophisticated members of the insect and crab family. These devices are paradigms for the development of autonomous machines that can carry out directed goals. The machine then becomes a robust survivalist platform that can carry sensors or instruments. These autonomous roving machines, now in an early stage of development (several proof-of-concept prototype walkers have been built), can be developed so that they are inexpensive, robust, and versatile carriers for a variety of instrument packages. Applications are immediate and many, in areas as diverse as prosthetics, medicine, space, construction, nanoscience, defense, remote sensing, environmental cleanup, and biotechnology.

  6. Autonomic adjustments to exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    Autonomic nervous system adjustments to the heart and blood vessels are necessary for mediating the cardiovascular responses required to meet the metabolic demands of working skeletal muscle during exercise. These demands are met by precise exercise intensity-dependent alterations in sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity. The purpose of this review is to examine the contributions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems in mediating specific cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses to exercise. These changes in autonomic outflow are regulated by several neural mechanisms working in concert, including central command (a feed forward mechanism originating from higher brain centers), the exercise pressor reflex (a feed-back mechanism originating from skeletal muscle), the arterial baroreflex (a negative feed-back mechanism originating from the carotid sinus and aortic arch), and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors (a feed-back mechanism from stretch receptors located in the heart and lungs). In addition, arterial chemoreceptors and phrenic afferents from respiratory muscles (i.e., respiratory metaboreflex) are also capable of modulating the autonomic responses to exercise. Our goal is to provide a detailed review of the parasympathetic and sympathetic changes that occur with exercise distinguishing between the onset of exercise and steady-state conditions, when appropriate. In addition, studies demonstrating the contributions of each of the aforementioned neural mechanisms to the autonomic changes and ensuing cardiac and/or vascular responses will be covered. PMID:25880502

  7. Autonomous inverted helicopter flight via reinforcement learning

    E-print Network

    Thrun, Sebastian

    antenna, IMU, and magnetic compass were mounted on the tail boom. The IMU in particular was mounted fairly of successful autonomous helicopter flight are given in [7,2,9,8]. Because helicopter flight is usually open-loop. Helicopter in configuration for upright-only flight (single GPS antenna). helicopter is powered by a twin

  8. Online Identification and Stochastic Control for Autonomous

    E-print Network

    Papalambros, Panos

    Online Identification and Stochastic Control for Autonomous Internal Combustion Engines Andreas A Advanced internal combustion engine technologies have afforded an increase in the number of controllable and investment in advanced internal combustion en- gine technologies. These technologies, such as fuel injection

  9. Data Networking for Autonomous Fatigue Crack Detection

    E-print Network

    Yi, Yung

    Data Networking for Autonomous Fatigue Crack Detection Jinhwan Jung, Deawoo Kim, Hankyeol Lee monitoring, where sensors are distributed to monitor buildings, bridges, large dams, and etc. Out of a large number of application domains we focus on the fa- tigue crack detection of a structure, e.g., bridge

  10. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  11. Assembling Composite Web Services from Autonomous Components

    E-print Network

    Honavar, Vasant

    Assembling Composite Web Services from Autonomous Components Jyotishman PATHAK, Samik BASU, sbasu, honavar}@cs.iastate.edu Abstract. Web services are fast emerging as the technology of choice to an iterative and incremental technique for modeling composite Web services proposed by the authors. Keywords

  12. Spatial abstraction for autonomous robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Susan L; Aroor, Anoop; Evanusa, Matthew; Sklar, Elizabeth I; Parsons, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Optimal navigation for a simulated robot relies on a detailed map and explicit path planning, an approach problematic for real-world robots that are subject to noise and error. This paper reports on autonomous robots that rely on local spatial perception, learning, and commonsense rationales instead. Despite realistic actuator error, learned spatial abstractions form a model that supports effective travel. PMID:26227680

  13. -A Scalable Autonomous Scientific Digital Library

    E-print Network

    Lee, Wang-Chien

    CiteSeerX - A Scalable Autonomous Scientific Digital Library Huajing Li1 Isaac G. Councill2 Levent, giles}@ist.psu.edu Abstract-- CiteSeer is a scientific literature digital library and search engine are discussed. I. INTRODUCTION CiteSeer has arisen as a web-based scientific literature digital library

  14. Environmental Data Collection Using Autonomous Wave Gliders

    E-print Network

    Bulk flux estimates 2-D wave spectra Top water layer temperature Fixed location/drifting Limited sea conditions Bulk flux estimates 2-D wave spectra Water temperature profile Autonomous Temperature Relative Humidity Campbell Scientific Temperature Probe Model 109SS Sea water temperature Garmin

  15. Auctionbased autonomous intersection management Dustin Carlino

    E-print Network

    Stone, Peter

    to maintain a reasonable travel time for drivers with low budgets. An implementation of the mechanism intersection management scheme reflect­ ing variation in travelers' value of time, and a corresponding ``wallet be infeasible for human drivers, autonomous vehicles are capable of quickly and seamlessly bidding on behalf

  16. Pervasive `Calm' for Autonomous Robotic Agents

    E-print Network

    Pervasive `Calm' Perception for Autonomous Robotic Agents Thiemo Wiedemeyer, Ferenc Bálint that these tasks impose onto perception mech- anisms. There is a strong need to scale robot perception capabilities requiring the robotic agent to wait for the results of perception processes. Appears in: Proceedings

  17. Comparative anatomy of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan

    2011-11-16

    This short review aims to point out the general anatomical features of the autonomic nervous systems of non-mammalian vertebrates. In addition it attempts to outline the similarities and also the increased complexity of the autonomic nervous patterns from fish to tetrapods. With the possible exception of the cyclostomes, perhaps the most striking feature of the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is the similarity between the vertebrate classes. An evolution of the complexity of the system can be seen, with the segmental ganglia of elasmobranchs incompletely connected longitudinally, while well developed paired sympathetic chains are present in teleosts and the tetrapods. In some groups the sympathetic chains may be reduced (dipnoans and caecilians), and have yet to be properly described in snakes. Cranial autonomic pathways are present in the oculomotor (III) and vagus (X) nerves of gnathostome fish and the tetrapods, and with the evolution of salivary and lachrymal glands in the tetrapods, also in the facial (VII) and glossopharyngeal (IX) nerves. PMID:20444653

  18. Control of Autonomous Mobile Robots Magnus Egerstedt

    E-print Network

    Egerstedt, Magnus

    , such as autonomous vacuum cleaners, lawn mowers, and pool cleaners; · Planetary exploration robots, such as the NASA of the environment in which the system operates, which imposes a number of challenges on the control design. In this chapter we will cover modeling and architectural design issues for such systems. We will moreover discuss

  19. Integrating the autonomous subsystems management process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, Barry R.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which the ranking of the Space Station Module Power Management and Distribution testbed may be achieved and an individual subsystem's internal priorities may be managed within the complete system are examined. The application of these results in the integration and performance leveling of the autonomously managed system is discussed.

  20. The Utility of Pollination for Autonomic Computing

    E-print Network

    Bauer, Bernhard

    The Utility of Pollination for Autonomic Computing Holger Kasinger and Bernhard Bauer University. From the biology's point of view, pollination is an important step in the reproduction of seed plants the pollination process between plants and insects im- plies inherently. To utilize pollination as a paradigm

  1. Love alters autonomic reactivity to emotions.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Inna; Zilberstein-Kra, Yael; Leckman, James F; Feldman, Ruth

    2011-12-01

    Periods of bond formation are accompanied by physiological and emotional changes, yet, little is known about the effects of falling in love on the individual's physiological response to emotions. We examined autonomic reactivity to the presentation of negative and positive films in 112 young adults, including 57 singles and 55 new lovers who began a romantic relationship 2.5 months prior to the experiment Autonomic reactivity was measured by Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) to two baseline emotionally neutral films, two negative films, and two positive films. Results demonstrated that RSA in singles decreased during the presentation of negative emotions, indicating physiological stress response. However, no such decrease was found among new lovers, pointing to more optimal vagal regulation during the period of falling in love. Autonomic reactivity, indexed by RSA decrease from the positive to the negative films, was greater among singles as compared to lovers, suggesting that love buffers against autonomic stress and facilitates emotion regulation. Findings suggest that vagal regulation may be one mechanism through which love and attachment reduce stress and promote well-being and health. PMID:22142209

  2. Robotany : autonomous vehicles that care for houseplants

    E-print Network

    Cinnamon, Sara Elizabeth, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Robotany is a system of autonomous robots that act on behalf of houseplants that rest on top of their chassis. Their duty is to do what plants would if they had the gift of mobility - namely to seek out sunlight or water ...

  3. Towards an Autonomous Global Ocean Carbon Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. K.

    2007-12-01

    The ocean is by far the largest carbon reservoir in rapid communication with the atmosphere. Understanding both ocean carbon chemistry and ocean carbon biology are critical for carbon prediction. Marine carbon biomass accounts for roughly 50% of global carbon photosynthesis and a ~10 Pg C/year particulate carbon flux through 100 m into the deep sea. The latter export is commonly referred to as the biological carbon pump. The entire plant biomass of the ocean turns over on week time scales. We lack predictive skill for the biological pump mainly because observations of the biological pump have to be tied to ships which are unable to remain at sea at any location longer than several weeks. Since 2001, a dozen low cost, long lived, robotic Carbon Explorers have been deployed to operate in the ocean for year-long time scales and return real-time information on the daily variation of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) concentration of the upper 1000 m of the ocean. On June 22 2007 the next generation of Explorer, the Carbon Flux Explorer (CFE) was recovered after a successful two day test and routine operation as deep as 800 m in waters of the San Clemente Basin off shore of San Diego. The CFE represents integration of the Optical Sedimentation Recorder (engineered at Berkeley Laboratory) and the Sounding Ocean Lagrangian Observer (SOLO) profiling float engineered at Scripps. Every eight hours, the CFE surfaced and transmitted in real time engineering and position information in minutes to shore and ship via Iridium satellite link. This fully autonomous and robotic free vehicle/instrument is designed to follow (at hourly resolution) variations of particulate organic and inorganic carbon sedimentation for seasons. Beyond enhanced predictability of the ocean biological carbon pump brought by such enhanced technology, it is fully feasible in the next decade to implement a low cost real-time ocean carbon observing system (a CARBON-ARGO), capable of real time assessment of ocean carbon flux which when coupled with atmospheric CO2 measurements will constrain the balance between carbon emissions and natural and human mediated carbon sinks on land.

