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Sample records for autosomal dominant brachydactyly

  1. Clinical neurogenetics: autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Shakkottai, Vikram G; Fogel, Brent L

    2013-11-01

    The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias are a diverse and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by degeneration and dysfunction of the cerebellum and its associated pathways. Clinical and diagnostic evaluation can be challenging because of phenotypic overlap among causes, and a stratified and systematic approach is essential. Recent advances include the identification of additional genes causing dominant genetic ataxia, a better understanding of cellular pathogenesis in several disorders, the generation of new disease models that may stimulate development of new therapies, and the use of new DNA sequencing technologies, including whole-exome sequencing, to improve diagnosis. PMID:24176420

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disorder catalog Conditions > Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (often shortened to ADNFLE ) On this page: Description ... What is ADNFLE? Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is an uncommon form of epilepsy that ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (often shortened to ADPEAF ) On ... July 2008 What is ADPEAF? Autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF) is an uncommon form ...

  4. Autosomal Dominant Growth Hormone Deficiency (Type II).

    PubMed

    Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Kular, Dalvir; Dattani, Mehul T

    2015-06-01

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) is the commonest pituitary hormone deficiency resulting from congenital or acquired causes, although for most patients its etiology remains unknown. Among the known factors, heterozygous mutations in the growth hormone gene (GH1) lead to the autosomal dominant form of GHD, also known as type II GHD. In many cohorts this is the commonest form of congenital isolated GHD and is mainly caused by mutations that affect the correct splicing of GH-1. These mutations cause skipping of the third exon and lead to the production of a 17.5-kDa GH isoform that exerts a dominant negative effect on the secretion of the wild type GH. The identification of these mutations has clinical implications for the management of patients, as there is a well-documented correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the increased expression of the 17.5-kDa isoform. Patients with type II GHD have a variable height deficit and severity of GHD and may develop additional pituitary hormone defiencies over time, including ACTH, TSH and gonadotropin deficiencies. Therefore, their lifelong follow-up is recommended. Detailed studies on the effect of heterozygous GH1 mutations on the trafficking, secretion and action of growth hormone can elucidate their mechanism on a cellular level and may influence future treatment options for GHD type II. PMID:26182479

  5. Weill-Marchesani syndrome - possible linkage of the autosomal dominant form to 15q21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Rust, K.

    1996-10-02

    Weill-Marchesani syndrome comprises short stature, brachydactyly, microspherophakia, glaucoma, and ectopia lentis is regarded as an autosomal recessive trait. We present two families each with affected individuals in 3 generations demonstrating autosomal dominant inheritance of Weill-Marchesani syndrome. Linkage analysis in these 2 families suggests a gene for Weill-Marchesani syndrome maps to 15q21.1. The dislocated lenses and connective tissue disorder in these families suggests that fibrillin-1 and microfibril-associated protein 1, which both map to 15q21.1, are candidate genes for Weill-Marchesani syndrome. Immunohistochemistry staining of skin sections from family 1 showed an apparent decrease in fibrillin staining compared to control individuals. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Symptom onset in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Aisen, Paul S.; Bird, Thomas; Danek, Adrian; Fox, Nick C.; Goate, Alison; Frommelt, Peter; Ghetti, Bernardino; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Lopera, Francisco; Martins, Ralph; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard P.; McDade, Eric; Moreno, Sonia; Reiman, Eric M.; Ringman, John M.; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa; Tariot, Pierre N.; Xiong, Chengjie; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify factors influencing age at symptom onset and disease course in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD), and develop evidence-based criteria for predicting symptom onset in ADAD. Methods: We have collected individual-level data on ages at symptom onset and death from 387 ADAD pedigrees, compiled from 137 peer-reviewed publications, the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) database, and 2 large kindreds of Colombian (PSEN1 E280A) and Volga German (PSEN2 N141I) ancestry. Our combined dataset includes 3,275 individuals, of whom 1,307 were affected by ADAD with known age at symptom onset. We assessed the relative contributions of several factors in influencing age at onset, including parental age at onset, age at onset by mutation type and family, and APOE genotype and sex. We additionally performed survival analysis using data on symptom onset collected from 183 ADAD mutation carriers followed longitudinally in the DIAN Study. Results: We report summary statistics on age at onset and disease course for 174 ADAD mutations, and discover strong and highly significant (p < 10?16, r2 > 0.38) correlations between individual age at symptom onset and predicted values based on parental age at onset and mean ages at onset by mutation type and family, which persist after controlling for APOE genotype and sex. Conclusions: Significant proportions of the observed variance in age at symptom onset in ADAD can be explained by family history and mutation type, providing empirical support for use of these data to estimate onset in clinical research. PMID:24928124

  7. Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Michael; Torchia, Daniele; Romanelli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephelopathy is an autosomal dominant disease affecting small vessels and often resulting in subcortical infarcts. A skin biopsy may facilitate its diagnosis as the cutaneous surface is much easier to sample than the central nervous system’s tissue. Unfortunately, there is no effective treatment available today. PMID:23556034

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the blood as well, including too much phosphate (hyperphosphatemia) or too little magnesium (hypomagnesemia). Some people ... the normal regulation of other molecules, such as phosphate and magnesium, leading to other signs of autosomal ...

  9. INTRODUCTION Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, progressive

    E-print Network

    Perrimon, Norbert

    INTRODUCTION Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, progressive neurodegenerative protein, huntingtin (Htt) (The Huntington's Disease Collaborative Research Group, 1993). The polyQ tract in HD (The Huntington's Disease Collaborative Research Group, 1993). Numerous studies have demonstrated

  10. Evidence for further genetic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar-Singh, R.; Kenna, P.F.; Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, P. )

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the possible involvement of further genetic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa using a previously unreported large Irish family with the disease. We have utilized polymorphic microsatellite markers to exclude the disease gene segregating in this family from 3q, 6p, and the pericentric region of 8, that is, each of the three chromosomal regions to which adRP loci are known to map. Hence, we provide definitive evidence for the involvement of a fourth locus in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Regulation of cell proliferation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    E-print Network

    Paul, Binu M.

    2011-08-31

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a life-threatening genetic disorder characterized by the presence of fluid-filled cysts primarily in the kidneys. Mutations in either the PKD1 or PKD2 genes are the underlying cause of ADPKD...

  12. Nonallelic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with incomplete penetrance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P.

    1994-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of retinal diseases in which photoreceptor cells throughout the retina degenerate. Although there is considerable genetic heterogeneity (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms exist), there is a possibility that some clinically defined subtypes of the disease may be the result of mutations at the same locus. One possible clinically defined subtype is that of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) with incomplete penetrance. Whereas in most families with ADRP, carriers can be clearly identified because of visual loss, ophthalmological findings, or abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs), in occasional families some obligate carriers are asymptomatic and have normal or nearly normal ERGs even late in life. A recent paper reported the mapping of the diseases locus in one pedigree (designated adRP7) with ADRP with incomplete penetrance to chromosome 7p. To test the idea that ADRP with incomplete penetrance may be genetically homogeneous, we have evaluated whether a different family with incomplete penetrance also has a disease gene linked to the same region. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Novel TMEM98 mutations in pedigrees with autosomal dominant nanophthalmos

    PubMed Central

    Khorram, David; Choi, Michael; Roos, Ben R.; Stone, Edwin M.; Kopel, Teresa; Allen, Richard; Alward, Wallace L.M.; Scheetz, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal dominant nanophthalmos is an inherited eye disorder characterized by a structurally normal but smaller eye. Patients with nanophthalmos have high hyperopia (far-sightedness), a greater incidence of angle-closure glaucoma, and increased risk of surgical complications. In this study, the clinical features and the genetic basis of nanophthalmos were investigated in two large autosomal dominant nanophthalmos pedigrees. Methods Fourteen members of a Caucasian pedigree from the United States and 15 members of a pedigree from the Mariana Islands enrolled in a genetic study of nanophthalmos and contributed DNA samples. Twenty of 29 family members underwent eye examinations that included measurement of axial eye length and/or refractive error. The genetic basis of nanophthalmos in the pedigrees was studied with linkage analysis, whole exome sequencing, and candidate gene (i.e., TMEM98) sequencing to identify the nanophthalmos-causing gene. Results Nine members of the pedigree from the United States and 11 members of the pedigree from the Mariana Islands were diagnosed with nanophthalmos that is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. The patients with nanophthalmos had abnormally short axial eye lengths, which ranged from 15.9 to 18.4 mm. Linkage analysis of the nanophthalmos pedigree from the United States identified nine large regions of the genome (greater than 10 Mbp) that were coinherited with disease in this family. Genes within these “linked regions” were examined for disease-causing mutations using exome sequencing, and a His196Pro mutation was detected in the TMEM98 gene, which was recently reported to be a nanophthalmos gene. Sanger sequencing subsequently showed that all other members of this pedigree with nanophthalmos also carry the His196Pro TMEM98 mutation. Testing the Mariana Islands pedigree for TMEM98 mutations identified a 34 bp heterozygous deletion that spans the 3? end of exon 4 in all affected family members. Neither TMEM98 mutation was detected in public exome sequence databases. Conclusions A recent report identified a single TMEM98 missense mutation in a nanophthalmos pedigree. Our discovery of two additional TMEM98 mutations confirms the important role of the gene in the pathogenesis of autosomal dominant nanophthalmos. PMID:26392740

  14. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: the last 3 years

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Vicente E.; Harris, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most prevalent, potentially lethal monogenic disorder. It has large inter- and intra-familial variability explained to a large extent by its genetic heterogeneity and modifier genes. An increased understanding of its underlying genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms and a better appreciation of its progression and systemic manifestations have laid out the foundation for the development of clinical trials and potentially effective therapies. The purpose of this review is to update the core of knowledge in this area with recent publications that have appeared during 2006–2009. PMID:19455193

  15. Homozygotes for the autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, M.L.; Falchetti, A.; Tonelli, F. ); Weber, G.; Svensson, A.; Larsson, C. ); Castello, R.; Furlani, L.; Scappaticci, S.; Fraccaro, M.

    1993-12-01

    Families in which both parents are heterozygotes for the same autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome are extremely unusual. Recently, the authors had the unique opportunity to evaluate three symptomatic siblings from the union between two unrelated individuals affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). When the three siblings and their parents and relatives were genotyped for 12 markers tightly linked to the MEN1 locus, at 11q13, two of the siblings were found to be homozygotes, and one a heterozygote, for MEN1. With regard to the MEN1 syndrome, no phenotypic differences were observed between the two homozygotes and the heterozygotes. However, the two homozygotes showed unexplained infertility, which was not the case for any of the heterozygotes. Thus, MEN1 appears to be a disease with complete dominance, and the presence of two MEN1 alleles with mutations of the type that occur constitutionally may be insufficient for tumor development. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease: a review and proposal for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease has provided significant understanding of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. The present review summarizes clinical, pathological, imaging, biochemical, and molecular studies of autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the similarities and differences between the dominantly inherited form of Alzheimer's disease and the more common sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease. Current developments in autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease are presented, including the international Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network and this network's initiative for clinical trials. Clinical trials in autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease may test the amyloid hypothesis, determine the timing of treatment, and lead the way to Alzheimer's disease prevention. PMID:21211070

  17. [Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: is the treatment for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Le Meur, Yannick

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent Mendelian inherited disorder. It covers 6.1% of incident ESRD patients in France in 2011. Long left untreated, this disease will soon benefit from targeted therapies currently under evaluation. Several molecules have already reached the stage of clinical trials: the evaluation of mTOR inhibitors yielded deceiving results and, more recently, 2 different molecules demonstrated a slight impact on the progression of total kidney volume (TKV): tolvaptan, vasopressin receptor-V2 inhibitor and somatostatin analogues; both of these molecules acting throughout the decrease of intracellular AMPc. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe the signaling pathways involved, then to present both the published and ongoing clinical trials and the promising molecules evaluated in murine models. PMID:25086476

  18. Novel therapeutic approaches to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    LaRiviere, Wells B; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E

    2015-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder characterized by the progressive growth of renal cysts that, over time, destroy the architecture of the renal parenchyma and typically lead to kidney failure by the sixth decade of life. ADPKD is common and represents a leading cause of renal failure worldwide. Currently, there are no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for the disease, and the existing standard of care is primarily supportive in nature. However, significant advances in the understanding of the molecular biology of the disease have inspired investigation into potential new therapies. Several drugs designed to slow or arrest the progression of ADPKD have shown promise in preclinical models and clinical trials, including vasopressin receptor antagonists and somatostatin analogs. This article examines the literature underlying the rationale for molecular therapies for ADPKD and reviews the existing clinical evidence for their indication for human patients with the disease. PMID:25438190

  19. Metabolic abnormalities in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhiguo; Xie, Guoqiang; Ong, Albert C M

    2015-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disorder and is known to affect all ethnic groups with a prevalence of 1:400-1:1000 live births. The kidney in ADKPD is characterized by the formation of numerous cysts which progressively expand and eventually destroy normal kidney structure and function. Cysts occur in other organs outside the kidney, most commonly in the liver, pancreas and spleen. Important non-cystic features include intracranial aneurysms and cardiac valve defects. Less well recognized are a range of metabolic abnormalities, which could be involved in cystic disease progression or be associated with other disease complications. In this review, we summarize the literature suggesting that metabolic abnormalities could be important under-recognised and under-treated features in ADPKD. PMID:24589722

  20. [Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Chung; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2014-06-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most prevalent monogenic cerebral small vessel diseases caused by a mutation in the NOTCH3 gene. The clinical manifestations of CADASIL range from single or multiple lacunar infarcts, transient ischemic attacks, dementia, migraine with aura to psychiatric disorders. The features of brain MRI of CADASIL include multiple lacunar infarcts and diffuse leukoencephalopathy, which frequently involves external capsules and anterior temporal regions. Almost all patients with CADASIL harbor cysteine-involving mutations in NOTCH3. In Taiwan, two thirds of CADASIL patients carry NOTCH3 p.R544C mutations, and only approximately 56% of patients with CADASIL have leukoencephalopathy with anterior temporal regions involvement. PMID:26035923

  1. Saccade velocity in idiopathic and autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed Central

    Bürk, K; Fetter, M; Skalej, M; Laccone, F; Stevanin, G; Dichgans, J; Klockgether, T

    1997-01-01

    Slow saccades are often found in degenerative ataxia. Experimental studies have shown that horizontal saccades are generated in the paramedian pontine reticular formation and that lesions in this area produce slow saccades. Based on these findings, saccade slowing should be a frequent feature of olivopontocerebellar atrophy, a type of cerebellar degeneration with prominent involvement of the pons. To test this hypothesis, saccade velocity was measured in 31 patients with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) and 17 patients with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia (IDCA). Saccade velocity was reduced in most patients with ADCA whereas it was normal in IDCA although olivopontocerebellar atrophy occurred in both groups. Saccade velocities correlated with pontine size in ADCA but not in IDCA. The data disprove the hypothesis that saccadic slowing is a clinical hallmark of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Instead, only patients with ADCA and morphological features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy have slow saccades. Images PMID:9219762

  2. Proteins linked to autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive disorders harbor characteristic rare missense mutation distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Turner, Tychele N; Douville, Christopher; Kim, Dewey; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Karchin, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    The role of rare missense variants in disease causation remains difficult to interpret. We explore whether the clustering pattern of rare missense variants (MAF < 0.01) in a protein is associated with mode of inheritance. Mutations in genes associated with autosomal dominant (AD) conditions are known to result in either loss or gain of function, whereas mutations in genes associated with autosomal recessive (AR) conditions invariably result in loss-of-function. Loss-of-function mutations tend to be distributed uniformly along protein sequence, whereas gain-of-function mutations tend to localize to key regions. It has not previously been ascertained whether these patterns hold in general for rare missense mutations. We consider the extent to which rare missense variants are located within annotated protein domains and whether they form clusters, using a new unbiased method called CLUstering by Mutation Position. These approaches quantified a significant difference in clustering between AD and AR diseases. Proteins linked to AD diseases exhibited more clustering of rare missense mutations than those linked to AR diseases (Wilcoxon P = 5.7 × 10(-4), permutation P = 8.4 × 10(-4)). Rare missense mutation in proteins linked to either AD or AR diseases was more clustered than controls (1000G) (Wilcoxon P = 2.8 × 10(-15) for AD and P = 4.5 × 10(-4) for AR, permutation P = 3.1 × 10(-12) for AD and P = 0.03 for AR). The differences in clustering patterns persisted even after removal of the most prominent genes. Testing for such non-random patterns may reveal novel aspects of disease etiology in large sample studies. PMID:26246501

  3. SPP2 Mutations Cause Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Xue; Xu, Qihua; Gao, Xiang; Tam, Pancy O. S.; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhang, Xiumei; Chen, Li Jia; Jia, Wenshuang; Zhao, Qingshun; Vollrath, Douglas; Pang, Chi Pui; Zhao, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) shows progressive loss of photoreceptors involved with heterogeneous genetic background. Here, by exome sequencing and linkage analysis on a Chinese family with autosomal dominant RP, we identified a putative pathogenic variant, p.Gly97Arg, in the gene SPP2, of which expression was detected in multiple tissues including retina. The p.Gly97Arg was absent in 800 ethnically matched chromosomes and 1400 in-house exome dataset, and was located in the first of the two highly conserved disulfide bonded loop of secreted phosphoprotein 2 (Spp-24) encoded by SPP2. Overexpression of p.Gly97Arg and another signal peptide mutation, p.Gly29Asp, caused cellular retention of both endogenous wild type and exogenous mutants in vitro, and primarily affected rod photoreceptors in zebrafish mimicking cardinal feature of RP. Taken together, our data indicate that the two mutations of SPP2 have dominant negative effects and cellular accumulation of Spp-24 might be particularly toxic to photoreceptors and/or retinal pigment epithelium. SPP2 has a new role in retinal degeneration. PMID:26459573

  4. Molecular advances in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Anna Rachel; Germino, Gregory G; Somlo, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD) is the most common form of inherited kidney disease that results in renal failure. The understanding of the pathogenesis of ADPKD has advanced significantly since the discovery of the 2 causative genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Dominantly inherited gene mutations followed by somatic second-hit mutations inactivating the normal copy of the respective gene result in renal tubular cyst formation that deforms the kidney and eventually impairs its function. The respective gene products, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2, work together in a common cellular pathway. Polycystin-1, a large receptor molecule, forms a receptor-channel complex with polycystin-2, which is a cation channel belonging to the TRP family. Both polycystin proteins have been localized to the primary cilium, a nonmotile microtubule-based structure that extends from the apical membrane of tubular cells into the lumen. Here we discuss recent insights in the pathogenesis of ADPKD including the genetics of ADPKD, the properties of the respective polycystin proteins, the role of cilia, and some cell-signaling pathways that have been implicated in the pathways related to PKD1 and PKD2. PMID:20219615

  5. SPP2 Mutations Cause Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Xue; Xu, Qihua; Gao, Xiang; Tam, Pancy O S; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhang, Xiumei; Chen, Li Jia; Jia, Wenshuang; Zhao, Qingshun; Vollrath, Douglas; Pang, Chi Pui; Zhao, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) shows progressive loss of photoreceptors involved with heterogeneous genetic background. Here, by exome sequencing and linkage analysis on a Chinese family with autosomal dominant RP, we identified a putative pathogenic variant, p.Gly97Arg, in the gene SPP2, of which expression was detected in multiple tissues including retina. The p.Gly97Arg was absent in 800 ethnically matched chromosomes and 1400 in-house exome dataset, and was located in the first of the two highly conserved disulfide bonded loop of secreted phosphoprotein 2 (Spp-24) encoded by SPP2. Overexpression of p.Gly97Arg and another signal peptide mutation, p.Gly29Asp, caused cellular retention of both endogenous wild type and exogenous mutants in vitro, and primarily affected rod photoreceptors in zebrafish mimicking cardinal feature of RP. Taken together, our data indicate that the two mutations of SPP2 have dominant negative effects and cellular accumulation of Spp-24 might be particularly toxic to photoreceptors and/or retinal pigment epithelium. SPP2 has a new role in retinal degeneration. PMID:26459573

  6. Pathophysiological Mechanisms of Autosomal Dominant Congenital Stromal Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shoujun; Sun, Mei; Meng, Xianmin; Iozzo, Renato V.; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Birk, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant congenital stromal corneal dystrophy (CSCD) is a human genetic disease characterized by corneal opacities beginning shortly after birth. It is linked to a frameshift mutation in decorin, resulting in a C-terminal truncation lacking 33 amino acids that includes the “ear” repeat, a feature specific for small leucine-rich proteoglycans. Our goals are to elucidate the roles of the mutant decorin in CSCD pathophysiology and to decipher the mechanism whereby mutant decorin affects matrix assembly. A novel animal model that recapitulates human CSCD was generated. This transgenic mouse model targets expression of truncated decorin to keratocytes, thereby mimicking the human frameshift mutation. Mutant mice expressed both wild-type and mutant decorin. Corneal opacities were found throughout, with increased severity toward the posterior stroma. The architecture of the lamellae was disrupted with relatively normal lamellae separated by regions of abnormal fibril organization. Within abnormal zones, the interfibrillar spacing and the fibril diameters were increased. Truncated decorin negatively affected the expression of endogenous decorin, biglycan, lumican, and keratocan and positively affected fibromodulin. Our results provide a mechanistic explanation for the generation of corneal opacities in CSCD. Thus, truncated decorin acts in a dominant-negative manner to interfere dually with matrix assembly and binding to receptor tyrosine kinases, thereby causing abnormal expression of endogenous small leucine-rich proteoglycans leading to structural abnormalities within the cornea and vision loss. PMID:21893019

  7. Evaluation of polyglutamine repeats in autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Chikara; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Funayama, Manabu; Inamizu, Saeko; Ando, Maya; Li, Yuanzhe; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Araki, Takehisa; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ehara, Yoshiro; Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated the contributions of various polyglutamine (polyQ) disease genes to Parkinson's disease (PD). We compared the distributions of polyQ repeat lengths in 8 common genes (ATXN1, ATXN2, ATXN3, CACNA1A, ATXN7, TBP, ATN1, and HTT) in 299 unrelated patients with autosomal dominant PD (ADPD) and 329 normal controls. We also analyzed the possibility of genetic interactions between ATXN1 and ATXN2, ATXN2 and ATXN3, and ATXN2 and CACNA1A. Intermediate-length polyQ expansions (>24 Qs) of ATXN2 were found in 7 ADPD patients and no controls (7/299 = 2.34% and 0/329 = 0%, respectively; p = 0.0053 < 0.05/8 after Bonferroni correction). These patients showed typical L-DOPA-responsive PD phenotypes. Conversely, no significant differences in polyQ repeat lengths were found between the ADPD patients and the controls for the other 7 genes. Our results may support the hypothesis that ATXN2 polyQ expansion is a specific predisposing factor for multiple neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24534762

  8. Urine proteome of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is responsible for 10% of cases of the end stage renal disease. Early diagnosis, especially of potential fast progressors would be of benefit for efficient planning of therapy. Urine excreted proteome has become a promising field of the search for marker patterns of renal diseases including ADPKD. Up to now however, only the low molecular weight fraction of ADPKD proteomic fingerprint was studied. The aim of our study was to characterize the higher molecular weight fraction of urinary proteome of ADPKD population in comparison to healthy controls as a part of a general effort aiming at exhaustive characterization of human urine proteome in health and disease, preceding establishment of clinically useful disease marker panel. Results We have analyzed the protein composition of urine retentate (>10?kDa cutoff) from 30 ADPKD patients and an appropriate healthy control group by means of a gel-free relative quantitation of a set of more than 1400 proteins. We have identified an ADPKD-characteristic footprint of 155 proteins significantly up- or downrepresented in the urine of ADPKD patients. We have found changes in proteins of complement system, apolipoproteins, serpins, several growth factors in addition to known collagens and extracellular matrix components. For a subset of these proteins we have confirmed the results using an alternative analytical technique. Conclusions Obtained results provide basis for further characterization of pathomechanism underlying the observed differences and establishing the proteomic prognostic marker panel. PMID:23228063

  9. Autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease caused by SNCA duplications.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takuya; Ross, Owen A; Puschmann, Andreas; Dickson, Dennis W; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2016-01-01

    The discovery in 1997 that mutations in the SNCA gene cause Parkinson's disease (PD) greatly advanced our understanding of this illness. There are pathogenic missense mutations and multiplication mutations in SNCA. Thus, not only a mutant protein, but also an increased dose of wild-type protein can produce autosomal dominant parkinsonism. We review the literature on SNCA duplications and focus on pathologically-confirmed cases. We also report a newly-identified American family with SNCA duplication whose proband was autopsied. We found that over half of the reported cases with SNCA duplication had early-onset parkinsonism and non-motor features, such as dysautonomia, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), hallucinations (usually visual) and cognitive deficits leading to dementia. Only a few cases have presented with typical features of PD. Our case presented with depression and RBD that preceded parkinsonism, and dysautonomia that led to an initial diagnosis of multiple system atrophy. Dementia and visual hallucinations followed. Our patient and the other reported cases with SNCA duplications had widespread cortical Lewy pathology. Neuronal loss in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 2/3 regions were seen in about half of the autopsied SNCA duplication cases. Similar pathology was also observed in SNCA missense mutation and triplication carriers. PMID:26350119

  10. Hypertension in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD)

    PubMed Central

    Sans-Atxer, Laia; Torra, Roser; Fernández-Llama, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) complications are the major cause of death in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients. Hypertension is common in these patients even before the onset of renal insufficiency. Blood pressure (BP) elevation is a key factor in patient outcome, mainly owing to the high prevalence of target organ damage together with a poor renal prognosis when BP is increased. Many factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, including the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) stimulation. Polycystin deficiency may also contribute to hypertension because of its potential role in regulating the vascular tone. Early diagnosis and treatment of hypertension improve the CV and renal complications of this population. Ambulatory BP monitoring is recommended for prompt diagnosis of hypertension. CV risk assessment is mandatory. Even though a nonpharmacological approach should not be neglected, RAAS inhibitors are the cornerstone of hypertension treatment. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) should be avoided unless resistant hypertension is present. The BP should be <140/90 mmHg in all ADPKD patients and a more intensive control (<135/85 mmHg) should be pursued as soon as microalbuminuria or left ventricle hypertrophy is present. PMID:26064509

  11. Autosomal dominant familial erythrocytosis due to autonomous erythropoietin production

    SciTech Connect

    Distelhorst, C.W.; Wagner, D.S.; Goldwasser, E.; Adamson, J.W.

    1981-12-01

    A family is described in which four members spanning three consecutive generations have erythrocytosis associated with a normal hemoglobin oxygen affinity. When bone marrow from one affected family member was cultured in vitro, erythroid colonies formed only when erythropoietin was added to the culture. Serum erythropoietin, measured by radioimmunoassay, was significantly elevated above normal in each of the affected family members. Bioassayable erythropoietin was detected in the urine of two of the three affected family members. In two of the affected family members, erythropoietin was measured in serum by radioimmunoassay and in urine by bioassay before and for 4 days following an isovolemic phlebotomy, which reduced the red cell mass by 20%. Neither serum nor urinary erythropoietin levels changed following phlebotomy. The erythrocytosis in this family appears to be secondary to inappropriately increased erythropoietin production unassociated with a decrease in the blood oxygen-carrying capacity. This is the first instance in which autonomous erythropoietin production appears to be inherited on an autosomal dominant basis.

  12. Tolvaptan: A Review in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Blair, Hannah A; Keating, Gillian M

    2015-10-01

    Tolvaptan (Jinarc(®)) is a highly selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist indicated for use in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Tolvaptan is the first pharmaceutical agent to be approved in Europe for delaying the progression of ADPKD in adults with stage 1-3 chronic kidney disease at initiation of treatment. In the large phase III TEMPO 3:4 trial in adults with ADPKD, 3 years' treatment with oral tolvaptan significantly reduced growth in total kidney volume and slowed renal function decline relative to placebo. Tolvaptan was also associated with a significantly lower rate of events for the composite secondary endpoint of time to investigator-assessed clinical progression relative to placebo, an effect that was largely attributable to reductions in the risk of worsening renal function and the risk of worsening kidney pain. Many of the most common adverse events in the tolvaptan group were related to its aquaretic mechanism of action (e.g. polyuria, nocturia, polydipsia and thirst). Tolvaptan was also associated with idiosyncratic elevations of liver enzymes which were reversible on discontinuation of the drug. Although the use of tolvaptan requires careful consideration and balancing of benefits and risks, current evidence suggests that tolvaptan is a promising new treatment option for patients with ADPKD. PMID:26407729

  13. Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis: Genetics, phenotype, and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Stephens, K.; Dale, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis (ADCH; cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disorder manifested by transient neutropenia that recurs every three weeks. To facilitate mapping the ADCH gene by genetic linkage analysis, we studied 9 ADCH families with 42 affected individuals. Pedigrees revealed AD inheritance with no evidence for decreased penetrance. Similar intra- and interfamilial variable expression was observed, with no evidence to support heterogeneity. At least 3 families displayed apparent new mutations. Many adults developed chronic neutropenia, while offspring always cycled during childhood. Children displayed recurrent oral ulcers, gingivitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, and skin and other infections with additional symptoms. Interestingly, there were no cases of neonatal infection. Some children required multiple hospitalizations for treatment. Four males under age 18 died of Clostridium sepsis following necrotizing enterocolitis; all had affected mothers. No other deaths due to ADCH were found; most had improvement of symptoms and infections as adults. Adults experienced increased tooth loss prior to age 30 (16 out of 27 adults, with 9 edentulous). No increase in myelodysplasia, malignancy, or congenital anomalies was observed. Recombinant G-CSF treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and infections. The results suggest that ADCH is not a benign disorder, especially in childhood, and abdominal pain requires immediate evaluation. Diagnosis of ADCH requires serial blood counts in the proband and at least one CBC in relatives to exclude similar disorders. Genetic counseling requires specific histories as well as CBCs of each family member at risk to determine status regardless of symptom history, especially to assess apparent new mutations.

  14. Messenger RNA processing is altered in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy†

    PubMed Central

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Gasparini, Laura; Giacomini, Caterina; Corrado, Patrizia; Terlizzi, Rossana; Giorgio, Elisa; Magini, Pamela; Seri, Marco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Parchi, Piero; Brusco, Alfredo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterized by autonomic dysfunction, followed by cerebellar and pyramidal features. ADLD is caused by duplication of the lamin B1 gene (LMNB1), which leads to its increased expression. The molecular pathways involved in the disease are still poorly understood. Hence, we analyzed global gene expression in fibroblasts and whole blood of LMNB1 duplication carriers and used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis to explore their gene signatures. We found that LMNB1 duplication is associated with dysregulation of genes involved in the immune system, neuronal and skeletal development. Genes with an altered transcriptional profile clustered in specific genomic regions. Among the dysregulated genes, we further studied the role of RAVER2, which we found to be overexpressed at mRNA and protein level. RAVER2 encodes a putative trans regulator of the splicing repressor polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) and is likely implicated in alternative splicing regulation. Functional studies demonstrated an abnormal splicing pattern of several PTB-target genes and of the myelin protein gene PLP1, previously demonstrated to be involved in ADLD. Mutant mice with different lamin B1 expression levels confirmed that Raver2 expression is dependent on lamin B1 in neural tissue and determines an altered splicing pattern of PTB-target genes and Plp1. Overall our results demonstrate that deregulation of lamin B1 expression induces modified splicing of several genes, likely driven by raver-2 overexpression, and suggest that an alteration of mRNA processing could be a pathogenic mechanism in ADLD. PMID:25637521

  15. Apolipoprotein AI mutation Arg-60 causes autosomal dominant amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Soutar, A K; Hawkins, P N; Vigushin, D M; Tennent, G A; Booth, S E; Hutton, T; Nguyen, O; Totty, N F; Feest, T G; Hsuan, J J

    1992-01-01

    A mutation in the gene for apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) was identified in an English family with autosomal dominant non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. The plasma of all affected individuals contained a variant apoAI with one additional charge, as well as normal apoAI. The propositus was heterozygous; the coding region of his apoAI gene contained both the normal sequence and a single-base substitution changing the codon for residue 60 of the mature protein from CTG (leucine) to CGG (arginine). Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization showed that the other affected individuals were also heterozygotes and that there was concordance of the mutant allele with the presence of variant plasma apoAI. Amyloid fibrils isolated from the spleen of the propositus consisted of proteins that ran as a doublet with an apparent mass of approximately 10 kDa in SDS/PAGE and a trace band at 28 kDa. Electrospray mass spectrometry of the purified 10-kDa material revealed components with mass corresponding to the N-terminal 88, 92, 93, and 94 residues of apoAI each with substitution of arginine for leucine. These observations were confirmed by direct protein sequencing and laser desorption time-of-flight mass analysis. No material with the normal apoAI sequence was detected. The trace band at 28 kDa yielded the N-terminal sequence of mature apoAI, indicating that intact or minimally degraded apoAI was also present in the fibril preparation. Discovery of this mutation and the detailed characterization of the apoAI fragments that form the amyloid fibrils open additional avenues for investigation of amyloidogenesis. Images PMID:1502149

  16. Current management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most frequent cause of genetic renal disease affecting approximately 4 to 7 million individuals worldwide and accounting for 7%-15% of patients on renal replacement therapy, is a systemic disorder mainly involving the kidney but cysts can also occur in other organs such as the liver, pancreas, arachnoid membrane and seminal vesicles. Though computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were similar in evaluating 81% of cystic lesions of the kidney, MRI may depict septa, wall thickening or enhancement leading to upgrade in cyst classification that can affect management. A screening strategy for intracranial aneurysms would provide 1.0 additional year of life without neurological disability to a 20-year-old patient with ADPKD and reduce the financial impact on society of the disease. Current treatment strategies include reducing: cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels, cell proliferation and fluid secretion. Several randomised clinical trials (RCT) including mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, somatostatin analogues and a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist have been performed to study the effect of diverse drugs on growth of renal and hepatic cysts, and on deterioration of renal function. Prophylactic native nephrectomy is indicated in patients with a history of cyst infection or recurrent haemorrhage or to those in whom space must be made to implant the graft. The absence of large RCT on various aspects of the disease and its treatment leaves considerable uncertainty and ambiguity in many aspects of ADPKD patient care as it relates to end stage renal disease (ESRD). The outlook of patients with ADPKD is improving and is in fact much better than that for patients in ESRD due to other causes. This review highlights the need for well-structured RCTs as a first step towards trying newer interventions so as to develop updated clinical management guidelines. PMID:26380198

  17. Current management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2015-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most frequent cause of genetic renal disease affecting approximately 4 to 7 million individuals worldwide and accounting for 7%-15% of patients on renal replacement therapy, is a systemic disorder mainly involving the kidney but cysts can also occur in other organs such as the liver, pancreas, arachnoid membrane and seminal vesicles. Though computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were similar in evaluating 81% of cystic lesions of the kidney, MRI may depict septa, wall thickening or enhancement leading to upgrade in cyst classification that can affect management. A screening strategy for intracranial aneurysms would provide 1.0 additional year of life without neurological disability to a 20-year-old patient with ADPKD and reduce the financial impact on society of the disease. Current treatment strategies include reducing: cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels, cell proliferation and fluid secretion. Several randomised clinical trials (RCT) including mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, somatostatin analogues and a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist have been performed to study the effect of diverse drugs on growth of renal and hepatic cysts, and on deterioration of renal function. Prophylactic native nephrectomy is indicated in patients with a history of cyst infection or recurrent haemorrhage or to those in whom space must be made to implant the graft. The absence of large RCT on various aspects of the disease and its treatment leaves considerable uncertainty and ambiguity in many aspects of ADPKD patient care as it relates to end stage renal disease (ESRD). The outlook of patients with ADPKD is improving and is in fact much better than that for patients in ESRD due to other causes. This review highlights the need for well-structured RCTs as a first step towards trying newer interventions so as to develop updated clinical management guidelines. PMID:26380198

  18. Angiotensin Blockade in Late Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Vicente E.; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Schrier, Robert W.; Braun, William E.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Winklhofer, Franz T.; Brosnahan, Godela; Czarnecki, Peter G.; Hogan, Marie C.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic F.; Grantham, Jared J.; Harris, Peter C.; Flessner, Michael F.; Moore, Charity G.; Perrone, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension develops early in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and is associated with disease progression. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension in patients with ADPKD. Dual blockade of the RAAS may circumvent compensatory mechanisms that limit the efficacy of monotherapy with an angiotensin-converting–enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin II–receptor blocker (ARB). METHODS In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 486 patients, 18 to 64 years of age, with ADPKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR], 25 to 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) to receive an ACE inhibitor (lisinopril) and placebo or lisinopril and an ARB (telmisartan), with the doses adjusted to achieve a blood pressure of 110/70 to 130/80 mm Hg. The composite primary outcome was the time to death, end-stage renal disease, or a 50% reduction from the baseline estimated GFR. Secondary outcomes included the rates of change in urinary aldosterone and albumin excretion, frequency of hospitalizations for any cause and for cardiovascular causes, incidence of pain, frequency of ADPKD-related symptoms, quality of life, and adverse study-medication effects. Patients were followed for 5 to 8 years. RESULTS There was no significant difference between the study groups in the incidence of the composite primary outcome (hazard ratio with lisinopril–telmisartan, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.42). The two treatments controlled blood pressure and lowered urinary aldosterone excretion similarly. The rates of decline in the estimated GFR, urinary albumin excretion, and other secondary outcomes and adverse events, including hyperkalemia and acute kidney injury, were also similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Monotherapy with an ACE inhibitor was associated with blood-pressure control in most patients with ADPKD and stage 3 chronic kidney disease. The addition of an ARB did not alter the decline in the estimated GFR. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others; HALT-PKD [Study B] ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01885559.) PMID:25399731

  19. Tolvaptan in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Three Years' Experience

    PubMed Central

    Higashihara, Eiji; Chapman, Arlene B.; Grantham, Jared J.; Bae, Kyongtae; Watnick, Terry J.; Horie, Shigeo; Nutahara, Kikuo; Ouyang, John; Krasa, Holly B.; Czerwiec, Frank S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a frequent cause of end-stage renal disease, has no cure. V2-specific vasopressin receptor antagonists delay disease progression in animal models. Design, setting, participants, and measurements This is a prospectively designed analysis of annual total kidney volume (TKV) and thrice annual estimated GFR (eGFR) measurements, from two 3-year studies of tolvaptan in 63 ADPKD subjects randomly matched 1:2 to historical controls by gender, hypertension, age, and baseline TKV or eGFR. Prespecified end points were group differences in log-TKV (primary) and eGFR (secondary) slopes for month 36 completers, using linear mixed model (LMM) analysis. Sensitivity analyses of primary and secondary end points included LMM using all subject data and mixed model repeated measures (MMRM) of change from baseline at each year. Pearson correlation tested the association between log-TKV and eGFR changes. Results Fifty-one subjects (81%) completed 3 years of tolvaptan therapy; all experienced adverse events (AEs), with AEs accounting for six of 12 withdrawals. Baseline TKV (controls 1422, tolvaptan 1635 ml) and eGFR (both 62 ml/min per 1.73 m2) were similar. Control TKV increased 5.8% versus 1.7%/yr for tolvaptan (P < 0.001, estimated ratio of geometric mean 0.96 [95% confidence interval 0.95 to 0.97]). Corresponding annualized eGFR declined: ?2.1 versus ?0.71 ml/min per 1.73 m2/yr (P = 0.01, LMM group difference 1.1 ml/min per 1.73 m2/yr [95% confidence interval 0.24 to 1.9]). Sensitivity analyses including withdrawn subjects were similar, whereas MMRM analyses were significant at each year for TKV and nonsignificant for eGFR. Increasing TKV correlated with decreasing eGFR (r = ?0.21, P < 0.01). Conclusion ADPKD cyst growth progresses more slowly with tolvaptan than in historical controls, but AEs are common. PMID:21903984

  20. Blood Pressure in Early Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Robert W.; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Perrone, Ronald D.; Torres, Vicente E.; Braun, William E.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Winklhofer, Franz T.; Brosnahan, Godela; Czarnecki, Peter G.; Hogan, Marie C.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic F.; Grantham, Jared J.; Harris, Peter C.; Flessner, Michael F.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Moore, Charity G.; Chapman, Arlene B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is common in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and is associated with increased total kidney volume, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, and progression of kidney disease. METHODS In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 558 hypertensive participants with ADPKD (15 to 49 years of age, with an estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR] >60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) to either a standard blood-pressure target (120/70 to 130/80 mm Hg) or a low blood-pressure target (95/60 to 110/75 mm Hg) and to either an angiotensin-converting–enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril) plus an angiotensin-receptor blocker (telmisartan) or lisinopril plus placebo. The primary outcome was the annual percentage change in the total kidney volume. RESULTS The annual percentage increase in total kidney volume was significantly lower in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (5.6% vs. 6.6%, P = 0.006), without significant differences between the lisinopril–telmisartan group and the lisinopril–placebo group. The rate of change in estimated GFR was similar in the two medication groups, with a negative slope difference in the short term in the low-blood-pressure group as compared with the standard-blood-pressure group (P<0.001) and a marginally positive slope difference in the long term (P = 0.05). The left-ventricular-mass index decreased more in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (?1.17 vs. ?0.57 g per square meter per year, P<0.001); urinary albumin excretion was reduced by 3.77% with the low-pressure target and increased by 2.43% with the standard target (P<0.001). Dizziness and light-headedness were more common in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (80.7% vs. 69.4%, P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS In early ADPKD, the combination of lisinopril and telmisartan did not significantly alter the rate of increase in total kidney volume. As compared with standard blood-pressure control, rigorous blood-pressure control was associated with a slower increase in total kidney volume, no overall change in the estimated GFR, a greater decline in the left-ventricular-mass index, and greater reduction in urinary albumin excretion. PMID:25399733

  1. Renal Relevant Radiology: Radiologic Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:24370765

  2. A gene for autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus localizes to 6p12

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrison, J.B.; Arnould, V.J.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    1996-05-01

    Congenital nystagmus is an idiopathic disorder characterized by bilateral ocular oscillations usually manifest during infancy. Vision is typically decreased due to slippage of images across the fovea. As such, visual acuity correlates with nystagmus intensity, which is the amplitude and frequency of eye movements at a given position of gaze. X-linked, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive pedigrees have been described, but no mapping studies have been published. We recently described a large pedigree with autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus. A genome-wide search resulted in six markers on 6p linked by two-point analysis at {theta} = 0 (D6S459, D6S452, D6S465, FTHP1, D6S257, D6S430). Haplotype analysis localizes the gene for autosomal dominant congenital motor mystagmus to an 18-cM region between D6S271 and D6S455. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Evidence of autosomal dominant mutations in childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Wirth, B.; Zerres, K. )

    1994-07-01

    Autosomal recessive and dominant inheritance of proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are well documented. Several genetic studies found a significant deviation from the assumption of recessive inheritance in SMA, with affected children in one generation. The existence of new autosomal dominant mutations has been assumed as the most suitable explanation, which is supported by three observations of this study: (1) The segregation ratio calculated in 333 families showed a significant deviation from autosomal recessive inheritance in the milder forms of SMA (= .09[+-].06 for onset at 10-36 mo and .13[+-].07 for onset at >36 mo; and P = .09[+-]0.7 for SMA IIIa and .12[+-].07 for SMA IIIb). (2) Three families with affected subjects in two generations are reported, in whom the disease could have started as an autosomal dominant mutation. (3) Linkage studies with chromosome 5q markers showed that in 5 (5.4%) of 93 informative families the patient shared identical haplotypes with at least one healthy sib. Other mechanisms, such as the existence of phenocopies, pseudodominance, or a second autosomal recessive gene locus, cannot be excluded in single families. The postulation of spontaneous mutations, however, is a suitable explanation for all three observations. Estimated risk figures for genetic counseling are given. 29 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Bovine Polledness – An Autosomal Dominant Trait with Allelic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Medugorac, Ivica; Seichter, Doris; Graf, Alexander; Russ, Ingolf; Blum, Helmut; Göpel, Karl Heinrich; Rothammer, Sophie; Förster, Martin; Krebs, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The persistent horns are an important trait of speciation for the family Bovidae with complex morphogenesis taking place briefly after birth. The polledness is highly favourable in modern cattle breeding systems but serious animal welfare issues urge for a solution in the production of hornless cattle other than dehorning. Although the dominant inhibition of horn morphogenesis was discovered more than 70 years ago, and the causative mutation was mapped almost 20 years ago, its molecular nature remained unknown. Here, we report allelic heterogeneity of the POLLED locus. First, we mapped the POLLED locus to a ?381-kb interval in a multi-breed case-control design. Targeted re-sequencing of an enlarged candidate interval (547 kb) in 16 sires with known POLLED genotype did not detect a common allele associated with polled status. In eight sires of Alpine and Scottish origin (four polled versus four horned), we identified a single candidate mutation, a complex 202 bp insertion-deletion event that showed perfect association to the polled phenotype in various European cattle breeds, except Holstein-Friesian. The analysis of the same candidate interval in eight Holsteins identified five candidate variants which segregate as a 260 kb haplotype also perfectly associated with the POLLED gene without recombination or interference with the 202 bp insertion-deletion. We further identified bulls which are progeny tested as homozygous polled but bearing both, 202 bp insertion-deletion and Friesian haplotype. The distribution of genotypes of the two putative POLLED alleles in large semi-random sample (1,261 animals) supports the hypothesis of two independent mutations. PMID:22737241

  5. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  6. Mutations in a BTB-Kelch Protein, KLHL7, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    E-print Network

    Abecasis, Goncalo

    ARTICLE Mutations in a BTB-Kelch Protein, KLHL7, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa expressed, including expression in rod photoreceptors, and encodes a 75 kDa protein of the BTB-Kelch subfamily within the BTB superfamily. BTB-Kelch proteins have been implicated in ubiquitination through

  7. Abstract Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney dis-ease represents one of the most common monogenetic

    E-print Network

    Witzgall, Ralph - Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät III

    Abstract Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney dis- ease represents one of the most common. In this review, we will highlight some of the characteristics of polycystic kidney disease, briefly touch kidney disease actually behaves re- cessively on a cellular level. Finally, a model will be pre- sented

  8. Human Genome and Diseases: Review Molecular basis of autosomal-dominant polycystic

    E-print Network

    Witzgall, Ralph - Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät III

    Human Genome and Diseases: Review Molecular basis of autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease A kidney dis- ease (ADPKD) is one of the most common monogenetic diseases in humans. The discovery and therapeutic strategies. Key words. PKD1; PKD2; polycystin-1; polycystin-2; ADPKD; polycystic kidney disease

  9. NATURE MEDICINE ADVANCE ONLINE PUBLICATION 1 Autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome in

    E-print Network

    Will, Sebastian

    infections and impaired vaccination responses2,3. In many patients, CVID presents as an immune dysregulation. The mammalian immune system contains self-reactive T cells, which are controlled by forkhead box P3-positiveNATURE MEDICINE ADVANCE ONLINE PUBLICATION 1 Autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome

  10. A recurring dominant negative mutation causes autosomal dominant growth hormone deficiency - a clinical research center study

    SciTech Connect

    Cogan, J.D.; Prince, M.; Phillips, J.

    1995-12-01

    Familial isolated GH deficiency type II (IGHD-II) is an autosomal dominant disorder that has been previously shown in some patients to be caused by heterogeneous GH gene defects that affect GH messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. We report here our findings of multiple G{r_arrow}A transitions of the first base of the donor splice site of IVS 3 (+1G{r_arrow}A) in IGHD II subjects from three nonrelated kindreds from Sweden, North America, and South Africa. This + 1G{r_arrow}A substitution creates an NlaIII site that was used to demonstrate that all affected individuals in all three families were heterozygous for the mutation. To determine the effect of this mutation of GH mRNA processing, HeLa cells were transfected with expression plasmids containing normal or mutant +1G{r_arrow}A alleles, and complementary DNAs from the resulting GH mRNAs were sequenced. The mutation was found to destroy the GH IVS3 donor splice site, causing skipping of exon 3 and loss of the codons for amino acids 32-71 of the mature GH peptide from the mutant GH mRNA. Our finding of exon 3 skipping in transcripts of the +1G{r_arrow}A mutant allele is identical to our previous report of a different sixth base transition (+6T{r_arrow}C) mutation of the IVS 3 donor splice site that also causes IGHD II. Microsatellite analysis of an affected subjects` DNA from each of the three nonrelated kindreds indicates that the +1G{r_arrow}A mutation arose independently in each family. Finding that neither grandparent has the mutation in the first family suggests that it arose de novo in that family. Our data indicate that (1) +1G{r_arrow}A IVS 3 mutations perturb GH mRNA splicing and cause IGHD II; and (2) these mutations can present as de novo GHD cases. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Localization of a gene for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) to chromosome 4q

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Lind. L.; Westermark, E.

    1994-09-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), a disorder affecting the formation of enamel, is significantly more common in Northern Sweden than in other parts of the world. The disease is genetically and clinically heterogenous, and autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance patterns have been recognized. Linkage analysis has identified two different loci for X-linked AI, one of which is identical to the gene encoding the enamel protein amelogenin. However, in families with an autosomal inheritance pattern for AI, the genetic basis of the disease still remains unknown. We report a linkage analysis study performed on three Swedish families where the affected members had an autosomal dominant variant of AI (ADAI) clinically characterized as local hypoplastic. Significant linkage to microsatellite markers on chromosome 4q were obtained, with a maximum lod score of 5.55 for the marker D4S428. Recombinations in the family localized the ADAI locus to the interval between D4S392 and D4S395. This chromosome region contains both a locus for the dental disorder dentinogenesis imperfecta and the albumin gene. Serum albumin has been suggested to play a role in enamel formation, and the albumin gene is therefore a candidate gene for this genetic disease.

  12. Two novel disease-causing variants in BMPR1B are associated with brachydactyly type A1.

    PubMed

    Racacho, Lemuel; Byrnes, Ashley M; MacDonald, Heather; Dranse, Helen J; Nikkel, Sarah M; Allanson, Judith; Rosser, Elisabeth; Underhill, T Michael; Bulman, Dennis E

    2015-12-01

    Brachydactyly type A1 is an autosomal dominant disorder primarily characterized by hypoplasia/aplasia of the middle phalanges of digits 2-5. Human and mouse genetic perturbations in the BMP-SMAD signaling pathway have been associated with many brachymesophalangies, including BDA1, as causative mutations in IHH and GDF5 have been previously identified. GDF5 interacts directly as the preferred ligand for the BMP type-1 receptor BMPR1B and is important for both chondrogenesis and digit formation. We report pathogenic variants in BMPR1B that are associated with complex BDA1. A c.975A>C (p.(Lys325Asn)) was identified in the first patient displaying absent middle phalanges and shortened distal phalanges of the toes in addition to the significant shortening of middle phalanges in digits 2, 3 and 5 of the hands. The second patient displayed a combination of brachydactyly and arachnodactyly. The sequencing of BMPR1B in this individual revealed a novel c.447-1G>A at a canonical acceptor splice site of exon 8, which is predicted to create a novel acceptor site, thus leading to a translational reading frameshift. Both mutations are most likely to act in a dominant-negative manner, similar to the effects observed in BMPR1B mutations that cause BDA2. These findings demonstrate that BMPR1B is another gene involved with the pathogenesis of BDA1 and illustrates the continuum of phenotypes between BDA1 and BDA2. PMID:25758993

  13. Molecular analysis and genetic mapping of the rhodopsin gene in families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Bunge, S.; Wedemann, H.; Samanns, C.; Horn, M.; Schwinger, E.; Gal, A. ); David, D. ); Terwilliger, D.J.; Ott, J. ); Born, L.I. van den )

    1993-07-01

    Eighty-eight patients/families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were screened for rhodopsin mutations. Direct sequencing revealed 13 different mutations in a total of 14 (i.e., 16%) unrelated patients. Five of these mutations (T4K, Q28H, R135G, F220C, and C222R) have not been reported so far. In addition, multipoint linkage analysis was performed on two large families with autosomal dominant RP due to rhodopsin mutations by using five DNA probes from 3q21-q24. No tight linkage was found between the rhodopsin locus (RHO) and D3S47 ([theta][sub max] = 0.08). By six-point analysis, RHO was localized in the region between D3S21 and D3S47, with a maximum lod score of 13.447 directly at D3S20. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Familial cutaneous malignant melanoma: autosomal dominant trait possibly linked to the Rh locus.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, M H; Goldin, L R; Clark, W H; Lovrien, E; Kraemer, K H; Tucker, M A; Elder, D E; Fraser, M C; Rowe, S

    1983-01-01

    Segregation and linkage analyses were undertaken in families with multiple cases of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and a recently-described melanoma precursor, the dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS). Clinical and laboratory data, including 23 genetic markers, were collected on 401 members of 14 high-risk kindreds. Pedigree analysis was compatible with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance for the familial CMM trait. Although a similar model probably applies to the DNS trait as well, segregation analysis could not confirm the presence of a major locus. However, linkage analysis suggested that an autosomal dominant model was appropriate for the DNS, and that a DNS/CMM susceptibility gene may be located on the short arm of chromosome 1, within 30 map units of the Rh locus [maximum logarithm of odds (lod) score = 2.00]. Images PMID:6577466

  15. A novel HSF4 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Zhang, Qing; Zhou, Lu-xin; Tang, Zhao-hui

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to identify the mutation of the whole coding region of shock transcription factor 4 (HSF4) gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract (ADCC). All exons of HSF4 were amplified by PCR. Sequence analysis of PCR products was performed. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was conducted to confirm the pathogenic mutation. The results showed that a C to T substitution occurred at nucleotide 331 in patients of this family, leading to the replacement of the amino acid arginine-111 with cysteine in exon 3. RFLP analysis showed that the amino acid change was co-segregated with all affected individuals. It was concluded that the new mutation of c.331C>T in HSF4 DNA may be responsible for the autosomal dominant congenital cataract in this family. PMID:25877371

  16. Imaging characteristics of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL).

    PubMed

    Stojanov, Dragan; Vojinovic, Slobodan; Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra; Tasic, Aleksandar; Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Vujnovic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Diagnosis and follow-up in patients with CADASIL are based mainly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI shows white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). WMHs lesions tend to be symmetrical and bilateral, distributed in the periventricular and deep white matter. The anterior temporal lobe and external capsules are predilection sites for WMHs, with higher specificity and sensitivity of anterior temporal lobe involvement compared to an external capsule involvement. Lacunar infarcts are presented by an imaging signal that has intensity of cerebrospinal fluid in all MRI sequences. They are localized within the semioval center, thalamus, basal ganglia and pons. CMBs are depicted as focal areas of signal loss on T2 images which increases in size on the T2*-weighted gradient echo planar images ("blooming effect"). PMID:25725137

  17. Imaging characteristics of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    Stojanov, Dragan; Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra; Vojinovic, Slobodan; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela; Tasic, Aleksandar; Vujnovic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Diagnosis and follow-up in patients with CADASIL are based mainly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI shows white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). WMHs lesions tend to be symmetrical and bilateral, distributed in the periventricular and deep white matter. The anterior temporal lobe and external capsules are predilection sites for WMHs, with higher specificity and sensitivity of anterior temporal lobe involvement compared to an external capsule involvement. Lacunar infarcts are presented by an imaging signal that has intensity of cerebrospinal fluid in all MRI sequences. They are localized within the semioval center, thalamus, basal ganglia and pons. CMBs are depicted as focal areas of signal loss on T2 images which increases in size on the T2*-weighted gradient echo planar images (“blooming effect”). PMID:25725137

  18. Locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia: Evidence for the existence of a fifth locus

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, four loci have been identified: the SCA-1 locus (on chromosome (chr) 6p), the SCA-2 locus (on chr 12q), the SCA-3/MJD locus (on chr 14q), and more recently an SCA-4 locus was described (chr 16q) in a Utah kindred. We have studied one large French Canadian kindred with four generations of living affected individuals segregating an autosomal dominant form of SCA. Linkage analysis using anonymous DNA markers which flank the four previously described loci significantly excludes the French Canadian kindred from the SCA-1, SCA-2, SCA-3/MJD and SCA-4 loci. Therefore a fifth, still unmapped, SCA locus remains to be identified.

  19. Cutaneous malignant melanoma and familial dysplastic nevi: evidence for autosomal dominance and pleiotropy.

    PubMed Central

    Bale, S J; Chakravarti, A; Greene, M H

    1986-01-01

    Segregation of familial cutaneous melanoma has been shown to be compatible with autosomal dominant transmission with incomplete penetrance. However, the combined phenotype of melanoma and a known melanoma-precursor lesion, the dysplastic nevus (DN), has not previously been found to fit a Mendelian model of inheritance using complex segregation analysis. Employing a life-table and disease-free survival analysis approach, we estimated the lifetime incidence of melanoma in the sibs and offspring of DN-affected individuals to be 46%, consistent with a highly penetrant, autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. To further elucidate the relationship between the two traits, we conducted a linkage analysis between the melanoma locus and a hypothetical DN locus, and obtained a maximum lod score of 3.857 at theta = .08. Furthermore, all families giving evidence for linkage were in the coupling phase and the maximum likelihood estimate of theta was not significantly different from 0 (P = .1). This provides evidence that the DN and melanoma traits may represent pleiotropic effects of a single, highly penetrant gene behaving in an autosomal dominant manner. PMID:3456198

  20. A nonsense mutation in the enamelin gene causes local hypoplastic autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2).

    PubMed

    Mårdh, Carina K; Bäckman, Birgitta; Holmgren, Gösta; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P; Forsman-Semb, Kristina

    2002-05-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is an inherited tooth disorder affecting tooth enamel formation only. A gene for autosomal dominant AI, the local hypoplastic form, has been localized to a 4 Mb region on chromosome 4q (AIH2). The enamelin gene (ENAM ), has been mapped to chromosome 4q21, to the same region as AIH2, and was recently shown to be mutated in patients with smooth and thin hypoplastic autosomal dominant AI (ADAI). In this study, we describe an ENAM mutation causing the local hypoplastic form of ADAI, a phenotype that accounts for 27% of the autosomally inherited cases in Northern Sweden. This nonsense mutation in the enamelin gene results in a truncated peptide of 52 amino acids as compared with 1142 amino acids of the normal protein. Our results show that while a splice site mutation is associated with smooth and thin hypoplastic AI, a base substitution resulting in a shorter peptide causes local hypoplasia of the enamel, a milder form of AI. These findings support ENAM as a disease gene, and shed new light on the molecular mechanism of the disease and to the function of the enamelin protein in enamel formation. PMID:11978766

  1. The role of noise and positive feedback in the onset of autosomal dominant diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant (AD) diseases result when a single mutant or non-functioning gene is present on an autosomal chromosome. These diseases often do not emerge at birth. There are presently two prevailing theories explaining the expression of AD diseases. One explanation originates from the Knudson two-hit theory of hereditary cancers, where loss of heterozygosity or occurrence of somatic mutations impairs the function of the wild-type copy. While these somatic second hits may be sufficient for stable disease states, it is often difficult to determine if their occurrence necessarily marks the initiation of disease progression. A more direct consequence of a heterozygous genetic background is haploinsufficiency, referring to a lack of sufficient gene function due to reduced wild-type gene copy number; however, haploinsufficiency can involve a variety of additional mechanisms, such as noise in gene expression or protein levels, injury and second hit mutations in other genes. In this study, we explore the possible contribution to the onset of autosomal dominant diseases from intrinsic factors, such as those determined by the structure of the molecular networks governing normal cellular physiology. Results First, simple models of single gene insufficiency using the positive feedback loops that may be derived from a three-component network were studied by computer simulation using Bionet software. The network structure is shown to affect the dynamics considerably; some networks are relatively stable even when large stochastic variations in are present, while others exhibit switch-like dynamics. In the latter cases, once the network switches over to the disease state it remains in that state permanently. Model pathways for two autosomal dominant diseases, AD polycystic kidney disease and mature onset diabetes of youth (MODY) were simulated and the results are compared to known disease characteristics. Conclusions By identifying the intrinsic mechanisms involved in the onset of AD diseases, it may be possible to better assess risk factors as well as lead to potential new drug targets. To illustrate the applicability of this study of pathway dynamics, we simulated the primary pathways involved in two autosomal dominant diseases, Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) and mature onset diabetes of youth (MODY). Simulations demonstrate that some of the primary disease characteristics are consistent with the positive feedback - stochastic variation theory presented here. This has implications for new drug targets to control these diseases by blocking the positive feedback loop in the relevant pathways. PMID:20587063

  2. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M.; Gaskell, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is a diagnostic classification encompassing a broad group of proximal myopathies. A gene for the dominant form of LGMD (LGMD1A) has recently been localized to a 7-cM region of chromosome 5q between D5S178 and IL9. We studied three additional dominant LGMD families for linkage to these two markers and excluded all from localization to this region, providing evidence for locus heterogeneity within the dominant form of LGMD. Although the patterns of muscle weakness were similar in all families studied, the majority of affected family members in the chromosome 5-linked pedigree have a dysarthric speech pattern, which is not present in any of the five unlinked families. The demonstration of heterogeneity within autosomal dominant LGMD is the first step in attempting to subclassify these families with similar clinical phenotypes on a molecular level. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Recessive versus imprinted disorder: consanguinity can impede establishing the diagnosis of autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Serap; Akin, Leyla; Akcay, Teoman; Adal, Erdal; Sarikaya, Sevil; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia with low/normal parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels can be observed in hypoparathyroidism (HP), a disorder that may follow an autosomal dominant (AD) or autosomal recessive (AR) mode of inheritance. Similar biochemical changes are also observed in pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type Ia and Ib, but affected patients usually show elevated PTH levels indicative of hormonal resistance. Features of Albright’s hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) are typically not observed in patients affected by familial forms of PHP-Ib, which are most frequently caused by maternally inherited, heterozygous microdeletions within STX16 and are associated with isolated loss of methylation at GNAS exon A/B. We established the molecular defect in two children of consanguineous Turkish parents, who presented with hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and low 25-OH vitamin D levels, but initially normal or only mildly elevated PTH levels, i.e. findings that do not readily exclude HP. After normalizing serum magnesium levels, hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia persisted, and PTH levels increased, suggesting PTH-resistance rather than PTH-deficiency. Because of the absence of AHO and parental consanguinity, an AR form of PHP-Ib appeared plausible, which had previously been suggested for sporadic cases. However, loss of GNAS methylation was restricted to exon A/B, which led to the identification of the 3-kb STX16 microdeletion. The same mutation was also detected in the healthy mother, who did not show any GNAS methylation abnormality, indicating that her deletion resides on the paternal allele. Our findings emphasize the importance of considering a parentally imprinted, autosomal dominant disorder even if consanguinity suggests an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. PMID:20538864

  4. The anterior segment disorder autosomal dominant keratitis is linked to the Aniridia/PAX-6 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, F.; Pearce, W.G.; Mah, T.S.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disease characterized by anterior stromal corneal opacification and vascularization in the peripheral cornea. Progression into the central cornea may compromise visual acuity. Other anterior segment features include minimal radial defects of the iris stroma. Posterior segment involvement is characterized by foveal hypoplasia with minimal effect on visual acuity. Aniridia is a second autosomal dominantly inherited ocular disorder defined by structural defects of the iris, frequently severe enough to cause an almost complete absence of iris. This may be accompanied by other anterior segment manifestations, including cataract and keratitis. Posterior segment involvement in aniridia is characterized by foveal hypoplasia resulting in a highly variable impairment of visual acuity, often with nystagmus. Aniridia is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disease and occurs in 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 people. Aniridia has been shown to result from mutations in PAX-6, a gene thought to regulate fetal eye development. The similar clinical findings in ADK and aniridia, with the similar patterns of inheritance, compelled us to investigate if these two ocular disorders are variants of the same genetic disorder. We have tested for linkage between PAX-6 and ADK within an ADK family with 33 members over four generations, including 11 affected individuals. Linkage studies reveal that D11S914 (located within 3 cM of PAX-6) does not recombine with ADK (LOD score 3.61; {theta} = 0.00), consistent with PAX-6 mutations being responsible for ADK. Direct sequencing of PAX-6 RT-PCR products from ADK patients is underway to identify the mutation within the PAX-6 gene that results in ADK. The linkage of PAX-6 with ADK, along with a recent report that mutations in PAX-6 also underlie Peter`s anomaly, implicates PAX-6 widely in anterior segment malformations.

  5. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Beck, Anita E.; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Harrell, Tanya M.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A.; Carey, John C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lee, Brendan H.; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; McGee, Sean; O’Reilly, Patrick; Paeper, Bryan; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shaffer, Tristan; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Underwood, Jason G.; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Yi, Qian; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development. PMID:25957469

  6. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL): a rare cause of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Toni-Uebari, Thelma K

    2013-01-01

    The clinical course of a 60-year-old gentleman with a history of atypical migraine, recurrent encephalopathic episodes and progressive cognitive impairment is presented. He was diagnosed with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy, a rare genetic disorder of the cerebral blood vessels caused by mutations in the Notch 3 gene on chromosome 19. The diagnosis was confirmed by MRI, skin biopsy and genetic testing. His cognitive function has progressively deteriorated and he continues to receive supportive care provision. The course and review of the condition are highlighted. PMID:23355563

  7. Evidence for a third genetic locus for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daoust, M.C.; Bichet, D.G.; Reynolds, D.M.

