Science.gov

Sample records for autosomal dominant distal

  1. Relative Contribution of Mutations in Genes for Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierick, Ines; Baets, Jonathan; Irobi, Joy; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Deconinck, Tine; Merlini, Luciano; Van den Bergh, Peter; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Robberecht, Wim; Fischer, Dirk; Morales, Raul Juntas; Mitrovic, Zoran; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Nelis, Eva; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting spinal alpha-motor neurons. Since 2001, mutations in six different genes have been identified for autosomal dominant distal HMN; "glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)," "dynactin 1 (DCTN1)," "small heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1),"…

  2. Mutation Conferring Apical-Targeting Motif on AE1 Exchanger Causes Autosomal Dominant Distal RTA

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Andrew C.; Su, Ya; Yiu, Vivian; Cuthbert, Alan W.; Trachtman, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in SLC4A1 that mislocalize its product, the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger AE1, away from its normal position on the basolateral membrane of the α-intercalated cell cause autosomal dominant distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). We studied a family exhibiting dominant inheritance and defined a mutation (AE1-M909T) that affects the C terminus of AE1, a region rich in potential targeting motifs that are incompletely characterized. Expression of AE1-M909T in Xenopus oocytes confirmed preservation of its anion exchange function. Wild-type GFP-tagged AE1 localized to the basolateral membrane of polarized MDCK cells, but AE1-M909T localized to both the apical and basolateral membranes. Wild-type AE1 trafficked directly to the basolateral membrane without apical passage, whereas AE1-M909T trafficked to both cell surfaces, implying the gain of an apical-targeting signal. We found that AE1-M909T acquired class 1 PDZ ligand activity that the wild type did not possess. In summary, the AE1-M909T mutation illustrates the role of abnormal targeting in dRTA and provides insight into C-terminal motifs that govern normal trafficking of AE1. PMID:22518001

  3. Mutation conferring apical-targeting motif on AE1 exchanger causes autosomal dominant distal RTA.

    PubMed

    Fry, Andrew C; Su, Ya; Yiu, Vivian; Cuthbert, Alan W; Trachtman, Howard; Karet Frankl, Fiona E

    2012-07-01

    Mutations in SLC4A1 that mislocalize its product, the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger AE1, away from its normal position on the basolateral membrane of the α-intercalated cell cause autosomal dominant distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). We studied a family exhibiting dominant inheritance and defined a mutation (AE1-M909T) that affects the C terminus of AE1, a region rich in potential targeting motifs that are incompletely characterized. Expression of AE1-M909T in Xenopus oocytes confirmed preservation of its anion exchange function. Wild-type GFP-tagged AE1 localized to the basolateral membrane of polarized MDCK cells, but AE1-M909T localized to both the apical and basolateral membranes. Wild-type AE1 trafficked directly to the basolateral membrane without apical passage, whereas AE1-M909T trafficked to both cell surfaces, implying the gain of an apical-targeting signal. We found that AE1-M909T acquired class 1 PDZ ligand activity that the wild type did not possess. In summary, the AE1-M909T mutation illustrates the role of abnormal targeting in dRTA and provides insight into C-terminal motifs that govern normal trafficking of AE1. PMID:22518001

  4. Mutations in the chloride-bicarbonate exchanger gene AE1 cause autosomal dominant but not autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Karet, F. E.; Gainza, F. J.; Györy, A. Z.; Unwin, R. J.; Wrong, O.; Tanner, M. J. A.; Nayir, A.; Alpay, H.; Santos, F.; Hulton, S. A.; Bakkaloglu, A.; Ozen, S.; Cunningham, M. J.; di Pietro, A.; Walker, W. G.; Lifton, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    Primary distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) is characterized by reduced ability to acidify urine, variable hyperchloremic hypokalemic metabolic acidosis, nephrocalcinosis, and nephrolithiasis. Kindreds showing either autosomal dominant or recessive transmission are described. Mutations in the chloride-bicarbonate exchanger AE1 have recently been reported in four autosomal dominant dRTA kindreds, three of these altering codon Arg589. We have screened 26 kindreds with primary dRTA for mutations in AE1. Inheritance was autosomal recessive in seventeen kindreds, autosomal dominant in one, and uncertain due to unknown parental phenotype or sporadic disease in eight kindreds. No mutations in AE1 were detected in any of the autosomal recessive kindreds, and analysis of linkage showed no evidence of linkage of recessive dRTA to AE1. In contrast, heterozygous mutations in AE1 were identified in the one known dominant dRTA kindred, in one sporadic case, and one kindred with two affected brothers. In the dominant kindred, the mutation Arg-589/Ser cosegregated with dRTA in the extended pedigree. An Arg-589/His mutation in the sporadic case proved to be a de novo mutation. In the third kindred, affected brothers both have an intragenic 13-bp duplication resulting in deletion of the last 11 amino acids of AE1. These mutations were not detected in 80 alleles from unrelated normal individuals. These findings underscore the key role of Arg-589 and the C terminus in normal AE1 function, and indicate that while mutations in AE1 cause autosomal dominant dRTA, defects in this gene are not responsible for recessive disease. PMID:9600966

  5. Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC).

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N P; Goldberg, M F; Fishman, G A; Salzano, T

    1984-01-01

    We report the second family recognised to have autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy. The clinical features were (1) autosomal dominant inheritance; (2) peripheral, coarse pigmentary degeneration of the fundus for 360 degrees, with a relatively discrete posterior border in the equatorial region (this finding may be pathognomonic); (3) superficial punctate yellowish-white opacities in the retina; (4) various vascular abnormalities; (5) breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier; (6) retinal neovascularisation; (7) vitreous abnormalities; and (8) choroidal atrophy. Visual reduction was mainly due to macular oedema or vitreous haemorrhage. Images PMID:6689931

  6. A new family linked to the RP13 locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on distal 17p.

    PubMed

    Tarttelin, E E; Plant, C; Weissenbach, J; Bird, A C; Bhattacharya, S S; Inglehearn, C F

    1996-06-01

    A form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) mapping to chromosome 17p has been reported in a single large South African family. We now report a new family with severe early onset ADRP which maps to 17p. Linkage and haplotype analysis in this family places the ADRP locus in the 5 cM interval between markers AFMc024za5 and D17S1845, confirming the data obtained in the South African family. The discovery of a second 17p linked family may imply that this is one of the more common loci for dominant RP. In addition, the confirmation of an RP diagnosis at this locus is of interest since loci for a dominant cone dystrophy and Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA1) have recently been linked to the same markers. While the cone dystrophy locus may be allelic with RP, our data and that of Goliath et al show that distinct genes are responsible for dominant RP and Leber's congenital amaurosis on chromosome 17p. PMID:8782056

  7. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy: a degenerative disease with a range of developmental ocular anomalies. Eye (Lond). 2011 Jan;25(1):113-8. doi: 10.1038/eye.2010.165. Epub 2010 Nov 12. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Yardley J, Leroy BP, ...

  8. Autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy with speech dyspraxia.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, I E

    2000-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Rolandic Epilepsy with Speech Dyspraxia (ADRESD) is a rare disorder which highlights the relationship between Benign Rolandic Epilepsy (BRE) and speech and language disorders. Subtle speech and language disorders have recently been well characterised in BRE. ADRESD is associated with long term, more severe speech and language difficulties. The time course of rolandic epilepsy in ADRESD is typical of that of BRE. ADRESD is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with anticipation. It is postulated that the anticipation may be due to an, as yet unidentified, triplet repeat expansion in a gene for rolandic epilepsy. BRE follows complex inheritance but it is possible that ADRESD may hold some valuable clues to the pathogenesis of BRE. PMID:11231219

  9. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ADPEAF autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features Enable Javascript to view the ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features ( ADPEAF ) is an uncommon form ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... stationary night blindness autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness is a disorder of the retina , which is ...

  11. Frontometaphyseal dysplasia: evidence for autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed

    Kassner, E G; Haller, J O; Reddy, V H; Mitarotundo, A; Katz, I

    1976-12-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia is a syndrome that encompasses cranial hyperostosis, abnormal tubulation of cylindrical bones, and other skeletal and extraskeletal abnormalities. The most striking features are overgrowth of the supraorbital ridges which results in a Mephistophelian facial appearance and a radiographic configuration of the skull that has been likened to a soldier's helmet. Most patients have severe hearing loss, defective dentition, poorly developed musculature, and joint contractures. Dominant inheritance has been suggested in previous reports, but an appropriate pedigree has been documented in only one family. This paper describes three additional patients in two unrelated families: (1) an 8-year-old boy whose mother has mild metaphyseal dysplasia and several minor skeletal abnormalities that have occurred in patients with the syndrome; and (2) two maternal half-brothers. These cases provide additional evidence that frontometaphyseal dysplasia is an autosomal dominant trait with variable penetrance. PMID:998829

  12. Cleidocranial Dysplasia with Autosomal Dominant Inheritance Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, P; Khan, S; Sharma, R; Bhargava, S

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in a female with brachycephalic skull, depressed frontal bone and nasal bridge, hypoplastic middle one-third of face with mandibular prognathism and hyper mobility of both shoulders with associated radiographic features. Odontologist is often the first professional who patient of CCD approaches, since there is a delay in the eruption or absence of permanent teeth. The premature diagnosis allows a scope for proper treatment modalities, offering a better life quality for patient. PMID:25184084

  13. Cleidocranial dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance pattern.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, P; Khan, S; Sharma, R; Bhargava, S

    2014-07-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in a female with brachycephalic skull, depressed frontal bone and nasal bridge, hypoplastic middle one-third of face with mandibular prognathism and hyper mobility of both shoulders with associated radiographic features. Odontologist is often the first professional who patient of CCD approaches, since there is a delay in the eruption or absence of permanent teeth. The premature diagnosis allows a scope for proper treatment modalities, offering a better life quality for patient. PMID:25184084

  14. Non-syndromic autosomal-dominant deafness.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M B

    2002-07-01

    Non-syndromic deafness is a paradigm of genetic heterogeneity. More than 70 loci have been mapped, and 25 of the nuclear genes responsible for non-syndromic deafness have been identified. Autosomal-dominant genes are responsible for about 20% of the cases of hereditary non-syndromic deafness, with 16 different genes identified to date. In the present article we review these 16 genes, their function and their contribution to deafness in different populations. The complexity is underlined by the fact that several of the genes are involved in both dominant and recessive non-syndromic deafness or in both non-syndromic and syndromic deafness. Mutations in eight of the genes have so far been detected in only single dominant deafness families, and their contribution to deafness on a population base might therefore be limited, or is currently unknown. Identification of all genes involved in hereditary hearing loss will help in the understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying normal hearing, will facilitate early diagnosis and intervention and might offer opportunities for rational therapy. PMID:12123480

  15. Evidence for further genetic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar-Singh, R.; Kenna, P.F.; Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, P. )

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the possible involvement of further genetic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa using a previously unreported large Irish family with the disease. We have utilized polymorphic microsatellite markers to exclude the disease gene segregating in this family from 3q, 6p, and the pericentric region of 8, that is, each of the three chromosomal regions to which adRP loci are known to map. Hence, we provide definitive evidence for the involvement of a fourth locus in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Nonallelic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with incomplete penetrance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P.

    1994-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of retinal diseases in which photoreceptor cells throughout the retina degenerate. Although there is considerable genetic heterogeneity (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms exist), there is a possibility that some clinically defined subtypes of the disease may be the result of mutations at the same locus. One possible clinically defined subtype is that of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) with incomplete penetrance. Whereas in most families with ADRP, carriers can be clearly identified because of visual loss, ophthalmological findings, or abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs), in occasional families some obligate carriers are asymptomatic and have normal or nearly normal ERGs even late in life. A recent paper reported the mapping of the diseases locus in one pedigree (designated adRP7) with ADRP with incomplete penetrance to chromosome 7p. To test the idea that ADRP with incomplete penetrance may be genetically homogeneous, we have evaluated whether a different family with incomplete penetrance also has a disease gene linked to the same region. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. RNA Interference Prevents Autosomal-Dominant Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Seiji B; Ranum, Paul T; Moteki, Hideaki; Pan, Bifeng; Goodwin, Alexander T; Goodman, Shawn S; Abbas, Paul J; Holt, Jeffrey R; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-06-01

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory deficit. It is frequently caused by the expression of an allele carrying a single dominant missense mutation. Herein, we show that a single intracochlear injection of an artificial microRNA carried in a viral vector can slow progression of hearing loss for up to 35 weeks in the Beethoven mouse, a murine model of non-syndromic human deafness caused by a dominant gain-of-function mutation in Tmc1 (transmembrane channel-like 1). This outcome is noteworthy because it demonstrates the feasibility of RNA-interference-mediated suppression of an endogenous deafness-causing allele to slow progression of hearing loss. Given that most autosomal-dominant non-syndromic hearing loss in humans is caused by this mechanism of action, microRNA-based therapeutics might be broadly applicable as a therapy for this type of deafness. PMID:27236922

  18. Familial multiple lipomatosis with clear autosomal dominant inheritance and onset in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Hiang; Spence, Roy A J; Upadhyaya, Meena; Morrison, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    Familial multiple lipomatosis is rare. Several modes of inheritance have been proposed but no conclusive evidence shown, although some families have suggested autosomal dominant inheritance. The authors describe a family with multiple lipomatosis showing clear autosomal dominant inheritance, and no mutations within the NF1, SPRED1 or Cowden disease (PTEN) genes. Familial autosomal dominant lipomatosis is a rare but distinct entity. PMID:22707495

  19. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: the last 3 years

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Vicente E.; Harris, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most prevalent, potentially lethal monogenic disorder. It has large inter- and intra-familial variability explained to a large extent by its genetic heterogeneity and modifier genes. An increased understanding of its underlying genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms and a better appreciation of its progression and systemic manifestations have laid out the foundation for the development of clinical trials and potentially effective therapies. The purpose of this review is to update the core of knowledge in this area with recent publications that have appeared during 2006–2009. PMID:19455193

  20. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C M

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 (th) century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 (st) century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  1. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 th century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 st century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  2. Nutraceutical for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yuajit, Chaowalit; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disorder caused by mutations of either PKD1 or PKD2 gene. Cyst formation initiates from a combination of abnormal cell proliferation along with enhanced fluid secretion. ADPKD is characterized by the progressive enlargement of cysts which destroy the renal parenchymal cells, resulting in renal failure. Currently, there is no effective treatment for this disease. Interestingly, several relevant therapeutic effects of herbal medicine relevant to pathogenic process of ADPKD have urged the researchers to search for potential candidate herb as nutraceutical for ADPKD therapy. Up to now, several natural compounds, such as triptolide, curcumin, ginkolide B, and steviol (stevia extract) have been shown to be able to retard cyst progression in ADPKD. The detailed mechanism of these compounds showed that triptolide enhanced calcium restoration, curcumin inhibited ERK & p-STAT3 pathways, ginkolide B inhibited Ras/MAPK pathway, and steviol activated AMPK, which inhibited CFTR channel and mTOR pathway in cell and mouse models of PKD. In addition, they are currently inpreclinical and clinical studies, respectively. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of ADPKD and the recent therapeutic approaches, especially a potential use of nutraceutical for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:26817244

  3. GCAP1 mutations associated with autosomal dominant cone dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the heterogeneity of autosomal dominant cone and cone-rod dystrophies (adCD, and adCORD, respectively). As one of the best characterized adCD genes, we focus on the GUCA1A gene encoding guanylate cyclase activating protein 1 (GCAP1), a protein carrying three high affinity Ca2+ binding motifs (EF hands). GCAP1 senses changes in cytoplasmic free [Ca2+] and communicates these changes to GC1, by either inhibiting it (at high free [Ca2+]), or stimulating it (at low free [Ca2+]). A number of missense mutations altering the structure and Ca2+ affinity of EF hands have been discovered. These mutations are associated with a gain of function, producing dominant cone and cone rod dystrophy phenotypes. In this article we review these mutations and describe the consequences of specific mutations on GCAP1 structure and GC stimulation. PMID:20238026

  4. Homozygotes for the autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, M.L.; Falchetti, A.; Tonelli, F. ); Weber, G.; Svensson, A.; Larsson, C. ); Castello, R.; Furlani, L.; Scappaticci, S.; Fraccaro, M.