  4. Autonomous Surface Sample Acquisition for Planetary and Lunar Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. P.

    2007-08-01

    Surface science sample acquisition is a critical activity within any planetary and lunar exploration mission, and our research is focused upon the design, implementation, experimentation and demonstration of an onboard autonomous surface sample acquisition capability for a rover equipped with a robotic arm upon which are mounted appropriate science instruments. Images captured by a rover stereo camera system can be processed using shape from stereo methods and a digital elevation model (DEM) generated. We have developed a terrain feature identification algorithm that can determine autonomously from DEM data suitable regions for instrument placement and/or surface sample acquisition. Once identified, surface normal data can be generated autonomously which are then used to calculate an arm trajectory for instrument placement and sample acquisition. Once an instrument placement and sample acquisition trajectory has been calculated, a collision detection algorithm is required to ensure the safe operation of the arm during sample acquisition.We have developed a novel adaptive 'bounding spheres' approach to this problem. Once potential science targets have been identified, and these are within the reach of the arm and will not cause any undesired collision, then the 'cost' of executing the sample acquisition activity is required. Such information which includes power expenditure and duration can be used to select the 'best' target from a set of potential targets. We have developed a science sample acquisition resource requirements calculation that utilises differential inverse kinematics methods to yield a high fidelity result, thus improving upon simple 1st order approximations. To test our algorithms a new Planetary Analogue Terrain (PAT) Laboratory has been created that has a terrain region composed of Mars Soil Simulant-D from DLR Germany, and rocks that have been fully characterised in the laboratory. These have been donated by the UK Planetary Analogue Field Study network, and constitute the science targets for our autonomous sample acquisition work. Our PAT Lab. terrain has been designed to support our new rover chassis which is based upon the ExoMars rover Concept-E mechanics which were investigated during the ESA ExoMars Phase A study. The rover has 6 wheel drives, 6 wheels steering, and a 6 wheel walking capability. Mounted on the rover chassis is the UWA robotic arm and mast. We have designed and built a PanCam system complete with a computer controlled pan and tilt mechanism. The UWA PanCam is based upon the ExoMars PanCam (Phase A study) and hence supports two Wide Angle Cameras (WAC - 64 degree FOV), and a High Resolution Camera (HRC - 5 degree FOV). WAC separation is 500 mm. Software has been developed to capture images which form the data input into our on-board autonomous surface sample acquisition algorithms.

  5. Apoptosis and Self-Destruct: A Contribution to Autonomic Agents?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Autonomic Computing (AC), a self-managing systems initiative based on the biological metaphor of the autonomic nervous system, is increasingly gaining momentum as the way forward in designing reliable systems. Agent technologies have been identified as a key enabler for engineering autonomicity in systems, both in terms of retrofitting autonomicity into legacy systems and designing new systems. The AC initiative provides an opportunity to consider other biological systems and principles in seeking new design strategies. This paper reports on one such investigation; utilizing the apoptosis metaphor of biological systems to provide a dynamic health indicator signal between autonomic agents.

  6. Autonomic Nervous System and Immune System Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, MJ; Ganta, CK

    2015-01-01

    The present review assesses the current state of literature defining integrative autonomic-immune physiological processing, focusing on studies that have employed electrophysiological, pharmacological, molecular biological and central nervous system experimental approaches. Central autonomic neural networks are informed of peripheral immune status via numerous communicating pathways, including neural and non-neural. Cytokines and other immune factors affect the level of activity and responsivity of discharges in sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves innervating diverse targets. Multiple levels of the neuraxis contribute to cytokine-induced changes in efferent parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve outflows, leading to modulation of peripheral immune responses. The functionality of local sympathoimmune interactions depends on the microenvironment created by diverse signaling mechanisms involving integration between sympathetic nervous system neurotransmitters and neuromodulators; specific adrenergic receptors; and the presence or absence of immune cells, cytokines and bacteria. Functional mechanisms contributing to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway likely involve novel cholinergic-adrenergic interactions at peripheral sites, including autonomic ganglion and lymphoid targets. Immune cells express adrenergic and nicotinic receptors. Neurotransmitters released by sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve endings bind to their respective receptors located on the surface of immune cells and initiate immune-modulatory responses. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the autonomic nervous system are instrumental in orchestrating neuroimmune processes, although additional studies are required to understand dynamic and complex adrenergic-cholinergic interactions. Further understanding of regulatory mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous, parasympathetic nervous, and immune systems is critical for understanding relationships between chronic disease development and immune-associated changes in autonomic nervous system function. PMID:24944034

  7. Navigation strategies for multiple autonomous mobile robots moving in formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. K. C.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of deriving navigation strategies for a fleet of autonomous mobile robots moving in formation is considered. Here, each robot is represented by a particle with a spherical effective spatial domain and a specified cone of visibility. The global motion of each robot in the world space is described by the equations of motion of the robot's center of mass. First, methods for formation generation are discussed. Then, simple navigation strategies for robots moving in formation are derived. A sufficient condition for the stability of a desired formation pattern for a fleet of robots each equipped with the navigation strategy based on nearest neighbor tracking is developed. The dynamic behavior of robot fleets consisting of three or more robots moving in formation in a plane is studied by means of computer simulation.

  8. Dynamic map building for an autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.J.; Durrant-Whyte, H.F. ); Cox, I.J. )

    1992-08-01

    This article presents an algorithm for autonomous map building and maintenance for a mobile robot. The authors believe that mobile robot navigation can be treated as a problem of tracking geometric features that occur naturally in the environment. They represent each feature in the map by a location estimate (the feature state vector) and two distinct measures of uncertainty: a covariance matrix to represent uncertainty in feature location, and a credibility measure to represent their belief in the validity of the feature. During each position update cycle, predicted measurements are generated for each geometric feature in the map and compared with actual sensor observations. Successful matches cause a feature's credibility to be increased. Unpredicted observations are used to initialize new geometric features, while unobserved predictions result in a geometric feature's credibility being decreased. They also describe experimental results obtained with the algorithm that demonstrate successful map building using real sonar data.

  9. Visual exploration of 2D autonomous dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas; Sadlo, Filip

    2015-05-01

    In an introductory course on dynamical systems or Hamiltonian mechanics, vector field diagrams are a central tool to show a system’s qualitative behaviour in a certain domain. Because of their low sampling rates and the involved issues of vector normalization, these plots give only a coarse insight and are unable to convey the vector field behaviour at locations with high variation, in particular in the neighbourhood of critical points. Similarly, automatic generation of phase portraits based on traditional sampling cannot precisely capture separatrices or limit cylces. In this paper, we present ASysViewer, an application for the interactive visual exploration of two-dimensional autonomous dynamical systems, using line integral convolution techniques for visualization, and grid-based techniques to extract critical points and separatrices. ASysViewer is addressed to undergraduate students during their first course in dynamical systems or Hamiltonian mechanics.

  10. Application of a Chaotic Oscillator in an Autonomous Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlelo-Cuautle, Esteban; Ramos-López, Hugo C.; Sánchez-Sánchez, Mauro; Pano-Azucena, Ana D.; Sánchez-Gaspariano, Luis A.; Núñez-Pérez, José C.; Camas-Anzueto, Jorge L.

    2014-05-01

    Terrain exploration robots can be of great usefulness in critical navigation circumstances. However, the challenge is how to guarantee a control for covering a full terrain area. That way, the application of a chaotic oscillator to control the wheels of an autonomous mobile robot, is introduced herein. Basically, we describe the realization of a random number generator (RNG) based on a double-scroll chaotic oscillator, which is used to guide the robot to cover a full terrain area. The resolution of the terrain exploration area is determined by both the number of bits provided by the RNG and the characteristics of step motors. Finally, the experimental results highlight the covered area by painting the trajectories that the robot explores.

  11. Autonomous Robotic Refueling System (ARRS) for rapid aircraft turnaround

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, O. R.; Jackson, E.; Rueb, K.; Thompson, B.; Powell, K.

    An autonomous robotic refuelling system is being developed to achieve rapid aircraft turnaround, notably during combat operations. The proposed system includes a gantry positioner with sufficient reach to position a robotic arm that performs the refuelling tasks; a six degree of freedom manipulator equipped with a remote center of compliance, torque sensor, and a gripper that can handle standard tools; a computer vision system to locate and guide the refuelling nozzle, inspect the nozzle, and avoid collisions; and an operator interface with video and graphics display. The control system software will include components designed for trajectory planning and generation, collision detection, sensor interfacing, sensory processing, and human interfacing. The robotic system will be designed so that upgrading to perform additional tasks will be relatively straightforward.

  12. Multiple independent autonomous hydraulic oscillators driven by a common gravity head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    Self-switching microfluidic circuits that are able to perform biochemical experiments in a parallel and autonomous manner, similar to instruction-embedded electronics, are rarely implemented. Here, we present design principles and demonstrations for gravity-driven, integrated, microfluidic pulsatile flow circuits. With a common gravity head as the only driving force, these fluidic oscillator arrays realize a wide range of periods (0.4 s-2 h) and flow rates (0.10-63 ?l min-1) with completely independent timing between the multiple oscillator sub-circuits connected in parallel. As a model application, we perform systematic, parallel analysis of endothelial cell elongation response to different fluidic shearing patterns generated by the autonomous microfluidic pulsed flow generation system.

  13. An architectural approach to create self organizing control systems for practical autonomous robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, Helen

    1991-01-01

    For practical industrial applications, the development of trainable robots is an important and immediate objective. Therefore, the developing of flexible intelligence directly applicable to training is emphasized. It is generally agreed upon by the AI community that the fusion of expert systems, neural networks, and conventionally programmed modules (e.g., a trajectory generator) is promising in the quest for autonomous robotic intelligence. Autonomous robot development is hindered by integration and architectural problems. Some obstacles towards the construction of more general robot control systems are as follows: (1) Growth problem; (2) Software generation; (3) Interaction with environment; (4) Reliability; and (5) Resource limitation. Neural networks can be successfully applied to some of these problems. However, current implementations of neural networks are hampered by the resource limitation problem and must be trained extensively to produce computationally accurate output. A generalization of conventional neural nets is proposed, and an architecture is offered in an attempt to address the above problems.