    1995-02-10

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with loci on chromosomes 16p and 4q. It has a moderately high spontaneous mutation rate, although the relative frequency of such mutations at each gene locus is unknown. In studying genetic heterogeneity in the French-Canadian population, we identified a family in which a classical clinical presentation of ADPKD resulted from a mutation at a locus genetically distinct from either of the previously described loci for this disease. This suggests the existence of a third genetic locus for ADPKD. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. A transducin-like gene maps to the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstat-Saslow, D.L.; Reeders, S.T.; Germino, G.G.; Somlo, S. )

    1993-12-01

    A novel human gene (sazD) that maps to the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease region shares sequence similarity with members of the [beta]-transducin superfamily. The cDNA sazD-c predicts an [approximately]58-kDa protein (sazD) with seven internal repeats, similar to the WD-40 motif of the transducin family. The size of this protein family has been expanding rapidly; however, neither the structure nor the function of this repeated motif is known. Preliminary data do not suggest that sazD is mutated in patients with polycystic kidney disease. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Will introduction of tolvaptan change clinical practice in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Horie, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    The vasopressin inhibitor tolvaptan is clinically effective in slowing growth of renal cysts and reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), but these effects are mitigated by the associated polyuria. Changes of total kidney volume, eGFR, and symptoms will guide physicians and patients in tolvaptan treatment. Guidance about when to initiate treatment in the course of ADPKD may be forthcoming. Ongoing long-term observations will inform future recommendations about tolvaptan use in ADPKD. PMID:26126090

  10. DVL1 Frameshift Mutations Clustering in the Penultimate Exon Cause Autosomal-Dominant Robinow Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F.; Hoischen, Alexander; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Gambin, Tomasz; Alcino, Michele Calijorne; Penney, Samantha; Saraiva, Jorge M.; Hove, Hanne; Skovby, Flemming; Kayserili, Hülya; Estrella, Elicia; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Steehouwer, Marloes; Muzny, Donna M.; Sutton, V. Reid; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Robinow syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features and for which both autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant inheritance patterns have been described. Causative variants in the non-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14 mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within the penultimate exon of DVL1. In five families in which samples from unaffected parents were available, the variants were demonstrated to represent de novo mutations. All variant alleles are predicted to result in a premature termination codon within the last exon, escape nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), and most likely generate a C-terminally truncated protein with a distinct ?1 reading-frame terminus. Study of the transcripts extracted from affected subjects’ leukocytes confirmed expression of both wild-type and variant alleles, supporting the hypothesis that mutant mRNA escapes NMD. Genomic variants identified in our study suggest that truncation of the C-terminal domain of DVL1, a protein hypothesized to have a downstream role in the Wnt-5a non-canonical pathway, is a common cause of DRS. PMID:25817016

  11. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Gambin, Tomasz; Alcino, Michele Calijorne; Penney, Samantha; Saraiva, Jorge M; Hove, Hanne; Skovby, Flemming; Kayserili, Hülya; Estrella, Elicia; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Steehouwer, Marloes; Muzny, Donna M; Sutton, V Reid; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Brunner, Han G; van Bon, Bregje W M; Carvalho, Claudia M B

    2015-04-01

    Robinow syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features and for which both autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant inheritance patterns have been described. Causative variants in the non-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14 mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within the penultimate exon of DVL1. In five families in which samples from unaffected parents were available, the variants were demonstrated to represent de novo mutations. All variant alleles are predicted to result in a premature termination codon within the last exon, escape nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), and most likely generate a C-terminally truncated protein with a distinct -1 reading-frame terminus. Study of the transcripts extracted from affected subjects' leukocytes confirmed expression of both wild-type and variant alleles, supporting the hypothesis that mutant mRNA escapes NMD. Genomic variants identified in our study suggest that truncation of the C-terminal domain of DVL1, a protein hypothesized to have a downstream role in the Wnt-5a non-canonical pathway, is a common cause of DRS. PMID:25817016

  12. Lamin B1 overexpression increases nuclear rigidity in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Marotta, Roberto; Mazzaro, Nadia; Gritti, Marta; Mazzanti, Michele; Capellari, Sabina; Cortelli, Pietro; Gasparini, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The architecture and structural mechanics of the cell nucleus are defined by the nuclear lamina, which is formed by A- and B-type lamins. Recently, gene duplication and protein overexpression of lamin B1 (LB1) have been reported in pedigrees with autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD). However, how the overexpression of LB1 affects nuclear mechanics and function and how it may result in pathology remain unexplored. Here, we report that in primary human skin fibroblasts derived from ADLD patients, LB1, but not other lamins, is overexpressed at the nuclear lamina and specifically enhances nuclear stiffness. Transient transfection of LB1 in HEK293 and neuronal N2a cells mimics the mechanical phenotype of ADLD nuclei. Notably, in ADLD fibroblasts, reducing LB1 protein levels by shRNA knockdown restores elasticity values to those indistinguishable from control fibroblasts. Moreover, isolated nuclei from ADLD fibroblasts display a reduced nuclear ion channel open probability on voltage-step application, suggesting that biophysical changes induced by LB1 overexpression may alter nuclear signaling cascades in somatic cells. Overall, the overexpression of LB1 in ADLD cells alters nuclear mechanics and is linked to changes in nuclear signaling, which could help explain the pathogenesis of this disease.—Ferrera, D., Canale, C., Marotta, R., Mazzaro, N., Gritti, M., Mazzanti, M., Capellari, S., Cortelli, P., Gasparini, L. Lamin B1 overexpression increases nuclear rigidity in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy fibroblasts. PMID:24858279

  13. Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease: diagnosis, classification, and management-A KDIGO consensus report.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Alper, Seth L; Antignac, Corinne; Bleyer, Anthony J; Chauveau, Dominique; Dahan, Karin; Deltas, Constantinos; Hosking, Andrew; Kmoch, Stanislav; Rampoldi, Luca; Wiesener, Michael; Wolf, Matthias T; Devuyst, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Rare autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding uromodulin (UMOD), hepatocyte nuclear factor-1? (HNF1B), renin (REN), and mucin-1 (MUC1). Multiple names have been proposed for these disorders, including 'Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease (MCKD) type 2', 'Familial Juvenile Hyperuricemic Nephropathy (FJHN)', or 'Uromodulin-Associated Kidney Disease (UAKD)' for UMOD-related diseases and 'MCKD type 1' for the disease caused by MUC1 mutations. The multiplicity of these terms, and the fact that cysts are not pathognomonic, creates confusion. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) proposes adoption of a new terminology for this group of diseases using the term 'Autosomal Dominant Tubulointerstitial Kidney Disease' (ADTKD) appended by a gene-based subclassification, and suggests diagnostic criteria. Implementation of these recommendations is anticipated to facilitate recognition and characterization of these monogenic diseases. A better understanding of these rare disorders may be relevant for the tubulointerstitial fibrosis component in many forms of chronic kidney disease. PMID:25738250

  14. Suppression and Replacement Gene Therapy for Autosomal Dominant Disease in a Murine Model of Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Millington-Ward, Sophia; Chadderton, Naomi; O'Reilly, Mary; Palfi, Arpad; Goldmann, Tobias; Kilty, Claire; Humphries, Marian; Wolfrum, Uwe; Bennett, Jean; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2011-01-01

    For dominantly inherited disorders development of gene therapies, targeting the primary genetic lesion has been impeded by mutational heterogeneity. An example is rhodopsin-linked autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with over 150 mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Validation of a mutation-independent suppression and replacement gene therapy for this disorder has been undertaken. The therapy provides a means of correcting the genetic defect in a mutation-independent manner thereby circumventing the mutational diversity. Separate adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors were used to deliver an RNA interference (RNAi)-based rhodopsin suppressor and a codon-modified rhodopsin replacement gene resistant to suppression due to nucleotide alterations at degenerate positions over the RNAi target site. Viruses were subretinally coinjected into P347S mice, a model of dominant rhodopsin-linked retinitis pigmentosa. Benefit in retinal function and structure detected by electroretinography (ERG) and histology, respectively, was observed for at least 5 months. Notably, the photoreceptor cell layer, absent in 5-month-old untreated retinas, contained 3–4 layers of nuclei, whereas photoreceptor ultrastructure, assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) improved significantly. The study provides compelling evidence that codelivered suppression and replacement is beneficial, representing a significant step toward the clinic. Additionally, dual-vector delivery of combined therapeutics represents an exciting approach, which is potentially applicable to other inherited disorders. PMID:21224835

  15. Suppression and replacement gene therapy for autosomal dominant disease in a murine model of dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Millington-Ward, Sophia; Chadderton, Naomi; O'Reilly, Mary; Palfi, Arpad; Goldmann, Tobias; Kilty, Claire; Humphries, Marian; Wolfrum, Uwe; Bennett, Jean; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2011-04-01

    For dominantly inherited disorders development of gene therapies, targeting the primary genetic lesion has been impeded by mutational heterogeneity. An example is rhodopsin-linked autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with over 150 mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Validation of a mutation-independent suppression and replacement gene therapy for this disorder has been undertaken. The therapy provides a means of correcting the genetic defect in a mutation-independent manner thereby circumventing the mutational diversity. Separate adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors were used to deliver an RNA interference (RNAi)-based rhodopsin suppressor and a codon-modified rhodopsin replacement gene resistant to suppression due to nucleotide alterations at degenerate positions over the RNAi target site. Viruses were subretinally coinjected into P347S mice, a model of dominant rhodopsin-linked retinitis pigmentosa. Benefit in retinal function and structure detected by electroretinography (ERG) and histology, respectively, was observed for at least 5 months. Notably, the photoreceptor cell layer, absent in 5-month-old untreated retinas, contained 3-4 layers of nuclei, whereas photoreceptor ultrastructure, assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) improved significantly. The study provides compelling evidence that codelivered suppression and replacement is beneficial, representing a significant step toward the clinic. Additionally, dual-vector delivery of combined therapeutics represents an exciting approach, which is potentially applicable to other inherited disorders. PMID:21224835

  16. Screening for mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gannon, A.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.

  17. Fine localization of the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 17p

    SciTech Connect

    Goliath, R.; Janssens, P.; Beighton, P.

    1995-10-01

    The term {open_quotes}retintis pigmentosa{close_quotes} (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerative disorders. Clinical manifestations include night-blindness, with variable age of onset, followed by constriction of the visual field that may progress to total loss of sight in later life. Previous studies have shown that RP is caused by mutations within different genes and may be inherited as an X-linked recessive (XLRRP), autosomal recessive (ARRP), or autosomal dominant (ADRP) trait. The AD form of this group of conditions has been found to be caused by mutations within the rhodopsin gene in some families and the peripherin/RDS gene in others. In addition, some ADRP families have been found to be linked to anonymous markers on 8cen, 7p, 7q,19q, and, more recently, 17p. The ADRP gene locus on the short arm of chromosome 17 was identified in a large South African family (ADRP-SA) of British origin. The phenotypic expression of the disorder, which has been described elsewhere is consistent in the pedigree with an early onset of disease symptoms. In all affected subjects in the family, onset of symptoms commenced before the age of 10 years. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  19. Autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE): absence of chromosomal rearrangements in LGI1 gene.

    PubMed

    Manna, Ida; Mumoli, Laura; Labate, Angelo; Citrigno, Luigi; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Aguglia, Umberto; Quattrone, Aldo; Gambardella, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Mutations of leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) gene are found in about half of the families with autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE). More recently a LGI1 heterozygous microdeletion was found in a single ADLTE family, suggesting that submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities should be investigated in cases negative for LGI1 mutations. This study examines whether microdeletions and duplications of the LG1 gene occurred in eight ADLTE families and 20 sporadic patients that were negative for LGI1 mutations. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was applied to detect potential deletions and duplications of LGI1 gene. In all patients, MLPA analysis did not reveal any pathogenic changes in the LGI1 gene. Chromosomal rearrangements involving the LGI1 gene were not identified in our series of familial or sporadic LTE. These results further illustrate the considerable genetic heterogeneity for ADLTE, despite the relatively homogeneous clinical picture. There are as yet undiscovered mechanisms underlying ADLTE. PMID:24315022

  20. Bone mineral density and laboratory evaluation of a type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis carrier.

    PubMed

    Takacs, I; Cooper, H; Weaver, D D; Econs, M J

    1999-07-01

    Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO2) is an inherited disorder characterized by increased skeletal mass and characteristic abnormalities evident on radiography. Although previous investigators have described nonpenetrant individuals (carriers), it is not known whether carriers manifest subtle abnormalities. We hypothesized that ADO2 carriers would have an abnormality of osteoclast function that would lead to changes in bone mineral density (BMD), in serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), or in creatine kinase isoenzyme BB (CK-BB) levels that would permit carrier recognition. We identified a female carrier in a well-established ADO2 family and measured BMD, serum TRAP, and CK-BB concentrations. She had normal BMD, serum TRAP, and CK-BB concentrations. Thus, these measurements cannot be used to exclude carrier status in individuals who are seen for genetic counseling. However, measurements in other asymptotic carriers are necessary before concluding that these measurements are normal in all or most nonpenetrant individuals. PMID:10377007

  1. Autosomal dominant zonular cataract with sutural opacities localized to chromosome 17q11-12

    SciTech Connect

    Padma, T.; Ayyagari, R.; Murty, J.S.

    1995-10-01

    Congenital cataracts constitute a morphologically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that are a major cause of childhood blindness. Different loci for hereditary congenital cataracts have been mapped to chromosomes 1, 2, 16, and 17q24. We report linkage of a gene causing a unique form of autosomal dominant zonular cataracts with Y-sutural opacities to chromosome 17q11-12 in a three-generation family exhibiting a maximum lod score of 3.9 at D17S805. Multipoint analysis gave a Mod confidence interval of 17 cM. This interval is bounded by the markers D17S799 and D17S798, a region that would encompass a number of candidate genes including that coding for {Beta}A3/A1-crystallin. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Visser, Folkert W.; Drenth, Joost P.H.; Gevers, Tom J.G.; Groen, Gerbrand J.; Hogan, Marie C.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Drenth, J.P.H.; de Fijter, J.W.; Gansevoort, R.T.; Peters, D.J.M.; Wetzels, J.; Zietse, R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4–6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe, impacting physical activity and social relationships, and frequently difficult to manage. This review provides an overview of pathophysiological mechanisms that can lead to pain and discusses the sensory innervation of the kidneys and the upper abdominal organs, including the liver. In addition, the results of a systematic literature search of ADPKD-specific treatment options are presented. Based on pathophysiological knowledge and evidence derived from the literature an argumentative stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in ADPKD is proposed. PMID:25165181

  3. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: the changing face of clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ong, Albert C M; Devuyst, Olivier; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Walz, Gerd

    2015-05-16

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most common inherited kidney disease and accounts for 7-10% of all patients on renal replacement therapy worldwide. Although first reported 500 years ago, this disorder is still regarded as untreatable and its pathogenesis is poorly understood despite much study. During the past 40 years, however, remarkable advances have transformed our understanding of how the disease develops and have led to rapid changes in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, especially during the past decade. This Review will summarise the key findings, highlight recent developments, and look ahead to the changes in clinical practice that will likely arise from the adoption of a new management framework for this major kidney disease. PMID:26090645

  4. Functional heterogeneity of mutant rhodopsins responsible for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, C H; Schneider, B G; Agarwal, N; Papermaster, D S; Nathans, J

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen mutant rhodopsins responsible for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) have been produced by transfection of cloned cDNA into tissue culture cells. Three mutants [class I: Phe-45----Leu, Gln-344----termination (deletion of C-terminal positions 344-348), and Pro-347----Leu] resemble wild-type rhodopsin in yield, regenerability with 11-cis-retinal, and plasma membrane localization. Ten mutants [class II: Thr-17----Met, Pro-23----His, Thr-58----Arg, Val-87----Asp, Gly-89----Asp, Gly-106----Trp, Arg-135----Leu, Arg-135----Trp, Tyr-178----Cys, and Asp-190----Gly] accumulate to significantly lower levels, regenerate with 11-cis-retinal variably or not at all, and are transported inefficiently to the plasma membrane, remaining primarily in the endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest that there are at least two distinct biochemical defects associated with different rhodopsin mutants in ADRP. Images PMID:1924344

  5. High-density renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease demonstrated by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Grantham, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    Unenhanced abdominal CT scans of 35 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) showed multiple high-density (58-84 HU) renal cysts in 42.9% of patients, occasional high-density cysts in 25.7%, and no high-density cysts in 31.4%. These high-density cysts were usually subcapsular and were more frequent in patients with markedly enlarged kidneys and flank pain at the time of CT. Follow-up CT often showed a reduction in cyst densities, although some cysts developed mural calcification and calcification of their contents. Renal carcinomas occur rarely in ADPKD and may occasionally be hyperdense. However, high-density cysts may usually be distinguished from carcinomas on CT by their smooth contours, sharp interfaces with renal parenchyma, homogeneity, and lack of contrast enhancement.

  6. Linkage disequilibrium in the region of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    SciTech Connect

    Snarey, A. ); Thomas, S.; Harris, P.C. ); Schneider, M.C. ); Pound, S.E.; Wright, A.F. ); Barton, N.; Somlo, S.; Germino, G.G.; Reeders, S.T.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located on chromosome 16p, between the flanking markers D16S84 and D16S125 (26.6 prox). This region is 750 kb long and has been cloned. The authors have looked at the association of 10 polymorphic markers from the region, with the disease and with each other. This was done in a set of Scottish families that had previously shown association with D16S94, a marker proximal to the PKD1 region. They report significant association between two CA repeat markers and the disease but have not found evidence for a single founder haplotype in these families, indicating the presence of several mutations in this population. Their results favor a location of the PKD1 gene in the proximal part of the candidate region. 25 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Refined localisation of the second gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, D.J.M.; Saris, J.J.; Spruit, L.

    1994-09-01

    The PKD1-gene responsible for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in 85% of the families maps to chromosome 16q13. Last year the PKD2-gene was localized on chromosome 4q21-23 between the markers D4S231 and D4S231 and D4S423, an interval of about 8cM. In a collaborative effort to narrow down the PKD2-region, families with recombinants have been analyzed with several markers within the interval. First, an integrated map had to be constructed which contains previously published markers of different sources. To construct this map, cosmids and/or YACs isolated with the markers have been mapped by two-color FISH and were screened with the other markers. Affected recombinants localize the disease between D4S1534 and D4S1544.

  8. Autosomal dominant (Beukes) premature degenerative osteoarthropathy of the hip joint unlinked to COL2A1

    SciTech Connect

    Beighton, P.; Ramesar, R.; Cilliers, H.J.

    1994-12-01

    Molecular investigations have been undertaken in several separate large South African families with autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias in which premature degenerative osteoarthropathy of the hip joint was the major manifestation. There are sometimes additional minor changes in the spine and these conditions fall into the general spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) nosological category. In some kindreds, linkage between phenotype and the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) has been established, while in others there is no linkage. We have now completed molecular linkage investigations in an Afrikaner family named Beukes, in which 47 members in 6 generations have premature osteoarthropathy of the hip joint. A LOD score of minus infinity indicates that this condition is not the result of a defect of the COL2A1 gene. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Localization of genes for autosomal dominant congenital cataracts to chromosomes 2 and 17

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyagari, R.; Scott, M.; Wozencraft, L.

    1994-09-01

    Linkage analysis was performed in a seven generation family in which 28 of 52 individuals examined had autosomal dominant congenital pulverulent cataracts and a five generation family in which 10 of 17 individuals examined had autosomal dominant congenital zonular cataracts with sutural opacities. Initial analysis with 21 microsatellite markers in 7 candidate gene regions localized the pulverulent cataract locus to the long arm of chromosome 2 near the {beta}B2-crystallin gene. A lod score of 3.6 was obtained with D2S72 ({theta}=0.12), 3.5 with CRYG ({theta}=0.06), 3.4 with ({theta}=0.05), 2.0 with D2S117 ({theta}=0.22) and 6.6 with D2S128 ({theta}=0.05). Multipoint linkage analysis gave Zmax=4.2 at D2S157 with a one lod confidence interval covering 19 cM. The closest flanking markers showing obligate recombinants are D2S157 and D2S173. The zonular cataract locus was mapped to chromosome 2 near the {gamma}-crystallin gene cluster. A maximum lod score of 3.8 was obtained with D17S805 ({theta}=0.0), 2.1 with D17S798 ({theta}=0.60), and 3.7 with NF1 ({theta}=0.0). Multipoint analysis showed Zmax=3.81 at D17S805 with a one lod confidence interval covering 17 cM based on the Genethon map, localizing cataracts between markers D17S799 and D17S800. Further efforts are being directed at refining the localization of these cataract loci and examining the nearby crystallin genes for possible mutations.

  10. Further screening of the rhodopsin gene in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Vaithinathan, R.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1994-05-15

    Here the authors report 8 novel mutations and 8 previously reported mutations found from further analysis of the rhodopsin gene in a large set of additional patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Leukocyte DNA was purified from 122 unrelated patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa who were not included in previous analyses. The coding region and splice donor and acceptor sites of the rhodopsin gene were screened for mutations using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct genomic sequencing. They found 29 patients with varient bands that were due to mutations. Sequence analysis showed that 20 cases each had 1 of 9 previously published mutations: Pro23His, Thr58Arg, Gly89Asp, Pro171Leu, Glu181Lys, Pro347Leu, Phe45Leu, Arg135Trp, and Lys296Glu. In 9 other cases, they found 8 novel mutations. One was a 3-bp deletion (Cys264-del), and the rest were point mutations resulting in an altered amino acid: Gly51Arg (GGC [yields] CGC), Cys110Tyr (TCG [yields] TAC), Gly114Asp (GGC [yields] GAC), Ala164Glu (GCG [yields] GAG), Pro171Ser (CCA [yields] TCA), Val345Leu (GTG [yields] CTG), and Pro347Gln (CCG [yields] CAG). Each of these novel mutations was found in only one family except for Gly51Arg, which was found in two. In every family tested, the mutation cosegregated with the disease. However, in pedigree D865 only one affected member was available for analysis. About two-thirds of the mutations affect amino acids in transmembrane domains, yet only one-half of opsin's residues are in these regions. One-third of the mutations alter residues in the extracellular/intradiscal space, which includes only 25% of the protein.

  11. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.T.B.; Jones, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) (MIM No.18260) constitutes a clinically and genetically diverse group of disorders that share the primary feature of progressive, severe, lower extremity spasticity. FSP is classified according to the mode of inheritance and whether progressive spasticity occurs in isolation ({open_quotes}uncomplicated FSP{close_quotes}) or with other neurologic abnormalities ({open_quotes}complicated FSP{close_quotes}), including optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, or deafness. Recently, autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP was shown to be genetically heterogeneous and tightly linked to a group of microsatellite markers on chromosome 14q in one large kindred. We examined 126 members of a non-consanguineous North American kindred of Irish descent. FSP was diagnosed in 31 living subjects who developed insidiously progressive gait disturbance between ages 12 and 35 years. Using genetic linkage analysis to microsatellite DNA polymorphisms, we showed that the FSP locus on chromosome 14q was exluded from linkage with the disorder in our family. Subsequently, we searched for genetic linkage between the disorder and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms spanning approximately 50% of the genome. We observed significantly positive, two-point maximum lod scores (Z) for markers on chromosome 15q: D15S128 (Z=9.70, {theta}=0.05), D15S165 (Z=3.30, {theta}=0.10), and UT511 (Z=3.86, {theta}=0.10). Our data clearly establishes that one locus for autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP is mapped to the pericentric region of chromosome 15q. Identifying genes responsible for chromosome 15q-linked and chromosome 14q-linked FSP will greatly advance our understanding of this condition and hopefully other inherited and degenerative brain and spinal cord disorders that are also characterized by axonal degeneration.

  12. Autosomal dominant frontonasal dysplasia (atypical Greig syndrome): Lessons from the Xt mutant mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.L.; Nunes, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Greig syndrome is the autosomal dominant association of mild hypertelorism, variable polysyndactyly, and normal intelligence. Several families have been found to have translocations or deletions of 7p13 interrupting the normal expression of GLI3 (a zinc finger, DNA binding, transcription repressor). Recently, a mutation in the mouse homologue of GLI3 was found in the extra-toes mutant mouse (Xt). The phenotypic features of this mouse model include mild hypertelorism, postaxial polydactyly of the forelimbs, preaxial polydactyly of the hindlimbs, and variable tibial hemimelia. The homozygous mutant Xt/Xt have severe frontonasal dysplasia (FND), polysyndactyly of fore-and hindlimbs and invariable tibial hemimelia. We have recently evaluated a child with severe (type D) frontonasal dysplasia, fifth finger camptodactyly, preaxial polydactyly of one foot, and ispilateral tibial hemimelia. His father was born with a bifid nose, broad columnella, broad feet, and a two centimeter leg length discrepancy. The paternal grandmother of the proband is phenotypically normal; however, her fraternal twin died at birth with severe facial anomalies. The paternal great-grandmother of the proband is phenotypically normal however her niece was born with moderate ocular hypertelorism. This pedigree is suggestive of an autosomal dominant form of frontonasal dysplasia with variable expressivity. The phenotypic features of our case more closely resemble the Xt mouse than the previously defined features of Greig syndrome in humans. This suggests that a mutation in GLI3 may be responsible for FND in this family. We are currently using polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers flanking GLI3 in a attempt to demonstrate linkage in this pedigree. Demonstration of a GLI3 mutation in this family would broaden our view of the spectrum of phenotypes possible in Greig syndrome and could provide insight into genotype/phenotype correlation in FND.

  13. CHMP4B, a Novel Gene for Autosomal Dominant Cataracts Linked to Chromosome 20q

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Alan ; Bennett, Thomas M. ; Knopf, Harry L. S. ; Yamada, Koki ; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro ; Niikawa, Norio ; Shim, Soomin ; Hanson, Phyllis I. 

    2007-01-01

    Cataracts are a clinically diverse and genetically heterogeneous disorder of the crystalline lens and a leading cause of visual impairment. Here we report linkage of autosomal dominant “progressive childhood posterior subcapsular” cataracts segregating in a white family to short tandem repeat (STR) markers D20S847 (LOD score [Z] 5.50 at recombination fraction [?] 0.0) and D20S195 (Z=3.65 at ?=0.0) on 20q, and identify a refined disease interval (rs2057262–(3.8 Mb)–rs1291139) by use of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Mutation profiling of positional-candidate genes detected a heterozygous transversion (c.386A?T) in exon 3 of the gene for chromatin modifying protein-4B (CHMP4B) that was predicted to result in the nonconservative substitution of a valine residue for a phylogenetically conserved aspartic acid residue at codon 129 (p.D129V). In addition, we have detected a heterozygous transition (c.481G?A) in exon 3 of CHMP4B cosegregating with autosomal dominant posterior polar cataracts in a Japanese family that was predicted to result in the missense substitution of lysine for a conserved glutamic acid residue at codon 161 (p.E161K). Transfection studies of cultured cells revealed that a truncated form of recombinant D129V-CHMP4B had a different subcellular distribution than wild type and an increased capacity to inhibit release of virus-like particles from the cell surface, consistent with deleterious gain-of-function effects. These data provide the first evidence that CHMP4B, which encodes a key component of the endosome sorting complex required for the transport-III (ESCRT-III) system of mammalian cells, plays a vital role in the maintenance of lens transparency. PMID:17701905

  14. Mutational screening of 320 Brazilian patients with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Cintra, Vívian Pedigone; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Marques, Sandra Elisabete; de Oliveira, Luana Michelli; Tumas, Vitor; Marques, Wilson

    2014-12-15

    Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a clinical and genetically heterogeneous group of debilitating neurodegenerative diseases that are related to at least 36 different genetic loci; they are clinically characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and are frequently accompanied by other neurological and non-neurological manifestations. The relative frequency of SCA varies greatly among different regions, presumably because of a founder effect or local ethnicities. Between July 1998 and May 2012, we investigated 320 Brazilian patients with an SCA phenotype who belonged to 150 unrelated families with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern and 23 sporadic patients from 13 Brazilian states. A total of 265 patients (82.8%) belonging to 131 unrelated families (87.3%) were found to have a definite mutation, and SCA3 accounted for most of the familial cases (70.7%), followed by SCA7 (6%), SCA1 (5.3%), SCA2 (2.7%), SCA6 (1.3%), SCA8 (0.7%) and SCA10 (0.7%). In the Ribeirão Preto mesoregion, which is located in the northeast part of São Paulo State, the prevalence of SCA3 was approximately 5 per 100,000 inhabitants, which is the highest prevalence found in Brazil. No mutation was found in the SCA12, SCA17 and DRPLA genes, and all the sporadic cases remained without a molecular diagnosis. This study further characterizes the spectrum of SCA mutations found in Brazilian patients, which suggests the existence of regional differences and demonstrates the expansion of the SCA8 locus in Brazilian families. PMID:25466696

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Tolvaptan in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kevin F.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the Tolvaptan Efficacy and Safety in Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease and its Outcomes (TEMPO) trial, tolvaptan significantly reduced expansion of kidney volume and loss of kidney function. Objective: To determine how benefits observed in the TEMPO trial might relate to longer-term health outcomes such as progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality in addition to its cost-effectiveness. Design: A decision-analytic model. Data Sources: Published literature. Target Population: Persons with early Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD). Time Horizon: Lifetime. Perspective: Societal. Interventions: We compared a strategy where patients receive tolvaptan therapy until death, development of ESRD, or liver complications to one where they do not receive tolvaptan. Outcome Measures: Median age at ESRD onset, life expectancy, discounted quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and lifetime costs (in 2010 USD), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results of Base Case Analysis: Tolvaptan prolonged the median age at ESRD onset by 6.5 years and increased life expectancy by 2.6 years. At a drug cost of $5,760 per month, tolvaptan cost $744,100 per QALY gained compared to standard care. Results of Sensitivity Analysis: For patients with ADPKD progressing more slowly, tolvaptan’s cost per QALY gained was even higher. Limitations: Although the TEMPO trial followed patients for 3 years, our main analysis assumed that the clinical benefits of tolvaptan persisted over patients’ lifetimes. Conclusions and Relevance: Assuming that tolvaptan’s benefits persist longer term, the drug may slow progression to ESRD and reduce mortality. However, barring an approximately 95% reduction in the price of tolvaptan, its cost-effectiveness does not compare favorably with many other commonly accepted medical interventions. PMID:24042366

  16. Relevance of ultrasound examination in general practice. A case report of a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Plewa, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a genetic disorder which results in the development of multiple cysts in the kidneys and other parenchymal organs. The two genes in which mutations are known to cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are PKD1 and PKD2. Approximately 50% of individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease will develop end-stage renal disease by the age of 60. Early stages of the disease are usually asymptomatic and at the moment of establishing a definitive diagnosis, complications and associated disorders, including end-stage renal disease, occur frequently. About 95% of individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease have an affected parent and about 5% have a de novo mutation. Each child of an affected individual has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutation. The first symptoms of disease usually develop in the third or fourth decades of life. Imaging examinations of relatives at risk allow for an early detection when no clinical symptoms are present as well as enable treatment of complications and associated disorders. Ultrasound examination as a basic and minimally invasive imaging technique can be easily used in general practice. In the majority of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, sonography allows for a certain and reliable diagnosis of this disease. Additionally, it enables to perform follow-up examinations both of the patient and their family. The possibility of ultrasound imaging in general practice broadens clinical examination and facilitates establishing a proper diagnosis. The paper presents a case report of a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Its aim was to present the relevance of ultrasound examination in general practice.

  17. Adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy without early autonomic dysfunctions linked to lamin B1 duplication: a phenotypic variant.

    PubMed

    Potic, Ana; Pavlovic, Aleksandra M; Uziel, Graziella; Kozic, Dusko; Ostojic, Jelena; Rovelli, Attilio; Sternic, Nadezda; Bjelan, Mladen; Sarto, Elisa; Di Bella, Daniela; Taroni, Franco

    2013-08-01

    The early presentation of autonomic dysfunctions at the disease onset has been considered the mandatory clinical feature in adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, which is a rarely recognised leukodystrophy caused by duplication of the lamin B1 gene. We report the first family with adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy and lamin B1 duplication, without the distinguishing early-appearing autonomic dysfunctions. Subjects from three consecutive generations of a multi-generational Serbian family affected by adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy underwent clinical, biochemical, neurophysiological, neuroradiological, and genetic studies. The patients atypically exhibited late autonomic dysfunctions commencing at the disease end-stages in some. Genetic findings of lamin B1 duplication verified adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, which was supported also by neuroimaging studies. Exclusively, proton magnetic spectroscopy of the brain revealed a possibility of neuro-axonal damage in the white matter lesions, while magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord excluded spinal myelin affection as a required finding in this leukodystrophy. The detection of lamin B1 duplication, even when autonomic dysfunctions do not precede the other symptoms of the disease, proves for the first time that lamin B1-duplicated adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy may have a phenotypic variant with delayed autonomic dysfunctions. Prior to this report, such a phenotype had been speculated to represent an entity different from lamin B1-duplicated leukodystrophy. Hereby we confirm the underlying role of lamin B1 duplication, regardless of the autonomic malfunction onset in this disorder. It is the only report on adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy from Southeastern Europe. PMID:23681646

  18. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Willer, Jason R; Davis, Erica E; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Brunner, Han G; Beaudet, Arthur L; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R; Lupski, James R; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Yang, Yaping

    2015-12-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5' end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1(st) coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6(?)) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs(?)4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5' end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5' to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS. PMID:26637980

  19. Functional polycystin-1 dosage governs autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Katharina; Ward, Christopher J.; Hommerding, Cynthia J.; Nasr, Samih H.; Tuan, Han-Fang; Gainullin, Vladimir G.; Rossetti, Sandro; Torres, Vicente E.; Harris, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations to PKD1 or PKD2, triggering progressive cystogenesis and typically leading to end-stage renal disease in midlife. The phenotypic spectrum, however, ranges from in utero onset to adequate renal function at old age. Recent patient data suggest that the disease is dosage dependent, where incompletely penetrant alleles influence disease severity. Here, we have developed a knockin mouse model matching a likely disease variant, PKD1 p.R3277C (RC), and have proved that its functionally hypomorphic nature modifies the ADPKD phenotype. While Pkd1+/null mice are normal, Pkd1RC/null mice have rapidly progressive disease, and Pkd1RC/RC animals develop gradual cystogenesis. These models effectively mimic the pathophysiological features of in utero–onset and typical ADPKD, respectively, correlating the level of functional Pkd1 product with disease severity, highlighting the dosage dependence of cystogenesis. Additionally, molecular analyses identified p.R3277C as a temperature-sensitive folding/trafficking mutant, and length defects in collecting duct primary cilia, the organelle central to PKD pathogenesis, were clearly detected for the first time to our knowledge in PKD1. Altogether, this study highlights the role that in trans variants at the disease locus can play in phenotypic modification of dominant diseases and provides a truly orthologous PKD1 model, optimal for therapeutic testing. PMID:23064367

  20. Preclinical trials in autosomal dominant AD: implementation of the DIAN-TU trial.

    PubMed

    Mills, S M; Mallmann, J; Santacruz, A M; Fuqua, A; Carril, M; Aisen, P S; Althage, M C; Belyew, S; Benzinger, T L; Brooks, W S; Buckles, V D; Cairns, N J; Clifford, D; Danek, A; Fagan, A M; Farlow, M; Fox, N; Ghetti, B; Goate, A M; Heinrichs, D; Hornbeck, R; Jack, C; Jucker, M; Klunk, W E; Marcus, D S; Martins, R N; Masters, C M; Mayeux, R; McDade, E; Morris, J C; Oliver, A; Ringman, J M; Rossor, M N; Salloway, S; Schofield, P R; Snider, J; Snyder, P; Sperling, R A; Stewart, C; Thomas, R G; Xiong, C; Bateman, R J

    2013-10-01

    The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network Trials Unit (DIAN-TU) was formed to direct the design and management of interventional therapeutic trials of international DIAN and autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD) participants. The goal of the DIAN-TU is to implement safe trials that have the highest likelihood of success while advancing scientific understanding of these diseases and clinical effects of proposed therapies. The DIAN-TU has launched a trial design that leverages the existing infrastructure of the ongoing DIAN observational study, takes advantage of a variety of drug targets, incorporates the latest results of biomarker and cognitive data collected during the observational study, and implements biomarkers measuring Alzheimer's disease (AD) biological processes to improve the efficiency of trial design. The DIAN-TU trial design is unique due to the sophisticated design of multiple drugs, multiple pharmaceutical partners, academics servings as sponsor, geographic distribution of a rare population and intensive safety and biomarker assessments. The implementation of the operational aspects such as home health research delivery, safety magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) at remote locations, monitoring clinical and cognitive measures, and regulatory management involving multiple pharmaceutical sponsors of the complex DIAN-TU trial are described. PMID:24016464

  1. Cyclic mood disorder heralding adult-onset autosomal dominant leucodystrophy: a clinical masquerader.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajendra S; Prakash, Swayam; Raghavendra, B S; Nagpal, Kadam; Handa, Rahul

    2014-06-01

    Leucodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of progressive white matter diseases which may be inherited in dominant, recessive or X-linked fashion depending on the type. Adrenoleucodystrophy (ALD) and metachromatic leucodystrophy (MLD) are rather commoner forms of leucodystrophies whereas krabbes disease, alexander disease, cannavans disease etc. are of less common type. Adult-onset autosomal dominant leucodystrophy (ADLD) is a lately described rarer form of leucodystrophy with perhaps no case report from India. Various leucodystrophies may have different clinical presentations, ranging from subtle cognitive and psychiatric manifestations to gross motor disabilities, visual impairment and seizure. Psychiatric manifestations in the form of psychoses and frank schizophrenia are commonly described in MLD. Depression though uncommonly reported in MLD, cyclic mood disorders have been rarely described in any form of leucodystrophies. We are reporting an eye opener, a case of ADLD which masqueraded as a rapid cyclic mood disorder for initial four years, later to be followed by progressive neurological signs and symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is perhaps the first case report of ADLD presenting as rapid cyclic mood disorder in the world literature. PMID:24813031

  2. Longitudinal change in CSF biomarkers in autosomal-dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Anne M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Bateman, Randall J.; Goate, Alison M.; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Martins, Ralph N.; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard; Ringman, John M.; Rossor, Martin N.; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Marcus, Daniel; Cairns, Nigel J.; Buckles, Virginia D.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicopathologic evidence suggests the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD) begins many years prior to cognitive symptoms. Biomarkers are required to identify affected individuals during this asymptomatic (“pre-clinical”) stage to permit intervention with potential disease-modifying therapies designed to preserve normal brain function. Studies of families with autosomal-dominant AD (ADAD) mutations provide a unique and powerful means to investigate AD biomarker changes during the asymptomatic period. In this biomarker study comparing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), plasma and in vivo amyloid imaging, cross-sectional data obtained at baseline in individuals from ADAD families enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) demonstrate reduced concentrations of CSF amyloid-?1-42 (A?1–42) associated with the presence of ?-amyloid plaques, and elevated concentrations of CSF tau, ptau181 and VILIP-1, markers of neurofibrillary tangles and/or neuronal injury/death, in asymptomatic mutation carriers 10-20 years prior to their estimated age at symptom onset (EAO), and prior to detection of cognitive deficits. When compared longitudinally, however, the concentrations of CSF biomarkers of neuronal injury/death within-individuals decrease after their EAO, suggesting a slowing of acute neurodegenerative processes with symptomatic disease progression. These results emphasize the importance of longitudinal, within-person assessment when modeling biomarker trajectories across the course of the disease. If corroborated, this pattern may influence the definition of a positive neurodegenerative biomarker outcome in clinical trials. PMID:24598588

  3. Heterozygous HTRA1 mutations are associated with autosomal dominant cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Verdura, Edgard; Hervé, Dominique; Scharrer, Eva; Amador, Maria Del Mar; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Philippi, Anne; Corlobé, Astrid; Bergametti, Françoise; Gazal, Steven; Prieto-Morin, Carol; Beaufort, Nathalie; Le Bail, Benoit; Viakhireva, Irina; Dichgans, Martin; Chabriat, Hugues; Haffner, Christof; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease represents a heterogeneous group of disorders leading to stroke and cognitive impairment. While most small vessel diseases appear sporadic and related to age and hypertension, several early-onset monogenic forms have also been reported. However, only a minority of patients with familial small vessel disease carry mutations in one of known small vessel disease genes. We used whole exome sequencing to identify candidate genes in an autosomal dominant small vessel disease family in which known small vessel disease genes had been excluded, and subsequently screened all candidate genes in 201 unrelated probands with a familial small vessel disease of unknown aetiology, using high throughput multiplex polymerase chain reaction and next generation sequencing. A heterozygous HTRA1 variant (R166L), absent from 1000 Genomes and Exome Variant Server databases and predicted to be deleterious by in silico tools, was identified in all affected members of the index family. Ten probands of 201 additional unrelated and affected probands (4.97%) harboured a heterozygous HTRA1 mutation predicted to be damaging. There was a highly significant difference in the number of likely deleterious variants in cases compared to controls (P = 4.2 × 10(-6); odds ratio = 15.4; 95% confidence interval = 4.9-45.5), strongly suggesting causality. Seven of these variants were located within or close to the HTRA1 protease domain, three were in the N-terminal domain of unknown function and one in the C-terminal PDZ domain. In vitro activity analysis of HTRA1 mutants demonstrated a loss of function effect. Clinical features of this autosomal dominant small vessel disease differ from those of CARASIL and CADASIL by a later age of onset and the absence of the typical extraneurological features of CARASIL. They are similar to those of sporadic small vessel disease, except for their familial nature. Our data demonstrate that heterozygous HTRA1 mutations are an important cause of familial small vessel disease, and that screening of HTRA1 should be considered in all patients with a hereditary small vessel disease of unknown aetiology. PMID:26063658

  4. Relative Contribution of Mutations in Genes for Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierick, Ines; Baets, Jonathan; Irobi, Joy; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Deconinck, Tine; Merlini, Luciano; Van den Bergh, Peter; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Robberecht, Wim; Fischer, Dirk; Morales, Raul Juntas; Mitrovic, Zoran; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Nelis, Eva; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting spinal alpha-motor neurons. Since 2001, mutations in six different genes have been identified for autosomal dominant distal HMN; "glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)," "dynactin 1 (DCTN1)," "small heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1),"…

  5. Prevalence of Cysts in Seminal Tract and Abnormal Semen Parameters in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torra, Roser; Sarquella, Joaquim; Calabia, Jordi; Martí, Jordi; Ars, Elisabet; Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Ballarin, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder with a wide range of extrarenal involvement. The scope of this study was to analyze the prevalence of seminal cysts and to correlate these findings with the sperm parameters in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A prospective study enrolled 30 adult men with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Of these 30 patients, 22 agreed to provide a semen sample for analysis, and 28 of 30 agreed to undergo an ultrasound rectal examination. Data obtained from the semen tests and from the ultrasound study were compared. Results: Cysts in the seminal tract were present in 10 (43.47%) of 28 individuals. Twenty of 22 patients showed abnormal semen parameters, with asthenozoospermia as the most common finding. No correlation between ultrasound findings and sperm abnormalities was observed. Conclusions: The presence of cysts in the seminal tract is remarkably high (43.47%); however, this finding does not correlate with sperm abnormalities, which are also a frequent finding, especially asthenozoospermia. This semen abnormality is probably related to the abnormal function of polycystins. More attention should be paid to reproductive aspects in the initial evaluation of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease before their ability to conceive is further impaired by uremia. PMID:18322042

  6. AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT MICROTIA LINKED TO FIVE TANDEM COPIES OF A COPY NUMBER VARIABLE REGION AT CHROMOSOME 4pTER

    E-print Network

    AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT MICROTIA LINKED TO FIVE TANDEM COPIES OF A COPY NUMBER VARIABLE REGION present in normal individuals contain genes considered to be dosage tolerant for human development. We coloboma and lacrimal duct obstruction. The phenotype is linked to a cytogenetically visible alteration

  7. Clinical effects of phosphodiesterase 3A mutations in inherited hypertension with brachydactyly.

    PubMed

    Toka, Okan; Tank, Jens; Schächterle, Carolin; Aydin, Atakan; Maass, Philipp G; Elitok, Saban; Bartels-Klein, Eireen; Hollfinger, Irene; Lindschau, Carsten; Mai, Knut; Boschmann, Michael; Rahn, Gabriele; Movsesian, Matthew A; Müller, Thomas; Doescher, Andrea; Gnoth, Simone; Mühl, Astrid; Toka, Hakan R; Wefeld-Neuenfeld, Yvette; Utz, Wolfgang; Töpper, Agnieszka; Jordan, Jens; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Klussmann, Enno; Bähring, Sylvia; Luft, Friedrich C

    2015-10-01

    Autosomal-dominant hypertension with brachydactyly is a salt-independent Mendelian syndrome caused by activating mutations in the gene encoding phosphodiesterase 3A. These mutations increase the protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of phosphodiesterase 3A resulting in enhanced cAMP-hydrolytic affinity and accelerated cell proliferation. The phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein is diminished, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide is dysregulated, potentially accounting for all phenotypic features. Untreated patients die prematurely of stroke; however, hypertension-induced target-organ damage is otherwise hardly apparent. We conducted clinical studies of vascular function, cardiac functional imaging, platelet function in affected and nonaffected persons, and cell-based assays. Large-vessel and cardiac functions indeed seem to be preserved. The platelet studies showed normal platelet function. Cell-based studies demonstrated that available phosphodiesterase 3A inhibitors suppress the mutant isoforms. However, increasing cGMP to indirectly inhibit the enzyme seemed to have particular use. Our results shed more light on phosphodiesterase 3A activation and could be relevant to the treatment of severe hypertension in the general population. PMID:26283042

  8. Further evidence for a locus for autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma on chromosome 1q and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.; Paglinauan, C.; Stawski, S.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a term used to describe a group of disorders which have in common a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve associated with typical visual field defects and usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Two percent of white Americans and 6-10% of black Americans are affected by the disease. Compelling data indicate that susceptibility to many types of glaucoma is inherited. Hereditary juvenile glaucoma is one form of glaucoma that develops in children and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance. Using a single large Caucasian pedigree affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma, Sheffield discovered positive linkage to a group of markers that map to a 30 cM region on the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q21-q31). We have subsequently identified three unrelated Caucasian pedigrees affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that also demonstrate linkage to this region on chromosome 1, with the highest combined lod score of 5.12 at theta = .05 for marker D1S218. The identification of critical recombinant individuals in our three pedigrees has allowed us to further localize the disease gene to a 12 cM region between markers D1S242 and D1S431. In addition, we have identified several pedigrees which do not demonstrate linkage to chromosome 1q, including a black family affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that is indistinguishable clinically from the disorder affecting the caucasian pedigrees and three pedigrees affected with pigmentary dispersion syndrome, a form of glaucoma that also affects the juvenile population and is also inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. These findings provide evidence for genetic heterogeneity in juvenile glaucoma.

  9. Novel stop and frameshifting mutations in the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease 2 (PKD2) gene.

    PubMed

    Viribay, M; Hayashi, T; Tellería, D; Mochizuki, T; Reynolds, D M; Alonso, R; Lens, X M; Moreno, F; Harris, P C; Somlo, S; San Millán, J L

    1997-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most frequent inherited disorders. The majority of cases are due to mutation of the PKD1 gene, on 16p13.3, while in most of the remainder the disease maps to the PKD2 locus, at chromosome 4q21-q23. Recently, the PKD2 gene has been positionally cloned and three nonsense mutations within the coding sequence of the gene identified. Here we report a systematic mutation screening of all 15 exons of the PKD2 gene in chromosome 4-linked ADPKD families, using heteroduplex and SSCP analyses. We have identified and characterized seven novel mutations, with a detection rate of approximately 90% in the population studied. All of the mutations result in the premature stop of translation: four nonsense changes and three deletions. The deletions are all frameshifting, of four T nucleotides in one case and one G nucleotide in the other two. All mutations are unique and are distributed throughout the gene without evidence of clustering. Comparison of specific mutations with the clinical profile in ADPKD2 families shows no clear correlation. PMID:9402976

  10. Sirtuin 1 inhibition delays cyst formation in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xia; Fan, Lucy X.; Sweeney, William E.; Denu, John M.; Avner, Ellis D.; Li, Xiaogang

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations in either PKD1 or PKD2 and is characterized by the development of multiple bilateral renal cysts that replace normal kidney tissue. Here, we used Pkd1 mutant mouse models to demonstrate that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–dependent (NAD-dependent) protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is involved in the pathophysiology of ADPKD. SIRT1 was upregulated through c-MYC in embryonic and postnatal Pkd1-mutant mouse renal epithelial cells and tissues and could be induced by TNF-?, which is present in cyst fluid during cyst development. Double conditional knockouts of Pkd1 and Sirt1 demonstrated delayed renal cyst formation in postnatal mouse kidneys compared with mice with single conditional knockout of Pkd1. Furthermore, treatment with a pan-sirtuin inhibitor (nicotinamide) or a SIRT1-specific inhibitor (EX-527) delayed cyst growth in Pkd1 knockout mouse embryonic kidneys, Pkd1 conditional knockout postnatal kidneys, and Pkd1 hypomorphic kidneys. Increased SIRT1 expression in Pkd1 mutant renal epithelial cells regulated cystic epithelial cell proliferation through deacetylation and phosphorylation of Rb and regulated cystic epithelial cell death through deacetylation of p53. This newly identified role of SIRT1 signaling in cystic renal epithelial cells provides the opportunity to develop unique therapeutic strategies for ADPKD. PMID:23778143

  11. Role of follicle-stimulating hormone on biliary cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Onori, Paolo; Mancinelli, Romina; Franchitto, Antonio; Carpino, Guido; Renzi, Anastasia; Brozzetti, Stefania; Venter, Julie; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Jefferson, Douglas M.; Alpini, Gianfranco; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the progressive development of renal and hepatic cysts. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) has been demonstrated to be a trophic factor for biliary cells in normal rats and experimental cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Aims To assess the effect of FSH on cholangiocyte proliferation during ADPKD using both in vivo and in vitro models. Methods Evaluation of FSH receptor (FSHR), FSH, phospho-extracellular-regulated kinase (pERK) and c-myc expression in liver fragments from normal patients and patients with ADPKD. In vitro, we studied proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cAMP levels in a human immortalized, non-malignant cholangiocyte cell line (H69) and in an immortalized cell line obtained from the epithelium lining the hepatic cysts from the patients with ADPKD (LCDE) with or without transient silencing of the FSH gene. Results Follicle-stimulating hormone is linked to the active proliferation of the cystic wall and to the localization of p-ERK and c-myc. This hormone sustains the biliary growth by activation of the cAMP/ERK signalling pathway. Conclusion These results showed that FSH has an important function in cystic growth acting on the cAMP pathway, demonstrating that it provides a target for medical therapy of hepatic cysts during ADPKD. PMID:23617956

  12. Localization of a new autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa gene on chromosome 17p screeningof candidate genes

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J.; Goliath, R.; Shugart, Y.Y.

    1994-09-01

    A new gene locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) on 17p has been identified in a large South African (SA) family consisting of 28 living affected individuals in 4 successive generations. This is the first ADRP gene to be reported from SA. The human recoverin (RCVN) gene, which codes for a retinal-specific protein important in recovery to the dark state after visual excitation, has been mapped to 17p13.1 and was considered as a prime candidate gene for the disorder in this family. Mutation screening (using 8 different electrophoretic conditions to resolve heteroduplexes and SSCPs) did not produce any evidence of RCVN being involved in the pathogenesis of ADRP in this SA family. In addition, a mobility shift detected within exon 1 of the RCVN gene did not track with the ADRP phenotype. RP patients from 77 SA families and 30 normal individuals are being examined to establish the frequency of this polymorphism in the SA population. Highly polymorphic markers from 17p13 are now being sought in order to establish the minimum region containing this novel ADRP-SA gene. Two additional recently described retinal-expressed cDNAs, guanylyl cyclase and pigment epithelium-derived factor, which map to 17p13.1, will be tested for tight linkage to ADRP-SA.

  13. Mutation spectrum of the rhodopsin gene among patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Dryja, T.P.; Han, L.B.; Cowley, G.S.; McGee, T.L.; Berson, E.L. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors searched for point mutations in every exon of the rhodopsin gene in 150 patients from separate families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Including the 4 mutations the authors reported previously, they found a total of 17 different mutations that correlate with the disease. Each of these mutations is a single-base substitution corresponding to a single amino acid substitution. Based on current models for the structure of rhodopsin, 3 of the 17 mutant amino acids are normally located on the cytoplasmic side of the protein, 6 in transmembrane domains, and 8 on the intradiscal side. Forty-three of the 150 patients (29%) carry 1 of these mutations, and no patient has more than 1 mutation. In every family with a mutation so far analyzed, the mutation cosegregates with the disease. They found one instance of a mutation in an affected patient that was absent in both unaffected parents (i.e., a new germ-line mutation), indicating that some isolate cases of retinitis pigmentosa carry a mutation of the rhodopsin gene.

  14. Further refinement of the location for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 7p (RP9)

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.F.; Keen, T.J.; Al-Maghtheh, M.; Gregory, C.Y.; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Jay, M.R.; Moore, A.T.; Bird, A.C. )

    1994-04-01

    A form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) mapping to chromosome 7p was recently reported by this laboratory, in a single large family from southeastern England. Further sampling of the family and the use a number of genetic markers from 7p have facilitated the construction of a series of multipoint linkage maps of the region with the most likely disease gene location. From this and haplotype data, the locus can now be placed between the markers D7S484 and D7S526, in an interval estimated to be 1.6-4 cM. Genetic distances between the markers previously reported to be linked to this region and those described in the recent whole-genome poly-CA map were estimated from data in this and other families. These data should assist in the construction of a physical map of the region and will help to identify candidate genes for the 7p adRP locus. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Autosomal-dominant immune dysregulation syndrome in humans with CTLA4 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wing, James B.; Kennedy, Alan; Bulashevska, Alla; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Grüning, Björn A.; Unger, Susanne; Frede, Natalie; Baumann, Ulrich; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Dueckers, Gregor; Niehues, Tim; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Kanariou, Maria; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Warnatz, Klaus; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Thimme, Robert; Hasselblatt, Peter; Emmerich, Florian; Cathomen, Toni; Backofen, Rolf; Fisch, Paul; Seidl, Maximilian; May, Annette; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Ikemizu, Shinji; Salzer, Ulrich; Franke, Andre; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    The protein cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is an essential negative regulator of immune responses and its loss causes fatal autoimmunity in mice. We investigated a large autosomal-dominant family with five individuals presenting with a complex immune dysregulation syndrome characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections and multiple autoimmune features. We identified a heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 1 of CTLA4. Screening of 71 unrelated patients with comparable clinical phenotypes identified five additional families (nine individuals) with novel splice site and missense mutations in CTLA4. While clinical penetrance was incomplete (eight adults of a total of 19 CTLA4 mutation carriers were considered unaffected), CTLA-4 protein expression was decreased in regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in patients and carriers with CTLA4 mutations. Whilst Treg cells were generally present at elevated numbers, their suppressive function, CTLA-4 ligand binding and transendocytosis of CD80 were impaired. Mutations in CTLA4 were also associated with decreased circulating B cell numbers and antibody levels. Taken together, mutations in CTLA-4 resulting in CTLA-4 haploinsufficiency or impaired ligand binding results in a complex syndrome with features of both autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. PMID:25329329

  16. A recurrent deletion mutation in OPA1 causes autosomal dominant optic atrophy in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Shi, Wei; Song, Liming; Zhang, Xiao; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Ge, Xianglian; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Min, Qingjie; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is the most frequent form of hereditary optic neuropathy and occurs due to the degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells. To identify the genetic defect in a family with putative ADOA, we performed capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) to screen known retinal disease genes. However, six exons failed to be sequenced by CNGS in optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1). Sequencing of those exons identified a 4?bp deletion mutation (c.2983-1_2985del) in OPA1. Furthermore, we sequenced the transcripts of OPA1 from the patient skin fibroblasts and found there is six-nucleotide deletion (c.2984-c.2989, AGAAAG). Quantitative-PCR and Western blotting showed that OPA1 mRNA and its protein expression have no obvious difference between patient skin fibroblast and control. The analysis of protein structure by molecular modeling suggests that the mutation may change the structure of OPA1 by formation of an alpha helix protruding into an existing pocket. Taken together, we identified an OPA1 mutation in a family with ADOA by filling the missing CNGS data. We also showed that this mutation affects the structural intactness of OPA1. It provides molecular insights for clinical genetic diagnosis and treatment of optic atrophy. PMID:25374051

  17. The liver in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Torres, V E; Holley, K E; Offord, K P; Rakela, J; Ludwig, J

    1990-02-01

    A histomorphometric and clinico-pathologic analysis of 26 autopsy cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) showed that (1) the density of biliary microhamartomas (BMHs) and the stage of polycystic liver disease were strongly correlated, and (2) both were positively correlated with the stage of renal dysfunction and age at autopsy. Using multiple linear regression analysis, only the stage of renal dysfunction was significantly predictive of the density of BMHs, but both variables were simultaneously predictive for the stage of polycystic liver disease. On serial sections, 41.4% of cysts were connected to BMHs and 81.0% of BMHs to portal tracts. Bile-like material was found in 10.7% of BMHs. Flat or polypoid hyperplasia of the epithelium was observed in 2.7% of cysts. These results support the long-maintained view that hepatic cysts in ADPKD result from cystic dilatation of BMHs. They indicate, however, that the number of BMHs increases during life. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that hepatic and renal cysts in ADPKD have similar pathogeneses, that BMHs and hepatic cysts result from hyperplasia of the bile duct epithelium, and that as they grow, the hepatic cysts become disconnected from the biliary ducts from which they are derived. PMID:2302034

  18. Functional Connectivity in Autosomal Dominant and Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jewell B; Brier, Matthew R; Bateman, Randall J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Benzinger, Tammie L; Xiong, Chengjie; Raichle, Marcus; Holtzman, David M; Sperling, Reisa A; Mayeux, Richard; Ghetti, Bernardino; Ringman, John M; Salloway, Stephen; McDade, Eric; Rossor, Martin N; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M; Fox, Nick C; Koeppe, Robert A; Jack, Clifford R; Mathis, Chester A; Oliver, Angela; Blazey, Tyler M; Moulder, Krista; Buckles, Virginia; Hornbeck, Russ; Chhatwal, Jasmeer; Schultz, Aaron P; Goate, Alison M; Fagan, Anne M; Cairns, Nigel J; Marcus, Daniel S; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau M

    2014-01-01

    Importance Autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) is caused by rare genetic mutations in three specific genes, in contrast to late-onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD), which has a more polygenetic risk profile. Design, Setting, and Participants We analyzed functional connectivity in multiple brain resting state networks (RSNs) in a cross-sectional cohort of ADAD (N=79) and LOAD (N=444) human participants using resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) at multiple international academic sites. Main Outcomes and Measures For both types of AD, we quantified and compared functional connectivity changes in RSNs as a function of dementia severity as measured by clinical dementia rating (CDR). In ADAD, we qualitatively investigated functional connectivity changes with respect to estimated years from onset of symptoms within five RSNs. Results Functional connectivity decreases with increasing CDR were similar for both LOAD and ADAD in multiple RSNs. Ordinal logistic regression models constructed in each type of AD accurately predicted CDR stage in the other, further demonstrating similarity of functional connectivity loss in each disease type. Among ADAD participants, functional connectivity in multiple RSNs appeared qualitatively lower in asymptomatic mutation carriers near their anticipated age of symptom onset compared to asymptomatic mutation non-carriers. Conclusions and Relevance rs-fcMRI changes with progressing AD severity are similar between ADAD and LOAD. Rs-fcMRI may be a useful endpoint for LOAD and ADAD therapy trials. ADAD disease process may be an effective model for LOAD disease process. PMID:25069482

  19. Mutations in a BTB-Kelch Protein, KLHL7, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, James S.; Ray, Joseph W.; Waseem, Naushin; Johnson, Kory; Brooks, Matthew J.; Hugosson, Therése; Breuer, Debra; Branham, Kari E.; Krauth, Daniel S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Ponjavic, Vesna; Gränse, Lotta; Khanna, Ritu; Trager, Edward H.; Gieser, Linn M.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna; Cojocaru, Radu I.; Ghiasvand, Noor M.; Chakarova, Christina F.; Abrahamson, Magnus; Göring, Harald H.H.; Webster, Andrew R.; Birch, David G.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Fann, Yang; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Daiger, Stephen P.; Heckenlively, John R.; Andréasson, Sten; Swaroop, Anand

    2009-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases that result in dysfunction and/or death of rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. So far, 18 genes have been identified for autosomal-dominant (ad) RP. Here, we describe an adRP locus (RP42) at chromosome 7p15 through linkage analysis in a six-generation Scandinavian family and identify a disease-causing mutation, c.449G?A (p.S150N), in exon 6 of the KLHL7 gene. Mutation screening of KLHL7 in 502 retinopathy probands has revealed three different missense mutations in six independent families. KLHL7 is widely expressed, including expression in rod photoreceptors, and encodes a 75 kDa protein of the BTB-Kelch subfamily within the BTB superfamily. BTB-Kelch proteins have been implicated in ubiquitination through Cullin E3 ligases. Notably, all three putative disease-causing KLHL7 mutations are within a conserved BACK domain; homology modeling suggests that mutant amino acid side chains can potentially fill the cleft between two helices, thereby affecting the ubiquitination complexes. Mutations in an identical region of another BTB-Kelch protein, gigaxonin, have previously been associated with giant axonal neuropathy. Our studies suggest an additional role of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein-degradation pathway in maintaining neuronal health and in disease. PMID:19520207

  20. Twenty patients including 7 probands with autosomal dominant cutis laxa confirm clinical and molecular homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elastin gene mutations have been associated with a variety of phenotypes. Autosomal dominant cutis laxa (ADCL) is a rare disorder that presents with lax skin, typical facial characteristics, inguinal hernias, aortic root dilatation and pulmonary emphysema. In most patients, frameshift mutations are found in the 3’ region of the elastin gene (exons 30-34) which result in a C-terminally extended protein, though exceptions have been reported. Methods We clinically and molecularly characterized the thus far largest cohort of ADCL patients, consisting of 19 patients from six families and one sporadic patient. Results Molecular analysis showed C-terminal frameshift mutations in exon 30, 32, and 34 of the elastin gene and identified a mutational hotspot in exon 32 (c.2262delA). This cohort confirms the previously reported clinical constellation of skin laxity (100%), inguinal hernias (51%), aortic root dilatation (55%) and emphysema (37%). Conclusion ADCL is a clinically and molecularly homogeneous disorder, but intra- and interfamilial variability in the severity of organ involvement needs to be taken into account. Regular cardiovascular and pulmonary evaluations are imperative in the clinical follow-up of these patients. PMID:23442826

  1. A recurrent deletion mutation in OPA1 causes autosomal dominant optic atrophy in a Chinese family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping; Shi, Wei; Song, Liming; Zhang, Xiao; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Ge, Xianglian; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Min, Qingjie; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is the most frequent form of hereditary optic neuropathy and occurs due to the degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells. To identify the genetic defect in a family with putative ADOA, we performed capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) to screen known retinal disease genes. However, six exons failed to be sequenced by CNGS in optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1). Sequencing of those exons identified a 4 bp deletion mutation (c.2983-1_2985del) in OPA1. Furthermore, we sequenced the transcripts of OPA1 from the patient skin fibroblasts and found there is six-nucleotide deletion (c.2984-c.2989, AGAAAG). Quantitative-PCR and Western blotting showed that OPA1 mRNA and its protein expression have no obvious difference between patient skin fibroblast and control. The analysis of protein structure by molecular modeling suggests that the mutation may change the structure of OPA1 by formation of an alpha helix protruding into an existing pocket. Taken together, we identified an OPA1 mutation in a family with ADOA by filling the missing CNGS data. We also showed that this mutation affects the structural intactness of OPA1. It provides molecular insights for clinical genetic diagnosis and treatment of optic atrophy.

  2. Further refinement of the location for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 7p (RP9).

    PubMed Central

    Inglehearn, C. F.; Keen, T. J.; al-Maghtheh, M.; Gregory, C. Y.; Jay, M. R.; Moore, A. T.; Bird, A. C.; Bhattacharya, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    A form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) mapping to chromosome 7p was recently reported by this laboratory, in a single large family from southeastern England. Further sampling of the family and the use a number of genetic markers from 7p have facilitated the construction of a series of multipoint linkage maps of the region with the most likely disease gene location. From this and haplotype data, the locus can now be placed between the markers D7S484 and D7S526, in an interval estimated to be 1.6-4 cM. Genetic distances between the markers previously reported to be linked to this region and those described in the recent whole-genome poly-CA map were estimated from data in this and other families. These data should assist in the construction of a physical map of the region and will help to identify candidate genes for the 7p adRP locus. PMID:8128965

  3. Percutaneous Treatment of Pyocystis in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Akinci, Devrim Turkbey, Baris; Yilmaz, Rahmi; Akpinar, Erhan; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan

    2008-09-15

    The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is frequently complicated by infection of a cyst within a polycystic kidney, which is a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma damaging the clinical course of patients. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous drainage in management of infected cysts in ADPKD patients. Between May 2003 and December 2006, percutaneous drainage was performed in 16 infected renal cysts of four kidneys in three patients (two females, one male), with a mean age of 57.3 years. Cyst dimensions, total amount of drained cyst fluid, catheterization duration, isolated microorganisms, and follow-up duration were recorded. Technical, clinical success rates were 100%; the complication rate was 0%. Diameters of cysts ranged between 3 and 8 cm. Average volume of drained fluid and average duration of catheterization for one cyst were 226 ml and 9.8 days. No recurrence was encountered but one patient (no. 3), who had pyocystis in the right kidney and was treated with catheterization, referred with left flank pain due to pyocystis in her left kidney 3 months later. Follow-up durations were 35, 47, and 11 months for patients 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For patient 3, follow-up duration for the second procedure was 7 months. We conclude that percutaneous drainage with antibiotic therapy should be the initial method in management of infected cysts in ADPKD patients, with high success and low complication rates.

  4. Expanded motor and psychiatric phenotype in autosomal dominant Segawa syndrome due to GTP cyclohydrolase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Van Hove, J L K; Steyaert, J; Matthijs, G; Legius, E; Theys, P; Wevers, R; Romstad, A; Møller, L B; Hedrich, K; Goriounov, D; Blau, N; Klein, C; Casaer, P

    2006-01-01

    Background Segawa syndrome due to GTP cyclohydrolase deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expression, that is clinically characterised by l?dopa responsive, diurnally fluctuating dystonia and parkinsonian symptoms. Objective To delineate the neurological and psychiatric phenotype in all affected individuals of three extended families. Methods GTP cyclohydrolase deficiency was documented by biochemical analyses, enzymatic measurements in fibroblasts, and molecular investigations. All affected individuals were examined neurologically, and psychiatric data were systematically reviewed. Results Eighteen affected patients from three families with proven GTP cyclohydrolase deficiency were identified. Eight patients presenting at less than 20?years of age had typical motor symptoms of dystonia with diurnal variation. Five family members had late?presenting mild dopa?responsive symptoms of rigidity, frequent falls, and tendonitis. Among mutation carriers older than 20?years of age, major depressive disorder, often recurrent, and obsessive?compulsive disorder were strikingly more frequent than observed in the general population. Patients responded well to medication increasing serotonergic neurotransmission and to l?dopa substitution. Sleep disorders including difficulty in sleep onset and maintenance, excessive sleepiness, and frequent disturbing nightmares were present in 55% of patients. Conclusion Physicians should be aware of this expanded phenotype in affected members of families with GTP cyclohydrolase deficiency. PMID:16361586

  5. Identification of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene, PKD1

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.C.; Zhang, F.; Geng, L.

    1994-09-01

    The PKDl gene was localized to an {approximately}480 kb interval of chromosome 16pl3. More than 20 independent transcripts were found in the interval. In view of the high new mutation rate in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases (ADPKD), we anticipated the PKD1 gene would be large. The largest transcript in the region was represented by five cDNA clones located adjacent to the tuberin gene (TSC2). Two of these clones, KG8 and NKG9, contain {approximately}4.5 kb of contiguous sequence corresponding to the 3{prime} end of the 14 kb mRNA which is transcribed from telomeric to centromeric. They spans 11 exons, and to evaluate the reading frame of the cDNA, we have compared the human and monkey sequence using human primers, and found 90-94% identity at the DNA level, and by observing amino acid conservation, determined the reading frame. To date, our open-reading frame of {approximately}800 amino-acids contained only a potential threonine kinase site, but no other recognizable peptide motifs or repeats, and was not homologous to sequences in Swissprot and GenBank. No Southern blot abnormalities have been detected with the cDNA probes used. However, an exon-by-exon scan of 8 exons for mutations by SSCP and genomic sequencing (predicted missense changes) has identified 3 patients with mutations not found in normals, and identify the KG8 gene as the PKD1 gene.

  6. Liver cysts in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: clinical and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Cook, L.T.; Grantham, J.J.

    1985-08-01

    Hepatic CT findings were analyzed in 44 patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease and were correlated with liver and renal function tests and liver, splenic, and renal CT volume measurements. CT showed many large liver cysts in 31.8% of patients, small liver cysts in 25%, and no liver cysts in 43.2%. Patients with many large cysts often showed increased liver volumes. There was no correlation between severity of liver involvement and extent of renal cystic disease as determined from urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and renal volumes. Liver function tests were normal except in two patients, one with a cholangiocarcinoma, which may have arisen from a cyst, and the other with an infected liver cyst and chronic active hepatitis. Accordingly, if liver function tests are abnormal, an attempt should be made to identify complications of polycystic liver disease such as tumor cyst infection, and biliary obstruction. CT is a useful method for detecting liver cysts and identifying patients at risk for these complications.

  7. A Missense Mutation in HK1 Leads to Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Yandong; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Li; Lyubasyuk, Vera; Wang, Keqing; Xu, Mingchu; Li, Yumei; Wu, Frances; Wen, Cindy; Bernstein, Paul S.; Lin, Danni; Zhu, Susanna; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with over 60 causative genes known to date. Nevertheless, approximately 40% of RP cases remain genetically unsolved, suggesting that many novel disease-causing genes are yet to be identified. In this study, we aimed to identify the causative mutation for a large autosomal dominant RP (adRP) family with negative results from known retinal disease gene screening. Methods. Linkage analysis followed by whole-exome sequencing was performed. Stringent variant filtering and prioritization was carried out to identify the causative mutation. Results. Linkage analysis identified a minimal disease region of 8 Mb on chromosome 10 with a peak parametric logarithm (base 10) of odds (LOD) score of 3.500. Further whole-exome sequencing identified a heterozygous missense mutation (NM_000188.2:c.2539G>A, p.E847K) in hexokinase 1 (HK1) that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Biochemical assays showed that the E847K mutation does not affect hexokinase enzymatic activity or the protein stability, suggesting that the mutation may impact other uncharacterized function or result in a gain of function of HK1. Conclusions. Here, we identified HK1 as a novel causative gene for adRP. This is the first report that associates the glucose metabolic pathway with human retinal degenerative disease, suggesting a potential new disease mechanism. PMID:25316723

  8. A novel OPA1 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Yuan, Yimin; Lin, Bing; Feng, Hao; Li, Yan; Dai, Xianning; Zhou, Huihui; Dong, Xujie; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Guan, Min-Xin; Institute of Genetics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310012; Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, OH 45229

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the characterization of a four-generation large Chinese family with ADOA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find a new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G in OPA1 gene which may be a novel pathogenic mutation in this pedigree. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We do not find any mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with optic atrophy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree. -- Abstract: A large four-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) was investigated in the present study. Eight of the family members were affected in this pedigree. The affected family members exhibited early-onset and progressive visual impairment, resulting in mild to profound loss of visual acuity. The average age-at-onset was 15.9 years. A new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G was identified by sequence analysis of the 12th exon of the OPA1 gene. This mutation resulted in a proline to alanine substitution at codon 400, which was located in an evolutionarily conserved region. This missense mutation in the GTPase domain was supposed to result in a loss of function for the encoded protein and act through a dominant negative effect. No other mutations associated with optic atrophy were found in our present study. The c.C1198G heterozygous mutation in the OPA1 gene may be a novel key pathogenic mutation in this pedigree with ADOA. Furthermore, additional nuclear modifier genes, environmental factors, and psychological factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree.