    1993-12-01

    Families in which both parents are heterozygotes for the same autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome are extremely unusual. Recently, the authors had the unique opportunity to evaluate three symptomatic siblings from the union between two unrelated individuals affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). When the three siblings and their parents and relatives were genotyped for 12 markers tightly linked to the MEN1 locus, at 11q13, two of the siblings were found to be homozygotes, and one a heterozygote, for MEN1. With regard to the MEN1 syndrome, no phenotypic differences were observed between the two homozygotes and the heterozygotes. However, the two homozygotes showed unexplained infertility, which was not the case for any of the heterozygotes. Thus, MEN1 appears to be a disease with complete dominance, and the presence of two MEN1 alleles with mutations of the type that occur constitutionally may be insufficient for tumor development. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  5. The pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Somlo, S; Markowitz, G S

    2000-07-01

    The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the two major genes responsible for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, are the seminal discoveries upon which much of the current investigation into the pathogenesis of this common heritable disease is based. A major mechanistic insight was achieved with the discovery that autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease occurs by a two-hit mechanism requiring somatic inactivation of the normal allele in individual polarized epithelial cells. Most recent advances are focused on the function of the respective protein products, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2. Indirect evidence supports an interaction between polycystin-1 and -2, albeit it is unlikely that they work in concert in all tissues and at all times. They associate in yeast two hybrid and cotransfection assays and there is a striking similarity in the renal and pancreatic cystic phenotypes of Pkd2-/- and Pkd1del34/del34 mice. Also, the respective homologues of both proteins are expressed in the same sensory neuronal cells in the nematode and the human disease phenotypes remain completely overlapping with the major difference being in relative severity. Mounting evidence supports the hypothesis that polycystin-1 is a cell surface receptor. A close homologue in the sea urchin sperm mediates the acrosome reaction in response to contact with egg-jelly, the nematode homologue functions in mechano- or chemosensation, and the solution structure of the repeated extracellular polycystic kidney disease domains reveals a beta-sandwich fold commonly found in surface receptor molecules. Indirect evidence also supports the initial hypothesis that polycystin-2 is a calcium channel subunit. Several closely related homologues retain the calcium channel signature motif but differ in their predicted interaction domains, and one of these homologues has been shown to be a calcium regulated cation channel. Several important distinctions in polcystin-1 and -2 function have also been

  6. LAMB3 mutations causing autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Seymen, F; Lee, K E; Ko, J; Yildirim, M; Tuna, E B; Gencay, K; Shin, T J; Kyun, H K; Simmer, J P; Hu, J C-C

    2013-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can be either isolated or part of a larger syndrome. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a collection of autosomal-recessive disorders featuring AI associated with skin fragility and other symptoms. JEB is a recessive syndrome usually caused by mutations in both alleles of COL17A1, LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2. In rare cases, heterozygous carriers in JEB kindreds display enamel malformations in the absence of skin fragility (isolated AI). We recruited two kindreds with autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) characterized by generalized severe enamel hypoplasia with deep linear grooves and pits. Whole-exome sequencing of both probands identified novel heterozygous mutations in the last exon of LAMB3 that likely truncated the protein. The mutations perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in both families. In Family 1, an 8-bp deletion (c.3446_3453del GACTGGAG) shifted the reading frame (p.Gly 1149Glufs*8). In Family 2, a single nucleotide substitution (c.C3431A) generated an in-frame translation termination codon (p.Ser1144*). We conclude that enamel formation is particularly sensitive to defects in hemidesmosome/basement-membrane complexes and that syndromic and non-syndromic forms of AI can be etiologically related. PMID:23958762

  7. Mitochondrial anomalies in a Swiss family with autosomal dominant myoglobinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-du Pan, R.C.; Favre, H.; Junod, A.

    1997-04-14

    We report on a Swiss family in which 10 individuals of both sexes in 4 successive generations suffered from myoglobinuria, precipitated by febrile illness. It is the second family described with autosomal dominant inheritance of myoglobinuria. Four individuals suffered acute renal failure, which in two was reversible only after dialysis. In a recent case, a mitochondrial disorder was suspected because of an abnormal increase in lactate levels during an exercise test and because of a subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria in a muscle biopsy, associated with a lack of cytochrome C oxidase in some muscle fibers. No mutation in the mitochondrial DNA was identified. Along with the inheritance pattern, these findings suggest that the myoglobinuria in this family is caused by a nuclear-encoded mutation affecting the respiratory chain. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Platelet counts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Setyapranata, Stella; Holt, Stephen G

    2016-05-01

    Platelet counts in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) have been reported to be lower than in control populations in one small study but data are sparse. We retrospectively audited real world platelet data from 290 ADPKD patients with corresponding age and sex-matched controls. We analysed 42 972 individual blood counts and patients with ADPKD had statistically lower platelet counts (213 ± 63 vs. 238 ± 69 × 10(9)/L, p < 0.01) on dialysis. In the transplant and chronic kidney disease (CKD) groups, there were no significant differences in the platelet counts. The magnitude of the difference in platelet numbers was small and unlikely to be clinically significant, so findings of low platelets in ADPKD should be further investigated. PMID:26270278

  9. Molecular diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torra Balcells, R; Ars Criach, E

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disorder. Its estimated prevalence is 1 per 800 individuals. ADPKD patients constitute 8% of the population on dialysis or kidney transplantation. The disease can be diagnosed using radiological or genetic procedures. Direct genetic diagnosis of the disease can now be performed in Spain; however, it is not an easy or cheap test. This is why every case should be considered individually to determine whether genetic testing is appropriate, and to determine which genetic test is most adequate. Genetic testing in ADPKD is of special interest for living donors and neonatal and sporadic cases. Genetic testing offers the chance of performing prenatal or pre-implantation testing of embryos in families with severe cases of the disease. Also, this will enable the disease to be treated, when specific treatment becomes available, in cases that would not be candidates for treatment without genetic confirmation. PMID:21270911

  10. [Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: is the treatment for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Le Meur, Yannick

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent Mendelian inherited disorder. It covers 6.1% of incident ESRD patients in France in 2011. Long left untreated, this disease will soon benefit from targeted therapies currently under evaluation. Several molecules have already reached the stage of clinical trials: the evaluation of mTOR inhibitors yielded deceiving results and, more recently, 2 different molecules demonstrated a slight impact on the progression of total kidney volume (TKV): tolvaptan, vasopressin receptor-V2 inhibitor and somatostatin analogues; both of these molecules acting throughout the decrease of intracellular AMPc. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe the signaling pathways involved, then to present both the published and ongoing clinical trials and the promising molecules evaluated in murine models. PMID:25086476

  11. Autism in siblings with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Tomoko; Kumada, Tomohiro; Saito, Keiko; Fujii, Tatsuya

    2013-02-01

    In 1999, Hirose et al. reported a Japanese family with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) associated with a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 subunit mutation (S252L). We followed the siblings of this family, and found that the elder brother had Asperger's disorder without mental retardation (MR) and the younger brother had autistic disorder with profound MR. The clinical epileptic features of the siblings were very similar, and both had deficits in socialization, but their cognitive development differed markedly. It thus seems that epilepsy is the direct phenotype of the S252L mutation, whereas other various factors modulate the cognitive and social development. No patients with ADNFLE have previously been reported to have autism spectrum disorder or profound MR. PMID:22883468

  12. Novel therapeutic approaches to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    LaRiviere, Wells B; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E

    2015-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder characterized by the progressive growth of renal cysts that, over time, destroy the architecture of the renal parenchyma and typically lead to kidney failure by the sixth decade of life. ADPKD is common and represents a leading cause of renal failure worldwide. Currently, there are no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for the disease, and the existing standard of care is primarily supportive in nature. However, significant advances in the understanding of the molecular biology of the disease have inspired investigation into potential new therapies. Several drugs designed to slow or arrest the progression of ADPKD have shown promise in preclinical models and clinical trials, including vasopressin receptor antagonists and somatostatin analogs. This article examines the literature underlying the rationale for molecular therapies for ADPKD and reviews the existing clinical evidence for their indication for human patients with the disease. PMID:25438190

  13. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Beck, Anita E.; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Harrell, Tanya M.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A.; Carey, John C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lee, Brendan H.; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; McGee, Sean; O’Reilly, Patrick; Paeper, Bryan; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shaffer, Tristan; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Underwood, Jason G.; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Yi, Qian; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development. PMID:25957469

  14. MOLECULAR ADVANCES IN AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Anna Rachel; Germino, Gregory G.; Somlo, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD) is the most common form of inherited kidney disease that results renal failure. The understanding the pathogenesis of ADPKD has advanced significantly since the discovery of the two causative genes, PKD1 or PKD2. Dominantly inherited gene mutations followed by somatic second hit mutations inactivating the normal copy of the respective gene result in renal tubular cyst formation that deforms the kidney and eventually impairs its function. The respective gene products, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2, work together in a common cellular pathway. Polycystin-1, a large receptor molecule, forms a receptor-channel complex with polycystin-2, which is a cation channel belonging to the TRP family. Both polycystin proteins have been localized to the primary cilium, a non-motile microtubule based structure that extends from the apical membrane of tubular cells into the lumen. Here we discuss recent insights in the pathogenesis of ADPKD including the genetics of ADPKD, the properties of the respective polycystin proteins, the role of cilia, and some cell signaling pathways that have been implicated in the pathways related to PKD1 and PKD2. PMID:20219615

  15. Autosomal Dominant Diabetes Arising From a Wolfram Syndrome 1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Chines, Peter S.; Hara, Takashi; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Swift, Amy J.; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Mahadevan, Jana; Peltonen, Sirkku; Huopio, Hanna; Nuutila, Pirjo; Narisu, Narisu; Goldfeder, Rachel L.; Stitzel, Michael L.; Lu, Simin; Boehnke, Michael; Urano, Fumihiko; Collins, Francis S.; Laakso, Markku

    2013-01-01

    We used an unbiased genome-wide approach to identify exonic variants segregating with diabetes in a multigenerational Finnish family. At least eight members of this family presented with diabetes with age of diagnosis ranging from 18 to 51 years and a pattern suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance. We sequenced the exomes of four affected members of this family and performed follow-up genotyping of additional affected and unaffected family members. We uncovered a novel nonsynonymous variant (p.Trp314Arg) in the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene that segregates completely with the diabetic phenotype. Multipoint parametric linkage analysis with 13 members of this family identified a single linkage signal with maximum logarithm of odds score 3.01 at 4p16.2-p16.1, corresponding to a region harboring the WFS1 locus. Functional studies demonstrate a role for this variant in endoplasmic reticulum stress, which is consistent with the β-cell failure phenotype seen in mutation carriers. This represents the first compelling report of a mutation in WFS1 associated with dominantly inherited nonsyndromic adult-onset diabetes. PMID:23903355

  16. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.; Stephens, K.; Evans, J.P. ); Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. ); Kukolich, M. )

    1994-07-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF; also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by missing central digits and other distal limb malformations. An association between SHSF and cytogenetically visible rearrangements of chromosome 7 at bands q21-q22 provides compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene at this location, and the locus has been designated SHFD1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21-q22 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen-D7S492-D7S527-(D7S479-D7S491)-SHFD1-D7S553-D7S518-qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at three of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrates autosomal dominant SHSF. Evidence against linkage of the SHSF gene to 7q21-q22 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF. The authors propose the name SHSF2 for this second locus. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Imaging-based diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Pei, York; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Conklin, John; Sundsbak, Jamie L; Heyer, Christina M; Chan, Winnie; Wang, Kairong; He, Ning; Rattansingh, Anand; Atri, Mostafa; Harris, Peter C; Haider, Masoom A

    2015-03-01

    The clinical use of conventional ultrasonography (US) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is currently limited by reduced diagnostic sensitivity, especially in at-risk subjects younger than 30 years of age. In this single-center prospective study, we compared the diagnostic performance of MRI with that of high-resolution (HR) US in 126 subjects ages 16-40 years born with a 50% risk of ADPKD who underwent both these renal imaging studies and comprehensive PKD1 and PKD2 mutation screening. Concurrently, 45 healthy control subjects without a family history of ADPKD completed the same imaging protocol. We analyzed 110 at-risk subjects whose disease status was unequivocally defined by molecular testing and 45 unaffected healthy control subjects. Using a total of >10 cysts as a test criterion in subjects younger than 30 years of age, we found that MRI provided both a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Comparison of our results from HR US with those from a previous study of conventional US using the test criterion of a total of three or more cysts found a higher diagnostic sensitivity (approximately 97% versus approximately 82%) with a slightly decreased specificity (approximately 98% versus 100%) in this study. Similar results were obtained in test subjects between the ages of 30 and 40 years old. These results suggest that MRI is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosis of ADPKD. HR US has the potential to rival the diagnostic performance of MRI but is both center- and operator-dependent. PMID:25074509