  14. Multiple independent autonomous hydraulic oscillators driven by a common gravity head.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Lesher-Perez, Sasha Cai; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Self-switching microfluidic circuits that are able to perform biochemical experiments in a parallel and autonomous manner, similar to instruction-embedded electronics, are rarely implemented. Here, we present design principles and demonstrations for gravity-driven, integrated, microfluidic pulsatile flow circuits. With a common gravity head as the only driving force, these fluidic oscillator arrays realize a wide range of periods (0.4?s-2?h) and flow rates (0.10-63??l?min(-1)) with completely independent timing between the multiple oscillator sub-circuits connected in parallel. As a model application, we perform systematic, parallel analysis of endothelial cell elongation response to different fluidic shearing patterns generated by the autonomous microfluidic pulsed flow generation system. PMID:26073884

  15. Systems, methods and apparatus for modeling, specifying and deploying policies in autonomous and autonomic systems using agent-oriented software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Penn, Joaquin (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments, an agent-oriented specification modeled with MaCMAS, is analyzed, flaws in the agent-oriented specification modeled with MaCMAS are corrected, and an implementation is derived from the corrected agent-oriented specification. Described herein are systems, method and apparatus that produce fully (mathematically) tractable development of agent-oriented specification(s) modeled with methodology fragment for analyzing complex multiagent systems (MaCMAS) and policies for autonomic systems from requirements through to code generation. The systems, method and apparatus described herein are illustrated through an example showing how user formulated policies can be translated into a formal mode which can then be converted to code. The requirements-based programming systems, method and apparatus described herein may provide faster, higher quality development and maintenance of autonomic systems based on user formulation of policies.

  16. Autonomous urban reconnaissance ingress system (AURIS): providing a tactically relevant autonomous door-opening kit for unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, David J.; Rufo, Michael A.; Berkemeier, Matthew D.; Alberts, Joel A.

    2012-06-01

    The Autonomous Urban Reconnaissance Ingress System (AURIS™) addresses a significant limitation of current military and first responder robotics technology: the inability of reconnaissance robots to open doors. Leveraging user testing as a baseline, the program has derived specifications necessary for military personnel to open doors with fielded UGVs (Unmanned Ground Vehicles), and evaluates the technology's impact on operational mission areas: duration, timing, and user patience in developing a tactically relevant, safe, and effective system. Funding is provided through the US ARMY Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) and the project represents a leap forward in perception, autonomy, robotic implements, and coordinated payload operation in UGVs. This paper describes high level details of specification generation, status of the last phase of development, an advanced view of the system autonomy capability, and a short look ahead towards the ongoing work on this compelling and important technology.

  17. Viability-based computation of spatially constrained minimum time trajectories for an autonomous underwater vehicle: implementation and

    E-print Network

    Marques, Eduardo R. B.

    dynamical systems. The algorithm is instantiated for a specific dynamics (Dubin's vehicle with current algorithm is tested in an experiment with a Light Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (LAUV) system for generating optimum trajectories for a vehicle with a heading-specific planar dynamic, driven by a non

  18. 24.11.2014 rrlab.cs.uni-kl.de Trajectory tracking is one basic task an autonomous vehicle

    E-print Network

    Berns, Karsten

    24.11.2014 rrlab.cs.uni-kl.de Trajectory tracking is one basic task an autonomous vehicle should/dynamic model of the leading vehicle has to be created. Based on the latest information, the model shall be used to generate a trajectory lookahead. Tasks Analyze the state of the art in vehicle tracking (following

  19. Auditory stimulation and cardiac autonomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Vitor E.; Guida, Heraldo L.; Frizzo, Ana C. F.; Cardoso, Ana C. V.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have already demonstrated that auditory stimulation with music influences the cardiovascular system. In this study, we described the relationship between musical auditory stimulation and heart rate variability. Searches were performed with the Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane databases using the following keywords: “auditory stimulation”, “autonomic nervous system”, “music” and “heart rate variability”. The selected studies indicated that there is a strong correlation between noise intensity and vagal-sympathetic balance. Additionally, it was reported that music therapy improved heart rate variability in anthracycline-treated breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that dopamine release in the striatal system induced by pleasurable songs is involved in cardiac autonomic regulation. Musical auditory stimulation influences heart rate variability through a neural mechanism that is not well understood. Further studies are necessary to develop new therapies to treat cardiovascular disorders. PMID:22948465

  20. Autonomous Rovers for Polar Science Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lever, J. H.; Ray, L. E.; Williams, R. M.; Morlock, A. M.; Burzynski, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed and deployed two over-snow autonomous rovers able to conduct remote science campaigns on Polar ice sheets. Yeti is an 80-kg, four-wheel-drive (4WD) battery-powered robot with 3 - 4 hr endurance, and Cool Robot is a 60-kg 4WD solar-powered robot with unlimited endurance during Polar summers. Both robots navigate using GPS waypoint-following to execute pre-planned courses autonomously, and they can each carry or tow 20 - 160 kg instrument payloads over typically firm Polar snowfields. In 2008 - 12, we deployed Yeti to conduct autonomous ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys to detect hidden crevasses to help establish safe routes for overland resupply of research stations at South Pole, Antarctica, and Summit, Greenland. We also deployed Yeti with GPR at South Pole in 2011 to identify the locations of potentially hazardous buried buildings from the original 1950's-era station. Autonomous surveys remove personnel from safety risks posed during manual GPR surveys by undetected crevasses or buried buildings. Furthermore, autonomous surveys can yield higher quality and more comprehensive data than manual ones: Yeti's low ground pressure (20 kPa) allows it to cross thinly bridged crevasses or other voids without interrupting a survey, and well-defined survey grids allow repeated detection of buried voids to improve detection reliability and map their extent. To improve survey efficiency, we have automated the mapping of detected hazards, currently identified via post-survey manual review of the GPR data. Additionally, we are developing machine-learning algorithms to detect crevasses autonomously in real time, with reliability potentially higher than manual real-time detection. These algorithms will enable the rover to relay crevasse locations to a base station for near real-time mapping and decision-making. We deployed Cool Robot at Summit Station in 2005 to verify its mobility and power budget over Polar snowfields. Using solar power, this zero-emissions rover could travel more than 500 km per week during Polar summers and provide 100 - 200 W to power instrument payloads to help investigate the atmosphere, magnetosphere, glaciology and sub-glacial geology in Antarctica and Greenland. We are currently upgrading Cool Robot's navigation and solar-power systems and will deploy it during 2013 to map the emissions footprint around Summit Station to demonstrate its potential to execute long-endurance Polar science campaigns. These rovers could assist science traverses to chart safe routes into the interior of Antarctica and Greenland or conduct autonomous, remote science campaigns to extend spatial and temporal coverage for data collection. Our goals include 1,000 - 2,000-km summertime traverses of Antarctica and Greenland, safe navigation through 0.5-m amplitude sastrugi fields, survival in blizzards, and rover-network adaptation to research events of opportunity. We are seeking Polar scientists interested in autonomous, mobile data collection and can adapt the rovers to meet their requirements.

  1. Autonomous reinforcement learning with experience replay.

    PubMed

    Wawrzy?ski, Pawe?; Tanwani, Ajay Kumar

    2013-05-01

    This paper considers the issues of efficiency and autonomy that are required to make reinforcement learning suitable for real-life control tasks. A real-time reinforcement learning algorithm is presented that repeatedly adjusts the control policy with the use of previously collected samples, and autonomously estimates the appropriate step-sizes for the learning updates. The algorithm is based on the actor-critic with experience replay whose step-sizes are determined on-line by an enhanced fixed point algorithm for on-line neural network training. An experimental study with simulated octopus arm and half-cheetah demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed algorithm to solve difficult learning control problems in an autonomous way within reasonably short time. PMID:23237972

  2. Forced synchronization of autonomous dynamical Boolean networks.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Durón, R R; Campos-Cantón, E; Campos-Cantón, I; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    We present the design of an autonomous time-delay Boolean network realized with readily available electronic components. Through simulations and experiments that account for the detailed nonlinear response of each circuit element, we demonstrate that a network with five Boolean nodes displays complex behavior. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of two identical networks display near-instantaneous synchronization to a periodic state when forced by a common periodic Boolean signal. A theoretical analysis of the network reveals the conditions under which complex behavior is expected in an individual network and the occurrence of synchronization in the forced networks. This research will enable future experiments on autonomous time-delay networks using readily available electronic components with dynamics on a slow enough time-scale so that inexpensive data collection systems can faithfully record the dynamics. PMID:26328564

  3. Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, Benjamin J.; Castano, Rebecca; Estlin, Tara A.; Gaines, Daniel M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Thompson, David R.; DeGranville, Charles K.; Chien, Steve A.; Tang, Benyang; Burl, Michael C.; Judd, Michele A.

    2010-01-01

    The Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science System (AEGIS) provides automated targeting for remote sensing instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission, which at the time of this reporting has had two rovers exploring the surface of Mars (see figure). Currently, targets for rover remote-sensing instruments must be selected manually based on imagery already on the ground with the operations team. AEGIS enables the rover flight software to analyze imagery onboard in order to autonomously select and sequence targeted remote-sensing observations in an opportunistic fashion. In particular, this technology will be used to automatically acquire sub-framed, high-resolution, targeted images taken with the MER panoramic cameras. This software provides: 1) Automatic detection of terrain features in rover camera images, 2) Feature extraction for detected terrain targets, 3) Prioritization of terrain targets based on a scientist target feature set, and 4) Automated re-targeting of rover remote-sensing instruments at the highest priority target.

  4. Multiple Autonomous Discrete Event Controllers for Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, Timothy C.

    2003-01-01

    The Multiple Autonomous Discrete Event Controllers for Constellations (MADECC) project is an effort within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Information Systems Division to develop autonomous positioning and attitude control for constellation satellites. It will be accomplished using traditional control theory and advanced coordination algorithms developed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). This capability will be demonstrated in the discrete event control test-bed located at JHU/APL. This project will be modeled for the Leonardo constellation mission, but is intended to be adaptable to any constellation mission. To develop a common software architecture. the controllers will only model very high-level responses. For instance, after determining that a maneuver must be made. the MADECC system will output B (Delta)V (velocity change) value. Lower level systems must then decide which thrusters to fire and for how long to achieve that (Delta)V.

  5. Demonstration of autonomous air monitoring through robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Rancatore, R.

    1989-11-01

    The project included modifying an existing teleoperated robot to include autonomous navigation, large object avoidance, and air monitoring and demonstrating that prototype robot system in indoor and outdoor environments. The robot was also modified to carry a HNU PI-101 Photoionization Detector air monitoring device. A sonar range finder, which already was an integral part of the Surveyor, was repositioned to the front of the robot chassis to detect large obstacles in the path of the robot. In addition, the software of the onboard computer was also extensively modified to provide: navigation control, dynamic steering to smoothly follow the wire-course without hesitation, obstacle avoidance, autonomous shut down and remote reporting of toxic substance detection.