  9. Autosomal Dominant Hypoparathyroidism Caused by Germline Mutation in GNA11: Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Opas, Evan E.; Tuluc, Florin; Metzger, Daniel L.; Hou, Cuiping; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Context: Most cases of autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism (ADH) are caused by gain-of-function mutations in CASR or dominant inhibitor mutations in GCM2 or PTH. Objective: Our objectives were to identify the genetic basis for ADH in a multigenerational family and define the underlying disease mechanism. Subjects: Here we evaluated a multigenerational family with ADH in which affected subjects had normal sequences in these genes and were shorter than unaffected family members. Methods: We collected clinical and biochemical data from 6 of 11 affected subjects and performed whole-exome sequence analysis on DNA from two affected sisters and their affected father. Functional studies were performed after expression of wild-type and mutant G?11 proteins in human embryonic kidney-293-CaR cells that stably express calcium-sensing receptors. Results: Whole-exome-sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation, c.179G>T; p.R60L, in GNA11, which encodes the ?-subunit of G11, the principal heterotrimeric G protein that couples calcium-sensing receptors to signal activation in parathyroid cells. Functional studies of G?11 R60L showed increased accumulation of intracellular concentration of free calcium in response to extracellular concentration of free calcium with a significantly decreased EC50 compared with wild-type G?11. By contrast, R60L was significantly less effective than the oncogenic Q209L form of G?11 as an activator of the MAPK pathway. Compared to subjects with CASR mutations, patients with GNA11 mutations lacked hypercalciuria and had normal serum magnesium levels. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the germline gain-of-function mutation of GNA11 is a cause of ADH and implicate a novel role for GNA11 in skeletal growth. PMID:24823460

  10. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen, S.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.; Plaetke, R.; Reimherr, F.; Wender, P.; Leppert, M.; Byerley, W. )

    1993-06-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as [open quotes]bipolar affective disorder[close quotes], is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, the authors ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping at 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has >97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has >73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores <[minus]2.0 at [theta] = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores >1 (chromosome 5 -- D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11 -- D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores >1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, the linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. 72 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. A Missense Mutation in KCTD17 Causes Autosomal Dominant Myoclonus-Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M.P.; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C.; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M.; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%–50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  12. Exclusion of the familial Mediterranean fever locus as a susceptibility region for autosomal dominant familial Hibernian fever.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, M F; McDermott, E M; Quane, K A; Jones, L C; Ogunkolade, B W; Curtis, D; Waldron-Lynch, F; Phelan, M; Hitman, G A; Molloy, M G; Powell, R J

    1998-01-01

    Autosomal dominant periodic fevers constitute a range of syndromes characterised by recurrent attacks of fever and abdominal pain. Familial Hibernian fever (FHF) has been described in only one United Kingdom based family, but two other Irish families have been found with similar clinical features. FHF resembles familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) in several clinical features, but the mode of inheritance of FHF is dominant whereas FMF is recessive. We have investigated whether autosomal dominant periodic fevers, in particular FHF, map to the FMF susceptibility locus (MEFV) on chromosome 16p13.3. We have used informative microsatellite markers flanking this locus to genotype members of the three families mentioned above. Two point and multipoint lod scores definitively excluded linkage to MEFV in the two larger families. A haplotype study confirmed these findings, indicating that FHF is genotypically as well as phenotypically distinct from FMF. Images PMID:9610811

  13. Enamelin maps to human chromosome 4q21 within the autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta locus.

    PubMed

    Dong, J; Gu, T T; Simmons, D; MacDougall, M

    2000-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of hereditary enamel defects. Of the autosomal dominant forms, only the local hypoplastic type has been mapped to human chromosome 4q 13-4q21. Enamelin is a large enamel matrix protein secreted by ameloblasts. The purpose of this study was to determine the human chromosomal localization of enamelin to establish an association with various forms of amelogenesis imperfecta. Chromosomal mapping was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using somatic hybrid and deletion/derivation cell line panels with an enamelin primer set based on 100% conserved regions between pig and mouse cDNAs. Sequence-tagged site content mapping using eight markers within the critical local hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta region was then performed using an isolated human enamelin genomic BAC clone. The human enamelin amplicon was confirmed by DNA sequence analysis, revealing 81% and 73% identity to pig and mouse cDNAs, respectively. PCR amplification using a somatic cell hybrid panel placed enamelin on chromosome 4 with analysis of a regional chromosome 4 mapping panel refining the localization to 4q 13.1-q21.23. An identified human enamelin BAC genomic clone was shown to contain markers D4S2604 and D4S2670, as well as the first exon of the human ameloblastin gene, placing enamelin in the critical amelogenesis imperfecta locus between markers HIS1 and D4S2604 at 4q21. Our results suggest that enamelin is a strong candidate gene for this disease. Furthermore, human 4q21 may contain a second cluster of enamel matrix genes located proximally to the identified cluster of dentin and bone genes. PMID:11037750

  14. Novel mutations of PKD genes in the Czech population with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disorder caused by mutation in either one of two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. High structural and sequence complexity of PKD genes makes the mutational diagnostics of ADPKD challenging. The present study is the first detailed analysis of both PKD genes in a cohort of Czech patients with ADPKD using High Resolution Melting analysis (HRM) and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA). Methods The mutational analysis of PKD genes was performed in a set of 56 unrelated patients. For mutational screening of the PKD1 gene, the long-range PCR (LR-PCR) strategy followed by nested PCR was used. Resulting PCR fragments were analyzed by HRM; the positive cases were reanalyzed and confirmed by direct sequencing. Negative samples were further examined for sequence changes in the PKD2 gene by the method of HRM and for large rearrangements of both PKD1 and PKD2 genes by MLPA. Results Screening of the PKD1 gene revealed 36 different likely pathogenic germline sequence changes in 37 unrelated families/individuals. Twenty-five of these sequence changes were described for the first time. Moreover, a novel large deletion was found within the PKD1 gene in one patient. Via the mutational analysis of the PKD2 gene, two additional likely pathogenic mutations were detected. Conclusions Probable pathogenic mutation was detected in 71% of screened patients. Determination of PKD mutations and their type and localization within corresponding genes could help to assess clinical prognosis of ADPKD patients and has major benefit for prenatal and/or presymptomatic or preimplantational diagnostics in affected families as well. PMID:24694054

  15. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: No evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar-Singh, R.; He Wang; Humphries, P.; Farrar, G.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue the authors have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. They performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test they obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses they have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, they have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Z[sub m]) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, they have mapped (Z[sub m] = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. 27 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Evidence against a second autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.; Bhattacharya, S. ); Farrar, J.; Humphries, P. ); Denton, M. ); Gal, A. )

    1993-08-01

    In 1989 McWilliam et al. reported close linkage of the autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) locus to chromosome 3q marker D3S47 in a large Irish pedigree (McWilliam et al 1989). Subsequent studies confirmed linkage in two other adRP families (Lester et al 1990; Olsson et al. 1990). Shortly afterward, utations in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, mapping to 3q21-24, were implicated in disease causation, and it is now known that around one-third of adRP results from such mutations (Dryja et al. 1991; Sung et al. 1991; Inglchearn et al. 1992a). At that time, sequencing studies had failed to find rhodopsin mutations in the three families first linked to 3q. Several adRP families in which rhodopsin mutations had been found gave lod scores that, when pooled, had a peak of 4.47 at a theta of .12 (Inglehearn et al. 1992b). The apparent lack of mutations in families TCDM1, adRP3, and 20 together with the linkage data in these and the proved RHO-RP families, led to speculation that two adRP loci existed on chromosome 3q (Olsson et al. 1990; Inglehearn et al. 1992b). However this situation has been reversed by more recent analysis, since rhodopsin mutations have now been found in all three families. There is therefore no longer any evidence to support the hypothesis that a second adRP locus exists close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q.

  17. Allele-specific gene silencing in two mouse models of autosomal dominant skeletal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Loy, Ryan E; Lueck, John D; Mostajo-Radji, Mohammed A; Carrell, Ellie M; Dirksen, Robert T

    2012-01-01

    We explored the potential of mutant allele-specific gene silencing (ASGS) in providing therapeutic benefit in two established mouse models of the autosomal dominantly-inherited muscle disorders, Malignant Hyperthermia (MH) and Central Core Disease (CCD). Candidate ASGS siRNAs were designed and validated for efficacy and specificity on ryanodine receptor (RyR1) cDNA mini-constructs expressed in HEK293 cells using RT-PCR- and confocal microscopy-based assays. In vivo delivery of the most efficacious identified siRNAs into flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles was achieved by injection/electroporation of footpads of 4-6 month old heterozygous Ryr1(Y524S/+) (YS/+) and Ryr1(I4895T/+) (IT/+) knock-in mice, established mouse models of MH with cores and CCD, respectively. Treatment of IT/+ mice resulted in a modest rescue of deficits in the maximum rate (?38% rescue) and magnitude (?78%) of ligand-induced Ca(2+) release that occurred in the absence of a change in the magnitude of electrically-evoked Ca(2+) release. Compared to the difference between the caffeine sensitivity of Ca(2+) release in FDB fibers from YS/+ and WT mice treated with SCR siRNA (EC(50): 1.1 mM versus 4.4 mM, respectively), caffeine sensitivity was normalized in FDB fibers from YS/+ mice following 2 (EC(50): 2.8 mM) and 4 week (EC(50): 6.6 mM) treatment with YS allele-specific siRNA. Moreover, the temperature-dependent increase in resting Ca(2+) observed in FDB fibers from YS/+ mice was normalized to WT levels after 2 weeks of treatment with YS allele-specific siRNA. As determined by quantitative real time PCR, the degree of functional rescue in YS/+ and IT/+ mice correlated well with the relative increase in fractional WT allele expression. PMID:23152933

  18. Allele-Specific Gene Silencing in Two Mouse Models of Autosomal Dominant Skeletal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Ryan E.; Lueck, John D.; Mostajo-Radji, Mohammed A.; Carrell, Ellie M.; Dirksen, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the potential of mutant allele-specific gene silencing (ASGS) in providing therapeutic benefit in two established mouse models of the autosomal dominantly-inherited muscle disorders, Malignant Hyperthermia (MH) and Central Core Disease (CCD). Candidate ASGS siRNAs were designed and validated for efficacy and specificity on ryanodine receptor (RyR1) cDNA mini-constructs expressed in HEK293 cells using RT-PCR- and confocal microscopy-based assays. In vivo delivery of the most efficacious identified siRNAs into flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles was achieved by injection/electroporation of footpads of 4–6 month old heterozygous Ryr1Y524S/+ (YS/+) and Ryr1I4895T/+ (IT/+) knock-in mice, established mouse models of MH with cores and CCD, respectively. Treatment of IT/+ mice resulted in a modest rescue of deficits in the maximum rate (?38% rescue) and magnitude (?78%) of ligand-induced Ca2+ release that occurred in the absence of a change in the magnitude of electrically-evoked Ca2+ release. Compared to the difference between the caffeine sensitivity of Ca2+ release in FDB fibers from YS/+ and WT mice treated with SCR siRNA (EC50: 1.1 mM versus 4.4 mM, respectively), caffeine sensitivity was normalized in FDB fibers from YS/+ mice following 2 (EC50: 2.8 mM) and 4 week (EC50: 6.6 mM) treatment with YS allele-specific siRNA. Moreover, the temperature-dependent increase in resting Ca2+ observed in FDB fibers from YS/+ mice was normalized to WT levels after 2 weeks of treatment with YS allele-specific siRNA. As determined by quantitative real time PCR, the degree of functional rescue in YS/+ and IT/+ mice correlated well with the relative increase in fractional WT allele expression. PMID:23152933

  19. Does increased water intake prevent disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease?

    PubMed Central

    Higashihara, Eiji; Nutahara, Kikuo; Tanbo, Mitsuhiro; Hara, Hidehiko; Miyazaki, Isao; Kobayashi, Kuninori; Nitatori, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical effects of increased water intake on autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) progression are unknown. Methods ADPKD patients with creatinine clearance ?50 mL/min/1.73 m2 were divided into high (H-, n = 18) and free (F-, n = 16) water-intake groups, mainly according to their preference. Prior to the study, 30 patients underwent annual evaluation of total kidney volume (TKV) and 24-h urine for an average of 33 months. During the 1-year study period, TKV and 24-h urine were analyzed at the beginning and end of the study and every 4 months, respectively. Results During the pre-study period, urine volume (UV) in the H-group was higher (P = 0.034), but TKV and kidney function and their slopes were not significantly different between the two groups. After the study commenced, UV further increased (P < 0.001) in the H-group but not in the F-group. During the study period, TKV and kidney function slopes were not significantly different between the two groups (primary endpoint). Plasma copeptin was lower (P = 0.024) in the H-group than in the F-group. TKV and kidney function slopes became worse (P = 0.047 and 0.011, respectively) after high water intake (H-group) but not in the F-group. High UV was associated with increased urine sodium, and urine sodium positively correlated with the % TKV slope (P = 0.014). Conclusions Although the main endpoint was not significant, high water intake enhanced disease progression in the H-group when compared with the pre-study period. These findings necessitate a long-term randomized study before drawing a final conclusion. PMID:24739484

  20. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Becchetti, Andrea; Aracri, Patrizia; Meneghini, Simone; Brusco, Simone; Amadeo, Alida

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is a focal epilepsy with attacks typically arising in the frontal lobe during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. It is characterized by clusters of complex and stereotyped hypermotor seizures, frequently accompanied by sudden arousals. Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms may be also observed. Approximately 12% of the ADNFLE families carry mutations on genes coding for subunits of the heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). This is consistent with the widespread expression of these receptors, particularly the ?4?2(*) subtype, in the neocortex and thalamus. However, understanding how mutant nAChRs lead to partial frontal epilepsy is far from being straightforward because of the complexity of the cholinergic regulation in both developing and mature brains. The relation with the sleep-waking cycle must be also explained. We discuss some possible pathogenetic mechanisms in the light of recent advances about the nAChR role in prefrontal regions as well as the studies carried out in murine models of ADNFLE. Functional evidence points to alterations in prefrontal GABA release, and the synaptic unbalance probably arises during the cortical circuit maturation. Although most of the available functional evidence concerns mutations on nAChR subunit genes, other genes have been recently implicated in the disease, such as KCNT1 (coding for a Na(+)-dependent K(+) channel), DEPD5 (Disheveled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin Domain-containing protein 5), and CRH (Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone). Overall, the uncertainties about both the etiology and the pathogenesis of ADNFLE point to the current gaps in our knowledge the regulation of neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex. PMID:25717303

  1. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Senno, Laura del; Aguiari, Gianluca

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 ?g/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 ?g/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new opportunities for the therapy of ADPKD patients.

  2. Novel Mutations of ABCB6 Associated with Autosomal Dominant Dyschromatosis Universalis Hereditaria

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Xue-Jun; Ni, Tong; Wang, Wei-Ping; Fan, Xiao-Buo; Yin, Hong-Lin; Jiang, Shao-Jun; Yao, Bing; Hu, Yu-An; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiao-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Objective Dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria (DUH) is a rare heterogeneous pigmentary genodermatosis, which was first described in 1933. The genetic cause has recently been discovered by the discovery of mutations in ABCB6. Here we investigated a Chinese family with typical features of autosomal dominant DUH and 3 unrelated patients with sporadic DUH. Methods Skin tissues were obtained from the proband, of this family and the 3 sporadic patients. Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis of ABCB6 were performed. Peripheral blood DNA samples were obtained from 21 affected, 14 unaffected, 11 spouses in the family and the 3 sporadic patients. A genome-wide linkage scan for the family was carried out to localize the causative gene. Exome sequencing was performed from 3 affected and 1 unaffected in the family. Sanger sequencing of ABCB6 was further used to identify the causative gene for all samples obtained from available family members, the 3 sporadic patients and a panel of 455 ethnically-matched normal Chinese individuals. Results Histopathological analysis showed melanocytes in normal control’s skin tissue and the hyperpigmented area contained more melanized, mature melanosomes than those within the hypopigmented areas. Empty immature melanosomes were found in the hypopigmented melanocytes. Parametric multipoint linkage analysis produced a HLOD score of 4.68, with markers on chromosome 2q35-q37.2. A missense mutation (c.1663 C>A, p.Gln555Lys) in ABCB6 was identified in this family by exome and Sanger sequencing. The mutation perfectly cosegregated with the skin phenotype. An additional mutation (g.776 delC, c.459 delC) in ABCB6 was found in an unrelated sporadic patient. No mutation in ABCB6 was discovered in the other two sporadic patients. Neither of the two mutations was present in the 455 controls. Melanocytes showed positive immunoreactivity to ABCB6. Conclusion Our data add new variants to the repertoire of ABCB6 mutations with DUH. PMID:24224009

  3. A missense mutation in the Ca-sensing receptor gene causes familial autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Y.M.; Finegold, D.N.; Armitage, M.M.

    1994-09-01

    A large family was identified in which hypoparathyroidism was observed to segregate as an autosomal dominant trait in 3 generations. Linkage analysis using short tandem repeat polymorphisms linked the disease phenotype to chromosomal region 3q13. This region contains a newly identified Ca-sensing receptor (PCAR1) gene. This receptor regulates the secretion of parathyroid hormone from parathyroid cells in response to extracellular ionized Ca concentration ([Ca{sup +2}]). PCR-based single stranded conformational analysis of exonic sequences of the PCAR1 gene revealed an abnormal conformer in exon 3 in affected individuals. Direct sequencing of the amplification product from an affected and an unaffected family member showed an A {yields} G transition at nucleotide 770 of the PCAR1 gene [numbering based on the bovine sequence (Genbank accession number S67307)]. This substitution created a Msp1 restriction site which cosegregated with hypoparathyroidism in this family. This substitution was not observed in unaffected family members, unrelated spouses, or unrelated population controls. This substitution is predicted to result in the replacement of a glutamine residue at amino acid 246 by an arginine residue. The Ca-sensing receptor appears to be a member of the family of seven membrane spanning G-protein linked receptors. The extracellular location of this amino acid substitution appears to produce a gain of function mutation increasing the receptor sensitivity to [Ca{sup +2}] and decreasing the calcium {open_quotes}set point{close_quotes}. This is in contrast to the loss of function mutations observed in the PCAR1 gene in pedigrees with familial hypercalcemic hypocalciuria.

  4. A YAC contig encompassing the chromosome 7p locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.F.; Keen, T.J.; Ratel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited retinal degeneration characterized by night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, often leading to complete blindness. The autosomal dominant form (adRP) maps to at least six different loci, including the rhodopsin and peripherin/Rds genes and four loci identified only by linkage analysis on chromosomes 7p, 7q, 8cen and 19q. The 7p locus was reported by this laboratory in a large English family, with a lod score of 16.5. Several new genetic markers have been tested in the family and this locus has now been refined to an interval of approximately 1 cM between markers D7S795 and D7S484 in the 7p13-15 region. In order to clone the gene for adRP, we have used microsatellites and STSs from the region to identify over 80 YACs, from four different libraries, which map to this interval. End clones from key YACs were isolated for the generation of additional STSs. Eleven microsatellite markers between D7S435 (distal) and D7S484 (proximal) have been ordered by a combination of both physical and genetic mapping. In this way we have now obtained a YAC contig spanning approximately 3 megabases of chromosome 7p within which the adRP gene must lie. One gene (aquaporin) and one chromosome 7 brain EST have been placed on the contig but both map distal to the region of interest. Sixteen other ESTs and three further known 7p genes mapping in the region have been excluded. We are now attempting to build a cosmid contig in the defined interval and identify further expressed sequences from both YACs and cosmids to test as candidates for the adRP gene.

  5. Clinical Correlates of Mass Effect in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsuk; Park, Hayne Cho; Ryu, Hyunjin; Kim, Kiwon; Kim, Hyo Sang; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Yu, Su Jong; Chung, Jin Wook; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cheong, Hae Il; Lee, Kyubeck; Park, Jong Hoon; Pei, York; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Curie

    2015-01-01

    Mass effect from polycystic kidney and liver enlargement can result in significant clinical complications and symptoms in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In this single-center study, we examined the correlation of height-adjusted total liver volume (htTLV) and total kidney volume (htTKV) by CT imaging with hepatic complications (n = 461) and abdominal symptoms (n = 253) in patients with ADPKD. “Mass-effect” complications were assessed by review of medical records and abdominal symptoms, by a standardized research questionnaire. Overall, 91.8% of patients had 4 or more liver cysts on CT scans. Polycystic liver disease (PLD) was classified as none or mild (htTLV < 1,600 mL/m); moderate (1,600 ? htTLV <3,200 mL/m); and severe (htTLV ? 3,200 mL/m). The prevalence of moderate and severe PLD in our patient cohort was 11.7% (n = 54/461) and 4.8% (n = 22/461), respectively, with a female predominance in both the moderate (61.1%) and severe (95.5%) PLD groups. Pressure-related complications such as leg edema (20.4%), ascites (16.6%), and hernia (3.6%) were common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 6-fold increased risk (compared to no or mild PLD) for these complications in multivariate analysis. Similarly, abdominal symptoms including back pain (58.8%), flank pain (53.1%), abdominal fullness (46.5%), and dyspnea/chest-discomfort (44.3%) were very common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 5-fold increased risk for these symptoms. Moderate to severe PLD is a common and clinically important problem in ~16% of patients with ADPKD who may benefit from referral to specialized centers for further management. PMID:26641645

  6. Novel CACNA1S mutation causes autosomal dominant hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiufen; Liu, Mugen; Xu, Chunsheng; Tang, Zhaohui; Liao, Yuhua; Du, Rong; Li, Wei; Wu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Xianqin; Zhu, Jianfang; Ren, Xiang; Ke, Tie; Wang, Qing; Yang, Junguo

    2006-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder which is characterized by periodic attacks of muscle weakness associated with a decrease in the serum potassium level. The skeletal muscle calcium channel ?-subunit gene CACNA1S is a major disease-causing gene for HypoPP, however, only three specific HypoPP-causing mutations, Arg528His, Arg1,239His and Arg1,239Gly, have been identified in CACNA1S to date. In this study, we studied a four-generation Chinese family with HypoPP with 43 living members and 19 affected individuals. Linkage analysis showed that the causative mutation in the family is linked to the CACNA1S gene with a LOD score of 6.7. DNA sequence analysis revealed a heterozygous C to G transition at nucleotide 1,582, resulting in a novel 1,582C?G (Arg528Gly) mutation. The Arg528Gly mutation co-segregated with all affected individuals in the family, and was not present in 200 matched normal controls. The penetrance of the Arg528Gly mutation was complete in male mutation carriers, however, a reduced penetrance of 83% (10/12) was observed in female carriers. No differences were detected for age-at-onset and severity of the disease (frequency of symptomatic attacks per year) between male and female patients. Oral intake of KCl is effective in blocking the symptomatic attacks. This study identifies a novel Arg528Gly mutation in the CACNA1S gene that causes HypoPP in a Chinese family, expands the spectrum of mutations causing HypoPP, and demonstrates a gender difference in the penetrance of the disease. PMID:15726306

  7. Evaluation of Lipin 2 as a candidate gene for autosomal dominant 1 high-grade myopia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Young, Terri L

    2005-06-01

    The first autosomal dominant high-grade myopia locus has been mapped to chromosome 18p11.31 between markers D18S59 and D18S1138 by haplotype analysis. Refinement of the region by transmission disequilibrium testing suggests that a candidate gene (or genes) for this locus named myopia 2 (MYP2) is likely in an interval between markers D18S63 and D18S52. Lipin 2 (LPIN2), a candidate gene for lipodystrophy, maps in proximity to this locus. Our purpose in this study was to identify mutations and polymorphisms in the LPIN2 gene in myopic patients and control subjects. Expression studies of this gene by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that LPIN2 was ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, such as brain, kidney, lung, heart, and skeletal muscles. It was also expressed in cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve, and sclera. Direct sequencing of the LPIN2 gene revealed 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in myopia and unaffected individuals. Eight of them were novel. Among the 11 SNPs detected in this study, 2 exonic variants (G2950692A and C2924436T) were synonymous and do not lead to changes in amino acid of the translated protein product. Two transversions in intron 1 (T2951033A homozygote and heterozygote, C2951049A) and one transversions in intron 7 (G2924536C homozygote and heterozygote), 5 nucleotide variants (A 2909606T, del2909343T, G2907798C, T2907425G, T2907152C) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), and TATTAA nucleotide deletions (homozygote and heterozygote) at 2950970-5 in intron 1 were also detected. Although LPIN2 gene was excluded as a candidate for MYP2, the SNPs detected in this study will aid in future mapping and association studies involving this gene. PMID:15862761

  8. A novel frameshift mutation of POU4F3 gene associated with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee Keun; Park, Hong-Joon; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Park, Rekil; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2010-06-04

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the transcription factor POU4F3 gene are associated with non-syndromic hearing loss in humans; however, there have been few reports of mutations in this gene worldwide. We performed a mutation analysis of the POU4F3 gene in 42 unrelated Koreans with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss, identifying a novel 14-bp deletion mutation in exon 2 (c.662del14) in one patient. Audiometric examination revealed severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in this patient. The novel mutation led to a truncated protein that lacked both functional POU domains. We further investigated the functional distinction between wild-type and mutant POU4F3 proteins using in vitro assays. The wild-type protein was completely localized in the nucleus, while the truncation of protein seriously affected its nuclear localization. In addition, the mutant failed to activate reporter gene expression. This is the first report of a POU4F3 mutation in Asia, and moreover our data suggest that further investigation will need to delineate ethnicity-specific genetic background for autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss within Asian populations.

  9. Evaluation of candidate genes for familial brachydactyly.

    PubMed Central

    Mastrobattista, J M; Dollé, P; Blanton, S H; Northrup, H

    1995-01-01

    Type A1 brachydactyly in humans is a recognisable syndrome characterised by shortening of the middle phalanx of all digits with occasional fusion of the middle and terminal phalanges. The purpose of this study was to evaluate candidate genes for type A1 brachydactyly in two families with multiple affected members. Several classes of genes have been implicated in the control of distal limb development including homeobox containing genes (MSX1, MSX2) some members of the homeobox gene family, and genes encoding growth factors of the FGF, TGF, and PDGF families. Homeobox (Hox) genes are a family of developmental control genes activated early in embryogenesis that encode positional information along the anterior-posterior body axis and specify distinct spatial domains within developing limbs. Growth factor genes can regulate the proliferation and differentiation of various embryonic structures including limb buds and have been shown to influence Hox gene expression. Candidate genes HOXD, MSX1, MSX2, FGF-1, and FGF-2 were excluded in one family. The brachydactyly type A1 gene or locus was not found in either of the two families studied. PMID:8592325

  10. A Nonsense Mutation in CRYBB1 Associated with Autosomal Dominant Cataract Linked to Human Chromosome 22q

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Donna S.; Boskovska, Olivera B.; Knopf, Harry L. S.; Lampi, Kirsten J.; Shiels, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cataract is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous lens disorder that usually presents as a sight-threatening trait in childhood. Here we have mapped dominant pulverulent cataract to the ?-crystallin gene cluster on chromosome 22q11.2. Suggestive evidence of linkage was detected at markers D22S1167 (LOD score [Z] 2.09 at recombination fraction [?] 0) and D22S1154 (Z=1.39 at ?=0), which closely flank the genes for ?B1-crystallin (CRYBB1) and ?A4-crystallin (CRYBA4). Sequencing failed to detect any nucleotide changes in CRYBA4; however, a G?T transversion in exon 6 of CRYBB1 was found to cosegregate with cataract in the family. This single-nucleotide change was predicted to introduce a translation stop codon at glycine 220 (G220X). Expression of recombinant human ?B1-crystallin in bacteria showed that the truncated G220X mutant was significantly less soluble than wild type. This study has identified the first CRYBB1 mutation associated with autosomal dominant cataract in humans. PMID:12360425

  11. Mutations in extracellular matrix genes NID1 and LAMC1 cause autosomal dominant Dandy-Walker malformation and occipital cephaloceles

    PubMed Central

    Darbro, Benjamin W.; Mahajan, Vinit B.; Gakhar, Lokesh; Skeie, Jessica M.; Campbell, Elizabeth; Wu, Shu; Bing, Xinyu; Millen, Kathleen J.; Dobyns, William B.; Kessler, John A.; Jalali, Ali; Cremer, James; Segre, Alberto; Manak, J. Robert; Aldinger, Kimerbly A.; Suzuki, Satoshi; Natsume, Nagato; Ono, Maya; Hai, Huynh Dai; Viet, Le Thi; Loddo, Sara; Valente, Enza M.; Bernardini, Laura; Ghonge, Nitin; Ferguson, Polly J.; Bassuk, Alexander G.

    2013-01-01

    We performed whole-exome sequencing of a family with autosomal dominant Dandy-Walker malformation and occipital cephaloceles (ADDWOC) and detected a mutation in the extracellular matrix protein encoding gene NID1. In a second family, protein interaction network analysis identified a mutation in LAMC1, which encodes a NID1 binding partner. Structural modeling the NID1-LAMC1 complex demonstrated that each mutation disrupts the interaction. These findings implicate the extracellular matrix in the pathogenesis of Dandy-Walker spectrum disorders. PMID:23674478

  12. Whole Exome Sequencing Identified MCM2 as a Novel Causative Gene for Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Deafness in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cheng; Chen, Siqi; Qi, Yu; Liu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    We report the genetic analysis of autosomal dominant, nonsyndromic, progressive sensorineural hearing loss in a Chinese family. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a missense variant (c.130C>T, p.R44C) in the MCM2 gene, which has a pro-apoptosis effect and is involved in the initiation of eukaryotic genome replication. This missense variant is very likely to be the disease causing variant. It segregated with hearing loss in this pedigree, and was not found in the dbSNP database or databases of genomes and SNP in the Chinese population, in 76 patients with sporadic hearing loss, or in 145 normal individuals. We performed western blot and immunofluorescence to test the MCM2 protein expression in the cochlea of rats and guinea pigs, demonstrating that MCM2 was widely expressed in the cochlea and was also surprisingly expressed in the cytoplasm of terminally differentiated hair cells. We then transiently expressed the variant MCM2 cDNA in HEK293 cells, and found that these cells displayed a slight increase in apoptosis without any changes in proliferation or cell cycle, supporting the view that this variant is pathogenic. In summary, we have identified MCM2 as a novel gene responsible for nonsyndromic hearing loss of autosomal dominant inheritance in a Chinese family. PMID:26196677

  13. BRAIN ABNORMALITIES IN YOUNG ADULTS AT GENETIC RISK FOR AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Reiman, Eric M.; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Chen, Kewei; Velez-Pardo, Carlos; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Fagan, Anne M.; Shah, Aarti R.; Alvarez, Sergio; Arbelaez, Andrés; Giraldo, Margarita; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Sperling, Reisa A.; Dickerson, Brad; Stern, Chantal E.; Tirado, Victoria; Munoz, Claudia; Reiman, Rebecca A.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Alexander, Gene E.; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background We previously detected functional brain imaging abnormalities in young adults at genetic risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we sought to characterize structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and plasma biomarker abnormalities in young adults at risk for autosomal dominant early-onset AD. Biomarker measurements were characterized and compared in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers and non-carriers from the world’s largest known autosomal dominant early-onset AD kindred, more than two decades before the carriers’ estimated median age of 44 at the onset of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and before their estimated age of 28 at the onset of amyloid-? (A?) plaque deposition. Methods Biomarker data for this cross-sectional study were acquired in Antioquia, Colombia between July and August, 2010. Forty-four participants from the Colombian Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative (API) Registry had structural MRIs, functional MRIs during associative memory encoding/novel viewing and control tasks, and cognitive assessments. They included 20 mutation carriers and 24 non-carriers, who were cognitively normal, 18-26 years old and matched for their gender, age, and educational level. Twenty of the participants, including 10 mutation carriers and 10 non-carriers, had lumbar punctures and venipunctures. Primary outcome measures included task-dependent hippocampal/parahippocampal activations and precuneus/posterior cingulate deactivations, regional gray matter reductions, CSF A?1-42, total tau and phospho-tau181 levels, and plasma A?1-42 levels and A?1-42/A?1-40 ratios. Structural and functional MRI data were compared using automated brain mapping algorithms and AD-related search regions. Cognitive and fluid biomarkers were compared using Mann-Whitney tests. Findings The mutation carrier and non-carrier groups did not differ significantly in their dementia ratings, neuropsychological test scores, or proportion of apolipoprotein E (APOE) ?4 carriers. Compared to the non-carriers, carriers had higher CSF A?1-42 levels (p=0·008), plasma A?1-42 levels (p=0·01), and plasma A?1-42/A?1-40 ratios (p=0·001), consistent with A?1-42 overproduction. They also had greater hippocampal/parahippocampal activations (as low as p=0·008, after correction for multiple comparisons), less precuneus/posterior cingulate deactivations (as low as p=0·001, after correction), less gray matter in several regions (p-values <0·005, uncorrected, and corrected p=0·008 in the parietal search region), similar to findings in the later preclinical and clinical stages of autosomal dominant and late-onset AD. Interpretation Young adults at genetic risk for autosomal dominant AD have functional and structural MRI abnormalities, along with CSF and plasma biomarker findings consistent with A?1-42 over-production. While the extent to which the underlying brain changes are progressive or developmental remain to be determined, this study demonstrates the earliest known biomarker changes in cognitively normal people at genetic risk for autosomal dominant AD. Funding Banner Alzheimer’s Foundation, Nomis Foundation, Anonymous Foundation, Forget Me Not Initiative, Boston University Department of Psychology, Colciencias (1115-408-20512, 1115-545-31651), National Institute on Aging (R01 AG031581, P30 AG19610, UO1 AG024904, RO1 AG025526, RF1AG041705), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (F31-NS078786) and state of Arizona. PMID:23137948

  14. A novel mutation in the TECTA gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu; Tang, Wen-Xue; Gao, Xue; Yu, Fei; Dai, Zhi-Yao; Zhao, Jian-Dong; Lu, Yu; Ji, Fei; Huang, Sha-Sha; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Han, Ming-Yu; Song, Yue-Shuai; Zhu, Yu-Hua; Kang, Dong-Yang; Han, Dong-Yi; Dai, Pu

    2014-01-01

    TECTA-related deafness can be inherited as autosomal-dominant nonsyndromic deafness (designated DFNA) or as the autosomal-recessive version. The ?-tectorin protein, which is encoded by the TECTA gene, is one of the major components of the tectorial membrane in the inner ear. Using targeted DNA capture and massively parallel sequencing (MPS), we screened 42 genes known to be responsible for human deafness in a Chinese family (Family 3187) in which common deafness mutations had been ruled out as the cause, and identified a novel mutation, c.257-262CCTTTC>GCT (p. Ser86Cys; p. Pro88del) in exon 3 of the TECTA gene in the proband and his extended family. All affected individuals in this family had moderate down-sloping hearing loss across all frequencies. To our knowledge, this is the second TECTA mutation identified in Chinese population. This study demonstrates that targeted genomic capture, MPS, and barcode technology might broaden the availability of genetic testing for individuals with undiagnosed DFNA. PMID:24586623

  15. Elevated serum levels of creatine kinase BB in autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II--a family study.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Fowler, H L; Pendleton, J W; Sforza, P P; Gerard, R D; Lui, C Y; Eldridge, T H; Iranmanesh, A

    1992-07-01

    A markedly elevated BB isoenzyme fraction of serum creatine kinase was noted in four male siblings and correlated with typical radiographic findings of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis Type II (ADO Type II). Patients with other sclerosing bone diseases had no elevation of CK-BB. The precision of the electrophoretic mobility patterns and correlation by I-125 tagged radioimmunoassay method confirms that this is CK-BB. We postulate that the dysfunctional and/or immature osteoclasts in ADO are more dependent on CK-BB than on the usual tricarboxylic acid cycle for the production of energy. The correlation of marked elevation of serum CK-BB with radiographic evidence of ADO Type II may prove to be of value as a biologic marker in the early diagnosis of the illness and lead to better understanding of the metabolism of bone. PMID:1516225

  16. Genetic linkage analysis of 14 candidate gene loci in a family with autosomal dominant osteoarthritis without dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbelt, I; Bijkerk, C; Breedveld, F C; Slagboom, P E

    1997-01-01

    The role of various gene loci was investigated in a family in which familial osteoarthritis (FOA), with onset at an early age, is transmitted as an autosomal dominant mendelian trait. The absence of clinical and radiographic signs of dysplasia and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPDD) indicates that the basic disease process in this family is osteoarthritis (OA). Genetic linkage analysis of 14 candidate genes resulted in the exclusion of 10 important genes (COL2A1, COL9A1, COL9A2, COL11A1, COL11A2, COMP, the CPDD region, CRTL-1, CRTM, and MMP3). Other relevant genes were not informative in this family. The candidate loci previously identified in FOA and heritable skeletal disorders associated with OA are clearly not involved in the development of the primary FOA phenotype in the family investigated, indicating genetic heterogeneity. Images PMID:9429149

  17. Linkage analysis excludes the glaucoma locus on 1q from involvement in autosomal dominant glaucoma with iris hypoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Heon, E.; Sheth, B.P.; Kalenak, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic factors have been implicated in a variety of types of glaucoma including primary open-angle glaucoma, infantile glaucoma, pigmentary glaucoma, and juvenile open-angle glaucoma. We previously mapped the disease-causing gene for one type of juvenile open angle glaucoma to chromosome 1q21-31. Weatherill and Hart (1969) and Pearce (1983) each noted the association of iris hypoplasia and early-onset autosomal dominant glaucoma. We recently had the opportunity to study a large family (12 affected members) with this phenotype. Affected individuals developed glaucoma at an average age of 30 years. These patients also have a strikingly underdeveloped iris stroma which causes a peculiar eye color. Linkage analysis was able to completely exclude the 1q glaucoma locus from involvement in the disorder that affects this family. A complete clinical description of the family and linkage results at additional candidate loci will be presented.

  18. Mapping of a gene for autosomal dominant juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 1 q

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, J.E.; Lichter, P.R.; Torrez, D.; Wong, D.; Johnson, A.T.; Boehnke, M.; Uro, J.L.A. )

    1994-01-01

    A large Caucasian family is presented, in which a juvenile-onset form of open-angle glaucoma is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. Sixteen affected family members were identified from 31 at-risk individuals descended from the affected founder. Affected patients developed high intraocular pressures (sometimes >40 mm Hg) within the first 2 decades of life. Linkage analysis between the disease phenotype and 12 microsatellite repeat markers located on chromosome 1 q gave a maximum lod score of 8.38 at a recombination fraction of zero for marker D1S210. Analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggests a total inclusion region of about 14 cM between markers D1S194 and D1S218 at 1q21-q31. This represents the second juvenile-glaucoma family, in which the disease has been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 1. 57 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD): executive summary from a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Arlene B; Devuyst, Olivier; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gansevoort, Ron T; Harris, Tess; Horie, Shigeo; Kasiske, Bertram L; Odland, Dwight; Pei, York; Perrone, Ronald D; Pirson, Yves; Schrier, Robert W; Torra, Roser; Torres, Vicente E; Watnick, Terry; Wheeler, David C

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) affects up to 12 million individuals and is the fourth most common cause for renal replacement therapy worldwide. There have been many recent advances in the understanding of its molecular genetics and biology, and in the diagnosis and management of its manifestations. Yet, diagnosis, evaluation, prevention, and treatment vary widely and there are no broadly accepted practice guidelines. Barriers to translation of basic science breakthroughs to clinical care exist, with considerable heterogeneity across countries. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Controversies Conference on ADPKD brought together a panel of multidisciplinary clinical expertise and engaged patients to identify areas of consensus, gaps in knowledge, and research and health-care priorities related to diagnosis; monitoring of kidney disease progression; management of hypertension, renal function decline and complications; end-stage renal disease; extrarenal complications; and practical integrated patient support. These are summarized in this review. PMID:25786098

  20. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma to 1q21-q31 in three affected pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Paglinauan, C.; Fine, A.; Sporn, C.; Lou, D. ); Haines, J.L. )

    1994-05-15

    Glaucoma is a common disorder that results in irreversible damage to the optic nerve, causing absolute blindness. In most cases, the optic nerve is damaged by an elevation of the intraocular pressure that is the result of an abnormality in the normal drainage function of the trabecular meshwork. A family history of glaucoma is an important risk factor for the disease, suggesting that genetic defects predisposing to this condition are likely. Three pedigrees segregating an autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma demonstrated significant linkage to a group of closely spaced markers on chromosome 1. These results confirm the initial mapping of this disease and suggest that this region on chromosome 1 contains an important locus for juvenile glaucoma. The authors describe recombination events that improve the localization of the responsible gene, reducing the size of the candidate region from 30 to 12 cM. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Linkage and clinical characterization of families with the RP10 (chromosome 7q) form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.A.; Humphries, P.; McGuire, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a set of degenerative retinal diseases characterized by night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, often followed by loss of central vision. Genetically heterogeneous, retinitis pigmentosa has been found in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked forms. For autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), 6 loci have been mapped: rhodopsin on chromosome 3q, peripherin/RDS on 6p, RP9 on 7p, RP10 on 7q, RP1 on 8q, and RP11 on 19q. Jordan et al. first reported linkage to 7q in a Spanish family with early onset disease. Recently, McGuire et al. reported the existence of a second, unrelated family of American descent with adRP that maps to the same region of 7q. The second family also has classical, diffuse retinitis pigmentosa though with later onset. The finding of two unrelated families that map to this region suggests that RP10 may account for a significant fraction of retinitis pigmentosa cases. Combining data from both families localizes the disease gene to 7q31.1-q35. In the Spanish family a Z{sub max} of 7.2 at 0% recombination was found with the marker D7S480 and affected individuals recombinant for D7S486 and D7S650 flank the disease. The American family showed a Z{sub max} of 5.3 at 0% recombination wtih the marker D7S514 and there are affected individuals recombinant for the markers D7S522, D7S677 and D7S486, and one affected individual recombinant for D7S530. Together, these data place the disease locus between D7S522 and D7S650. In addition, blue cone pigment, which maps to 7q31.3-q32, was excluded as a candidate gene in both families by linkage testing using intragenic polymorphisms and mutation screening.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of congenital hyperinsulinism due to autosomal dominant mutations in ABCC8.

    PubMed

    Nessa, Azizun; Aziz, Qadeer H; Thomas, Alison M; Harmer, Stephen C; Tinker, Andrew; Hussain, Khalid

    2015-09-15

    Congenital Hyperinsulinism (CHI) is a rare heterogeneous disease characterized by unregulated insulin secretion. Dominant mutations in ABCC8 causing medically unresponsive CHI have been reported; however, the molecular mechanisms are not clear. The molecular basis of medically unresponsive CHI due to dominant ABCC8 mutations has been studied in 10 patients, who were medically unresponsive to diazoxide (DZX), and nine of whom required a near-total pancreatectomy, and one partial pancreatectomy. DNA sequencing revealed seven dominant inactivating heterozygous missense mutations in ABCC8, including one novel and six previously reported but uncharacterized mutations. Two groups of mutations with different cellular mechanisms were characterized. Mutations in the transmembrane domain (TMD) were more responsive to channel activators such as DZX, MgADP and metabolic inhibition. The trafficking analysis has shown that nucleotide-binding domain two (NBD2) mutations are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are present on the membrane. However, the TMD mutations were retained in the ER. D1506E was the most severe SUR1-NBD2 mutation. Homologous expression of D1506E revealed a near absence of KATP currents in the presence of DZX and intracellular MgADP. Heterozygous expression of D1506E showed a strong dominant-negative effect on SUR1\\Kir6.2 currents. Overall, we define two groups of mutation with different cellular mechanisms. In the first group, channel complexes with mutations in NBD2 of SUR1 traffic normally but are unable to be activated by MgADP. In the second group, channels mutations in the TMD of SUR1 are retained in the ER and have variable functional impairment. PMID:26092864

  3. A novel CRX mutation by whole-exome sequencing in an autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy pedigree

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qin-Kang; Zhao, Na; Lv, Ya-Su; Gong, Wei-Kun; Wang, Hui-Yun; Tong, Qi-Hu; Lai, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Rong-Rong; Fang, Ming-Yan; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Du, Zhen-Fang; Zhang, Xian-Ning

    2015-01-01

    AIM To identify the disease-causing gene mutation in a Chinese pedigree with autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy (adCORD). METHODS A southern Chinese adCORD pedigree including 9 affected individuals was studied. Whole-exome sequencing (WES), coupling the Agilent whole-exome capture system to the Illumina HiSeq 2000 DNA sequencing platform was used to search the specific gene mutation in 3 affected family members and 1 unaffected member. After a suggested variant was found through the data analysis, the putative mutation was validated by Sanger DNA sequencing of samples from all available family members. RESULTS The results of both WES and Sanger sequencing revealed a novel nonsense mutation c.C766T (p.Q256X) within exon 5 of CRX gene which was pathogenic for adCORD in this family. The mutation could affect photoreceptor-specific gene expression with a dominant-negative effect and resulted in loss of the OTX tail, thus the mutant protein occupies the CRX-binding site in target promoters without establishing an interaction and, consequently, may block transactivation. CONCLUSION All modes of Mendelian inheritance in CORD have been observed, and genetic heterogeneity is a hallmark of CORD. Therefore, conventional genetic diagnosis of CORD would be time-consuming and labor-intensive. Our study indicated the robustness and cost-effectiveness of WES in the genetic diagnosis of CORD. PMID:26682157

  4. Two pedigrees of autosomal dominant atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD): Exclusion from the critical region on 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Amati, F.; Mari, A.; Mingarelli, R.

    1995-07-03

    Atrioventricular canal defects (AVCD) constitute the predominant congenital heart defect in Down`s syndrome. For this reason, a candidate gene involved in atrioventricular canal development was previously searched and excluded in dominant pedigrees of AVCD, using linkage analysis of polymorphisms from chromosome 21. Because of the striking association between 8p deletion and AVCD, a search for an AVCD gene was carried out in two pedigrees of individuals with autosomal dominant AVCD using a set of DNA markers of the 8pter{r_arrow}q12 region. These two families include affected individuals and subjects who have transmitted the defect but are not clinically affected. Two-point lod scores were significantly negative for all markers at penetrance levels of 90% and 50%. Multipoint analysis excluded the region covered by the markers LPL-D8S262 and 30 cM to either side of this area. This result corroborates heterogeneity of this heart defect and indicates that the genetic basis of familial AVCD is different from AVCD associated to either trisomy 21 or 8p deletion. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Age-dependent gait abnormalities in mice lacking the Rnf170 gene linked to human autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Kook Hwan; Chae, Sujin; Kim, Chanki; Kim, Jeongjin; Shin, Hee-Sup; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kim, Daesoo

    2015-12-20

    Really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 170 (RNF170) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase known to mediate ubiquitination-dependent degradation of type-I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (ITPR1). It has recently been demonstrated that a point mutation of RNF170 gene is linked with autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), which is characterized by an age-dependent increase of walking abnormalities, a rare genetic disorder reported in only two families. Although this mutant allele is known to be dominant, the functional identity thereof has not been clearly established. Here, we generated mice lacking Rnf170 (Rnf170(-/-)) to evaluate the effect of its loss of function in vivo. Remarkably, Rnf170(-/-) mice began to develop gait abnormalities in old age (12 months) in the form of asynchronous stepping between diagonal limb pairs with a fixed step sequence during locomotion, while age-matched wild-type mice showed stable gait patterns using several step sequence repertoires. As reported in ADSA patients, they also showed a reduced sensitivity for proprioception and thermal nociception. Protein blot analysis revealed that the amount of Itpr1 protein was significantly elevated in the cerebellum and spinal cord but intact in the cerebral cortex in Rnf170(-/-) mice. These results suggest that the loss of Rnf170 gene function mediates ADSA-associated phenotypes and this gives insights on the cure of patients with ADSA and other age-dependent walking abnormalities. PMID:26433933

  6. Acute simultaneous multiple lacunar infarcts as the initial presentation of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Chen, Yun-Chung; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an adult-onset, dominantly inherited small-vessel disease of the brain caused by NOTCH3 mutations and characterized by recurrent subcortical infarctions, dementia, migraine with aura, and mood disturbance. We report a patient with unusual presentation of CADASIL with acute simultaneous multiple subcortical lacunar infarcts as the first manifestation. A 69-year-old man developed confusion, drowsiness, right hemiparesis, and slurred speech following orthopedic surgeries. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse leukoencephalopathy and multiple acute subcortical lacunar infarcts. Brain magnetic resonance angiography, echocardiography and 24-hour electrocardiography were unremarkable. The symptoms improved quickly after treatment with fluid hydration and antiplatelet agent, and his consciousness and mentality totally recovered within 3 days. The NOTCH3 genetic testing showed a heterozygous missense mutation, c.1630C>T (p. Arg544Cys). The experience in this case suggests that brain imaging is important in managing postoperative confusion, and any patient with diffuse leukoencephalopathy of unknown etiology may need to be tested for NOTCH3 mutations. Surgery is an important factor of encephalopathy and acute infarction in individuals with NOTCH3 mutations. Comprehensive presurgical evaluations and proactive perioperative precautions to avoid dehydration and anemia are necessary for patients with CADASIL who are about to receive anesthesia and surgery. PMID:25959358

  7. Autosomal Dominant Hypercalciuria in a Mouse Model Due to a Mutation of the Epithelial Calcium Channel, TRPV5

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Nellie Y.; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Tammaro, Paolo; Gorvin, Caroline M.; Stechman, Michael J.; Ahmad, Bushra N.; Hannan, Fadil M.; Piret, Sian E.; Evans, Holly; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Hough, Tertius A.; Fraser, William D.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Brown, Steve D. M.; Bindels, René J. M.; Cox, Roger D.; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Hypercalciuria is a major cause of nephrolithiasis, and is a common and complex disorder involving genetic and environmental factors. Identification of genetic factors for monogenic forms of hypercalciuria is hampered by the limited availability of large families, and to facilitate such studies, we screened for hypercalciuria in mice from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis programme. We identified a mouse with autosomal dominant hypercalciuria (HCALC1). Linkage studies mapped the Hcalc1 locus to a 11.94 Mb region on chromosome 6 containing the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, members 5 (Trpv5) and 6 (Trpv6) genes. DNA sequence analysis of coding regions, intron-exon boundaries and promoters of Trpv5 and Trpv6 identified a novel T to C transition in codon 682 of TRPV5, mutating a conserved serine to a proline (S682P). Compared to wild-type littermates, heterozygous (Trpv5682P/+) and homozygous (Trpv5682P/682P) mutant mice had hypercalciuria, polyuria, hyperphosphaturia and a more acidic urine, and ?10% of males developed tubulointerstitial nephritis. Trpv5682P/682P mice also had normal plasma parathyroid hormone but increased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations without increased bone resorption, consistent with a renal defect for the hypercalciuria. Expression of the S682P mutation in human embryonic kidney cells revealed that TRPV5-S682P-expressing cells had a lower baseline intracellular calcium concentration than wild-type TRPV5-expressing cells, suggesting an altered calcium permeability. Immunohistological studies revealed a selective decrease in TRPV5-expression from the renal distal convoluted tubules of Trpv5682P/+ and Trpv5682P/682P mice consistent with a trafficking defect. In addition, Trpv5682P/682P mice had a reduction in renal expression of the intracellular calcium-binding protein, calbindin-D28K, consistent with a specific defect in TRPV5-mediated renal calcium reabsorption. Thus, our findings indicate that the TRPV5 S682P mutant is functionally significant and study of HCALC1, a novel model for autosomal dominant hypercalciuria, may help further our understanding of renal calcium reabsorption and hypercalciuria. PMID:23383183

  8. Diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease using efficient PKD1 and PKD2 targeted next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Trujillano, Daniel; Bullich, Gemma; Ossowski, Stephan; Ballarín, José; Torra, Roser; Estivill, Xavier; Ars, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) relies on mutation screening of PKD1 and PKD2, which is complicated by extensive allelic heterogeneity and the presence of six highly homologous sequences of PKD1. To date, specific sequencing of PKD1 requires laborious long-range amplifications. The high cost and long turnaround time of PKD1 and PKD2 mutation analysis using conventional techniques limits its widespread application in clinical settings. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of PKD1 and PKD2. Pooled barcoded DNA patient libraries were enriched by in-solution hybridization with PKD1 and PKD2 capture probes. Bioinformatics analysis was performed using an in-house developed pipeline. We validated the assay in a cohort of 36 patients with previously known PKD1 and PKD2 mutations and five control individuals. Then, we used the same assay and bioinformatics analysis in a discovery cohort of 12 uncharacterized patients. We detected 35 out of 36 known definitely, highly likely, and likely pathogenic mutations in the validation cohort, including two large deletions. In the discovery cohort, we detected 11 different pathogenic mutations in 10 out of 12 patients. This study demonstrates that laborious long-range PCRs of the repeated PKD1 region can be avoided by in-solution enrichment of PKD1 and PKD2 and NGS. This strategy significantly reduces the cost and time for simultaneous PKD1 and PKD2 sequence analysis, facilitating routine genetic diagnostics of ADPKD. PMID:25333066

  9. Identification of novel PKD1 and PKD2 mutations in a Chinese population with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bei; Chen, Song-Chang; Yang, Yan-Mei; Yan, Kai; Qian, Ye-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Hu, Yu-Ting; Dong, Min-Yue; Jin, Fan; Huang, He-Feng; Xu, Chen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most frequently inherited renal diseases caused by mutations in PKD1 and PKD2. We performed mutational analyses of PKD genes in 49 unrelated patients using direct PCR-sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for PKD1 and PKD2. RT-PCR analysis was also performed in a family with a novel PKD2 splicing mutation. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 44 (89.8%) of the patients: 42 (95.5%) of the patients showed mutations in PKD1, and 2 (4.5%) showed mutations in PKD2. Ten nonsense, 17 frameshift, 4 splicing and one in-frame mutation were found in 32 of the patients. Large rearrangements were found in 3 patients, and missense mutations were found in 9 patients. Approximately 61.4% (27/44) of the mutations are first reported with a known mutation rate of 38.6%. RNA analysis of a novel PKD2 mutation (c.595_595?+?14delGGTAAGAGCGCGCGA) suggested monoallelic expression of the wild-type allele. Furthermore, patients with PKD1-truncating mutations reached end-stage renal disease (ESRD) earlier than patients with non-truncating mutations (47?±?3.522 years vs. 59?±?11.687 years, P?=?0.016). The mutation screening of PKD genes in Chinese ADPKD patients will enrich our mutation database and significantly contribute to improve genetic counselling for ADPKD patients. PMID:26632257

  10. T-cell factor/?-catenin activity is suppressed in two different models of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle M; Iglesias, Diana M; Zhang, Zhao; Corsini, Rachel; Chu, LeeLee; Murawski, Inga; Gupta, Indra; Somlo, Stefan; Germino, Gregory G; Goodyer, Paul R

    2011-07-01

    During murine kidney development, canonical WNT signaling is highly active in tubules until about embryonic days E16-E18. At this time, ?-catenin transcriptional activity is progressively restricted to the nephrogenic zone. The cilial protein genes PKD1 and PKD2 are known to be mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), and previous studies proposed that these mutations could lead to a failure to suppress canonical WNT signaling activity. Several in vitro studies have found a link between cilial signaling and ?-catenin regulation, suggesting that aberrant activity might contribute to the cystic phenotype. To study this, we crossed T-cell factor (TCF)/?-catenin-lacZ reporter mice with mice having Pkd1 or Pkd2 mutations and found that there was no ?-galactosidase staining in cells lining the renal cysts. Thus, suppression of canonical WNT activity, defined by the TCF/?-catenin-lacZ reporter, is normal in these two different models of polycystic kidney disease. Hence, excessive ?-catenin transcriptional activity may not contribute to cystogenesis in these models of ADPKD. PMID:21389971

  11. Two novel missense mutations in the TECTA gene in Korean families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sagong, Borum; Park, Raekil; Kim, Yee Hyuk; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Baek, Jeong-In; Cho, Hyun-Joo; Cho, In-Jee; Kim, Un-Kyung; Lee, Sang-Heun

    2010-01-01

    The TECTA gene, which encodes alpha-tectorin, is known as a causative gene for DFNA8/DFNA12, and DFNB21 hearing loss in humans. In the present study, mutation analysis of the TECTA gene was performed in 62 Korean patients with hereditary hearing loss. Two novel nucleotide substitutions, p.V317E and p.T1866M, were identified for the first time in the Korean population. These mutations result in the substitution of amino acids in the zonadhesin (ZA) and the zona pellucida (ZP) domains, and show a genotype-phenotype correlation, which is a characteristic of TECTA-related mutations in autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss. Both mutations are located in highly conserved regions of alpha-tectorin and were not found in 120 unrelated control subjects with normal hearing. Based on this evidence, it is likely that both mutations are the pathogenic ones causing the hearing loss. This study provides useful information for the functional study of hereditary hearing loss caused by tectorial membrane defects. PMID:20947814

  12. Early astrocytosis in autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease measured in vivo by multi-tracer positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Schöll, Michael; Carter, Stephen F.; Westman, Eric; Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Almkvist, Ove; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Wall, Anders; Graff, Caroline; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Studying autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD), caused by gene mutations yielding nearly complete penetrance and a distinct age of symptom onset, allows investigation of presymptomatic pathological processes that can identify a therapeutic window for disease-modifying therapies. Astrocyte activation may occur in presymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because reactive astrocytes surround ?-amyloid (A?) plaques in autopsy brain tissue. Positron emission tomography was performed to investigate fibrillar A?, astrocytosis and cerebral glucose metabolism with the radiotracers 11C-Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB), 11C-deuterium-L-deprenyl (DED) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) respectively in presymptomatic and symptomatic ADAD participants (n?=?21), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n?=?11) and sporadic AD (n?=?7). Multivariate analysis using the combined data from all radiotracers clearly separated the different groups along the first and second principal components according to increased PIB retention/decreased FDG uptake (component 1) and increased DED binding (component 2). Presymptomatic ADAD mutation carriers showed significantly higher PIB retention than non-carriers in all brain regions except the hippocampus. DED binding was highest in presymptomatic ADAD mutation carriers. This suggests that non-fibrillar A? or early stage plaque depostion might interact with inflammatory responses indicating astrocytosis as an early contributory driving force in AD pathology. The novelty of this finding will be investigated in longitudinal follow-up studies. PMID:26553227

  13. Ameloblastin gene (AMBN) maps within the critical region for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta at chromosome 4q21.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, M; DuPont, B R; Simmons, D; Reus, B; Krebsbach, P; Kärrman, C; Holmgren, G; Leach, R J; Forsman, K

    1997-04-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a broad group of hereditary enamel defects that is characterized by a high degree of clinical diversity. Recently, the local hypoplastic form of autosomal dominant AI (AIH2) has been mapped to human chromosome 4q in a 17.6-cM region. This locus has been further refined to a 4-Mb interval between D4S2421 and Albumin. Recently, a cDNA clone for an enamel matrix protein, ameloblastin (AMBN), has been isolated. In this report, we have isolated a PAC human genomic clone containing the human AMBN gene. The AMBN was mapped by two color fluorescence in situ hybridization using two P1 genomic clones for sequence tagged site (STS) markers, D4S400 and D4S409, which flank the critical AIH2 region. Our results place AMBN at 4q21 between D4S409 (4q13) and D4S400 (4q21). Furthermore, the AMBN PAC genomic clone was shown to contain three STS markers, D4S2604, D4S2670, and D4S2609, which are contained within the critical region defined by six Swedish families with AIH2. AMBN is therefore a strong candidate gene for AIH2. PMID:9126491

  14. Apelin and copeptin: two opposite biomarkers associated with kidney function decline and cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, Antonio; Chirico, Valeria; Lupica, Rosaria; Buemi, Antoine; Loddo, Saverio; Caccamo, Chiara; Salis, Paola; Bertani, Tullio; Buemi, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Vasopressin (AVP) plays a detrimental role in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Copeptin represents a measurable substitute for circulating AVP whereas apelin counteracts AVP signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of apelin and copeptin for the progression of ADPKD disease. 52 ADPKD patients were enrolled and followed until the end of the observation period or the primary study endpoint was reached, defined by the combined outcome of decrease of glomerular filtration rate associated with a total renal volume increase. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was employed for identifying the progression of renal disease and Kaplan-Meier curves assessed the renal survival. Adjusted risk estimates for progression endpoint and incident renal replacement therapy (RRT) were calculated using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. ADPKD patients were characterized by lower apelin levels and higher copeptin levels when compared with healthy subjects. These biomarkers were strictly correlated with osmolality and markers of renal function. At ROC analysis, apelin and copeptin showed a very good diagnostic profile in identifying ADPKD progression. After the follow up of 24 months, 33 patients reached the endpoint. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed that apelin predicted renal disease progression and incident RRT independently of other potential confounders. Apelin is associated with kidney function decline in ADPKD, suggesting that it may be a new marker to predict kidney outcome. PMID:23973863

  15. Early astrocytosis in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease measured in vivo by multi-tracer positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Schöll, Michael; Carter, Stephen F; Westman, Eric; Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Almkvist, Ove; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Wall, Anders; Graff, Caroline; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Studying autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD), caused by gene mutations yielding nearly complete penetrance and a distinct age of symptom onset, allows investigation of presymptomatic pathological processes that can identify a therapeutic window for disease-modifying therapies. Astrocyte activation may occur in presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD) because reactive astrocytes surround ?-amyloid (A?) plaques in autopsy brain tissue. Positron emission tomography was performed to investigate fibrillar A?, astrocytosis and cerebral glucose metabolism with the radiotracers (11)C-Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB), (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl (DED) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) respectively in presymptomatic and symptomatic ADAD participants (n?=?21), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n?=?11) and sporadic AD (n?=?7). Multivariate analysis using the combined data from all radiotracers clearly separated the different groups along the first and second principal components according to increased PIB retention/decreased FDG uptake (component 1) and increased DED binding (component 2). Presymptomatic ADAD mutation carriers showed significantly higher PIB retention than non-carriers in all brain regions except the hippocampus. DED binding was highest in presymptomatic ADAD mutation carriers. This suggests that non-fibrillar A? or early stage plaque depostion might interact with inflammatory responses indicating astrocytosis as an early contributory driving force in AD pathology. The novelty of this finding will be investigated in longitudinal follow-up studies. PMID:26553227

  16. Recurrent Skin and Lung Infections in Autosomal Dominant Hyper IgE Syndrome with Transactivation Domain STAT3 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Chad J.; Said, Sarmad; Hernandez, German T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hyper IgE is a rare systemic disease characterized by the clinical triad of high serum levels of IgE (>2000 IU/mL), eczema, and recurrent staphylococcal skin and lung infections. The presentation of hyper IgE syndrome is highly variable, which makes it easy to confuse the diagnosis with that of severe atopy or other rare immunodeficiency disorders. Case Report. A 23-year-old Hispanic presented with history of frequent respiratory and gastrointestinal infections as a child and multiple episodes of skin and lung infections (abscess) with Staphylococcus aureus throughout his adult life. He had multiple eczematous lesions and folliculitis over his entire body, oral/esophageal candidiasis, and retention of his primary teeth. The IgE was elevated (>5000 IU/mL). Genetic mutation analysis revealed a mutation affecting the transactivation domain of the STAT3 gene. Conclusion. The hallmark of hyper IgE syndrome is serum IgE of >2000 IU/mL. Hyper IgE syndrome is a genetic disorder that is either autosomal dominant or recessive. A definite diagnosis can be made with genetic mutation analysis, and in this case, it revealed a very rare finding of the transactivation domain STAT3 mutation. Hyper IgE syndrome is a challenge for clinicians in establishing a diagnosis in suspected cases. PMID:25379309

  17. A third major locus for autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia maps to 1p34.1-p32.

    PubMed Central

    Varret, M; Rabès, J P; Saint-Jore, B; Cenarro, A; Marinoni, J C; Civeira, F; Devillers, M; Krempf, M; Coulon, M; Thiart, R; Kotze, M J; Schmidt, H; Buzzi, J C; Kostner, G M; Bertolini, S; Pocovi, M; Rosa, A; Farnier, M; Martinez, M; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), one of the most frequent hereditary disorders, is characterized by an isolated elevation of LDL particles that leads to premature mortality from cardiovascular complications. It is generally assumed that mutations in the LDLR and APOB genes account for ADH. We identified one large French pedigree (HC2) and 12 additional white families with ADH in which we excluded linkage to the LDLR and APOB, implicating a new locus we named "FH3." A LOD score of 3.13 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained at markers D1S2892 and D1S2722. We localized the FH3 locus to a 9-cM interval at 1p34.1-p32. We tested four regional markers in another set of 12 ADH families. Positive LOD scores were obtained in three pedigrees, whereas linkage was excluded in the others. Heterogeneity tests indicated linkage to FH3 in approximately 27% of these non-LDLR/non-APOB ADH families and implied a fourth locus. Radiation hybrid mapping located four candidate genes at 1p34.1-p32, outside the critical region, showing no identity with FH3. Our results show that ADH is genetically more heterogeneous than conventionally accepted. PMID:10205269

  18. Opposing Effects of Inhibitors of Aurora-A and EGFR in Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nikonova, Anna S.; Deneka, Alexander Y.; Eckman, Louisa; Kopp, Meghan C.; Hensley, Harvey H.; Egleston, Brian L.; Golemis, Erica A.

    2015-01-01

    Aurora-A kinase (AURKA) overexpression in numerous tumors induces aneuploidy, in part because of cytokinetic defects. Alisertib and other small-molecule inhibitors targeting AURKA are effective in some patients as monotherapies or combination therapies. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pro-proliferative signaling activity is commonly elevated in cancer, and the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib is commonly used as a standard of care agent for cancer. An erlotinib/alisertib combination therapy is currently under assessment in clinical trials, following pre-clinical studies that indicated synergy of these drugs in cancer. We were interested in further exploring the activity of this drug combination. Beyond well-established functions for AURKA in mitotic progression, additional non-mitotic AURKA functions include control of ciliary stability and calcium signaling. Interestingly, alisertib exacerbates the disease phenotype in mouse models for autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a common inherited syndrome induced by aberrant signaling from PKD1 and PKD2, cilia-localized proteins that have calcium channel activity. EGFR is also more active in ADPKD, making erlotinib also of potential interest in this disease setting. In this study, we have explored the interaction of alisertib and erlotinib in an ADPKD model. These experiments indicated erlotinib-­restrained cystogenesis, opposing alisertib action. Erlotinib also interacted with alisertib to regulate proliferative signaling proteins, albeit in a complicated manner. Results suggest a nuanced role of AURKA signaling in different pathogenic conditions and inform the clinical use of AURKA inhibitors in cancer patients with comorbidities. PMID:26528438

  19. Identification of novel PKD1 and PKD2 mutations in a Chinese population with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Chen, Song-Chang; Yang, Yan-Mei; Yan, Kai; Qian, Ye-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Hu, Yu-Ting; Dong, Min-Yue; Jin, Fan; Huang, He-Feng; Xu, Chen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most frequently inherited renal diseases caused by mutations in PKD1 and PKD2. We performed mutational analyses of PKD genes in 49 unrelated patients using direct PCR-sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for PKD1 and PKD2. RT-PCR analysis was also performed in a family with a novel PKD2 splicing mutation. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 44 (89.8%) of the patients: 42 (95.5%) of the patients showed mutations in PKD1, and 2 (4.5%) showed mutations in PKD2. Ten nonsense, 17 frameshift, 4 splicing and one in-frame mutation were found in 32 of the patients. Large rearrangements were found in 3 patients, and missense mutations were found in 9 patients. Approximately 61.4% (27/44) of the mutations are first reported with a known mutation rate of 38.6%. RNA analysis of a novel PKD2 mutation (c.595_595?+?14delGGTAAGAGCGCGCGA) suggested monoallelic expression of the wild-type allele. Furthermore, patients with PKD1-truncating mutations reached end-stage renal disease (ESRD) earlier than patients with non-truncating mutations (47?±?3.522 years vs. 59?±?11.687 years, P?=?0.016). The mutation screening of PKD genes in Chinese ADPKD patients will enrich our mutation database and significantly contribute to improve genetic counselling for ADPKD patients. PMID:26632257

  20. A Report of Accelerated Coronary Artery Disease Associated with Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Courtney B.; Hahn, Virginia; Kobayashi, Taisei; Litwack, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common heritable form of vascular dementia and it is caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. The neurologic manifestations of CADASIL syndrome have been well characterized; however, here we report one of the first de novo cases of CADASIL-associated coronary artery disease. A 45-year-old woman with a history of CADASIL and remote tobacco use presented with unstable angina. She was found to have diffuse and irregular narrowing of the left anterior descending artery and a drug eluting stent was deployed. Months later, she developed two subsequent episodes of unstable angina, requiring stent placement in the distal left anterior descending artery and the right coronary artery. Though the neurologic manifestations of CADASIL have been well described, these patients may also be predisposed to developing premature coronary artery disease. Patients with CADASIL and their physicians should be aware of this possible association because these patients may not be identified as high risk by traditional cardiovascular risk estimators. These patients may benefit from more aggressive interventions to reduce cardiac risk. PMID:26435852

  1. A Report of Accelerated Coronary Artery Disease Associated with Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Courtney B; Hahn, Virginia; Kobayashi, Taisei; Litwack, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common heritable form of vascular dementia and it is caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. The neurologic manifestations of CADASIL syndrome have been well characterized; however, here we report one of the first de novo cases of CADASIL-associated coronary artery disease. A 45-year-old woman with a history of CADASIL and remote tobacco use presented with unstable angina. She was found to have diffuse and irregular narrowing of the left anterior descending artery and a drug eluting stent was deployed. Months later, she developed two subsequent episodes of unstable angina, requiring stent placement in the distal left anterior descending artery and the right coronary artery. Though the neurologic manifestations of CADASIL have been well described, these patients may also be predisposed to developing premature coronary artery disease. Patients with CADASIL and their physicians should be aware of this possible association because these patients may not be identified as high risk by traditional cardiovascular risk estimators. These patients may benefit from more aggressive interventions to reduce cardiac risk. PMID:26435852

  2. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: Localization of the second gene to chromosome 4q13-q23

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberling, W.J.; Kumar, S.; Kenyon, J.B.; Connolly, C.J. ); Gabow, P.A. ); Somlo, S. )

    1993-12-01

    At least two loci are known to exist for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). One was localized to 16p, but the second less common locus has remained unlinked. Over 100 microsatellite markers, distributed across all chromosomes, have been typed on informative family members from the large Sicilian kindred in which the genetic heterogeneity was first discovered. Both the affected and the unaffected status of every family member used in the study were consulted in the successful localization of a second ADPKD gene to chromosome 4q. It was found to be flanked by the markers D4S231 and D4S414, defining a segment that spans about 9 cM. The new locus has been designated PKD4. This second localization will allow researchers to target another ADPKD gene for isolation in an effort to understand the pathogenesis of this common disorder. Furthermore, when flanking markers for the second ADPKD gene are used in conjunction with flanking markers for PKD1, the accuracy of the diagnosis of the subtype of ADPKD present in any particular family will be enhanced. This will improve the accuracy of linkage-based presymptomatic diagnoses by reducing the error due to genetic heterogeneity. 42 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Exon Sequencing of PKD1 Gene in an Iranian Patient with Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hafizi, Atousa; Khatami, Saeid Reza; Galehdari, Hamid; Shariati, Gholamreza; Saberi, Ali Hossein; Hamid, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common genetic kidney disorders with the incidence of 1 in 1,000 births. ADPKD is genetically heterogeneous with two genes identified: PKD1 (16p13.3, 46 exons) and PKD2 (4q21, 15 exons). Eighty five percent of the patients with ADPKD have at least one mutation in the PKD1 gene. Genetic studies have demonstrated an important allelic variability among patients, but very few data are known about the genetic variation among Iranian populations. Methods: In this study, exon direct sequencing of PKD1 was performed in a seven-year old boy with ADPKD and in his parents. The patient’s father was ADPKD who was affected without any kidney dysfunction, and the patient’s mother was congenitally missing one kidney. Results: Molecular genetic testing found a mutation in all three members of this family. It was a missense mutation GTG>ATG at position 3057 in exon 25 of PKD1. On the other hand, two novel missense mutations were reported just in the 7-year-old boy: ACA>GCA found in exon 15 at codon 2241 and CAC>AAC found in exon 38 at codon 3710. For checking the pathogenicity of these mutations, exons 15, 25, and 38 of 50 unrelated normal cases were sequenced. Conclusion: our findings suggested that GTG>ATG is a polymorphism with high frequency (60%) as well as ACA>GCA and CAC>AAC are polymorphisms with frequencies of 14% and 22%, respectively in the population of Southwest Iran. PMID:24842140

  4. Therapeutic Area Data Standards for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Report From the Polycystic Kidney Disease Outcomes Consortium (PKDOC).