  18. [Clinical diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Magistroni, Riccardo; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder related to kidney. ADPKD is usually easy to diagnose in people who have a family history of ADPKDs developing typical symptoms, including flank, abdominal pain or macroscopic hematuria. In this setting, diagnosis in adults at risk for ADPKD is commonly performed by ultrasonography, which reveals two enlarged kidneys with multiple bilateral cysts. ADPKD may be more difficult to diagnose in the absence of family history or in subjects with atypical presentation, including asymmetric or focal renal imaging findings, discordant disease within family, early onset of ADPKD and development of ESRD before 30 yr of age. The presence of a total of three or more renal cysts for at-risk subjects aged 15-39 years and two cysts or more in each kidney for at-risk subjects aged 40-59 years are sufficient for the diagnosis of ADPKD. The absence of any renal cyst is sufficient for disease exclusion only for at-risk subjects aged 40 years or older. If the family history is negative, the diagnosis of ADPKD can be made in a patient with enlarged kidneys, numerous cysts, presence of liver cysts and absence of findings suggesting a different cystic disease. If the imaging diagnosis is not clear or showing atypical manifestations in subjects, molecular genetic testing should be performed. PMID:27067212

  19. Renal transplantation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Nada; Devuyst, Olivier; Pirson, Yves

    2014-08-01

    In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) evaluated for kidney transplantation, issues related to native nephrectomy, cystic liver involvement, screening for intracranial aneurysms and living-related kidney donation deserve special consideration. Prophylactic native nephrectomy is restricted to patients with a history of cyst infection or recurrent haemorrhage or to those in whom space must be made to implant the graft. Patients with liver involvement require pretransplant imaging. Selection of patients for pretransplant screening of intracranial aneurysms should follow the general recommendations for patients with ADPKD. In living related-donor candidates aged <30 years and at-risk of ADPKD, molecular genetic testing should be carried out when ultrasonography and MRI findings are normal or equivocal. After kidney transplantation, patient and graft survival rates are excellent and the volume of native kidneys decreases. However, liver cysts continue to grow and treatment with a somatostatin analogue should be considered in patients with massive cyst involvement. Cerebrovascular events have a marginal effect on post-transplant morbidity and mortality. An increased risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus and nonmelanoma skin cancers has been reported, but several studies have challenged these findings. Finally, no data currently support the preferential use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors as immunosuppressive agents in transplant recipients with ADPKD. PMID:24935705

  20. Copa Syndrome: a Novel Autosomal Dominant Immune Dysregulatory Disease.

    PubMed

    Vece, Timothy J; Watkin, Levi B; Nicholas, Sarah K; Canter, Debra; Braun, Michael C; Guillerman, Robert Paul; Eldin, Karen W; Bertolet, Grant; McKinley, Scott D; de Guzman, Marietta; Forbes, Lisa R; Chinn, Ivan; Orange, Jordan S

    2016-05-01

    Inherently defective immunity typically results in either ineffective host defense, immune regulation, or both. As a category of primary immunodeficiency diseases, those that impair immune regulation can lead to autoimmunity and/or autoinflammation. In this review we focus on one of the most recently discovered primary immunodeficiencies that leads to immune dysregulation: "Copa syndrome". Copa syndrome is named for the gene mutated in the disease, which encodes the alpha subunit of the coatomer complex-I that, in aggregate, is devoted to transiting molecular cargo from the Golgi complex to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Copa syndrome is autosomal dominant with variable expressivity and results from mutations affecting a narrow amino acid stretch in the COPA gene-encoding COPα protein. Patients with these mutations typically develop arthritis and interstitial lung disease with pulmonary hemorrhage representing a striking feature. Immunologically Copa syndrome is associated with autoantibody development, increased Th17 cells and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression including IL-1β and IL-6. Insights have also been gained into the underlying mechanism of Copa syndrome, which include excessive ER stress owing to the impaired return of proteins from the Golgi, and presumably resulting aberrant cellular autophagy. As such it represents a novel cellular disorder of intracellular trafficking associated with a specific clinical presentation and phenotype. PMID:27048656

  1. Recent advances in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rangan, G K; Tchan, M C; Tong, A; Wong, A T Y; Nankivell, B J

    2016-08-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic renal disease in adults, affecting one in every 1000 Australians. It is caused by loss-of-function heterozygous mutations in either PKD1 or PKD2 , which encode the proteins, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 respectively. The disease hallmark is the development of hundreds of microscopic fluid-filled cysts in the kidney during early childhood, which grow exponentially and continuously through life at varying rates (between 2% and 10% per year), causing loss of normal renal tissue and up to a 50% lifetime risk of dialysis-dependent kidney failure. Other systemic complications include hypertensive cardiac disease, hepatic cysts, intracranial aneurysms, diverticular disease and hernias. Over the last two decades, advances in the genetics and pathogenesis of this disease have led to novel treatments that reduce the rate of renal cyst growth and may potentially delay the onset of kidney failure. New evidence indicates that conventional therapies (such as angiotensin inhibitors and statins) have mild attenuating effects on renal cyst growth and that systemic levels of vasopressin are critical for promoting renal cyst growth in the postnatal period. Identifying and integrating patient-centred perspectives in clinical trials is also being advocated. This review will provide an update on recent advances in the clinical management of ADPKD. PMID:27553994

  2. Evaluation of polyglutamine repeats in autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Chikara; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Funayama, Manabu; Inamizu, Saeko; Ando, Maya; Li, Yuanzhe; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Araki, Takehisa; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ehara, Yoshiro; Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated the contributions of various polyglutamine (polyQ) disease genes to Parkinson's disease (PD). We compared the distributions of polyQ repeat lengths in 8 common genes (ATXN1, ATXN2, ATXN3, CACNA1A, ATXN7, TBP, ATN1, and HTT) in 299 unrelated patients with autosomal dominant PD (ADPD) and 329 normal controls. We also analyzed the possibility of genetic interactions between ATXN1 and ATXN2, ATXN2 and ATXN3, and ATXN2 and CACNA1A. Intermediate-length polyQ expansions (>24 Qs) of ATXN2 were found in 7 ADPD patients and no controls (7/299 = 2.34% and 0/329 = 0%, respectively; p = 0.0053 < 0.05/8 after Bonferroni correction). These patients showed typical L-DOPA-responsive PD phenotypes. Conversely, no significant differences in polyQ repeat lengths were found between the ADPD patients and the controls for the other 7 genes. Our results may support the hypothesis that ATXN2 polyQ expansion is a specific predisposing factor for multiple neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24534762

  3. Autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease caused by SNCA duplications.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takuya; Ross, Owen A; Puschmann, Andreas; Dickson, Dennis W; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2016-01-01

    The discovery in 1997 that mutations in the SNCA gene cause Parkinson's disease (PD) greatly advanced our understanding of this illness. There are pathogenic missense mutations and multiplication mutations in SNCA. Thus, not only a mutant protein, but also an increased dose of wild-type protein can produce autosomal dominant parkinsonism. We review the literature on SNCA duplications and focus on pathologically-confirmed cases. We also report a newly-identified American family with SNCA duplication whose proband was autopsied. We found that over half of the reported cases with SNCA duplication had early-onset parkinsonism and non-motor features, such as dysautonomia, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), hallucinations (usually visual) and cognitive deficits leading to dementia. Only a few cases have presented with typical features of PD. Our case presented with depression and RBD that preceded parkinsonism, and dysautonomia that led to an initial diagnosis of multiple system atrophy. Dementia and visual hallucinations followed. Our patient and the other reported cases with SNCA duplications had widespread cortical Lewy pathology. Neuronal loss in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 2/3 regions were seen in about half of the autopsied SNCA duplication cases. Similar pathology was also observed in SNCA missense mutation and triplication carriers. PMID:26350119

  4. Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis: Genetics, phenotype, and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Stephens, K.; Dale, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis (ADCH; cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disorder manifested by transient neutropenia that recurs every three weeks. To facilitate mapping the ADCH gene by genetic linkage analysis, we studied 9 ADCH families with 42 affected individuals. Pedigrees revealed AD inheritance with no evidence for decreased penetrance. Similar intra- and interfamilial variable expression was observed, with no evidence to support heterogeneity. At least 3 families displayed apparent new mutations. Many adults developed chronic neutropenia, while offspring always cycled during childhood. Children displayed recurrent oral ulcers, gingivitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, and skin and other infections with additional symptoms. Interestingly, there were no cases of neonatal infection. Some children required multiple hospitalizations for treatment. Four males under age 18 died of Clostridium sepsis following necrotizing enterocolitis; all had affected mothers. No other deaths due to ADCH were found; most had improvement of symptoms and infections as adults. Adults experienced increased tooth loss prior to age 30 (16 out of 27 adults, with 9 edentulous). No increase in myelodysplasia, malignancy, or congenital anomalies was observed. Recombinant G-CSF treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and infections. The results suggest that ADCH is not a benign disorder, especially in childhood, and abdominal pain requires immediate evaluation. Diagnosis of ADCH requires serial blood counts in the proband and at least one CBC in relatives to exclude similar disorders. Genetic counseling requires specific histories as well as CBCs of each family member at risk to determine status regardless of symptom history, especially to assess apparent new mutations.

  5. Why kidneys fail in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Jared J; Mulamalla, Sumanth; Swenson-Fields, Katherine I

    2011-10-01

    The weight of evidence gathered from studies in humans with hereditary polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1 and PKD2 disorders, as well as from experimental animal models, indicates that cysts are primarily responsible for the decline in glomerular filtration rate that occurs fairly late in the course of the disease. The processes underlying this decline include anatomic disruption of glomerular filtration and urinary concentration mechanisms on a massive scale, coupled with compression and obstruction by cysts of adjacent nephrons in the cortex, medulla and papilla. Cysts prevent the drainage of urine from upstream tributaries, which leads to tubule atrophy and loss of functioning kidney parenchyma by mechanisms similar to those found in ureteral obstruction. Cyst-derived chemokines, cytokines and growth factors result in a progression to fibrosis that is comparable with the development of other progressive end-stage renal diseases. Treatment of renal cystic disorders early enough to prevent or reduce cyst formation or slow cyst growth, before the secondary changes become widespread, is a reasonable strategy to prolong the useful function of kidneys in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:21862990

  6. Reproductive issues for adults with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vora, Neeta; Perrone, Ronald; Bianchi, Diana W

    2008-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common disorder. However, the consequences of ADPKD on male and female reproductive health are not widely known. Several abnormalities are found in men with ADPKD, including necrospermia, immotile sperm, seminal vesicle cysts, and ejaculatory duct cysts. Female fertility is not affected. Affected women with ADPKD and normal renal function have a high rate of successful uncomplicated pregnancies. Pregnant women with ADPKD with compromised kidney function should be monitored carefully for the development of hypertension and preeclampsia. Their fetuses should be examined sonographically for signs of uteroplacental insufficiency, such as intrauterine growth restriction and oligohydramnios. The diagnosis of ADPKD should always be considered when prenatal sonographic findings of hyperechogenic enlarged kidneys are found. In this setting, a family history and renal sonogram of both parents is indicated. Sequencing of the PKD1 and PKD2 genes is available and can be used for both prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. We review in detail these topics to familiarize physicians taking care of patients with ADPKD with the reproductive issues that confront affected individuals. PMID:18215709

  7. Imaging for the prognosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kyongtae T; Grantham, Jared J

    2010-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the unrelenting enlargement of innumerable cysts derived from renal tubules. This cystic growth often leads to a grotesque renal enlargement. Relatively early in life, the cysts trigger secondary complications including pain, hypertension and gross hematuria; renal insufficiency is usually not detected until the fifth or sixth decade of life. Therapies targeted to molecular and pathophysiological abnormalities slow cyst growth and protect renal function in animal models of the disease. Unfortunately, the translation of these treatments into clinical trials is hampered since glomerular filtration rate, the usual biomarker of renal disease progression, does not decrease substantially until extensive and irreversible damage to noncystic parenchyma occurs. Ultrasonography, CT and MRI have been used for many years to quantify the increase in renal volume in patients with ADPKD. Imaging with these techniques has also been used to accurately quantify the rate of increased kidney and total cyst volume in patients. In this Review we discuss the overwhelming evidence in support of the view that imaging is an invaluable tool to monitor the onset and progression of ADPKD and is well-suited to gauge the response of this disease to targeted therapy before renal function begins to decline. PMID:20111050

  8. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: time for a change?

    PubMed

    Chapman, Arlene B

    2007-05-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is rapidly changing. Cellular pathways that involve the polycystins are being mapped and involve the primary cilium, intracellular calcium and cAMP regulation, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. With the use of new imaging approaches, earlier diagnosis of hepatic cystic disease is possible, and measurement of kidney and cystic growth as well as kidney blood flow is possible over relatively short periods. PKD gene type, gender, proteinuria, and the presence of hypertension relate to the rate of kidney growth in ADPKD. On the basis of risk factors for progression to ESRD and the pathogenic roles that intracellular cAMP and mTOR play in cystogenesis, novel therapies are now being tested, including maximal inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system, inhibition of renal intracellular cAMP using vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists, and somatostatin analogues, as well as inhibitors of mTOR. This review addresses the current understanding of the pathogenesis and the natural history of ADPKD; accuracy and reliability of diagnostic approaches in utero, childhood, and adulthood; the value of reliable magnetic resonance imaging to measure disease progression early in the course of ADPKD; and novel therapeutic approaches that are being evaluated in ADPKD. PMID:17429048