  6. Performance Simulation of Autonomous Solar Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yanping; Strikwerda, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of a new type of autonomous solar navigation system is analyzed in this paper. Such efficient autonomous navigation systems will reduce operation costs and alleviate the Deep Space Network workload in future space missions. The method is demonstrated by applying it to the STEREO mission. Orbit determination is simulated through the use of the mission-defined trajectory profile and solar angular data acquired by the on-board science instruments currently being considered. The study shows that the orbit solution derived by this new type of solar navigation system can satisfy the mission's navigation requirements; the position uncertainties obtained in the simulations are well below the mission allowable values, and are comparable to the results obtained with the conventional Doppler tracking system in some cases.

  7. Autonomous RPRV Navigation, Guidance and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Donald E.; Myers, Thomas T.; Zellner, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Dryden Flight Research Center has the responsibility for flight testing of advanced remotely piloted research vehicles (RPRV) to explore highly maneuverable aircraft technology, and to test advanced structural concepts, and related aeronautical technologies which can yield important research results with significant cost benefits. The primary purpose is to provide the preliminary design of an upgraded automatic approach and landing control system and flight director display to improve landing performance and reduce pilot workload. A secondary purpose is to determine the feasibility of an onboard autonomous navigation, orbit, and landing capability for safe vehicle recovery in the event of loss of telemetry uplink communication with the vehicles. The current RPRV approach and landing method, the proposed automatic and manual approach and autoland system, and an autonomous navigation, orbit, and landing system concept which is based on existing operational technology are described.

  8. The autonomic nervous system and renal physiology

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, John A; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2013-01-01

    Research in resistant hypertension has again focused on autonomic nervous system denervation – 50 years after it had been stopped due to postural hypotension and availability of newer drugs. These (ganglionic blockers) drugs have all been similarly stopped, due to postural hypotension and yet newer antihypertensive agents. Recent demonstration of the feasibility of limited regional transcatheter sympathetic denervation has excited clinicians due to potential therapeutic implications. Standard use of ambulatory blood pressure recording equipment may alter our understanding of the diagnosis, potential treatment strategies, and health care outcomes – when faced with patients whose office blood pressure remains in the hypertensive range – while under treatment with three antihypertensive drugs at the highest tolerable doses, plus a diuretic. We review herein clinical relationships between autonomic function, resistant hypertension, current treatment strategies, and reflect upon the possibility of changes in our approach to resistant hypertension. PMID:24039445

  9. Autonomous Flight Safety System Road Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James C.; Zoemer, Roger D.; Forney, Chris S.

    2005-01-01

    On February 3, 2005, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) conducted the first Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) test on a moving vehicle -- a van driven around the KSC industrial area. A subset of the Phase III design was used consisting of a single computer, GPS receiver, and UPS antenna. The description and results of this road test are described in this report.AFSS is a joint KSC and Wallops Flight Facility project that is in its third phase of development. AFSS is an independent subsystem intended for use with Expendable Launch Vehicles that uses tracking data from redundant onboard sensors to autonomously make flight termination decisions using software-based rules implemented on redundant flight processors. The goals of this project are to increase capabilities by allowing launches from locations that do not have or cannot afford extensive ground-based range safety assets, to decrease range costs, and to decrease reaction time for special situations.

  10. Fuzzy logic in autonomous orbital operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Jani, Yashvant

    1991-01-01

    Fuzzy logic can be used advantageously in autonomous orbital operations that require the capability of handling imprecise measurements from sensors. Several applications are underway to investigate fuzzy logic approaches and develop guidance and control algorithms for autonomous orbital operations. Translational as well as rotational control of a spacecraft have been demonstrated using space shuttle simulations. An approach to a camera tracking system has been developed to support proximity operations and traffic management around the Space Station Freedom. Pattern recognition and object identification algorithms currently under development will become part of this camera system at an appropriate level in the future. A concept to control environment and life support systems for large Lunar based crew quarters is also under development. Investigations in the area of reinforcement learning, utilizing neural networks, combined with a fuzzy logic controller, are planned as a joint project with the Ames Research Center.

  11. Simulating autonomous agents wtih augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelenbe, Erol; Hussain, Khaled F.; Kaptan, Varol

    2002-07-01

    In many critical applications such as airport operations (for capacity planning), military simulations (for tactical training and planning), and medical simulations (for the planning of medical treatment and surgical operations), it is very useful to conduct simulations within physically accurate and visually realistic settings that are represented by real video imaging sequences. Furthermore, it is important that the simulated entities conduct autonomous actions which are realistic and which follow plans of action or intelligent behavior in reaction to current situations. We describe the research we have conducted to incorporate synthetic objects in a visually realistic manner in video sequences representing a real scene. We also discuss how the synthetic objects can be designed to conduct intelligent behavior within an augmented reality setting. The paper discusses both the computer vision aspects that we have addressed and solved, and the issues related to the insertion of intelligent autonomous objects within an augmented reality simulation.

  12. Autonomous and Autonomic Systems: A Paradigm for Future Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walter F.; Hinchey, Michael G.; Rash, James L.; Rouff, Christopher A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA increasingly will rely on autonomous systems concepts, not only in the mission control centers on the ground, but also on spacecraft and on rovers and other assets on extraterrestrial bodies. Automomy enables not only reduced operations costs, But also adaptable goal-driven functionality of mission systems. Space missions lacking autonomy will be unable to achieve the full range of advanced mission objectives, given that human control under dynamic environmental conditions will not be feasible due, in part, to the unavoidably high signal propagation latency and constrained data rates of mission communications links. While autonomy cost-effectively supports accomplishment of mission goals, autonomicity supports survivability of remote mission assets, especially when human tending is not feasible. Autonomic system properties (which ensure self-configuring, self-optimizing self-healing, and self-protecting behavior) conceptually may enable space missions of a higher order into any previously flown. Analysis of two NASA agent-based systems previously prototyped, and of a proposed future mission involving numerous cooperating spacecraft, illustrates how autonomous and autonomic system concepts may be brought to bear on future space missions.

  13. Flocking algorithm for autonomous flying robots.

    PubMed

    Virágh, Csaba; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Tarcai, Norbert; Szörényi, Tamás; Somorjai, Gerg?; Nepusz, Tamás; Vicsek, Tamás

    2014-06-01

    Animal swarms displaying a variety of typical flocking patterns would not exist without the underlying safe, optimal and stable dynamics of the individuals. The emergence of these universal patterns can be efficiently reconstructed with agent-based models. If we want to reproduce these patterns with artificial systems, such as autonomous aerial robots, agent-based models can also be used in their control algorithms. However, finding the proper algorithms and thus understanding the essential characteristics of the emergent collective behaviour requires thorough and realistic modeling of the robot and also the environment. In this paper, we first present an abstract mathematical model of an autonomous flying robot. The model takes into account several realistic features, such as time delay and locality of communication, inaccuracy of the on-board sensors and inertial effects. We present two decentralized control algorithms. One is based on a simple self-propelled flocking model of animal collective motion, the other is a collective target tracking algorithm. Both algorithms contain a viscous friction-like term, which aligns the velocities of neighbouring agents parallel to each other. We show that this term can be essential for reducing the inherent instabilities of such a noisy and delayed realistic system. We discuss simulation results on the stability of the control algorithms, and perform real experiments to show the applicability of the algorithms on a group of autonomous quadcopters. In our case, bio-inspiration works in two ways. On the one hand, the whole idea of trying to build and control a swarm of robots comes from the observation that birds tend to flock to optimize their behaviour as a group. On the other hand, by using a realistic simulation framework and studying the group behaviour of autonomous robots we can learn about the major factors influencing the flight of bird flocks. PMID:24852272

  14. Abnormal autonomic cardiovascular control in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Toussirot, E.; Bahjaoui-Bouhaddi, M.; Poncet, J.; Cappelle, S.; Henriet, M.; Wendling, D.; Regnard, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—This study was aimed at assessing the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to adjustments of cardiovascular function in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).?METHODS—In 18 AS patients (mean age: 34.9; mean disease duration: 6.4 years) and 13 healthy controls (mean age: 31.7) the changes of heart rate (HR) with deep breathing (E/I ratio) and standing up (30/15 ratio) were recorded. The slope of cardiac baroreflex, the times series of blood pressure and HR values upon lying and standing, and venous plasma concentrations of catecholamines were also analysed. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), plasma C reactive protein (CRP) concentration and a clinical index (BASDAI score) were used to assess the degree of disease activity in patients.?RESULTS—In the standing patients, blood pressure was found to decrease progressively (p< 0.001). Furthermore, the patients with a BASDAI score > 5 had a higher heart rate than patients with a BASDAI score < 5 (p<0.02), and there was a trend for a similar difference when patients were classified according to their ESR and CRP. Plasma catecholamine concentrations and the E/I ratio were not different in patients from controls. The 30/15 ratio and the slope of the spontaneous baroreflex during standing were both lower in AS patients than controls (p< 0.01).?CONCLUSIONS—This study demonstrated a change in autonomic nervous system function of AS patients, with a decreased parasympathetic activity, as evidenced by higher HR and lower baroreflex slope. As these significant deviances were mainly observed in patients with more active (or more inflammatory) disease, the autonomic nervous system involvement could be related to the inflammatory process. This autonomic strain may be related to the cardiac involvement in AS patients.?? PMID:10419866

  15. MARVIN siegt im Millennial Event: Autonome Flugroboter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musial, Marek; Brandenburg, Uwe Wolfgang; Hommel, Günter

    2002-01-01

    Der fliegende Roboter MARVIN ist ein mit Bordrechner und Sensoren aufgerüsteter Modellhelikopter, der in Funkverbindung mit einer bodengestützten Rechneranlage autonom operiert. Er wurde zwischen 1997 und 2000 in Projekt-Lehr-veranstaltungen an der TU Berlin gebaut. MARVIN schlug in einem internationalen Wettbewerb für fliegende Roboter die nordamerikanische Konkurrenz. Die für MARVIN neu entworfene Technik könnte für zahlreiche Aufgaben kommerziell eingesetzt werden. Doch die Entwicklung zur industriellen Serienreife scheiterte bislang an wirtschaftlichen und gesetzlichen Hemmnissen.