    PubMed

    Perrone, Ronald D; Neville, Jon; Chapman, Arlene B; Gitomer, Berenice Y; Miskulin, Dana C; Torres, Vicente E; Czerwiec, Frank S; Dennis, Eslie; Kisler, Bron; Kopko, Steve; Krasa, Holly B; LeRoy, Elizabeth; Castedo, Juliana; Schrier, Robert W; Broadbent, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Data standards provide a structure for consistent understanding and exchange of data and enable the integration of data across studies for integrated analysis. There is no data standard applicable to kidney disease. We describe the process for development of the first-ever Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) data standard for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) by the Polycystic Kidney Disease Outcomes Consortium (PKDOC). Definition of common data elements and creation of ADPKD-specific data standards from case report forms used in long-term ADPKD registries, an observational cohort (Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease [CRISP] 1 and 2), and a randomized clinical trial (Halt Progression of Polycystic Kidney Disease [HALT-PKD]) are described in detail. This data standard underwent extensive review, including a global public comment period, and is now available online as the first PKD-specific data standard (www.cdisc.org/therapeutic). Submission of clinical trial data that use standard data structures and terminology will be required for new electronic submissions to the US Food and Drug Administration for all disease areas by the end of 2016. This data standard will allow for the mapping and pooling of available data into a common data set in addition to providing a foundation for future studies, data sharing, and long-term registries in ADPKD. This data set will also be used to support the regulatory qualification of total kidney volume as a prognostic biomarker for use in clinical trials. The availability of consensus data standards for ADPKD has the potential to facilitate clinical trial initiation and increase sharing and aggregation of data across observational studies and among completed clinical trials, thereby improving our understanding of disease progression and treatment. PMID:26088508

  5. Value of magnetic resonance angiography for the detection of intracranial aneurysms in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Huston, J; Torres, V E; Sulivan, P P; Offord, K P; Wiebers, D O

    1993-06-01

    The association of intracranial aneurysms with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the 30-day mortality rate exceeding 50% for aneurysmal rupture, the effectiveness of surgical repair of unruptured aneurysms with a low surgical risk, and the development of noninvasive imaging techniques for their detection have led physicians to consider the value of screening patients with ADPKD for unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The sensitivity and specificity of high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of small intracranial aneurysms have been disappointing. To determine the value of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), 85 patients with ADPKD without symptoms related to an intracranial aneurysm and 2 patients with ADPKD presenting with a subarachnoid hemorrhage or a suspected aneurysmal leak were studied. MRA was performed with the Multisequence Vascular Package (GE Medical Systems) with use of three-dimensional time-of-flight and three-dimensional phase-contrast techniques, and postprocessing maximum intensity projection images were generated to eliminate the problem of overlapping vessels. Asymptomatic intracranial aneurysms were detected in 6 (22%) of 27 patients with and 3 (5%) of 56 patients without a family history of intracranial aneurysm or subarachnoid hemorrhage (P = 0.02, information missing in 2 patients) and in the 2 patients who presented with a symptomatic aneurysm. A stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that a family history of intracranial aneurysm or subarachnoid hemorrhage was independently associated with the presence of intracranial aneurysms. All of the aneurysms were < or = 6.5 mm in diameter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8338918

  6. DFNA8/12 caused by TECTA mutations is the most identified subtype of nonsyndromic autosomal dominant hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Morín, Matías; Meyer, Nicole C; Mayo, Fernando; Modamio-Hoybjor, Silvia; Mencía, Angeles; Olavarrieta, Leticia; Morales-Angulo, Carmelo; Nishimura, Carla J; Workman, Heather; DeLuca, Adam P; del Castillo, Ignacio; Taylor, Kyle R; Tompkins, Bruce; Goodman, Corey W; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Wesemael, Maarten Van; Lachlan, K; Shearer, A Eliot; Braun, Terry A; Huygen, Patrick L M; Kremer, Hannie; Van Camp, Guy; Moreno, Felipe; Casavant, Thomas L; Smith, Richard J H; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A

    2011-07-01

    The prevalence of DFNA8/DFNA12 (DFNA8/12), a type of autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), is unknown as comprehensive population-based genetic screening has not been conducted. We therefore completed unbiased screening for TECTA mutations in a Spanish cohort of 372 probands from ADNSHL families. Three additional families (Spanish, Belgian, and English) known to be linked to DFNA8/12 were also included in the screening. In an additional cohort of 835 American ADNSHL families, we preselected 73 probands for TECTA screening based on audiometric data. In aggregate, we identified 23 TECTA mutations in this process. Remarkably, 20 of these mutations are novel, more than doubling the number of reported TECTA ADNSHL mutations from 13 to 33. Mutations lie in all domains of the ?-tectorin protein, including those for the first time identified in the entactin domain, as well as the vWFD1, vWFD2, and vWFD3 repeats, and the D1-D2 and TIL2 connectors. Although the majority are private mutations, four of them-p.Cys1036Tyr, p.Cys1837Gly, p.Thr1866Met, and p.Arg1890Cys-were observed in more than one unrelated family. For two of these mutations founder effects were also confirmed. Our data validate previously observed genotype-phenotype correlations in DFNA8/12 and introduce new correlations. Specifically, mutations in the N-terminal region of ?-tectorin (entactin domain, vWFD1, and vWFD2) lead to mid-frequency NSHL, a phenotype previously associated only with mutations in the ZP domain. Collectively, our results indicate that DFNA8/12 hearing loss is a frequent type of ADNSHL. PMID:21520338

  7. Growth of arachnoid cysts in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: serial imaging and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Krauer, Fabienne; Ahmadli, Uzeyir; Kollias, Spyros; Bleisch, Jörg; Wüthrich, Rudolf P.; Serra, Andreas L.; Poster, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder that results in the growth of cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Multisystemic involvement is common including affection of the central nervous system with cerebral aneurysms and arachnoid cysts. Methods This is a prospective cohort study to investigate the prevalence and growth rate of arachnoid cysts in ADPKD patients. Participants enrolled in the SUISSE ADPKD cohort were offered cranial imaging for the detection of intracranial alterations. In the case of identified arachnoid cysts, patients were suggested to undergo follow-up imaging to assess the growth rate of the cysts. Volume of arachnoid cysts at the baseline and at follow-up visits was assessed by manual segmentation on a dedicated workstation. Results A total of 109 ADPKD patients agreed to undergo cranial imaging. In 14 (12.8%) patients (9 males and 5 females), 18 singular arachnoid cysts were identified. The baseline volumes of individual cysts ranged from 1.8 to 337.6 cm3. During a mean follow-up period of 24 months, the volume changes of 12 individual arachnoid cysts of nine patients ranged from ?3.1 to 3.7 cm3. Cystic lesions were mostly localized in the middle fossa. All affected patients were clinically asymptomatic. Conclusions We found a higher prevalence of arachnoid cysts in ADPKD patients with more advanced disease. There was a large variability in size and growth. These arachnoid cysts were clinically silent and their growth pattern was subtle and unpredictable, in contrast to the much more foreseeable growth of the renal cysts. PMID:26019816

  8. New onset diabetes after kidney transplantation in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Sixiu; Yang, Guang; Mei, Changlin; Ong, Albert; Mao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disorder with numerous cysts developing in bilateral kidneys. Meanwhile, ADPKD can also be regarded as a systemic disease because the cystic and non-cystic abnormalities could be identified in multiple organs in patients with ADPKD. Several lines of evidence suggest the risk of post-transplant diabetes mellitus or new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is higher in patients with ADPKD compared with non-ADPKD renal recipients, but the available results are conflicting. We describe the protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis for investigating the risk of NODAT in patients with ADPKD. Methods and analysis PubMed, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library will be searched. Cohort studies irrespective of language and publication status, comparing the incidence of NODAT in renal recipients with ADPKD and other kidney disease will be eligible. We will assess heterogeneity among studies. Along with 95% CIs, dichotomous data will be summarised as risk ratios; numbers needed to treat/harm and continuous data will be given as standard mean differences. Excluding outliers and testing small sample size studies if our results are robust, sensitivity analysis will be carried out. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required because this study includes no confidential personal data or patient interventions. The review findings will be helpful in designing and implementing future studies and will be of interest to a wide range of readers, including healthcare professionals, researchers, health service managers and policymakers. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated electronically and in print. Trial registration number The study protocol has been registered in PROSPERO (http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/) under registration number CRD42014009677. PMID:26546139

  9. Mutations in POGLUT1, Encoding Protein O-Glucosyltransferase 1, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Dowling-Degos Disease

    PubMed Central

    Basmanav, F. Buket; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Pasternack, Sandra M.; Thiele, Holger; Fritz, Günter; Wenzel, Jörg; Größer, Leopold; Wehner, Maria; Wolf, Sabrina; Fagerberg, Christina; Bygum, Anette; Altmüller, Janine; Rütten, Arno; Parmentier, Laurent; El Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila; Hafner, Christian; Nürnberg, Peter; Kruse, Roland; Schoch, Susanne; Hanneken, Sandra; Betz, Regina C.

    2014-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by progressive and disfiguring reticulate hyperpigmentation. We previously identified loss-of-function mutations in KRT5 but were only able to detect pathogenic mutations in fewer than half of our subjects. To identify additional causes of DDD, we performed exome sequencing in five unrelated affected individuals without mutations in KRT5. Data analysis identified three heterozygous mutations from these individuals, all within the same gene. These mutations, namely c.11G>A (p.Trp4?), c.652C>T (p.Arg218?), and c.798-2A>C, are within POGLUT1, which encodes protein O-glucosyltransferase 1. Further screening of unexplained cases for POGLUT1 identified six additional mutations, as well as two of the above described mutations. Immunohistochemistry of skin biopsies of affected individuals with POGLUT1 mutations showed significantly weaker POGLUT1 staining in comparison to healthy controls with strong localization of POGLUT1 in the upper parts of the epidermis. Immunoblot analysis revealed that translation of either wild-type (WT) POGLUT1 or of the protein carrying the p.Arg279Trp substitution led to the expected size of about 50 kDa, whereas the c.652C>T (p.Arg218?) mutation led to translation of a truncated protein of about 30 kDa. Immunofluorescence analysis identified a colocalization of the WT protein with the endoplasmic reticulum and a notable aggregating pattern for the truncated protein. Recently, mutations in POFUT1, which encodes protein O-fucosyltransferase 1, were also reported to be responsible for DDD. Interestingly, both POGLUT1 and POFUT1 are essential regulators of Notch activity. Our results furthermore emphasize the important role of the Notch pathway in pigmentation and keratinocyte morphology. PMID:24387993

  10. Identification of copy number variation in the gene for autosomal dominant optic atrophy, OPA1, in a Chinese pedigree.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Chen, Y H; Liu, Z; Deng, Y; Li, N N; Huang, H; Qi, M; Yi, X; Zhu, J

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is an optic neuropathy characterized by bilateral optic nerve pallor and decreased visual acuity. It has been reported to be associated with two genes, OPA1, OPA3, and the OPA4, OPA5, and OPA8 loci. However, mutations in OPA1 constitute the most prevalent cause of ADOA. The purpose of this study was to identify the underlying genetic defect in a Chinese pedigree with ADOA. DNA from six members of a Chinese pedigree was collected for testing genomic and copy number variation (CNV) by targeted region capture and next generation sequencing (targeted NGS). A new developmental CNV detection method was applied to analyze the sequence data. Further verification of CNV was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Three members of the pedigree with clinically diagnosed ADOA were screened for pathogenic genes related to ophthalmic genetic disease. No eligible pathogenic point mutations associated with ADOA disease-causing genes were found in pedigree members with ADOA. Upon further analysis for CNVs, we found a heterozygous deletion in exons 1-9 of OPA1, which was confirmed by real-time PCR. In this study we used a new developmental method to detect CNVs associated with ADOA in a Chinese pedigree. To our knowledge, this is the first case of ADOA caused by a CNV of the OPA1 gene in Chinese patients. The findings suggest that CNVs might be an important mutation type in Chinese patients with ADOA, and that CNV screening should be performed when point mutation screens are negative in these patients. PMID:26400325

  11. Unfolded protein response-induced dysregulation of calcium homeostasis promotes retinal degeneration in rat models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, V; Kotla, P; Strang, C; Gorbatyuk, M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) in rats is closely associated with a persistently activated unfolded protein response (UPR). If unchecked, the UPR might trigger apoptosis, leading to photoreceptor death. One of the UPR-activated cellular signaling culminating in apoptotic photoreceptor cell death is linked to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, we validated whether ADRP retinas experience a cytosolic Ca2+ overload, and whether sustained UPR in the wild-type retina could promote retinal degeneration through Ca2+-mediated calpain activation. We performed an ex vivo experiment to measure intracellular Ca2+ in ADRP retinas as well as to detect the expression levels of proteins that act as Ca2+ sensors. In separate experiments with the subretinal injection of tunicamycin (UPR inducer) and a mixture of calcium ionophore (A231278) and thapsigargin (SERCA2b inhibitor) we assessed the consequences of a sustained UPR activation and increased intracellular Ca2+ in the wild-type retina, respectively, by performing scotopic ERG, histological, and western blot analyses. Results of the study revealed that induced UPR in the retina activates calpain-mediated signaling, and increased intracellular Ca2+ is capable of promoting retinal degeneration. A significant decline in ERG amplitudes at 6 weeks post treatment was associated with photoreceptor cell loss that occurred through calpain-activated CDK5-pJNK-Csp3/7 pathway. Similar calpain activation was found in ADRP rat retinas. A twofold increase in intracellular Ca2+ and up- and downregulations of ER membrane-associated Ca2+-regulated IP3R channels and SERCA2b transporters were detected. Therefore, sustained UPR activation in the ADRP rat retinas could promote retinal degeneration through increased intracellular Ca2+ and calpain-mediated apoptosis.

  12. White matter pathology and disconnection in the frontal lobe in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    Craggs, L J L; Yamamoto, Y; Ihara, M; Fenwick, R; Burke, M; Oakley, A E; Roeber, S; Duering, M; Kretzschmar, H; Kalaria, R N

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging indicates diffuse white matter (WM) changes are associated with cognitive impairment in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). We examined whether the distribution of axonal abnormalities is related to microvascular pathology in the underlying WM. Methods We used post-mortem brains from CADASIL subjects and similar age cognitively normal controls to examine WM axonal changes, microvascular pathology, and glial reaction in up to 16 different regions extending rostro-caudally through the cerebrum. Using unbiased stereological methods, we estimated length densities of affected axons immunostained with neurofilament antibody SMI32. Standard immunohistochemistry was used to assess amyloid precursor protein immunoreactivity per WM area. To relate WM changes to microvascular pathology, we also determined the sclerotic index (SI) in WM arterioles. Results The degree of WM pathology consistently scored higher across all brain regions in CADASIL subjects (P?

  13. De novo post-transplant thrombotic microangiopathy localized only to the graft in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with thrombophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rolla, Davide; Fontana, Iris; Ravetti, Jean Louis; Marsano, Luigina; Bellino, Diego; Panaro, Laura; Ansaldo, Francesca; Mathiasen, Lisa; Storace, Giulia; Trezzi, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a serious complication of renal transplantation and is mostly related to the prothrombotic effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). A subset of TMA (29%-38%) is localized only to the graft. Case 1: A young woman suffering from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) underwent kidney transplant. After 2 months, she showed slow renal deterioration (serum creatinine from 1.9 to 3.1 mg/dl), without hematological signs of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS); only LDH enzyme transient increase was detected. Renal biopsy showed TMA: temporary withdraw of tacrolimus and plasmapheresis was performed. The renal function recovered (serum creatinine 1.9 mg/dl). From screening for thrombophilia, we found a mutation of the Leiden factor V gene. Case 2: A man affected by ADPKD underwent kidney transplantation, with delay graft function; first biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, but a second biopsy revealed TMA, while no altered hematological parameters of HUS was detected. We observed only a slight increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. The tacrolimus was halved and plasmapheresis was performed: LDH levels normalized within 10 days and renal function improved (serum creatinine from 9 to 2.9 mg/dl). We found a mutation of the prothrombin gene. Only a renal biopsy clarifies the diagnosis of TMA, but it is necessary to pay attention to light increasing level of LDH. Conclusion: Prothrombotic effect of CNIs and mTOR inhibitor, mutation of genes encoding factor H or I, anticardiolipin antibodies, vascular rejection, cytomegalovirus infection are proposed to trigger TMA; we detected mutations of factor II and Leiden factor V, as facilitating conditions for TMA in patients affected by ADPKD. PMID:26693501

  14. Identification of a Novel Gene on 10q22.1 Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP).

    PubMed

    Daiger, Stephen P; Sullivan, Lori S; Bowne, Sara J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Blanton, Susan H; Wheaton, Dianna K; Avery, Cheryl E; Cadena, Elizabeth D; Koenekoop, Robert K; Fulton, Robert S; Wilson, Richard K; Weinstock, George M; Lewis, Richard A; Birch, David G

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome linkage mapping identified a region on chromosome 10q21.3-q22.1 with a maximum LOD score of 3.0 at 0 % recombination in a six-generation family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). All known adRP genes and X-linked RP genes were excluded in the family by a combination of methods. Whole-exome next-generation sequencing revealed a missense mutation in hexokinase 1, HK1 c.2539G > A, p.Glu847Lys, tracking with disease in all affected family members. One severely-affected male is homozygous for this region by linkage analysis and has two copies of the mutation. No other potential mutations were detected in the linkage region nor were any candidates identified elsewhere in the genome. Subsequent testing detected the same mutation in four additional, unrelated adRP families, for a total of five mutations in 404 probands tested (1.2 %). Of the five families, three are from the Acadian population in Louisiana, one is French Canadian and one is Sicilian. Haplotype analysis of the affected chromosome in each family and the homozygous individual revealed a rare, shared haplotype of 450 kb, suggesting an ancient founder mutation. HK1 is a widely-expressed gene, with multiple, abundant retinal transcripts, coding for hexokinase 1. Hexokinase catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose to glusose-6-phospate, the first step in glycolysis. The Glu847Lys mutation is in a highly-conserved site, outside of the active site or known functional sites. PMID:26427411

  15. A novel mutation of EYA4 in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant middle-frequency sensorineural hearing loss by targeted exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zhang, Zhao; Cheng, Jing; Lu, Yu; Yang, Chang-Liang; Luo, Yan-Yun; Yang, Guang; Yang, Hui; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Jia; Yao, Hang-Qi

    2015-06-01

    The middle-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (MFSNHL) is rare among hereditary non-syndromic hearing loss. To date, only three genes are reported to be associated with MFSNHL, including TECTA, EYA4 and COL11A2. In this report, we analyzed and explored the clinical audiological characteristics and the causative gene of a Chinese family named HG-Z087 with non-syndromic autosomal dominant inherited MFSNHL. Clinical audiological characteristics and inheritance pattern of a family were evaluated, and pedigree was drawn based on medical history investigation. Our results showed that the Chinese family was characterized by late onset, progressive, non-sydromic autosomal dominant MFSNHL. Targeted exome sequencing, conducted using DNA samples of an affected member in this family, revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation c.1643C>G in exon 18 of EYA4, causing amino-acid (aa) substitution Arg for Thr at a conserved position aa-548. The p.T548R mutation related to hearing loss in the selected Chinese family was validated by Sanger sequencing. However, the mutation was absent in control group containing 100 DNA samples from normal Chinese families. In conclusion, we identified the pathogenic gene and found that the novel missense mutation c.1643C>G (p.T548R) in EYA4 might have caused autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment in the selected Chinese family. PMID:25809937

  16. End-Stage Renal Disease From Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease in the United States, 2001-2010

    PubMed Central

    Reule, Scott; Sexton, Donal J.; Solid, Craig A.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Foley, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is amenable to early detection and specialty care. Thus, while important to patients with the condition, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from ADPKD may also be an indicator of the overall state of nephrology care. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of temporal trends in renal replacement therapy (RRT)-requiring ESRD from ADPKD and pre-RRT nephrologist care, 2001-2010 (n = 23,772). Setting & Participants US patients who initiated maintenance RRT between 2001 and 2010 (n = 1,069,343), from United States Renal Data System data. Predictor RRT-requiring ESRD from ADPKD. Outcomes Death, wait-listing for renal transplant, renal transplant. Measurements US census data were used as population denominators. The Poisson distribution was used to compute incidence rates. Incidence ratios were standardized to rates in 2001-2002 for age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Patients with and without ADPKD were matched to compare clinical outcomes. Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rates and adjusted hazards ratios for clinical events after inception of RRT. Results General population incidence ratios in 2009-2010 were unchanged from 2001-2002 (incidence ratio 1.02). Of patients with ADPKD, 48.1% received > 12 months of nephrology care before RRT; preemptive transplant was the initial RRT in 14.3% and fistula the initial hemodialysis access in 35.8%. Over 4.9 years of follow-up, patients with ADPKD were more likely to be listed for transplant (11.7 [95% CI 11.5-12.0] per 100 person-years vs. 8.4 [8.2-8.7]) and to undergo transplant (9.8 [9.5-10.0] vs. 4.8 [4.7-5.0]), and less likely to die (5.6 [5.4-5.7] vs. 15.5 [15.3-15.8]) than matched controls without ADPKD. Limitations Retrospective, nonexperimental, registry-based study of associations; cause-and-effect relationships cannot be determined. Conclusions While outcomes on dialysis are better for ADPKD than for non-ADPKD patients, access to predialysis nephrology care and non-declining ESRD rates may be a cause for concern. PMID:25134777

  17. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 16 interacts with alpha-tectorin and is mutated in autosomal dominant hearing loss (DFNA4).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Miller, Katharine K; Yang, Tao; Hildebrand, Michael S; Shearer, A Eliot; DeLuca, Adam P; Scheetz, Todd E; Drummond, Jennifer; Scherer, Steve E; Legan, P Kevin; Goodyear, Richard J; Richardson, Guy P; Cheatham, Mary Ann; Smith, Richard J; Dallos, Peter

    2011-03-01

    We report on a secreted protein found in mammalian cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) that is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family of adhesion proteins. Ceacam16 mRNA is expressed in OHC, and its protein product localizes to the tips of the tallest stereocilia and the tectorial membrane (TM). This specific localization suggests a role in maintaining the integrity of the TM as well as in the connection between the OHC stereocilia and TM, a linkage essential for mechanical amplification. In agreement with this role, CEACAM16 colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with the TM protein ?-tectorin. In addition, we show that mutation of CEACAM16 leads to autosomal dominant nonsyndromic deafness (ADNSHL) at the autosomal dominant hearing loss (DFNA4) locus. In aggregate, these data identify CEACAM16 as an ?-tectorin-interacting protein that concentrates at the point of attachment of the TM to the stereocilia and, when mutated, results in ADNSHL at the DFNA4 locus. PMID:21368133

  18. Mapping of the locus for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2) to a 4-Mb YAC contig on chromosome 4q11-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Kaerrman, C.; Holmgren, G.; Forsman, K. |

    1997-01-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (Al) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited enamel defects. We recently mapped a locus for autosomal dominant local hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2) to the long arm of chromosome 4. The disease gene was localized to a 17.6-cM region between the markers D4S392 and D4S395. The albumin gene (ALB), located in the same interval, was a candidate gene for autosomal dominant AI (ADAI) since albumin has a potential role in enamel maturation. Here we describe refined mapping of the AIH2 locus and the construction of marker maps by radiation hybrid mapping and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-based sequence tagged site-content mapping. A radiation hybrid map consisting of 11 microsatellite markers in the 5-cM interval between D4S409 and D4S1558 was constructed. Recombinant haplotypes in six Swedish ADAI families suggest that the disease gene is located in the interval between D4S2421 and ALB. ALB is therefore not likely to be the disease-causing gene. Affected members in all six families share the same allele haplotypes, indicating a common ancestral mutation in all families. The AIH2 critical region is less than 4 cM and spans a physical distance of approximately 4 Mb as judged from radiation hybrid maps. A YAC contig over the AIH2 critical region including several potential candidate genes was constructed. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Exome sequencing reveals a heterozygous DLX5 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal-dominant split-hand/foot malformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Xin, Qian; Li, Lin; Li, Jiangxia; Zhang, Changwu; Qiu, Rongfang; Qian, Chenmin; Zhao, Hailing; Liu, Yongchao; Shan, Shan; Dang, Jie; Bian, Xianli; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Qiji

    2014-01-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a congenital limb deformity due to the absence or dysplasia of central rays of the autopod. Six SHFM loci have already been identified. Here we describe a Chinese family with autosomal-dominant SHFM1 that has previously been mapped to 7q21.2-21.3. The two affected family members, mother and son, showed deep median clefts between toes, ectrodactyly and syndactyly; the mother also showed triphalangeal thumbs. Exome sequencing and variant screening of candidate genes in the six loci known to be responsible for SHFM revealed a novel heterozygous mutation, c.558G>T (p.(Gln186His)), in distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5). As DLX5 encodes a transcription factor capable of transactivating MYC, we also tested whether the mutation could affect DLX5 transcription acitivity. Results from luciferase reporter assay revealed that a mutation in DLX5 compromised its transcriptional activity. This is the first report of a mutation in DLX5 leading to autosomal-dominant SHFM1. PMID:24496061

  20. Extensive intrafamilial and interfamilial phenotypic variation among patients with autosomal dominant retinal dystrophy and mutations in the human RDS/peripherin gene.

    PubMed

    Apfelstedt-Sylla, E; Theischen, M; Rüther, K; Wedemann, H; Gal, A; Zrenner, E

    1995-01-01

    Clinical phenotypes of patients with mutations in the human RDS/peripherin gene are described. A 67-year-old woman, who carried a 1 base pair deletion in codon 307, presented with typical late onset autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In another autosomal dominant pedigree, a nonsense mutation at codon 46 caused 'inverse' retinitis pigmentosa-like fundus changes associated with progressive cone-rod degeneration in a 58-year-old man, whereas his 40-year-old son presented with yellow deposits in the retinal pigment epithelial layer resembling a pattern dystrophy, and with moderately reduced rod and cone function, as determined by two colour dark adapted threshold perimetry and electroretinography. It is suggested that both clinical pictures within this latter family may represent manifestations of fundus flavimaculatus. The clinical data of the three patients provide further evidence for the remarkable variety of disease expression within and between families with mutations in the RDS/peripherin gene. Currently, the most comprehensive statement could be that RDS/peripherin mutations are associated either with typical RP or with various forms of flecked retinal disease. PMID:7880786

  1. Brachydactyly E: isolated or as a feature of a syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brachydactyly (BD) refers to the shortening of the hands, feet or both. There are different types of BD; among them, type E (BDE) is a rare type that can present as an isolated feature or as part of more complex syndromes, such as: pseudohypopthyroidism (PHP), hypertension with BD or Bilginturan BD (HTNB), BD with mental retardation (BDMR) or BDE with short stature, PTHLH type. Each syndrome has characteristic patterns of skeletal involvement. However, brachydactyly is not a constant feature and shows a high degree of phenotypic variability. In addition, there are other syndromes that can be misdiagnosed as brachydactyly type E, some of which will also be discussed. The objective of this review is to describe some of the syndromes in which BDE is present, focusing on clinical, biochemical and genetic characteristics as features of differential diagnoses, with the aim of establishing an algorithm for their differential diagnosis. As in our experience many of these patients are recruited at Endocrinology and/or Pediatric Endocrinology Services due to their short stature, we have focused the algorithm in those steps that could mainly help these professionals. PMID:24028571

  2. Refinement of the MYP3 locus on human chromosome 12 in a German family with Mendelian autosomal dominant high-grade myopia by SNP array mapping.

    PubMed

    Nürnberg, Gudrun; Jacobi, Felix K; Broghammer, Martina; Becker, Christian; Blin, Nikolaus; Nürnberg, Peter; Stephani, Ulrich; Pusch, Carsten M

    2008-04-01

    Myopia, or short-sightedness, is the most common form of vision disorder worldwide. Higher levels of myopia, usually defined as an axial eye length of >26 mm or a refractive error of < -5.00 diopters are often designated as 'pathologic' myopia, because of the predisposition to develop further eye disorders such as retinal detachment, macular degeneration, cataract, or glaucoma. Many distinct forms of autosomal dominant non-syndromic high-grade myopia are described in humans. While the underlying chromosomal locations and critical disease intervals have been identified and located to physical map positions, the gene defects and causative mutations responsible for autosomal dominant myopia remain elusive to date. Examination of a German six-generation kindred by 10K whole genome chips led to the identification of a 19-cM map segment as being the most likely familial myopia candidate region spanning from chromosomal band 12q14.3 to 12q21.31 (MYP3). In our family, a maximum multi-point LOD score of 3.9 was obtained between rs1373877 and rs717996. The recombination breakpoints in this family and the interval of the originally reported German/Italian family defining the MYP3 locus on chromosome 12 (OMIM 603221, two-point LOD score 3.85 for markers D12S1706 and D12S327 at 12q21-23) allowed us to significantly refine a minimum consensus region. This new composite region is located between microsatellite marker D12S1684 at 75.8 K and SNP_A-1509586 (alias rs717996) at position 82,636,288 bp, and narrows the original 30.1 cM of the MYP3 interval to 6.8 cM. The refined MYP3 interval allowed us to restrict the list of database-indexed genes to 25, several of which are promising MYP3 candidates based on similarities with genes and proteins involved in vision physiology and eye disease. While autosomal dominant high-grade myopia is recognized to be genetically heterogeneous, our results suggest genetic homogeneity of the MYP3-based condition in families that share the same ethnic and geographical background. The future identification of this MYP3 gene may provide insights into the pathophysiology of myopia and eye development. PMID:18360688

  3. Genetic Linkage of Autosomal-Dominant Alport Syndrome with Leukocyte Inclusions and Macrothrombocytopenia (Fechtner Syndrome) to Chromosome 22q11-13

    PubMed Central

    Toren, Amos; Amariglio, Ninette; Rozenfeld-Granot, Galit; Simon, Amos J.; Brok-Simoni, Frida; Pras, Elon; Rechavi, Gideon

    1999-01-01

    Summary Fechtner syndrome is an autosomal-dominant variant of Alport syndrome, manifested by nephritis, sensorineural hearing loss, cataract formation, macrothrombocytopenia, and polymorphonuclear inclusion bodies. As opposed to autosomal-recessive and X-linked Alport syndromes, which have been genetically well studied, the genetic basis of Fechtner syndrome remains elusive. We have mapped the disease-causing gene to the long arm of chromosome 22 in an extended Israeli family with Fechtner syndrome plus impaired liver functions and hypercholesterolemia in some individuals. Six markers from chromosome 22q yielded a LOD score >3.00. A maximum two-point LOD score of 7.02 was obtained with the marker D22S283 at a recombination fraction of 0. Recombination analysis placed the disease-causing gene in a 5.5-Mb interval between the markers D22S284 and D22S1167. No collagen genes or genes comprising the basement membrane have been mapped to this region. PMID:10577925

  4. Two double non allelic heterozygotes for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease at loci PKD1 and PKD4 are not more affected than heterozygous relatives

    SciTech Connect

    Bachner, L.; Vinet, M.C.; Kaplan, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a family in which both members of a non-consanguineous couple are affected by autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). They have three affected children without obvious clinical differences, and three affected grand-children. Two different morbid loci for this disease have been localized, PKD1 on chromosome 16p and PKD4 on chromosome 4q. There were four a priori mating possibilities for this couple: PKD1xPKD1, PKD1xPKD4 or PKD4xPKD1 and PKD4xPKD4. We demonstrate by linkage analysis that: (i) the father is heterozygous at the PKD1 locus (most probably a de novo mutation); (ii) the mother is heterozygous at the PKD4 locus. The abnormal alleles segregates as follows: one child has the abnormal PKD1, another child has the abnormal PKD4 while the third child is a compound heterozygote for both abnormal PKD1 and PKD4 alleles, which were both transmitted to one offspring. The clinical status of these subjects is similar to the status of their relatives in the same age range, suggesting that both PKD1 and PKD4 are truly dominant disease. As there is no other example of such a situation for heterogeneous dominant diseases, we discuss this issue and some possible pathogenic processes by comparison with the similar problem of expressivity in homozygotes for dominant diseases.

  5. [18F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of liver cyst infection in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and fever of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Banzo, J; Ubieto, M A; Gil, D; Prats, E; Razola, P; Tardín, L; Andrés, A; Rambalde, E F; Ayala, S M; Cáncer, L; Velilla, J

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis, localization and treatment of infected cysts in the kidney or liver of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) remain a clinical challenge. We report the findings of (18)F-FDG PET-CT in an ADPKD diagnosed patient who required renal transplantation five years before and in his follow up presented repeated episodes of bacteriemia without known focus on radiological tests performed. The (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan showed numerous hypermetabolic images with focal or ring-shaped morphology related to the content and the wall of some hepatic cysts. The increased metabolic activity was localized on segments VI and VII. We proceeded to drainage of one cyst in segment VI, removing 110 cc of purulent fluid which grew E. Coli BLEE. The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan should be included in the diagnostic algorithm for detecting infected liver cysts in patients with ADPKD and fever of unknown origin. PMID:23153986

  6. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) associated with a novel C82R mutation in the NOTCH3 gene.

    PubMed

    Zea-Sevilla, M Ascensión; Bermejo-Velasco, Pedro; Serrano-Heranz, Regino; Calero, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a rare inherited cerebrovascular disease associated with mutations in the NOTCH3 gene on chromosome 19, and represents the most common hereditary stroke disorder. We describe a pedigree, which suffered the classical clinical CADASIL pattern of migraine headaches, recurrent subcortical infarcts, and subcortical dementia, associated with a previously undescribed missense mutation (c.[244T>C], p.[C82R]) in NOTCH3. This new mutation extends the list of known pathogenic mutations responsible for CADASIL, which are associated with an odd number of cysteine residues within any of the epidermal growth factor-like repeats of Notch3 receptor protein. PMID:25096610

  7. No association between multiple sclerosis and the Notch3 gene responsible for cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    Broadley, S; Sawcer, S; Chataway, S; Coraddu, F; Coles, A; Gray, J; Roxburgh, R; Clayton, D; Compston, D

    2001-01-01

    The clinical and radiological overlap between multiple sclerosis and cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL; MIM 125310) raises the possibility of diagnostic confusion and suggests that pleiotropic effects of the Notch3 gene might include influencing susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. To investigate these possibilities three microsatellites markers closely flanking the Notch 3 gene in 745simplex families with multiple sclerosis were genotyped and exon 3 and exon 4 of the gene were directly sequenced in a subset of the index members from these families (n=93). No evidence for association was found in any of the three markers and none of the commoner mutations causing CADASIL were found in the sequenced patients.?? PMID:11413271

  8. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, genetic homogeneity, and mapping of the locus within a 2-cM interval

    SciTech Connect

    Ducros, A.; Alamowitch, S.; Nagy, T.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a recently identified autosomal dominant cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of subcortical infarcts leading to dementia. A genetic linkage analysis conducted in two large families recently allowed us to map the affected gene on chromosome 19 in a 12-cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215. In the present study, these first 2 families and 13 additional ones, including a total of 199 potentially informative meiosis, have been genotyped with eight polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families were linked to chromosome 19. The highest combined lod score (Z{sub max} = 37.24 at {theta} = .01) was obtained with marker D19S841, a new CA{sub n} microsatellite marker that we isolated from chromosome 19 cosmids. The recombinant events observed within these families were used to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL within a 2-cM interval that is now bracketed by D19S226 and D19S199 on 19p13.1. These data strongly suggest the genetic homogeneity of this recently identified condition and establish the value of its clinical and neuroimaging diagnostic criteria. Besides their importance for the ongoing positional cloning of the CADASIL gene, these data help to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL relative to familial hemiplegic migraine and hereditary paroxysmal cerebellar ataxia, conditions that we both mapped within the same chromosome 19 region. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Autosomal dominant Kufs` disease: Clinical heterogeneity in nine families, and exclusion of linkage to CLN1 and CLN3 markers in a large American kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, F.; Andermann, E.; Carpenter, S.

    1994-09-01

    Most forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are autosomal recessive, and three genes have already been mapped: the infantile form (CLN 1); the juvenile form (CLN 3); and the early juvenile variant (CLN 5) on chromosomes 1, 16 and 13, respectively. Kufs` disease or adolescent-adult onset NCL is usually inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, and presents as three distinct clinical syndromes: progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) with onset in the early teens or around age 30; and onset of dementia with motor disability in the 30s. We have studied three families originating from different parts of the USA manifesting dominantly inherited Kufs` disease. Granular osmophilic deposits (GROD) were found in brain, but storage in skin was not an obligatory feature. Six dominantly inherited PME families have been ascertained from three different regions of Spain. No storage was found in skin or muscle in any of these families. The mean age of onset in the American families is earlier, the clinical manifestations more severe, and the progression much more rapid that in the Spanish families. These findings would suggest the possibility of genetic heterogeneity involving two or more loci, or different mutations at the same gene locus. Genetic linkage studies have been carried out in a six-generation New Jersey family in an attempt to characterize the gene(s) responsible for this disorder. The infantile NCL locus on chromosome 1p (CLN1) and the juvenile NCL locus on chromosome 16p (CLN 3) have been excluded in this family. Further clinical, pathological and molecular genetic studies should lead to the clarification of the diagnostic approaches in this disorder.

  10. Superficial temporal artery-to-middle cerebral artery bypass surgery for middle cerebral artery stenosis in a patient with cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Muta, Daisuke; Kawano, Takayuki; Shinojima, Naoki; Kuratsu, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy is a rare hereditary small vessel disease. Ischemic events are the main clinical manifestation of this condition. Here, we present a case in which superficial temporal artery-to-middle cerebral artery anastomosis was performed in a patient with cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy who developed cerebral infarctions caused by severe middle cerebral artery stenosis. Cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity were effectively improved using double anastomoses. To our knowledge, surgical revascularization for patients with this condition has not yet been described in the literature. Superficial temporal artery-to-middle cerebral artery anastomosis is effective for patients with cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy who show marked regional cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:26543744

  11. Repair of Rhodopsin mRNA by Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-Splicing: A New Approach for Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission. PMID:25619725

  12. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Affecting Residue Arg138 of Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase Cause a Progeroid Form of Autosomal-Dominant Cutis Laxa.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Ganesh, Jaya; Tan, Yu Xuan; Al Bughaili, Mohammed; Lin, Angela E; Sahai, Inderneel; Bahena, Paulina; Reichert, Sara L; Loh, Abigail; Wright, Graham D; Liu, Jaron; Rahikkala, Elisa; Pivnick, Eniko K; Choudhri, Asim F; Krüger, Ulrike; Zemojtel, Tomasz; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Mostafavi, Roya; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Symoens, Sofie; Pajunen, Leila; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Meierhofer, David; Robinson, Peter N; Mundlos, Stefan; Villarroel, Camilo E; Byers, Peter; Masri, Amira; Robertson, Stephen P; Schwarze, Ulrike; Callewaert, Bert; Reversade, Bruno; Kornak, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Progeroid disorders overlapping with De Barsy syndrome (DBS) are collectively denoted as autosomal-recessive cutis laxa type 3 (ARCL3). They are caused by biallelic mutations in PYCR1 or ALDH18A1, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), respectively, which both operate in the mitochondrial proline cycle. We report here on eight unrelated individuals born to non-consanguineous families clinically diagnosed with DBS or wrinkly skin syndrome. We found three heterozygous mutations in ALDH18A1 leading to amino acid substitutions of the same highly conserved residue, Arg138 in P5CS. A de novo origin was confirmed in all six probands for whom parental DNA was available. Using fibroblasts from affected individuals and heterologous overexpression, we found that the P5CS-p.Arg138Trp protein was stable and able to interact with wild-type P5CS but showed an altered sub-mitochondrial distribution. A reduced size upon native gel electrophoresis indicated an alteration of the structure or composition of P5CS mutant complex. Furthermore, we found that the mutant cells had a reduced P5CS enzymatic activity leading to a delayed proline accumulation. In summary, recurrent de novo mutations, affecting the highly conserved residue Arg138 of P5CS, cause an autosomal-dominant form of cutis laxa with progeroid features. Our data provide insights into the etiology of cutis laxa diseases and will have immediate impact on diagnostics and genetic counseling. PMID:26320891

  13. A novel frameshift variant of COCH supports the hypothesis that haploinsufficiency is not a cause of autosomal dominant nonsyndromic deafness 9.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masatsugu; Mutai, Hideki; Arimoto, Yukiko; Nakano, Atsuko; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    COCH (coagulation factor C homology) encodes cochlin, and certain mutations of COCH cause autosomal dominant nonsyndromic deafness 9 (DFNA9). Hearing loss due to COCH mutation begins in adulthood, and 17 missense mutations and two in-frame mutations have been reported. Studies with animal and cellular models have suggested that the underlying biological mechanism of DFNA9 is the dominant-negative effect of mutated COCH and not haploinsufficiency. However, no human cases of DFNA9 that support this hypothesis have been reported. The proband of the present case was an 18-year-old male with congenital or infantile hearing loss. Targeted next-generation sequencing analysis detected a heterozygous novel frameshift mutation of COCH (c.146dupT, p.C50LfsX8) in the proband, whose hearing loss began earlier than what is typical for DFNA9. His mother also carried the mutation but had normal hearing. Consequently, the mutation was not considered to be the cause of the proband's hearing loss. This family is the first case of a truncating COCH variant and supports the hypothesis that COCH haploinsufficiency is not the cause of hearing loss in humans. PMID:26631968

  14. Recovery of Dominant, Autosomal Flightless Mutants of Drosophila Melanogaster and Identification of a New Gene Required for Normal Muscle Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, R. M.; Ball, E.; Stark, M.; Lawn, A.; Sparrow, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    To identify further mutations affecting muscle function and development in Drosophila melanogaster we recovered 22 autosomal dominant flightless mutations. From these we have isolated eight viable and lethal alleles of the muscle myosin heavy chain gene, and seven viable alleles of the indirect flight muscle (IFM)-specific Act88F actin gene. The Mhc mutations display a variety of phenotypic effects, ranging from reductions in myosin heavy chain content in the indirect flight muscles only, to reductions in the levels of this protein in other muscles. The Act88F mutations range from those which produce no stable actin and have severely abnormal myofibrillar structure, to those which accumulate apparently normal levels of actin in the flight muscles but which still have abnormal myofibrils and fly very poorly. We also recovered two recessive flightless mutants on the third chromosome. The remaining five dominant flightless mutations are all lethal alleles of a gene named lethal(3)Laker. The Laker alleles have been characterized and the gene located in polytene bands 62A10,B1-62B2,4. Laker is a previously unidentified locus which is haplo-insufficient for flight. In addition, adult wild-type heterozygotes and the lethal larval trans-heterozygotes show abnormalities of muscle structure indicating that the Laker gene product is an important component of muscle. PMID:8056306

  15. Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in Six Families with an Initial Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Liu, Yichuan; March, Michael; Pellegrino, Renata; Golhar, Ryan; Corton, Marta; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; López-Molina, Maria Isabel; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Guo, Yiran; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Xuanzhu; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Jianguo; Keating, Brendan; Xu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetics underlying dominant forms of inherited retinal dystrophies using whole exome sequencing (WES) in six families extensively screened for known mutations or genes. Thirty-eight individuals were subjected to WES. Causative variants were searched among single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletion variants (indels) and whenever no potential candidate emerged, copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed. Variants or regions harboring a candidate variant were prioritized and segregation of the variant with the disease was further assessed using Sanger sequencing in case of SNVs and indels, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) for CNVs. SNV and indel analysis led to the identification of a previously reported mutation in PRPH2. Two additional mutations linked to different forms of retinal dystrophies were identified in two families: a known frameshift deletion in RPGR, a gene responsible for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and p.Ser163Arg in C1QTNF5 associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration. A novel heterozygous deletion spanning the entire region of PRPF31 was also identified in the affected members of a fourth family, which was confirmed with qPCR. This study allowed the identification of the genetic cause of the retinal dystrophy and the establishment of a correct diagnosis in four families, including a large heterozygous deletion in PRPF31, typically considered one of the pitfalls of this method. Since all findings in this study are restricted to known genes, we propose that targeted sequencing using gene-panel is an optimal first approach for the genetic screening and that once known genetic causes are ruled out, WES might be used to uncover new genes involved in inherited retinal dystrophies. PMID:26197217

  16. Associations Between Biomarkers and Age in the Presenilin 1 E280A Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease Kindred A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Adam S.; Chen, Kewei; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Jakimovich, Laura J.; Gomez, Madelyn Gutierrez; Langois, Carolyn M.; Langbaum, Jessica B. S.; Roontiva, Auttawut; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Lee, Wendy; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Lopez, Liliana; Moreno, Sonia; Muñoz, Claudia; Tirado, Victoria; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Fagan, Anne M.; Giraldo, Margarita; Garcia, Gloria; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Age-associated changes in brain imaging and fluid biomarkers are characterized and compared in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers and noncarriers from the world’s largest known autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD) kindred. OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare age-associated changes in brain imaging and fluid biomarkers in PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers and noncarriers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional measures of 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography, 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, structural magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and plasma biomarkers of AD were assessed from 54 PSEN1 E280A kindred members (age range, 20-59 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We used brain mapping algorithms to compare regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose and gray matter volumes in cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers and noncarriers. We used regression analyses to characterize associations between age and the mean cortical to pontine 18F-florbetapir standard uptake value ratios, precuneus cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, hippocampal gray matter volume, CSF A?1-42, total tau and phosphorylated tau181, and plasma A? measurements. Age at onset of progressive biomarker changes that distinguish carriers from noncarriers was estimated using best-fitting regression models. RESULTS Compared with noncarriers, cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers had significantly lower precuneus cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, smaller hippocampal volume, lower CSF A?1-42, higher CSF total tau and phosphorylated tau181, and higher plasma A?1-42 measurements. Sequential changes in biomarkers were seen at age 20 years (95% CI, 14-24 years) for CSF A?1-42, age 16 years (95% CI, 11-24 years) for the mean cortical 18F-florbetapir standard uptake value ratio, age 15 years (95% CI, 10-24 years) for precuneus cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, age 15 years (95% CI, 7-20 years) for CSF total tau, age 13 years (95% CI, 8-19 years) for phosphorylated tau181, and age 6 years (95% CI, 1-10 years) for hippocampal volume, with cognitive decline up to 6 years before the kindred’s estimated median age of 44 years (95% CI, 43-45 years) at mild cognitive impairment diagnosis. No age-associated findings were seen in plasma A?1-42 or A?1-40. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This cross-sectional study provides additional information about the course of different AD biomarkers in the preclinical and clinical stages of autosomal dominant AD. PMID:25580592

  17. A SPRY2 mutation leading to MAPK/ERK pathway inhibition is associated with an autosomal dominant form of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Milillo, Annamaria; La Carpia, Francesca; Costanzi, Stefano; D'Urbano, Vanessa; Martini, Maurizio; Lanuti, Paola; Vischini, Gisella; Larocca, Luigi M; Marchisio, Marco; Miscia, Sebastiano; Amoroso, Antonio; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Sangiorgi, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) represents the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide with a prevalence of 25-50% among patients with primary glomerulopathies. In ~5-10% of the patients the disease segregates with an autosomal dominant (AD) pattern. Association studies identified loci on chromosomes 1q32, 6p21, 8p23, 17p13, 22q12, whereas classical linkage studies on AD families identified loci on chromosomes 2q36, 4q26-31, 6q22, 17q12-22. We have studied a large Sicilian family where IgAN segregates with an AD transmission. To identify the causal gene, the exomes of two affected and one unaffected individual have been sequenced. From the bioinformatics analysis a p.(Arg119Trp) variant in the SPRY2 gene was identified as the probable disease-causing mutation. Moreover, functional characterization of this variant showed that it is responsible for the inhibition of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway. The same effect was observed in two sporadic IgAN patients carriers of wild-type SPRY2, suggesting that downregulation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway represents a common mechanism leading to IgAN. PMID:25782674

  18. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel CEACAM16 Mutation Associated with Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss DFNA4B in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    He, Chufeng; Li, Haibo; Qing, Jie; Grati, Mhamed; Hu, Zhengmao; Li, Jiada; Hu, Yiqiao; Xia, Kun; Mei, Lingyun; Wang, Xingwei; Yu, Jianjun; Chen, Hongsheng; Jiang, Lu; Liu, Yalan; Men, Meichao; Zhang, Hailin; Guan, Liping; Xiao, Jingjing; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Xuezhong; Feng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL/DFNA) is a highly genetically heterogeneous disorder. Hitherto only about 30 ADNSHL-causing genes have been identified and many unknown genes remain to be discovered. In this research, genome-wide linkage analysis mapped the disease locus to a 4.3 Mb region on chromosome 19q13 in SY-026, a five-generation nonconsanguineous Chinese family affected by late-onset and progressive ADNSHL. This linkage region showed partial overlap with the previously reported DFNA4. Simultaneously, probands were analyzed using exome capture followed by next generation sequencing. Encouragingly, a heterozygous missense mutation, c.505G>A (p.G169R) in exon 3 of the CEACAM16 gene (carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 16), was identified via this combined strategy. Sanger sequencing verified that the mutation co-segregated with hearing loss in the family and that it was not present in 200 unrelated control subjects with matched ancestry. This is the second report in the literature of a family with ADNSHL caused by CEACAM16 mutation. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blots also prove CEACAM16 to be a secreted protein. Furthermore, our studies in transfected HEK293T cells show that the secretion efficacy of the mutant CEACAM16 is much lower than that of the wild-type, suggesting a deleterious effect of the sequence variant. PMID:25589040

  19. Mutations in the 5' UTR of ANKRD26, the ankirin repeat domain 26 gene, cause an autosomal-dominant form of inherited thrombocytopenia, THC2.

    PubMed

    Pippucci, Tommaso; Savoia, Anna; Perrotta, Silverio; Pujol-Moix, Núria; Noris, Patrizia; Castegnaro, Giovanni; Pecci, Alessandro; Gnan, Chiara; Punzo, Francesca; Marconi, Caterina; Gherardi, Samuele; Loffredo, Giuseppe; De Rocco, Daniela; Scianguetta, Saverio; Barozzi, Serena; Magini, Pamela; Bozzi, Valeria; Dezzani, Luca; Di Stazio, Mariateresa; Ferraro, Marcella; Perini, Giovanni; Seri, Marco; Balduini, Carlo L

    2011-01-01

    THC2, an autosomal-dominant thrombocytopenia described so far in only two families, has been ascribed to mutations in MASTL or ACBD5. Here, we show that ANKRD26, another gene within the THC2 locus, and neither MASTL nor ACBD5, is mutated in eight unrelated families. ANKRD26 was also found to be mutated in the family previously reported to have an ACBD5 mutation. We identified six different ANKRD26 mutations, which were clustered in a highly conserved 19 bp sequence located in the 5' untranslated region. Mutations were not detected in 500 controls and are absent from the 1000 Genomes database. Available data from an animal model and Dr. Watson's genome give evidence against haploinsufficiency as the pathogenetic mechanism for ANKRD26-mediated thrombocytopenia. The luciferase reporter assay suggests that these 5' UTR mutations might enhance ANKRD26 expression. ANKRD26 is the ancestor of a family of primate-specific genes termed POTE, which have been recently identified as a family of proapoptotic proteins. Dysregulation of apoptosis might therefore be the pathogenetic mechanism, as demonstrated for another thrombocytopenia, THC4. Further investigation is needed to provide evidence supporting this hypothesis. PMID:21211618

  20. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Variant in EFEMP1 Co-Segregating in a Family with Autosomal Dominant Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Donna S.; Bennett, Thomas M.; Shiels, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a clinically important and genetically heterogeneous cause of progressive vision loss as a result of retinal ganglion cell death. Here we have utilized trio-based, whole-exome sequencing to identify the genetic defect underlying an autosomal dominant form of adult-onset POAG segregating in an African-American family. Exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.418C>T, p.Arg140Trp) in exon-5 of the gene coding for epidermal growth factor (EGF) containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) that co-segregated with disease in the family. Linkage and haplotype analyses with microsatellite markers indicated that the disease interval overlapped a known POAG locus (GLC1H) on chromosome 2p. The p.Arg140Trp substitution was predicted in silico to have damaging effects on protein function and transient expression studies in cultured cells revealed that the Trp140-mutant protein exhibited increased intracellular accumulation compared with wild-type EFEMP1. In situ hybridization of the mouse eye with oligonucleotide probes detected the highest levels of EFEMP1 transcripts in the ciliary body, cornea, inner nuclear layer of the retina, and the optic nerve head. The recent finding that a common variant near EFEMP1 was associated with optic nerve-head morphology supports the possibility that the EFEMP1 variant identified in this POAG family may be pathogenic. PMID:26162006

  1. Disease Progression in Autosomal Dominant Cone-Rod Dystrophy Caused by a Novel Mutation (D100G) in the GUCA1A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Eva; Lee, Winston; Merriam, Joanna E.; Allikmets, Rando; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To document longitudinal fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and electroretinogram (ERG) findings in a family with cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) caused by a novel missense mutation (D100G) in the GUCA1A gene. Methods Observational case series. Results Three family members 26 to 49 years old underwent complete clinical examinations. In all patients, funduscopic findings showed intraretinal pigment migration, loss of neurosensory retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and macular atrophy. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging revealed the presence of a progressive hyperautofluorescent ring around a hypoautofluorescent center corresponding to macular atrophy. Full-field electroretinograms (ERG) showed a more severe loss of cone than rod function in each patient. 30 Hz flicker responses fell far below normal limits. Longitudinal FAF and ERG findings in one patient suggested progressive cone-rod dystrophy. Two more advanced patients exhibited reduced rod response consistent with disease stage. Direct sequencing of the GUCA1A gene revealed a new missense mutation, p.Asp100Gly (D100G), in each patient. Conclusion Patients with autosomal dominant CRD caused by a D100G mutation in GUCA1A exhibit progressive vision loss early within the first decade of life identifiable by distinct ERG characteristics and subsequent genetic testing. PMID:24352742

  2. Fine mapping of the Autosomal Dominant Split Hand/Split Foot Locus on Chromosome 7, Band q21.3-q22.1

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Stephen W.; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Allen, Todd; Kim, Julia; Geshuri, Dorrit; Nunes, Mark; Soder, Sylvia; Stephens, Karen; Pagon, Roberta A.; Patton, Michael A.; Berg, Mary Anne; Donlon, Tim; Rivera, Horacio; Pfeiffer, R. A.; Naritomi, Kenji; Hughes, Helen; Genuardi, Maurizio; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Neri, Giovanni; Lovrein, Everett; Magenis, Ellen; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Evans, James P.

    1994-01-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHFD) is a human developmental defect characterized by missing digits, fusion of remaining digits, and a deep median cleft in the hands and feet. Cytogenetic studies of deletions and translocations associated with this disorder have indicated that an autosomal dominant split hand/split foot locus (gene SHFD1) maps to 7q21-q22. To characterize the SHFD1 locus, somatic cell hybrid lines were constructed from cytogenetically abnormal individuals with SHFD. Molecular analysis resulted in the localization of 93 DNA markers to one of 10 intervals surrounding the SHFD1 locus. The translocation breakpoints in four SHFD patients were encompassed by the smallest region of overlap among the SHFD-associated deletions. The order of DNA markers in the SHFD1 critical region has been defined as PON–D7S812–SHFD1–D7S811–ASNS. One DNA marker, D7S811, detected altered restriction enzyme fragments in three patients with translocations when examined by pulsed-field gel electro-phoresis (PFGE). These data map SHFD1, a gene that is crucial for human limb differentiation, to a small interval in the q21.3-q22.1 region of human chromosome 7. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 4 PMID:8023840

  3. The disruption of a novel limb cis-regulatory element of SHH is associated with autosomal dominant preaxial polydactyly-hypertrichosis.

    PubMed

    Petit, Florence; Jourdain, Anne-Sophie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Keren, Boris; Andrieux, Joris; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Porchet, Nicole; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Escande, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    The expression gradient of the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is crucial in establishing the number and the identity of the digits during anteroposterior patterning of the limb. Its anterior ectopic expression is responsible for preaxial polydactyly (PPD). Most of these malformations are due to the gain-of-function of the Zone of Polarizing Activity Regulatory Sequence, the only limb-specific enhancer of SHH known to date. We report a family affected with a novel condition associating PPD and hypertrichosis of the upper back, following an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. This phenotype is consistent with deregulation of SHH expression during limb and follicle development. In affected members, we identified a 2?kb deletion located ~240?kb upstream from the SHH promoter. The deleted sequence is capable of repressing the transcriptional activity of the SHH promoter in vitro, consistent with a silencer activity. We hypothesize that the deletion of this silencer could be responsible for SHH deregulation during development, leading to a PPD-hypertrichosis phenotype. PMID:25782671

  4. A Missense Mutation in the Alpha-Actinin 1 Gene (ACTN1) Is the Cause of Autosomal Dominant Macrothrombocytopenia in a Large French Family

    PubMed Central

    Guéguen, Paul; Rouault, Karen; Chen, Jian-Min; Raguénès, Odile; Fichou, Yann; Hardy, Elisabeth; Gobin, Eric; Pan-petesch, Brigitte; Kerbiriou, Mathieu; Trouvé, Pascal; Marcorelles, Pascale; Abgrall, Jean-francois; Le Maréchal, Cédric; Férec, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenia is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a reduced number of blood platelets. Despite the identification of nearly 20 causative genes in the past decade, approximately half of all subjects with inherited thrombocytopenia still remain unexplained in terms of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Here we report a six-generation French pedigree with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and the identification of its genetic basis. Of the 55 subjects available for analysis, 26 were diagnosed with isolated macrothrombocytopenia. Genome-wide linkage analysis mapped a 10.9 Mb locus to chromosome 14 (14q22) with a LOD score of 7.6. Candidate gene analysis complemented by targeted next-generation sequencing identified a missense mutation (c.137GA; p.Arg46Gln) in the alpha-actinin 1 gene (ACTN1) that segregated with macrothrombocytopenia in this large pedigree. The missense mutation occurred within actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin 1, a functionally critical domain that crosslinks actin filaments into bundles. The evaluation of cultured mutation-harboring megakaryocytes by electron microscopy and the immunofluorescence examination of transfected COS-7 cells suggested that the mutation causes disorganization of the cellular cytoplasm. Our study concurred with a recently published whole-exome sequence analysis of six small Japanese families with congenital macrothrombocytopenia, adding ACTN1 to the growing list of thrombocytopenia genes. PMID:24069336

  5. A pedigree with autosomal dominant thrombocytopenia, red cell macrocytosis, and an occurrence of t(12:21) positive pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Escher, Robert; Wilson, Peter; Carmichael, Catherine; Suppiah, Ram; Liu, Marjorie; Kavallaris, Maria; Cannon, Ping; Michaud, Joelle; Scott, Hamish S

    2007-01-01

    Sampling and analyzing new families with inherited blood disorders are major steps contributing to the identification of gene(s) responsible for normal and pathologic hematopoiesis. Familial occurrences of hematological disorders alone, or as part of a syndromic disease, have been reported, and for some the underlying genetic mutation has been identified. Here we describe a new autosomal dominant inherited phenotype of thrombocytopenia and red cell macrocytosis in a four-generation pedigree. Interestingly, in the youngest generation, a 2-year-old boy presenting with these familial features has developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by a t(12;21) translocation. Tri-lineage involvement of platelets, red cells and white cells may suggest a genetic defect in an early multiliear progenitor or a stem cell. Functional assays in EBV-transformed cell lines revealed a defect in cell proliferation and tubulin dynamics. Two candidate genes, RUNX1 and FOG1, were sequenced but no pathogenic mutation was found. Identification of the underlying genetic defect(s) in this family may help in understanding the complex process of hematopoiesis. PMID:17434765

  6. The Impact of the Availability of Prevention Studies on the Desire to Undergo Predictive Testing in Persons at-risk for Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Megan; Grill, Joshua D.; Rodriguez-Agudelo, Yaneth; Medina, Luis D.; Fox, Michelle; Alvarez-Retuerto, Ana Isabel; Wharton, David; Brook, Jenny; Ringman, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Persons at-risk for autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases provide the opportunity to efficiently test preventive interventions. Only a minority of such persons, however, choose to undergo revealing genetic testing, presenting a challenge to enrollment. Thirty-four preclinical Latinos (n = 26) and non-Latinos at-risk for familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) unaware of their genetic status were administered a questionnaire exploring their interest in undergoing revealing genetic testing at baseline and in the context of eligibility for four prevention trials of increasing invasiveness. Forty-four percent of subjects expressed a baseline interest in undergoing revealing testing which increased to 85% in order to be eligible for a study of an oral drug "felt to be very safe.” If there were a 50% chance of receiving placebo, this number dropped to 62% (p = 0.02). For those not interested in a study involving a 50% chance of receiving placebo, a range of 5% to 40% chance of receiving placebo was given as acceptable. For more invasive studies, living in the U.S. (as opposed to Mexico) positively influenced the likelihood of participating. Our data suggests that clinical trial designs in which persons must confront their genetic status prior to enrollment are feasible. Study designs to minimize the likelihood of being placed on placebo or provide the eventual administration of the drug through open-label extensions should be considered. PMID:23876673

  7. Autosomal-Dominant Distal Myopathy Associated with a Recurrent Missense Mutation in the Gene Encoding the Nuclear Matrix Protein, Matrin 3

    PubMed Central

    Senderek, Jan; Garvey, Sean M.; Krieger, Michael; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Urtizberea, Andoni; Roos, Andreas; Elbracht, Miriam; Stendel, Claudia; Tournev, Ivailo; Mihailova, Violeta; Feit, Howard; Tramonte, Jeff; Hedera, Peter; Crooks, Kristy; Bergmann, Carsten; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Zerres, Klaus; Lochmüller, Hanns; Seboun, Eric; Weis, Joachim; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Hauser, Michael A.; Jackson, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    Distal myopathies represent a heterogeneous group of inherited skeletal muscle disorders. One type of adult-onset, progressive autosomal-dominant distal myopathy, frequently associated with dysphagia and dysphonia (vocal cord and pharyngeal weakness with distal myopathy [VCPDM]), has been mapped to chromosome 5q31 in a North American pedigree. Here, we report the identification of a second large VCPDM family of Bulgarian descent and fine mapping of the critical interval. Sequencing of positional candidate genes revealed precisely the same nonconservative S85C missense mutation affecting an interspecies conserved residue in the MATR3 gene in both families. MATR3 is expressed in skeletal muscle and encodes matrin 3, a component of the nuclear matrix, which is a proteinaceous network that extends throughout the nucleus. Different disease related haplotype signatures in the two families provided evidence that two independent mutational events at the same position in MATR3 cause VCPDM. Our data establish proof of principle that the nuclear matrix is crucial for normal skeletal muscle structure and function and put VCPDM on the growing list of monogenic disorders associated with the nuclear proteome. PMID:19344878

  8. A Non-Synonymous Mutation in the Canine Pkd1 Gene Is Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease in Bull Terriers

    PubMed Central

    Gharahkhani, Puya; O'Leary, Caroline A.; Kyaw-Tanner, Myat; Sturm, Richard A.; Duffy, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic Kidney Disease is an autosomal dominant disease common in some lines of Bull Terriers (BTPKD). The disease is linked to the canine orthologue of human PKD1 gene, Pkd1, located on CFA06, but no disease-associated mutation has been reported. This study sequenced genomic DNA from two Bull Terriers with BTPKD and two without the disease. A non-synonymous G>A transition mutation in exon 29 of Pkd1 was identified. A TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assay was designed and demonstrated the heterozygous detection of the mutation in 47 Bull Terriers with BTPKD, but not in 102 Bull Terriers over one year of age and without BTPKD. This missense mutation replaces a glutamic acid residue with a lysine residue in the predicted protein, Polycystin 1. This region of Polycystin 1 is highly conserved between species, and is located in the first cytoplasmic loop of the predicted protein structure, close to the PLAT domain and the second transmembrane region. Thus, this change could alter Polycystin 1 binding or localization. Analytic programs PolyPhen 2, Align GVGD and SIFT predict this mutation to be pathogenic. Thus, BTPKD is associated with a missense mutation in Pkd1, and the application of this mutation specific assay could reduce disease transmission by allowing diagnosis of disease in young animals prior to breeding. PMID:21818326

  9. A novel mutation (ASn244Lys) in the peripherin/RDS gene causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa associated with bull's eye maculopathy detected by nonradioisotopic SSCP

    SciTech Connect

    Kikawa, Emi; Nakazawa, Mitsuru; Chida, Yasushi; Shiono, Takashi; Tamai, Makota )

    1994-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is characterized by night blindness, an eventual loss of visual field, a diminished response on the electroretinogram, and pigmentary retinal degeneration. These features are primarily explained by the degeneration of photoreceptors. The recent development of the molecular genetic approach has enabled the identification of genes responsible for parts of autosomal dominant RP (ADRP). Rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS genes, in particular, have been successfully shown to cosegregate with ADRP. The authors, therefore, screened 42 unrelated Japanese patients with ADRP to search for mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene. The method we employed for screening was a nonradioisotopic modification of single-strand conformation polymorphism. Among 42 unrelated patients with ADRP, the DNA from one patient (SY) showed an abnormal pattern in exon 2 on SSCP. The DNA fragments were then amplified from affected and nonaffected members of the same family as SY. The alteration in the DNA sequence that was commonly found in the affected members of the family was identified as a heterozygous transversional change of C to A at the third nucleotide in codon 244, resulting in the amino acid replacement of asparagine residue with lysine residue. None of unaffected family members or 30 normal control individuals had this alteration.

  10. Pheochromocytoma as a rare cause of arterial hypertension in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: A diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Hessheimer, Amelia J.; Vidal, Oscar; Valentini, Mauro; García-Valdecasas, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) frequently suffer arterial hypertension even prior to significant loss of renal function, a clinical situation that obscures detection of modifiable secondary causes of hypertension. Presentation of case A 50-year-old man with ADPKD and polycystic liver and resistant hypertension is diagnosed with a 4-cm right adrenal mass. Cross-sectional MRI is indicative of pheochromocytoma versus adrenocortical carcinoma or metastasis, though there are no typical PCC symptoms and plasma and urine metanephrines are within normal ranges. Since malignancy cannot be excluded, right adrenalectomy is performed. Considering that the enlarged liver poses an obstacle for transperitoneal open and laparoscopic approaches, a retroperitoneoscopic approach is used. Surgical pathology reveals a 4.5-cm pheochromocytoma; the patient no longer requires antihypertensive therapy. Discussion & conclusion Pheochromocytoma is a rare but treatable cause of hypertension in ADPKD; given the anatomical complexities these patients present, careful preoperative planning and surgical technique are essential to a favorable outcome. PMID:26254120

  11. [A case of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) in which lomerizine hydrochloride was suggested to prevent recurrent stroke].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hisao; Nagami, Shuhei; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old man visited our hospital because of left hemiparesis in September 2006. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a high-intensity lesions in the right corona radiata on diffusion-weighted images and a high-intensity lesions in the basal ganglia and deep white matter on T2-weighted images. He recovered with no sequelae. Antithrombotic agents such as aspirin were given to prevent stroke, but stroke recurred three times over the course of 3 years. In February 2009, neurological examination revealed right hemiparalysis and dysarthria. Dysphagia and cognitive decline had been progressing gradually. We suspected cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) on the basis of the clinical and family history. An Arg75Pro mutation in the Notch3 gene was found, but did not involve a cysteine residue. Antithrombotic agents were ineffective. We tried lomerizine hydrochloride, which was reported to prevent stroke in a patient with CADASIL. In Japan, lomerizine hydrochloride is used to prevent migraine and to selectively inhibit cerebral artery contraction. During treatment with lomerizine hydrochloride (5 mg/day) for more than 3 years, there was no recurrence of cerebral infarction and no further deterioration of cognitive function or MRI findings. There is no evidence supporting the efficacy of antithrombotic agents in CADASIL patients. Moreover, antithrombotic agents have been reported to increase the frequency of clinically silent microbleeds on MRI in CADASIL. Lomerizine hydrochloride might therefore be one option for the treatment of CADASIL. PMID:24429644

  12. Identification of 13 new mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene in 17 kindreds with familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B.