  9. Genetics, phenotype, and natural history of autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E. |; Dale, D.C.

    1996-12-30

    Cyclic hematopoiesis (CH, or cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disease manifested by transient severe neutropenia that recurs approximately every 21 days. The hematologic profile of families with the autosomal dominant form (ADCH) has not been well characterized, and it is unknown if the phenotype is distinct from the more common sporadic congenital or acquired forms of CH. We studied nine ADCH families whose children displayed typical CH blood patterns. Pedigrees confirmed dominant inheritance without evidence of heterogeneity or decreased penetrance; three pedigrees suggested new mutations. Families were Caucasian with exception of one with a Cherokee Native American founder. A wide spectrum of symptom severity, ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening illness, was observed within families. The phenotype changed with age. Children displayed typical neutrophil cycles with symptoms of mucosal ulceration, lymphadenopathy, and infections. Adults often had fewer and milder symptoms, sometimes accompanied by mild chronic neutropenia without distinct cycles. While CH is commonly described as {open_quotes}benign{close_quotes}, four children in three of the nine families died of Clostridium or E. coli colitis, documenting the need for urgent evaluation of abdominal pain. Misdiagnosis with other neutropenias was common but can be avoided by serial blood counts in index cases. Genetic counseling requires specific histories and complete blood counts in relatives at risk to assess status regardless of symptoms, especially to determine individuals with new mutations. We propose diagnostic criteria for ADCH in affected children and adults. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of neutropenia and morbidity. The differential diagnosis from other forms of familial neutropenia is reviewed. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Current management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2015-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most frequent cause of genetic renal disease affecting approximately 4 to 7 million individuals worldwide and accounting for 7%-15% of patients on renal replacement therapy, is a systemic disorder mainly involving the kidney but cysts can also occur in other organs such as the liver, pancreas, arachnoid membrane and seminal vesicles. Though computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were similar in evaluating 81% of cystic lesions of the kidney, MRI may depict septa, wall thickening or enhancement leading to upgrade in cyst classification that can affect management. A screening strategy for intracranial aneurysms would provide 1.0 additional year of life without neurological disability to a 20-year-old patient with ADPKD and reduce the financial impact on society of the disease. Current treatment strategies include reducing: cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels, cell proliferation and fluid secretion. Several randomised clinical trials (RCT) including mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, somatostatin analogues and a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist have been performed to study the effect of diverse drugs on growth of renal and hepatic cysts, and on deterioration of renal function. Prophylactic native nephrectomy is indicated in patients with a history of cyst infection or recurrent haemorrhage or to those in whom space must be made to implant the graft. The absence of large RCT on various aspects of the disease and its treatment leaves considerable uncertainty and ambiguity in many aspects of ADPKD patient care as it relates to end stage renal disease (ESRD). The outlook of patients with ADPKD is improving and is in fact much better than that for patients in ESRD due to other causes. This review highlights the need for well-structured RCTs as a first step towards trying newer interventions so as to develop updated clinical management guidelines. PMID:26380198

  11. Review of tolvaptan for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Baur, Brian P; Meaney, Calvin J

    2014-06-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by bilateral renal cysts, kidney pain, hypertension, and progressive loss of renal function. It is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease and the most common inherited kidney disease in the United States. Despite its prevalence, disease-modifying treatment options do not currently exist. Tolvaptan is an orally active, selective arginine vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist already in use for hyponatremia. Tolvaptan exhibits dose-proportional pharmacokinetics with a half-life of ~12 hours. Metabolism occurs through the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme, and tolvaptan is a substrate for P-glycoprotein, resulting in numerous drug interactions. Recent research has highlighted the beneficial effect of tolvaptan on delaying the progression of ADPKD, which is the focus of this review. Pharmacologic, preclinical, and phase II and III clinical trial studies have demonstrated that tolvaptan is an effective treatment option that targets underlying pathogenic mechanisms of ADPKD. Tolvaptan delays the increase in total kidney volume (surrogate marker for disease progression), slows the decline in renal function, and reduces kidney pain. However, tolvaptan has significant adverse effects including aquaretic effects (polyuria, nocturia, polydipsia) and elevation of aminotransferase enzyme concentrations with the potential for acute liver failure. Appropriate patient selection is critical to optimize long-term benefits while minimizing adverse effects and hepatotoxic risk factors. Overall, tolvaptan is the first pharmacotherapeutic intervention to demonstrate significant benefit in the treatment of ADPKD, but practitioners and regulatory agencies must carefully weigh the risks versus benefits. Additional research should focus on incidence and risk factors of liver injury, cost-effectiveness, clinical management of drug-drug interactions, and long-term disease outcomes. PMID:24706579

  12. Practical genetics for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Pei, York

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common mendelian disorder of the kidney and accounts for ~5% of end-stage renal disease in North America. It is characterized by focal development of renal cysts which increase in number and size with age. Mutations of PKD1 and PKD2 account for most cases. Although the clinical manifestations of both gene types overlap completely, PKD1 is associated with more severe disease than PKD2, with larger kidneys and earlier onset of end-stage renal disease. Furthermore, marked within-family renal disease variability is well documented in ADPKD and suggests a strong modifier effect from as yet unknown genetic and environmental factors. In turn, the significant inter- and intra-familial renal disease variability poses a challenge for diagnosis and genetic counseling. In general, renal ultrasonography is commonly used for the diagnosis, and age-dependent criteria have been defined for subjects at risk of PKD1. However, the utility of the PKD1 ultrasound criteria in the clinical setting is unclear since their performance characteristics have not been defined for the milder PKD2 and the gene type for most test subjects is unknown. Recently, highly predictive ultrasound diagnostic criteria have been derived for at-risk subjects of unknown gene type. Additionally, both DNA linkage and gene-based direct sequencing are available for the diagnosis of ADPKD, especially in subjects with equivocal imaging results, a negative or indeterminate family history, or in younger at-risk individuals being evaluated as potential living related kidney donor. This review will highlight the utility and limitations of clinical predictors of gene types, imaging- and molecular-based diagnostic tests, and present an integrated approach for evaluating individuals suspected to have ADPKD. PMID:21071968

  13. Heterozygous Reelin Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Lateral Temporal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  14. Multigenerational autosomal dominant inheritance of 5p chromosomal deletions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Willing, Marcia; Grange, Dorothy K; Shinawi, Marwan; Manwaring, Linda; Vineyard, Marisa; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cottrell, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    Deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-) is associated with phenotypic features including a cat-like cry in infancy, dysmorphic facial features, microcephaly, and intellectual disability, and when encompassing a minimal critical region, may be defined as Cri-du-Chat syndrome (CdCS). Most 5p deletions are de novo in origin, and familial cases are often associated with translocation and inversion. Herein, we report three multigenerational families carrying 5p terminal deletions of different size transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner causing variable clinical findings. Terminal 5p deletions and the mode of inheritance were clinically characterized and molecularly analyzed by a combination of microarray and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. Shared phenotypic features documented in this cohort included neuropsychiatric findings, poor growth, and dysmorphic facial features. This study supports newly recognized effects of aberrant SEMA5A and CTNND2 dosage on severity of autistic and cognitive phenotypes. Comparative analysis of the breakpoints narrows the critical region for the cat-like cry down to an interval less than 1 Mb encompassing a candidate gene ICE1, which regulates small nuclear RNA transcription. This study also indicates that familial terminal 5p deletion is a rare presentation displaying intra- and inter-familial phenotypic variability, the latter of which may be attributed to size and gene content of the deletion. The observed intra-familial phenotypic heterogeneity suggests that additional modifying elements including genetic and environmental factors may have an impact on the clinical manifestations observed in 5p deletion carriers, and in time, further high resolution studies of 5p deletion breakpoints will continue to aid in defining genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:26601658

  15. Heterozygous reelin mutations cause autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C E; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  16. Early Renal Abnormalities in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Esther; Rook, Mieneke; Tent, Hilde; Navis, Gerjan; van der Jagt, Eric J.; de Jong, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Potential therapeutic interventions are being developed for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A pivotal question will be when to initiate such treatment, and monitoring disease progression will thus become more important. Therefore, the prevalence of renal abnormalities in ADPKD at different ages was evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Included were 103 prevalent ADPKD patients (Ravine criteria). Measured were mean arterial pressure (MAP), total renal volume (TRV), GFR, effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), renal vascular resistance (RVR), and filtration fraction (FF). Twenty-four-hour urine was collected. ADPKD patients were compared with age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Results: Patients and controls were subdivided into quartiles of age (median ages 28, 37, 42, and 52 years). Patients in the first quartile of age had almost the same GFR when compared with controls, but already a markedly decreased ERPF and an increased FF (GFR 117 ± 32 versus 129 ± 17 ml/min, ERPF 374 ± 119 versus 527 ± 83 ml/min, FF 32% ± 4% versus 25% ± 2%, and RVR 12 (10 to 16) versus 8 (7 to 8) dynes/cm2, respectively). Young adult ADPKD patients also had higher 24-hour urinary volumes, lower 24-hour urinary osmolarity, and higher urinary albumin excretion (UAE) than healthy controls, although TRV in these young adult patients was modestly enlarged (median 1.0 L). Conclusions: Already at young adult age, ADPKD patients have marked renal abnormalities, including a decreased ERPF and increased FF and UAE, despite modestly enlarged TRV and near-normal GFR. ERPF, FF, and UAE may thus be better markers for disease severity than GFR. PMID:20413443

  17. Current management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most frequent cause of genetic renal disease affecting approximately 4 to 7 million individuals worldwide and accounting for 7%-15% of patients on renal replacement therapy, is a systemic disorder mainly involving the kidney but cysts can also occur in other organs such as the liver, pancreas, arachnoid membrane and seminal vesicles. Though computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were similar in evaluating 81% of cystic lesions of the kidney, MRI may depict septa, wall thickening or enhancement leading to upgrade in cyst classification that can affect management. A screening strategy for intracranial aneurysms would provide 1.0 additional year of life without neurological disability to a 20-year-old patient with ADPKD and reduce the financial impact on society of the disease. Current treatment strategies include reducing: cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels, cell proliferation and fluid secretion. Several randomised clinical trials (RCT) including mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, somatostatin analogues and a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist have been performed to study the effect of diverse drugs on growth of renal and hepatic cysts, and on deterioration of renal function. Prophylactic native nephrectomy is indicated in patients with a history of cyst infection or recurrent haemorrhage or to those in whom space must be made to implant the graft. The absence of large RCT on various aspects of the disease and its treatment leaves considerable uncertainty and ambiguity in many aspects of ADPKD patient care as it relates to end stage renal disease (ESRD). The outlook of patients with ADPKD is improving and is in fact much better than that for patients in ESRD due to other causes. This review highlights the need for well-structured RCTs as a first step towards trying newer interventions so as to develop updated clinical management guidelines. PMID:26380198

  18. Angiotensin Blockade in Late Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Vicente E.; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Schrier, Robert W.; Braun, William E.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Winklhofer, Franz T.; Brosnahan, Godela; Czarnecki, Peter G.; Hogan, Marie C.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic F.; Grantham, Jared J.; Harris, Peter C.; Flessner, Michael F.; Moore, Charity G.; Perrone, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension develops early in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and is associated with disease progression. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension in patients with ADPKD. Dual blockade of the RAAS may circumvent compensatory mechanisms that limit the efficacy of monotherapy with an angiotensin-converting–enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin II–receptor blocker (ARB). METHODS In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 486 patients, 18 to 64 years of age, with ADPKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR], 25 to 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) to receive an ACE inhibitor (lisinopril) and placebo or lisinopril and an ARB (telmisartan), with the doses adjusted to achieve a blood pressure of 110/70 to 130/80 mm Hg. The composite primary outcome was the time to death, end-stage renal disease, or a 50% reduction from the baseline estimated GFR. Secondary outcomes included the rates of change in urinary aldosterone and albumin excretion, frequency of hospitalizations for any cause and for cardiovascular causes, incidence of pain, frequency of ADPKD-related symptoms, quality of life, and adverse study-medication effects. Patients were followed for 5 to 8 years. RESULTS There was no significant difference between the study groups in the incidence of the composite primary outcome (hazard ratio with lisinopril–telmisartan, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.42). The two treatments controlled blood pressure and lowered urinary aldosterone excretion similarly. The rates of decline in the estimated GFR, urinary albumin excretion, and other secondary outcomes and adverse events, including hyperkalemia and acute kidney injury, were also similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Monotherapy with an ACE inhibitor was associated with blood-pressure control in most patients with ADPKD and stage 3 chronic kidney disease

  19. Blood Pressure in Early Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Robert W.; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Perrone, Ronald D.; Torres, Vicente E.; Braun, William E.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Winklhofer, Franz T.; Brosnahan, Godela; Czarnecki, Peter G.; Hogan, Marie C.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic F.; Grantham, Jared J.; Harris, Peter C.; Flessner, Michael F.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Moore, Charity G.; Chapman, Arlene B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is common in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and is associated with increased total kidney volume, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, and progression of kidney disease. METHODS In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 558 hypertensive participants with ADPKD (15 to 49 years of age, with an estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR] >60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) to either a standard blood-pressure target (120/70 to 130/80 mm Hg) or a low blood-pressure target (95/60 to 110/75 mm Hg) and to either an angiotensin-converting–enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril) plus an angiotensin-receptor blocker (telmisartan) or lisinopril plus placebo. The primary outcome was the annual percentage change in the total kidney volume. RESULTS The annual percentage increase in total kidney volume was significantly lower in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (5.6% vs. 6.6%, P = 0.006), without significant differences between the lisinopril–telmisartan group and the lisinopril–placebo group. The rate of change in estimated GFR was similar in the two medication groups, with a negative slope difference in the short term in the low-blood-pressure group as compared with the standard-blood-pressure group (P<0.001) and a marginally positive slope difference in the long term (P = 0.05). The left-ventricular-mass index decreased more in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (−1.17 vs. −0.57 g per square meter per year, P<0.001); urinary albumin excretion was reduced by 3.77% with the low-pressure target and increased by 2.43% with the standard target (P<0.001). Dizziness and light-headedness were more common in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (80.7% vs. 69.4%, P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS In early ADPKD, the combination of lisinopril and telmisartan did not significantly

  20. Autosomal dominant aniridia: probable linkage to acid phosphatase-1 locus on chromosome 2.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, R E; Chakravarti, A; Hittner, H M; Riccardi, V M

    1980-01-01

    Maximum likelihood analysis for linkage between autosomal dominant aniridia and 12 biochemical and serological markers in a single large family showed a probable linkage between autosomal dominant aniridia and the enzyme acid phosphatase-1. The presence of an autosomal dominant aniridia gene linked to acid phosphatase-1 on chromosome arm 2p and the existence of an aniridia syndrome resulting from deletion of band 13 of the short arm of chromosome 11 establishes a chromosome basis for genetic heterogeneity of aniridia phenotypes. PMID:6929510

  1. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CADASIL cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy ...