  16. Autonomous Spacecraft Communication Interface for Load Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; May, Ryan D.; Morris, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based controllers can remain in continuous communication with spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) with near-instantaneous communication speeds. This permits near real-time control of all of the core spacecraft systems by ground personnel. However, as NASA missions move beyond LEO, light-time communication delay issues, such as time lag and low bandwidth, will prohibit this type of operation. As missions become more distant, autonomous control of manned spacecraft will be required. The focus of this paper is the power subsystem. For present missions, controllers on the ground develop a complete schedule of power usage for all spacecraft components. This paper presents work currently underway at NASA to develop an architecture for an autonomous spacecraft, and focuses on the development of communication between the Mission Manager and the Autonomous Power Controller. These two systems must work together in order to plan future load use and respond to unanticipated plan deviations. Using a nominal spacecraft architecture and prototype versions of these two key components, a number of simulations are run under a variety of operational conditions, enabling development of content and format of the messages necessary to achieve the desired goals. The goals include negotiation of a load schedule that meets the global requirements (contained in the Mission Manager) and local power system requirements (contained in the Autonomous Power Controller), and communication of off-plan disturbances that arise while executing a negotiated plan. The message content is developed in two steps: first, a set of rapid-prototyping "paper" simulations are preformed; then the resultant optimized messages are codified for computer communication for use in automated testing.

  17. Precise laser gyroscope for autonomous inertial navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A G; Molchanov, A V; Izmailov, E A; Chirkin, M V

    2015-01-31

    Requirements to gyroscopes of strapdown inertial navigation systems for aircraft application are formulated. The construction of a ring helium – neon laser designed for autonomous navigation is described. The processes that determine the laser service life and the relation between the random error of the angular velocity measurement and the surface relief features of the cavity mirrors are analysed. The results of modelling one of the promising approaches to processing the laser gyroscope signals are presented. (laser gyroscopes)

  18. Precise laser gyroscope for autonomous inertial navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. G.; Molchanov, A. V.; Chirkin, M. V.; Izmailov, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Requirements to gyroscopes of strapdown inertial navigation systems for aircraft application are formulated. The construction of a ring helium - neon laser designed for autonomous navigation is described. The processes that determine the laser service life and the relation between the random error of the angular velocity measurement and the surface relief features of the cavity mirrors are analysed. The results of modelling one of the promising approaches to processing the laser gyroscope signals are presented.

  19. System for autonomous monitoring of bioagents

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, Richard G.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Colston, Jr, Billy W.; Brown, Steve B.; Masquelier, Don A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Venkateswaran, Kodomudi

    2015-06-09

    An autonomous monitoring system for monitoring for bioagents. A collector gathers the air, water, soil, or substance being monitored. A sample preparation means for preparing a sample is operatively connected to the collector. A detector for detecting the bioagents in the sample is operatively connected to the sample preparation means. One embodiment of the present invention includes confirmation means for confirming the bioagents in the sample.

  20. ALHAT: Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Edward A.; Carson, John M., III

    2015-01-01

    The ALHAT project was chartered by NASA HQ in 2006 to develop and mature to TRL 6 an autonomous lunar landing GN&C and sensing system for crewed, cargo, and robotic planetary landing vehicles. The multi-center ALHAT team was tasked with providing a system capable of identifying and avoiding surface hazards in real time to enable safe precision landing to within tens of meters of a designated planetary landing site under any lighting conditions.

  1. Autonomic correlates of physical and moral disgust.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Cristina; Mancini, Francesco; Petrocchi, Nicola; Medea, Barbara; Couyoumdjian, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    Given that the hypothesis of a common origin of physical and moral disgust has received sparse empirical support, this study aimed to shed light on the subjective and autonomic signatures of these two facets of the same emotional response. Participants (20 men, 20 women) were randomly assigned to physical or moral disgust induction by the use of audio scripts while their electrocardiogram was continuously recorded. Affect ratings were obtained before and after the induction. Time and frequency domain heart rate variability (HRV) measures were obtained. After controlling for disgust sensitivity (DS-R) and obsessive-compulsive (OCI-R) tendencies, both scripts elicited disgust but whereas the physical script elicited a feeling of dirtiness, the moral script evoked more indignation and contempt. The disgust-induced subjective responses were associated with opposite patterns of autonomic reactivity: enhanced activity of the parasympathetic nervous system without concurrent changes in heart rate (HR) for physical disgust and decreased vagal tone and increased HR and autonomic imbalance for moral disgust. Results suggest that immorality relies on the same biological root of physical disgust only in subjects with obsessive compulsive tendencies. Disgust appears to be a heterogeneous response that varies based on the individuals' contamination-based appraisal. PMID:23684734

  2. Autonomous system for cross-country navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stentz, Anthony; Brumitt, Barry L.; Coulter, R. C.; Kelly, Alonzo

    1993-05-01

    Autonomous cross-country navigation is essential for outdoor robots moving about in unstructured environments. Most existing systems use range sensors to determine the shape of the terrain, plan a trajectory that avoids obstacles, and then drive the trajectory. Performance has been limited by the range and accuracy of sensors, insufficient vehicle-terrain interaction models, and the availability of high-speed computers. As these elements improve, higher- speed navigation on rougher terrain becomes possible. We have developed a software system for autonomous navigation that provides for greater capability. The perception system supports a large braking distance by fusing multiple range images to build a map of the terrain in front of the vehicle. The system identifies range shadows and interpolates undersamples regions to account for rough terrain effects. The motion planner reduces computational complexity by investigating a minimum number of trajectories. Speeds along the trajectory are set to provide for dynamic stability. The entire system was tested in simulation, and a subset of the capability was demonstrated on a real vehicle. Results to date include a continuous 5.1 kilometer run across moderate terrain with obstacles. This paper begins with the applications, prior work, limitations, and current paradigms for autonomous cross-country navigation, and then describes our contribution to the area.

  3. Autonomous environment modeling by a mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutarlier, Philippe

    1991-02-01

    Internal geometric representation of the environment is considered. The autonomy of a mobile robot partly relies on its ability to build a reliable representation of its environment. On the other hand, an autonomous environment building process requires that model be adapted to plan motions and perception actions. Therefore, the modeling process must be a reversible interface between perception motion devices and the model itself. Several kinds of models are necessary in order to achieve an autonomous process. Sensors give stochastic information on the surface, navigation needs free-space representation, and perception planning requires aspect graphs. The functions of stochastic surface modeling, free space representation, and topological graph computing are presented through the integrated geometric model builder called 'Yaka.' Since all environment data uncertainties are correlated together through the robot location inaccuracy, classical filtering methods are inadequate. A method of computing a linear variance estimator, that is adapted to the problem, is proposed. This general formalism is validated by a large number of experimentation wherein the robot incrementally builds a surfacic representation of its environment. Free space cannot be deduced directly, at each step, from the surfacic data provided by the sensors. Innacuracies on object surfaces and uncertainties on the visibility of objects by the sensor as well as the possible motion of objects must all be taken into account for building the free space incrementally. Then, motion and perception planning for autonomous environment modeling are achieved using this free space model and topological location and aspect graphs.

  4. Multi-mission, autonomous, synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Thomas J.; Wilson, Michael L.; Madsen, David; Jensen, Mark; Sullivan, Stephanie; Addario, Michael; Hally, Iain

    2014-05-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UASs) have become a critical asset in current battlespaces and continue to play an increasing role for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions. With the development of medium-to-low altitude, rapidly deployable aircraft platforms, the ISR community has seen an increasing push to develop ISR sensors and systems with real-time mission support capabilities. This paper describes recent flight demonstrations and test results of the RASAR (Real-time, Autonomous, Synthetic Aperture Radar) sensor system. RASAR is a modular, multi-band (L and X) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging sensor designed for self-contained, autonomous, real-time operation with mission flexibility to support a wide range of ISR needs within the size, weight and power constraints of Group III UASs. The sensor command and control and real-time image formation processing are designed to allow integration of RASAR into a larger, multi-intelligence system of systems. The multi-intelligence architecture and a demonstration of real-time autonomous cross-cueing of a separate optical sensor will be presented.

  5. New solutions for autonomous control and navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkoumian, Baghrat V.

    2005-10-01

    The most precise navigation systems are commonly based on at least 3 laser gyros and 3 mechanical accelerometers, based on moving or tensioned elements. Laser gyro's "dead zone" guides to existence of additive subsystems, and mechanical accelerometer accumulate the "error of zero" and does not measure during the free fall of an object. Here is found that dead zone on laser gyro characteristics is a result of the precession of momentum of pulse of ring baghron. The necessity of precise laser gyro tuning in Alert city, Canada, is discussed. The method to minimize the precession and to avoid the dead zone on the output characteristics is proposed. Therewith new solutions for autonomous control and navigation are discussed. Here is proposed the autonomous unit of sensors of irregular movement without moving parts and without ring laser resonators, disposed motionless on the object to be measured, based on unique unified 6 mini modules of the autonomous resonatory devices (ARD's). Another new solution could be computer 3D-mouse without pad and with 3 independent outputs for each axis of irregular movement, or the gear of control, which could be arranged in the marker or pen. ARD theory, the experiments and testing are discussed.

  6. Autonomic cardiac control in depressed adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Michelle L.; Sheeber, Lisa; Simmons, Julian G.; Davis, Betsy; Shortt, Joann Wu; Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify the aspects of cardiac physiology associated with depressive disorder early in life by examining measures of autonomic cardiac control in a community-based sample of depressed adolescents at an early phase of illness, and matched on a number of demographic factors with a non-depressed comparison group. Methods Participants were 127 adolescents (44 boys), ages 14–18, who formed two demographically matched groups of clinically depressed and non-depressed participants. Adolescents were excluded if they evidenced comorbid externalizing or substance-dependence disorders, were taking medications with known cardiac effects, or reported regular nicotine use. Resting measures of heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, skin conductance level, blood pressure, and pre-ejection period were collected. Results Depressed adolescents had resting heart rates significantly higher than those of healthy adolescents. No other measure of autonomic functioning differentiated the groups. Post-hoc analyses were conducted to examine the influence of illness chronicity, severity, comorbidity and sex on cardiac psychophysiology. These variables did not appear to exert a significant influence on the findings. Conclusions Our findings suggest that neither autonomic cardiac control, illness chronicity or severity, nor medication effects fully explain resting heart rate differences between depressed and non-depressed adolescents. Future research on depression and heart rate should consider mechanisms other than sympathetic or parasympathetic control as potential explanations of heart rate differences, including blood-clotting mechanisms, vascular and endothelial dysfunction of the coronary arteries, and inflammatory immune system response. PMID:20577986

  7. Autonomous navigation for structured exterior environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pletta, J B

    1993-12-01

    The Telemanaged Mobile Security Station (TMSS) was developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the role of mobile robotics in exterior perimeter security systems. A major feature of the system is its capability to perform autonomous patrols of the security site`s network of roads. Perimeter security sites are well known, structured environments; the locations of the roads, buildings, and fences are relatively static. A security robot has the advantage of being able to learn its new environment prior to autonomous travel. The TMSS robot combines information from a microwave beacon system and on-board dead reckoning sensors to determine its location within the site. The operator is required to teleoperate the robot in a teach mode over all desired paths before autonomous operations can commence. During this teach phase, TMSS stores points from its position location system at two meter intervals. This map data base is used for planning paths and for reference during path following. Details of the position location and path following systems will be described along with system performance and recommendations for future enhancements.