    1996-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive postnatal deficiency of arginine vasopressin as a result of mutation in the gene that encodes the hormone. To determine the extent of mutations in the coding region that produce the phenotype, we studied members of 17 unrelated kindreds with the disorder. We sequenced all 3 exons of the gene by using a rapid, direct dye-terminator method and found the causative mutation in each kindred. In four kindreds, the mutations were each identical to mutations described in other affected families. In the other 13 kindreds each mutation was unique. There were two missense mutations that altered the cleavage region of the signal peptide, seven missense mutations in exon 2, which codes for the conserved portion of the protein, one nonsense mutation in exon 2, and three nonsense mutations in exon 3. These findings, together with the clinical features of FNDI, suggest that each of the mutations exerts an effect by directing the production of a pre-prohormone that cannot be folded, processed, or degraded properly and eventually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. 63 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Autosomal dominant Marfan-like connective-tissue disorder with aortic dilation and skeletal anomaslies not linked to the Fibrillin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Boileau, C.; Coulon, M.; Alexandre, J.-A.; Junien, C. ); Jondeau, G.; Delorme, G.; Dubourg, O.; Bourdarias, J.-P. ); Babron, M.-C.; Bonaieti-Pellie, C. ); Sakai, L. ); Melki, J. )

    1993-07-01

    The authors describe a large family with a connective-tissue disorder that exhibits some of the skeletal and cardiovascular features seen in Marfan syndrome. However, none of the 19 affected individuals displayed ocular abnormalities and therefore did not comply with recognized criteria for this disease. These patients could alternatively be diagnosed as MASS (mitral valve, aorta, skeleton, and skin) phenotype patients or represent a distinct clinical entity, i.e., a new autosomal dominant connective-tissue disorder. The fibrillin genes located on chromosomes 15 and 5 are clearly involved in the classic form of Marfan syndrome and a clinically related disorder (congenital contractural arachnodactyly), respectively. To test whether one of these genes was also implicated in this French family, the authors performed genetic analyses. Blood samples were obtained for 56 family members, and four polymorphic fibrillin gene markers, located on chromosomes 15 (Fib15) and 5 (Fib5), respectively, were tested. Linkage between the disease allele and the markers of these two genes was excluded with lod scores of [minus]11.39 (for Fib15) and [minus]13.34 (for Fib5), at 0 = .001, indicating that the mutation is at a different locus. This phenotype thus represents a new connective-tissue disorder, overlapping but different from classic Marfan syndrome. 33 refs., 1 fig. 2 tabs.

  14. Refining the localization of the PKD2 locus on chromosome 4q by linkage analysis in Spanish families with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease type 2

    SciTech Connect

    San Millan, J.L.; Viribay, M.; Peral, B.; Moreno, F.; Martinez, I.; Weissenbach, J.

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. At least two distinct forms of ADPKD are now well defined. In {approximately}86% of affected European families, a gene defect localized to 16p13.3 was responsible for ADPKD, while a second locus has been recently localized to 4q13-q23 as candidate for the disease in the remaining families. We present confirmation of linkage to microsatellite markers on chromosome 4q in eight Spanish families with ADPKD, in which the disease was not linked to 16p13.3. By linkage analysis with marker D4S423, a maximum lod score of 9.03 at a recombination fraction of .00 was obtained. Multipoint linkage analysis, as well as a study of recombinant haplotypes, placed the PKD2 locus between D4S1542 and D4S1563, thereby defining a genetic interval of {approximately}1 cM. The refined map will serve as a genetic framework for additional genetic and physical mapping of the region and will improve the accuracy of presymptomatic diagnosis of PKD2. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. SNP Linkage Analysis and Whole Exome Sequencing Identify a Novel POU4F3 Mutation in Autosomal Dominant Late-Onset Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss (DFNA15)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung-Jin; Hong, Sung Hwa; Ki, Chang-Seok; Cho, Sang Sun; Venselaar, Hanka; Vriend, Gert; Kim, Jong-Won

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (AD-NSHL) is one of the most common genetic diseases in human and is well-known for the considerable genetic heterogeneity. In this study, we utilized whole exome sequencing (WES) and linkage analysis for direct genetic diagnosis in AD-NSHL. The Korean family had typical AD-NSHL running over 6 generations. Linkage analysis was performed by using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip and pinpointed a genomic region on 5q31 with a significant linkage signal. Sequential filtering of variants obtained from WES, application of the linkage region, bioinformatic analyses, and Sanger sequencing validation identified a novel missense mutation Arg326Lys (c.977G>A) in the POU homeodomain of the POU4F3 gene as the candidate disease-causing mutation in the family. POU4F3 is a known disease gene causing AD-HSLH (DFNA15) described in 5 unrelated families until now each with a unique mutation. Arg326Lys was the first missense mutation affecting the 3rd alpha helix of the POU homeodomain harboring a bipartite nuclear localization signal sequence. The phenotype findings in our family further supported previously noted intrafamilial and interfamilial variability of DFNA15. This study demonstrated that WES in combination with linkage analysis utilizing bi-allelic SNP markers successfully identified the disease locus and causative mutation in AD-NSHL. PMID:24260153

  16. Aberrant transcript produced by a splice donor site deletion in the TECTA gene is associated with autosomal dominant deafness in a Brazilian family.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Batissoco, Ana C; Lima, Fernanda T; Auricchio, Maria T B M; Nonose, Renata W; dos Santos, Simone R; Guilherme, Luiza; Oiticica, Jeanne; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2012-12-15

    We ascertained a Brazilian family with nine individuals affected by autosomal dominant nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. The bilateral hearing loss affected mainly mid-high frequencies, was apparently stable with an early onset. Microsatellites close to the DFNA8/DFNA12 locus, which harbors the TECTA gene, showed significant multipoint lod scores (3.2) close to marker D11S4107. Sequencing of the exons and exon-intron boundaries of the TECTA gene in one affected subject revealed the deletion c.5383+5delGTGA in the 5' end of intron 16, that includes the last two bases of the donor splice site consensus sequence. This mutation segregates with deafness within the family. To date, 33 different TECTA mutations associated with autossomal dominant hearing loss have been described. Among them is the mutation reported herein, first described by Hildebrand et al. (2011) in a UK family. The audioprofiles from the UK and Brazilian families were similar. In order to investigate the transcripts produced by the mutated allele, we performed cDNA analysis of a lymphoblastoid cell line from an affected heterozygote with the c.5383+5delGTGA and a noncarrier from the same family. The analysis allowed us to identify an aberrant transcript with skipping of exon 16, without affecting the reading frame. One of the dominant TECTA mutations already described, a synonymous substitution in exon 16 (c.5331Gdominant hearing loss, the c.5383+5delGTGA mutation does not have an inactivating effect on the protein. PMID:22995349

  17. Map refinement of locus RP13 to human chromosome 17p13.3 in a second family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kojis, T.L.; Heinzmann, C.; Ngo, J.T.

    1996-02-01

    In order to elucidate the genetic basis of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) in a large eight-generation family (UCLA-RP09) of British descent, we assessed linkage between the UCLA-RP09 adRP gene and numerous genetic loci, including eight adRP candidate genes, five anonymous adRP-linked DNA loci, and 20 phenotypic markers. Linkage to the UCLA-RP09 disease gene was excluded for all eight candidate genes analyzed, including rhodopsin (RP4) and peripherin/RDS (RP7), for the four adRP loci RP1, RP9, RP10 and RP11, as well as for 17 phenotypic markers. The anonymous DNA marker locus D17S938, linked to adRP locus RP13 on chromosome 17p13.1, yielded a suggestive but not statistically significant positive lod score. Linkage was confirmed between the UCLA-RP09 adRP gene and markers distal to D17S938 in the chromosomal region 17p13.3. A reanalysis of the original RP13 data from a South African adRP family of British descent, in conjunction with our UCLA-RP09 data, suggests that only one adRP locus exists on 17p but that it maps to a more telomeric position, at band 17p13.3, than previously reported. Confirmation of the involvement of RP13 in two presumably unrelated adRP families, both of British descent, suggests that this locus is a distinct adRP gene in a proportion of British, and possibly other, adRP families. 39 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Modeling of autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa in Caenorhabditis elegans uncovers a nexus between global impaired functioning of certain splicing factors and cell type-specific apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Peña, Karinna; Fontrodona, Laura; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Torres, Silvia; Cornes, Eric; García-Rodríguez, Francisco J; Serrat, Xènia; González-Knowles, David; Foissac, Sylvain; Porta-De-La-Riva, Montserrat; Cerón, Julián

    2015-12-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a rare genetic disease that causes gradual blindness through retinal degeneration. Intriguingly, seven of the 24 genes identified as responsible for the autosomal-dominant form (adRP) are ubiquitous spliceosome components whose impairment causes disease only in the retina. The fact that these proteins are essential in all organisms hampers genetic, genomic, and physiological studies, but we addressed these difficulties by using RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our study of worm phenotypes produced by RNAi of splicing-related adRP (s-adRP) genes functionally distinguishes between components of U4 and U5 snRNP complexes, because knockdown of U5 proteins produces a stronger phenotype. RNA-seq analyses of worms where s-adRP genes were partially inactivated by RNAi, revealed mild intron retention in developing animals but not in adults, suggesting a positive correlation between intron retention and transcriptional activity. Interestingly, RNAi of s-adRP genes produces an increase in the expression of atl-1 (homolog of human ATR), which is normally activated in response to replicative stress and certain DNA-damaging agents. The up-regulation of atl-1 correlates with the ectopic expression of the pro-apoptotic gene egl-1 and apoptosis in hypodermal cells, which produce the cuticle, but not in other cell types. Our model in C. elegans resembles s-adRP in two aspects: The phenotype caused by global knockdown of s-adRP genes is cell type-specific and associated with high transcriptional activity. Finally, along with a reduced production of mature transcripts, we propose a model in which the retina-specific cell death in s-adRP patients can be induced through genomic instability. PMID:26490224

  19. Nonmuscle Myosin Heavy Chain IIA Mutations Define a Spectrum of Autosomal Dominant Macrothrombocytopenias: May-Hegglin Anomaly and Fechtner, Sebastian, Epstein, and Alport-Like Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Karen E.; Campos-Barros, Angel; Toren, Amos; Rozenfeld-Granot, Galit; Carlsson, Lena E.; Savige, Judy; Denison, Joyce C.; Gregory, Martin C.; White, James G.; Barker, David F; Greinacher, Andreas; Epstein, Charles J.; Glucksman, Marc J.; Martignetti, John A.

    2001-01-01

    May-Hegglin anomaly (MHA) and Fechtner (FTNS) and Sebastian (SBS) syndromes are autosomal dominant platelet disorders that share macrothrombocytopenia and characteristic leukocyte inclusions. FTNS has the additional clinical features of nephritis, deafness, and cataracts. Previously, mutations in the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain 9 gene (MYH9), which encodes nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MYHIIA), were identified in all three disorders. The spectrum of mutations and the genotype-phenotype and structure-function relationships in a large cohort of affected individuals (n=27) has now been examined. Moreover, it is demonstrated that MYH9 mutations also result in two other FTNS-like macrothrombocytopenia syndromes: Epstein syndrome (EPS) and Alport syndrome with macrothrombocytopenia (APSM). In all five disorders, MYH9 mutations were identified in 20/27 (74%) affected individuals. Four mutations, R702C, D1424N, E1841K, and R1933X, were most frequent. R702C and R702H mutations were only associated with FTNS, EPS, or APSM, thus defining a region of MYHIIA critical in the combined pathogenesis of macrothrombocytopenia, nephritis, and deafness. The E1841K, D1424N, and R1933X coiled-coil domain mutations were common to both MHA and FTNS. Haplotype analysis using three novel microsatellite markers revealed that three E1841K carriers—one with MHA and two with FTNS—shared a common haplotype around the MYH9 gene, suggesting a common ancestor. The two new globular-head mutations, K371N and R702H, as well as the recently identified MYH9 mutation, R705H, which results in DFNA17, were modeled on the basis of X-ray crystallographic data. Altogether, our data suggest that MHA, SBS, FTNS, EPS, and APSM comprise a phenotypic spectrum of disorders, all caused by MYH9 mutations. On the basis of our genetic analyses, the name “MYHIIA syndrome” is proposed to encompass all of these disorders. PMID:11590545

  20. A Truncated Form of Rod Photoreceptor PDE6 ?-Subunit Causes Autosomal Dominant Congenital Stationary Night Blindness by Interfering with the Inhibitory Activity of the ?-Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Anurima; Bocquet, Béatrice; Sénéchal, Audrey; Artemyev, Nikolai O.; Hamel, Christian P.; Brabet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness (adCSNB) is caused by mutations in three genes of the rod phototransduction cascade, rhodopsin (RHO), transducin ?-subunit (GNAT1), and cGMP phosphodiesterase type 6 ?-subunit (PDE6B). In most cases, the constitutive activation of the phototransduction cascade is a prerequisite to cause adCSNB. The unique adCSNB-associated PDE6B mutation found in the Rambusch pedigree, the substitution p.His258Asn, leads to rod photoreceptors desensitization. Here, we report a three-generation French family with adCSNB harboring a novel PDE6B mutation, the duplication, c.928-9_940dup resulting in a tyrosine to cysteine substitution at codon 314, a frameshift, and a premature termination (p.Tyr314Cysfs*50). To understand the mechanism of the PDE6?1-314fs*50 mutant, we examined the properties of its PDE6-specific portion, PDE6?1-313. We found that PDE6?1-313 maintains the ability to bind noncatalytic cGMP and the inhibitory ?-subunit (P?), and interferes with the inhibition of normal PDE6?? catalytic subunits by P?. Moreover, both truncated forms of the PDE6? protein, PDE6?1-313 and PDE6?1-314fs*50 expressed in rods of transgenic X. laevis are targeted to the phototransduction compartment. We hypothesize that in affected family members the p.Tyr314Cysfs*50 change results in the production of the truncated protein, which binds P? and causes constitutive activation of the phototransduction thus leading to the absence of rod adaptation. PMID:24760071

  1. A comparison of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging shows that kidney length predicts chronic kidney disease in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Harpreet; Smith, Vikram; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Grantham, Jared J; Torres, Vicente E; Mrug, Michal; Bae, Kyongtae T; Wu, Zhiyuan; Ge, Yinghui; Landslittel, Doug; Gibbs, Patrice; O'Neill, W Charles; Chapman, Arlene B

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is marked by gradual renal cyst and kidney enlargement and ultimately renal failure. Magnetic resonance-based, height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) over 600?cc/m predicts the development of CKD stage 3 within 8 years in the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging in Polycystic Kidney Disease cohort. Here we compared simultaneous ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to determine whether ultrasound and kidney length (KL) predict future CKD stage 3 over longer periods of follow-up. A total of 241 ADPKD patients, 15-46 years, with creatinine clearance of 70?ml/min and above had iothalamate clearance, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound evaluations. Participants underwent an average of five repeat clearance measurements over a mean follow-up of 9.3 years. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance-based TKV and KL were compared using Bland-Altman plots and intraclass correlations. Each measure was tested to predict future CKD stage 3. Relatively strong intraclass correlations between ultrasound and magnetic resonance were found for both htTKV and KL (0.81 and 0.85, respectively). Ultrasound and magnetic resonance-based htTKV and KL predicted future CKD stage 3 similarly (AUC of 0.87, 0.88, 0.87, and 0.88, respectively). An ultrasound kidney length over 16.5?cm and htTKV over 650?ml/min had the best cut point for predicting the development of CKD stage 3. Thus, kidney length alone is sufficient to stratify the risk of progression to renal insufficiency early in ADPKD using either ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25830764

  2. Analysis of opa1 isoforms expression and apoptosis regulation in autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) patients with mutations in the opa1 gene.

    PubMed

    Formichi, Patrizia; Radi, Elena; Giorgi, Eleonora; Gallus, Gian Nicola; Brunetti, Jlenia; Battisti, Carla; Rufa, Alessandra; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Franceschini, Rossella; Bracci, Luisa; Federico, Antonio

    2015-04-15

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is a hereditary optic neuropathy characterized by bilateral symmetrical visual loss, decrease in retinal ganglion cells and a loss of myelin within the optic nerve. ADOA is associated to mutations in Optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1), which encodes a mitochondrial protein involved in cristae remodeling, maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity, mitochondrial fusion and apoptosis regulation. We thus evaluated the rate of apoptosis and the expression levels of OPA1 isoforms in ADOA and control cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from eight patients with OPA1 mutation and age matched controls were cultivated both in basal conditions or with 2-deoxy-D-ribose, a reducing sugar that induces apoptosis through oxidative stress. Apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry, phosphatidylserine translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase 3 activation. We also analyzed the expression levels of OPA1 isoforms in ADOA and control cells cultured with and without 2-deoxy-D-ribose. We showed an increased percentage of apoptotic cells in ADOA patients compared to controls, both in basal culture conditions and after 2-deoxy-D-ribose treatment. This suggested a great susceptibility of ADOA cells to oxidative stress and a strong correlation between OPA1 protein dysfunctions and morphological-functional alterations to mitochondria. Moreover OPA1 protein expression was significantly decreased in lymphocytes from the ADOA patients after 2-deoxy-D-ribose treatment, implying a great sensitivity of the mutated protein to free radical damage. Concluding, we could confirm that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis may play a key role in the pathophysiological process bringing to retinal ganglion cells degeneration in ADOA. PMID:25796301

  3. Localization of a gene (CMT2A) for autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 to chromosome 1p and evidence of genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Othmane, K.B.; Loprest, L.J.; Wilkinson, K.M. ); Middleton, L.T. )

    1993-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 (CMT2) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy characterized by variable age of onset and normal or slightly diminished nerve conduction velocity. CMT2 is pathologically and genetically distinct from CMT type 1 (CMT1). While CMT1 has been shown to be genetically heterogeneous, no chromosomal localization has been established for CMT2. The authors have performed pedigree linkage analysis in six large autosomal dominant CMT2 families and have demonstrated linkage and heterogeneity to a series of microsatellites (D1S160, D1S170, D1S244, D1S228 and D1S199) in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Significant evidence for heterogeneity was found using admixture analyses and the two-point lod scores. Admixture analyses using the multipoint results for the markers D1S244, D1S228, and D1S199 supported the two-point findings. Three families, DUK662, DUK1241, and 1523 gave posterior probabilities of 1.0, 0.98, and 0.88 of being of the linked type. Multipoint analysis examining the [open quotes]linked[close quotes] families showed that the most favored location for the CMT2A gene is within the interval flanked by D1S244 and D1S228 (odds approximately 70:1 of lying within versus outside that interval). These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrate further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  4. Two novel mutations in NOTCH3 gene causes cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcritical infarct and leucoencephalopathy in two Chinese families

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuyou; Wang, Juan; Wu, Yuanbo; Wang, Guoping; Hu, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the genetic pathogenic causes of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcritical infarct and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) in two Chinese families, to provide the molecular basis for genetic counseling and antenatal diagnosis. Methods: The genetic mutation of gene NOTCH3 of propositus and family members was analyzed in these two CADASIL families by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing technology directly. At the same time, the NOTCH3 gene mutation point of 100 healthy collators was detected, to explicit the pathogenic mutation by function prediction with Polyphen-2 and SIFT. Results: Both propositus of the two families and patients with symptom were all accorded with the clinical features of CADASIL. It was shown by DNA sequencing that the 19th exon [c. 3043 T > A (p.Cys1015Ser)] in gene NOTCH3 of propositus, 2 patients (II3, III7), and a presymptomatic patient (IV1) in Family I all had heterozygosity missense mutation; and the 3rd exon [c.316T > G, p. (Cys106Gly)] in gene NOTCH3 of the propositus, a patient (IV3) and two presymptomatic patients (IV5, 6) in Family II all had heterozygosity missense mutation; and no mutations were detected in the 100 healthy collators. It was indicated by analyzing the function prediction that the mutation of [c. 3043 T > A (p.Cys1015Ser)] and [c.316T > G, p. (Cys106Gly)] may both influence encoding protein in NOTCH3. By analysis of the conservatism of mutation point in each species, these two basic groups were highly conserved. Conclusion: The heterozygosity missense mutation of 19th exon [c. 3043 T > A (p.Cys1015Ser)] and the 3rd exon [c.316T > G, p. (Cys106Gly)] in NOTCH3 gene are the new pathogenic mutations of CADASIL, and enriches the mutation spectrum of NOTCH3 gene. PMID:25973016

  5. Autosomal Dominant STAT3 Deficiency and Hyper-IgE Syndrome Molecular, Cellular, and Clinical Features From a French National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Melki, Isabelle; Natividad, Angels; Puel, Anne; Fieschi, Claire; Yun, Ling; Thumerelle, Caroline; Oksenhendler, Eric; Boutboul, David; Thomas, Caroline; Hoarau, Cyrille; Lebranchu, Yvon; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Cazorla, Celine; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Micheau, Marguerite; Tron, Fran[cedil]cois; Baruchel, Andre; Barlogis, Vincent; Palenzuela, Gilles; Mathey, Catherine; Dominique, Stephane; Body, Gerard; Munzer, Martine; Fouyssac, Fanny; Jaussaud, Rolland; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Blanche, Stephane; Debre, Marianne; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lambert, Nathalie; Grandin, Virginie; Ndaga, Stephanie; Jacques, Corinne; Harre, Chantal; Forveille, Monique; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Durandy, Anne; Bodemer, Christine; Suarez, Felipe; Hermine, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Fischer, Alain; Picard, Capucine

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant deficiency of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is the main genetic etiology of hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig) E syndrome. We documented the molecular, cellular, and clinical features of 60 patients with heterozygous STAT3 mutations from 47 kindreds followed in France. We identified 11 known and 13 new mutations of STAT3. Low levels of interleukin (IL)-6-dependent phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (or accumulation) of STAT3 were observed in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes (EBV-B cells) from all STAT3-deficient patients tested. The immunologic phenotype was characterized by high serum IgE levels (96% of the patients), memory B-cell lymphopenia (94.5%), and hypereosinophilia (80%). A low proportion of IL-17A-producing circulating T cells was found in 14 of the 15 patients tested. Mucocutaneous infections were the most frequent, typically caused by Staphylococcus aureus (all patients) and Candida albicans (85%). Up to 90% of the patients had pneumonia, mostly caused by Staph. aureus (31%) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (30%). Recurrent pneumonia was associated with secondary bronchiectasis and pneumatocele (67%), as well as secondary aspergillosis (22%). Up to 92% of the patients had dermatitis and connective tissue abnormalities, with facial dysmorphism (95%), retention of decidual teeth (65%), osteopenia (50%), and hyperextensibility (50%). Four patients developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The clinical outcome was favorable, with 56 patients, including 43 adults, still alive at the end of study (mean age, 21 yr; range, 1 mo to 46 yr). Only 4 patients died, 3 from severe bacterial infection (aged 1, 15, and 29 yr, respectively). Antibiotic prophylaxis (90% of patients), antifungal prophylaxis (50%), and IgG infusions (53%) improved patient health, as demonstrated by the large decrease in pneumonia recurrence. Overall, the prognosis of STAT3 deficiency may be considered good, provided that multiple prophylactic measures, including IgG infusions, are implemented. PMID:22751495

  6. Autosomal recessive

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and the other gene comes from the father. Recessive inheritance means both genes in a pair must be abnormal to cause ... born to parents who carry the same autosomal recessive change ... abnormal gene from both parents and developing the disease. You ...

  7. Calcilytic Ameliorates Abnormalities of Mutant Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Knock-In Mice Mimicking Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia (ADH).

    PubMed

    Dong, Bingzi; Endo, Itsuro; Ohnishi, Yukiyo; Kondo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Amizuka, Norio; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Abe, Masahiro; Fukumoto, Seiji; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    Activating mutations of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) cause autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH). ADH patients develop hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypercalciuria, similar to the clinical features of hypoparathyroidism. The current treatment of ADH is similar to the other forms of hypoparathyroidism, using active vitamin D3 or parathyroid hormone (PTH). However, these treatments aggravate hypercalciuria and renal calcification. Thus, new therapeutic strategies for ADH are needed. Calcilytics are allosteric antagonists of CaSR, and may be effective for the treatment of ADH caused by activating mutations of CaSR. In order to examine the effect of calcilytic JTT-305/MK-5442 on CaSR harboring activating mutations in the extracellular and transmembrane domains in vitro, we first transfected a mutated CaSR gene into HEK cells. JTT-305/MK-5442 suppressed the hypersensitivity to extracellular Ca(2+) of HEK cells transfected with the CaSR gene with activating mutations in the extracellular and transmembrane domains. We then selected two activating mutations locating in the extracellular (C129S) and transmembrane (A843E) domains, and generated two strains of CaSR knock-in mice to build an ADH mouse model. Both mutant mice mimicked almost all the clinical features of human ADH. JTT-305/MK-5442 treatment in vivo increased urinary cAMP excretion, improved serum and urinary calcium and phosphate levels by stimulating endogenous PTH secretion, and prevented renal calcification. In contrast, PTH(1-34) treatment normalized serum calcium and phosphate but could not reduce hypercalciuria or renal calcification. CaSR knock-in mice exhibited low bone turnover due to the deficiency of PTH, and JTT-305/MK-5442 as well as PTH(1-34) increased bone turnover and bone mineral density (BMD) in these mice. These results demonstrate that calcilytics can reverse almost all the phenotypes of ADH including hypercalciuria and renal calcification, and suggest that calcilytics can become a novel therapeutic agent for ADH. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:25967373

  8. Cyst infection in hospital-admitted autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients is predominantly multifocal and associated with kidney and liver volume

    PubMed Central

    Balbo, B.E.P.; Sapienza, M.T.; Ono, C.R.; Jayanthi, S.K.; Dettoni, J.B.; Castro, I.; Onuchic, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    Positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has improved cyst infection (CI) management in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The determinants of kidney and/or liver involvement, however, remain uncertain. In this study, we evaluated clinical and imaging factors associated with CI in kidney (KCI) and liver (LCI) in ADPKD. A retrospective cohort study was performed in hospital-admitted ADPKD patients with suspected CI. Clinical, imaging and surgical data were analyzed. Features of infected cysts were evaluated by PET/CT. Total kidney (TKV) and liver (TLV) volumes were measured by CT-derived multiplanar reconstruction. CI was detected in 18 patients who experienced 24 episodes during an interval of 30 months (LCI in 12, KCI in 10 and concomitant infection in 2). Sensitivities of CT, magnetic resonance imaging and PET/CT were 25.0, 71.4, and 95.0%. Dysuria (P<0.05), positive urine culture (P<0.01), and previous hematuria (P<0.05) were associated with KCI. Weight loss (P<0.01) and increased C-reactive protein levels (P<0.05) were associated with LCI. PET/CT revealed that three or more infected cysts were present in 70% of the episodes. TKV was higher in kidney-affected than in LCI patients (AUC=0.91, P<0.05), with a cut-off of 2502 mL (72.7% sensitivity, 100.0% specificity). TLV was higher in liver-affected than in KCI patients (AUC=0.89, P<0.01) with a cut-off of 2815 mL (80.0% sensitivity, 87.5% specificity). A greater need for invasive procedures was observed in LCI (P<0.01), and the overall mortality was 20.8%. This study supports PET/CT as the most sensitive imaging method for diagnosis of cyst infection, confirms the multifocal nature of most hospital-admitted episodes, and reveals an association of kidney and liver volumes with this complication. PMID:24919173

  9. Assessment of the interphotoreceptor matrix proteoglycan-1 (IMPG1) gene localised to 6q13-q15 in autosomal dominant Stargardt-like disease (ADSTGD), progressive bifocal chorioretinal atrophy (PBCRA), and North Carolina macular dystrophy (MCDR1).

    PubMed Central

    Gehrig, A; Felbor, U; Kelsell, R E; Hunt, D M; Maumenee, I H; Weber, B H

    1998-01-01

    We have recently characterised the genomic organisation of a novel interphotoreceptor matrix proteoglycan, IMPG1, and have mapped the gene locus to chromosome 6q13-q15 by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. As the interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM) is thought to play a critical role in retinal adhesion and the maintenance of photoreceptor cells, it is conceivable that a defect in one of the IPM components may cause degenerative lesions in retinal structures and thus may be associated with human retinopathies. By genetic linkage analysis, several retinal dystrophies including one form of autosomal dominant Stargardt-like macular dystrophy (STGD3), progressive bifocal chorioretinal atrophy (PBCRA), and North Carolina macular dystrophy (MCDR1) have previously been localised to a region on proximal 6q that overlaps the IMPG1 locus. We have therefore assessed the entire coding region of IMPG1 by exon amplification and subsequent single stranded conformational analysis in patients from 6q linked multigeneration families diagnosed with PBCRA and MCDR1, as well as a single patient from an autosomal dominant STGD pedigree unlinked to either of the two known STGD2 and STGD3 loci on chromosomes 13q and 6q, respectively. No disease associated mutations were identified. In addition, using an intragenic polymorphism, IMPG1 was excluded by genetic recombination from both the PBCRA and the MCDR1 loci. However, as the autosomal dominant Stargardt-like macular dystrophies are genetically heterogeneous, other forms of this disorder, in particular STGD3 previously linked to 6q, may be caused by mutations in IMPG1. Images PMID:9719369

  10. Sex-linked dominant

    MedlinePLUS

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... type of chromosome that is affected (autosomal or sex chromosome). It also depends on whether the trait ...

  11. Molecular Genetic Diagnosis of a Bethlem Myopathy Family with an Autosomal-Dominant COL6A1 Mutation, as Evidenced by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyung Jun; Choi, Young-Chul; Kim, Seung Min; Kim, Se Hoon; Hong, Young Bin; Yoon, Bo Ram

    2015-01-01

    Background We describe herein the application of whole exome sequencing (WES) for the molecular genetic diagnosis of a large Korean family with dominantly inherited myopathy. Case Report The affected individuals presented with slowly progressive proximal weakness and ankle contracture. They were initially diagnosed with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) based on clinical and pathologic features. However, WES and subsequent capillary sequencing identified a pathogenic splicing-site mutation (c.1056+1G>A) in COL6A1, which was previously reported to be an underlying cause of Bethlem myopathy. After identification of the genetic cause of the disease, careful neurologic examination revealed subtle contracture of the interphalangeal joint in the affected members, which is a characteristic sign of Bethlem myopathy. Therefore, we revised the original diagnosis from LGMD to Bethlem myopathy. Conclusions This is the first report of identification of COL6A1-mediated Bethlem myopathy in Korea, and indicates the utility of WES for the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. PMID:25749816

  12. Congenital anonychia and brachydactyly of the left foot - Cooks syndrome variant: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Daipayan

    2014-04-01

    Cooks syndrome is characterized by familial congenital anonychia or onychodystrophy, hypoplasia or absence of distal phalanges of the hands and feet with brachydactyly of the fifth finger and digitalization of the thumb (triphalangism). It is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. Here, we report a case of congenital anonychia and brachydactyly of the left foot, which possibly is a variant of Cooks syndrome with a positive family history of similar deformity. PMID:25400355

  13. Congenital anonychia and brachydactyly of the left foot - Cooks syndrome variant: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Daipayan

    2014-01-01

    Cooks syndrome is characterized by familial congenital anonychia or onychodystrophy, hypoplasia or absence of distal phalanges of the hands and feet with brachydactyly of the fifth finger and digitalization of the thumb (triphalangism). It is listed as a “rare disease” by the Office of Rare Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. Here, we report a case of congenital anonychia and brachydactyly of the left foot, which possibly is a variant of Cooks syndrome with a positive family history of similar deformity. PMID:25400355

  14. A de Novo mutation in the coding sequence for neurophysin-II (Pro{sup 24} {yields} Leu) is associated with onset and transmission of autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Repaske, D.R.; Browning, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    The molecular basis of autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, a hereditary deficiency of vasopressin, was determined by nucleotide sequence analysis of the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin-II gene. A C{yields}T mutation at nucleotide 1761 was detected in one allele of this gene in each affected individual in three generations of one family. This mutant gene encodes a normal arginine vasopressin peptide, but predicts a substitution of leucine for proline at amino acid 24 of neurophysin-II, the arginine vasopressin carrier protein. This mutation was not detected in 50 control individuals, thus demonstrating that it is not a common silent genetic polymorphism. The disease arose in the second generation of the studied family, and the chromosome 20 carrying this new mutation was identified by polymorphic CA microsatellite haplotype analysis. The first affected individual inherited this chromosome segment from her mother, who had neither the disease nor this mutation in her somatic cell DNA. Third generation individuals who subsequently inherited this mutation were affected. These data demonstrate that this amino acid substitution in neurophysin-II causes this disease. Two possibilities to explain the mechanism by which clinical deficiency of arginine vasopressin develops even in the presence of one normal arginine vasopressin-neurophysin-II allele are discussed. 40 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. A novel point mutation in the translation initiation codon of the pre-pro-vasopressin-neurophysin II gene: Cosegregation with morphological abnormalities and clinical symptoms in autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Rutishauser, J.; Boeni-Schnetzler, M.; Froesch, E.R.; Wichmann, W.; Huisman, T.

    1996-01-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a rare variant of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus. Several different mutations in the human vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NP II) gene have been described. We studied nine family members from three generations of an ADNDI pedigree at the clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. AVP concentrations were measured during diagnostic fluid restriction tests. Coronal and sagittal high resolution T1-weighted images of the pituitary were obtained from affected and healthy family members. PCR was used to amplify the AVP-NP II precursor gene, and PCR products were directly sequenced. Under maximal osmotic stimulation, AVP serum levels were close to or below the detection limit in affected individuals. Magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed the characteristic hyperintense ({open_quotes}bright spot{close_quotes}) appearance of the posterior pituitary in two healthy family members. This signal was absent in all four ADNDI patients examined. The coding sequences of AVP and its carrier protein, neurophysin II, were normal in all family members examined. Affected individuals showed a novel single base deletion (G 227) in the translation initiation codon of the AVP-NP II signal peptide on one allele. The mutation in the AVP-NP II leader sequence appears to be responsible for the disease in this kindred, possibly by interfering with protein translocation. The absence of the hyperintense posterior pituitary signal in affected individuals could reflect deficient posterior pituitary function. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) in an Italian family carrying a novel nonsense mutation and two missense changes in exons 44 and 45 of the PKD1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rossetti, S.; Bresin, E.; Corra, S.

    1996-10-16

    Sixty-seven Italian patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) were screened for mutations in the 3{prime} unique region of the PKD1 gene, using heteroduplex DNA analysis. Novel aberrant bands were detected in 3 patients from the same family. DNA sequencing showed a C to T transition in exon 44 (C12269T), resulting in a premature stop codon (R4020X), predicted to impair the synthesis of the putative intracytoplasmic C-terminus tail of the PKD1 protein, polycystin. The mutation also generates a novel DdeI restriction site, and the abnormal restriction pattern was observed both on genomic DNA and on cDNA from the affected relatives, indicating that this is indeed the pathogenetic molecular lesion. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) performed on lymphocyte mRNA showed that the mutant transcript is normally present and stable. No aberrantly spliced mRNAs were detected. Interestingly, the mutant PKD1 chromosome in this family also bears two missense mutations downstream (A12341G and C12384T), not found in the other ADPKD families studied. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the back of the eye called the retinal pigment epithelium. This cell layer supports and nourishes the ... that detect light and color. In the retinal pigment epithelium, bestrophin-1 functions as a channel that ...

  18. Analysis of data from the ERA-EDTA Registry indicates that conventional treatments for chronic kidney disease do not reduce the need for renal replacement therapy in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Spithoven, Edwin M; Kramer, Anneke; Meijer, Esther; Orskov, Bjarne; Wanner, Christoph; Caskey, Fergus; Collart, Frederic; Finne, Patrik; Fogarty, Damian G; Groothoff, Jaap W; Hoitsma, Andries; Nogier, Marie-Béatrice; Postorino, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Zurriaga, Oscar; Jager, Kitty J; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2014-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a major cause of end-stage kidney failure, but is often identified early and therefore amenable to timely treatment. Interventions known to postpone the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in non-ADPKD patients have also been tested in ADPKD patients, but with inconclusive results. To help resolve this we determined changes in RRT incidence rates as an indicator for increasing effective renoprotection over time in ADPKD. We analyzed data from the European Renal Association-European Dialyses and Transplant Association Registry on 315,444 patients starting RRT in 12 European countries between 1991 and 2010, grouped into four 5-year periods. Of them, 20,596 were due to ADPKD. Between the first and last period the mean age at onset of RRT increased from 56.6 to 58.0 years. The age- and gender-adjusted incidence rate of RRT for ADPKD increased slightly over the four periods from 7.6 to 8.3 per million population. No change over time was found in the incidence of RRT for ADPKD up to age 50, whereas in recent time periods the incidence in patients above the age of 70 clearly increased. Among countries there was a significant positive association between RRT take-on rates for non-ADPKD kidney disease and ADPKD. Thus, the increased age at onset of RRT is most likely due to an increased access for elderly ADPKD patients or lower competing risk prior to the start of RRT rather than the consequence of effective emerging renoprotective treatments for ADPKD. PMID:24827775

  19. The Calcilytic Agent NPS 2143 Rectifies Hypocalcemia in a Mouse Model With an Activating Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Mutation: Relevance to Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia Type 1 (ADH1)

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Fadil M.; Walls, Gerard V.; Babinsky, Valerie N.; Nesbit, M. Andrew; Kallay, Enikö; Hough, Tertius A.; Fraser, William D.; Cox, Roger D.; Hu, Jianxin; Spiegel, Allen M.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia type 1 (ADH1) is caused by germline gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and may lead to symptomatic hypocalcemia, inappropriately low serum PTH concentrations and hypercalciuria. Negative allosteric CaSR modulators, known as calcilytics, have been shown to normalize the gain-of-function associated with ADH-causing CaSR mutations in vitro and represent a potential targeted therapy for ADH1. However, the effectiveness of calcilytic drugs for the treatment of ADH1-associated hypocalcemia remains to be established. We have investigated NPS 2143, a calcilytic compound, for the treatment of ADH1 by in vitro and in vivo studies involving a mouse model, known as Nuf, which harbors a gain-of-function CaSR mutation, Leu723Gln. Wild-type (Leu723) and Nuf mutant (Gln723) CaSRs were expressed in HEK293 cells, and the effect of NPS 2143 on their intracellular calcium responses was determined by flow cytometry. NPS 2143 was also administered as a single ip bolus to wild-type and Nuf mice and plasma concentrations of calcium and PTH, and urinary calcium excretion measured. In vitro administration of NPS 2143 decreased the intracellular calcium responses of HEK293 cells expressing the mutant Gln723 CaSR in a dose-dependent manner, thereby rectifying the gain-of-function associated with the Nuf mouse CaSR mutation. Intraperitoneal injection of NPS 2143 in Nuf mice led to significant increases in plasma calcium and PTH without elevating urinary calcium excretion. These studies of a mouse model with an activating CaSR mutation demonstrate NPS 2143 to normalize the gain-of-function causing ADH1 and improve the hypocalcemia associated with this disorder. PMID:26052899

  20. Autosomal dominant transmission of a Goldenhar-like syndrome: Description of a family and report of a sporadic case with a de novo 4p16;8q24.11 translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Graganm H.N. Jr.; Hixon, H.; Bacino, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    We report vertical transmission of a Goldenhar-like syndrome, including a father and 5 offspring, with male-to-male transmission and variable features that include hearing loss, ear anomalies (microtia, ear tags/pits), branchial cysts, ocular/periocular dermoids, micrognathia and seizures. We also report an individual with an apparently balanced de novo reciprocal translocation with breakpoints at 4p16 and 8q24.11. This individual has unilateral microtia, an epibulbar dermoid cyst, facial asymmetry with a small chin, and seizures. In addition to these features resembling those seen in the family above, she has multiple exostoses, supraventricular tachycardia, hypoglycemia and mild developmental delays. Based on the overlap in physical findings between this family and the individual with the de novo reciprocal translocation, linkage studies on the family were intiated. Preliminary results exclude linkage to HOX 7 at 4p16.1 but not to 8q. The brancho-oto-renal syndrome has previously been localized to 8q11-8q13, but linkage to this region appears unlikely. Although most cases of Goldenhar syndrome appear to be sporadic, there are a few reports of autosomal dominant inheritance (MIM No. 164210). One such family showed vertical transmission of dermoids, ear anomalies, hearing loss, micrognathia and vertebral anomalies, but no branchial cysts. Another family showed sensorineural deafness, preauricular pits, and branchial fistulae, and other families reveal ear anomalies, branchial fistulas, and hearing loss. These latter families appear to lack ocular/periocular dermoids, and appear to be affected by a different disorder (MIM No. 125100). Further clinical delineation of such families, combined with genetic linkage analysis, should help to sort out this heterogeneity.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia? The incidence of autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia is unknown. What genes are related to autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia? Autosomal ...

  2. Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa and E150K Mutation in the Opsin Gene*S

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa and E150K Mutation in the Opsin Gene*S Received group of hered- itary disorders of the retina caused by mutation in genes of the photoreceptor proteins with an autosomal dominant (adRP), autosomal recessive (arRP), or X-linked pattern of inheritance. Although

  3. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Brachydactyly and Mental Retardation: An Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy–like Syndrome Localized to 2q37

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, L. C.; Leverton, K.; Luttikhuis, M. E. M. Oude; Oley, C. A.; Flint, J.; Wolstenholme, J.; Duckett, D. P.; Barrow, M. A.; Leonard, J. V.; Read, A. P.; Trembath, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    We report five patients with a combination of brachymetaphalangia and mental retardation, similar to that observed in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). Four patients had cytogenetically visible de novo deletions of chromosome 2q37. The fifth patient was cytogenetically normal and had normal bioactivity of the ? subunit of Gs (Gs?), the protein that is defective in AHO. In this patient, we have used a combination of highly polymorphic molecular markers and FISH to demonstrate a microdeletion at 2q37. The common region of deletion overlap involves the most telomeric 2q marker, D2S125, and extends proximally for a maximum distance of 17.6 cM. We suggest this represents a consistent phenotype associated with some deletions at 2q37 and that genes important for skeletal and neurodevelopment lie within this region. Screening for deletions at this locus should be considered in individuals with brachymetaphalangia and mental retardation. Furthermore, 2q37 represents a candidate region for type E brachydactyly. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7847374

  5. Brachydactyly and mental retardation: An Albright hereditary osteodystrophy-like syndrome localized to 2q37

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, L.C. |; Oude Luttikhuis, M.E.M.; Duckett, D.P.; Barrow, M.A.; Leverton, K.; Read, A.P.; Oley, C.A.; Wolstenholme, J.; Flint, J.; Leonard, J.V.

    1995-02-01

    We report five patients with a combination of brachymetaphalangia and mental retardation, similar to that observed in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). Four patients had cytogenetically visible de novo deletions of chromosome 2q37. The fifth patient was cytogenetically normal and had normal bioactivity of the {alpha} subunit of Gs (Gs{alpha}), the protein that is defective in AHO. In this patient, we have used a combination of highly polymorphic molecular markers and FISH to demonstrate a microdeletion at 2q37. The common region of deletion overlap involves the most telomeric 2q marker, D2S125, and extends proximally for a maximum distance of 17.6 cM. We suggest this represents a consistent phenotype associated with some deletions at 2q37 and that genes important for skeletal and neurodevelopment lie within this region. Screening for deletions at this locus should be considered in individuals with brachymetaphalangia and mental retardation. Furthermore, 2q37 represents a candidate region for type E brachydactyly. 28 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. An inversion involving the mouse Shh locus results in brachydactyly through dysregulation of Shh expression

    PubMed Central

    Niedermaier, Michael; Schwabe, Georg C.; Fees, Stephan; Helmrich, Anne; Brieske, Norbert; Seemann, Petra; Hecht, Jochen; Seitz, Volkhard; Stricker, Sigmar; Leschik, Gundula; Schrock, Evelin; Selby, Paul B.; Mundlos, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Short digits (Dsh) is a radiation-induced mouse mutant. Homozygous mice are characterized by multiple defects strongly resembling those resulting from Sonic hedgehog (Shh) inactivation. Heterozygous mice show a limb reduction phenotype with fusion and shortening of the proximal and middle phalanges in all digits, similar to human brachydactyly type A1, a condition caused by mutations in Indian hedgehog (IHH). We mapped Dsh to chromosome 5 in a region containing Shh and were able to demonstrate an inversion comprising 11.7 Mb. The distal breakpoint is 13.298 kb upstream of Shh, separating the coding sequence from several putative regulatory elements identified by interspecies comparison. The inversion results in almost complete downregulation of Shh expression during E9.5–E12.5, explaining the homozygous phenotype. At E13.5 and E14.5, however, Shh is upregulated in the phalangeal anlagen of Dsh/+ mice, at a time point and in a region where WT Shh is never expressed. The dysregulation of Shh expression causes the local upregulation of hedgehog target genes such as Gli1-3, patched, and Pthlh, as well as the downregulation of Ihh and Gdf5. This results in shortening of the digits through an arrest of chondrocyte differentiation and the disruption of joint development. PMID:15841179

  7. Isolated brachydactyly type E caused by a HOXD13 nonsense mutation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Brachydactyly type E (BDE; MIM#113300) is characterized by shortening of the metacarpal, metatarsal, and often phalangeal bones, and predominantly affects postaxial ray(s) of the limb. BDE may occur as an isolated trait or as part of a syndrome. Isolated BDE is rare and in the majority of cases the molecular pathogenesis has so far not been resolved. Originally, the molecular cause of isolated BDE has been unravelled in 2 families and shown to result from heterozygous missense mutations in the homeodomain of the HOXD13 gene. Since the initial manuscript, one further HOXD13 mutation has been reported only in a single family manifesting isolated BDE. Case Presentation In this paper, we report on a Polish family exhibiting isolated BDE caused by a novel nonsense heterozygous HOXD13 mutation. We investigated a Polish female proband and her father, both affected by isolated BDE, in whom we identified a nonsense heterozygous mutation c.820C > T(p.R274X) in the HOXD13 gene. So far, only two missense HOXD13 substitutions (p.S308C and p.I314L), localized within the homeodomain of the HOXD13 transcription factor, as well as a single nonsense mutation (p.E181X) were associated with BDE. Both missense changes were supposed to alter DNA binding affinity of the protein. Conclusion The variant p.R274X identified in our proband is the fourth HOXD13 mutation, and the second truncating (nonsense) mutation, reported to result in typical isolated BDE. We refer our clinical and molecular findings to the previously described HOXD13 associated phenotypes and mutations. PMID:22233338

  8. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, ?-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  9. De novo apparently balanced reciprocal translocation between 5q11.2 and 17q23 associated with Klippel-Feil anomaly and type A1 brachydactyly

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Wakui, Keiko

    1995-07-03

    We report on a girl with Klippel-Feil anomaly, type A1 brachydactyly, and minor facial anomalies. She has an apparently balanced de novo reciprocal translocation between 5q11.2 and 17q23. The possible significance of this chromosomal abnormality is discussed. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Congenital vocal cord paralysis with possible autosomal recessive inheritance: Case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, R.; Friedman, S.; Fallet, S.

    1996-08-23

    We describe an infant with congenital vocal cord paralysis born to consanguineous parents. While autosomal dominant and X-linked inheritance have been previously reported in this condition, we conclude that the degree of parental consanguinity in this case strongly suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Although we cannot exclude X-linked inheritance, evidence from animal studies demonstrates autosomal recessive inheritance and provides a possible molecular basis for congenital vocal cord paralysis. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Targeted loss of the ATR-X syndrome protein in the limb mesenchyme of mice causes brachydactyly.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Lauren A; Russell, Bailey A; Watson, L Ashley; Beier, Frank; Bérubé, Nathalie G

    2013-12-15

    ATR-X syndrome is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the ATRX gene. Affected individuals are cognitively impaired and display a variety of developmental abnormalities, including skeletal deformities. To investigate the function of ATRX during skeletal development, we selectively deleted the gene in the developing forelimb mesenchyme of mice. The absence of ATRX in the limb mesenchyme resulted in shorter digits, or brachydactyly, a defect also observed in a subset of ATR-X patients. This phenotype persisted until adulthood, causing reduced grip strength and altered gait in mutant mice. Examination of the embryonic ATRX-null forelimbs revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cell death, which could explain the reduced digit length. In addition, staining for the DNA damage markers ?-histone 2A family member X (?-H2AX) and 53BP1 demonstrated a significant increase in the number of cells with DNA damage in the embryonic ATRX-null forepaw. Strikingly, only one large bright DNA damage event was observed per nucleus in proliferating cells. These large ?-H2AX foci were located in close proximity to the nuclear lamina and remained largely unresolved after cell differentiation. In addition, ATRX-depleted forelimb mesenchymal cells did not exhibit hypersensitivity to DNA fork-stalling compounds, suggesting that the nature as well as the response to DNA damage incurred by loss of ATRX in the developing limb fundamentally differs from other tissues. Our data suggest that DNA damage-induced apoptosis is a novel cellular mechanism underlying brachydactyly that might be relevant to additional skeletal syndromes. PMID:23892236

  12. Autosomal Recessive Inheritance of Classic Bethlem Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Foley, A. Reghan; Hu, Ying; Zou, Yaqun; Columbus, Alexandra; Shoffner, John; Dunn, Diane M.; Weiss, Robert B.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) result in Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM) or phenotypes intermediate between UCMD and BM. While UCMD can be caused by either recessively or dominantly acting mutations, BM has thus far been described as an exclusively autosomal dominant condition. We report two adult siblings with classic Bethlem myopathy who are compound heterozygous for a single nucleotide deletion (exon 23; c.1770delG), leading to in-frame skipping of exon 23 on the maternal allele, and a missense mutation p.R830W in exon 28 on the paternal allele. The parents are carriers of the respective mutations and are clinically unaffected. The exon skipping mutation in exon 23 results in a chain incapable of heterotrimeric assembly, while p.R830W likely ameliorates the phenotype into the Bethlem range. Thus, autosomal recessive inheritance can also underlie Bethlem myopathy, supporting the notion that UCMD and BM are part of a common clinical and genetic spectrum. PMID:19884007

  13. Ataxias with autosomal, X-chromosomal or maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-07-01

    Heredoataxias are a group of genetic disorders with a cerebellar syndrome as the leading clinical manifestation. The current classification distinguishes heredoataxias according to the trait of inheritance into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and maternally inherited heredoataxias. The autosomal dominant heredoataxias are separated into spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1-8, 10-15, 17-23, 25-30, and dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy), episodic ataxias (EA1-7), and autosomal dominant mitochondrial heredoataxias (Leigh syndrome, MIRAS, ADOAD, and AD-CPEO). The autosomal recessive ataxias are separated into Friedreich ataxia, ataxia due to vitamin E deficiency, ataxia due to Abeta-lipoproteinemia, Refsum disease, late-onset Tay-Sachs disease, cerebrotendineous xanthomatosis, spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia telangiectasia-like disorder, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 and 2, spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, Cayman ataxia, Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, and autosomal recessive mitochondrial ataxias (AR-CPEO, SANDO, SCAE, AHS, IOSCA, MEMSA, LBSL CoQ-deficiency, PDC-deficiency). Only two of the heredoataxias, fragile X/tremor/ataxia syndrome, and XLSA/A are transmitted via an X-linked trait. Maternally inherited heredoataxias are due to point mutations in genes encoding for tRNAs, rRNAs, respiratory chain subunits or single large scale deletions/duplications of the mitochondrial DNA and include MELAS, MERRF, KSS, PS, MILS, NARP, and non-syndromic mitochondrial disorders. Treatment of heredoataxias is symptomatic and supportive and may have a beneficial effect in single patients. **Please see page 424 for abbreviation list. PMID:19650351

  14. A New Subtype of Brachydactyly Type B Caused by Point Mutations in the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Antagonist NOGGIN

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, K. ; Seemann, P. ; Silan, F. ; Goecke, T. O. ; Irgang, S. ; Kjaer, K. W. ; Kjaergaard, S. ; Mahoney, M. J. ; Morlot, S. ; Reissner, C. ; Kerr, B. ; Wilkie, A. O. M. ; Mundlos, S. 

    2007-01-01

    Brachydactyly type B (BDB) is characterized by terminal deficiency of fingers and toes, which is caused by heterozygous truncating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase–like orphan receptor 2 (ROR2) in the majority of patients. In a subset of ROR2-negative patients with BDB, clinically defined by the additional occurrence of proximal symphalangism and carpal synostosis, we identified six different point mutations (P35A, P35S, A36P, E48K, R167G, and P187S) in the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist NOGGIN (NOG). In contrast to previously described loss-of-function mutations in NOG, which are known to cause a range of conditions associated with abnormal joint formation but without BDB, the newly identified BDB mutations do not indicate a major loss of function, as suggested by calculation of free-binding energy of the modeled NOG-GDF5 complex and functional analysis of the micromass culture system. Rather, they presumably alter NOG’s ability to bind to BMPs and growth-differentiation factors (GDFs) in a subtle way, thus disturbing the intricate balance of BMP signaling. The combined features observed in this phenotypic subtype of BDB argue for a functional connection between BMP and ROR2 signaling and support previous findings of a modulating effect of ROR2 on the BMP-receptor pathway through the formation of a heteromeric complex of the receptors at the cell surface. PMID:17668388

  15. Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infacts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... functions such as sensation, voluntary muscle movement, thought, reasoning, memory, etc. Infarcts : areas of tissue that have ... therapy are instituted for rehabilitation from stroke. Other Clinical Names for CADASIL Hereditary multi-infarct dementia Chronic ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... back of the eye that detects light and color. People with this condition typically have difficulty seeing and distinguishing objects in low light (night blindness). For example, they are not able to identify ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood. IgE normally triggers an immune response against foreign invaders in the body, particularly parasitic worms, and ... These cells help control the body's response to foreign invaders such as bacteria and fungi. Changes in ...

  18. Phenotypic variant of Brachydactyly-mental retardation syndrome in a family with an inherited interstitial 2q37.3 microdeletion including HDAC4

    PubMed Central

    Villavicencio-Lorini, Pablo; Klopocki, Eva; Trimborn, Marc; Koll, Randi; Mundlos, Stefan; Horn, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Deletions of the chromosomal region 2q37 cause brachydactyly-mental retardation syndrome (BDMR), also known as Albright hereditary osteodystrophy-like syndrome. Recently, histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) haploinsufficiency has been postulated to be the critical genetic mechanism responsible for the main clinical characteristics of the BDMR syndrome like developmental delay and behavioural abnormalities in combination with brachydactyly type E (BDE). We report here on the first three generation familial case of BDMR syndrome with inheritance of an interstitial microdeletion of chromosome 2q37.3. The deletion was detected by array comparative genomic hybridization and comprises the HDAC4 gene and two other genes. The patients of this pedigree show a variable severity of psychomotor and behavioural abnormalities in combination with a specific facial dysmorphism but without BDE. Given that only about half of the patients with 2q37 deletions have BDE; we compared our patients with other patients carrying 2q37.3 deletions or HDAC4 mutations known from the literature to discuss the diagnostic relevance of the facial dysmorphism pattern in 2q37.3 deletion cases involving the HDAC4 gene. We conclude that HDAC4 haploinsufficiency is responsible for psychomotor and behavioural abnormalities in combination with the BDMR syndrome-specific facial dysmorphism pattern and that these clinical features have a central diagnostic relevance. PMID:23188045

  19. Probing Mechanisms of Photoreceptor Degeneration in a New Mouse Model of the Common Form of Autosomal

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa due to P23H Opsin Mutations*S Received for publication,December 6 dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Although P23H cul- tured cell and transgenic animal models have been- eases (3). Among them, retinitis pigmentosa (RP)2 refers to a group that displays genetic heterogeneity

  20. The cytogenetics of mammalian autosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, A.

    1988-01-01

    Combining data from animal and clinical studies with classical cytogenetic observations, the volume provides information on various aspects of mammalian autosomal rearrangements. Topics range from the reproductive consequences to carriers of autosomal rearrangements to the application of structural rearrangements and DNA probes to gene mapping. In addition, the book presents an overview of new perspectives and future directions for research.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Reviewed September 2014 What is autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia? Autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia ...

  2. The 2q37-deletion syndrome: an update of the clinical spectrum including overweight, brachydactyly and behavioural features in 14 new patients

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Camille; Landais, Emilie; Briault, Sylvain; David, Albert; Tassy, Olivier; Gruchy, Nicolas; Delobel, Bruno; Grégoire, Marie-José; Leheup, Bruno; Taine, Laurence; Lacombe, Didier; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Toutain, Annick; Paubel, Agathe; Mugneret, Francine; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Arpin, Stéphanie; Le Caignec, Cedric; Jonveaux, Philippe; Beri, Mylène; Leporrier, Nathalie; Motte, Jacques; Fiquet, Caroline; Brichet, Olivier; Mozelle-Nivoix, Monique; Sabouraud, Pascal; Golovkine, Nathalie; Bednarek, Nathalie; Gaillard, Dominique; Doco-Fenzy, Martine

    2013-01-01

    The 2q37 locus is one of the most commonly deleted subtelomeric regions. Such a deletion has been identified in >100 patients by telomeric fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and, less frequently, by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). A recognizable ‘2q37-deletion syndrome' or Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy-like syndrome has been previously described. To better map the deletion and further refine this deletional syndrome, we formed a collaboration with the Association of French Language Cytogeneticists to collect 14 new intellectually deficient patients with a distal or interstitial 2q37 deletion characterized by FISH and array-CGH. Patients exhibited facial dysmorphism (13/14) and brachydactyly (10/14), associated with behavioural problems, autism or autism spectrum disorders of varying severity and overweight or obesity. The deletions in these 14 new patients measured from 2.6 to 8.8?Mb. Although the major role of HDAC4 has been demonstrated, the phenotypic involvement of several other genes in the deleted regions is unknown. We further refined the genotype–phenotype correlation for the 2q37 deletion. To do this, we examined the smallest overlapping deleted region for candidate genes for skeletal malformations (facial dysmorphism and brachydactyly), overweight, behavioural problems and seizures, using clinical data, a review of the literature, and the Manteia database. Among the candidate genes identified, we focus on the roles of PRLH, PER2, TWIST2, CAPN10, KIF1A, FARP2, D2HGDH and PDCD1. PMID:23073310

  3. Behavioral Retardation in a Macaque with Autosomal Trisomy and Aging Mother.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waal, Frans B. M. de; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The social development of a female rhesus monkey was followed from birth until death, age 32 months. The monkey had an extra autosome and was hydrocephalic. The monkey showed serious motor deficiencies, delayed social development, poorly established dominance relationships, and heavy dependence on mother and kin. The monkey was, however, well…

  4. Fine genetic mapping of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 6p21

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, Yin Y.; Banerjee, P.; Knowles, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The inherited retinal degenerations known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be caused by mutations at many different loci and can be inherited as an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked recessive trait. Two forms of autosomal recessive (arRP) have been reported to cosegregate with mutations in the rhodopsin gene and the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase on chromosome 4p. Genetic linkage has been reported on chromosomes 6p and 1q. In a large Dominican family, we reported an arRp gene near the region of the peripherin/RDS gene. Four recombinations were detected between the disease locus and an intragenic marker derived from peripherin/RDS. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. INVESTIGATION Autosomal Admixture Levels Are Informative About

    E-print Network

    Rosenberg, Noah

    -term variance decreases as the sex bias from a contributing source population increases. This result can have been empirically investigated in a variety of human populations. In the Americas, these includeINVESTIGATION Autosomal Admixture Levels Are Informative About Sex Bias in Admixed Populations Amy

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 (often shortened to ARCA1 ) On this ... January 2015 What is ARCA1? Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 (ARCA1) is a condition characterized by ...

  7. A novel TECTA mutation confirms the recognizable phenotype among autosomal recessive hearing impairment families.

    PubMed

    Alasti, Fatemeh; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Behrouzifard, Amir Hossein; Sadeghi, Abdorrahim; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Kremer, Hannie; Smith, Richard J H; Van Camp, Guy

    2008-02-01

    Mutations in the TECTA gene result in sensorineural non-syndromic hearing impairment. TECTA-related deafness can be inherited autosomal dominantly (designated as DFNA8/12) or autosomal recessively (as DFNB21). The alpha-tectorin protein, which is encoded by the TECTA gene, is one of the major components of the tectorial membrane in the inner ear. Six mutations in the TECTA gene have already been reported in families segregating autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment. In this study, seventy-five Iranian families segregating autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment were analyzed for homozygosity at the DFNB21 locus by genotyping two short tandem repeat markers closely linked to the TECTA gene. Allelic segregation consistent with possible linkage to the DFNB21 locus was found in 1/75 families studied. By sequencing all 23 coding exons of TECTA, a 16bp deletion (c.6203-6218del16) in exon 21, leading to a frameshift, segregating with the hearing loss was found. All 3 affected individuals of this family have moderate-to-severe hearing loss across all frequencies, which is more pronounced in the mid frequencies. This new mutation, as well as the six previously reported mutations in the TECTA gene, is inactivating. All of these mutations lead to an easily recognized audiometric profile of moderate to severe hearing impairment as presented by the family in this study too. The TECTA autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness phenotype differs from the typical profound deafness phenotype that is seen in most families segregating autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness. On the basis of the recognizable phenotype, we recommend mutation screening of TECTA in families with this hearing phenotype. PMID:18022253

  8. Associations between STR autosomal markers and longevity.

    PubMed

    Bediaga, N G; Aznar, J M; Elcoroaristizabal, X; Albóniga, O; Gómez-Busto, F; Artaza Artabe, I; Rocandio, Ana; de Pancorbo, M M

    2015-10-01

    Life span is a complex and multifactorial trait, which is shaped by genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and stochastic factors. The possibility that highly hypervariable short tandem repeats (STRs) associated with longevity has been largely explored by comparing the genotypic pools of long lived and younger individuals, but results so far have been contradictory. In view of these contradictory findings, the present study aims to investigate whether HUMTHO1 and HUMCSF1PO STRs, previously associated with longevity, exert a role as a modulator of life expectancy, as well as to assess the extent to which other autosomal STR markers are associated with human longevity in population from northern Spain. To that end, 21 autosomal microsatellite markers have been studied in 304 nonagenarian individuals (more than 90 years old) and 516 younger controls of European descent. Our results do not confirm the association found in previous studies between longevity and THO1 and CSF1PO loci. However, significant association between longevity and autosomal STR markers D12S391, D22S1045, and DS441 was observed. Even more, when we compared allelic frequency distribution of the 21 STR markers between cases and controls, we found that 6 out of the 21 STRs studied showed different allelic frequencies, thus suggesting that the genomic portrait of the human longevity is far complex and probably shaped by a high number of genomic loci. PMID:26335621

  9. A novel frameshift mutation in KCNQ4 in a family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wasano, Koichiro; Mutai, Hideki; Obuchi, Chie; Masuda, Sawako; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    Mutation of KCNQ4 has been reported to cause autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNA2A) that usually presents as progressive hearing loss starting from mild to moderate hearing loss during childhood. Here, we identified a novel KCNQ4 mutation, c.1044_1051del8, in a family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. The proband was homozygous for the mutation and was born to consanguineous parents; she showed severe hearing loss that was either congenital or of early childhood onset. The proband had a sister who was heterozygous for the mutation but showed normal hearing. The mutation caused a frameshift that eliminated most of the cytoplasmic C-terminus, including the A-domain, which has an important role for protein tetramerization, and the B-segment, which is a binding site for calmodulin (CaM) that regulates channel function via Ca ions. The fact that the heterozygote had normal hearing indicates that sufficient tetramerization and CaM binding sites were present to preserve a normal phenotype even when only half the proteins contained an A-domain and B-segment. On the other hand, the severe hearing loss in the homozygote suggests that complete loss of the A-domain and B-segment in the protein caused loss of function due to the failure of tetramer formation and CaM binding. This family suggests that some KCNQ4 mutations can cause autosomal recessive hearing loss with more severe phenotype in addition to autosomal dominant hearing loss with milder phenotype. This genotype-phenotype correlation is analogous to that in KCNQ1 which causes autosomal dominant hereditary long QT syndrome 1 with milder phenotype and the autosomal recessive Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome 1 with more severe phenotype due to deletion of the cytoplasmic C-terminus of the potassium channel. PMID:26036578

  10. Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness genes: a review.

    PubMed

    Duman, Duygu; Tekin, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    More than 50 Percent of prelingual hearing loss is genetic in origin, and of these up to 93 Percent are monogenic autosomal recessive traits. Some forms of genetic deafness can be recognized by their associated syndromic features, but in most cases, hearing loss is the only finding and is referred to as nonsyndromic deafness. To date, more than 700 different mutations have been identified in one of 42 genes in individuals with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). Reported mutations in GJB2, encoding connexin 26, makes this gene the most common cause of hearing loss in many populations. Other relatively common deafness genes include SLC26A4, MYO15A, OTOF, TMC1, CDH23, and TMPRSS3. In this report we summarize genes and mutations reported in families with ARNSHL. Founder effects were demonstrated for some recurrent mutations but the most significant findings are the extreme locus and allelic heterogeneity and different spectrum of genes and mutations in each population. PMID:22652773

  11. Apparent autosomal recessive inheritance in families with proximal spinal muscular atrophy affecting individuals in two generations

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Zerres, K.; Hahnen, E.

    1996-11-01

    With the evidence that deletions in the region responsible for childhood- and juvenile-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are on chromosome 5 it is now possible to confirm autosomal recessive inheritance in most patients (denoted {open_quotes}SMA 5q{close_quotes}). Homozygous deletions in the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene can be detected in 95%-98% of patients with early-onset SMA (types I and II), whereas as many as 10%-20% of patients with the milder, juvenile-onset form (type III SMA) do not show deletions. In families with affected subjects in two generations, it is difficult to decide whether they are autosomal dominantly inherited or caused by three independent recessive mutations (pseudodominant inheritance). Given an incidence of >1/10,000 of SMA 5q, patients with autosomal recessive SMA have an {approximately}1% recurrence risk to their offspring. Although the dominant forms are not linked to chromosome 5q, pseudodominant families can now be identified by the presence of homozygous deletions in the SMN gene. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. On identification problems requiring linked autosomal markers.

    PubMed

    Egeland, Thore; Sheehan, Nuala

    2008-06-01

    This paper considers identification problems based on DNA marker data. The topics we discuss are general, but we will exemplify them in a simple context. There is DNA available from two persons. There is uncertainty about the relationship between the two individuals and a number of hypotheses describing the possible relationship is available. The task is to determine the most likely pedigree. This problem is fairly standard. However, there are some problems that cannot be solved using DNA from independently segregating loci. For example, the likelihoods for (i) grandparent-grandchild, (ii) uncle-niece and (iii) half-sibs coincide for such DNA data and so these relations cannot be distinguished on the basis of markers normally used for forensic identification problems: the likelihood ratio comparing any pair of hypotheses will be unity. Sometimes, but not in the examples we consider, other sources of DNA like mtDNA or sex chromosomes can help to distinguish between such equally likely possibilities. Prior information can likewise be of use. For instance, age information can exclude alternative (i) above and also indicate that alternative (iii) is apriori more likely than alternative (ii). More generally, the above problems can be solved using linked autosomal markers. To study the problem in detail and understand how linkage works in this regard, we derive an explicit formula for a pair of linked markers. The formula extends to independent pairs of linked markers. While this approach adds to the understanding of the problem, more markers are required to obtain satisfactory results and then the Lander-Green algorithm is needed. Simulation experiments are presented based on a range of scenarios and we conclude that useful results can be obtained using available freeware (MERLIN and R). The main message of this paper is that linked autosomal markers deserve greater attention in forensic genetics and that the required laboratory and statistical analyses can be performed based on existing technology and freeware. PMID:19083824

  13. A Novel Autosomal Recessive GJA1 Missense Mutation Linked to Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying; Chen, I-Ping; de Almeida, Salome; Tiziani, Valdenize; Do Amaral, Cassio M. Raposo; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Reichenberger, Ernst J.