  2. Vertebral Aspergillosis in a Patient with Autosomal-Dominant Hyper-IgE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hong; Kuang, Lei; Wang, Bing; Lian, Zhesi

    2014-01-01

    We present a report of an autosomal-dominant hyper-IgE syndrome patient with vertebral aspergillosis. Early diagnosis and antifungal therapy with surgery are crucial for improving the outcome of this aggressive condition. PMID:24197892

  3. A gene for autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus localizes to 6p12

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrison, J.B.; Arnould, V.J.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    1996-05-01

    Congenital nystagmus is an idiopathic disorder characterized by bilateral ocular oscillations usually manifest during infancy. Vision is typically decreased due to slippage of images across the fovea. As such, visual acuity correlates with nystagmus intensity, which is the amplitude and frequency of eye movements at a given position of gaze. X-linked, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive pedigrees have been described, but no mapping studies have been published. We recently described a large pedigree with autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus. A genome-wide search resulted in six markers on 6p linked by two-point analysis at {theta} = 0 (D6S459, D6S452, D6S465, FTHP1, D6S257, D6S430). Haplotype analysis localizes the gene for autosomal dominant congenital motor mystagmus to an 18-cM region between D6S271 and D6S455. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. A YAC contig encompassing the chromosome 7p locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.F.; Keen, T.J.; Ratel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited retinal degeneration characterized by night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, often leading to complete blindness. The autosomal dominant form (adRP) maps to at least six different loci, including the rhodopsin and peripherin/Rds genes and four loci identified only by linkage analysis on chromosomes 7p, 7q, 8cen and 19q. The 7p locus was reported by this laboratory in a large English family, with a lod score of 16.5. Several new genetic markers have been tested in the family and this locus has now been refined to an interval of approximately 1 cM between markers D7S795 and D7S484 in the 7p13-15 region. In order to clone the gene for adRP, we have used microsatellites and STSs from the region to identify over 80 YACs, from four different libraries, which map to this interval. End clones from key YACs were isolated for the generation of additional STSs. Eleven microsatellite markers between D7S435 (distal) and D7S484 (proximal) have been ordered by a combination of both physical and genetic mapping. In this way we have now obtained a YAC contig spanning approximately 3 megabases of chromosome 7p within which the adRP gene must lie. One gene (aquaporin) and one chromosome 7 brain EST have been placed on the contig but both map distal to the region of interest. Sixteen other ESTs and three further known 7p genes mapping in the region have been excluded. We are now attempting to build a cosmid contig in the defined interval and identify further expressed sequences from both YACs and cosmids to test as candidates for the adRP gene.

  5. A de novo mutation of the MYH7 gene in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Tetsuya; Xiong, Hui; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Wang, Shuo; Satake, Wataru; Jiao, Hui; Yang, Yanling; Cha, Pei-Chieng; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Wu, Xiru; Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-01-01

    Laing distal myopathy (LDM) is an autosomal dominant myopathy that is caused by mutations in the slow/beta cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MYH7) gene. It has been recently reported that LDM presents with a wide range of clinical manifestations. We herein report a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy. The affected individuals in the family presented with foot drop in early childhood, along with progressive distal and proximal limb weakness. Their characteristic symptoms include scapular winging and scoliosis in the early disease phase and impairment of ambulation in the advanced phase. Although limb-girdle muscle dystrophy (LGMD) was suspected initially, a definite diagnosis could not be reached. As such, we performed linkage analysis and detected four linkage regions, namely 1q23.2-24.1, 14q11.2-12, 15q26.2-26.3 and 17q24.3. Through subsequent whole exome sequencing, we found a de novo p.K1617del causative mutation in the MYH7 gene and diagnosed the disease as LDM. This is the first LDM case in China. Our patients have severe clinical manifestations that mimic LGMD in comparison with the patients with the same mutation reported elsewhere. PMID:27081534

  6. A de novo mutation of the MYH7 gene in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy.

    PubMed

    Oda, Tetsuya; Xiong, Hui; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Wang, Shuo; Satake, Wataru; Jiao, Hui; Yang, Yanling; Cha, Pei-Chieng; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Wu, Xiru; Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-01-01

    Laing distal myopathy (LDM) is an autosomal dominant myopathy that is caused by mutations in the slow/beta cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MYH7) gene. It has been recently reported that LDM presents with a wide range of clinical manifestations. We herein report a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy. The affected individuals in the family presented with foot drop in early childhood, along with progressive distal and proximal limb weakness. Their characteristic symptoms include scapular winging and scoliosis in the early disease phase and impairment of ambulation in the advanced phase. Although limb-girdle muscle dystrophy (LGMD) was suspected initially, a definite diagnosis could not be reached. As such, we performed linkage analysis and detected four linkage regions, namely 1q23.2-24.1, 14q11.2-12, 15q26.2-26.3 and 17q24.3. Through subsequent whole exome sequencing, we found a de novo p.K1617del causative mutation in the MYH7 gene and diagnosed the disease as LDM. This is the first LDM case in China. Our patients have severe clinical manifestations that mimic LGMD in comparison with the patients with the same mutation reported elsewhere. PMID:27081534

  7. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME) in a unique south Indian community.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Radha; Viswanathan, Natarajan; Shanmugam, Ganesan; Sankaralingam, Saravanan; Essaki, Bobby; Chelladurai, Rachel P

    2016-03-01

    Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME)/familial adult onset myoclonic epilepsy (FAME) is a nonprogressive disorder characterized by (1) distal tremors that are usually precipitated by posture and action; (2) stimulus-sensitive myoclonus that is predominantly seen in the upper limb and is precipitated by photic stimuli, fatigue, emotional stress, and sleep deprivation; (3) seizures that were predominantly of the generalized tonic-clonic type that showed significant response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). ADCME has been reported worldwide with different genetic loci in Japanese families (8q23.3-q24.1), Italian families (2p11.1-q12.2), a French family (5p15.3.1-p15.1), and a Thai family (3q26.32-q28). ADCME has not been reported in South India and is still not recognized as an independent entity under the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). We report 241 patients with ADCME identified belonging to 48 families. The 48 families are domiciled in two southern districts of Tamilnadu in India, belonging to a community called "Nadar" whose nativity is confined to these southern districts, with reported unique genetic characteristics. This study is reported for the presentation of this rare disease in a unique ethnic group, and is the largest single report on ADCME worldwide. PMID:26749494

  8. Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to report on a family with pathologically and genetically diagnosed autosomal dominant inherited centronuclear myopathy (CNM). In addition, this study aimed to investigate the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic characteristics of the disease. This pedigree was traced back three generations, four patients underwent neurological examination, two patients underwent muscle biopsy, and eight family members were subjected to dynamin 2 (DNM2) gene mutation analysis. DNM2 mutations were detected in seven family members, of which four patients exhibited DNM2 mutation‑specific clinical and pathological features. Lower extremity weakness was the predominant symptom of these patients, however, proximal and distal lower extremity involvement was inconsistent. All patients exhibited marked systematic muscle atrophy and various degrees of facial muscle involvement. The patients presented the typical pathological changes of CNM, and their muscle tissues were heavily replaced by adipose tissue, with clustered distribution of muscle fibers as another notable feature. DNM2‑CNM patients of this pedigree exhibited heterogeneous clinical and pathological features, providing a basis for further molecular genetic analysis. PMID:27035234

  9. Fibrosis and progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

    PubMed

    Norman, Jill

    2011-10-01

    The age on onset of decline in renal function and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in autosomal polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is highly variable and there are currently no prognostic tools to identify patients who will progress rapidly to ESRD. In ADPKD, expansion of cysts and loss of renal function are associated with progressive fibrosis. Similar to the correlation between tubulointerstitial fibrosis and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD), in ADPKD, fibrosis has been identified as the most significant manifestation associated with an increased rate of progression to ESRD. Fibrosis in CKD has been studied extensively. In contrast, little is known about the mechanisms underlying progressive scarring in ADPKD although some commonality may be anticipated. Current data suggest that fibrosis associated with ADPKD shares at least some of the "classical" features of fibrosis in CKD (increased interstitial collagens, changes in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), over-expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), over-expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) but that there are also some unique and stage-specific features. Epithelial changes appear to precede and to drive interstitial changes leading to the proposal that development of fibrosis in ADPKD is biphasic with alterations in cystic epithelia precipitating changes in interstitial fibroblasts and that reciprocal interactions between these cell types drives progressive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Since fibrosis is a major component of ADPKD it follows that preventing or slowing fibrosis should retard disease progression with obvious therapeutic benefits. The development of effective anti-fibrotic strategies in ADPKD is dependent on understanding the precise mechanisms underlying initiation and progression of fibrosis in ADPKD and the role of the intrinsic genetic defect in these processes. This article is

  10. Pontobulbar palsy and neurosensory deafness (Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome) with possible autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, S A; Nevin, N C; Harding, A E

    1990-03-01

    A female with the Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is described. The patient's father, a paternal uncle, and possibly a paternal first cousin had neurosensory deafness and a paternal aunt had clinical symptoms indicative of the syndrome. This family raises the possibility that the disorder is genetically heterogeneous with autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant forms. Alternatively, it could be caused by a mutant gene on the X chromosome. PMID:2325091

  11. Pontobulbar palsy and neurosensory deafness (Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome) with possible autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, S A; Nevin, N C; Harding, A E

    1990-01-01

    A female with the Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is described. The patient's father, a paternal uncle, and possibly a paternal first cousin had neurosensory deafness and a paternal aunt had clinical symptoms indicative of the syndrome. This family raises the possibility that the disorder is genetically heterogeneous with autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant forms. Alternatively, it could be caused by a mutant gene on the X chromosome. Images PMID:2325091

  12. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen, S.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.; Plaetke, R.; Reimherr, F.; Wender, P.; Leppert, M.; Byerley, W. )

    1993-06-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as [open quotes]bipolar affective disorder[close quotes], is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, the authors ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping at 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has >97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has >73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores <[minus]2.0 at [theta] = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores >1 (chromosome 5 -- D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11 -- D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores >1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, the linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. 72 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, H; Jensen, S; Hoff, M; Holik, J; Plaetke, R; Reimherr, F; Wender, P; Leppert, M; Byerley, W

    1993-01-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as "bipolar affective disorder," is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, we ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has > 97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has > 73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores < -2.0 at recombination fraction (theta) = .0, 174 DNA loci produced lod scores < -2.0 at theta = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores > 1 (chromosome 5--D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11--D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores > 1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, our linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. PMID:8503452

  14. Absence of ocular manifestations in autosomal dominant Alport syndrome associated with haematological abnormalties.

    PubMed

    Colville, D; Wang, Y Y; Jamieson, R; Collins, F; Hood, J; Savige, J

    2000-12-01

    Most patients with Alport syndrome have X-linked or autosomal recessive disease that is characterised by renal failure, hearing loss, and, in nearly 75% of the cases, a dot-and-fleck retinopathy and anterior lenticonus. There are only case reports of individuals with the rare autosomal dominant form, who can have haematuria or renal failure, deafness, and, in addition, low platelet counts and neutrophil inclusions. The ocular features of autosomal dominant inheritance have not been described. We have examined the eyes in the members of two families where Alport syndrome was diagnosed on the basis of the clinical features and family history, and where autosomal dominant inheritance was confirmed by father-to-son disease transmission, the associated haematological abnormalities, and haplotypes that segregated with the recently described locus at chromosome 22q. In Family A, the eyes of two individuals with haematuria, hearing loss, and haematological abnormalities and of nine unaffected family members were examined. In Family B, the eyes of two individuals with renal failure, normal hearing, and haematological abnormalities were examined. None of the affected or unaffected members in either family had a dot-and-fleck retinopathy, anterior lenticonus, a history suggesting recurrent corneal erosions, or corneal dystrophy. These results indicate that the protein abnormality in autosomal dominant Alport syndrome does not produce the retinopathy and lenticonus typical of X-linked and autosomal recessive disease. This may be because the abnormal protein is not present or is less important in the ocular basement membranes than elsewhere, or because the presence of a normal allele in autosomal dominant disease compensates for the defective allele. PMID:11135492

  15. Clinical and Radiological Findings of Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type II: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Priyanka; Sharda, Neelkamal; Bhowate, Rahul R.

    2013-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited genetic disease characterized by sclerosis of the skeleton caused by the absence or malfunction of osteoclasts. Three distinct forms of the disease have been recognized, autosomal dominant osteopetrosis being the most common. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis exhibits a heterogeneous trait with milder symptoms, often at later childhood or adulthood. The aim of this case report is to present the clinical and radiographic features of a 35-year-old female patient with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II who exhibited features of chronic generalised periodontitis, and the radiographs revealed generalised osteosclerosis and hallmark radiographic features of ADO type II, that is, “bone-within-bone appearance” and “Erlenmeyer-flask deformity.” PMID:24260721

  16. Bovine Polledness – An Autosomal Dominant Trait with Allelic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Medugorac, Ivica; Seichter, Doris; Graf, Alexander; Russ, Ingolf; Blum, Helmut; Göpel, Karl Heinrich; Rothammer, Sophie; Förster, Martin; Krebs, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The persistent horns are an important trait of speciation for the family Bovidae with complex morphogenesis taking place briefly after birth. The polledness is highly favourable in modern cattle breeding systems but serious animal welfare issues urge for a solution in the production of hornless cattle other than dehorning. Although the dominant inhibition of horn morphogenesis was discovered more than 70 years ago, and the causative mutation was mapped almost 20 years ago, its molecular nature remained unknown. Here, we report allelic heterogeneity of the POLLED locus. First, we mapped the POLLED locus to a ∼381-kb interval in a multi-breed case-control design. Targeted re-sequencing of an enlarged candidate interval (547 kb) in 16 sires with known POLLED genotype did not detect a common allele associated with polled status. In eight sires of Alpine and Scottish origin (four polled versus four horned), we identified a single candidate mutation, a complex 202 bp insertion-deletion event that showed perfect association to the polled phenotype in various European cattle breeds, except Holstein-Friesian. The analysis of the same candidate interval in eight Holsteins identified five candidate variants which segregate as a 260 kb haplotype also perfectly associated with the POLLED gene without recombination or interference with the 202 bp insertion-deletion. We further identified bulls which are progeny tested as homozygous polled but bearing both, 202 bp insertion-deletion and Friesian haplotype. The distribution of genotypes of the two putative POLLED alleles in large semi-random sample (1,261 animals) supports the hypothesis of two independent mutations. PMID:22737241

  17. Evidence of autosomal dominant mutations in childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Wirth, B.; Zerres, K. )

    1994-07-01

    Autosomal recessive and dominant inheritance of proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are well documented. Several genetic studies found a significant deviation from the assumption of recessive inheritance in SMA, with affected children in one generation. The existence of new autosomal dominant mutations has been assumed as the most suitable explanation, which is supported by three observations of this study: (1) The segregation ratio calculated in 333 families showed a significant deviation from autosomal recessive inheritance in the milder forms of SMA (= .09[+-].06 for onset at 10-36 mo and .13[+-].07 for onset at >36 mo; and P = .09[+-]0.7 for SMA IIIa and .12[+-].07 for SMA IIIb). (2) Three families with affected subjects in two generations are reported, in whom the disease could have started as an autosomal dominant mutation. (3) Linkage studies with chromosome 5q markers showed that in 5 (5.4%) of 93 informative families the patient shared identical haplotypes with at least one healthy sib. Other mechanisms, such as the existence of phenocopies, pseudodominance, or a second autosomal recessive gene locus, cannot be excluded in single families. The postulation of spontaneous mutations, however, is a suitable explanation for all three observations. Estimated risk figures for genetic counseling are given. 29 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Bone Mineral Density and Microarchitecture in Patients With Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Mariana; Coelho, Maria Caroline Alves; Moraes, Aline Barbosa; de Paula Paranhos-Neto, Francisco; Madeira, Miguel; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; Neto, Leonardo Vieira

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this case study is to describe changes in areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan, as well as volumetric bone density and microarchitecture by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in two patients with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO) and compare with 20 healthy subjects. We describe a 44-year-old male patient with six low-impact fractures since he was age 16 years, and a 32-year-old female patient with four low-impact fractures on her past history. Radiographic changes were typical of ADO. Consistent with the much higher aBMD, total volumetric BMD (average bone density of the whole bone, including trabecular and cortical compartments) at distal radius and tibia (HR-pQCT) was more than twice the mean values found in healthy subjects in both patients. Trabecular number and thickness were higher, leading to an evident increase in trabecular bone volume to tissue volume. Also, an enormous increase in cortical thickness was found. Most important, a great heterogeneity in bone microstructure of the affected patients was evident on HR-pQCT images: islets of very dense bone were interposed with areas with apparent normal density. The increase in aBMD, volumetric BMD, and most indices of trabecular and cortical bone, associated with the great heterogeneity on bone tridimensional microarchitecture, reflect the accumulation of old and fragile bone randomly distributed along the skeleton. These alterations in bone microstructure probably compromise bone quality, which might justify the high prevalence of low-impact fractures in patients with ADO, despite abnormally elevated BMD. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26387875

  19. A recurring dominant negative mutation causes autosomal dominant growth hormone deficiency - a clinical research center study

    SciTech Connect

    Cogan, J.D.; Prince, M.; Phillips, J.