  8. SOLON: An autonomous vehicle mission planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudziak, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The State-Operator Logic Machine (SOLON) Planner provides an architecture for effective real-time planning and replanning for an autonomous vehicle. The highlights of the system, which distinguish it from other AI-based planners that have been designed previously, are its hybrid application of state-driven control architecture and the use of both schematic representations and logic programming for the management of its knowledge base. SOLON is designed to provide multiple levels of planning for a single autonomous vehicle which is supplied with a skeletal, partially-specified mission plan at the outset of the vehicle's operations. This mission plan consists of a set of objectives, each of which will be decomposable by the planner into tasks. These tasks are themselves comparatively complex sets of actions which are executable by a conventional real-time control system which does not perform planning but which is capable of making adjustments or modifications to the provided tasks according to constraints and tolerances provided by the Planner. The current implementation of the SOLON is in the form of a real-time simulation of the Planner module of an Intelligent Vehicle Controller (IVC) on-board an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). The simulation is embedded within a larger simulator environment known as ICDS (Intelligent Controller Development System) operating on a Symbolics 3645/75 computer.

  9. Experiences with a Requirements-Based Programming Approach to the Development of a NASA Autonomous Ground Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G.; Rash, James L.; Rouff, Christopher A.; Gracanin, Denis; Erickson, John

    2005-01-01

    Requirements-to-Design-to-Code (R2D2C) is an approach to the engineering of computer-based systems that embodies the idea of requirements-based programming in system development. It goes further; however, in that the approach offers not only an underlying formalism, but full formal development from requirements capture through to the automatic generation of provably-correct code. As such, the approach has direct application to the development of systems requiring autonomic properties. We describe a prototype tool to support the method, and illustrate its applicability to the development of LOGOS, a NASA autonomous ground control system, which exhibits autonomic behavior. Finally, we briefly discuss other areas where the approach and prototype tool are being considered for application.

  10. Autonomous In-Situ Resources Prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dissly, R. W.; Buehler, M. G.; Schaap, M. G.; Nicks, D.; Taylor, G. J.; Castano, R.; Suarez, D.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will describe the concept of an autonomous, intelligent, rover-based rapid surveying system to identify and map several key lunar resources to optimize their ISRU (In Situ Resource Utilization) extraction potential. Prior to an extraction phase for any target resource, ground-based surveys are needed to provide confirmation of remote observation, to quantify and map their 3-D distribution, and to locate optimal extraction sites (e.g. ore bodies) with precision to maximize their economic benefit. The system will search for and quantify optimal minerals for oxygen production feedstock, water ice, and high glass-content regolith that can be used for building materials. These are targeted because of their utility and because they are, or are likely to be, variable in quantity over spatial scales accessible to a rover (i.e., few km). Oxygen has benefits for life support systems and as an oxidizer for propellants. Water is a key resource for sustainable exploration, with utility for life support, propellants, and other industrial processes. High glass-content regolith has utility as a feedstock for building materials as it readily sinters upon heating into a cohesive matrix more readily than other regolith materials or crystalline basalts. Lunar glasses are also a potential feedstock for oxygen production, as many are rich in iron and titanium oxides that are optimal for oxygen extraction. To accomplish this task, a system of sensors and decision-making algorithms for an autonomous prospecting rover is described. One set of sensors will be located in the wheel tread of the robotic search vehicle providing contact sensor data on regolith composition. Another set of instruments will be housed on the platform of the rover, including VIS-NIR imagers and spectrometers, both for far-field context and near-field characterization of the regolith in the immediate vicinity of the rover. Also included in the sensor suite are a neutron spectrometer, ground-penetrating radar, and an instrumented cone penetrometer for subsurface assessment. Output from these sensors will be evaluated autonomously in real-time by decision-making software to evaluate if any of the targeted resources has been detected, and if so, to quantify their abundance. Algorithms for optimizing the mapping strategy based on target resource abundance and distribution are also included in the autonomous software. This approach emphasizes on-the-fly survey measurements to enable efficient and rapid prospecting of large areas, which will improve the economics of ISRU system approaches. The mature technology will enable autonomous rovers to create in-situ resource maps of lunar or other planetary surfaces, which will facilitate human and robotic exploration.

  11. Autonomous Image Analysis for Future Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Morris, R. L.; Ruzon, M. A.; Bandari, E.; Roush, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    To explore high priority landing sites and to prepare for eventual human exploration, future Mars missions will involve rovers capable of traversing tens of kilometers. However, the current process by which scientists interact with a rover does not scale to such distances. Specifically, numerous command cycles are required to complete even simple tasks, such as, pointing the spectrometer at a variety of nearby rocks. In addition, the time required by scientists to interpret image data before new commands can be given and the limited amount of data that can be downlinked during a given command cycle constrain rover mobility and achievement of science goals. Experience with rover tests on Earth supports these concerns. As a result, traverses to science sites as identified in orbital images would require numerous science command cycles over a period of many weeks, months or even years, perhaps exceeding rover design life and other constraints. Autonomous onboard science analysis can address these problems in two ways. First, it will allow the rover to preferentially transmit "interesting" images, defined as those likely to have higher science content. Second, the rover will be able to anticipate future commands. For example, a rover might autonomously acquire and return spectra of "interesting" rocks along with a high-resolution image of those rocks in addition to returning the context images in which they were detected. Such approaches, coupled with appropriate navigational software, help to address both the data volume and command cycle bottlenecks that limit both rover mobility and science yield. We are developing fast, autonomous algorithms to enable such intelligent on-board decision making by spacecraft. Autonomous algorithms developed to date have the ability to identify rocks and layers in a scene, locate the horizon, and compress multi-spectral image data. We are currently investigating the possibility of reconstructing a 3D surface from a sequence of images acquired by a robotic arm camera. This would then allow the return of a single completely in focus image constructed only from those portions of individual images that lie within the camera's depth of field. Output from these algorithms could be used to autonomously obtain rock spectra, determine which images should be transmitted to the ground, or to aid in image compression. We will discuss these algorithms and their performance during a recent rover field test.

  12. The nature of the autonomic dysfunction in multiple system atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Samir M.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    The concept that multiple system atrophy (MSA, Shy-Drager syndrome) is a disorder of the autonomic nervous system is several decades old. While there has been renewed interest in the movement disorder associated with MSA, two recent consensus statements confirm the centrality of the autonomic disorder to the diagnosis. Here, we reexamine the autonomic pathophysiology in MSA. Whereas MSA is often thought of as "autonomic failure", new evidence indicates substantial persistence of functioning sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves even in clinically advanced disease. These findings help explain some of the previously poorly understood features of MSA. Recognition that MSA entails persistent, constitutive autonomic tone requires a significant revision of our concepts of its diagnosis and therapy. We will review recent evidence bearing on autonomic tone in MSA and discuss their therapeutic implications, particularly in terms of the possible development of a bionic baroreflex for better control of blood pressure.

  13. Autonomic imbalance: prophet of doom or scope for hope?

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, A I; Maser, R E; Ziegler, D

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that cardiac autonomic neuropathy increases morbidity and mortality in diabetes and may have greater predictive power than traditional risk factors for cardiovascular events. Significant morbidity and mortality can now be attributable to autonomic imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system regulation of cardiovascular function. New and emerging syndromes include orthostatic tachycardia, orthostatic bradycardia and an inability to use heart rate as a guide to exercise intensity because of the resting tachycardia. Recent studies have shown that autonomic imbalance may be a predictor of risk of sudden death with intensification of glycaemic control. This review examines an association of autonomic dysregulation and the role of inflammatory cytokines and adipocytokines that promote cardiovascular risk. In addition, conditions of autonomic imbalance associated with cardiovascular risk are discussed. Potential treatment for restoration of autonomic balance is outlined. PMID:21569084

  14. Metatranscriptomic analysis of autonomously collected and preserved marine bacterioplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Ottesen. E.; Marin III, R.; Preston, C.; Young, C. R.; Ryan, J. P.; Scholin C. A.; DeLong, E. F.

    2011-06-30

    Planktonic microbial activity and community structure is dynamic, and can change dramatically on time scales of hours to days. Yet for logistical reasons, this temporal scale is typically undersampled in the marine environment. In order to facilitate higher-resolution, long-term observation of microbial diversity and activity, we developed a protocol for automated collection and fixation of marine microbes using the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) platform. The protocol applies a preservative (RNALater) to cells collected on filters, for long-term storage and preservation of total cellular RNA. Microbial samples preserved using this protocol yielded high-quality RNA after 30 days of storage at room temperature, or onboard the ESP at in situ temperatures. Pyrosequencing of complementary DNA libraries generated from ESP-collected and preserved samples yielded transcript abundance profiles nearly indistinguishable from those derived from conventionally treated replicate samples. To demonstrate the utility of the method, we used a moored ESP to remotely and autonomously collect Monterey Bay seawater for metatranscriptomic analysis. Community RNA was extracted and pyrosequenced from samples collected at four time points over the course of a single day. In all four samples, the oxygenic photoautotrophs were predominantly eukaryotic, while the bacterial community was dominated by Polaribacter-like Flavobacteria and a Rhodobacterales bacterium sharing high similarity with Rhodobacterales sp. HTCC2255. However, each time point was associated with distinct species abundance and gene transcript profiles. These laboratory and field tests confirmed that autonomous collection and preservation is a feasible and useful approach for characterizing the expressed genes and environmental responses of marine microbial communities.