    2013-01-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare sclerosing skeletal disorder with progressive hyperostosis of craniofacial bones. CMD can be inherited in an autosomal dominant (AD) trait or occur after de novo mutations in the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. Although the autosomal recessive (AR) form of CMD had been mapped to 6q21-22 the mutation has been elusive. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing for one subject with AR CMD and identified a novel missense mutation (c.716G>A, p.Arg239Gln) in the C-terminus of the gap junction protein alpha-1 (GJA1) coding for connexin 43 (Cx43). We confirmed this mutation in 6 individuals from 3 additional families. The homozygous mutation cosegregated only with affected family members. Connexin 43 is a major component of gap junctions in osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Gap junctions are responsible for the diffusion of low molecular weight molecules between cells. Mutations in Cx43 cause several dominant and recessive disorders involving developmental abnormalities of bone such as dominant and recessive oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD; MIM #164200, 257850) and isolated syndactyly type III (MIM #186100), the characteristic digital anomaly in ODDD. However, characteristic ocular and dental features of ODDD as well as syndactyly are absent in patients with the recessive Arg239Gln Cx43 mutation. Bone remodeling mechanisms disrupted by this novel Cx43 mutation remain to be elucidated. PMID:23951358

  14. Four Copies of SNCA Responsible for Autosomal Dominant Parkinson's Disease in Two Italian Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Ferese, Rosangela; Modugno, Nicola; Campopiano, Rosa; Santilli, Marco; Zampatti, Stefania; Giardina, Emiliano; Nardone, Annamaria; Postorivo, Diana; Fornai, Francesco; Novelli, Giuseppe; Romoli, Edoardo; Ruggieri, Stefano; Gambardella, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parkinson's disease (PD) is mostly characterized by alpha-synuclein (SNCA) aggregation and loss of nigrostriatal dopamine-containing neurons. In this study a novel SNCA multiplication is described in two siblings affected by severe parkinsonism featuring early onset dyskinesia, psychiatric symptoms, and cognitive deterioration. Methods. SNCA dosage was performed using High-Density Comparative Genomic Hybridization Array (CGH-Array), Multiple Ligation Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), and Quantitative PCR (qPCR). Genetic analysis was associated with clinical evaluation. Results. Genetic analysis of siblings showed for the first time a 351?Kb triplication containing SNCA gene along with 6 exons of MMRN1 gene in 4q22.1 and a duplication of 1,29?Mb of a genomic region flanking the triplication. Conclusions. The identification of this family indicates a novel mechanism of SNCA gene multiplication, which confirms the genomic instability in this region and provides data on the genotype-phenotype correlation in PD patients. PMID:26635992

  15. A novel human CRYGD mutation in a juvenile autosomal dominant cataract

    PubMed Central

    Roshan, Mascarenhas; Vijaya, Pai H.; Lavanya, G. Rao; Shama, Prasada K.; Santhiya, S.T.; Graw, Jochen; Gopinath, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Identification of causal mutation in the crystallin, connexin, and paired box gene 6 (PAX6) genes associated with childhood cataract in patients from India. Methods In this study, forty eight members from seventeen families and 148 sporadic cases of childhood cataract were evaluated. Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on available affected and unaffected family members. Samples of genomic DNA were PCR amplified to screen for mutations in the candidate genes viz., alpha-A crystallin (CRYAA), beta- B2 crystallin (CRYBB2), gamma-A crystallin (CRYGA), gamma-B crystallin (CRYGB), gamma-C crystallin (CRYGC), gamma-D crystallin (CRYGD), gap junction alpha-3 (GJA3), gap junction alpha-8 (GJA8), and PAX6 based on polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis. Samples showing any band mobility shift were subjected to bidirectional sequencing to confirm the variation. Co-segregation of the observed change with the disease phenotype was further tested by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for the appropriate restriction site. Results DNA sequencing analysis of CRYAA, CRYBB2, CRYGA-D, GJA3, GJA8, and PAX6 of the affected members of a family (C-35) showed a novel heterozygous missense mutation C>A at position 229 in CRYGD in three affected members of family C-35 with anterior polar coronary cataract. This variation C229A substitution created a novel restriction site for AluI and resulted in a substitution of highly conserved arginine at position 77 by serine (R77S). AluI restriction site analysis confirmed the transversion mutation. Analysis of the available unaffected members of the family (C-35) and 100 unrelated control subjects (200 chromosomes) of the same ethnic background did not show R77S variation. Data generated using ProtScale and PyMOL programs revealed that the mutation altered the stability and solvent-accessibility of the CRYGD protein. Conclusions We describe here a family having anterior polar coronary cataract that co-segregates with the novel allele R77S of CRYGD in all the affected members. The same was found to be absent in the ethnically matched controls (n=100) studied. Interestingly the residue Arg has been frequently implicated in four missense (R15C, R15S, R37S, and R59H) and in one truncation mutation (R140X) of CRYGD. In two of the reported mutations Arg residues have been replaced with Serine. This finding further expands the mutation spectrum of CRYGD in association with childhood cataract and demonstrates a possible mechanism of cataractogenesis. Screening of other familial (n=48) and sporadic (n=148) cases of childhood cataract, did not reveal any previously reported or novel mutation in the candidate genes screened. PMID:20508808

  16. Mutations in KCNJ13 Cause Autosomal-Dominant Snowflake Vitreoretinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Jiao, Xiaodong; Li, Anren; Sergeev, Yuri V.; Ding, Xiaoyan; Sharma, Anil K.; Chan, Chi-Chao; Medina, Igor; Edwards, Albert O.

    2008-01-01

    Snowflake vitreoretinal degeneration (SVD, MIM 193230) is a developmental and progressive hereditary eye disorder that affects multiple tissues within the eye. Diagnostic features of SVD include fibrillar degeneration of the vitreous humor, early-onset cataract, minute crystalline deposits in the neurosensory retina, and retinal detachment. A genome-wide scan previously localized the genetic locus for SVD to a 20 Mb region flanked by D2S2158 and D2S2202. This region contains 59 genes, of which 20 were sequenced, disclosing a heterozygous mutation (484C > T, R162W) in KCNJ13, member 13 of subfamily J of the potassium inwardly rectifying channel family in all affected individuals. The mutation in KCNJ13, the gene encoding Kir7.1, was not present in unaffected family members and 210 control individuals. Kir7.1 localized to human retina and retinal pigment epithelium and was especially prevalent in the internal limiting membrane adjacent to the vitreous body. Molecular modeling of this mutation predicted disruption of the structure of the potassium channel in the closed state located immediately adjacent to the cell-membrane inner boundary. Functionally, unlike wild-type Kir7.1 whose overexpression in CHO-K1 cells line produces highly selective potassium current, overexpression of R162W mutant Kir7.1 produces a nonselective cation current that depolarizes transfected cells and increases their fragility. These results indicate that the KCNJ13 R162W mutation can cause SVD and further show that vitreoretinal degeneration can arise through mutations in genes whose products are not structural components of the vitreous. PMID:18179896

  17. Loss of cilia suppresses cyst growth in genetic models of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Tian, Xin; Igarashi, Peter; Pazour, Gregory J; Somlo, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Kidney cysts occur following inactivation of polycystins in otherwise intact cilia or following complete removal of cilia by inactivation of intraflagellar transport-related proteins. We investigated the mechanisms of cyst formation in these two distinct processes by combining conditional inactivation of polycystins with concomitant ablation of cilia in developing and adult kidney and liver. We found that loss of intact cilia suppressed cyst growth following inactivation of polycystins and that the severity of cystic disease was directly related to the length of time between the initial loss of the polycystin proteins and the subsequent involution of cilia. This cilia-dependent cyst growth was not explained by activation of the MAPK/ERK, mTOR or cAMP pathways and is likely to be distinct from the mechanism of cyst growth following complete loss of cilia. These data establish the existence of a new pathway defined by polycystin-dependent inhibition and cilia-dependent activation that promotes rapid cyst growth. PMID:23892607

  18. Loss of cilia suppresses cyst growth in genetic models of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming; Tian, Xin; Igarashi, Peter; Pazour, Gregory J.; Somlo, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Kidney cysts occur following inactivation of polycystins in otherwise intact cilia or following complete removal of cilia by inactivation of intraflagellar transport-related proteins. We investigated the mechanisms of cyst formation in these two distinct processes by combining conditional inactivation of polycystins with concomitant ablation of cilia in developing and adult kidney and liver. We found that loss of intact cilia suppresses cyst growth following inactivation of polycystins and that the severity of cystic disease was directly related to the length of time between the initial loss of the polycystin proteins and the subsequent involution of cilia. This cilia-dependent cyst growth was not explained by activation of the MAPK/ERK, mTOR or cAMP pathways and is likely to be distinct from the mechanism of cyst growth following complete loss of cilia. The data establish the existence of a novel pathway defined by polycystin-dependent inhibition and cilia-dependent activation that promotes rapid cyst growth. PMID:23892607

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... region of the brain, which is involved in reasoning and memory, can cause progressive loss of intellectual ... more about genetic testing , particularly the difference between clinical tests and research tests . To locate a healthcare ...

  20. [Congenital hereditary hypotrychosis. Generalized autosomal dominant hypotrichosis with pili torti (hypotrichosis congenita hereditaria Marie Unna)].

    PubMed

    Spiegl, B; Hundeiker, M

    1979-11-22

    Report on a family with numerous relatives in 7 generations suffering from hypotrichosis congenita hereditaria Marie Unna type. Personal investigations were possible in 29 persons. 19 of them presented the characteristic features of the syndrome with pili torti, generalized inborn hypotrichosis and a type of baldness resembling androgenetic alopecia. PMID:511082

  1. Association of autosomal dominant familial exudative vitreoretinopathy and spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mammo, Danny; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Thomas, Benjamin J; Shah, Ankoor R; Abbey, Ashkan M; Trese, Michael T; Drenser, Kimberly A; Capone, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We present an 8-month-old boy with severe retinal detachment from familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FZD4 exon 1 deletion). He was subsequently diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy with SMN1 deletion. ?-catenin signaling is dysregulated in both disorders, so we hypothesize that the co-occurrence may have exacerbated the vitreoretinal phenotype. PMID:26109022

  2. A Point Mutation in PDGFRB Causes Autosomal-Dominant Penttinen Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jennifer J; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica Y; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M; Sapp, Julie; Crenshaw, Molly; Finch, NiCole A; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Rademakers, Rosa; Sybert, Virginia P; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2015-09-01

    Penttinen syndrome is a distinctive disorder characterized by a prematurely aged appearance with lipoatrophy, epidermal and dermal atrophy along with hypertrophic lesions that resemble scars, thin hair, proptosis, underdeveloped cheekbones, and marked acro-osteolysis. All individuals have been simplex cases. Exome sequencing of an affected individual identified a de novo c.1994T>C p.Val665Ala variant in PDGFRB, which encodes the platelet-derived growth factor receptor ?. Three additional unrelated individuals with this condition were shown to have the identical variant in PDGFRB. Distinct mutations in PDGFRB have been shown to cause infantile myofibromatosis, idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, and an overgrowth disorder with dysmorphic facies and psychosis, none of which overlaps with the clinical findings in Penttinen syndrome. We evaluated the functional consequence of this causative variant on the PDGFRB signaling pathway by transfecting mutant and wild-type cDNA into HeLa cells, and transfection showed ligand-independent constitutive signaling through STAT3 and PLC?. Penttinen syndrome is a clinically distinct genetic condition caused by a PDGFRB gain-of-function mutation that is associated with a specific and unusual perturbation of receptor function. PMID:26279204

  3. Brachmann-de Lange syndrome: Autosomal dominant inheritance and male-to-male transmission

    SciTech Connect

    McKenney, R.R.; Elder, F.F.B.; Northrup, H.; Garcia, J.

    1996-12-30

    We report on familial occurrence of the Brachmann-de Lange syndrome (BDLS): a mildly affected father and his severely affected son and daughter who have different mothers. Both children are severely affected while the father has a much milder but definite BDLS phenotype. Our report documents the third example of male-to-male transmission and adds to the argument against exclusively maternal transmission in familial cases. In addition, our findings illustrate the occurrence of severe manifestations in cases of familial BDLS. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Maximiliano A; Wilken, Miguel; Bruno, Verónica; Pujol-Lereis, Virginia; Povedano, Guillermo; Saccoliti, María; Taratuto, Analia; Ameriso, Sebastián F

    2015-09-01

    CADASIL is the most common cause of hereditary stroke and vascular dementia. Published information about this disease in South America is scant. We describe clinical and demographic characteristics of 13 patients (10 families) with CADASIL from Argentina.Methods Medical records, diagnostic tests and family history of patients with CADASIL were reviewed.Results Thirteen patients with CADASIL (10 families) were included. All patients had European ancestry. Initial presentation was stroke in most patients (n = 11). Stroke patients later developed cognitive complaints (n = 9), migraine with aura (n = 1), apathy (n = 4) and depression (n = 6). External capsule and temporal lobe involvement on MRI were characteristic imaging findings. Two patients died after intracerebral hemorrhage.Conclusion This is the first report of non-related patients with CADASIL in South America addressing ancestry. Since European ancestry is not highly prevalent in all South American countries, there may be variable incidence of CADASIL within this region. PMID:26352492

  5. A Novel HSF4 Gene Mutation Causes Autosomal-Dominant Cataracts in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Huibin; Huang, Chen; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Ziyuan; Zhang, Zhike; Xu, Haining; You, Yuchen; Hu, Jinping; Li, Xuemin; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cataracts are a significant cause of visual impairment or blindness in children. One-third of cases estimated to have a genetic cause. We carried out gene analysis and bioinformatics analysis to map the locus and to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 12-member, four-generation Chinese family affected with bilateral congenital cataracts. We screened individuals of the family and discovered a distinct missense mutation in HSF4 (a gene at this locus that encodes teat-shock transcription factor 4). Bioinformatics analysis was used to determine possible changes in the protein structure that could affect the phenotype. Sequencing of the candidate genes showed a heterozygous c.69 G?T change in the heat shock transcription factor 4 (HSF4) gene, which resulted in the substitution of a lysine with an asparagine (p. K23N). This mutation cosegregated with all affected individuals and was not observed in unaffected family members. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the p. K23N mutation was predicted to be disease causing. This is the first report of the novel missense mutation, c.69 G?T (p. K23N), in exon 3 of the HSF4 locus on 16q21-q22 associated with bilateral congenital cataracts in a Chinese family. This novel mutation could enable propergenetic diagnostics and counseling in affected families and could lead to a better understanding of the structure and function of HSF4 in health and disease. PMID:24637349

  6. LMNA-associated cardiocutaneous progeria: an inherited autosomal dominant premature aging syndrome with late onset.

    PubMed

    Kane, Megan S; Lindsay, Mark E; Judge, Daniel P; Barrowman, Jemima; Ap Rhys, Colette; Simonson, Lisa; Dietz, Harry C; Michaelis, Susan

    2013-07-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA, which encodes the nuclear scaffold proteins lamin A and C. In HGPS and related progerias, processing of prelamin A is blocked at a critical step mediated by the zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24. LMNA-linked progerias can be grouped into two classes: (1) the processing-deficient, early onset "typical" progerias (e.g., HGPS), and (2) the processing-proficient "atypical" progeria syndromes (APS) that are later in onset. Here we describe a previously unrecognized progeria syndrome with prominent cutaneous and cardiovascular manifestations belonging to the second class. We suggest the name LMNA-associated cardiocutaneous progeria syndrome (LCPS) for this disorder. Affected patients are normal at birth but undergo progressive cutaneous changes in childhood and die in middle age of cardiovascular complications, including accelerated atherosclerosis, calcific valve disease, and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the proband demonstrated cancer susceptibility, a phenotype rarely described for LMNA-based progeria disorders. The LMNA mutation that caused LCPS in this family is a heterozygous c.899A>G (p.D300G) mutation predicted to alter the coiled-coil domain of lamin A/C. In skin fibroblasts isolated from the proband, the processing and levels of lamin A and C are normal. However, nuclear morphology is aberrant and rescued by treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors, as is also the case for HGPS and other laminopathies. Our findings advance knowledge of human LMNA progeria syndromes, and raise the possibility that typical and atypical progerias may converge upon a common mechanism to cause premature aging disease. PMID:23666920

  7. Linkage studies in Spanish autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease-type 2 (ADPKD-2) families

    SciTech Connect

    San Millan, J.L.; Viribay, M.; Perral, B.

    1994-09-01

    ADPKD results from mutations in at least two genetically distinct loci. Most of the cases (ADPKD-1) are due to mutations in the locus PKD1, on the short arm of chromosome 16. ADPKD-2 accounts for 15% of ADPKD in Spanish population. Previous linkage studies have localized the gene for ADPKD-2 (PKD2) in the chromosome region 4q13-q23, and the distance between the flanking markers, D4S231 and D4S423/D4S414, was 7 cM. We have analyzed seven unrelated families with ADPKD not linked to PKD1 by using eight microsatellite markers that map within the candidate region. All the families did show linkage to any of the markers for which they were informative. Pairwise linkage analysis revealed that loci D4S414 and D4S423 are tightly linked to the disease with lod scores of 3.12 and 6.50, respectively, at a recombination fraction of 0.00. Multilocus linkage analysis indicates that the most likely location for PKD2 is distal to D4S1542, with odds of 1000:1 over the location proximal to D4S1542. Two recombination events involving PKD2 chromosomes have been identified in our seven families. These results provide a proximal boundary for the PKD2 locus and, considering previous studies, its localization is further refined to a 3 cM interval flanked by markers D4S1542 and D4S414/D4S423.

  8. Isolation of a P1 phagemid encompassing the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Schneider, M.C.; Reeders, S.T.

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated a P1 phagemid using primers for the 3 prime end of the tuberin gene (TSC2) on chromosome 16p13, which encompasses a large gene (KG8) which shows PKD1-specific mutations. The approximately 90-100 kilobase phagemid encompasses at least 4 genes (KG8, Nik7, KG3, and KM17). The CA repeats SM6 (upstream of the KG8 gene) and KG8 localized to the gene itself (3 prime untranslated) are found in the phagemid, as well as a number of trinucleotide repeat elements. One, a CCT-hybridizing fragment maps internal to the KG8 cDNA and appears to make the cosmid corresponding to the region (cGGG10) unstable. None of the previously published cosmids from the region completely encompasses the KG8 gene. A detailed R1 map of the region has been prepared and compared to the cosmid maps. Sequence of the regional genes will be presented. The phagemid will provide an alternative genomic source for evaluating the genomic sequence/map. In addition, this phagemid will potentially be useful as a vector for transfection of the entire PKD1 gene and its regulatory sequences.

  9. X Chromosome and Autosome Dosage Responses in Drosophila melanogaster Heads

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen-Xia; Oliver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    X chromosome dosage compensation is required for male viability in Drosophila. Dosage compensation relative to autosomes is two-fold, but this is likely to be due to a combination of homeostatic gene-by-gene regulation and chromosome-wide regulation. We have baseline values for gene-by-gene dosage compensation on autosomes, but not for the X chromosome. Given the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes, these baseline values could differ. We used a series of deficiencies on the X and autosomes, along with mutations in the sex-determination gene transformer-2, to carefully measure the sex-independent X-chromosome response to gene dosage in adult heads by RNA sequencing. We observed modest and indistinguishable dosage compensation for both X chromosome and autosome genes, suggesting that the X chromosome is neither inherently more robust nor sensitive to dosage change. PMID:25850426

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal recessive hyper-IgE syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... syndrome? AR-HIES is a rare disorder whose prevalence is unknown. What genes are related to autosomal ... immunodeficiency ; immunoglobulin ; infection ; inherited ; neurological ; NK cells ; pneumonia ; prevalence ; protein ; recessive ; respiratory ; syndrome ; white blood cells You ...

  11. X Chromosome and Autosome Dosage Responses in Drosophila melanogaster Heads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Xia; Oliver, Brian

    2015-06-01

    X chromosome dosage compensation is required for male viability in Drosophila. Dosage compensation relative to autosomes is two-fold, but this is likely to be due to a combination of homeostatic gene-by-gene regulation and chromosome-wide regulation. We have baseline values for gene-by-gene dosage compensation on autosomes, but not for the X chromosome. Given the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes, these baseline values could differ. We used a series of deficiencies on the X and autosomes, along with mutations in the sex-determination gene transformer-2, to carefully measure the sex-independent X-chromosome response to gene dosage in adult heads by RNA sequencing. We observed modest and indistinguishable dosage compensation for both X chromosome and autosome genes, suggesting that the X chromosome is neither inherently more robust nor sensitive to dosage change. PMID:25850426

  12. Autosomal Translocation Patient Who Experienced Premature Menopause: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yesol; Jeong, Do-won; Lee, Eun-gyeong; Jeon, Dong-Su; Kim, Jun-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a condition in which the ovarian functions of hormone production and oocyte development become impaired before the typical age for menopause. POF and early menopause are present in a broad spectrum of gonad dysgenesis, from a complete cessation of ovarian function to an intermittent follicle maturation failure. Actually POF has been identified as a genetic entity (especially chromosome X), but data on genetic factors of premature menopause are limited. Until now, several cases revealed that inactivation of X chromosomes has an effect on ages of premature menopause and females with balanced or unbalanced X-autosome translocations can have several reproductive problems. On the other hand, there have been a few data that was caused by autosome-autosome translocation can lead. Therefore we report a relevant case of POF with translocation between chromosomes 1 and 4. She had her first menstrual period at the age of 12, and after 7 years she stopped menstruation. Chromosomal analysis showed 46, XX, t (1;4) (p22.3;q31.3). While evaluating this rare case, we could review various causes (especially genetic factors) of POF. To remind clinicians about this disease, we report a case of POF caused by autosome-autosome translocation with a literature review. PMID:26356509

  13. Novel mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal recessive generalized lymphatic dysplasia with non-immune hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    Fotiou, Elisavet; Martin-Almedina, Silvia; Simpson, Michael A.; Lin, Shin; Gordon, Kristiana; Brice, Glen; Atton, Giles; Jeffery, Iona; Rees, David C.; Mignot, Cyril; Vogt, Julie; Homfray, Tessa; Snyder, Michael P.; Rockson, Stanley G.; Jeffery, Steve; Mortimer, Peter S.; Mansour, Sahar; Ostergaard, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Generalized lymphatic dysplasia (GLD) is a rare form of primary lymphoedema characterized by a uniform, widespread lymphoedema affecting all segments of the body, with systemic involvement such as intestinal and/or pulmonary lymphangiectasia, pleural effusions, chylothoraces and/or pericardial effusions. This may present prenatally as non-immune hydrops. Here we report homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in PIEZO1, resulting in an autosomal recessive form of GLD with a high incidence of non-immune hydrops fetalis and childhood onset of facial and four limb lymphoedema. Mutations in PIEZO1, which encodes a mechanically activated ion channel, have been reported with autosomal dominant dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis and non-immune hydrops of unknown aetiology. Besides its role in red blood cells, our findings indicate that PIEZO1 is also involved in the development of lymphatic structures. PMID:26333996

  14. The efficacy of microarray screening for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    van Huet, Ramon A. C.; Pierrache, Laurence H.M.; Meester-Smoor, Magda A.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; de Wijs, Ilse J.; Collin, Rob W. J.; Hoefsloot, Lies H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of multiple versions of a commercially available arrayed primer extension (APEX) microarray chip for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). Methods We included 250 probands suspected of arRP who were genetically analyzed with the APEX microarray between January 2008 and November 2013. The mode of inheritance had to be autosomal recessive according to the pedigree (including isolated cases). If the microarray identified a heterozygous mutation, we performed Sanger sequencing of exons and exon–intron boundaries of that specific gene. The efficacy of this microarray chip with the additional Sanger sequencing approach was determined by the percentage of patients that received a molecular diagnosis. We also collected data from genetic tests other than the APEX analysis for arRP to provide a detailed description of the molecular diagnoses in our study cohort. Results The APEX microarray chip for arRP identified the molecular diagnosis in 21 (8.5%) of the patients in our cohort. Additional Sanger sequencing yielded a second mutation in 17 patients (6.8%), thereby establishing the molecular diagnosis. In total, 38 patients (15.2%) received a molecular diagnosis after analysis using the microarray and additional Sanger sequencing approach. Further genetic analyses after a negative result of the arRP microarray (n = 107) resulted in a molecular diagnosis of arRP (n = 23), autosomal dominant RP (n = 5), X-linked RP (n = 2), and choroideremia (n = 1). Conclusions The efficacy of the commercially available APEX microarray chips for arRP appears to be low, most likely caused by the limitations of this technique and the genetic and allelic heterogeneity of RP. Diagnostic yields up to 40% have been reported for next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques that, as expected, thereby outperform targeted APEX analysis. PMID:25999674

  15. A novel HSF4 gene mutation (p.R405X) causing autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in a large consanguineous family from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Sajjad, Naheed; Goebel, Ingrid; Kakar, Naseebullah; Cheema, Abdul Majeed; Kubisch, Christian; Ahmad, Jamil

    2008-01-01

    Background Hereditary cataracts are most frequently inherited as autosomal dominant traits, but can also be inherited in an autosomal recessive or X-linked fashion. To date, 12 loci for autosomal recessive cataracts have been mapped including a locus on chromosome 16q22 containing the disease-causing gene HSF4 (Genbank accession number NM_001040667). Here, we describe a family from Pakistan with the first nonsense mutation in HSF4 thus expanding the mutational spectrum of this heat shock transcription factor gene. Methods A large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataracts was collected from Quetta. Genetic linkage analysis was performed for the common known autosomal recessive cataracts loci and linkage to a locus containing HSF4 (OMIM 602438) was found. All exons and adjacent splice sites of the heat shock transcription factor 4 gene (HSF4) were sequenced. A mutation-specific restriction enzyme digest (HphI) was performed for all family members and unrelated controls. Results The disease phenotype perfectly co-segregated with markers flanking the known cataract gene HSF4, whereas other autosomal recessive loci were excluded. A maximum two-point LOD score with a Zmax = 5.6 at ? = 0 was obtained for D16S421. Direct sequencing of HSF4 revealed the nucleotide exchange c.1213C > T in this family predicting an arginine to stop codon exchange (p.R405X). Conclusion We identified the first nonsense mutation (p.R405X) in exon 11 of HSF4 in a large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataract. PMID:19014451

  16. Autosomal Recessive Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita; Ghosh, Epsita; Dayal, Surabhi

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (AED) with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, a very rare entity, in a 2-year-old female child of two asymptomatic, consanguineous parents. Their previous child also had a similar condition. Autosomal recessive AED (AR-AED) can have its full expression both in males and females and it is clinically indistinguishable from the x-linked recessive AED (XL-AED), which is the most common type of ectodermal dysplasia. Unlike the partially symptomatic carriers of XL-AED, the heterozygotes of AR-AED are phenotypically asymptomatic. PMID:25071285

  17. DOCK6 mutations are responsible for a distinct autosomal-recessive variant of Adams-Oliver syndrome associated with brain and eye anomalies.

    PubMed

    Sukalo, Maja; Tilsen, Felix; Kayserili, Hülya; Müller, Dietmar; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Ruddy, Deborah M; Wakeling, Emma; Ørstavik, Karen Helene; Snape, Katie M; Trembath, Richard; De Smedt, Maryse; van der Aa, Nathalie; Skalej, Martin; Mundlos, Stefan; Wuyts, Wim; Southgate, Laura; Zenker, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by the association of aplasia cutis congenita with terminal transverse limb defects, often accompanied by additional cardiovascular or neurological features. Both autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive disease transmission have been observed, with recent gene discoveries indicating extensive genetic heterogeneity. Mutations of the DOCK6 gene were first described in autosomal-recessive cases of AOS and only five DOCK6-related families have been reported to date. Recently, a second type of autosomal-recessive AOS has been attributed to EOGT mutations in three consanguineous families. Here, we describe the identification of 13 DOCK6 mutations, the majority of which are novel, across 10 unrelated individuals from a large cohort comprising 47 sporadic cases and 31 AOS pedigrees suggestive of autosomal-recessive inheritance. DOCK6 mutations were strongly associated with structural brain abnormalities, ocular anomalies, and intellectual disability, thus suggesting that DOCK6-linked disease represents a variant of AOS with a particularly poor prognosis. PMID:25824905

  18. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. CATSPER2, a human autosomal nonsyndromic male infertility gene

    E-print Network

    Lancet, Doron

    ARTICLE CATSPER2, a human autosomal nonsyndromic male infertility gene Nili Avidan1 , Hannah Tamary in spermatozoa) may explain the observed deafness and male infertility phenotypes. To the best of our knowledge associated with nonsyndromic male infertility. European Journal of Human Genetics (2003) 11, 497­502. doi:10

  20. Adhalin Gene Mutations in Patients with Autosomal Recessive Childhood Onset Muscular Dystrophy with Adhalin Deficiency

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    Adhalin Gene Mutations in Patients with Autosomal Recessive Childhood Onset Muscular Dystrophy Neurology, National Sanatorium Tokushima Hospital, Oegun, Tokushima 776, Japan; gLaboratoryof Gene Research Homozygous adhalim gene mutations were found in three patients from two consanguineousfamilies with autosomal

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

    MedlinePLUS

    ... testing PubMed Recent literature Conditions > Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (often shortened to ARSACS ) On ... June 2013 What is ARSACS? Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, more commonly known as ARSACS, ...

  2. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Kim, Helen J.; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W.; Stevenson, David A.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema. PMID:26387913

  3. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M; Kim, Helen J; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W; Stevenson, David A; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema. PMID:26387913

  4. Missense mutations in IHH impair Indian Hedgehog signaling in C3H10T1/2 cells: Implications for brachydactyly type A1, and new targets for Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shengzhen; Zhou, Jian; Gao, Bo; Hu, Jianxin; Wang, Hongsheng; Meng, Junwei; Zhao, Xinzhi; Ma, Gang; Lin, Chuwen; Xiao, Yue; Tang, Wei; Zhu, Xuming; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Feng, Guoying; Chan, Danny; He, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Heterozygous missense mutations in IHH result in Brachydactyly type A1 (BDA1; OMIM 112500), a condition characterized by the shortening of digits due to hypoplasia/aplasia of the middle phalanx. Indian Hedgehog signaling regulates the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes and is essential for endochondral bone formation. Analyses of activated IHH signaling in C3H10T1/2 cells showed that three BDA1-associated mutations (p.E95K, p.D100E and p.E131K) severely impaired the induction of targets such as Ptch1 and Gli1. However, this was not a complete loss of function, suggesting that these mutations may affect the interaction with the receptor PTCH1 or its partners, with an impact on the induction potency. From comparative microarray expression analyses and quantitative real-time PCR, we identified three additional targets, Sostdc1, Penk1 and Igfbp5, which were also severely affected. Penk1 and Igfbp5 were confirmed to be regulated by GLI1, while the induction of Sostdc1 by IHH is independent of GLI1. SOSTDC1 is a BMP antagonist, and altered BMP signaling is known to affect digit formation. The role of Penk1 and Igfbp5 in skeletogenesis is not known. However, we have shown that both Penk1 and Igfbp5 are expressed in the interzone region of the developing joint of mouse digits, providing another link for a role for IHH signaling in the formation of the distal digits. PMID:20024692

  5. X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa in an American family

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E.; Daiger, S.P.; Blanton, S.H.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a genetically heterogeneous disease with autosomal dominant (adRP), autosomal recessive and X-linked forms. At least 3 forms of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa have been reported: RP2 which maps to Xp11.4-p 11.23, RP3 which maps to Xp21.1 and RP6, which maps to Xp21.3-p21.1. The X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa are generally considered to be recessive as female carriers are not affected or are much less affected than males. Here we report a five generation American family with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa in which both males and females are significantly affected. The disease locus in this family appears to be distinct from RP2 and RP3. The American family (UTAD054) presents with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa. The family appeared to fit an autosomal dominant pattern; however, linkage testing excluded all known adRP loci. Absence of male-to-male transmission in the pedigree suggested the possibility of X-linked dominant inheritance. Thus we tested six microsatellite markers that map to Xp (DXS987, DXS989, DXS993, DXS999, DXS1003 and DXS1110). Of these, DXS989 showed tight linkage with one allele (199) showing a 100% concordance with disease status. The odds favoring an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance in this family, versus autosomal dominant, are 10{sup 5}:1. In addition, recombinations for DXS999, and dXS1110, the two markers flanking DXS989, were observed in affected individuals. These data map the disease locus in this family to a 9 mb region on the X chromosome between Xp22.11 and Xp21.41. In addition, the recombinant individuals exclude close linkage to RP2 and RP3. The observance of high penetrance in females indicates that this family has X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We suggest that this mode of inheritance should be considered in other families with dominant retinitis pigmentosa but an absence of male-to-male transmission.

  6. Characterization of large structural genetic mosaicism in human autosomes.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N; Dean, Michael C; Jacobs, Kevin B; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M; Gaudet, Mia M; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiung, Chao A; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Berndt, Sonja I; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Bracci, Paige M; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C; Cook, Michael B; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J; Epstein, Caroline G; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fuchs, Charles S; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M; Greene, Mark H; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Savage, Sharon A; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T; Spitz, Margaret R; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R; Teras, Lauren R; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolpin, Brian M; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C; Beaty, Terri H; Bierut, Laura J; Desch, Karl C; Doheny, Kimberly F; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A; Kang, Jae H; Laurie, Cecilia A; Li, Jun Z; Lowe, William L; Marazita, Mary L; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelson, Sarah C; Pasquale, Louis R; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Laurie, Cathy C; Caporaso, Neil E; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J

    2015-03-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10(-31)) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. PMID:25748358

  7. The social dominance paradox.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jennifer Louise; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Heyes, Cecilia M; Cools, Roshan

    2014-12-01

    Dominant individuals report high levels of self-sufficiency, self-esteem, and authoritarianism. The lay stereotype suggests that such individuals ignore information from others, preferring to make their own choices. However, the nonhuman animal literature presents a conflicting view, suggesting that dominant individuals are avid social learners, whereas subordinates focus on learning from private experience. Whether dominant humans are best characterized by the lay stereotype or the animal view is currently unknown. Here, we present a "social dominance paradox": using self-report scales and computerized tasks, we demonstrate that socially dominant people explicitly value independence, but, paradoxically, in a complex decision-making task, they show an enhanced reliance (relative to subordinate individuals) on social learning. More specifically, socially dominant people employed a strategy of copying other agents when the agents' responses had a history of being correct. However, in humans, two subtypes of dominance have been identified: aggressive and social. Aggressively dominant individuals, who are as likely to "get their own way" as socially dominant individuals but who do so through the use of aggressive or Machiavellian tactics, did not use social information, even when it was beneficial to do so. This paper presents the first study of dominance and social learning in humans and challenges the lay stereotype in which all dominant individuals ignore others' views. The more subtle perspective we offer could have important implications for decision making in both the boardroom and the classroom. PMID:25454588

  8. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  9. Rare variants in the notch signaling pathway describe a novel type of autosomal recessive Klippel-Feil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Ender; Yuregir, Ozge O; Bozdogan, Sevcan T; Aslan, Huseyin; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Gambin, Tomasz; Bayram, Yavuz; Atik, Mehmed M; Erdin, Serkan; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R

    2015-11-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is a rare disorder represented by a subgroup of segmentation defects of the vertebrae and characterized by fusion of the cervical vertebrae, low posterior hairline, and short neck with limited motion. Both autosomal dominant and recessive inheritance patterns were reported in families with Klippel-Feil. Mutated genes for both dominant (GDF6 and GDF3) and recessive (MEOX1) forms of Klippel-Feil syndrome have been shown to be involved in somite development via transcription regulation and signaling pathways. Heterotaxy arises from defects in proteins that function in the development of left-right asymmetry of the developing embryo. We describe a consanguineous family with a male proband who presents with classical Klippel-Feil syndrome together with heterotaxy (situs inversus totalis). The present patient also had Sprengel's deformity, deformity of the sternum, and a solitary kidney. Using exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.299delT; p.L100fs) in RIPPLY2, a gene shown to play a crucial role in somitogenesis and participate in the Notch signaling pathway via negatively regulating Tbx6. Our data confirm RIPPLY2 as a novel gene for autosomal recessive Klippel-Feil syndrome, and in addition-from a mechanistic standpoint-suggest the possibility that mutations in RIPPLY2 could also lead to heterotaxy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26238661

  10. The Y-Chromosomal and Autosomal Male-Determining M Factors of Musca Domestica Are Equivalent

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, R.; Hediger, M.; Roth, S.; Nothiger, R.; Dubendorfer, A.

    1997-01-01

    In Musca domestica, male sex is determined by a dominant factor, M, located either on the Y, the X or on an autosome. M prevents the activity of the female-determining gene F. In the absence of M, F becomes active and dictates female development. The various M factors may represent translocated copies of an ancestral Y-chromosomal M. Double mutants and germ line chimeras show that M(Y), M(I), M(II), M(III) and M(V) perform equivalent functions. When brought into the female germ line, they predetermine male development of the offspring. This maternal effect is overruled by the dominant female-determining factor F(D). M(I) and M(II) are weak M factors, as demonstrated by the presence of yolk proteins in M(I)/+ males and by the occurrence of some intersexes among the offspring that developed from transplanted M(I)/+ and M(II)/+ pole cells. The arrhenogenic mutation Ag has its focus in the female germ line and its temperature-sensitive period during oogenesis. We propose that M(I) and Ag represent allelic M factors that are affected in their expression. Analysis of mosaic gonads showed that in M. domestica the sex of the germ line is determined by inductive signals from the surrounding soma. We present a model to account for the observed phenomena. PMID:9286686

  11. Alteration of ornithine metabolism leads to dominant and recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Coutelier, Marie; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Habarou, Florence; Morais, Sara; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Tao, Feifei; Konop, Juliette; Stoll, Marion; Charles, Perrine; Jacoupy, Maxime; Matusiak, Raphaël; Alonso, Isabel; Tallaksen, Chantal; Mairey, Mathilde; Kennerson, Marina; Gaussen, Marion; Schule, Rebecca; Janin, Maxime; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Durand, Christelle M; Depienne, Christel; Calvas, Patrick; Coutinho, Paula; Saudubray, Jean-Marie; Rouleau, Guy; Brice, Alexis; Nicholson, Garth; Darios, Frédéric; Loureiro, José L; Zuchner, Stephan; Ottolenghi, Chris; Mochel, Fanny; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias are heterogeneous neurological disorders characterized by a pyramidal syndrome with symptoms predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Some limited pyramidal involvement also occurs in patients with an autosomal recessive neurocutaneous syndrome due to ALDH18A1 mutations. ALDH18A1 encodes delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), an enzyme that catalyses the first and common step of proline and ornithine biosynthesis from glutamate. Through exome sequencing and candidate gene screening, we report two families with autosomal recessive transmission of ALDH18A1 mutations, and predominant complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with marked cognitive impairment, without any cutaneous abnormality. More interestingly, we also identified monoallelic ALDH18A1 mutations segregating in three independent families with autosomal dominant pure or complex hereditary spastic paraplegia, as well as in two sporadic patients. Low levels of plasma ornithine, citrulline, arginine and proline in four individuals from two families suggested P5CS deficiency. Glutamine loading tests in two fibroblast cultures from two related affected subjects confirmed a metabolic block at the level of P5CS in vivo. Besides expanding the clinical spectrum of ALDH18A1-related pathology, we describe mutations segregating in an autosomal dominant pattern. The latter are associated with a potential trait biomarker; we therefore suggest including amino acid chromatography in the clinico-genetic work-up of hereditary spastic paraplegia, particularly in dominant cases, as the associated phenotype is not distinct from other causative genes. PMID:26026163

  12. Characterization of Large Structural Genetic Mosaicism in Human Autosomes

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N.; Dean, Michael C.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A.; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S.; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J.; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Bracci, Paige M.; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary A.; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C.; Cook, Michael B.; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G.; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J.; Epstein, Caroline G.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Greene, Mark H.; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C.; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X.; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Savage, Sharon A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R.; Teras, Lauren R.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S.; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G.; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Beaty, Terri H.; Bierut, Laura J.; Desch, Karl C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A.; Kang, Jae H.; Laurie, Cecilia A.; Li, Jun Z.; Lowe, William L.; Marazita, Mary L.; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L.; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10?31) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. PMID:25748358

  13. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S.

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  14. Early bilateral nephrectomy in infantile autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mallett, Tamara Mary; O'Hagan, Emma; McKeever, Karl Gerard

    2015-01-01

    The management of neonatal autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) complicated by severe pulmonary insufficiency presents complex clinical challenges. Where massive nephromegaly exists, early bilateral nephrectomy, supportive peritoneal dialysis and early aggressive nutrition can minimise infant mortality. Consensus, however, is lacking on the role and optimal timing of nephrectomy, with decision-making driven by the patient's clinical condition and the expertise of the centre. We report on our experience of an infant with ARPKD requiring neonatal renal replacement therapy and survival at 14?months following early bilateral nephrectomy. PMID:26670891

  15. dbMAE: the database of autosomal monoallelic expression

    PubMed Central

    Savova, Virginia; Patsenker, Jon; Vigneau, Sébastien; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, data on ‘random’ autosomal monoallelic expression has become available for the entire genome in multiple human and mouse tissues and cell types, creating a need for better access and dissemination. The database of autosomal monoallelic expression (dbMAE; https://mae.hms.harvard.edu) incorporates data from multiple recent reports of genome-wide analyses. These include transcriptome-wide analyses of allelic imbalance in clonal cell populations based on sequence polymorphisms, as well as indirect identification, based on a specific chromatin signature present in MAE gene bodies. Currently, dbMAE contains transcriptome-wide chromatin identification calls for 8 human and 21 mouse tissues, and describes over 16 000 murine and ?700 human cases of directly measured biased expression, compiled from allele-specific RNA-seq and genotyping array data. All data are manually curated. To ensure cross-publication uniformity, we performed re-analysis of transcriptome-wide RNA-seq data using the same pipeline. Data are accessed through an interface that allows for basic and advanced searches; all source references, including raw data, are clearly described and hyperlinked. This ensures the utility of the resource as an initial screening tool for those interested in investigating the role of monoallelic expression in their specific genes and tissues of interest. PMID:26503248

  16. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  17. A new locus for dominant "zonular pulverulent" cataract, on chromosome 13.

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, D; Ionides, A; Berry, V; Moore, A; Bhattacharya, S; Shiels, A

    1997-01-01

    Inherited cataract is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease that most often presents as a congenital autosomal dominant trait. Here we report the linkage of a new locus for dominant "zonular pulverulent" cataract (CZP) to chromosome 13. To map the CZP locus we performed molecular-genetic linkage analysis using microsatellite markers in a five-generation English pedigree. After exclusion of eight known loci and several candidate genes for autosomal dominant cataract, we obtained significantly positive LOD scores (Z) for markers D13S175 (maximum Z [Zmax] = 4.06; maximum recombination frequency [theta max] = 0) and D13S1236 (Zmax = 5.75, theta max = 0). Multipoint analysis gave Zmax = 6.62 (theta max = 0) at marker D13S175. Haplotype data indicated that CZP probably lies in the centromeric region of chromosome 13, provocatively close to the gene for lens connexin46. PMID:9199569

  18. Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism maps to 6q25.2-q27 in four ethnic groups: detailed genetic mapping of the linked region.

    PubMed

    Jones, A C; Yamamura, Y; Almasy, L; Bohlega, S; Elibol, B; Hubble, J; Kuzuhara, S; Uchida, M; Yanagi, T; Weeks, D E; Nygaard, T G

    1998-07-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative condition associated with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the zona compacta of the substantia nigra. There is increasing evidence that genetic factors play a role in the etiology of PD, although genetic heterogeneity is likely. An autosomal dominant syndrome with many similarities to sporadic PD has been mapped to 4q21-22 in a large Italian pedigree and has been found to be due to mutation of the alpha-synuclein gene. However, this gene appears to account for only a minority of PD, and a susceptibility locus for autosomal dominant parkinsonism has recently been mapped, on 2p13. Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (JP), which shows marked clinical similarity to PD, maps to 6q25.2-q27. We found linkage to this region in a group of 15 families from four distinct ethnic backgrounds. A full genomic screen excluded other candidate regions. We have constructed a detailed genetic map of the linked region and have mapped the position of the manganese superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2). Recombination events restricted the JP locus to a 6.9-cM region and excluded SOD2. The apparent homozygosity for null alleles at D6S955 in one family suggested a deletion and finer localization of the JP locus. PMID:9634534

  19. Mitochondrial Hsp60 Chaperonopathy Causes an Autosomal-Recessive Neurodegenerative Disorder Linked to Brain Hypomyelination and Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Daniella; Georgopoulos, Costa; Bross, Peter; Ang, Debbie; Segev, Yardena; Goldsher, Dorit; Nemirovski, Alexandra; Shahar, Eli; Ravid, Sarit; Luder, Anthony; Heno, Bayan; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Skorecki, Karl; Mandel, Hanna

    2008-01-01

    Hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HMLs) are disorders involving aberrant myelin formation. The prototype of primary HMLs is the X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) caused by mutations in PLP1. Recently, homozygous mutations in GJA12 encoding connexin 47 were found in patients with autosomal-recessive Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease (PMLD). However, many patients of both genders with PMLD carry neither PLP1 nor GJA12 mutations. We report a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred with clinical and radiological findings compatible with PMLD, in which linkage to PLP1 and GJA12 was excluded. Using homozygosity mapping and mutation analysis, we have identified a homozygous missense mutation (D29G) not previously described in HSPD1, encoding the mitochondrial heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) in all affected individuals. The D29G mutation completely segregates with the disease-associated phenotype. The pathogenic effect of D29G on Hsp60-chaperonin activity was verified by an in vivo E. coli complementation assay, which demonstrated compromised ability of the D29G-Hsp60 mutant protein to support E. coli survival, especially at high temperatures. The disorder, which we have termed MitCHAP-60 disease, can be distinguished from spastic paraplegia 13 (SPG13), another Hsp60-associated autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, by its autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern, as well as by its early-onset, profound cerebral involvement and lethality. Our findings suggest that Hsp60 defects can cause neurodegenerative pathologies of varying severity, not previously suspected on the basis of the SPG13 phenotype. These findings should help to clarify the important role of Hsp60 in myelinogenesis and neurodegeneration. PMID:18571143

  20. An autosomal genetic linkage map of the sheep genome

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, A.M.; Ede, A.J.; Pierson, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    We report the first extensive ovine genetic linkage map covering 2070 cM of the sheep genome. The map was generated from the linkage analysis of 246 polymorphic markers, in nine three-generation full-sib pedigrees, which make up the AgResearch International Mapping Flock. We have exploited many markers from cattle so that valuable comparisons between these two ruminant linkage maps can be made. The markers, used in the segregation analyses, comprised 86 anonymous microsatellite markers derived from the sheep genome, 126 anonymous microsatellites from cattle, one from deer, and 33 polymorphic markers of various types associated with known genes. The maximum number of informative meioses within the mapping flock was 22. The average number of informative meioses per marker was 140 (range 18-209). Linkage groups have been assigned to all 26 sheep autosomes. 102 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a rare hereditary neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a marked reduction in brain size and intellectual disability. MCPH is genetically heterogeneous and can exhibit additional clinical features that overlap with related disorders including Seckel syndrome, Meier-Gorlin syndrome, and microcephalic osteodysplastic dwarfism. In this review, we discuss the key proteins mutated in MCPH. To date, MCPH-causing mutations have been identified in twelve different genes, many of which encode proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation or are present at the centrosome, an organelle crucial for mitotic spindle assembly and cell division. We highlight recent findings on MCPH proteins with regard to their role in cell cycle progression, centrosome function, and early brain development. PMID:25548773

  2. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.C.; Teague, P.W.; Barber, A.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a severe retinal dystrophy characterized by night blindness, progressive constriction of the visual fields and loss of central vision in the fourth or fifth decades. The frequency of this form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) varies in different populations. Mutations within the rhodopsin, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase-{beta} subunit and cGMP-gated channel genes have been reported in some arRP families. The genetic loci responsible for the majority of cases have yet to be identified. Genetic heterogeneity is likely to be extensive. In order to minimize the amount of genetic heterogenity, a set of arRP families was ascertained within the South-Central Sardinian population, in which 81% of families with a known mode of inheritance show an autosomal recessive form of RP. The Sardinian population is an ethnic {open_quotes}outlier{close_quotes}, having remained relatively isolated from mainland and other cultures. Genetic linkage data has been obtained in a set of 11 Sardinian arRP kindreds containing 26 affected members. Under the assumption of genetic homogeneity, no evidence of linkage was found in the arRP kindreds using 195 markers, which excluded 62% of the genome (Z<-2). Positive lod scores were obtained with D14S80 which showed no recombination in a subset of 5 families. Heterogeneity testing using D14S80 and arRP showed no significant evidence of heterogeneity (p=0.18) but evidence of linkage ({chi}{sup 2}=3.64, p=0.028). We are currently screening the neural retina-specific leucine zipper gene (NRL) in 14q11 for mutations as a candidate locus.

  3. Autosomal Recessive Disorder Otospondylomegaepiphyseal Dysplasia Is Associated with Loss-of-Function Mutations in the COL11A2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melkoniemi, MiiaÂ; Brunner, Han G.Â; Manouvrier, SylvieÂ; Hennekam, RaoulÂ; Superti-Furga, AndreaÂ; Kääriäinen, HelenaÂ; Pauli, Richard M.Â; van Essen, TonÂ; Warman, Matthew L.Â; Bonaventure, JackyÂ; Miny, PeterÂ; Ala-Kokko, LeenaÂ

    2000-01-01

    Summary Otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia accompanied by severe hearing loss. The phenotype overlaps that of the autosomal dominant disorders—Stickler and Marshall syndromes—but can be distinguished by disproportionately short limbs, severe hearing loss, and lack of ocular involvement. In one family with OSMED, a homozygous Gly?Arg substitution has been described in COL11A2, which codes for the ?2 chain of type XI collagen. We report seven further families with OSMED. All affected individuals had a remarkably similar phenotype: profound sensorineural hearing loss, skeletal dysplasia with limb shortening and large epiphyses, cleft palate, an extremely flat face, hypoplasia of the mandible, a short nose with anteverted nares, and a flat nasal bridge. We screened affected individuals for mutations in COL11A2 and found different mutations in each family. Individuals from four families, including three with consanguineous parents, were homozygous for mutations. Individuals from three other families, in whom parents were nonconsanguineous, were compound heterozygous. Of the 10 identified mutations, 9 are predicted to cause premature termination of translation, and 1 is predicted to cause an in-frame deletion. We conclude that the OSMED phenotype is highly homogenous and results from homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for COL11A2 mutations, most of which are predicted to cause complete absence of ?2(XI) chains. PMID:10677296

  4. Pathology from evolutionary conflict, with a theory of X chromosome versus autosome conflict over sexually

    E-print Network

    Crespi, Bernard J.

    Pathology from evolutionary conflict, with a theory of X chromosome versus autosome conflict over extreme, pathological expression. In this regard, pathology reveals hidden evolutionary design. We first and the autosomes may be associated with various pathologies caused by extreme expression along the male­female axis

  5. Contrasting X-Linked and Autosomal Diversity across 14 Human Populations

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    ARTICLE Contrasting X-Linked and Autosomal Diversity across 14 Human Populations Leonardo Arbiza,1) populations. X/A diversity increases in all populations with increasing distance from genes, highlighting and the autosomes (Nx / NA). Recent studies by Hammer et al. have observed X/A diversity in human populations

  6. Rapid communication Joint match probabilities for Y chromosomal and autosomal markers

    E-print Network

    Walsh, Bruce

    Rapid communication Joint match probabilities for Y chromosomal and autosomal markers Bruce Walsh539, D18S512, D21S11 and Y chromosome haplotypes from loci DYS19, DYS385ab, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390. # 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Y chromosome; Autosomal loci; Y-STR; STR

  7. A gene for autosomal dominant progressive cone dystrophy (CORD5) maps to chromosome 17p12-p13

    SciTech Connect

    Balciuniene, J.; Holmgren, G.; Forsman, K.

    1995-11-20

    Inherited retinal dystrophy is a common cause of visual impairment. Cone dystrophy affects the cone function and is manifested as progressive loss of the central vision, defective color vision, and photophobia. Linkage was demonstrated between progressive cone dystrophy (CORD5) and genetic markers on chromosome 17p12-p13 in a five-generation family. Multipoint analysis gave a maximum lod score of 7.72 at the marker D17S938. Recombinant haplotypes in the family suggest that the cone dystrophy locus is located in a 25-cM interval between the markers D17S926/D17S849 and D17S804/D17S945. Furthermore, one recombination was detected between the disease locus and a microsatellite marker in the candidate gene RCV1, encoding the retinal protein recoverin. Two additional candidate genes encoding retinal guanylate cyclase (GUC2D) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) are located at 17p13.1. Moreover, loci for retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis have been mapped to the same region. Identification of the cone dystrophy locus may be of importance not only for identifying functional genes in the cone system, but also for identifying genes for other retinal disorders. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 70:10441048, 2002 A New Susceptibility Locus for Autosomal Dominant Pancreatic Cancer

    E-print Network

    Kruglyak, Leonid

    Pancreatic Cancer Maps to Chromosome 4q32-34 Michael A. Eberle,1,* Roland Pfu¨tzer,5,*, Kay L. Pogue-Geile,5 of Pittsburgh, and 6 Veterans Administration Pittsburgh Health Care System, Pittsburgh Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Nearly every person diagnosed with pancreatic

  9. Genetic mutation, linkage and heterogeneity analysis in Spanish pedigrees and isolated cases of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA)

    SciTech Connect

    Volpini, V.; Matilla, T.; Genis, D.

    1994-09-01

    We report a genetic study of 14 Spanish kindreds and 11 isolated cases with SCA. The diagnosis was ascertained in 60 members, but clinical data were only obtained for 35 of them. One defective gene responsible for the disease was localized to 6p22-p23 (SCA1) and the mutation consists of an expansion of an intragenic (CAG){sub n} repeat (REP). We studied all of our genealogical and isolated affected individuals in order to know their 6p mutational status. Thus we detected a large pedigree which has the pathological expansion with {open_quotes}n{close_quotes} in the range of 41 to 57 repeats. The expansion increases through generations and correlates with anticipation. In the Spanish population, the non-pathological range of {open_quotes}n{close_quotes} is from 6 to 39 repeats. These sequences are {open_quotes}protected{close_quotes} having an interrupted repeat configuration, studied by restriction and sequencing analysis. This mutation was not present in the genealogical or isolated affected individuals studied. We also tested our families with the recently reported CAG expansion in 12p-12ter (DRPLA) and obtained negative results. Linkage analysis in non-SCA1, DRPLA families using markers from others chromosomal regions, 12q23-24.1 (SCA2) and 14q24.3-q32 (SCA3), results in negative lod scores and shows genetic heterogeneity in our population.

  10. R298Q mutation of p63 gene in autosomal dominant ectodermal dysplasia associated with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Valenzise, Mariella; Arrigo, Teresa; De Luca, Francesco; Privitera, Agata; Frigiola, Alessandro; Carando, Adriana; Garelli, Emanuela; Silengo, Margherita

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the p63 gene have been identified in five types of syndromic ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) with overlapping phenotypes: Ectrodactyly-Ectodermal dysplasia-Clefting (EEC syndrome, MIM 604292), Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal dysplasia-Clefting (AEC syndrome, MIM 106260) [3], Acro-Dermato-Ungueal-Lacrimal-Tooth (ADULT syndrome, MIM 103285), Rapp-Hodgkin (RHS syndrome, MIM 129400) and Limb-Mammary (LMS syndrome, MIM 603543) [2]. In all those conditions congenital heart defects have been only occasionally found and to date, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVC) has never been observed in patients affected by p63-related ectodermal dysplasia [9]. Here we describe for the first time this association. PMID:18603493

  11. SCN4A pore mutation pathogenetically contributes to autosomal dominant essential tremor and may increase susceptibility to epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bergareche, Alberto; Bednarz, Marcin; Sánchez, Elena; Krebs, Catharine E; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; De La Riva, Patricia; Makarov, Vladimir; Gorostidi, Ana; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Marti-Masso, Jose Felix; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2015-12-15

    Essential tremor (ET) is the most prevalent movement disorder, affecting millions of people in the USA. Although a positive family history is one of the most important risk factors for ET, the genetic causes of ET remain unknown. In an attempt to identify genetic causes for ET, we performed whole-exome sequencing analyses in a large Spanish family with ET, in which two patients also developed epilepsy. To further assess pathogenicity, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse and human brain expression analyses, and patch clamp techniques were performed. A disease-segregating mutation (p.Gly1537Ser) in the SCN4A gene was identified. Posterior functional analyses demonstrated that more rapid kinetics at near-threshold potentials altered ion selectivity and facilitated the conductance of both potassium and ammonium ions, which could contribute to tremor and increase susceptibility to epilepsy, respectively. In this report, for the first time, we associated the genetic variability of SCN4A with the development of essential tremor, which adds ET to the growing list of neurological channelopathies. PMID:26427606

  12. A novel mutation in the major intrinsic protein (MIP) associated with autosomal dominant congenital cataracts in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Jiang, Jin; Zhu, Yanan; Li, Jinyu; Jin, Chongfei; Shentu, Xingchao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To detect the underlying genetic defect in a Chinese family affected with bilateral congenital cataracts. Methods A detailed family history and clinical data were recorded. Mutation screening was performed in the nuclear cataract-related gene by bidirectional sequencing of the amplified products. The mutation was verified by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). Results Two cataract phenotypes were observed within this family: one eye exhibited Y-suture and nuclear pulverulent opacification of the lens, while the others exhibited complete opacification in the fetal nuclear region. Sequencing of the candidate genes detected a heterozygous c.319G>A change in the coding region of the major intrinsic protein (MIP), resulting in the substitution of a highly conserved Valine by Isoleucine (p.V107I).The mutation was confirmed by DHPLC. Conclusions This study has identified a novel MIP mutation, p.V107I in a Chinese family with congenital cataracts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cataracts caused by a mutation in the second extracellular loop domain of MIP. PMID:20361015

  13. The prevalence of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) in the west of Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Razvi, S; Davidson, R; Bone, I; Muir, K

    2005-01-01

    Methods: A register for CADASIL was established at a regional neurosciences centre in 2002. All patients with genetically (exons 3, 4, 5, and 6) or histologically confirmed CADASIL residing in two defined administrative health areas were identified. Pedigree members at varying risk of carrying the mutation were also identified and the number of probable Notch3 mutation carriers in the defined population was predicted. Prevalence was calculated for definite CADASIL cases, with and without probable carrier numbers, based upon adult population figures from the 2002 national census. Results: Twenty two individuals from seven pedigrees with confirmed CADASIL and resident in the defined geographical area were identified, yielding a prevalence of 1.98 (95% confidence interval 1.24–3.00) per 100 000 adults. An additional 37 individuals were predicted to be carriers of the Notch3 mutation, yielding a probable mutation prevalence of 4.14 (3.04–5.53) per 100 000 adults. Conclusions: The prevalence of genetically proven CADASIL was 1.98 per 100 000 adults in the defined population. This figure underestimates disease burden. PMID:15834040

  14. Exome sequencing identifies a DNAJB6 mutation in a family with dominantly-inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    E-print Network

    Straight, Aaron

    . Introduction Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD1) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. LGMD1 often presents with progressive proximal muscle weakness of the upper associated with LGMD1, including the MYOT gene encoding myotilin in LGMD1A [2], the LMNA gene encoding lamin

  15. Yeast model analysis of novel polymerase gamma variants found in patients with autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Kaliszewska, Magdalena; Kruszewski, Jakub; Kierdaszuk, Biruta; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Nojszewska, Monika; ?usakowska, Anna; Vizueta, Joel; Sabat, Dorota; Lutyk, Dorota; Lower, Micha?; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, Dorota; Kaniak-Golik, Aneta; Pronicka, Ewa; Kami?ska, Anna; Bartnik, Ewa; Golik, Pawe?; To?ska, Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    Replication of the mitochondrial genome depends on the single DNA polymerase (pol gamma). Mutations in the POLG gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of the human polymerase gamma, have been linked to a wide variety of mitochondrial disorders that show remarkable heterogeneity, with more than 200 sequence variants, often very rare, found in patients. The pathogenicity and dominance status of many such mutations remain, however, unclear. Remarkable structural and functional conservation of human POLG and its S. cerevisiae ortholog (Mip1p) led to the development of many successful yeast models, enabling to study the phenotype of putative pathogenic mutations. In a group of patients with suspicion of mitochondrial pathology, we identified five novel POLG sequence variants, four of which (p.Arg869Ter, p.Gln968Glu, p.Thr1053Argfs*6, and p.Val1106Ala), together with one previously known but uncharacterised variant (p.Arg309Cys), were amenable to modelling in yeast. Familial analysis indicated causal relationship of these variants with disease, consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. To investigate the effect of these sequence changes on mtDNA replication, we obtained the corresponding yeast mip1 alleles (Arg265Cys, Arg672Ter, Arg770Glu, Thr809Ter, and Val863Ala, respectively) and tested their effect on mitochondrial genome stability and replication fidelity. For three of them (Arg265Cys, Arg672Ter, and Thr809Ter), we observed a strong, partially dominant phenotype of a complete loss of functional mtDNA, whereas the remaining two led to partial mtDNA depletion and significant increase in point mutation frequencies. These results show good correlation with the severity of symptoms observed in patients and allow to establish these variants as pathogenic mutations. PMID:26077851

  16. Language after dominant hemispherectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gott, Piggy S.

    1973-01-01

    Linguistic and related cognitive abilities were investigated two years after dominant left hemispherectomy for cerebral malignancy in a 12 year old female. Auditory comprehension of speech was superior to other modes of language abilities with expressive speech being the least developed. Findings suggested an isolation or non-communication between the systems for speaking and for writing and visual perception. It was concluded that language mechanisms in the right hemisphere were not just at a low level of development of the functions found in the dominant hemisphere but were modified as a result of interference by preexistent spatioperceptual systems. Images PMID:4772723

  17. Evidence for the existence of a fourth dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxia locus

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cendes, I. Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec McGill Univ., Quebec ); Andermann, E. McGill Univ., Quebec ); Rouleau, G.A. Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec )

    1994-05-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders. To date, three loci have been identified: The SCA1 locus (on chr 6p), the SCA2 locus (on chr 12q), and more recently a Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) locus (on chr 14q). The authors have studied one large French-Canadian kindred with four generations of living affected individuals segregating an autosomal dominant form of SCA. Linkage analysis using anonymous DNA markers that flank the three previously described loci significantly exclude the French-Canadian kindred from the SCA1, SCA2, and MJD loci. Therefore, a fourth, still unmapped SCA locus remains to be identified. In addition, the unique clinical phenotype present in all affected individuals of the French-Canadian kindred might be characteristic of this still unmapped SCA locus. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Domination game Bostjan Bresar

    E-print Network

    KlavÂ?ar, Sandi

    .rall@furman.edu January 8, 2009 Abstract The domination game played on a graph G consists of two players, Domina- tor in as few steps as possible and Staller wishes to delay the process as much as possible. The game domina

  19. Iron dominated magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  20. Mutations in HPCA Cause Autosomal-Recessive Primary Isolated Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Angelova, Plamena R.; Bartolomé-Robledo, Fernando; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Daniah; Stamelou, Maria; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Reports of primary isolated dystonia inherited in an autosomal-recessive (AR) manner, often lumped together as “DYT2 dystonia,” have appeared in the scientific literature for several decades, but no genetic cause has been identified to date. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous kindred affected by AR isolated dystonia, we identified homozygous mutations in HPCA, a gene encoding a neuronal calcium sensor protein found almost exclusively in the brain and at particularly high levels in the striatum, as the cause of disease in this family. Subsequently, compound-heterozygous mutations in HPCA were also identified in a second independent kindred affected by AR isolated dystonia. Functional studies suggest that hippocalcin might play a role in regulating voltage-dependent calcium channels. The identification of mutations in HPCA as a cause of AR primary isolated dystonia paves the way for further studies to assess whether “DYT2 dystonia” is a genetically homogeneous condition or not. PMID:25799108

  1. Linkage of autosomal recessive lamellar ichthyosis to chromosome 14q

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.J.; Compton, J.G.; Bale, S.J.; DiGiovanna, J.J.; Hashem, N.

    1994-12-01

    The authors have mapped the locus for lamellar ichthyosis (LI), an autosomal recessive skin disease characterized by abnormal cornification of the epidermis. Analysis using both inbred and outbred families manifesting severe LI showed complete linkage to several markers within a 9.3-cM region on chromosome 14q11. Affected individuals in inbred families were also found to have striking homozygosity for markers in this region. Linkage-based genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis is now available for informative at-risk families. Several transcribed genes have been mapped to the chromosome 14 region containing the LI gene. The transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1), which encodes one of the enzymes responsible for cross-linking epidermal proteins during formation of the stratum corneum, maps to this interval. The TGM1 locus was completely linked to LI (Z = 9.11), suggesting that TGM1 is a good candidate for further investigation of this disorder. The genes for four serine proteases also map to this region but are expressed only in hematopoietic or mast cells, making them less likely candidates.

  2. Autosomal mutations affecting adhesion between wing surfaces in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Prout, M; Damania, Z; Soong, J; Fristrom, D; Fristrom, J W

    1997-05-01

    Integrins are evolutionarily conserved transmembrane alpha,beta heterodimeric receptors involved in cell-to-matrix and cell-to-cell adhesions. In Drosophila the position-specific (PS) integrins mediate the formation and maintenance of junctions between muscle and epidermis and between the two epidermal wing surfaces. Besides integrins, other proteins are implicated in integrin-dependent adhesion. In Drosophila, somatic clones of mutations in PS integrin genes disrupt adhesion between wing surfaces to produce wing blisters. To identify other genes whose products function in adhesion between wing surfaces, we conducted a screen for autosomal mutations that produce blisters in somatic wing clones. We isolated 76 independent mutations in 25 complementation groups, 15 of which contain more than one allele. Chromosomal sites were determined by deficiency mapping, and genetic interactions with mutations in the beta PS integrin gene myospheroid were investigated. Mutations in four known genes (blistered, Delta, dumpy and mastermind) were isolated. Mutations were isolated in three new genes (piopio, rhea and steamer duck) that affect myo-epidermal junctions or muscle function in embryos. Mutations in three other genes (kakapo, kiwi and moa) may also affect cell adhesion or muscle function at hatching. These new mutants provide valuable material for the study of integrin-dependent cell-to-cell adhesion. PMID:9136017

  3. SLC7A14 linked to autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zi-Bing; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Lv, Ji-Neng; Xiang, Lue; Li, Dong-Qing; Chen, Jiangfei; Huang, Changjiang; Wu, Jinyu; Lu, Fan; Qu, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is characterized by degeneration of the retinal photoreceptors and is the leading cause of inherited blindness worldwide. Although few genes are known to cause autosomal recessive RP (arRP), a large proportion of disease-causing genes remain to be revealed. Here we report the identification of SLC7A14, a potential cationic transporter, as a novel gene linked to arRP. Using exome sequencing and direct screening of 248 unrelated patients with arRP, we find that mutations in the SLC7A14 gene account for 2% of cases of arRP. We further demonstrate that SLC7A14 is specifically expressed in the photoreceptor layer of the mammalian retina and its expression increases during postnatal retinal development. In zebrafish, downregulation of slc7a14 expression leads to an abnormal eye phenotype and defective light-induced locomotor response. Furthermore, targeted knockout of Slc7a14 in mice results in retinal degeneration with abnormal ERG response. This suggests that SLC7A14 has an important role in retinal development and visual function. PMID:24670872

  4. [Dominant Thalamus and Aphasia].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Akiko; Shimomura, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have shown that lesions of the dominant thalamus precipitate language disorders in a similar manner to transcortical aphasias, in a phenomenon known as "thalamic aphasia." In some cases, however, aphasia may not occur or may appear transiently following thalamic lesions. Furthermore, dominant thalamic lesions can produce changes in character, as observed in patients with amnesic disorder. Previous work has explored the utility of thalamic aphasia as a discriminative feature for classification of aphasia. Although the thalamus may be involved in the function of the brainstem reticular activating system and play a role in attentional network and in memory of Papez circuit or Yakovlev circuit, the mechanism by which thalamic lesion leads to the emergence of aphasic disorders is unclear. In this review, we we survey historical and recent literature on thalamic aphasia in an attempt to understand the neural processes affected by thalamic lesions. PMID:26618763

  5. Close genetic relationships in vast territories: autosomal and X chromosome Alu diversity in Yakuts from Siberia.

    PubMed

    Rocañín-Arjó, Ares; Rodríguez-Botigué, Laura; Esteban, Esther; Theves, Catherine; Evdokimova, Larissa E; Fedorova, Sardana A; Gibert, Morgane; Crubezy, Eric; Moral, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Twelve autosomal and 8 X chromosome Alu markers were genotyped for the first time in 161 Central and West Yakuts to test their ability to reconstruct the genetic history of these populations, the northernmost Turkic-speaker ethnic group living in Siberia. Autosomal data revealed that both groups showed extremely close genetic distances to other populations of Siberian origins that occupied areas from Lake Baikal, the ancestral place of origin of Yakuts, to North Siberia, their current territories. Autosomal and X chromosome data revealed some discrepancies on the genetic differentiation and the effective sizes of Central and West Yakuts. Such discrepancies could be related to the patrilineal and occasionally polygamous structure of these populations. Autosomal and X Alu markers are informative markers to reconstruct population past demography and history, but their utility is limited by the available data. This study represents a contribution for further investigations on these populations. PMID:24466640

  6. A Primary Male Autosomal Linkage Map of the Horse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Gabriella; Sandberg, Kaj; Persson, Helena; Marklund, Stefan; Breen, Matthew; Sandgren, Björn; Carlstén, Johan; Ellegren, Hans

    1998-01-01

    A primary male autosomal linkage map of the domestic horse (Equus caballus) has been developed by segregation analysis of 140 genetic markers within eight half-sib families. The family material comprised four Standardbred trotters and four Icelandic horses, with a total of 263 offspring. The marker set included 121 microsatellite markers, eight protein polymorphisms, five RFLPs, three blood group polymorphisms, two PCR–RFLPs, and one single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). One hundred markers were arranged into 25 linkage groups, 22 of which could be assigned physically to 18 different chromosomes (ECA1, ECA2, ECA3, ECA4, ECA5, ECA6, ECA7, ECA9, ECA10, ECA11, ECA13, ECA15, ECA16, ECA18, ECA19, ECA21, ECA22, and ECA30). The average distance between linked markers was 12.6 cM and the longest linkage group measured 103 cM. The total map distance contained within linkage groups was 679 cM. If the distances covered outside the ends of linkage groups and by unlinked markers were included, it was estimated that the marker set covered at least 1500 cM, that is, at least 50% of the genome. A comparison of the relationship between genetic and physical distances in anchored linkage groups gave ratios of 0.5–0.8 cM per Mb of DNA. This would suggest that the total male recombinational distance in the horse is 2000 cM; this value is lower than that suggested by chiasma counts. The present map should provide an important framework for future genome mapping in the horse. PMID:9750194

  7. Rapid detection of autosomal aneuploidy using microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P.N.; Teshima, I.E.; Winsor, E.J.T.