    1995-12-01

    Familial isolated GH deficiency type II (IGHD-II) is an autosomal dominant disorder that has been previously shown in some patients to be caused by heterogeneous GH gene defects that affect GH messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. We report here our findings of multiple G{r_arrow}A transitions of the first base of the donor splice site of IVS 3 (+1G{r_arrow}A) in IGHD II subjects from three nonrelated kindreds from Sweden, North America, and South Africa. This + 1G{r_arrow}A substitution creates an NlaIII site that was used to demonstrate that all affected individuals in all three families were heterozygous for the mutation. To determine the effect of this mutation of GH mRNA processing, HeLa cells were transfected with expression plasmids containing normal or mutant +1G{r_arrow}A alleles, and complementary DNAs from the resulting GH mRNAs were sequenced. The mutation was found to destroy the GH IVS3 donor splice site, causing skipping of exon 3 and loss of the codons for amino acids 32-71 of the mature GH peptide from the mutant GH mRNA. Our finding of exon 3 skipping in transcripts of the +1G{r_arrow}A mutant allele is identical to our previous report of a different sixth base transition (+6T{r_arrow}C) mutation of the IVS 3 donor splice site that also causes IGHD II. Microsatellite analysis of an affected subjects` DNA from each of the three nonrelated kindreds indicates that the +1G{r_arrow}A mutation arose independently in each family. Finding that neither grandparent has the mutation in the first family suggests that it arose de novo in that family. Our data indicate that (1) +1G{r_arrow}A IVS 3 mutations perturb GH mRNA splicing and cause IGHD II; and (2) these mutations can present as de novo GHD cases. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Autosomal dominant epidermodysplasia verruciformis lacking a known EVER1 or EVER2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, David H.; Gammon, Bryan; Snijders, Peter J.; Mbata, Ihunanya; Phifer, Beth; Hartley, A. Howland; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Murphy, Philip M.; Hwang, Sam T.

    2012-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by abnormal susceptibility to infection with specific human papillomavirus (HPV) serotypes. EV is a genetically heterogeneous disease, and autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance patterns have been reported. Nonsense mutations in the genes EVER1 and EVER2 have been identified in over 75% of cases. We present EV in a father and son with typical histologic and clinical findings that occur in the absence of mutations in EVER1 or EVER2. EV in this father/son pair in a non-consanguinous pedigree is consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance. This is the first report of autosomal dominant transmission of EV, providing further evidence of the genetic heterogeneity of EV. PMID:19706093

  1. A locus for autosomal dominant colobomatous microphthalmia maps to chromosome 15q12-q15.

    PubMed

    Morlé, L; Bozon, M; Zech, J C; Alloisio, N; Raas-Rothschild, A; Philippe, C; Lambert, J C; Godet, J; Plauchu, H; Edery, P

    2000-12-01

    Congenital microphthalmia is a common developmental ocular disorder characterized by shortened axial length. Isolated microphthalmia is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and may be inherited in an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked manner. Here, we studied a five-generation family of Sephardic Jewish origin that included 38 members, of whom 7 have either unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia of variable severity inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance. After exclusion of several candidate loci, we performed a genome-scan study and demonstrated linkage to chromosome 15q12-q15. Positive LOD scores were obtained with a maximum at the D15S1007 locus (maximum LOD score 3.77, at recombination fraction 0.00). Haplotype analyses supported the location of the disease-causing gene in a 13.8-cM interval between loci D15S1002 and D15S1040. PMID:11035633

  2. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  3. Evaluation and Management of Pain in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Marie C.; Norby, Suzanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Transient episodes of pain are common in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A small fraction of patients have disabling chronic pain. In this review, we discuss the etiologies of pain in ADPKD; review how ADPKD patients should be assessed; and discuss medical, surgical, and other management options. PMID:20439087

  4. Imaging characteristics of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    Stojanov, Dragan; Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra; Vojinovic, Slobodan; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela; Tasic, Aleksandar; Vujnovic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Diagnosis and follow-up in patients with CADASIL are based mainly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI shows white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). WMHs lesions tend to be symmetrical and bilateral, distributed in the periventricular and deep white matter. The anterior temporal lobe and external capsules are predilection sites for WMHs, with higher specificity and sensitivity of anterior temporal lobe involvement compared to an external capsule involvement. Lacunar infarcts are presented by an imaging signal that has intensity of cerebrospinal fluid in all MRI sequences. They are localized within the semioval center, thalamus, basal ganglia and pons. CMBs are depicted as focal areas of signal loss on T2 images which increases in size on the T2*-weighted gradient echo planar images (“blooming effect”). PMID:25725137

  5. Molecular analysis and genetic mapping of the rhodopsin gene in families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Bunge, S.; Wedemann, H.; Samanns, C.; Horn, M.; Schwinger, E.; Gal, A. ); David, D. ); Terwilliger, D.J.; Ott, J. ); Born, L.I. van den )

    1993-07-01

    Eighty-eight patients/families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were screened for rhodopsin mutations. Direct sequencing revealed 13 different mutations in a total of 14 (i.e., 16%) unrelated patients. Five of these mutations (T4K, Q28H, R135G, F220C, and C222R) have not been reported so far. In addition, multipoint linkage analysis was performed on two large families with autosomal dominant RP due to rhodopsin mutations by using five DNA probes from 3q21-q24. No tight linkage was found between the rhodopsin locus (RHO) and D3S47 ([theta][sub max] = 0.08). By six-point analysis, RHO was localized in the region between D3S21 and D3S47, with a maximum lod score of 13.447 directly at D3S20. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. An autosomal dominant syndrome of renal and anogenital malformations with syndactyly.

    PubMed

    Green, A J; Sandford, R N; Davison, B C

    1996-07-01

    We describe a family with autosomal dominant inheritance of anal anomalies, renal tract abnormalities, genital malformations, and syndactyly. These clinical manifestations do not clearly fall into any previously described syndrome. A mother and daughter had almost identical congenital malformations, short stature, and unusual facies. The proband was born with anal stenosis, a rectovaginal fistula, clitoral hypertrophy, a pelvic right kidney, and syndactyly of both feet. Her daughter had the same anal, clitoral, and foot anomalies, a solitary pelvic kidney, and no fistula. This family is likely to represent autosomal dominant inheritance of a new combination of malformations, which may overlap with the Townes-Brocks syndrome, but does not fall into a current diagnostic category. PMID:8818947

  7. Molecular Pathways and Therapies in Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saigusa, Takamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most prevalent inherited renal disease, characterized by multiple cysts that can eventually lead to kidney failure. Studies investigating the role of primary cilia and polycystins have significantly advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of PKD. This review will present clinical and basic aspects of ADPKD, review current concepts of PKD pathogenesis, evaluate potential therapeutic targets, and highlight challenges for future clinical studies. PMID:25933820

  8. Successful conservative treatment of bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jaisuresh, K.; Bavaharan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a rare, potentially lethal complication of polycystic kidney disease. Treatment mostly includes emergency nephrectomy of the affected kidney. We report a case of bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis in a 57-year-old diabetic male with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, who recovered with conservative treatment. Escherichia coli was cultured from the cyst aspirate. He was treated with percutaneous needle aspiration of infected cysts and intravenous antibiotics (meropenem and pazufloxacin) for 3 weeks. PMID:23814427

  9. Molecular pathways and therapies in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Saigusa, Takamitsu; Bell, P Darwin

    2015-05-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most prevalent inherited renal disease, characterized by multiple cysts that can eventually lead to kidney failure. Studies investigating the role of primary cilia and polycystins have significantly advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of PKD. This review will present clinical and basic aspects of ADPKD, review current concepts of PKD pathogenesis, evaluate potential therapeutic targets, and highlight challenges for future clinical studies. PMID:25933820

  10. A rare novel mutation in TECTA causes autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss in a Mongolian family

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genetic basis of autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss is complex. Genetic factors are responsible for approximately 50% of cases with congenital hearing loss. However, no previous studies have documented the clinical phenotype and genetic basis of autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss in Mongolians. Methods In this study, we performed exon capture sequencing of a Mongolian family with hereditary hearing loss and identified a novel mutation in TECTA gene, which encodes α -tectorin, a major component of the inner ear extracellular matrix that contacts the specialized sensory hair cells. Results The novel G → T missense mutation at nucleotide 6016 results in a substitution of amino acid aspartate at 2006 with tyrosine (Asp2006Tyr) in a highly conserved zona pellucida (ZP) domain of α-tectorin. The mutation is not found in control subjects from the same family with normal hearing and a genotype-phenotype correlation is observed. Conclusion A novel missense mutation c.6016 G > T (p.Asp2006Tyr) of TECTA gene is a characteristic TECTA-related mutation which causes autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss. Our result indicated that mutation in TECTA gene is responsible for the hearing loss in this Mongolian family. PMID:25008054

  11. Increases in kidney volume in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can be detected within 6 months.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Andreas D; Poster, Diane; Krauer, Fabienne; Weishaupt, Dominik; Raina, Shagun; Senn, Oliver; Binet, Isabelle; Spanaus, Katharina; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Serra, Andreas L

    2009-01-01

    Kidney volume growth is considered the best surrogate marker predicting the decline of renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. To assess the therapeutic benefit of new drugs more rapidly, changes in kidney volume need to be determined over a short time interval. Here we measured renal volume changes by manual segmentation volumetry applied to magnetic resonance imaging scans obtained with an optimized T1-weighted acquisition protocol without gadolinium-based contrast agents. One hundred young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and preserved renal function had a significant increase in total kidney volume by 2.71+/-4.82% in 6 months. Volume measurements were highly reproducible and accurate, as indicated by correlation coefficients of 1.000 for intra-observer and 0.996 for inter-observer agreement, with acceptable within-subject standard deviations. The change in renal volume correlated with baseline total kidney volume in all age subgroups. Total kidney volume positively correlated with male gender, hypertension, albuminuria and a history of macrohematuria but negatively with creatinine clearance. Albuminuria was associated with accelerated volume progression. Our study shows that increases in kidney volume can be reliably measured over a 6 month period in early autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease using unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging sequences. PMID:18971924

  12. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia in a large Swedish family: phenotypic spectrum and natural course.

    PubMed

    Grigelioniene, Giedre; Geiberger, Stefan; Horemuzova, Eva; Moström, Eva; Jäntti, Nina; Neumeyer, Lo; Åström, Eva; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Nordgren, Ann; Mäkitie, Outi

    2014-07-01

    Autosomal dominant brachyolmia (Type 3, OMIM #113500) belongs to a group of skeletal dysplasias caused by mutations in the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 4 (TRPV4) gene, encoding a Ca++-permeable, non-selective cation channel. The disorder is characterized by disproportionate short stature with short trunk, scoliosis and platyspondyly. The phenotypic variability and long-term natural course remain inadequately characterized. The purpose of this study was to describe a large Swedish family with brachyolmia type 3 due to a heterozygous TRPV4 mutation c.1847G>A (p.R616Q) in 11 individuals. The mutation has previously been detected in another family with autosomal dominant brachyolmia [Rock et al., 2008]. Review of hospital records and patient assessments indicated that clinical symptoms of brachyolmia became evident by school age with chronic pain in the spine and hips; radiographic changes were evident earlier. Growth was not affected during early childhood but deteriorated with age in some patients due to increasing spinal involvement. Affected individuals had a wide range of subjective symptoms with chronic pain in the extremities and the spine, and paresthesias. Our findings indicate that autosomal dominant brachyolmia may be associated with significant long-term morbidity, as seen in this family. PMID:24677493

  13. A Dominant Mutation in FBXO38 Causes Distal Spinal Muscular Atrophy with Calf Predominance

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Charlotte J.; d’Ydewalle, Constantin; Wooley, Joe; Fawcett, Katherine A.; Hernandez, Dena; Gardiner, Alice R.; Kalmar, Bernadett; Baloh, Robert H.; Gonzalez, Michael; Züchner, Stephan; Stanescu, Horia C.; Kleta, Robert; Mankodi, Ami; Cornblath, David R.; Boylan, Kevin B.; Reilly, Mary M.; Greensmith, Linda; Singleton, Andrew B.; Harms, Matthew B.; Rossor, Alexander M.; Houlden, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells and progressive muscle weakness. In two unrelated families affected by a distinct form of autosomal-dominant distal SMA initially manifesting with calf weakness, we identified by genetic linkage analysis and exome sequencing a heterozygous missense mutation, c.616T>C (p.Cys206Arg), in F-box protein 38 (FBXO38). FBXO38 is a known coactivator of the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 7 (KLF7), which regulates genes required for neuronal axon outgrowth and repair. The p.Cys206Arg substitution did not alter the subcellular localization of FBXO38 but did impair KLF7-mediated transactivation of a KLF7-responsive promoter construct and endogenous KLF7 target genes in both heterologously expressing human embryonic kidney 293T cells and fibroblasts derived from individuals with the FBXO38 missense mutation. This transcriptional dysregulation was associated with an impairment of neurite outgrowth in primary motor neurons. Together, these results suggest that a transcriptional regulatory pathway that has a well-established role in axonal development could also be critical for neuronal maintenance and highlight the importance of FBXO38 and KLF7 activity in motor neurons. PMID:24207122