  15. Towards Autonomous Agriculture: Automatic Ground Detection Using Trinocular Stereovision

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Giulio; Milella, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous driving is a challenging problem, particularly when the domain is unstructured, as in an outdoor agricultural setting. Thus, advanced perception systems are primarily required to sense and understand the surrounding environment recognizing artificial and natural structures, topology, vegetation and paths. In this paper, a self-learning framework is proposed to automatically train a ground classifier for scene interpretation and autonomous navigation based on multi-baseline stereovision. The use of rich 3D data is emphasized where the sensor output includes range and color information of the surrounding environment. Two distinct classifiers are presented, one based on geometric data that can detect the broad class of ground and one based on color data that can further segment ground into subclasses. The geometry-based classifier features two main stages: an adaptive training stage and a classification stage. During the training stage, the system automatically learns to associate geometric appearance of 3D stereo-generated data with class labels. Then, it makes predictions based on past observations. It serves as well to provide training labels to the color-based classifier. Once trained, the color-based classifier is able to recognize similar terrain classes in stereo imagery. The system is continuously updated online using the latest stereo readings, thus making it feasible for long range and long duration navigation, over changing environments. Experimental results, obtained with a tractor test platform operating in a rural environment, are presented to validate this approach, showing an average classification precision and recall of 91.0% and 77.3%, respectively.

  16. In vivo cell-autonomous transcriptional abnormalities revealed in mice expressing mutant huntingtin in striatal but not cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth A; Coppola, Giovanni; Tang, Bin; Kuhn, Alexandre; Kim, SoongHo; Geschwind, Daniel H; Brown, Timothy B; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2011-03-15

    Huntington's disease (HD), caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene, is characterized by abnormal protein aggregates and motor and cognitive dysfunction. Htt protein is ubiquitously expressed, but the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) is most susceptible to dysfunction and death. Abnormal gene expression represents a core pathogenic feature of HD, but the relative roles of cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous effects on transcription remain unclear. To determine the extent of cell-autonomous dysregulation in the striatum in vivo, we examined genome-wide RNA expression in symptomatic D9-N171-98Q (a.k.a. DE5) transgenic mice in which the forebrain expression of the first 171 amino acids of human Htt with a 98Q repeat expansion is limited to MSNs. Microarray data generated from these mice were compared with those generated on the identical array platform from a pan-neuronal HD mouse model, R6/2, carrying two different CAG repeat lengths, and a relatively high degree of overlap of changes in gene expression was revealed. We further focused on known canonical pathways associated with excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, dopamine signaling and trophic support. While genes related to excitotoxicity, dopamine signaling and trophic support were altered in both DE5 and R6/2 mice, which may be either cell autonomous or non-cell autonomous, genes related to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor are primarily affected in DE5 transgenic mice, indicating cell-autonomous mechanisms. Overall, HD-induced dysregulation of the striatal transcriptome can be largely attributed to intrinsic effects of mutant Htt, in the absence of expression in cortical neurons. PMID:21177255

  17. Adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy without early autonomic dysfunctions linked to lamin B1 duplication: a phenotypic variant.

    PubMed

    Potic, Ana; Pavlovic, Aleksandra M; Uziel, Graziella; Kozic, Dusko; Ostojic, Jelena; Rovelli, Attilio; Sternic, Nadezda; Bjelan, Mladen; Sarto, Elisa; Di Bella, Daniela; Taroni, Franco

    2013-08-01

    The early presentation of autonomic dysfunctions at the disease onset has been considered the mandatory clinical feature in adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, which is a rarely recognised leukodystrophy caused by duplication of the lamin B1 gene. We report the first family with adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy and lamin B1 duplication, without the distinguishing early-appearing autonomic dysfunctions. Subjects from three consecutive generations of a multi-generational Serbian family affected by adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy underwent clinical, biochemical, neurophysiological, neuroradiological, and genetic studies. The patients atypically exhibited late autonomic dysfunctions commencing at the disease end-stages in some. Genetic findings of lamin B1 duplication verified adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, which was supported also by neuroimaging studies. Exclusively, proton magnetic spectroscopy of the brain revealed a possibility of neuro-axonal damage in the white matter lesions, while magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord excluded spinal myelin affection as a required finding in this leukodystrophy. The detection of lamin B1 duplication, even when autonomic dysfunctions do not precede the other symptoms of the disease, proves for the first time that lamin B1-duplicated adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy may have a phenotypic variant with delayed autonomic dysfunctions. Prior to this report, such a phenotype had been speculated to represent an entity different from lamin B1-duplicated leukodystrophy. Hereby we confirm the underlying role of lamin B1 duplication, regardless of the autonomic malfunction onset in this disorder. It is the only report on adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy from Southeastern Europe. PMID:23681646

  18. Cell Autonomous and Non-Autonomous Effects of Senescent Cells in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre Yves; Campisi, Judith; Velarde, Michael C

    2015-07-01

    Human and mouse skin accumulate senescent cells in both the epidermis and dermis during aging. When chronically present, senescent cells are thought to enhance the age-dependent deterioration of the skin during extrinsic and intrinsic aging. However, when transiently present, senescent cells promote optimal wound healing. Here, we review recent studies on how senescent cells and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype contribute to different physiological and pathophysiological conditions in the skin with a focus on some of the cell autonomous and non-autonomous functions of senescent cells in the context of skin aging and wound healing. PMID:25855157

  19. Novel Microbial Diversity Retrieved by Autonomous Robotic Exploration of the World's Deepest Vertical Phreatic Sinkhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahl, Jason W.; Fairfield, Nathaniel; Harris, J. Kirk; Wettergreen, David; Stone, William C.; Spear, John R.

    2010-03-01

    The deep phreatic thermal explorer (DEPTHX) is an autonomous underwater vehicle designed to navigate an unexplored environment, generate high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) maps, collect biological samples based on an autonomous sampling decision, and return to its origin. In the spring of 2007, DEPTHX was deployed in Zacatón, a deep (˜318 m), limestone, phreatic sinkhole (cenote) in northeastern Mexico. As DEPTHX descended, it generated a 3-D map based on the processing of range data from 54 onboard sonars. The vehicle collected water column samples and wall biomat samples throughout the depth profile of the cenote. Post-expedition sample analysis via comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a wealth of microbial diversity. Traditional Sanger gene sequencing combined with a barcoded-amplicon pyrosequencing approach revealed novel, phylum-level lineages from the domains Bacteria and Archaea; in addition, several novel subphylum lineages were also identified. Overall, DEPTHX successfully navigated and mapped Zacatón, and collected biological samples based on an autonomous decision, which revealed novel microbial diversity in a previously unexplored environment.

  20. Novel microbial diversity retrieved by autonomous robotic exploration of the world's deepest vertical phreatic sinkhole.

    PubMed

    Sahl, Jason W; Fairfield, Nathaniel; Harris, J Kirk; Wettergreen, David; Stone, William C; Spear, John R

    2010-03-01

    The deep phreatic thermal explorer (DEPTHX) is an autonomous underwater vehicle designed to navigate an unexplored environment, generate high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) maps, collect biological samples based on an autonomous sampling decision, and return to its origin. In the spring of 2007, DEPTHX was deployed in Zacatón, a deep (approximately 318 m), limestone, phreatic sinkhole (cenote) in northeastern Mexico. As DEPTHX descended, it generated a 3-D map based on the processing of range data from 54 onboard sonars. The vehicle collected water column samples and wall biomat samples throughout the depth profile of the cenote. Post-expedition sample analysis via comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a wealth of microbial diversity. Traditional Sanger gene sequencing combined with a barcoded-amplicon pyrosequencing approach revealed novel, phylum-level lineages from the domains Bacteria and Archaea; in addition, several novel subphylum lineages were also identified. Overall, DEPTHX successfully navigated and mapped Zacatón, and collected biological samples based on an autonomous decision, which revealed novel microbial diversity in a previously unexplored environment. PMID:20298146

  1. Sensor coverage with a heterogeneous fleet of autonomous surface vessels

    E-print Network

    Jenkin, Michael R. M.

    . Jenkin York Centre for Field Robotics and Lassonde School of Engineering York University, Toronto Network in Field Robotics is gratefully acknowledged. deploy a collection of autonomous devices rather

  2. A viable multivariable adaptive controller with application to autonomous helicopters

    E-print Network

    Krupadanam, Ashish Samuel, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    Autonomous helicopters carry out missions in inaccessible hazardous environments. Their performance capability in speed, maneuverability and trajectory tracking must be comparable, if not superior, to manned vehicles. ...

  3. Cooperative Searching and Geomagnetic Surveying Using Teams of Autonomous Agents

    E-print Network

    and autonomous strategic decisions are made based on the predicted future state of the world. Agents formulate.6 Communication Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 3.7 Implementation

  4. The Relationship between Vascular Function and the Autonomic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and autonomic nervous system dysfunction are both risk factors for atherosclerosis. There is evidence demonstrating that there is a close interrelationship between these two systems. In hypertension, endothelial dysfunction affects the pathologic process through autonomic nervous pathways, and the pathophysiological process of autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus is closely related with vascular function. However, detailed mechanisms of this interrelationship have not been clearly explained. In this review, we summarize findings concerning the interrelationship between vascular function and the autonomic nervous system from both experimental and clinical studies. The clarification of this interrelationship may provide more comprehensive risk stratification and a new effective therapeutic strategy against atherosclerosis. PMID:24995054

  5. Cell-Autonomous Requirement for Rx Function in the Mammalian Retina and Posterior Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Martinez, Olga; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Liu, Chaomei; Mendoza, Marisela; Shah, Rina; Zhang, Li; Behringer, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    Rx is a paired-like homeobox gene that is required for vertebrate eye formation. Mice lacking Rx function do not develop eyes or the posterior pituitary. To determine whether Rx is required cell autonomously in these tissues, we generated embryonic chimeras consisting of wild type and Rx?/? cells. We found that in the eye, Rx-deficient cells cannot participate in the formation of the neuroretina, retina pigment epithelium and the distal part of the optic stalk. In addition, in the ventral forebrain, Rx function is required cell autonomously for the formation of the posterior pituitary. Interestingly, Rx?/? and wild type cells segregate before the morphogenesis of these two tissues begins. Our observations suggest that Rx function is not only required for the morphogenesis of the retina and posterior pituitary, but also prior to morphogenesis, for the sorting out of cells to form distinct fields of retinal/pituitary cells. PMID:19229337

  6. Multiblock copolymers exhibiting spatio-temporal structure with autonomous viscosity oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Michika; Ueki, Takeshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Ryo

    2015-10-01

    Here we report an ABA triblock copolymer that can express microscopic autonomous formation and break-up of aggregates under constant condition to generate macroscopic viscoelastic self-oscillation of the solution. The ABA triblock copolymer is designed to have hydrophilic B segment and self-oscillating A segment at the both sides by RAFT copolymerization. In the A segment, a metal catalyst of chemical oscillatory reaction, i.e., the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, is introduced as a chemomechanical transducer to change the aggregation state of the polymer depending on the redox states. Time-resolved DLS measurements of the ABA triblock copolymer confirm the presence of a transitional network structure of micelle aggregations in the reduced state and a unimer structure in the oxidized state. This autonomous oscillation of a well-designed triblock copolymer enables dynamic biomimetic softmaterials with spatio-temporal structure.