    1994-09-01

    Trisomy occurs in at least 4% of all clinically recognized pregnancies, making it the most common type of chromosome abnormality in humans. The most commonly occurring trisomies are those of chromosomes 13, 18, 21 and aneuploidy of X and Y, accounting for about 0.3% of all newborns and a much higher percentage of conceptuses. In Canada, prenatal chromosome analysis by amniocentesis is offered to those women {ge} 35 years of age at the time of delivery or equivalent risk by maternal serum screen. We are developing a rapid molecular diagnostic test to detect the most common autosomal aneuploidies in prenatal and neonatal samples. The tests makes use of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat markers labeled with fluorescent tags which allow analysis on a GENESCANNER automated fragment analyzer (ABI). Multiple polymorphic markers have been selected on each of chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. At a given locus, trisomic fetuses/neonates will have either three alleles or two alleles with one allele having twice the intensity of the other. Unaffected individuals have two equal intensity alleles. We are conducting a blind study that will compare the detection efficiencies of FISH analysis on uncultured cells and the molecular method on confirmation amniotic fluid samples collected at the time of termination of affected fetuses. Results on cultured amniocytes from one such patient confirmed that trisomy 21 can be detected. FISH was not done on this sample. In addition, detection efficiency of the molecular method in whole blood samples from affected neonates is also being studied. To date, two such samples have been tested, one with trisomy 13 and one with trisomy 18, and both samples were diagnosed correctly. Preliminary results suggest that this method may provide a valuable tool for the rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy.

  8. J.M. Butler ISFG 2007 Talk New Autosomal and Y-Chromosome STR Loci

    E-print Network

    J.M. Butler ­ ISFG 2007 Talk New Autosomal and Y-Chromosome STR Loci August 22, 2007 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/NISTpub.htm 1 New Autosomal and Y-Chromosome STR Loci John M. Butler, Carolyn R. "Becky" Hill, Amy E. Decker AMEL_X 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 X Y Chromosome Location (relative

  9. Developing an international network for Alzheimer research: The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network

    PubMed Central

    Morris, John C.; Aisen, Paul S.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Fagan, Anne M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Goate, Alison M.; Holtzman, David M.; Klunk, William E.; McDade, Eric; Marcus, Daniel S.; Martins, Ralph N.; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard; Oliver, Angela; Quaid, Kimberly; Ringman, John M.; Rossor, Martin N.; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R.; Selsor, Natalie J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Weiner, Michael W.; Xiong, Chengjie; Moulder, Krista L.; Buckles, Virginia D.

    2012-01-01

    The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) is a collaborative effort of international Alzheimer disease (AD) centers that are conducting a multifaceted prospective biomarker study in individuals at-risk for autosomal dominant AD (ADAD). DIAN collects comprehensive information and tissue in accordance with standard protocols from asymptomatic and symptomatic ADAD mutation carriers and their non-carrier family members to determine the pathochronology of clinical, cognitive, neuroimaging, and fluid biomarkers of AD. This article describes the structure, implementation, and underlying principles of DIAN, as well as the demographic features of the initial DIAN cohort. PMID:23139856

  10. Dominant Epistemologies in Mathematics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triadafillidis, Triadafillos A.

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the relationship between scientism and the dominant epistemologies in the field of mathematics education today. Suggests that the dominance of Cartesianism in mathematics education can be balanced by means of incorporating humanist philosophies. Contains 30 references. (ASK)

  11. X inactivation in triploidy and trisomy: the search for autosomal transfactors that choose the active X.

    PubMed

    Migeon, Barbara R; Pappas, Kara; Stetten, Gail; Trunca, Carolyn; Jacobs, Patricia A

    2008-02-01

    Only one X chromosome functions in diploid human cells irrespective of the sex of the individual and the number of X chromosomes. Yet, as we show, more than one X is active in the majority of human triploid cells. Therefore, we suggest that (i) the active X is chosen by repression of its XIST locus, (ii) the repressor is encoded by an autosome and is dosage sensitive, and (iii) the extra dose of this key repressor enables the expression of more than one X in triploid cells. Because autosomal trisomies might help locate the putative dosage sensitive trans-acting factor, we looked for two active X chromosomes in such cells. Previously, we reported that females trisomic for 18 different human autosomes had only one active X and a normal inactive X chromosome. Now we report the effect of triplication of the four autosomes not studied previously; data about these rare trisomies - full or partial - were used to identify autosomal regions relevant to the choice of active X. We find that triplication of the entire chromosomes 5 and 11 and parts of chromosomes 1 and 19 is associated with normal patterns of X inactivation, excluding these as candidate regions. However, females with inherited triplications of 1p21.3-q25.3, 1p31 and 19p13.2-q13.33 were not ascertained. Thus, if a single key dose-sensitive gene induces XIST repression, it could reside in one of these locations. Alternatively, more than one dosage-sensitive autosomal locus is required to form the repressor complex. PMID:17971834

  12. TMEM126A, encoding a mitochondrial protein, is mutated in autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic optic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Hanein, Sylvain; Perrault, Isabelle; Roche, Olivier; Gerber, Sylvie; Khadom, Noman; Rio, Marlene; Boddaert, Nathalie; Jean-Pierre, Marc; Brahimi, Nora; Serre, Valérie; Chretien, Dominique; Delphin, Nathalie; Fares-Taie, Lucas; Lachheb, Sahran; Rotig, Agnès; Meire, Françoise; Munnich, Arnold; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2009-04-01

    Nonsyndromic autosomal-recessive optic neuropathies are rare conditions of unknown genetic and molecular origin. Using an approach of whole-genome homozygosity mapping and positional cloning, we have identified the first gene, to our knowledge, responsible for this condition, TMEM126A, in a large multiplex inbred Algerian family and subsequently in three other families originating from the Maghreb. TMEM126A is conserved in higher eukaryotes and encodes a transmembrane mitochondrial protein of unknown function, supporting the view that mitochondrial dysfunction may be a hallmark of inherited optic neuropathies including isolated autosomal-recessive forms. PMID:19327736

  13. Lethal osteochondrodysplasia and de novo autosomal translocation involving the long arm of chromosome 4

    SciTech Connect

    Fryns, J.P.; Legius, E.; Van den Berghe, H.; Moerman, P.; Vandenberghe, K.; Maroteaux, P.

    1994-06-01

    Recently, we diagnosed a de noco t(4q;11q) with apparent breakpoints at 4q23 and 11q13 [karyotype: 46,XX,t(4;11)(q23;q13)] in a first trimester female fetus with a lethal chondrodysplasia. After the observation reported by Urioste et al. (1994) the presena finding of a de novo autosomal translocation with one breakpoint in the proximal part of 4q in another fetus with lethal osteochondrodysplasia may be a further indication toward the possible location of a gene cluster in this autosomal region. 1 ref.

  14. Loss-of-Function Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutations Cause an Autosomal-Recessive Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy with Persistent Myelination Defect

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Cas; Griffin, Laurie B.; Helman, Guy; Golas, Gretchen; Pizzino, Amy; Bloom, Miriam; Murphy, Jennifer L.P.; Crawford, Joanna; Evans, Sarah H.; Topper, Scott; Whitehead, Matthew T.; Schreiber, John M.; Chapman, Kimberly A.; Tifft, Cyndi; Lu, Katrina B.; Gamper, Howard; Shigematsu, Megumi; Taft, Ryan J.; Antonellis, Anthony; Hou, Ya-Ming; Vanderver, Adeline

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are known to cause leukodystrophies and genetic leukoencephalopathies—heritable disorders that result in white matter abnormalities in the central nervous system. Here we report three individuals (two siblings and an unrelated individual) with severe infantile epileptic encephalopathy, clubfoot, absent deep tendon reflexes, extrapyramidal symptoms, and persistently deficient myelination on MRI. Analysis by whole exome sequencing identified mutations in the nuclear-encoded alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) in these two unrelated families: the two affected siblings are compound heterozygous for p.Lys81Thr and p.Arg751Gly AARS, and the single affected child is homozygous for p.Arg751Gly AARS. The two identified mutations were found to result in a significant reduction in function. Mutations in AARS were previously associated with an autosomal-dominant inherited form of axonal neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2N (CMT2N). The autosomal-recessive AARS mutations identified in the individuals described here, however, cause a severe infantile epileptic encephalopathy with a central myelin defect and peripheral neuropathy, demonstrating that defects of alanyl-tRNA charging can result in a wide spectrum of disease manifestations. PMID:25817015

  15. Magnetic resonance microscopy of renal and biliary abnormalities in excised tissues from a mouse model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choong H; O’Connor, Amber K; Yang, Chaozhe; Tate, Joshua M; Schoeb, Trenton R; Flint, Jeremy J; Blackband, Stephen J; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is transmitted as either an autosomal dominant or recessive trait and is a major cause of renal failure and liver fibrosis. The cpk mouse model of autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD) has been extensively characterized using standard histopathological techniques after euthanasia. In the current study, we sought to validate magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) as a robust tool for assessing the ARPKD phenotype. We used MRM to evaluate the liver and kidney of wild-type and cpk animals at resolutions <100 ?m and generated three-dimensional (3D) renderings for pathological evaluation. Our study demonstrates that MRM is an excellent method for evaluating the complex, 3D structural defects in this ARPKD mouse model. We found that MRM was equivalent to water displacement in assessing kidney volume. Additionally, using MRM we demonstrated for the first time that the cpk liver exhibits less extensive ductal arborization, that it was reduced in volume, and that the ductal volume was disproportionately smaller. Histopathology indicates that this is a consequence of bile duct malformation. With its reduced processing time, volumetric information, and 3D capabilities, MRM will be a useful tool for future in vivo and longitudinal studies of disease progression in ARPKD. In addition, MRM will provide a unique tool to determine whether the human disease shares the newly appreciated features of the murine biliary phenotype. PMID:26320214

  16. Magnetic resonance microscopy of renal and biliary abnormalities in excised tissues from a mouse model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choong H; O'Connor, Amber K; Yang, Chaozhe; Tate, Joshua M; Schoeb, Trenton R; Flint, Jeremy J; Blackband, Stephen J; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is transmitted as either an autosomal dominant or recessive trait and is a major cause of renal failure and liver fibrosis. The cpk mouse model of autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD) has been extensively characterized using standard histopathological techniques after euthanasia. In the current study, we sought to validate magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) as a robust tool for assessing the ARPKD phenotype. We used MRM to evaluate the liver and kidney of wild-type and cpk animals at resolutions <100 ?m and generated three-dimensional (3D) renderings for pathological evaluation. Our study demonstrates that MRM is an excellent method for evaluating the complex, 3D structural defects in this ARPKD mouse model. We found that MRM was equivalent to water displacement in assessing kidney volume. Additionally, using MRM we demonstrated for the first time that the cpk liver exhibits less extensive ductal arborization, that it was reduced in volume, and that the ductal volume was disproportionately smaller. Histopathology indicates that this is a consequence of bile duct malformation. With its reduced processing time, volumetric information, and 3D capabilities, MRM will be a useful tool for future in vivo and longitudinal studies of disease progression in ARPKD. In addition, MRM will provide a unique tool to determine whether the human disease shares the newly appreciated features of the murine biliary phenotype. PMID:26320214

  17. Loss-of-function alanyl-tRNA synthetase mutations cause an autosomal-recessive early-onset epileptic encephalopathy with persistent myelination defect.

    PubMed

    Simons, Cas; Griffin, Laurie B; Helman, Guy; Golas, Gretchen; Pizzino, Amy; Bloom, Miriam; Murphy, Jennifer L P; Crawford, Joanna; Evans, Sarah H; Topper, Scott; Whitehead, Matthew T; Schreiber, John M; Chapman, Kimberly A; Tifft, Cyndi; Lu, Katrina B; Gamper, Howard; Shigematsu, Megumi; Taft, Ryan J; Antonellis, Anthony; Hou, Ya-Ming; Vanderver, Adeline

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are known to cause leukodystrophies and genetic leukoencephalopathies-heritable disorders that result in white matter abnormalities in the central nervous system. Here we report three individuals (two siblings and an unrelated individual) with severe infantile epileptic encephalopathy, clubfoot, absent deep tendon reflexes, extrapyramidal symptoms, and persistently deficient myelination on MRI. Analysis by whole exome sequencing identified mutations in the nuclear-encoded alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) in these two unrelated families: the two affected siblings are compound heterozygous for p.Lys81Thr and p.Arg751Gly AARS, and the single affected child is homozygous for p.Arg751Gly AARS. The two identified mutations were found to result in a significant reduction in function. Mutations in AARS were previously associated with an autosomal-dominant inherited form of axonal neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2N (CMT2N). The autosomal-recessive AARS mutations identified in the individuals described here, however, cause a severe infantile epileptic encephalopathy with a central myelin defect and peripheral neuropathy, demonstrating that defects of alanyl-tRNA charging can result in a wide spectrum of disease manifestations. PMID:25817015

  18. Defective splicing of Megf7/Lrp4, a regulator of distal limb development, in autosomal recessive mulefoot disease

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    Defective splicing of Megf7/Lrp4, a regulator of distal limb development, in autosomal recessive August 2006 Available online 11 September 2006 Abstract Mulefoot disease (MFD) is an autosomal recessive contains MEGF7/LRP4 (approved gene symbol LRP4), a gene that encodes a member of the multifunctional low

  19. Spread of X-chromosome inactivation into autosomal sequences: role for DNA elements, chromatin features and chromosomal domains.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Allison M; Chen, Chih-Yu; Lam, Lucia L; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Kobor, Michael S; Brown, Carolyn J

    2014-03-01

    X-chromosome inactivation results in dosage equivalence between the X chromosome in males and females; however, over 15% of human X-linked genes escape silencing and these genes are enriched on the evolutionarily younger short arm of the X chromosome. The spread of inactivation onto translocated autosomal material allows the study of inactivation without the confounding evolutionary history of the X chromosome. The heterogeneity and reduced extent of silencing on autosomes are evidence for the importance of DNA elements underlying the spread of silencing. We have assessed DNA methylation in six unbalanced X-autosome translocations using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 array. Two to 42% of translocated autosomal genes showed this mark of silencing, with the highest degree of inactivation observed for trisomic autosomal regions. Generally, the extent of silencing was greatest close to the translocation breakpoint; however, silencing was detected well over 100 kb into the autosomal DNA. Alu elements were found to be enriched at autosomal genes that escaped from inactivation while L1s were enriched at subject genes. In cells without the translocation, there was enrichment of heterochromatic features such as EZH2 and H3K27me3 for those genes that become silenced when translocated, suggesting that underlying chromatin structure predisposes genes towards silencing. Additionally, the analysis of topological domains indicated physical clustering of autosomal genes of common inactivation status. Overall, our analysis indicated a complex interaction between DNA sequence, chromatin features and the three-dimensional structure of the chromosome. PMID:24158853

  20. Comparative genetic mapping in Fragaria virginiana reveals autosomal origin of sex chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although most flowering plants are hermaphrodite, separate sexes (dioecy) have evolved repeatedly. The evolution of sex chromosomes from autosomes can often, but not always, accompany this transition. Thus, many have argued that plant genera that contain both hermaphroditic and dioecious members pro...

  1. Mutations in phospholipase DDHD2 cause autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG54)

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Michael; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Kornblum, Cornelia; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; Walter, Jochen; Konidari, Ioanna; Hulme, William; Speziani, Fiorella; Schöls, Ludger; Züchner, Stephan; Schüle, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a distal axonopathy of the corticospinal tract motor neurons leading to progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. Intracellular membrane trafficking, mitochondrial dysfunction and myelin formation are key functions involved in HSP pathogenesis. Only recently defects in metabolism of complex lipids have been implicated in a number of HSP subtypes. Mutations in the 23 known autosomal recessive HSP genes explain less than half of autosomal recessive HSP cases. To identify novel autosomal recessive HSP disease genes, exome sequencing was performed in 79 index cases with autosomal recessive forms of HSP. Resulting variants were filtered and intersected between families to allow identification of new disease genes. We identified two deleterious mutations in the phospholipase DDHD2 gene in two families with complicated HSP. The phenotype is characterized by early onset of spastic paraplegia, mental retardation, short stature and dysgenesis of the corpus callosum. Phospholipase DDHD2 is involved in intracellular membrane trafficking at the golgi/ endoplasmic reticulum interface and has been shown to possess phospholipase A1 activity in vitro. Discovery of DDHD2 mutations in HSP might therefore provide a link between two key pathogenic themes in HSP: membrane trafficking and lipid metabolism. PMID:23486545

  2. Electrostatic Compensation Restores Trafficking of the Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa E150K Opsin

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    linking recessive RP to a mutation in the opsin gene involved a nonsense mutation at codon 249 within exonElectrostatic Compensation Restores Trafficking of the Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa E-coupled recep- tor responsible for capturing light. Mutations in the gene encod- ing this protein can lead

  3. A Homozygous Mutation in Human PRICKLE1 Causes an Autosomal-Recessive

    E-print Network

    Scott, Matthew

    ARTICLE A Homozygous Mutation in Human PRICKLE1 Causes an Autosomal-Recessive Progressive Myoclonus regulates cell polarization.5 Depleting Prickle genes in the zebrafish embryo alters the convergent of a gene family encoding proteins containing a highly conserved PET domain, which mediates Prickle1-protein

  4. Announcement of Population Data Allele frequencies for 70 autosomal SNP loci with

    E-print Network

    Announcement of Population Data Allele frequencies for 70 autosomal SNP loci with U.S. Caucasian nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). For each sample, the 70 SNP markers were typed in 11 unique 6-plexes-Weinberg equilibrium indicated a statistically significant result. In order to evaluate the minimum number of SNP loci

  5. The Evaluation of an Autosomal SNP 12-plex Assay National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-print Network

    The Evaluation of an Autosomal SNP 12-plex Assay National Institute of Standards and Technology with SNP typing technologies make SNPs attractive for typing degraded DNA or other low copy number situations. SNP markers can be useful in combination with STRs for resolving complex paternity issues (e

  6. De novo origin of VCY2 from autosome to Y-transposed amplicon.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng-Rong; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yu-Chao; Yi, Yin-Sha; Qu, Fang; Liu, Tao-Cheng; Lv, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The formation of new genes is a primary driving force of evolution in all organisms. The de novo evolution of new genes from non-protein-coding genomic regions is emerging as an important additional mechanism for novel gene creation. Y chromosomes underlie sex determination in mammals and contain genes that are required for male-specific functions. In this study, a search was undertaken for Y chromosome de novo genes derived from non-protein-coding sequences. The Y chromosome orphan gene variable charge, Y-linked (VCY)2, is an autosome-derived gene that has sequence similarity to large autosomal fragments but lacks an autosomal protein-coding homolog. VCY2 locates in the amplicon containing long DNA fragments that were transposed from autosomes to the Y chromosome before the ape-monkey split. We confirmed that VCY2 cannot be encoded by autosomes due to the presence of multiple disablers that disrupt the open reading frame, such as the absence of start or stop codons and the presence of premature stop codons. Similar observations have been made for homologs in the autosomes of the chimpanzee, gorilla, rhesus macaque, baboon and out-group marmoset, which suggests that there was a non-protein-coding ancestral VCY2 that was common to apes and monkeys that predated the transposition event. Furthermore, while protein-coding orthologs are absent, a putative non-protein-coding VCY2 with conserved disablers was identified in the rhesus macaque Y chromosome male-specific region. This finding implies that VCY2 might have not acquired its protein-coding ability before the ape-monkey split. VCY2 encodes a testis-specific expressed protein and is involved in the pathologic process of male infertility, and the acquisition of this gene might improve male fertility. This is the first evidence that de novo genes can be generated from transposed autosomal non-protein-coding segments, and this evidence provides novel insights into the evolutionary history of the Y chromosome. PMID:25799347

  7. De Novo Origin of VCY2 from Autosome to Y-Transposed Amplicon

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Peng-Rong; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yu-Chao; Yi, Yin-Sha; Qu, Fang; Liu, Tao-Cheng; Lv, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The formation of new genes is a primary driving force of evolution in all organisms. The de novo evolution of new genes from non-protein-coding genomic regions is emerging as an important additional mechanism for novel gene creation. Y chromosomes underlie sex determination in mammals and contain genes that are required for male-specific functions. In this study, a search was undertaken for Y chromosome de novo genes derived from non-protein-coding sequences. The Y chromosome orphan gene variable charge, Y-linked (VCY)2, is an autosome-derived gene that has sequence similarity to large autosomal fragments but lacks an autosomal protein-coding homolog. VCY2 locates in the amplicon containing long DNA fragments that were transposed from autosomes to the Y chromosome before the ape-monkey split. We confirmed that VCY2cannot be encoded by autosomes due to the presence of multiple disablers that disrupt the open reading frame, such as the absence of start or stop codons and the presence of premature stop codons. Similar observations have been made for homologs in the autosomes of the chimpanzee, gorilla, rhesus macaque, baboon and out-group marmoset, which suggests that there was a non-protein-coding ancestral VCY2 that was common to apes and monkeys that predated the transposition event. Furthermore, while protein-coding orthologs are absent, a putative non-protein-coding VCY2 with conserved disablers was identified in the rhesus macaque Y chromosome male-specific region. This finding implies that VCY2 might have not acquired its protein-coding ability before the ape-monkey split. VCY2 encodes a testis-specific expressed protein and is involved in the pathologic process of male infertility, and the acquisition of this gene might improve male fertility. This is the first evidence that de novo genes can be generated from transposed autosomal non-protein-coding segments, and this evidence provides novel insights into the evolutionary history of the Y chromosome. PMID:25799347

  8. Dominant Leadership Style in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh

    2006-01-01

    The dominant leadership style is defined by the situation and the kind of organizational environment and climate. This, however, does not sufficiently define the leadership qualities in school organizations. There are other factors which also determine the dominant leadership style, which are the traits and style, teachers commitments, pass out…

  9. [Two cases of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with proximal dominant involvement (HMSN-P)].

    PubMed

    Mori, Chiaki; Saito, Tomoko; Saito, Toshio; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Sakoda, Saburo

    2015-01-01

    We, herein, report two independent cases with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with proximal dominant involvement (HMSN-P) inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Their common clinical features are slowly progressive proximal dominant muscular atrophy, fasciculations and mild to moderate distal sensory disturbance with areflexia. Nerve conduction study revealed an absence of sensory nerve action potentials, in contrast to almost normal compound muscle action potentials. Gene analysis in both patients elucidated heterozygous mutation (c.854C>T, p.Pro285Leu) in the TFG, which is an identical mutation, already described by Ishiura et al. Okinawa and Shiga are two foci of HMSN-P in Japan. Eventually, one patient is from Okinawa and the other is from a mountain village in Shiga prefecture. When we see a patient who has symptoms suggestive of motor neuron disease with sensory neuropathy, HMSN-P should be considered as a differential diagnosis despite the patient's actual resident place. PMID:26103812

  10. Lateral Dominance and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Albert J.

    1979-01-01

    Theory and research on the relation of lateral dominance to the causation of reading disability are reviewed. Both direct and indirect measures of cerebral hemisphere functioning are considered. (SBH)

  11. Neural mechanisms of social dominance

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Noriya; Yamamoto, Miyuki

    2015-01-01

    In a group setting, individuals' perceptions of their own level of dominance or of the dominance level of others, and the ability to adequately control their behavior based on these perceptions are crucial for living within a social environment. Recent advances in neural imaging and molecular technology have enabled researchers to investigate the neural substrates that support the perception of social dominance and the formation of a social hierarchy in humans. At the systems' level, recent studies showed that dominance perception is represented in broad brain regions which include the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and various cortical networks such as the prefrontal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, neurotransmitter systems such as the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems, modulate and are modulated by the formation of the social hierarchy in a group. While these monoamine systems have a wide distribution and multiple functions, it was recently found that the Neuropeptide B/W contributes to the perception of dominance and is present in neurons that have a limited projection primarily to the amygdala. The present review discusses the specific roles of these neural regions and neurotransmitter systems in the perception of dominance and in hierarchy formation. PMID:26136644

  12. Ocular dominance columns in strabismus.

    PubMed

    Adams, Daniel L; Horton, Jonathan C

    2006-01-01

    During development, the projection from the lateral geniculate nucleus to striate cortex becomes segregated into monocular regions called ocular dominance columns. Prior studies in cats have suggested that experimental strabismus or alternating monocular occlusion increases the width and segregation of columns. In the squirrel monkey, strabismus has been reported to induce the formation of ocular dominance columns. However, these studies are difficult to interpret because no animal can serve as its own control and the degree of inter-individual variability among normal subjects is considerable. We have re-examined the effect of strabismus on ocular dominance columns in a large group of strabismic and normal squirrel monkeys. Five animals rendered strabismic at age one week had well-developed, widely spaced columns. Among 16 control animals, a wide spectrum of column morphology was encountered. Some control animals lacked ocular dominance columns, whereas others had columns similar to those observed in strabismic animals. Natural variation in column expression in normal squirrel monkeys, and potential uncontrolled genetic influences, made it impossible to determine if strabismus affects ocular dominance columns. It was evident however, that strabismus does not affect the binocular projection from the lateral geniculate nucleus to each CO patch in the upper layers. In strabismic monkeys, just as in normal animals, each patch received input from geniculate afferents serving both the left eye and the right eye. In addition, in strabismic monkeys, as in normal animals, patches were not aligned with ocular dominance columns. PMID:17020634

  13. Genetic ancestry of a Moroccan population as inferred from autosomal STRs

    PubMed Central

    Bentayebi, K.; Abada, F.; Ihzmad, H.; Amzazi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Detecting population substructure and ancestry is a critical issue for both association studies of health behaviors and forensic genetics. Determining aspects of a population's genetic history as potential sources of substructure can aid in design of future genetic studies. Within this context, fifteen autosomal short tandem repeat (STR), were used to examine population genetic structure and hypotheses of the origin of the modern Moroccan population from individuals belonging to three different ethnical groups from Morocco (Arab, Berber and Sahrawi), by comparing their autosomal STR variation with that of neighboring and non-neighboring populations in North Africa, Europe and Middle East as well as proposed ancestral populations in Morocco (Berber). We report on the results that the gradient of North African ancestry accounts for previous observations of low levels of sharing with Near East and a substantially increased gene flow especially from Morocco and Spain. PMID:25606427

  14. Infantile variant of Bartter syndrome and sensorineural deafness: A new autosomal recessive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, D.; Shalev, H.; Carmi, Rivka; Ohaly, M.

    1995-12-04

    The infantile variant of Bartter syndrome (IBS) is usually associated with maternal polyhydramnios, premature birth, postnatal polyuria and hypokalemic hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and a typical appearance. IBS is thought to be an autosomal recessive trait. Several congenital tubular defects are associated with sensorineural deafness (SND). However, an association between the IBS and SND has not been reported so far. Here we describe 5 children of an extended consanguineous Bedouin family with IBS and SND. In 3 of the cases, the typical electrolyte imbalance and facial appearance were detected neonatally. SND was detected as early as age 1 month, suggesting either coincidental homozygotization of 2 recessive genes or a pleiotropic effect of one autosomal recessive gene. This association suggests that evaluation of SND is warranted in every case of IBS. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease caused by deletion at a dinucleotide repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Casimir, C.M.; Bu-Ghanim, H.N.; Rowe, P.; Segal, A.W. ); Rodaway, A.R.F.; Bentley, D.L. )

    1991-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited condition rendering neutrophils incapable of killing invading pathogens. This condition is due to the failure of a multicomponent microbicidal oxidase that normally yields a low-midpoint-potential b cytochrome (cytochrome b{sub 245}). Although defects in the X chromosome-linked cytochrome account for the majority of CGD patients, as many as 30% of CGD cases are due to an autosomal recessive disease. Of these, {gt}90% have been shown to be defective in the synthesis of a 47-kDa cytosolic component of the oxidase. The authors demonstrate here in three unrelated cases of autosomal recessive CGD that the identical underlying molecular lesion is a dinucleotide deletion at a GTGT tandem repeat, corresponding to the acceptor site of the first intron - exon junction. Slippage of the DNA duplex at this site may contribute to the high frequency of defects in this gene.

  16. Genetic ancestry of a Moroccan population as inferred from autosomal STRs.

    PubMed

    Bentayebi, K; Abada, F; Ihzmad, H; Amzazi, S

    2014-12-01

    Detecting population substructure and ancestry is a critical issue for both association studies of health behaviors and forensic genetics. Determining aspects of a population's genetic history as potential sources of substructure can aid in design of future genetic studies. Within this context, fifteen autosomal short tandem repeat (STR), were used to examine population genetic structure and hypotheses of the origin of the modern Moroccan population from individuals belonging to three different ethnical groups from Morocco (Arab, Berber and Sahrawi), by comparing their autosomal STR variation with that of neighboring and non-neighboring populations in North Africa, Europe and Middle East as well as proposed ancestral populations in Morocco (Berber). We report on the results that the gradient of North African ancestry accounts for previous observations of low levels of sharing with Near East and a substantially increased gene flow especially from Morocco and Spain. PMID:25606427

  17. DNA sequences of Alu elements indicate a recent replacement of the human autosomal genetic complement

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, A.; Deininger, P.L.; Batzer, M.A.

    1996-04-30

    DNA sequences of neutral nuclear autosomal loci, compared across diverse human populations, provide a previously untapped perspective into the mode and tempo of the emergence of modern humans and a critical comparison with published clonally inherited mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome measurements of human diversity. We obtained over 55 kilobases of sequence from three autosomal loci encompassing Alu repeats for representatives of diverse human populations as well as orthologous sequences for other hominoid species at one of these loci. Nucleotide diversity was exceedingly low. Most individuals and populations were identical. Only a single nucleotide difference distinguished presumed ancestral alleles from descendants. These results differ from those expected if alleles from divergent archaic populations were maintained through multiregional continuity. The observed virtual lack of sequence polymorphism is the signature of a recent single origin for modern humans, with general replacement of archaic populations. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The Evolving Puzzle of Autosomal Versus Y-linked Male Determination in Musca domestica

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Ronda L.; Meisel, Richard P.; Scott, Jeffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    Sex determination is one of the most rapidly evolving developmental pathways, but the factors responsible for this fast evolution are not well resolved. The house fly, Musca domestica, is an ideal model for studying sex determination because house fly sex determination is polygenic and varies considerably between populations. Male house flies possess a male-determining locus, the M factor, which can be located on the Y or X chromosome or any of the five autosomes. There can be a single M or multiple M factors present in an individual male, in heterozygous or homozygous condition. Males with multiple copies of M skew the sex ratio toward the production of males. Potentially in response to these male-biased sex ratios, an allele of the gene transformer, Md-traD, promotes female development in the presence of one or multiple M factors. There have been many studies to determine the linkage and frequency of these male determining factors and the frequency of Md-traD chromosomes in populations from around the world. This review provides a summary of the information available to date regarding the patterns of distribution of autosomal, X-linked and Y-linked M factors, the relative frequencies of the linkage of M, the changes in frequencies found in field populations, and the fitness of males with autosomal M factors vs. Y-linked M. We evaluate this natural variation in the house fly sex determination pathway in light of models of the evolution of sex determination. PMID:25552607

  19. Allele frequencies of 23 autosomal short tandem repeat loci in the Philippine population.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell Beltran; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Calacal, Gayvelline C; Laude, Rita P; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A

    2015-07-01

    We characterized diversity and forensic descriptive parameters of 23 autosomal STR loci (CSF1PO, D13S317, D16S539, D5S818, D7S820, TPOX, D18S51, D21S11, D3S1358, D8S1179, FGA, TH01, vWA, D1S1656, D10S1248, D12S391, D2S441, D22S1045, D19S433, D2S1338, D6S1043, Penta D and Penta E) among 167 unrelated Filipinos. The most variable autosomal STR loci observed is Penta E (observed heterozygosity: 0.9222, match probability: 0.0167). Results reveal matching probability of 8.21×10(-28) for 23 autosomal STR loci. This dataset for the Philippine population may now be used in evaluating the weight of DNA evidence for forensic applications such as in human identification, parentage/kinship testing, and interpretation of DNA mixtures. PMID:25804725

  20. The origin of Eastern European Jews revealed by autosomal, sex chromosomal and mtDNA polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study aims to establish the likely origin of EEJ (Eastern European Jews) by genetic distance analysis of autosomal markers and haplogroups on the X and Y chromosomes and mtDNA. Results According to the autosomal polymorphisms the investigated Jewish populations do not share a common origin, and EEJ are closer to Italians in particular and to Europeans in general than to the other Jewish populations. The similarity of EEJ to Italians and Europeans is also supported by the X chromosomal haplogroups. In contrast according to the Y-chromosomal haplogroups EEJ are closest to the non-Jewish populations of the Eastern Mediterranean. MtDNA shows a mixed pattern, but overall EEJ are more distant from most populations and hold a marginal rather than a central position. The autosomal genetic distance matrix has a very high correlation (0.789) with geography, whereas the X-chromosomal, Y-chromosomal and mtDNA matrices have a lower correlation (0.540, 0.395 and 0.641 respectively). Conclusions The close genetic resemblance to Italians accords with the historical presumption that Ashkenazi Jews started their migrations across Europe in Italy and with historical evidence that conversion to Judaism was common in ancient Rome. The reasons for the discrepancy between the biparental markers and the uniparental markers are discussed. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Damian Labuda (nominated by Jerzy Jurka), Kateryna Makova and Qasim Ayub (nominated by Dan Graur). PMID:20925954

  1. Genetic Architecture of Autosome-Mediated Hybrid Male Sterility in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Marin, I.

    1996-01-01

    Several estimators have been developed for assesing the number of sterility factors in a chromosome based on the sizes of fertile and sterile introgressed fragments. Assuming that two factors are required for producing sterility, simulations show that one of these, twice the inverse of the relative size of the largest fertile fragment, provides good average approximations when as few as five fertile fragments are analyzed. The estimators have been used for deducing the number of factors from previous data on several pairs of species. A particular result contrasts with the authors' interpretations: instead of the high number of sterility factors suggested, only a few per autosome are estimated in both reciprocal crosses involving Drosophila buzzatii and D. koepferae. It has been possible to map these factors, between three and six per chromosome, in the autosomes 3 and 4 of these species. Out of 203 introgressions of different fragments or combinations of fragments, the outcome of at least 192 is explained by the mapped zones. These results suggest that autosome-mediated sterility in the male hybrids of these species is mediated by a few epistatic factors, similarly to X-mediated sterility in the hybrids of other Drosophila species. PMID:8846896

  2. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26290131

  3. The evolving puzzle of autosomal versus Y-linked male determination in Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Ronda L; Meisel, Richard P; Scott, Jeffrey G

    2015-03-01

    Sex determination is one of the most rapidly evolving developmental pathways, but the factors responsible for this fast evolution are not well resolved. The house fly, Musca domestica, is an ideal model for studying sex determination because house fly sex determination is polygenic and varies considerably between populations. Male house flies possess a male-determining locus, the M factor, which can be located on the Y or X chromosome or any of the five autosomes. There can be a single M or multiple M factors present in an individual male, in heterozygous or homozygous condition. Males with multiple copies of M skew the sex ratio toward the production of males. Potentially in response to these male-biased sex ratios, an allele of the gene transformer, Md-tra(D), promotes female development in the presence of one or multiple M factors. There have been many studies to determine the linkage and frequency of these male determining factors and the frequency of Md-tra(D) chromosomes in populations from around the world. This review provides a summary of the information available to date regarding the patterns of distribution of autosomal, X-linked and Y-linked M factors, the relative frequencies of the linkage of M, the changes in frequencies found in field populations, and the fitness of males with autosomal M factors vs. Y-linked M. We evaluate this natural variation in the house fly sex determination pathway in light of models of the evolution of sex determination. PMID:25552607

  4. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, K. J.; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Dominguez, Jesus H.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA. PMID:26136112

  5. A deficiency screen of the major autosomes identifies a gene (matrimony) that is haplo-insufficient for achiasmate segregation in Drosophila oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, David; Orme, Charisse; Kramer, Joseph; Namba, Luria; Champion, Mia; Palladino, Michael J; Natzle, Jeanette; Hawley, R Scott

    2003-01-01

    In Drosophila oocytes, euchromatic homolog-homolog associations are released at the end of pachytene, while heterochromatic pairings persist until metaphase I. A screen of 123 autosomal deficiencies for dominant effects on achiasmate chromosome segregation has identified a single gene that is haplo-insufficient for homologous achiasmate segregation and whose product may be required for the maintenance of such heterochromatic pairings. Of the deficiencies tested, only one exhibited a strong dominant effect on achiasmate segregation, inducing both X and fourth chromosome nondisjunction in FM7/X females. Five overlapping deficiencies showed a similar dominant effect on achiasmate chromosome disjunction and mapped the haplo-insufficient meiotic gene to a small interval within 66C7-12. A P-element insertion mutation in this interval exhibits a similar dominant effect on achiasmate segregation, inducing both high levels of X and fourth chromosome nondisjunction in FM7/X females and high levels of fourth chromosome nondisjunction in X/X females. The insertion site for this P element lies immediately upstream of CG18543, and germline expression of a UAS-CG18543 cDNA construct driven by nanos-GAL4 fully rescues the dominant meiotic defect. We conclude that CG18543 is the haplo-insufficient gene and have renamed this gene matrimony (mtrm). Cytological studies of prometaphase and metaphase I in mtrm hemizygotes demonstrate that achiasmate chromosomes are not properly positioned with respect to their homolog on the meiotic spindle. One possible, albeit speculative, interpretation of these data is that the presence of only a single copy of mtrm disrupts the function of whatever "glue" holds heterochromatically paired homologs together from the end of pachytene until metaphase I. PMID:14573476

  6. Highly dominating, highly authoritarian personalities.

    PubMed

    Altemeyer, Bob

    2004-08-01

    The author considered the small part of the population whose members score highly on both the Social Dominance Orientation scale and the Right-Wing Authoritarianism scale. Studies of these High SDO-High RWAs, culled from samples of nearly 4000 Canadian university students and over 2600 of their parents and reported in the present article, reveal that these dominating authoritarians are among the most prejudiced persons in society. Furthermore, they seem to combine the worst elements of each kind of personality, being power-hungry, unsupportive of equality, manipulative, and amoral, as social dominators are in general, while also being religiously ethnocentric and dogmatic, as right-wing authoritarians tend to be. The author suggested that, although they are small in number, such persons can have considerable impact on society because they are well-positioned to become the leaders of prejudiced right-wing political movements. PMID:15279331

  7. Gravity-Induced Vacuum Dominance

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, William C. C.; Vanzella, Daniel A. T.

    2010-04-23

    It has been widely believed that, except in very extreme situations, the influence of gravity on quantum fields should amount to just small, subdominant contributions. This view seemed to be endorsed by the seminal results obtained over the last decades in the context of renormalization of quantum fields in curved spacetimes. Here, however, we argue that this belief is false by showing that there exist well-behaved spacetime evolutions where the vacuum energy density of free quantum fields is forced, by the very same background spacetime, to become dominant over any classical energy-density component. By estimating the time scale for the vacuum energy density to become dominant, and therefore for backreaction on the background spacetime to become important, we argue that this (infrared) vacuum dominance may bear unexpected astrophysical and cosmological implications.

  8. Dominant spinal muscular atrophy is caused by mutations in BICD2, an important golgin protein

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Carrera, Lilian A.; Wirth, Brunhilde

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are characterized by degeneration of spinal motor neurons and muscle weakness. Autosomal recessive SMA is the most common form and is caused by homozygous deletions/mutations of the SMN1 gene. However, families with dominant inherited SMA have been reported, for most of them the causal gene remains unknown. Recently, we and others have identified heterozygous mutations in BICD2 as causative for autosomal dominant SMA, lower extremity-predominant, 2 (SMALED2) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). BICD2 encodes the Bicaudal D2 protein, which is considered to be a golgin, due to its coiled-coil (CC) structure and interaction with the small GTPase RAB6A located at the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are resident proteins in the Golgi apparatus and form a matrix that helps to maintain the structure of this organelle. Golgins are also involved in the regulation of vesicle transport. In vitro overexpression experiments and studies of fibroblast cell lines derived from patients, showed fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. In the current review, we will discuss possible causes for this disruption, and the consequences at cellular level, with a view to better understand the pathomechanism of this disease. PMID:26594138

  9. Dominant resistance against plant viruses

    PubMed Central

    de Ronde, Dryas; Butterbach, Patrick; Kormelink, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To establish a successful infection plant viruses have to overcome a defense system composed of several layers. This review will overview the various strategies plants employ to combat viral infections with main emphasis on the current status of single dominant resistance (R) genes identified against plant viruses and the corresponding avirulence (Avr) genes identified so far. The most common models to explain the mode of action of dominant R genes will be presented. Finally, in brief the hypersensitive response (HR) and extreme resistance (ER), and the functional and structural similarity of R genes to sensors of innate immunity in mammalian cell systems will be described. PMID:25018765

  10. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Autosomal Recessive Carrier Screening Gene Mutation Detection System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-10-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified an autosomal recessive carrier screening gene mutation detection system into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the autosomal recessive carrier screening gene mutation detection system classification. The Agency has classified the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:26506632

  11. Thomsen or Becker myotonia? A novel autosomal recessive nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene associated with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Senkevics, Adriano S; Zilbersztajn-Gotlieb, Dinorah; Yamamoto, Lydia U; Muniz, Viviane P; Pavanello, Rita C M; Oliveira, Acary B; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2012-02-01

    We describe a large Brazilian consanguineous kindred with 3 clinically affected patients with a Thomsen myotonia phenotype. They carry a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene (K248X). None of the 6 heterozygote carriers show any sign of myotonia on clinical evaluation or electromyography. These findings confirm the autosomal recessive inheritance of the novel mutation in this family, as well as the occurrence of phenotypic variability in the autosomal recessive forms of myotonia. PMID:22246887

  12. Machado-Joseph disease is genetically different from Holguin dominant ataxia (SCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Silveria, I.; Manaia, A. Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris ); Melki, J.; Burlet, P.; Rozet, J.M.; Munnich, A. ); Magarino, C.; Gispert, S. Centro Nacional Genetica Medica, Havana ); Lunkes, A.; Auburger, G. )

    1993-09-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) and Holguin ataxia (SCA2) are autosomal dominant multisystem degenerations with spinocerebellar involvement that are predominant among people of Portuguese-Azorean and of Cuban descent, respectively. Their clinical distinction may at times be difficult to make in individual patients, due to significant phenotypic overlapping (similar overall age-of-onset and duration of cerebellar ataxia, eye movement, and, often, other common problems). The recent mapping of SCA2 to chromosome 12q provided another candidate region for linkage studies of MJD. Original data on 10 families with Holguin ataxia show that the locus of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) on chromosome 12q is linked to SCA2 at 4 cM and is thus far its closest marker. The exclusion of linkage 15 cM on each side of PAH in 16 families with MJD shows that these two forms of dominant ataxia are genetically distinct and at different chromosomal locations (nonallelic). 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Genetic and molecular analysis of the autosomal component of the primary sex determination signal of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Barbash, D.A.; Cline, T.W.

    1995-12-01

    Drosophila sex is determined by the action of the X:A chromosome balance on transcription of Sex-lethal (Sxl), a feminizing switch gene. We obtained loss-of-function mutations in denominator elements of the X:A signal by selecting for dominant suppressors of a female-specific lethal mutation in the numerator element, sisterlessA (sisA). Ten suppressors were recovered in this extensive genome-wide selection. All were mutations in deadpan (dpn), a pleiotropic locus previously discovered to be a denominator element. Detailed genetic and molecular characterization is presented of this diverse set of new dpn alleles including their effects on Sxl. Although selected only for impairment of sex-specific functions, all were also impaired in nonsex-specific functions. Male-lethal effects were anticipated for mutations in a major denominator element, but we found that viability of males lacking dpn function was reduced no more than 50% relative to their dpn{sup -} sisters. Moreover, loss of dpn activity in males caused only a modest depression of the Sxl {open_quotes}establishment{close_quotes} promoter (Sxl{sub Pe}), the X:A target. By itself, dpn cannot account for the masculinizing effect of increased autosomal ploidy, the effect that gave rise to the concept of the X:A ratio; nevertheless, if there are other denominator elements, our results suggest that their individual contributions to the sex-determination signal are even less than that of dpn. The time course of expression of dpn and Sxl in dpn mutant backgrounds suggests that dpn is required for sex determination only during the later stages of X:A signaling in males to prevent inappropriate expression of Sxl{sub Pe} in the face of increasing sis gene product levels. 77 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Genetic and molecular analysis of the autosomal component of the primary sex determination signal of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Barbash, D A; Cline, T W

    1995-12-01

    Drosophila sex is determined by the action of the X:A chromosome balance on transcription of Sex-lethal (Sxl), a feminizing switch gene. We obtained loss-of-function mutations in denominator elements of the X:A signal by selecting for dominant suppressors of a female-specific lethal mutation in the numerator element, sisterlessA (sisA). Ten suppressors were recovered in this extensive genome-wide selection. All were mutations in deadpan (dpn), a pleiotropic locus previously discovered to be a denominator element. Detailed genetic and molecular characterization is presented of this diverse set of new dpn alleles including their effects on Sxl. Although selected only for impairment of sex-specific functions, all were also impaired in nonsex-specific functions. Male-lethal effects were anticipated for mutations in a major denominator element, but we found that viability of males lacking dpn function was reduced no more than 50% relative to their dpn- sisters. Moreover, loss of dpn activity in males caused only a modest derepression of the Sxl "establishment" promoter (Sxlpe), the X:A target. By itself, dpn cannot account for the masculinizing effect of increased autosomal ploidy, the effect that gave rise to the concept of the X:A ratio; nevertheless, if there are other denominator elements, our results suggest that their individual contributions to the sex-determination signal are even less than that of dpn. The time course of expression of dpn and of Sxl in dpn mutant backgrounds suggests that dpn is required for sex determination only during the later stages of X:A signaling in males to prevent inappropriate expression of Sxlpe in the face of increasing sis gene product levels. PMID:8601486

  15. Advection dominated models for chemotaxis

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Anton

    Advection dominated models for chemotaxis Yasmin Dolak August 18, 2004 #12;Contents 1 Introduction modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Kinetic models for chemotaxis 11 2.1 Kinetic for chemotaxis and investigate their macroscopic limit. In the second half of the thesis, we will study

  16. Dominance and Age in Bilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdsong, David

    2014-01-01

    The present article examines the relationship between age and dominance in bilingual populations. Age in bilingualism is understood as the point in development at which second language (L2) acquisition begins and as the chronological age of users of two languages. Age of acquisition (AoA) is a factor in determining which of a bilingual's two…

  17. Brutus Dominance Behavior After Capture

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A couple of hours after being immobilized for collaring, Brutus, a wolf being studied by USGS scientists, appears to have fully recovered. He returns to his pack mates and demonstrates dominance behavior over a younger male wolf. Note that Brutus has a stiff, aggressive stance and upright tail, whil...

  18. From nature-dominated to human-dominated environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerli, Bruno; Grosjean, Martin; Hofer, Thomas; Núñez, Lautaro; Pfister, Christian

    2000-01-01

    To what extent is it realistic and useful to view human history as a sequence of changes from highly vulnerable societies of hunters and gatherers through periods with less vulnerable, well buffered and highly productive agrarian-urban societies to a world with regions of extreme overpopulation and overuse of life support systems, so that vulnerability to climatic-environmental changes and extreme events is again increasing? This question cannot be fully answered in our present state of knowledge, but at least we can try to illustrate, with three case studies from different continents, time periods and ecosystems, some fundamental changes in the relationship between natural processes and human activities that occur, as we pass from a nature-dominated to a human dominated environment. 1. Early-mid Holocene: Nature dominated environment — human adaptation, mitigation, and migration. In the central Andes, the Holocene climate changed from humid (10,800-8000 BP) to extreme arid (8000-3600 BP) conditions. Over the same period, prehistoric hunting communities adopted a more sedentary pattern of resource use by settling close to the few perennial water bodies, where they began the process of domesticating camelids around 5000 BP and irrigation from about 3100 BP. 2. Historical period: An agrarian society in transition from an "enduring" to an innovative human response. Detailed documentary evidence from Western Europe may be used to reconstruct quite precisely the impacts of climatic variations on agrarian societies. The period considered spans a major transition from an apparently passive response to the vagaries of the environment during the 16th century to an active and innovative attitude from the onset of the agrarian revolution in the late 18th century through to the present day. The associated changes in technology and in agricultural practices helped to create a society better able to survive the impact of climatic extremes. 3. The present day: A human dominated environment with increasing vulnerability of societies and economies to extreme events and natural variability. The third example, dealing with the history and impact of floods in Bangladesh, shows the increasing vulnerability of an over-exploited and human-dominated ecosystem. Measurements exist for a short time only (decades), historical data allow a prolongation of the record into the last century, and paleo-research provides the long-term record of processes operating over millennia. The long-term paleo-perspective is essential for a better understanding of future potential impacts on an increasingly human-dominated environment. Understanding today's global change processes calls for several new perspectives and synergisms: the integration of biophysically oriented climate change research with research about the increasingly dominant processes of human forcing, a focus on overexploited or limited natural resources and on vulnerable and critical regions, fuller use of our understanding of variability on a range of different timescales: "The present without a past has no future".

  19. Exclusion of the Unfolded Protein Response in Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in the Canine T4R RHO Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Marsili, Stefania; Genini, Sem; Sudharsan, Raghavi; Gingrich, Jeremy; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Beltran, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the occurrence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) following acute light damage in the naturally-occurring canine model of RHO-adRP (T4R RHO dog). Methods The left eyes of T4R RHO dogs were briefly light-exposed and retinas collected 3, 6 and 24 hours later. The contra-lateral eyes were shielded and used as controls. To evaluate the time course of cell death, histology and TUNEL assays were performed. Electron microscopy was used to examine ultrastructural alterations in photoreceptors at 15 min, 1 hour, and 6 hours after light exposure. Gene expression of markers of ER stress and UPR were assessed by RT-PCR, qRT-PCR and western blot at the 6 hour time-point. Calpain and caspase-3 activation were assessed at 1, 3 and 6 hours after exposure. Results A brief exposure to clinically-relevant levels of white light causes within minutes acute disruption of the rod outer segment disc membranes, followed by prominent ultrastructural alterations in the inner segments and the initiation of cell death by 6 hours. Activation of the PERK and IRE1 pathways, and downstream targets (BIP, CHOP) of the UPR was not observed. However increased transcription of caspase-12 and hsp70 occurred, as well as calpain activation, but not that of caspase-3. Conclusion The UPR is not activated in the early phase of light-induced photoreceptor cell death in the T4R RHO model. Instead, disruption in rods of disc and plasma membranes within minutes after light exposure followed by increase in calpain activity and caspase-12 expression suggests a different mechanism of degeneration. PMID:25695253

  20. Florbetapir PET analysis of amyloid-? deposition in the presenilin 1 E280A autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease kindred: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Adam S; Chen, Kewei; Quiroz, Yakeel T; Jakimovich, Laura J; Gomez, Madelyn Gutierrez; Langois, Carolyn M; Langbaum, Jessica B S; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Roontiva, Auttawut; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Lee, Wendy; Mo, Hua; Lopez, Liliana; Moreno, Sonia; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Giraldo, Margarita; Garcia, Gloria; Reiman, Rebecca A; Huentelman, Matthew J; Kosik, Kenneth S; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Fibrillar amyloid-? (A?) is thought to begin accumulating in the brain many years before the onset of clinical impairment in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. By assessing the accumulation of A? in people at risk of genetic forms of Alzheimer’s disease, we can identify how early preclinical changes start in individuals certain to develop dementia later in life. We sought to characterise the age-related accumulation of A? deposition in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers across the spectrum of preclinical disease. Methods Between Aug 1 and Dec 6, 2011, members of the familial Alzheimer’s disease Colombian kindred aged 18–60 years were recruited from the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative’s registry at the University of Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia. Cross-sectional assessment using florbetapir PET was done in symptomatic mutation carriers with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia, asymptomatic carriers, and asymptomatic non-carriers. These assessments were done at the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix, AZ, USA. A cortical grey matter mask consisting of six predefined regions. was used to measure mean cortical florbetapir PET binding. Cortical-to-pontine standard-uptake value ratios were used to characterise the cross-sectional accumulation of fibrillar A? deposition in carriers and non-carriers with regression analysis and to estimate the trajectories of fibrillar A? deposition. Findings We enrolled a cohort of 11 symptomatic individuals, 19 presymptomatic mutation carriers, and 20 asymptomatic non-carriers, ranging in age from 20 to 56 years. There was greater florbetapir binding in asymptomatic PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers than in age matched non-carriers. Fibrillar A? began to accumulate in PSEN 1E280A mutation carriers at a mean age of 28·2 years (95% CI 27·3–33·4), about 16 years and 21 years before the predicted median ages at mild cognitive impairment and dementia onset, respectively. 18F florbetapir binding rose steeply over the next 9·4 years and plateaued at a mean age of 37·6 years (95% CI 35·3–40·2), about 6 and 11 years before the expected respective median ages at mild cognitive impairment and dementia onset. Prominent florbetapir binding was seen in the anterior and posterior cingulate, precuneus, and parietotemporal and frontal grey matter, as well as in the basal ganglia. Binding in the basal ganglia was not seen earlier or more prominently than in other regions. Interpretation These findings contribute to the understanding of preclinical familial Alzheimer’s disease and help set the stage for assessment of amyloid-modifying treatments in the prevention of familial Alzheimer’s disease. Funding Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Banner Alzheimer’s Foundation, Nomis Foundation, Anonymous Foundation, Forget Me Not Initiative, Colciencias, National Institute on Aging, and the State of Arizona. PMID:23137949

  1. Prevalence estimation for monogenic autosomal recessive diseases using population-based genetic data.

    PubMed

    Schrodi, Steven J; DeBarber, Andrea; He, Max; Ye, Zhan; Peissig, Peggy; Van Wormer, Jeffrey J; Haws, Robert; Brilliant, Murray H; Steiner, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    Genetic methods can complement epidemiological surveys and clinical registries in determining prevalence of monogenic autosomal recessive diseases. Several large population-based genetic databases, such as the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project, are now publically available. By assuming Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, the frequency of individuals homozygous in the general population for a particular pathogenic allele can be directly calculated from a sample of chromosomes where some harbor the pathogenic allele. Further assuming that the penetrance of the pathogenic allele(s) is known, the prevalence of recessive phenotypes can be determined. Such work can inform public health efforts for rare recessive diseases. A Bayesian estimation procedure has yet to be applied to the problem of estimating disease prevalence from large population-based genetic data. A Bayesian framework is developed to derive the posterior probability density of monogenic, autosomal recessive phenotypes. Explicit equations are presented for the credible intervals of these disease prevalence estimates. A primary impediment to performing accurate disease prevalence calculations is the determination of truly pathogenic alleles. This issue is discussed, but in many instances remains a significant barrier to investigations solely reliant on statistical interrogation--functional studies can provide important information for solidifying evidence of variant pathogenicity. We also discuss several challenges to these efforts, including the population structure in the sample of chromosomes, the treatment of allelic heterogeneity, and reduced penetrance of pathogenic variants. To illustrate the application of these methods, we utilized recently published genetic data collected on a large sample from the Schmiedeleut Hutterites. We estimate prevalence and calculate 95% credible intervals for 13 autosomal recessive diseases using these data. In addition, the Bayesian estimation procedure is applied to data from a central European study of hereditary fructose intolerance. The methods described herein show a viable path to robustly estimating both the expected prevalence of autosomal recessive phenotypes and corresponding credible intervals using population-based genetic databases that have recently become available. As these genetic databases increase in number and size with the advent of cost-effective next-generation sequencing, we anticipate that these methods and approaches may be helpful in recessive disease prevalence calculations, potentially impacting public health management, health economic analyses, and treatment of rare diseases. PMID:25893794

  2. Microcephaly and congenital nephrotic syndrome owing to diffuse mesangial sclerosis: an autosomal recessive syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Garty, B Z; Eisenstein, B; Sandbank, J; Kaffe, S; Dagan, R; Gadoth, N

    1994-01-01

    Three sibs born to consanguineous parents had congenital nephrotic syndrome, microcephaly, and psychomotor retardation. Pathology of the kidneys showed diffuse mesangial sclerosis with deposits of IgG and C3 in the mesangium and glomerular basement membranes. All three children died before the age of 3 years. Of 19 published cases of children with the association of congenital nephrotic syndrome and microcephaly, only four had histological evidence of diffuse mesangial sclerosis, and two of their sibs probably had the same disease. The association of nephrotic syndrome owing to congenital diffuse mesangial sclerosis, microcephaly, and mental retardation appears to be a distinct syndrome with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Images PMID:8182716

  3. Sex-biased chromatin and regulatory cross-talk between sex chromosomes, autosomes, and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several autoimmune and neurological diseases exhibit a sex bias, but discerning the causes and mechanisms of these biases has been challenging. Sex differences begin to manifest themselves in early embryonic development, and gonadal differentiation further bifurcates the male and female phenotypes. Even at this early stage, however, there is evidence that males and females respond to environmental stimuli differently, and the divergent phenotypic responses may have consequences later in life. The effect of prenatal nutrient restriction illustrates this point, as adult women exposed to prenatal restrictions exhibited increased risk factors of cardiovascular disease, while men exposed to the same condition did not. Recent research has examined the roles of sex-specific genes, hormones, chromosomes, and the interactions among them in mediating sex-biased phenotypes. Such research has identified testosterone, for example, as a possible protective agent against autoimmune disorders and an XX chromosome complement as a susceptibility factor in murine models of lupus and multiple sclerosis. Sex-biased chromatin is an additional and likely important component. Research suggesting a role for X and Y chromosome heterochromatin in regulating epigenetic states of autosomes has highlighted unorthodox mechanisms of gene regulation. The crosstalk between the Y chromosomes and autosomes may be further mediated by the mitochondria. The organelles have solely maternal transmission and exert differential effects on males and females. Altogether, research supports the notion that the interaction between sex-biased elements might exert novel regulatory functions in the genome and contribute to sex-specific susceptibilities to autoimmune and neurological diseases. PMID:24422881

  4. Mutations in CERS3 Cause Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Marrakchi, Slaheddine; Ribierre, Florence; Kamoun, Bourane; Abid, Leila; Leipoldt, Michael; Turki, Hamida; Schempp, Werner; Heilig, Roland; Lathrop, Mark; Fischer, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3) and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289). Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3) and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis. PMID:23754960

  5. Mosaicism with a normal cell line and an autosomal structural rearrangement.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, R J; Dockery, H E; Fitzgerald, P H; Parfitt, R G; Romain, D R; Scobie, N; Shaw, R L; Tumewu, P; Watt, A J

    1994-01-01

    Over three decades, 12 cases of mosaicism for an autosomal rearrangement were recognised in the major cytogenetics laboratories in New Zealand, eight of which were studied between 1990 and 1992. One case inferentially involved the gonad, eight the soma, and three both gonad and soma. This mosaicism could have arisen as a postzygotic event either in a conceptus that was initially normal, with the generation of an abnormal cell line, or in a conceptus having a supernumerary chromosome which was lost at a subsequent mitosis, thereby restoring a normal cell line. Three of the 12 cases involved a presumed direct duplication, an otherwise very uncommon rearrangement. This may indicate a propensity for direct duplications to arise at mitosis rather than at meiosis; unequal sister chromatid exchange is a plausible mechanism. Mosaicism has clinical relevance for genetic counselling, as an intragonadal cell line carrying a rearrangement could generate multiple unbalanced gametes. Mosaicism for an autosomal rearrangement my be very much more common that is, or ever could be, recognised. Images PMID:8182714

  6. Longicorn beetle that vectors pinewood nematode carries many Wolbachia genes on an autosome.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Takuya; Anbutsu, Hisashi; Nikoh, Naruo; Kikuchi, Taisei; Shibata, Fukashi; Fukatsu, Takema

    2009-11-01

    Monochamus alternatus is the longicorn beetle notorious as a vector of the pinewood nematode that causes the pine wilt disease. When two populations of M. alternatus were subjected to diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of four Wolbachia genes, only the ftsZ gene was detected from one of the populations. The Wolbachia ftsZ gene persisted even after larvae were fed with a tetracycline-containing diet for six weeks. The inheritance of the ftsZ gene was not maternal but biparental, exhibiting a typical Mendelian pattern. The ftsZ gene titres in homozygotic ftsZ(+) insects were nearly twice as high as those in heterozygotic ftsZ(+) insects. Exhaustive PCR surveys revealed that 31 and 30 of 214 Wolbachia genes examined were detected from the two insect populations, respectively. Many of these Wolbachia genes contained stop codon(s) and/or frame shift(s). Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the location of the Wolbachia genes on an autosome. On the basis of these results, we conclude that a large Wolbachia genomic region has been transferred to and located on an autosome of M. alternatus. The discovery of massive gene transfer from Wolbachia to M. alternatus would provide further insights into the evolution and fate of laterally transferred endosymbiont genes in multicellular host organisms. PMID:19692404

  7. Analysis of 49 autosomal SNPs in three ethnic groups from Iran: Persians, Lurs and Kurds.

    PubMed

    Sharafi Farzad, M; Tomas, C; Børsting, C; Zeinali, Z; Malekdoost, M; Zeinali, S; Morling, N

    2013-07-01

    A total number of 149 individuals from Iran (Persians, Lurs and Kurds) were analyzed for 49 autosomal SNPs using PCR, SBE and capillary electrophoresis. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed. One SNP pair (rs1015250-rs251934) showed significant linkage disequilibrium in Kurds. However, this was most likely due to chance. High intrapopulation variability and no significant population structure were observed among the three ethnic groups from Iran. Pairwise FST values obtained from the mean numbers of pairwise differences between SNP profiles were calculated for Persians, Lurs, Kurds and eighteen other worldwide populations. For each of the three Iranian ethnic groups, the lowest FST values calculated between an Iranian and non-Iranian populations were observed between Iranians and populations in Iraq and Turkey. The three Iranian ethnic groups grouped together with other West Asian populations in the MDS plot drawn from the FST values. Statistical parameters of forensic interest calculated for the Iranian ethnic groups showed values of the same order of magnitudes as those obtained for Asians. The mean match probability calculated for the 49 SNPs ranged from 1.7x10(-18) for Kurds to 1.3x10(-19) for Persians. Despite the low level of genetic structure observed among Persians, Lurs and Kurds, a single autosomal SNP database should be used with care when extending its forensic application to other Iranian ethnic groups. PMID:23648204

  8. Comparative mapping identifies the fusion point of an ancient mammalian X-autosomal rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.A.; Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Previous comparisons of gene location in the three major groups of mammals (eutherians, marsupials, and monotremes) have suggested that the long arm of the human X represents the ancestral mammalian X chromosome, whereas the short arm represents an autosomal region(s) recently added to the eutherian X chromosome. To identify the fusion point of this ancient X-autosome rearrangement, we have mapped four genes, three of which map near the centromere of the human Xp, in marsupials and in a monotreme. We found that ARAF1, and GATA1 are located on the X chromosome in marsupials, and ALA2 and GATA1 are also located on the X in the platypus. This implies that the proximal short arm of the human X chromosome, including the centromere, was part of the ancestral mammalian X chromosome. The fusion point between the conserved region and the recently added regions therefore maps to human Xp11.23, although gene order on the human X indicates that there has been some rearrangement of this region. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Comprehensive Analysis of Deafness Genes in Families with Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Tahir; Onay, Huseyin; Aykut, Ayca; Bademci, Guney; Kirazli, Tayfun; Tekin, Mustafa; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive genetic testing has the potential to become the standard of care for individuals with hearing loss. In this study, we investigated the genetic etiology of autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in a Turkish cohort including individuals with cochlear implant, who had a pedigree suggestive of an autosomal recessive inheritance. A workflow including prescreening of GJB2 and a targeted next generation sequencing panel (Illum?na TruSightTM Exome) covering 2761 genes that we briefly called as mendelian exome sequencing was used. This panel includes 102 deafness genes and a number of genes causing Mendelian disorders. Using this approach, we identified causative variants in 21 of 29 families. Three different GJB2 variants were present in seven families. Remaining 14 families had 15 different variants in other known NSHL genes (MYO7A, MYO15A, MARVELD2, TMIE, DFNB31, LOXHD1, GPSM2, TMC1, USH1G, CDH23). Of these variants, eight are novel. Mutation detection rate of our workflow is 72.4%, confirming the usefulness of targeted sequencing approach in NSHL. PMID:26561413

  10. Autosomal recessive congenital cataract, intellectual disability phenotype linked to STX3 in a consanguineous Tunisian family.

    PubMed

    Chograni, M; Alkuraya, F S; Ourteni, I; Maazoul, F; Lariani, I; Chaabouni, H B

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the genetic basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataract and intellectual disability phenotype in a consanguineous Tunisian family. The whole genome scan of the studied family was performed with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The resulted runs of homozygosity (ROH) were analyzed through the integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery (iSyTE) in order to prioritize candidate genes associated with congenital cataract. Selected genes were amplified and sequenced. Bioinformatic analysis was conducted to predict the function of the mutant gene. We identified a new specific lens gene named syntaxin 3 linked to the studied phenotype. The direct sequencing of this gene revealed a novel missense mutation c.122A>G which results in p.E41G. Bioinformatic analysis suggested a deleterious effect of this mutation on protein structure and function. Here, we report for the first time a missense mutation of a novel lens specific gene STX3 in a phenotype associating autosomal recessive congenital cataract and intellectual disability. PMID:25358429

  11. Imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes in mammalian oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Tanino, Motohiko; Matoba, Ryo; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    Oocytes have unique characteristics compared with other cell types. In mouse and human oocytes, two X chromosomes are maintained in the active state. Previous microarray studies have shown that the balance of the expression state is maintained in haploid oocytes. Here, we investigated transcripts using RNA-sequence technology in mouse and human oocytes. The median expression ratio between X chromosome and autosomal genes (X:A) in immature mouse oocytes increased as the gene expression levels increased, reaching a value of 1. However, the ratio in mature oocytes was under 1 for all expression categories. Moreover, we observed a markedly low ratio resulting from the bimodal expression patterns of X–linked genes. The low X:A expression ratio in mature oocyte was independent of DNA methylation. While mature human oocytes exhibited a slightly low X:A expression ratio, this was the result of the skewed high frequency of lowly expressed X-linked genes rather than the bimodal state. We propose that this imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes is a feature of transcripts in mammalian oocytes lacking X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:26370379

  12. Comprehensive Analysis of Deafness Genes in Families with Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Atik, Tahir; Onay, Huseyin; Aykut, Ayca; Bademci, Guney; Kirazli, Tayfun; Tekin, Mustafa; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive genetic testing has the potential to become the standard of care for individuals with hearing loss. In this study, we investigated the genetic etiology of autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in a Turkish cohort including individuals with cochlear implant, who had a pedigree suggestive of an autosomal recessive inheritance. A workflow including prescreening of GJB2 and a targeted next generation sequencing panel (Illum?na TruSightTM Exome) covering 2761 genes that we briefly called as mendelian exome sequencing was used. This panel includes 102 deafness genes and a number of genes causing Mendelian disorders. Using this approach, we identified causative variants in 21 of 29 families. Three different GJB2 variants were present in seven families. Remaining 14 families had 15 different variants in other known NSHL genes (MYO7A, MYO15A, MARVELD2, TMIE, DFNB31, LOXHD1, GPSM2, TMC1, USH1G, CDH23). Of these variants, eight are novel. Mutation detection rate of our workflow is 72.4%, confirming the usefulness of targeted sequencing approach in NSHL. PMID:26561413

  13. A New Method to Assess Eye Dominance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle-Inclan, Fernando; Blanco, Manuel J.; Soto, David; Leiros, Luz

    2008-01-01

    People usually show a stable preference for one of their eyes when monocular viewing is required ("sighting dominance") or under dichoptic stimulation conditions ("sensory eye-dominance"). Current procedures to assess this "eye dominance" are prone to error. Here we present a new method that provides a continuous measure of eye dominance and…

  14. Coat color genetics of Peromyscus: IV. Variable white, a new dominant mutation in the deer mouse.

    PubMed

    Cowling, K; Robbins, R J; Haigh, G R; Teed, S K; Dawson, W D

    1994-01-01

    The variable white mutation arose spontaneously in 1983 within a laboratory stock of wild-type deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). The original mutant animal was born to a wild-type pair that had previously produced several entirely wild-type litters. Other variable white animals were bred from the initial individual. Variable white deer mice exhibit extensive areas of white on the head, sides, and tail. Usually a portion of pigmented pelage occurs dorsally and on the shoulders, but the extent of white varies from nearly all white to patches of white on the muzzle, tip of tail, and sides. The pattern is irregular, but not entirely asymmetrical. Eyes are pigmented, but histologically reveal a decrease in thickness and pigmentation of the choroid layer. Many variable white animals do not respond to auditory stimuli, an effect that is particularly evident in animals in which the head is entirely white. Ataxic behavior is also prevalent. Pigment distribution, together with auditory and retinal deficiencies, suggests a neural crest cell migration defect. Breeding data are consistent with an autosomal semidominant, lethal mode of inheritance. The trait differs from two somewhat similar variants in Peromyscus: from dominant spot (S) in extent and pattern of pigmentation and from whiteside (ws), an autosomal recessive trait, in the mode of inheritance and viability. Evidence for possible homology with the Va (varitint-waddler) locus in house mouse (Mus) is presented. The symbol Vw is tentatively assigned for the variable white locus in Peromyscus. PMID:8120357

  15. Patients with autosomal nephrogenic diabetes insipidus homozygous for mutations in the aquaporin 2 water-channel gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lieburg, A.F. van; Verdijk, M.A.J.; Knoers, V.V.A.M.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Oost, B.A. van; Os, C.H. van; Deen, P.M.T.; Essen, A.J. van; Proesmans, W.; Mallmann, R.