  14. Evidence for Locus Heterogeneity in Autosomal Dominant Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Marcy C.; Gilchrist, James M.; Chutkow, Jerry G.; McMichael, Robert; Westbrook, Carol A.; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; Jorgenson, Eric M.; Gaskell, P. Craig; Rosi, Barbara L.; Ramesar, Raj; Vance, Jeffery M.; Yamaoka, Larry H.; Roses, Allen D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is a diagnostic classification encompassing a broad group of proximal myopathies. A gene for the dominant form of LGMD (LGMD1A) has recently been localized to a 7-cM region of chromosome 5q between D5S178 and IL9. We studied three additional dominant LGMD families for linkage to these two markers and excluded all from localization to this region, providing evidence for locus heterogeneity within the dominant form of LGMD. Although the patterns of muscle weakness were similar in all families studied, the majority of affected family members in the chromosome 5–linked pedigree have a dysarthric speech pattern, which is not present in any of the five unlinked families. The demonstration of heterogeneity within autosomal dominant LGMD is the first step in attempting to subclassify these families with similar clinical phenotypes on a molecular level. PMID:8533766

  15. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M.; Gaskell, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is a diagnostic classification encompassing a broad group of proximal myopathies. A gene for the dominant form of LGMD (LGMD1A) has recently been localized to a 7-cM region of chromosome 5q between D5S178 and IL9. We studied three additional dominant LGMD families for linkage to these two markers and excluded all from localization to this region, providing evidence for locus heterogeneity within the dominant form of LGMD. Although the patterns of muscle weakness were similar in all families studied, the majority of affected family members in the chromosome 5-linked pedigree have a dysarthric speech pattern, which is not present in any of the five unlinked families. The demonstration of heterogeneity within autosomal dominant LGMD is the first step in attempting to subclassify these families with similar clinical phenotypes on a molecular level. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Diverging longitudinal changes in astrocytosis and amyloid PET in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Carter, Stephen F; Almkvist, Ove; Farid, Karim; Schöll, Michael; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Graff, Caroline; Wall, Anders; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    See Schott and Fox (doi:10.1093/brain/awv405) for a scientific commentary on this article.Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial dementia disorder characterized by early amyloid-β, tau deposition, glial activation and neurodegeneration, where the interrelationships between the different pathophysiological events are not yet well characterized. In this study, longitudinal multitracer positron emission tomography imaging of individuals with autosomal dominant or sporadic Alzheimer's disease was used to quantify the changes in regional distribution of brain astrocytosis (tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl), fibrillar amyloid-β plaque deposition ((11)C-Pittsburgh compound B), and glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) from early presymptomatic stages over an extended period to clinical symptoms. The 52 baseline participants comprised autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers (n = 11; 49.6 ± 10.3 years old) and non-carriers (n = 16; 51.1 ± 14.2 years old; 10 male), and patients with sporadic mild cognitive impairment (n = 17; 61.9 ± 6.4 years old; nine male) and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (n = 8; 63.0 ± 6.5 years old; five male); for confidentiality reasons, the gender of mutation carriers is not revealed. The autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease participants belonged to families with known mutations in either presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or amyloid precursor protein (APPswe or APParc) genes. Sporadic mild cognitive impairment patients were further divided into (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-positive (n = 13; 62.0 ± 6.4; seven male) and (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-negative (n = 4; 61.8 ± 7.5 years old; two male) groups using a neocortical standardized uptake value ratio cut-off value of 1.41, which was calculated with respect to the cerebellar grey matter. All baseline participants underwent multitracer positron emission tomography scans, cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis and neuropsychological assessment. Twenty-six of the participants

  17. Diverging longitudinal changes in astrocytosis and amyloid PET in autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Aubert, Laure; Carter, Stephen F.; Almkvist, Ove; Farid, Karim; Schöll, Michael; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Graff, Caroline; Wall, Anders; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    See Schott and Fox (doi:10.1093/brain/awv405) for a scientific commentary on this article. Alzheimer’s disease is a multifactorial dementia disorder characterized by early amyloid-β, tau deposition, glial activation and neurodegeneration, where the interrelationships between the different pathophysiological events are not yet well characterized. In this study, longitudinal multitracer positron emission tomography imaging of individuals with autosomal dominant or sporadic Alzheimer’s disease was used to quantify the changes in regional distribution of brain astrocytosis (tracer 11C-deuterium-L-deprenyl), fibrillar amyloid-β plaque deposition (11C-Pittsburgh compound B), and glucose metabolism (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) from early presymptomatic stages over an extended period to clinical symptoms. The 52 baseline participants comprised autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease mutation carriers (n = 11; 49.6 ± 10.3 years old) and non-carriers (n = 16; 51.1 ± 14.2 years old; 10 male), and patients with sporadic mild cognitive impairment (n = 17; 61.9 ± 6.4 years old; nine male) and sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (n = 8; 63.0 ± 6.5 years old; five male); for confidentiality reasons, the gender of mutation carriers is not revealed. The autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease participants belonged to families with known mutations in either presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or amyloid precursor protein (APPswe or APParc) genes. Sporadic mild cognitive impairment patients were further divided into 11C-Pittsburgh compound B-positive (n = 13; 62.0 ± 6.4; seven male) and 11C-Pittsburgh compound B-negative (n = 4; 61.8 ± 7.5 years old; two male) groups using a neocortical standardized uptake value ratio cut-off value of 1.41, which was calculated with respect to the cerebellar grey matter. All baseline participants underwent multitracer positron emission tomography scans, cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis and neuropsychological assessment. Twenty-six of the participants

  18. The anterior segment disorder autosomal dominant keratitis is linked to the Aniridia/PAX-6 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, F.; Pearce, W.G.; Mah, T.S.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disease characterized by anterior stromal corneal opacification and vascularization in the peripheral cornea. Progression into the central cornea may compromise visual acuity. Other anterior segment features include minimal radial defects of the iris stroma. Posterior segment involvement is characterized by foveal hypoplasia with minimal effect on visual acuity. Aniridia is a second autosomal dominantly inherited ocular disorder defined by structural defects of the iris, frequently severe enough to cause an almost complete absence of iris. This may be accompanied by other anterior segment manifestations, including cataract and keratitis. Posterior segment involvement in aniridia is characterized by foveal hypoplasia resulting in a highly variable impairment of visual acuity, often with nystagmus. Aniridia is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disease and occurs in 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 people. Aniridia has been shown to result from mutations in PAX-6, a gene thought to regulate fetal eye development. The similar clinical findings in ADK and aniridia, with the similar patterns of inheritance, compelled us to investigate if these two ocular disorders are variants of the same genetic disorder. We have tested for linkage between PAX-6 and ADK within an ADK family with 33 members over four generations, including 11 affected individuals. Linkage studies reveal that D11S914 (located within 3 cM of PAX-6) does not recombine with ADK (LOD score 3.61; {theta} = 0.00), consistent with PAX-6 mutations being responsible for ADK. Direct sequencing of PAX-6 RT-PCR products from ADK patients is underway to identify the mutation within the PAX-6 gene that results in ADK. The linkage of PAX-6 with ADK, along with a recent report that mutations in PAX-6 also underlie Peter`s anomaly, implicates PAX-6 widely in anterior segment malformations.

  19. A transducin-like gene maps to the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstat-Saslow, D.L.; Reeders, S.T.; Germino, G.G.; Somlo, S. )

    1993-12-01

    A novel human gene (sazD) that maps to the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease region shares sequence similarity with members of the [beta]-transducin superfamily. The cDNA sazD-c predicts an [approximately]58-kDa protein (sazD) with seven internal repeats, similar to the WD-40 motif of the transducin family. The size of this protein family has been expanding rapidly; however, neither the structure nor the function of this repeated motif is known. Preliminary data do not suggest that sazD is mutated in patients with polycystic kidney disease. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Evidence for a third genetic locus for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daoust, M.C.; Bichet, D.G.; Reynolds, D.M.

    1995-02-10

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with loci on chromosomes 16p and 4q. It has a moderately high spontaneous mutation rate, although the relative frequency of such mutations at each gene locus is unknown. In studying genetic heterogeneity in the French-Canadian population, we identified a family in which a classical clinical presentation of ADPKD resulted from a mutation at a locus genetically distinct from either of the previously described loci for this disease. This suggests the existence of a third genetic locus for ADPKD. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Asymmetric crying facies with microcephaly and mental retardation. An autosomal dominant syndrome with variable expressivity.

    PubMed

    Silengo, M C; Bell, G L; Biagioli, M; Guala, A; Bianco, R; Strandoni, P; De Sario, P N; Franceschini, P

    1986-12-01

    An infant boy with asymmetric crying facies, microcephaly, developmental retardation and failure to thrive is reported. His two siblings died in the newborn period because of complex congenital heart defects. The mother and the maternal grandmother have asymmetric crying facies, microcephaly and normal intelligence. A maternal aunt has severe physical and mental retardation, facial asymmetry, microcephaly, and cleft palate. This family allows an expansion of the spectrum of malformations associated with asymmetric crying facies and suggests autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expressivity. PMID:3815881

  2. Nephrectomy in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Patient with Exceptionally Large, Still Functioning Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Spithoven, Edwin M.; Casteleijn, Niek F.; Berger, Paul; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease. It is characterized by progressive cyst formation in both kidneys, often leading to end-stage kidney disease. Indications for surgical removal of an ADPKD kidney include intractable pain, hematuria, infection, or exceptional enlargement and small abdominal cavity hampering implantation of a donor kidney. We report the case of an extraordinarily large ADPKD kidney weighing 8.7 kg (19.3 lb) with a maximal length of 48 cm (19 inch), and with cysts filled with both clear and bloody fluid. PMID:25028584

  3. Dialysis-induced Subdural Hematoma in an Arachnoid Cyst Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Takata, Tadayuki; Kokudo, Yohei; Kume, Kodai; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Kamada, Masaki; Touge, Tetsuo; Deguchi, Kazushi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst (AC) is a neurological complication of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although an AC can increase the risk of a subdural hematoma, the clinical presentation of bleeding into an AC associated with ADPKD is not well known. We herein report the case of a 59-year-old woman in whom the initiation of hemodialysis for renal failure led to AC bleeding. A change of anticoagulant from heparin to nafamostat mesilate allowed dialysis to continue without rebleeding. These findings suggest that hemodialysis in patients with an AC associated with ADPKD may increase the risk of bleeding. Nafamostat mesilate may be useful in such cases. PMID:27477416

  4. Hypokalemic Hypertension Leading to a Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vutthikraivit, Wasawat; Assanatham, Montira

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disease. Hypertension is common and occurs before decline in renal function. However, the coexistence of hypertension and hypokalemia is rare in ADPKD patients. We report on a 32-year-old woman with secondary aldosteronism. Magnetic resonance imaging of the renal arteries revealed multiple cysts of varying sizes in both the kidneys and the liver, compatible with ADPKD. Increased reninangiotensin-aldosterone system activity was secondary to cyst expansion. After initiation of angiotensin II receptor blocker, her blood pressure was controlled without additional requirement of potassium. PMID:27453714

  5. Will introduction of tolvaptan change clinical practice in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Horie, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    The vasopressin inhibitor tolvaptan is clinically effective in slowing growth of renal cysts and reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), but these effects are mitigated by the associated polyuria. Changes of total kidney volume, eGFR, and symptoms will guide physicians and patients in tolvaptan treatment. Guidance about when to initiate treatment in the course of ADPKD may be forthcoming. Ongoing long-term observations will inform future recommendations about tolvaptan use in ADPKD. PMID:26126090

  6. Activation of AMP-activated kinase as a strategy for managing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    There is evidence that overactivity of both mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes importantly to the progressive expansion of renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Recent research has established that AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) can suppress the activity of each of these proteins. Clinical AMPK activators such as metformin and berberine may thus have potential in the clinical management of ADPKD. The traditional use of berberine in diarrhea associated with bacterial infections may reflect, in part, the inhibitory impact of AMPK on chloride extrusion by small intestinal enterocytes. PMID:19570618

  7. DVL1 Frameshift Mutations Clustering in the Penultimate Exon Cause Autosomal-Dominant Robinow Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F.; Hoischen, Alexander; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Gambin, Tomasz; Alcino, Michele Calijorne; Penney, Samantha; Saraiva, Jorge M.; Hove, Hanne; Skovby, Flemming; Kayserili, Hülya; Estrella, Elicia; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Steehouwer, Marloes; Muzny, Donna M.; Sutton, V. Reid; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Robinow syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features and for which both autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant inheritance patterns have been described. Causative variants in the non-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14 mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within the penultimate exon of DVL1. In five families in which samples from unaffected parents were available, the variants were demonstrated to represent de novo mutations. All variant alleles are predicted to result in a premature termination codon within the last exon, escape nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), and most likely generate a C-terminally truncated protein with a distinct −1 reading-frame terminus. Study of the transcripts extracted from affected subjects’ leukocytes confirmed expression of both wild-type and variant alleles, supporting the hypothesis that mutant mRNA escapes NMD. Genomic variants identified in our study suggest that truncation of the C-terminal domain of DVL1, a protein hypothesized to have a downstream role in the Wnt-5a non-canonical pathway, is a common cause of DRS. PMID:25817016

  8. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Gambin, Tomasz; Alcino, Michele Calijorne; Penney, Samantha; Saraiva, Jorge M; Hove, Hanne; Skovby, Flemming; Kayserili, Hülya; Estrella, Elicia; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Steehouwer, Marloes; Muzny, Donna M; Sutton, V Reid; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Brunner, Han G; van Bon, Bregje W M; Carvalho, Claudia M B

    2015-04-01

    Robinow syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features and for which both autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant inheritance patterns have been described. Causative variants in the non-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14 mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within the penultimate exon of DVL1. In five families in which samples from unaffected parents were available, the variants were demonstrated to represent de novo mutations. All variant alleles are predicted to result in a premature termination codon within the last exon, escape nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), and most likely generate a C-terminally truncated protein with a distinct -1 reading-frame terminus. Study of the transcripts extracted from affected subjects' leukocytes confirmed expression of both wild-type and variant alleles, supporting the hypothesis that mutant mRNA escapes NMD. Genomic variants identified in our study suggest that truncation of the C-terminal domain of DVL1, a protein hypothesized to have a downstream role in the Wnt-5a non-canonical pathway, is a common cause of DRS. PMID:25817016