  7. Multiblock copolymers exhibiting spatio-temporal structure with autonomous viscosity oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Onoda, Michika; Ueki, Takeshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Here we report an ABA triblock copolymer that can express microscopic autonomous formation and break-up of aggregates under constant condition to generate macroscopic viscoelastic self-oscillation of the solution. The ABA triblock copolymer is designed to have hydrophilic B segment and self-oscillating A segment at the both sides by RAFT copolymerization. In the A segment, a metal catalyst of chemical oscillatory reaction, i.e., the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, is introduced as a chemomechanical transducer to change the aggregation state of the polymer depending on the redox states. Time-resolved DLS measurements of the ABA triblock copolymer confirm the presence of a transitional network structure of micelle aggregations in the reduced state and a unimer structure in the oxidized state. This autonomous oscillation of a well-designed triblock copolymer enables dynamic biomimetic softmaterials with spatio-temporal structure. PMID:26511660

  8. Autonomous adaptation and collaboration of unmanned vehicles for tracking submerged contacts

    E-print Network

    Privette, Andrew Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous operations are vital to future naval operations. Unmanned systems, including autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and autonomous surface vehicles (ASVs), are anticipated to play a key role for critical tasks ...

  9. Trajectory Design for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles based on Ocean Model Predictions for

    E-print Network

    Caron, David

    Trajectory Design for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles based on Ocean Model Predictions for Feature Abstract Trajectory design for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) is of great importance% of the aquatic environment. Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) play a major role in the collection

  10. Multiple Vehicle Coordination and Cooperative Estimation for Target Tracking with Applications to Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Systems

    E-print Network

    to Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Systems Benjamin Triplett A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment to Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Systems Benjamin Triplett Chair of the Supervisory Committee: Assistant. Coordinated target tracking, in which several pursuit autonomous pursuit vehicles follow and maintain state

  11. High performance and provably safe polling-systems-based control algorithms of all-autonomous intersections

    E-print Network

    Miculescu, David

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of autonomous vehicles spurred a careful investigation of the potential benefits of all-autonomous transportation networks. Most studies conclude that autonomous systems can enable drastic improvements ...

  12. Systems and methods for autonomously controlling agricultural machinery

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Svoboda, John M.; Hess, J. Richard

    2003-07-08

    Systems and methods for autonomously controlling agricultural machinery such as a grain combine. The operation components of a combine that function to harvest the grain have characteristics that are measured by sensors. For example, the combine speed, the fan speed, and the like can be measured. An important sensor is the grain loss sensor, which may be used to quantify the amount of grain expelled out of the combine. The grain loss sensor utilizes the fluorescence properties of the grain kernels and the plant residue to identify when the expelled plant material contains grain kernels. The sensor data, in combination with historical and current data stored in a database, is used to identify optimum operating conditions that will result in increased crop yield. After the optimum operating conditions are identified, an on-board computer can generate control signals that will adjust the operation of the components identified in the optimum operating conditions. The changes result in less grain loss and improved grain yield. Also, because new data is continually generated by the sensor, the system has the ability to continually learn such that the efficiency of the agricultural machinery is continually improved.

  13. Classifying and recovering from sensing failures in autonomous mobile robots

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.R.; Hershberger, D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a characterization of sensing failures in autonomous mobile robots, a methodology for classification and recovery, and a demonstration of this approach on a mobile robot performing landmark navigation. A sensing failure is any event leading to defective perception, including sensor malfunctions, software errors, environmental changes, and errant expectations. The approach demonstrated in this paper exploits the ability of the robot to interact with its environment to acquire additional information for classification (i.e., active perception). A Generate and Test strategy is used to generate hypotheses to explain the symptom resulting from the sensing failure. The recovery scheme replaces the affected sensing processes with an alternative logical sensor. The approach is implemented as the Sensor Fusion Effects Exception Handling (SFX-EH) architecture. The advantages of SFX-EH are that it requires only a partial causal model of sensing failure, the control scheme strives for a fast response, tests are constructed so as to prevent confounding from collaborating sensors which have also failed, and the logical sensor organization allows SFX-EH to be interfaced with the behavioral level of existing robot architectures.

  14. Autonomic Imbalance and Borderline States of Thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Laurence

    1939-01-01

    Primary thyrotoxicosis may be regarded as having two main components—thyroid overactivity or dysfunction, and instability of the autonomic nervous system. Clinical observation suggests that the proportion of each component varies in individual cases. Results of treatment show that the larger the thyroid element the greater is the benefit of thyroidectomy or X-ray therapy, and the fewer the subsequent residual signs. When nervous instability predominates less relief is obtained by surgery or X-rays, and symptoms may be little changed or even made worse by the addition of hypothyroidism. Cases in which nervous instability predominates, with minimal thyroid dysfunction, have been termed “autonomic imbalance”, “neurocirculatory asthenia”, or “Basedow's disease with no thyrotoxicosis”. Thirteen such cases are described, all of which were females, with average age of 32 years. 9 had enlarged thyroids, 11 complained of palpitations, and 8 of excessive sweating. The basal metabolic rate, estimated in 8 cases, did not exceed +10%. There was some loss of weight in 6 cases, but in none was the appetite increased. The average diurnal pulse-rate did not exceed 95 and sleeping pulse was significantly lower. X-rays of heart, taken in 6 cases, were normal. Psychological troubles in 6 cases. Three cases treated by X-ray therapy and I surgically with no benefit. Remaining 10 cases treated medically with improvement. The group is ill-defined and requires further investigation of cause and treatment. The recognition of autonomic imbalance is important in order to avoid useless thyroidectomy or X-ray therapy, and encourage more extended use of psychotherapy. Investigation of its cause may yield information of value in the ætiological problem of thyrotoxicosis. PMID:19992127

  15. A Diversified Investment Strategy Using Autonomous Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Rui Pedro; Belo, Orlando

    In a previously published article, we presented an architecture for implementing agents with the ability to trade autonomously in the Forex market. At the core of this architecture is an ensemble of classification and regression models that is used to predict the direction of the price of a currency pair. In this paper, we will describe a diversified investment strategy consisting of five agents which were implemented using that architecture. By simulating trades with 18 months of out-of-sample data, we will demonstrate that data mining models can produce profitable predictions, and that the trading risk can be diminished through investment diversification.

  16. Pipeline inspection using an autonomous underwater vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Egeskov, P.; Bech, M.; Bowley, R.; Aage, C.

    1995-12-31

    Pipeline inspection can be carried out by means of small Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), operating either with a control link to a surface vessel, or totally independently. The AUV offers an attractive alternative to conventional inspection methods where Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) or paravanes are used. A flatfish type AUV ``MARTIN`` (Marine Tool for Inspection) has been developed for this purpose. The paper describes the proposed types of inspection jobs to be carried out by ``MARTIN``. The design and construction of the vessel, its hydrodynamic properties, its propulsion and control systems are discussed. The pipeline tracking and survey systems, as well as the launch and recovery systems are described.

  17. Malicious Hubs: Detecting Abnormally Malicious Autonomous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalafut, Andrew J.; Shue, Craig A; Gupta, Prof. Minaxi

    2010-01-01

    While many attacks are distributed across botnets, investigators and network operators have recently targeted malicious networks through high profile autonomous system (AS) de-peerings and network shut-downs. In this paper, we explore whether some ASes indeed are safe havens for malicious activity. We look for ISPs and ASes that exhibit disproportionately high malicious behavior using 12 popular blacklists. We find that some ASes have over 80% of their routable IP address space blacklisted and others account for large fractions of blacklisted IPs. Overall, we conclude that examining malicious activity at the AS granularity can unearth networks with lax security or those that harbor cybercrime.

  18. Autonomous Observations in Antarctica with AMICA

    E-print Network

    Di Rico, Gianluca; Dolci, Mauro; Straniero, Oscar; Valentini, Angelo; Valentini, Gaetano; Di Cianno, Amico; Giuliani, Croce; Magrin, Demetrio; Bonoli, Carlotta; Bortoletto, Favio; D'Alessandro, Maurizio; Corcione, Leonardo; Riva, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The Antarctic Multiband Infrared Camera (AMICA) is a double channel camera operating in the 2-28 micron infrared domain (KLMNQ bands) that will allow to characterize and exploit the exceptional advantages for Astronomy, expected from Dome C in Antarctica. The development of the camera control system is at its final stage. After the investigation of appropriate solutions against the critical environment, a reliable instrumentation has been developed. It is currently being integrated and tested to ensure the correct execution of automatic operations. Once it will be mounted on the International Robotic Antarctic Infrared Telescope (IRAIT), AMICA and its equipment will contribute to the accomplishment of a fully autonomous observatory.

  19. Autonomous land navigation in a structured environment

    SciTech Connect

    Klarer, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection and avoidance have not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are free of obstacles. The system performs path planning and execution based on maps constructed using the vehicle's onboard navigation system and mapmaker. The system software, hardware, and performance data are discussed. 6 refs.

  20. A relativistic and autonomous navigation satellite system

    E-print Network

    Delva, Pacôme; Kosti?, Uros; Carloni, Sante

    2011-01-01

    A relativistic positioning system has been proposed by Bartolom\\'e Coll in 2002. Since then, several group developed this topic with different approaches. I will present a work done in collaboration with Ljubljana University and the ESA Advanced Concepts Team. We developed a concept, Autonomous Basis of Coordinates, in order to take advantage of the full autonomy of a satellite constellation for navigation and positioning, by means of satellite inter-links. I will present the advantages of this new paradigm and a number of potential application for reference systems, geophysics and relativistic gravitation.