    1994-10-01

    Mutations in the X-chromosomal V2 receptor gene are known to cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Besides the X-linked form, an autosomal mode of inheritance has been described. Recently, mutations in the autosomal gene coding for water-channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2) of the renal collecting duct were reported in an NDI patient. In the present study, missense mutations and a single nucleotide deletion in the aquaporin 2 gene of three NDI patients from consanquineous matings are described. Expression studies in Xenopus oocytes showed that the missense AQP2 proteins are nonfunctional. These results prove that mutations in the AQP2 gene cause autosomal recessive NDI. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  16. X-linked dominant cone-rod degeneration: Linkage mapping of a new locus for retinitis pigmentosa (RP15) to Xp22.13-p22.11

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E.; Sullivan, L.S.; Daiger, S.P.

    1995-07-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the name given to a heterogeneous group of hereditary retinal degenerations characterized by progressive visual field loss, pigmentary changes of the retina, abnormal electroretinograms, and, frequently, night blindness. In this study, we investigated a family with dominant cone-rod degeneration, a variant form of retinitis pigmentosa. We used microsatellite markers to test for linkage to the disease locus and exluded all mapped autosomal loci. However, a marker from the short arm of the X chromosome, DXS989, showed 0% recombination to the disease locus, with a maximum lod (log-odds) score of 3.3. On the basis of this marker, the odds favoring X-linked dominant versus autosomal dominant inheritance are > 10{sup 5}:1. Haplotype analysis using an additional nine microsatellite markers places the disease locus in the Xp22.13-p22.11 region and excludes other X-linked disease loci causing retinal degeneration. The clinical expression of the retinal degeneration is consistent with X-linked dominant inheritance with milder, variable effects of Lyonization affecting expression in females. On the basis of these data we propose that this family has a novel form of dominant, X-linked cone-rod degeneration with the gene symbol {open_quotes}RP15{close_quotes}. 17 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Autosomal and sex-linked microsatellite loci in the green oak leaf roller Tortrix viridana L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Schroeder, H; Arens, P; Smulders, M J M

    2009-05-01

    Eight microsatellite markers were developed for the lepidopteran species Tortrix viridana using an enrichment protocol. The loci were highly variable with number of alleles ranging from four to 38. Six of the eight loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The other two were linked to the Z-chromosome. Values of observed heterozygosity ranged for the autosomal loci from 0.510 to 0.957. All loci will be useful to study dispersal and the autosomal loci, as well for phylogeographical studies. PMID:21564751

  18. Population genetics of 29 autosomal STRs and 17 Y-chromosomal STRs in a population sample from Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Älgenäs, Cajsa; Tillmar, Andreas O

    2014-03-01

    In this study, allele frequencies for 29 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) and haplotype frequencies for 17 Y-chromosomal STRs of an Afghan population have been generated. Samples from 348 men and women originating from Afghanistan were analysed for the autosomal STRs, and the combined match probability was estimated to be 7.5 × 10(-37). One hundred and sixty-nine men were analysed for the Y-chromosomal STRs, which resulted in 132 different haplotypes and a haplotype diversity of 0.995. PMID:23979058

  19. Human spermatogenic failure purges deleterious mutation load from the autosomes and both sex chromosomes, including the gene DMRT1.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Alexandra M; Aston, Kenneth I; Thompson, Emma; Carvalho, Filipa; Gonçalves, João; Huang, Ni; Matthiesen, Rune; Noordam, Michiel J; Quintela, Inés; Ramu, Avinash; Seabra, Catarina; Wilfert, Amy B; Dai, Juncheng; Downie, Jonathan M; Fernandes, Susana; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao; Amorim, António; Barros, Alberto; Carracedo, Angel; Hu, Zhibin; Hurles, Matthew E; Moskovtsev, Sergey; Ober, Carole; Paduch, Darius A; Schiffman, Joshua D; Schlegel, Peter N; Sousa, Mário; Carrell, Douglas T; Conrad, Donald F

    2013-03-01

    Gonadal failure, along with early pregnancy loss and perinatal death, may be an important filter that limits the propagation of harmful mutations in the human population. We hypothesized that men with spermatogenic impairment, a disease with unknown genetic architecture and a common cause of male infertility, are enriched for rare deleterious mutations compared to men with normal spermatogenesis. After assaying genomewide SNPs and CNVs in 323 Caucasian men with idiopathic spermatogenic impairment and more than 1,100 controls, we estimate that each rare autosomal deletion detected in our study multiplicatively changes a man's risk of disease by 10% (OR 1.10 [1.04-1.16], p<2 × 10(-3)), rare X-linked CNVs by 29%, (OR 1.29 [1.11-1.50], p<1 × 10(-3)), and rare Y-linked duplications by 88% (OR 1.88 [1.13-3.13], p<0.03). By contrasting the properties of our case-specific CNVs with those of CNV callsets from cases of autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and intellectual disability, we propose that the CNV burden in spermatogenic impairment is distinct from the burden of large, dominant mutations described for neurodevelopmental disorders. We identified two patients with deletions of DMRT1, a gene on chromosome 9p24.3 orthologous to the putative sex determination locus of the avian ZW chromosome system. In an independent sample of Han Chinese men, we identified 3 more DMRT1 deletions in 979 cases of idiopathic azoospermia and none in 1,734 controls, and found none in an additional 4,519 controls from public databases. The combined results indicate that DMRT1 loss-of-function mutations are a risk factor and potential genetic cause of human spermatogenic failure (frequency of 0.38% in 1306 cases and 0% in 7,754 controls, p = 6.2 × 10(-5)). Our study identifies other recurrent CNVs as potential causes of idiopathic azoospermia and generates hypotheses for directing future studies on the genetic basis of male infertility and IVF outcomes. PMID:23555275

  20. Novel Robinow syndrome causing mutations in the proximal region of the frizzled-like domain of ROR2 are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Ali, Bassam R; Jeffery, Steve; Patel, Neha; Tinworth, Lorna E; Meguid, Nagwa; Patton, Michael A; Afzal, Ali R

    2007-11-01

    ROR2 is a member of the cell surface receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKs) family of proteins and is involved in the developmental morphogenesis of the skeletal, cardiovascular and genital systems. Mutations in ROR2 have been shown to cause two distinct human disorders, autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome and dominantly inherited Brachydactyly type B. The recessive form of Robinow syndrome is a disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations whereas Brachydactyly type B is a dominant disease and is presumably caused by gain-of-function mutations in the same gene. We have previously established that all the missense mutations causing Robinow syndrome in ROR2 are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and therefore concluded that their loss of function is due to a defect in their intracellular trafficking. These mutations were in the distal portion of the frizzled-like cysteine rich domain and kringle domain. Here we report the identification of two novel mutations in the frizzled-like cysteine-rich domain of ROR2 causing Robinow syndrome. We establish the retention of the mutated proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum of HeLa cells and therefore failure to reach the plasma membrane. The clustering of Robinow-causing mutations in the extracellular frizzled-like cysteine-rich domain of ROR2 suggests a stringent requirement for the correct folding of this domain prior to export of ROR2 from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane. PMID:17665217

  1. A New PKD-1 Mutation Discovered in a Black African Woman With Autosomal Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seck, Sidy Mohamed; Guèye, Serigne; Diouf, Boucar

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetic disorder with two causal PKD-1 and PKD-2. Genetic studies have demonstrated an important allelic variability between patients but few data are known about genetic variants in African populations. We report a new mutation found in a 41-year old women with mild chronic kidney disease secondary to ADPKD. Molecular genetic testing found a deletion of 2 nucleotides A and C at positions 7290 and 7291 followed by insertion of a 5-base pair (CTGCA) located in exon 18 of the PKD1 gene. This newly identified frame shifting was compared to the PKD gene database but no similar mutation was yet reported. Other screened family members did not present any mutation. PMID:23841043

  2. Amplification-control element ACE-3 is important but not essential for autosomal chorion gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Swimmer, C; Delidakis, C; Kafatos, F C

    1989-01-01

    We have further characterized the cis-acting elements that control the amplification of the third chromosomal cluster of chorion genes in Drosophila melanogaster; these include the amplification-control element ACE-3 and four amplification-enhancing regions (AER-a to -d). We have used two types of deletions in the chorion cluster: the first was in vitro generated deletions of the ACE-3 region that were subsequently introduced into the germ line, and the second was deletions induced in vivo within a transposon at a preexisting chromosomal location, thus avoiding the complication of position effects. Some of the lines bearing deletions of either type showed amplification, albeit at drastically reduced levels. These unexpected results indicate that, despite its importance, ACE-3 is not essential for low-level amplification and that cis-acting amplification elements are functionally redundant within the autosomal chorion replicon. Images PMID:2554333

  3. A large duplication in LIPH underlies autosomal recessive hypotrichosis simplex in four Middle Eastern families.

    PubMed

    Nahum, Sagi; Pasternack, Sandra M; Pforr, Jana; Indelman, Margarita; Wollnik, Bernd; Bergman, Reuven; Nöthen, Markus M; König, Arne; Khamaysi, Ziyad; Betz, Regina C; Sprecher, Eli

    2009-06-01

    Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis simplex (ARHS) manifests with paucity of hair appearing during early childhood. We assessed four affected families. We initially genotyped three of these families for a panel of microsatellite markers spanning all ARHS-associated loci and obtained data suggesting linkage to 3q27, encompassing LIPH, which had previously been shown to be associated with ARHS. Accordingly, a homozygous duplication mutation in exon 2 of this gene (c.280_369dup; p.Gly94_Lys123dup) was found to segregate with the disease in all the families. Through the identification of the first duplication mutation in the human LIPH gene, we provide further evidence supporting a role for the phospholipase signalling pathway in hair growth and differentiation. PMID:18820939

  4. A distinct autosomal recessive ocular anomaly in Chaharborj, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Khakshoor, H; Daneshvar, R; Banaee, T; Tabatabaee Yazdi, S A; Hasanzadeh Nazarabadi, M; Moosavi, M; Tavassoli, F; Mahdavi, R

    2012-01-01

    In Chaharborj, a village in north-eastern ofthe Islamic Republic of Iran, a high prevalence of congenital blindness (1.1%) has been reported. The clinical findings have not been fully described. We therefore assessed the clinical aspects of this condition in a case series of 20 congenitally blind patients and 24 of their parents. All patients had been blind since birth. There was anterior segment dysgenesis and retinal non-attachment in all patients. There were no systemic anomalies. Histopathologically, there was iridocorneal adhesion, normal angle structure and retinal dysplasia. No significant difference was found in the frequency of different HLA class I alleles compared with the general population. The anomaly causing congenital blindness in these patients has components of both anterior and posterior segment dysgenesis. It appears to be a distinct entity with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. PMID:22360007

  5. Root anomalies and dentin dysplasia in autosomal recessive hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC).

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Lee, Moses; Vairo, Filippo; Loguercio Leite, Julio Cesar; Munerato, Maria Cristina; Visioli, Fernanda; D'Ávila, Stéphanie Rodrigues; Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C

    2015-12-01

    Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC, OMIM #211900) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by hyperphosphatemia, tooth root defects, and the progressive deposition of calcium phosphate crystals in periarticular spaces, soft tissues, and sometimes bone.(1) In this HFTC case report, we document the dental phenotype associated with a homozygous missense mutation (g.29077 C>T; c.484 C>T; p.Arg162*) in GALNT3 (OMIM 6017563), a gene encoding UDP-GalNAc transferase 3 that catalyzes the first step of O-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis in the Golgi. The medical and dental pathology is believed to be caused primarily by high serum phosphate levels (hyperphosphatemia), which, in turn, is caused by failure of GALNT3 to glycosylate the phosphate regulator protein FGF23, impairing its ability inhibit reabsorption of filtered phosphate in the kidneys. PMID:26337219

  6. Root anomalies and dentin dysplasia in autosomal recessive hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC)

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Lee, Moses; Vairo, Filippo; Leite, Julio Cesar Loguercio; Munerato, Maria Cristina; Visioli, Fernanda; D’Ávila, Stéphanie Rodrigues; Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC, OMIM #211900) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by hyperphosphatemia, tooth root defects, and the progressive deposition of calcium phosphate crystals in periarticular spaces, soft tissues, and sometimes bone.1 In this HFTC case report, we document the dental phenotype associated with a homozygous missense mutation (g.29077 C>T; c.484 C>T; p.Arg162*) in GALNT3 (OMIM 6017563), a gene encoding UDP-GalNAc transferase 3 that catalyzes the first step of O-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis in the Golgi. The medical and dental pathology is believed to be caused primarily by high serum phosphate levels (hyperphosphatemia), which, in turn, is caused by failure of GALNT3 to glycosylate the phosphate regulator protein FGF23, impairing its ability inhibit reabsorption of filtered phosphate in the kidneys. PMID:26337219

  7. Autosomal recessive sudden unexpected death in children probably caused by a cardiomyopathy associated with myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, K; Beer, S; Vure, E; Algom, M; Shapira, Y

    1979-01-01

    The propositus, who died suddenly at the age of 22 months, was investigated because of an unusual myopathy. Family history revealed two sisters and four cousins who had also died suddenly and unexpectedly. The finding of asymmetric septal hypertrophy by echocardiography in the propositus suggested that the cause of the sudden death in the relatives was an undetected cardiomyopathy accompanying a mild and often subclinical myopathy. The affected children were in two sibships and both sets of parents were first cousins. The mother of one sibship was the sister of the father of the other. It is suggested that a gene causes a mild autosomal recessive myopathy with cardiomyopathy that is often undiagnosed and usually ends in sudden unexpected death in the second year of life. The same gene may manifest on echocardiogram in some heterozygotes as asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Images PMID:513079

  8. Reconstructing the origin and dispersal patterns of village chickens across East Africa: insights from autosomal markers

    PubMed Central

    Mwacharo, J M; Nomura, K; Hanada, H; Han, J L; Amano, T; Hanotte, O

    2013-01-01

    Unravelling the genetic history of any livestock species is central to understanding the origin, development and expansion of agricultural societies and economies. Domestic village chickens are widespread in Africa. Their close association with, and reliance on, humans for long-range dispersal makes the species an important biological marker in tracking cultural and trading contacts between human societies and civilizations across time. Archaezoological and linguistic evidence suggest a complex history of arrival and dispersion of the species on the continent, with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop analysis revealing the presence of five distinct haplogroups in East African village chickens. It supports the importance of the region in understanding the history of the species and indirectly of human interactions. Here, through a detailed analysis of 30 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 657 village chickens from four East African countries (Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia and Sudan), we identify three distinct autosomal gene pools (I, II and III). Gene pool I is predominantly found in Ethiopia and Sudan, while II and III occur in both Kenya and Uganda. A gradient of admixture for gene pools II and III between the Kenyan coast and Uganda's hinterland (P = 0.001) is observed, while gene pool I is clearly separated from the other two. We propose that these three gene pools represent genetic signatures of separate events in the history of the continent that relate to the arrival and dispersal of village chickens and humans across the region. Our results provide new insights on the history of chicken husbandry which has been shaped by terrestrial and maritime contacts between ancient and modern civilizations in Asia and East Africa. PMID:23611649

  9. A Homozygous Missense Mutation in the IRBP Gene (RBP3) Associated with Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Anneke I.; McGee, Terri L.; Ziviello, Carmela; Banfi, Sandro; Dryja, Thaddeus P.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Federico; Ghosh, Debashis; Berson, Eliot L.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) has been considered essential for normal rod and cone function, as it mediates the transport of retinoids between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium. This study was performed to determine whether mutations in the IRBP gene (RBP3) are associated with photoreceptor degeneration. METHODS A consanguineous family was ascertained in which four children had autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Homozygosity mapping performed with SNP microarrays revealed only one homozygous region shared by all four affected siblings. Sequencing of RBP3, contained in this region, was performed in this family and others with recessive RP. Screening was also performed on patients with various other forms of retinal degeneration or malfunction. RESULTS Sequence analysis of RBP3 revealed a homozygous missense mutation (p.Asp1080Asn) in the four affected siblings. The mutation affects a residue that is completely conserved in all four homologous modules of the IRBP protein of vertebrate species and in C-terminal-processing proteases, photosynthesis enzymes found in bacteria, algae, and plants. Based on the previously reported crystal structure of Xenopus IRBP, the authors predict that the Asp1080-mediated conserved salt bridge that appears to participate in scaffolding of the retinol-binding domain is abolished by the mutation. No RBP3 mutations were detected in 395 unrelated patients with recessive or isolate RP or in 680 patients with other forms of hereditary retinal degeneration. CONCLUSIONS Mutations in RBP3 are an infrequent cause of autosomal recessive RP. The mutation Asp1080Asn may alter the conformation of the IRBP protein by disrupting a conserved salt bridge. PMID:19074801

  10. ATOH7 mutations cause autosomal recessive persistent hyperplasia of the primary vitreous

    PubMed Central

    Prasov, Lev; Masud, Tehmina; Khaliq, Shagufta; Mehdi, S. Qasim; Abid, Aiysha; Oliver, Edward R.; Silva, Eduardo D.; Lewanda, Amy; Brodsky, Michael C.; Borchert, Mark; Kelberman, Daniel; Sowden, Jane C.; Dattani, Mehul T.; Glaser, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factor ATOH7 (Math5) is specifically expressed in the embryonic neural retina and is required for the genesis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and optic nerves. In Atoh7 mutant mice, the absence of trophic factors secreted by RGCs prevents the development of the intrinsic retinal vasculature and the regression of fetal blood vessels, causing persistent hyperplasia of the primary vitreous (PHPV). We therefore screened patients with hereditary PHPV, as well as bilateral optic nerve aplasia (ONA) or hypoplasia (ONH), for mutations in ATOH7. We identified a homozygous ATOH7 mutation (N46H) in a large family with an autosomal recessive PHPV disease trait linked to 10q21, and a heterozygous variant (R65G, p.Arg65Gly) in one of five sporadic ONA patients. High-density single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis also revealed a CNTN4 duplication and an OTX2 deletion in the ONA cohort. Functional analysis of ATOH7 bHLH domain substitutions, by electrophoretic mobility shift and luciferase cotransfection assays, revealed that the N46H variant cannot bind DNA or activate transcription, consistent with structural modeling. The N46H variant also failed to rescue RGC development in mouse Atoh7?/? retinal explants. The R65G variant retains all of these activities, similar to wild-type human ATOH7. Our results strongly suggest that autosomal recessive persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous is caused by N46H and is etiologically related to nonsyndromic congenital retinal nonattachment. The R65G allele, however, cannot explain the ONA phenotype. Our study firmly establishes ATOH7 as a retinal disease gene and provides a functional basis to analyze new coding variants. PMID:22645276

  11. The distribution of 893 STS-markers over the 22 autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Plaetke, R.; Gerken, S.; Matsunami, N.

    1994-09-01

    We developed 1009 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the 22 autosomes and built genetic maps from 893 markers. Most of the markers (75%) are tetranucleotides, and 45% have heterozygosities {ge}0.75. The markers were developed from a chromosome non-specific library and were genotyped in four CEPH families (1331, 1332, 1362, and 884). Using the software package LINKAGE, we build the genetic maps in four steps. (I) The localization of each marker to a specific chromosome is determined by 2-point analysis with GENETHON markers. (II) For each chromosome, an anchor map is built from markers with heterozygosities {ge}0.75 and odds {ge}1000:1 for inversion of adjacent loci. (III) More markers are added to the map when odds for inversions are between 100:1 and 1000:1. (IV) Likely locations (1000:1 odds intervals) are determined for markers that cannot be mapped with respect to the above criteria under (II) and (III). 304 markers (34%) were chosen as anchor markers. They cover 3,057 cM of the autosomes (expected length: 4,084 cM). Overall 435 markers (49%) could be linearly ordered and cover 3,206 cM of the chromosomes; the average distance between markers is 7cM, but ranges may vary (e.g. 3-43 cM). Depending on the length of the chromosomes, the number of markers on the (linear) map varies from 5 (chromosome 22) to 42 (chromosome 1). For 458 (51%) markers we determined likely locations on the 22 chromosomes.

  12. Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in South Indian Families

    PubMed Central

    Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N.; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) south Indian families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 – 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier. PMID:26147992

  13. Genetic analysis of TMPRSS3 gene in the Korean population with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwook; Baek, Jeong-In; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Un-Kyung; Lee, Sang-Heun; Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2013-12-15

    The TMPRSS3 gene (DFNB8/10), which encodes a transmembrane serine protease, is a common hearing loss gene in several populations. Accurate functions of TMPRSS3 in the hearing pathway are still unknown, but TMPRSS3 has been reported to play a crucial role in inner ear development or maintenance. To date, 16 pathogenic mutations have been identified in many countries, but no mutational studies of the TMPRSS3 gene have been conducted in the Korean hearing loss population. In this study, we performed genetic analysis of TMPRSS3 in 40 unrelated Korean patients with autosomal recessive hearing loss to identify the aspect and frequency of TMPRSS3 gene mutations in the Korean population. A total of 22 variations were detected, including a novel variant (p.V291L) and a previously reported pathogenic mutation (p.A306T). The p.A306T mutation which has been detected in only compound heterozygous state in previous studies was identified in homozygous state for the first time in this study. Moreover, the clinical evaluation identified bilateral dilated vestibules in the patient with p.A306T mutation, and it suggested that p.A306T mutation of the TMPRSS3 gene might be associated with vestibular anomalies. In conclusion, this study investigated that only 2.5% of patients with autosomal recessive hearing loss were related to TMPRSS3 mutations suggesting low prevalence of TMPRSS3 gene in Korean hearing loss population. Also, it will provide the information of genotype-phenotype correlation to understand definite role of TMPRSS3 in the auditory system. PMID:23958653

  14. Involvement of interstitial telomeric sequences in two new cases of mosaicism for autosomal structural rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Jonathan; Receveur, Aline; Jedraszak, Guillaume; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Renaldo, Florence; Gondry, Jean; Andrieux, Joris; Copin, Henri; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Portnoï, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    Mosaicism for an autosomal structural rearrangement that does not involve ring or marker chromosomes is rare. The mechanisms responsible for genome instability have not always been explained. Several studies have shown that interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs), involved in some mosaic constitutional anomalies, are potent sources of genomic instability. Here we describe two cases of mosaicism for uncommon constitutional autosomal rearrangements, involving ITSs, identified by karyotyping and characterized by FISH and SNP-array analysis. The first patient, a boy with global developmental delay, had a rare type of pure distal 1q inverted duplication (1q32-qter), attached to the end of the short arm of the same chromosome 1, in approximately 35% of his cells. The second patient, a phenotypically normal man, was diagnosed as having mosaic for a balanced non-reciprocal translocation of the distal segment of 7q (7q33qter), onto the terminal region of the short arm of a whole chromosome 12, in approximately 80% of his cells. The remaining 20% of the cells showed an unbalanced state of the translocation, with only the der(7) chromosome. He was ascertained through his malformed fetus carrying a non-mosaic partial monosomy 7q, identified at prenatal diagnosis. We show that pan-telomeric and subtelomeric sequences were observed at the interstitial junction point of the inv dup(1q) and of the der(12)t(7;12), respectively. The present cases and review of the literature suggest that the presence of ITSs at internal sites of the chromosomes may explain mechanisms of the patients's mosaic structural rearrangements. PMID:25428228

  15. Microspherophakia-metaphyseal dysplasia: a 'new' dominantly inherited bone dysplasia with severe eye involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Verloes, A; Van Maldergem, L; de Marneffe, P; Dufier, J L; Maroteaux, P

    1990-01-01

    We report a father and son affected by a hitherto unpublished bone dysplasia with moderately severe dwarfism. On initial radiographs, thickening of the diaphyses of the long bones was striking. The small bones of the extremities were almost unaffected. With age, the metaphyseal deformation became more prominent. The epiphyses became irregular and their growth was delayed (particularly the femoral heads). The femoral neck showed an unusual 'lip' on the inner edge. Later, the stubby appearance of the long bones faded and, in adulthood, only enlarged metaphyses and deformed femoral necks persisted. The vertebrae showed moderate deformation with irregular flattening, and narrowing of the spinal canal with a shortened interpedicular distance. The eye defects consisted of high grade myopia, microspherophakia, lens coloboma, lens luxation, and retinal detachment. The name 'microspherophakia-metaphyseal dysplasia' is suggested for this probably autosomal dominant bone dysplasia. Images PMID:2395168

  16. O R I G I N A L A R T I C L E Animals deficient in C2Orf71, an autosomal recessive

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    pigmentosa-associated locus, develop severe early-onset retinal degeneration Brian M. Kevany, Ning Zhang for a previously uncharacterized cohort of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa cases. Genetic mappingO R I G I N A L A R T I C L E Animals deficient in C2Orf71, an autosomal recessive retinitis

  17. 38 CFR 4.69 - Dominant hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dominant hand. 4.69 Section 4.69 Pensions...Musculoskeletal System § 4.69 Dominant hand. Handedness for the purpose of a...by testing on VA examination. Only one hand shall be considered dominant. The...

  18. 38 CFR 4.69 - Dominant hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dominant hand. 4.69 Section 4.69 Pensions...Musculoskeletal System § 4.69 Dominant hand. Handedness for the purpose of a...by testing on VA examination. Only one hand shall be considered dominant. The...

  19. 38 CFR 4.69 - Dominant hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dominant hand. 4.69 Section 4.69 Pensions...Musculoskeletal System § 4.69 Dominant hand. Handedness for the purpose of a...by testing on VA examination. Only one hand shall be considered dominant. The...

  20. 38 CFR 4.69 - Dominant hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dominant hand. 4.69 Section 4.69 Pensions...Musculoskeletal System § 4.69 Dominant hand. Handedness for the purpose of a...by testing on VA examination. Only one hand shall be considered dominant. The...

  1. 38 CFR 4.69 - Dominant hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dominant hand. 4.69 Section 4.69 Pensions...Musculoskeletal System § 4.69 Dominant hand. Handedness for the purpose of a...by testing on VA examination. Only one hand shall be considered dominant. The...

  2. Quantitative genetics in soybean: Is dominance important?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In soybeans, dominance is generally considered to be non-existent or of little importance. Because genetic variation due to dominance dissipates rapidly with inbreeding, dominance would presumably not be useful in breeding soybean cultivars which are highly inbred. Yet, there is evidence for hetero...

  3. 78 FR 70080 - Market Dominant Price Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... Market Dominant Price Adjustment AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... market dominant products. The adjustments are scheduled to take effect January 26, 2014. This notice.... Ordering Paragraphs I. Overview A. Index-Based Price Changes for Market Dominant Classes of Mail...

  4. 5 CFR 532.305 - Dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dominant industry. 532.305 Section 532... SYSTEMS Determining Rates for Principal Types of Positions § 532.305 Dominant industry. (a)(1) A specialized industry is a “dominant industry” if the number of wage employees in the wage area who are...

  5. 5 CFR 532.305 - Dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dominant industry. 532.305 Section 532... SYSTEMS Determining Rates for Principal Types of Positions § 532.305 Dominant industry. (a)(1) A specialized industry is a “dominant industry” if the number of wage employees in the wage area who are...

  6. 5 CFR 532.305 - Dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dominant industry. 532.305 Section 532... SYSTEMS Determining Rates for Principal Types of Positions § 532.305 Dominant industry. (a)(1) A specialized industry is a “dominant industry” if the number of wage employees in the wage area who are...

  7. 5 CFR 532.305 - Dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dominant industry. 532.305 Section 532... SYSTEMS Determining Rates for Principal Types of Positions § 532.305 Dominant industry. (a)(1) A specialized industry is a “dominant industry” if the number of wage employees in the wage area who are...

  8. 5 CFR 532.305 - Dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dominant industry. 532.305 Section 532... SYSTEMS Determining Rates for Principal Types of Positions § 532.305 Dominant industry. (a)(1) A specialized industry is a “dominant industry” if the number of wage employees in the wage area who are...

  9. Clinical Correlates of Autosomal Chromosomal Abnormalities in an Electronic Medical Record–Linked Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Jouni, Hayan; Shameer, Khader; Asmann, Yan W.; Hazin, Ribhi; de Andrade, Mariza

    2013-01-01

    Although mosaic autosomal chromosomal abnormalities are being increasingly detected as part of high-density genotyping studies, the clinical correlates are unclear. From an electronic medical record (EMR)–based genome-wide association study (GWAS) of peripheral arterial disease, log-R-ratio and B-allele-frequency data were used to identify mosaic autosomal chromosomal abnormalities including copy number variation and loss of heterozygosity. The EMRs of patients with chromosomal abnormalities and those without chromosomal abnormalities were reviewed to compare clinical characteristics. Among 3336 study participants, 0.75% (n = 25, mean age = 74.8 ± 10.7 years, 64% men) had abnormal intensity plots indicative of autosomal chromosomal abnormalities. A hematologic malignancy was present in 8 patients (32%), of whom 4 also had a solid organ malignancy while 2 patients had a solid organ malignancy only. In 50 age- and sex-matched participants without chromosomal abnormalities, there was a lower rate of hematologic malignancies (2% vs 32%, P < .001) but not solid organ malignancies (20% vs 24%, P = .69). We also report the clinical characteristics of each patient with the observed chromosomal abnormalities. Interestingly, among 5 patients with 20q deletions, 4 had a myeloproliferative disorder while all 3 men in this group had prostate cancer. In summary, in a GWAS of 3336 adults, 0.75% had autosomal chromosomal abnormalities and nearly a third of them had hematologic malignancies. A potential novel association between 20q deletions, myeloproliferative disorders, and prostate cancer was also noted. PMID:26425586

  10. Validation of a combined autosomal/Y-chromosomal STR approach for analyzing typical biological stains in sexual-assault cases.

    PubMed

    Purps, Josephine; Geppert, Maria; Nagy, Marion; Roewer, Lutz

    2015-11-01

    DNA testing is an established part of the investigation and prosecution of sexual assault. The primary purpose of DNA evidence is to identify a suspect and/or to demonstrate sexual contact. However, due to highly uneven proportions of female and male DNA in typical stains, routine autosomal analysis often fails to detect the DNA of the assailant. To evaluate the forensic efficiency of the combined application of autosomal and Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) markers, we present a large retrospective casework study of probative evidence collected in sexual-assault cases. We investigated up to 39 STR markers by testing combinations of the 16-locus NGMSElect kit with both the 23-locus PowerPlex Y23 and the 17-locus Yfiler kit. Using this dual approach we analyzed DNA extracts from 2077 biological stains collected in 287 cases over 30 months. To assess the outcome of the combined approach in comparison to stand-alone autosomal analysis we evaluated informative DNA profiles. Our investigation revealed that Y-STR analysis added up to 21% additional, highly informative (complete, single-source) profiles to the set of reportable autosomal STR profiles for typical stains collected in sexual-assault cases. Detection of multiple male contributors was approximately three times more likely with Y-chromosomal profiling than with autosomal STR profiling. In summary, 1/10 cases would have remained inconclusive (and could have been dismissed) if Y-STR analysis had been omitted from DNA profiling in sexual-assault cases. PMID:26280567

  11. Epigenetic Dominance of Prion Conformers

    PubMed Central

    Saijo, Eri; Kang, Hae-Eun; Bian, Jifeng; Bowling, Kristi G.; Browning, Shawn; Kim, Sehun; Hunter, Nora; Telling, Glenn C.

    2013-01-01

    Although they share certain biological properties with nucleic acid based infectious agents, prions, the causative agents of invariably fatal, transmissible neurodegenerative disorders such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, sheep scrapie, and human Creutzfeldt Jakob disease, propagate by conformational templating of host encoded proteins. Once thought to be unique to these diseases, this mechanism is now recognized as a ubiquitous means of information transfer in biological systems, including other protein misfolding disorders such as those causing Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. To address the poorly understood mechanism by which host prion protein (PrP) primary structures interact with distinct prion conformations to influence pathogenesis, we produced transgenic (Tg) mice expressing different sheep scrapie susceptibility alleles, varying only at a single amino acid at PrP residue 136. Tg mice expressing ovine PrP with alanine (A) at (OvPrP-A136) infected with SSBP/1 scrapie prions propagated a relatively stable (S) prion conformation, which accumulated as punctate aggregates in the brain, and produced prolonged incubation times. In contrast, Tg mice expressing OvPrP with valine (V) at 136 (OvPrP-V136) infected with the same prions developed disease rapidly, and the converted prion was comprised of an unstable (U), diffusely distributed conformer. Infected Tg mice co-expressing both alleles manifested properties consistent with the U conformer, suggesting a dominant effect resulting from exclusive conversion of OvPrP-V136 but not OvPrP-A136. Surprisingly, however, studies with monoclonal antibody (mAb) PRC5, which discriminates OvPrP-A136 from OvPrP-V136, revealed substantial conversion of OvPrP-A136. Moreover, the resulting OvPrP-A136 prion acquired the characteristics of the U conformer. These results, substantiated by in vitro analyses, indicated that co-expression of OvPrP-V136 altered the conversion potential of OvPrP-A136 from the S to the otherwise unfavorable U conformer. This epigenetic mechanism thus expands the range of selectable conformations that can be adopted by PrP, and therefore the variety of options for strain propagation. PMID:24204258

  12. Dominance of Deleterious Alleles Controls the Response to a Population Bottleneck

    PubMed Central

    Balick, Daniel J.; Do, Ron; Cassa, Christopher A.; Reich, David; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2015-01-01

    Population bottlenecks followed by re-expansions have been common throughout history of many populations. The response of alleles under selection to such demographic perturbations has been a subject of great interest in population genetics. On the basis of theoretical analysis and computer simulations, we suggest that this response qualitatively depends on dominance. The number of dominant or additive deleterious alleles per haploid genome is expected to be slightly increased following the bottleneck and re-expansion. In contrast, the number of completely or partially recessive alleles should be sharply reduced. Changes of population size expose differences between recessive and additive selection, potentially providing insight into the prevalence of dominance in natural populations. Specifically, we use a simple statistic, BR??xipop1/?xjpop2, where xi represents the derived allele frequency, to compare the number of mutations in different populations, and detail its functional dependence on the strength of selection and the intensity of the population bottleneck. We also provide empirical evidence showing that gene sets associated with autosomal recessive disease in humans may have a BR indicative of recessive selection. Together, these theoretical predictions and empirical observations show that complex demographic history may facilitate rather than impede inference of parameters of natural selection. PMID:26317225

  13. An intronic deletion in the PROM1 gene leads to autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Eidinger, Osnat; Leibu, Rina; Newman, Hadas; Rizel, Leah; Perlman, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic basis for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) in a consanguineous Israeli Jewish family. Methods Patients underwent a detailed ophthalmic evaluation, including eye examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and electrophysiological tests, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed to identify homozygous regions shared among two of the affected individuals. Mutation screening of the underlying gene was performed with direct sequencing. In silico and in vitro analyses were used to predict the effect of the identified mutation on splicing. Results The affected family members are three siblings who have various degrees of progressive visual deterioration, glare, color vision abnormalities, and night vision difficulties. Visual field tests revealed central scotomas of different extension. Cone and rod ERG responses were reduced, with cones more severely affected. Homozygosity mapping revealed several homozygous intervals shared among two of the affected individuals. One included the PROM1 gene. Sequence analysis of the 26 coding exons of PROM1 in one affected individual revealed no mutations in the coding sequence or in intronic splice sites. However, in intron 21, proximate to the intron–exon junction, we observed a homozygous 10 bp deletion between positions ?26 and ?17 (c.2281–26_-17del). The deletion was linked to a known SNP, c.2281–6C>G. The deletion cosegregated with the disease in the family, and was not detected in public databases or in 101 ethnically-matched control individuals. In silico analysis predicted that this deletion would lead to altered intron 21 splicing. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that a recognition site for the SRSF2 splicing factor is located within the deleted sequence. The in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that c.2281–26_-17del leads to complete exon 22 skipping. Conclusions A novel and unique intronic mutation of PROM1, underlying autosomal recessive CRD in a consanguineous Israeli family, was found. This report expands the spectrum of pathogenic mutations of PROM1 and further demonstrates the importance of intronic mutations. PMID:26702251

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Nonsyndromic aplasia cutis congenita

    MedlinePLUS

    ... aplasia cutis congenita? alopecia ; autosomal ; autosomal dominant ; autosomal recessive ; cell ; congenital ; gene ; incidence ; inheritance ; injury ; lesion ; pattern of inheritance ; recessive ; ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Monilethrix

    MedlinePLUS

    ... help with understanding monilethrix? autosomal ; autosomal dominant ; autosomal recessive ; cell ; gene ; hair follicle ; hypotrichosis ; inheritance ; inherited ; keratin ; keratosis ; mutation ; ...

  16. Familial Albright`s hereditary osteodystrophy with hypoparathyroidism: Normal structural G{sub s}{alpha} gene

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, H.; Friedman, E.; Farfel, Z.

    1996-04-01

    Albright`s hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is a characteristic skeletal phenotype, including short stature, obesity, round face, and brachydactyly. AHO appears in patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) who have resistance to PTH and in their eumetabolic family members who have pseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). The differential diagnosis of AHO in families without PHP includes brachydactyly E, whose existence as a distinct entity has been questioned. We studied a patient with familial AHO who presented with hypocalcemia. To our surprise, PTH levels were low, and the response to PTH administration was normal. This is the first case of familial AHO with hypoparathyroidism. The proband`s family included 22 affected subjects spanning 3 generations, who had variable degrees of AHO manifestations, with an autosomal dominant inheritance trait. The metacarpophalangeal pattern profile was typical of that of PHP-PPHP. As deficient activity and inactivating mutations of G{sub s}{alpha} were described in PHP as well as in PPHP, we measured the biological activity of G{sub s} in family members, which was normal. To exclude subtle abnormalities in the G{sub s}{alpha} gene, we sequenced the entire coding region of G{alpha} in the propositus, which was normal. We conclude that hypocalcemia should be adequately evaluated even in the presence of familial AHO, and that familial AHO can occur with a normal coding structural Ga gene. Identification of the molecular defect in familial AHO without PHP will shed light on the pathogenesis of AHO in general. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Powerhouse failure and oxidative damage in autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay.

    PubMed

    Criscuolo, Chiara; Procaccini, C; Meschini, M C; Cianflone, A; Carbone, R; Doccini, S; Devos, D; Nesti, C; Vuillaume, I; Pellegrino, M; Filla, A; De Michele, G; Matarese, G; Santorelli, F M

    2015-12-01

    Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is a neurodegenerative disease due to mutations in SACS, which encodes sacsin, a protein localized on the mitochondrial surface and possibly involved in mitochondrial dynamics. In view of the possible mitochondrial involvement of sacsin, we investigated mitochondrial activity at functional and molecular level in skin fibroblasts obtained from ARSACS patients. We observed remarkable bioenergetic damage in ARSACS cells, as indicated by reduced basal, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-linked and maximal mitochondrial respiration rate, and by reduced respiratory chain activities and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. These phenomena were associated with increased reactive oxygen species production and oxidative nuclear DNA damage. Our results suggest that loss of sacsin is associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, and thus highlight a novel mechanism in the pathogenesis of ARSACS. The involvement of mitochondria and oxidative stress in disease pathogenesis has been described in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, on the basis of our findings, which suggest a potential therapeutic role for antioxidant agents, ARSACS seems to fall within a larger group of disorders. PMID:26530509

  18. RANK-dependent autosomal recessive osteopetrosis: characterization of five new cases with novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Pangrazio, Alessandra; Cassani, Barbara; Guerrini, Matteo M; Crockett, Julie C; Marrella, Veronica; Zammataro, Luca; Strina, Dario; Schulz, Ansgar; Schlack, Claire; Kornak, Uwe; Mellis, David J; Duthie, Angela; Helfrich, Miep H; Durandy, Anne; Moshous, Despina; Vellodi, Ashok; Chiesa, Robert; Veys, Paul; Lo Iacono, Nadia; Vezzoni, Paolo; Fischer, Alain; Villa, Anna; Sobacchi, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder attributed to reduced bone resorption by osteoclasts. Most human AROs are classified as osteoclast rich, but recently two subsets of osteoclast-poor ARO have been recognized as caused by defects in either TNFSF11 or TNFRSF11A genes, coding the RANKL and RANK proteins, respectively. The RANKL/RANK axis drives osteoclast differentiation and also plays a role in the immune system. In fact, we have recently reported that mutations in the TNFRSF11A gene lead to osteoclast-poor osteopetrosis associated with hypogammaglobulinemia. Here we present the characterization of five additional unpublished patients from four unrelated families in which we found five novel mutations in the TNFRSF11A gene, including two missense and two nonsense mutations and a single-nucleotide insertion. Immunological investigation in three of them showed that the previously described defect in the B cell compartment was present only in some patients and that its severity seemed to increase with age and the progression of the disease. HSCT performed in all five patients almost completely cured the disease even when carried out in late infancy. Hypercalcemia was the most important posttransplant complication. Overall, our results further underline the heterogeneity of human ARO also deriving from the interplay between bone and the immune system, and highlight the prognostic and therapeutic implications of the molecular diagnosis. PMID:22271396

  19. A defect in the CLIP1 gene (CLIP-170) can cause autosomal recessive intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Larti, Farzaneh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Musante, Luciana; Hu, Hao; Papari, Elahe; Fattahi, Zohreh; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Liu, Zhe; Banan, Mehdi; Garshasbi, Masoud; Wienker, Thomas F; Ropers, H Hilger; Galjart, Niels; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2015-03-01

    In the context of a comprehensive research project, investigating novel autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ARID) genes, linkage analysis based on autozygosity mapping helped identify an intellectual disability locus on Chr.12q24, in an Iranian family (LOD score = 3.7). Next-generation sequencing (NGS) following exon enrichment in this novel interval, detected a nonsense mutation (p.Q1010*) in the CLIP1 gene. CLIP1 encodes a member of microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking proteins, which specifically associates with the ends of growing MTs. These proteins regulate MT dynamic behavior and are important for MT-mediated transport over the length of axons and dendrites. As such, CLIP1 may have a role in neuronal development. We studied lymphoblastoid and skin fibroblast cell lines established from healthy and affected patients. RT-PCR and western blot analyses showed the absence of CLIP1 transcript and protein in lymphoblastoid cells derived from affected patients. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analyses showed MT plus-end staining only in fibroblasts containing the wild-type (and not the mutant) CLIP1 protein. Collectively, our data suggest that defects in CLIP1 may lead to ARID. PMID:24569606

  20. Mutation rate estimation for 15 autosomal STR loci in a large population from Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Hua; Liu, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Li; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    STR, short tandem repeats, are well known as a type of powerful genetic marker and widely used in studying human population genetics. Compared with the conventional genetic markers, the mutation rate of STR is higher. Additionally, the mutations of STR loci do not lead to genetic inconsistencies between the genotypes of parents and children; therefore, the analysis of STR mutation is more suited to assess the population mutation. In this study, we focused on 15 autosomal STR loci. DNA samples from a total of 42,416 unrelated healthy individuals (19,037 trios) from the population of Mainland China collected between Jan 2012 and May 2014 were successfully investigated. In our study, the allele frequencies, paternal mutation rates, maternal mutation rates and average mutation rates were detected. Furthermore, we also investigated the relationship between paternal ages, maternal ages, area, the time of pregnancy and average mutation rate. We found that the paternal mutation rate was higher than the maternal mutation rate and the paternal, maternal, and average mutation rates had a positive correlation with paternal age, maternal age and the time of pregnancy respectively. Additionally, the average mutation rate of coastal areas was higher than that of inland areas. PMID:26273562

  1. Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa E150K opsin mice exhibit photoreceptor disorganization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Jastrzebska, Beata; Mustafi, Debarshi; Sawada, Osamu; Maeda, Tadao; Genoud, Christel; Engel, Andreas; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of the E150K mutation in the rod opsin gene associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) has yet to be determined. We generated knock-in mice carrying a single nucleotide change in exon 2 of the rod opsin gene resulting in the E150K mutation. This novel mouse model displayed severe retinal degeneration affecting rhodopsin’s stabilization of rod outer segments (ROS). Homozygous E150K (KK) mice exhibited early-onset retinal degeneration, with disorganized ROS structures, autofluorescent deposits in the subretinal space, and aberrant photoreceptor phagocytosis. Heterozygous (EK) mice displayed a delayed-onset milder retinal degeneration. Further, mutant receptors were mislocalized to the inner segments and perinuclear region. Though KK mouse rods displayed markedly decreased phototransduction, biochemical studies of the mutant rhodopsin revealed only minimally affected chromophore binding and G protein activation. Ablation of the chromophore by crossing KK mice with mice lacking the critical visual cycle protein LRAT slowed retinal degeneration, whereas blocking phototransduction by crossing KK mice with GNAT1-deficient mice slightly accelerated this process. This study highlights the importance of proper higher-order organization of rhodopsin in the native tissue and provides information about the signaling properties of this mutant rhodopsin. Additionally, these results suggest that patients heterozygous for the E150K mutation should be periodically reevaluated for delayed-onset retinal degeneration. PMID:23221340

  2. Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment due to a Novel Deletion in the RDX Gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwanghyuk; Amin Ud Din, Mohammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2011-01-01

    The RDX gene anchors cytoskeletal actin of stereocilia to hair cell transmembrane and is responsible for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) due to DFNB24. A genome scan was performed using DNA samples from a consanguineous Pakistani family with ARNSHI. A significant maximum two-point LOD score of 4.5 (? = 0) and multipoint LOD score of 5.8 were achieved at marker D11S1998 (chr11?:?117.20?Mb). The region of homozygosity is bounded by markers D11S2000 (105.06?Mb) and D11S4464 (123.13?Mb) and contains the NSHI genes TECTA and RDX. Although no potentially causal variants were identified in the TECTA gene, within the RDX gene a novel deletion c.1076_1079delTTAA (p.Ile359Lysfs?6) was identified. The RDX deletion segregates with ARNSHI within the family and was not observed in 500 control chromosomes. It is predicted to cause premature truncation of radixin at the ?-helical domain and to result in nonfunctional transcripts within the cochlea. RDX isoforms which encode the coiled-coil region of the ?-helical domain are deemed necessary for proper function of hair cell stereocilia. PMID:22567349

  3. Genotype-phenotype spectrum of PYCR1-related autosomal recessive cutis laxa.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulou, Aikaterini; Fischer, Björn; Gardeitchik, Thatjana; Schröter, Phillipe; Kayserili, Hülya; Schlack, Claire; Li, Yun; Brum, Jaime Moritz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Castori, Marco; Spaich, Christiane; Fletcher, Elaine; Mahayri, Zeina; Bhat, Meenakshi; Girisha, Katta M; Lachlan, Katherine; Johnson, Diana; Phadke, Shubha; Gupta, Neerja; Simandlova, Martina; Kabra, Madhulika; David, Albert; Nijtmans, Leo; Chitayat, David; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Brancati, Francesco; Mundlos, Stefan; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Morava, Eva; Wollnik, Bernd; Kornak, Uwe

    2013-11-01

    Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 2B (ARCL2B; OMIM # 612940) is a segmental progeroid disorder caused by mutations in PYCR1 encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1, which is part of the conserved proline de novo synthesis pathway. Here we describe 33 patients with PYCR1-related ARCL from 27 families with initial diagnoses varying between wrinkly skin syndrome, gerodermia osteodysplastica, De Barsy syndrome or more severe progeria syndromes. Given the difficult differential diagnosis of ARCL syndromes we performed a systematic comparison of clinical features of PYCR1-related ARCL. Intrauterine growth retardation, a characteristic triangular facial gestalt, psychomotor retardation, and hypotonia were the most relevant distinctive hallmarks of ARCL due to proline de novo synthesis defects. Corneal clouding or cataracts, athetoid movements, and finger contractures were rather rare features, but had a high predictive value. In our cohort we identified 20 different PYCR1 mutations of which seven were novel. Most of the mutations accumulated in exons 4 to 6. Missense alterations of highly conserved residues were most frequent followed by splice site changes and a single nonsense mutation. Analysis of genotype-phenotype correlation revealed that patients with mutations in the first two exons had lower average clinical scores and absent or only mild intellectual disability. Structural analyses predicted interference with PYCR1 multimerization for a subset of missense mutations. These findings have implications for the clinics as well as the pathomechanism of PYCR1-related ARCL. PMID:24035636

  4. Exome sequencing reveals a thrombopoietin ligand mutation in a Micronesian family with autosomal recessive aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Syed K.; Olm-Shipman, Adam J.; Wilson, Nathan R.; Abhyankar, Sunil; Ganter, Brigitte; Furness, L. Mike; Fang, Jianwen; Calado, Rodrigo T.

    2013-01-01

    We recently identified 2 siblings afflicted with idiopathic, autosomal recessive aplastic anemia. Whole-exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous missense mutation in thrombopoietin (THPO, c.112C>T) in both affected siblings. This mutation encodes an arginine to cysteine substitution at residue 38 or residue 17 excluding the 21-amino acid signal peptide of THPO receptor binding domain (RBD). THPO has 4 conserved cysteines in its RBD that form 2 disulfide bonds. Our in silico modeling predicts that introduction of a fifth cysteine may disrupt normal disulfide bonding to cause poor receptor binding. In functional assays, the mutant-THPO–containing media shows two- to threefold reduced ability to sustain UT7-TPO cells, which require THPO for proliferation. Both parents and a sibling with heterozygous R17C change have reduced platelet counts, whereas a sibling with wild-type sequence has normal platelet count. Thus, the R17C partial loss-of-function allele results in aplastic anemia in the homozygous state and mild thrombocytopenia in the heterozygous state in our family. Together with the recent identification of THPO receptor (MPL) mutations and the effects of THPO agonists in aplastic anemia, our results have clinical implications in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with aplastic anemia and highlight a role for the THPO-MPL pathway in hematopoiesis in vivo. PMID:24085763

  5. CONSANGUINITY AND HOMOZYGOSITY AMONG TUNISIAN PATIENTS WITH AN AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE DISORDER.

    PubMed

    Kelmemi, Wided; Chelly, Imene; Kharrat, Maher; Chaabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba

    2015-11-01

    Consanguineous unions are a deeply rooted social practice among traditional societies. Despite their presumed social advantages, they can result in several health conditions. The aim of this study was: i) to compare consanguinity levels between Tunisian patients affected with autosomal recessive disorders (ARDs) and those with a chromosomal abnormality; and ii) to gain more insight into the mutational status of patients affected with ARDs. Data were collected from 290 files of patients affected by one of five ARDs confirmed by molecular analysis and 248 files of patients with confirmed Down syndrome. Information on the disease, mutation defining the disease, parents' relatedness and geographical origin was gathered. Consanguinity was found among 58% of the ARD patients and among 22% of Down syndrome patients, and a homozygous status was found in 90% of the patients born to related parents and in 70% of patients born to unrelated parents. Also, children from unrelated parents from the same geographical background were found to be more frequently affected by homozygous mutations than those from unrelated parents from different geographical backgrounds. The present study shows how marriage practices affect patterns of genetic variations and how they can lead to homogenization in the genetic pool. PMID:25630711

  6. X-to-autosome expression and msl-2 transcript abundance correlate among Drosophila melanogaster somatic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex has been studied extensively for its role in upregulating male X-linked genes. Recent advances in high-throughput technologies have improved our understanding of how the MSL complex mediates dosage compensation through chromosome-wide chromatin modifications. Most studies, however, have focused on cell line models that cannot reflect any potential heterogeneity of in vivo dosage compensation. Comparisons between cell line and organismal gene-level dosage compensation upregulation suggest the possibility of variation in MSL complex activity among somatic tissues. We hypothesize the degree, up to but not exceeding 2-fold, to which the MSL complex upregulates male X-linked genes varies quantitatively by tissue type. In this model, MSL complex abundance acts as a rheostat to control the extent of upregulation. Using publicly available expression data, we provide evidence for our model in Drosophila somatic tissues. Specifically, we find X-to-autosome expression correlates with the tissue-specific expression of msl-2 which encodes an essential male-specific component of the MSL complex. This result suggests MSL complex mediated dosage compensation varies quantitatively by tissue type. Furthermore, this result has consequences for models explaining the organismal-scale molecular and evolutionary consequences of MSL-mediated dosage compensation. PMID:25737812

  7. Regionalized autosomal STR profiles among Armenian groups suggest disparate genetic influences.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Robert K; Herrera, Kristian J; Barrett, Dianne A; Rodriguez, Rosa; Hadden, Laura R M; Harutyunyan, Ashot; Margaryan, Ashot; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Herrera, Rene J

    2011-10-01

    The archeology and ethnology of Armenia suggest that this region has acted as a crossroads for human migrations from Europe and the Middle East since at least the Neolithic. Near continual foreign influx has, in turn, led to the supposition that the gene pools of geographically separated Armenian populations may have diverged as differing historical influences potentially left distinct genetic traces in the various regions of the Armenian plateau. In this study, we seek to address whether any evidence for such genetic regional partitioning in Armenians exists by analyzing, for the first time, 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci in 404 Armenians from four geographically well-characterized collections (Ararat Valley, Gardman, Sasun, and Lake Van) that represent distinct communities from across Historical Armenia. In addition, to determine whether genetic differences among these four Armenian populations are the result of differential affinities to populations of known historical influence in Armenia, we utilize 27 biogeographically targeted reference populations for phylogenetic and admixture analyses. From these examinations, we find that while close genetic affiliations exist between the two easternmost Armenian groups analyzed, Ararat Valley and Gardman, the remaining two populations display substantial distinctions. In particular, Sasun is distinguished by evidence for genetic contributions from Turkey, while a stronger Balkan component is detected in Lake Van, potentially suggestive of remnant genetic influences from ancient Greek and Phrygian populations in this region. PMID:21826633

  8. TRPV4 Dysfunction Promotes Renal Cystogenesis in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Berrout, Jonathan; Boukelmoune, Nabila; O'Neil, Roger G.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of cyst formation and expansion in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is poorly understood, but impaired mechanosensitivity to tubular flow and dysfunctional calcium signaling are important contributors. The activity of the mechanosensitive Ca2+-permeable TRPV4 channel underlies flow-dependent Ca2+ signaling in murine collecting duct (CD) cells, suggesting that this channel may contribute to cystogenesis in ARPKD. Here, we developed a method to isolate CD-derived cysts and studied TRPV4 function in these cysts laid open as monolayers and in nondilated split-open CDs in a rat model of ARPKD. In freshly isolated CD-derived cyst monolayers, we observed markedly impaired TRPV4 activity, abnormal subcellular localization of the channel, disrupted TRPV4 glycosylation, decreased basal [Ca2+]i, and loss of flow-mediated [Ca2+]i signaling. In contrast, nondilated CDs of these rats exhibited functional TRPV4 with largely preserved mechanosensitive properties. Long-term systemic augmentation of TRPV4 activity with a selective TRPV4 activator significantly attenuated the renal manifestations of ARPKD in a time-dependent manner. At the cellular level, selective activation of TRPV4 restored mechanosensitive Ca2+ signaling as well as the function and subcellular distribution of TRPV4. In conclusion, the functional status of TRPV4, which underlies mechanosensitive Ca2+ signaling in CD cells, inversely correlates with renal cystogenesis in ARPKD. Augmenting TRPV4 activity may have therapeutic potential in ARPKD. PMID:23411787

  9. Large Autosomal Copy-Number Differences within Unselected Monozygotic Twin Pairs are Rare.

    PubMed

    McRae, Allan F; Visscher, Peter M; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G

    2015-02-01

    Monozygotic (MZ) twins form an important system for the study of biological plasticity in humans. While MZ twins are generally considered to be genetically identical, a number of studies have emerged that have demonstrated copy-number differences within a twin pair, particularly in those discordant for disease. The rate of autosomal copy-number variation (CNV) discordance within MZ twin pairs was investigated using a population sample of 376 twin pairs genotyped on Illumina Human610-Quad arrays. After CNV calling using both QuantiSNP and PennCNV followed by manual annotation, only a single CNV difference was observed within the MZ twin pairs, being a 130 KB duplication of chromosome 5. Five other potential discordant CNV were called by the software, but excluded based on manual annotation of the regions. It is concluded that large CNV discordance is rare within MZ twin pairs, indicating that any CNV difference found within phenotypically discordant MZ twin pairs has a high probability of containing the causal gene(s) involved. PMID:25578400

  10. Autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia-clinical and genetic characteristics of a well-defined cohort.

    PubMed

    Yoon, G; Baskin, B; Tarnopolsky, M; Boycott, K M; Geraghty, M T; Sell, E; Goobie, S; Meschino, W; Banwell, B; Ray, P N

    2013-11-01

    We describe the clinical and genetic features of a well-characterized cohort of patients with autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (ARHSP) in the province of Ontario. Patients with documented corticospinal tract abnormalities were screened by whole gene sequencing and multiplex ligation probe amplification for mutations in nine genes known to cause ARHSP. Of a cohort of 39 patients, a genetic diagnosis was established in 17 (44 %) and heterozygous mutations were detected in 8 (21 %). Mutations were most frequent in SPG7 (12 patients), followed by SPG11 (10 patients), PNPLA6 (SPG39, 2 patients), and ZFYVE26 (SPG15, 2 patients). Although there are associations between some clinical manifestations of ARHSP and specific genes, many patients are tested at an early stage of the disease when phenotype/genotype correlations are not obvious. Accurate molecular characterization of well-phenotyped cohorts of patients will be essential to establishing the natural history of these rare degenerative disorders to enable future clinical trials. PMID:23733235

  11. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Hirohide; Hirano, Makito; Kiriyama, Takao; Ikeda, Masanori; Ueno, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCF{sup hSel-10} ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  12. Missense mutations in the adhalin gene linked to autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Roberds, S.L.; Anderson, R.D.; Lim, L.E.

    1994-09-01

    Adhalin, the 50-kDa dystrophin-associated glycoprotein, is deficient in skeletal muscle of patients having severe childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy (SCARMD). In several North African families, SCARMD has been linked to markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome l3q, but SCARMD has been excluded from linkage to this locus in other families. To determine whether the adhalin gene might be involved in SCARMD, human adhalin cDNA and large portions of the adhalin gene were cloned. Adhalin is a transmembrane glycoprotein with an extracellular domain bearing limited homology to domains of entactin and nerve growth factor receptor, suggesting that adhalin may serve as a receptor for an extracellular matrix protein. The adhalin gene was mapped to chromosome 17q12-q21.33, excluding the gene from involvement in 13q-linked SCARMD. A polymorphic microsatellite was identified within intron 6 of the adhalin gene, and one allelic variant of this marker cosegregated with the disease phenotype in a large French family with a lod score of 3.61 at 0 recombination. Adhalin is undetectable in skeletal muscle from affected members of this family. Missense mutations were identified within the adhalin gene that might cause SCARMD in this family. Thus, genetic defects in at least two components, dystrophin and adhalin, of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex can independently cause muscular dystrophies.

  13. Autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome associated with an 8.5 kb mtDNA single deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Barrientos, A.; Casademont, J.; Cardellach, F.

    1996-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome (MIM 222300) is characterized by optic atrophy, diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, neurosensory hearing loss, urinary tract abnormalities, and neurological dysfunction. The association of clinical manifestations in tissues and organs unrelated functionally or embryologically suggested the possibility of a mitochondrial implication in the disease, which has been demonstrated in two sporadic cases. Nonetheless, familial studies suggested an autosomal recessive mode of transmission, and recent data demonstrated linkage with markers on the short arm of human chromosome 4. The patient reported here, as well as her parents and unaffected sister, carried a heteroplasmic 8.5-kb deletion in mtDNA. The deletion accounted for 23% of mitochondrial genomes in lymphocytes from the patient and {approximately}5% in the tissues studied from members of her family. The presence of the deletion in the patient in a proportion higher than in her unaffected parents suggests a putative defect in a nuclear gene that acts at the mitochondrial level. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Mutations in the PDE6B gene in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Danciger, M.; Blaney, J.; Gao, Y.Q.; Zhao, D.Y.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied 24 small families with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance of retinitis pigmentosa by a combination of haplotype analysis and exon screening. Initial analysis of the families was made with a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism adjacent to the gene for rod cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE6B). This was followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and single-strand conformation polymorphism electrophoresis (SSCPE) of the 22 exons and a portion of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the PDE6B gene in the probands of each family in which the PDE6B locus could not be ruled out from segregating with disease. Two probands were found with compound heterozygous mutations: Gly576Asp and His620(1-bp del) mutations were present in one proband, and a Lys706X null mutation and an AG to AT splice acceptor site mutation in intron 2 were present in the other. Only the affecteds of each of the two families carried both corresponding mutations. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Disruption of the methyltransferase-like 23 gene METTL23 causes mild autosomal recessive intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Bernkopf, Marie; Webersinke, Gerald; Tongsook, Chanakan; Koyani, Chintan N.; Rafiq, Muhammad A.; Ayaz, Muhammad; Müller, Doris; Enzinger, Christian; Aslam, Muhammad; Naeem, Farooq; Schmidt, Kurt; Gruber, Karl; Speicher, Michael R.; Malle, Ernst; Macheroux, Peter; Ayub, Muhammad; Vincent, John B.; Windpassinger, Christian; Duba, Hans-Christoph

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a gene for mild nonsyndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ID) in two unrelated families, one from Austria, the other from Pakistan. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis enabled us to define a region of homozygosity by descent on chromosome 17q25. Whole-exome sequencing and analysis of this region in an affected individual from the Austrian family identified a 5 bp frameshifting deletion in the METTL23 gene. By means of Sanger sequencing of METTL23, a nonsense mutation was detected in a consanguineous ID family from Pakistan for which homozygosity-by-descent mapping had identified a region on 17q25. Both changes lead to truncation of the putative METTL23 protein, which disrupts the predicted catalytic domain and alters the cellular localization. 3D-modelling of the protein indicates that METTL23 is strongly predicted to function as an S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase. Expression analysis of METTL23 indicated a strong association with heat shock proteins, which suggests that these may act as a putative substrate for methylation by METTL23. A number of methyltransferases have been described recently in association with ID. Disruption of METTL23 presented here supports the importance of methylation processes for intact neuronal function and brain development. PMID:24626631

  16. A Linguistically Informed Autosomal STR Survey of Human Populations Residing in the Greater Himalayan Region

    PubMed Central

    Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; van der Gaag, Kristiaan J.; Zuniga, Sofia B.; Xue, Yali; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R.; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.; Parkin, Emma J.; Su, Bing; Shi, Hong; Xiao, Chun-Jie; Tang, Wen-Ru; Kashyap, V. K.; Trivedi, R.; Sitalaximi, T.; Banerjee, Jheelam; Gaselô, Karma Tshering of; Tuladhar, Nirmal M.; Opgenort, Jean-Robert M. L.; van Driem, George L.; Barbujani, Guido; de Knijff, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The greater Himalayan region demarcates two of the most prominent linguistic phyla in Asia: Tibeto-Burman and Indo-European. Previous genetic surveys, mainly using Y-chromosome polymorphisms and/or mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms suggested a substantially reduced geneflow between populations belonging to these two phyla. These studies, however, have mainly focussed on populations residing far to the north and/or south of this mountain range, and have not been able to study geneflow patterns within the greater Himalayan region itself. We now report a detailed, linguistically informed, genetic survey of Tibeto-Burman and Indo-European speakers from the Himalayan countries Nepal and Bhutan based on autosomal microsatellite markers and compare these populations with surrounding regions. The genetic differentiation between populations within the Himalayas seems to be much higher than between populations in the neighbouring countries. We also observe a remarkable genetic differentiation between the Tibeto-Burman speaking populations on the one hand and Indo-European speaking populations on the other, suggesting that language and geography have played an equally large role in defining the genetic composition of present-day populations within the Himalayas. PMID:24614536

  17. Complex Inheritance Pattern Resembling Autosomal Recessive Inheritance Involving a Microdeletion in Thrombocytopenia–Absent Radius Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Klopocki, Eva ; Schulze, Harald ; Strauß, Gabriele ; Ott, Claus-Eric ; Hall, Judith ; Trotier, Fabienne ; Fleischhauer, Silke ; Greenhalgh, Lynn ; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth A. ; Neumann, Luitgard M. ; Habenicht, Rolf ; König, Rainer ; Seemanova, Eva ; Megarbane, André ; Ropers, Hans-Hilger ; Ullmann, Reinhard ; Horn, Denise ; Mundlos, Stefan 

    2007-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia–absent radius (TAR) syndrome is characterized by hypomegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and bilateral radial aplasia in the presence of both thumbs. Other frequent associations are congenital heart disease and a high incidence of cow’s milk intolerance. Evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance comes from families with several affected individuals born to unaffected parents, but several other observations argue for a more complex pattern of inheritance. In this study, we describe a common interstitial microdeletion of 200 kb on chromosome 1q21.1 in all 30 investigated patients with TAR syndrome, detected by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. Analysis of the parents revealed that this deletion occurred de novo in 25% of affected individuals. Intriguingly, inheritance of the deletion along the maternal line as well as the paternal line was observed. The absence of this deletion in a cohort of control individuals argues for a specific role played by the microdeletion in the pathogenesis of TAR syndrome. We hypothesize that TAR syndrome is associated with a deletion on chromosome 1q21.1 but that the phenotype develops only in the presence of an additional as-yet-unknown modifier (mTAR). PMID:17236129

  18. Severe neuronopathic autosomal recessive osteopetrosis due to homozygous deletions affecting OSTM1.

    PubMed

    Ott, Claus-Eric; Fischer, Björn; Schröter, Phillipe; Richter, Reyk; Gupta, Neerja; Verma, Nishant; Kabra, Madhulika; Mundlos, Stefan; Rajab, Anna; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Kornak, Uwe

    2013-08-01

    Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO, MIM 259700) is a genetically heterogeneous rare skeletal disorder characterized by failure of osteoclast resorption leading to pathologically increased bone density, bone marrow failure, and fractures. In the neuronopathic form neurological complications are especially severe and progressive. An early identification of the underlying genetic defect is imperative for assessment of prognosis and treatment by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we describe for the first time homozygous microdeletions of different sizes affecting the OSTM1 gene in two unrelated consanguineous families with children suffering from neuronopathic infantile malignant osteopetrosis. Patients showed an exceptionally severe phenotype with variable CNS malformations, seizures, blindness, and deafness. Multi-organ failure due to sepsis led to early death between six weeks and five months of age in spite of intensive care treatment. Analysis of the breakpoints revealed different mechanisms underlying both rearrangements. Microdeletions seem to represent a considerable portion of OSTM1 mutations and should therefore be included in a sufficient diagnostic screening. PMID:23685543

  19. Disruption of the methyltransferase-like 23 gene METTL23 causes mild autosomal recessive intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Bernkopf, Marie; Webersinke, Gerald; Tongsook, Chanakan; Koyani, Chintan N; Rafiq, Muhammad A; Ayaz, Muhammad; Müller, Doris; Enzinger, Christian; Aslam, Muhammad; Naeem, Farooq; Schmidt, Kurt; Gruber, Karl; Speicher, Michael R; Malle, Ernst; Macheroux, Peter; Ayub, Muhammad; Vincent, John B; Windpassinger, Christian; Duba, Hans-Christoph

    2014-08-01

    We describe the characterization of a gene for mild nonsyndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ID) in two unrelated families, one from Austria, the other from Pakistan. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis enabled us to define a region of homozygosity by descent on chromosome 17q25. Whole-exome sequencing and analysis of this region in an affected individual from the Austrian family identified a 5 bp frameshifting deletion in the METTL23 gene. By means of Sanger sequencing of METTL23, a nonsense mutation was detected in a consanguineous ID family from Pakistan for which homozygosity-by-descent mapping had identified a region on 17q25. Both changes lead to truncation of the putative METTL23 protein, which disrupts the predicted catalytic domain and alters the cellular localization. 3D-modelling of the protein indicates that METTL23 is strongly predicted to function as an S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase. Expression analysis of METTL23 indicated a strong association with heat shock proteins, which suggests that these may act as a putative substrate for methylation by METTL23. A number of methyltransferases have been described recently in association with ID. Disruption of METTL23 presented here supports the importance of methylation processes for intact neuronal function and brain development. PMID:24626631

  20. TMPRSS3, a type II transmembrane serine protease mutated in non-syndromic autosomal recessive deafness.

    PubMed

    Guipponi, Michel; Antonarakis, Stylianos Emmanuel; Scott, Hamish Steele

    2008-01-01

    Recently, we and others have shown that mutations in TMPRSS3 were responsible for autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. TMPRSS3 is a member of the Type II Transmembrane Serine Protease (TTSP) family and encodes for a protease that also contains LDLRA (low-density lipoprotein receptor class A) and SRCR (scavenger receptor cysteine rich) domains. Fourteen pathogenic mutations, which occur not only in the catalytic domain but also in the LDLRA and SRCR domains, have been identified to date that cause the DFNB8/10 forms of deafness. In vitro experiments demonstrated that TMPRSS3 mutants were proteolytically inactive indicating that TMPRSS3 protease activity is critical for normal auditory function. However, how missense mutations in the LDLRA and SRCR domains affect the proteolytic activity of TMPRSS3 remains to be elucidated. Although the role of TMPRSS3 in the auditory system is currently not completely understood, it has been shown to regulate the activity of the ENaC sodium channel in vitro and could therefore participate in the regulation of sodium concentration in the cochlea. TMPRSS3 mutations are not a common cause of hereditary deafness, the elucidation of its function is nevertheless important for better understanding of hearing, and provide biological targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:17981648