  9. A novel C202F mutation in the connexin26 gene (GJB2) associated with autosomal dominant isolated hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Morlé, L; Bozon, M; Alloisio, N; Latour, P; Vandenberghe, A; Plauchu, H; Collet, L; Edery, P; Godet, J; Lina-Granade, G

    2000-05-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene encoding connexin26 (CX26) account for up to 50% of cases of autosomal recessive hearing loss. In contrast, only one GJB2 mutation has been reported to date in an autosomal dominant form of isolated prelingual hearing loss. We report here a novel heterozygous 605G-->T mutation in GJB2 in all affected members of a large family with late childhood onset of autosomal dominant isolated hearing loss. The resulting C202F substitution, which lies in the fourth (M4) transmembrane domain of CX26, may impair connexin oligomerisation. Finally, our study suggests that GJB2 should be screened for heterozygous mutations in patients with autosomal dominant isolated hearing impairment, whatever the severity of the disease. PMID:10807696

  10. Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease: A Unique Resource to Study CSF Biomarker Changes in Preclinical AD

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Suzanne Elizabeth; Fagan, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) has been greatly influenced by investigation of rare families with autosomal dominant mutations that cause early onset AD. Mutations in the genes coding for amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN-1), and presenilin 2 (PSEN-2) cause over-production of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) leading to early deposition of Aβ in the brain, which in turn is hypothesized to initiate a cascade of processes, resulting in neuronal death, cognitive decline, and eventual dementia. Studies of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from individuals with the common form of AD, late-onset AD (LOAD), have revealed that low CSF Aβ42 and high CSF tau are associated with AD brain pathology. Herein, we review the literature on CSF biomarkers in autosomal dominant AD (ADAD), which has contributed to a detailed road map of AD pathogenesis, especially during the preclinical period, prior to the appearance of any cognitive symptoms. Current drug trials are also taking advantage of the unique characteristics of ADAD and utilizing CSF biomarkers to accelerate development of effective therapies for AD. PMID:26175713

  11. A mutation in FRIZZLED2 impairs Wnt signaling and causes autosomal dominant omodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Saal, Howard M.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Guerreiro, Iris; Donlin, Milene; Knudson, Luke; Sund, Kristen L.; Chang, Ching-Fang; Brugmann, Samantha A.; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant omodysplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by short humeri, radial head dislocation, short first metacarpals, facial dysmorphism and genitourinary anomalies. We performed next-generation whole-exome sequencing and comparative analysis of a proband with omodysplasia, her unaffected parents and her affected daughter. We identified a de novo mutation in FRIZZLED2 (FZD2) in the proband and her daughter that was not found in unaffected family members. The FZD2 mutation (c.1644G>A) changes a tryptophan residue at amino acid 548 to a premature stop (p.Trp548*). This altered protein is still produced in vitro, but we show reduced ability of this mutant form of FZD2 to interact with its downstream target DISHEVELLED. Furthermore, expressing the mutant form of FZD2 in vitro is not able to facilitate the cellular response to canonical Wnt signaling like wild-type FZD2. We therefore conclude that the FRIZZLED2 mutation is a de novo, novel cause for autosomal dominant omodysplasia. PMID:25759469

  12. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Lu, Xiang-Hui; Wang, Hui-Fang; Ban, Rui; Liu, Hua-Xu; Shi, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Yin, Xi; Pu, Chuan-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myopathies with rimmed vacuoles are a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders with progressive muscle weakness and varied clinical manifestations but similar features in muscle biopsies. Here, we describe a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles in a large family with 11 patients of three generations affected. Methods: A clinical study including family history, obstetric, pediatric, and development history was recorded. Clinical examinations including physical examination, electromyography (EMG), serum creatine kinase (CK), bone X-rays, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in this family. Open muscle biopsies were performed on the proband and his mother. To find the causative gene, the whole-exome sequencing was carried out. Results: Disease onset was from adolescence to adulthood, but the affected patients of the third generation presented an earlier onset and more severe clinical manifestations than the older generations. Clinical features were characterized as dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision. However, not every patient manifested all symptoms. Serum CK was mildly elevated and EMG indicated a myopathic pattern. Brain MRI showed cerebellum and brain stem mildly atrophy. Rimmed vacuoles and inclusion bodies were observed in muscle biopsy. The whole-exome sequencing was performed, but the causative gene has not been found. Conclusions: We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision, but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study. PMID:27453229

  13. Mutations in INF2 Are a Major Cause of Autosomal Dominant Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Olivia; Benoit, Geneviève; Gribouval, Olivier; Nevo, Fabien; Tête, Marie-Josèphe; Dantal, Jacques; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Touchard, Guy; Karras, Alexandre; Presne, Claire; Grunfeld, Jean-Pierre; Legendre, Christophe; Joly, Dominique; Rieu, Philippe; Mohsin, Nabil; Hannedouche, Thierry; Moal, Valérie; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Broutin, Isabelle; Mollet, Géraldine

    2011-01-01

    The recent identification of mutations in the INF2 gene, which encodes a member of the formin family of actin-regulating proteins, in cases of familial FSGS supports the importance of an intact actin cytoskeleton in podocyte function. To determine better the prevalence of INF2 mutations in autosomal dominant FSGS, we screened 54 families (78 patients) and detected mutations in 17% of them. All mutations were missense variants localized to the N-terminal diaphanous inhibitory domain of the protein, a region that interacts with the C-terminal diaphanous autoregulatory domain, thereby competing for actin monomer binding and inhibiting depolymerization. Six of the seven distinct altered residues localized to an INF2 region that corresponded to a subdomain of the mDia1 diaphanous inhibitory domain reported to co-immunoprecipitate with IQ motif–containing GTPase-activating protein 1 (IQGAP1). In addition, we evaluated 84 sporadic cases but detected a mutation in only one patient. In conclusion, mutations in INF2 are a major cause of autosomal dominant FSGS. Because IQGAP1 interacts with crucial podocyte proteins such as nephrin and PLCε1, the identification of mutations that may alter the putative INF2–IQGAP1 interaction provides additional insight into the pathophysiologic mechanisms linking formin proteins to podocyte dysfunction and FSGS. PMID:21258034

  14. Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease: diagnosis, classification, and management--A KDIGO consensus report.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Alper, Seth L; Antignac, Corinne; Bleyer, Anthony J; Chauveau, Dominique; Dahan, Karin; Deltas, Constantinos; Hosking, Andrew; Kmoch, Stanislav; Rampoldi, Luca; Wiesener, Michael; Wolf, Matthias T; Devuyst, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Rare autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding uromodulin (UMOD), hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF1B), renin (REN), and mucin-1 (MUC1). Multiple names have been proposed for these disorders, including 'Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease (MCKD) type 2', 'Familial Juvenile Hyperuricemic Nephropathy (FJHN)', or 'Uromodulin-Associated Kidney Disease (UAKD)' for UMOD-related diseases and 'MCKD type 1' for the disease caused by MUC1 mutations. The multiplicity of these terms, and the fact that cysts are not pathognomonic, creates confusion. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) proposes adoption of a new terminology for this group of diseases using the term 'Autosomal Dominant Tubulointerstitial Kidney Disease' (ADTKD) appended by a gene-based subclassification, and suggests diagnostic criteria. Implementation of these recommendations is anticipated to facilitate recognition and characterization of these monogenic diseases. A better understanding of these rare disorders may be relevant for the tubulointerstitial fibrosis component in many forms of chronic kidney disease. PMID:25738250

  15. Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Compensation May Preserve Vision in Patients with OPA1-Linked Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Van Bergen, Nicole J.; Crowston, Jonathan G.; Kearns, Lisa S.; Staffieri, Sandra E.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Cohn, Amy C.; Mackey, David A.; Trounce, Ian A.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy (ADOA) is the most common inherited optic atrophy where vision impairment results from specific loss of retinal ganglion cells of the optic nerve. Around 60% of ADOA cases are linked to mutations in the OPA1 gene. OPA1 is a fission-fusion protein involved in mitochondrial inner membrane remodelling. ADOA presents with marked variation in clinical phenotype and varying degrees of vision loss, even among siblings carrying identical mutations in OPA1. To determine whether the degree of vision loss is associated with the level of mitochondrial impairment, we examined mitochondrial function in lymphoblast cell lines obtained from six large Australian OPA1-linked ADOA pedigrees. Comparing patients with severe vision loss (visual acuity [VA]<6/36) and patients with relatively preserved vision (VA>6/9) a clear defect in mitochondrial ATP synthesis and reduced respiration rates were observed in patients with poor vision. In addition, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymology in ADOA patients with normal vision revealed increased complex II+III activity and levels of complex IV protein. These data suggest that OPA1 deficiency impairs OXPHOS efficiency, but compensation through increases in the distal complexes of the respiratory chain may preserve mitochondrial ATP production in patients who maintain normal vision. Identification of genetic variants that enable this response may provide novel therapeutic insights into OXPHOS compensation for preventing vision loss in optic neuropathies. PMID:21731710

  16. Ultrastructural appearance of renal and other basement membranes in the Bull terrier model of autosomal dominant hereditary nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hood, J C; Savige, J; Seymour, A E; Dowling, J; Martinello, P; Colville, D; Sinclair, R; Naito, I; Jennings, G; Huxtable, C

    2000-08-01

    Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may represent a model for autosomal dominant Alport's syndrome because affected dogs have the typically lamellated glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and father-to-son disease transmission occurs. This study examined the ultrastructural appearance of the renal and extrarenal basement membranes and their composition in affected Bull terriers. Affected stillborn animals and puppies had subepithelial frilling and vacuolation of the GBM. In adult dogs, lamellation was common, and subepithelial frilling and vacuolation were less prominent. Foot-process effacement and mesangial matrix expansion occurred frequently. Basement membranes in the glomeruli, tubules, and Bowman's capsule were significantly thickened and often mineralized. Immunohistochemical examination showed alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) collagen chains in all renal basement membranes; alpha 3(IV), alpha 4(IV), and alpha 5(IV) chains in the GBM, distal tubular basement membrane, and Bowman's capsule; and the alpha 6(IV) chain in Bowman's capsule. Conversely, the basement membranes from the affected Bull terrier cornea, lens capsule, retina, skin, lung, and muscle had a normal ultrastructural appearance and were not thickened compared with membranes in normal age-matched dogs. The distribution of basement membrane abnormalities in Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may occur because the defective protein is present exclusively or more abundantly in the kidney and is structurally more important in the kidney or because of local intrarenal stresses. PMID:10922317

  17. The myotubular myopathies: differential diagnosis of the X linked recessive, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive forms and present state of DNA studies.

    PubMed Central

    Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Clarke, A; Samson, F; Fardeau, M; Dubowitz, V; Moser, H; Grimm, T; Barohn, R J; Barth, P G

    1995-01-01

    Clinical differences exist between the three forms of myotubular myopathy. They differ regarding age at onset, severity of the disease, and prognosis, and also regarding some of the clinical characteristics. The autosomal dominant form mostly has a later onset and milder course than the X linked form, and the autosomal recessive form is intermediate in both respects. These differences are, however, quantitative rather than qualitative. Muscle biopsy studies of family members are useful in some cases, and immunohistochemical staining of desmin and vimentin may help distinguish between the X linked and autosomal forms. Determining the mode of inheritance and prognosis in individual families, especially those with a single male patient, still poses a problem. Current molecular genetic results indicate that the gene for the X linked form is located in the proximal Xq28 region. Further molecular genetic studies are needed to examine the existence of genetic heterogeneity in myotubular myopathy and to facilitate diagnosis. Images PMID:8544184

  18. Suppression and replacement gene therapy for autosomal dominant disease in a murine model of dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Millington-Ward, Sophia; Chadderton, Naomi; O'Reilly, Mary; Palfi, Arpad; Goldmann, Tobias; Kilty, Claire; Humphries, Marian; Wolfrum, Uwe; Bennett, Jean; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2011-04-01

    For dominantly inherited disorders development of gene therapies, targeting the primary genetic lesion has been impeded by mutational heterogeneity. An example is rhodopsin-linked autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with over 150 mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Validation of a mutation-independent suppression and replacement gene therapy for this disorder has been undertaken. The therapy provides a means of correcting the genetic defect in a mutation-independent manner thereby circumventing the mutational diversity. Separate adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors were used to deliver an RNA interference (RNAi)-based rhodopsin suppressor and a codon-modified rhodopsin replacement gene resistant to suppression due to nucleotide alterations at degenerate positions over the RNAi target site. Viruses were subretinally coinjected into P347S mice, a model of dominant rhodopsin-linked retinitis pigmentosa. Benefit in retinal function and structure detected by electroretinography (ERG) and histology, respectively, was observed for at least 5 months. Notably, the photoreceptor cell layer, absent in 5-month-old untreated retinas, contained 3-4 layers of nuclei, whereas photoreceptor ultrastructure, assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) improved significantly. The study provides compelling evidence that codelivered suppression and replacement is beneficial, representing a significant step toward the clinic. Additionally, dual-vector delivery of combined therapeutics represents an exciting approach, which is potentially applicable to other inherited disorders. PMID:21224835

  19. Screening for mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gannon, A.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.

  20. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  1. [Evidence for autosomal dominant inheritance through the maternal line in a case of primary ciliary diskinesia].

    PubMed

    Alvarez González, J; Busto Castañón, L; Nistal Serrano, M

    2006-01-01

    An atypical case of primary ciliary dyskinesia is presented in which the inheritance, rather than the classical autosomal recessive, appears to be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait through the maternal line. The case involves two brothers of 29 and 30 years of age, married without children, with a history of infertility, frequent episodes of sinusitis, and recurrent pulmonary infections. Their mother and sister have chronic bronchopathy of unknown etiology. Their father is healthy without pulmonary problems or sinusitis. At physical exam, both brothers, sister and mother presented with bronchial rhonchi at lung auscultation. Blood analysis and pulmonary function, liver and renal tests were all normal. The ultraestructual study of the sperm flagellum by electron microscopy revealed that both brothers have the same anomaly. Namely, in the majority of the cross-sections, both dynein arms are missing. The nexin filament was present, as well as the radial spokes and the central pair of microtubules. In some sperm, besides the absence of dynein arms, there was also absence of the central pair of microtubules. Neither anomalies of the fibrous sheath nor of the dense fibers were found. In approximately 50% of the spermatozoa, the midpiece had a decreased number of mitochondria and extra non-aligned mitochondria. Other findings included extra peripheral microtubules in the axoneme. PMID:17058621

  2. Fine localization of the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 17p

    SciTech Connect

    Goliath, R.; Janssens, P.; Beighton, P.

    1995-10-01

    The term {open_quotes}retintis pigmentosa{close_quotes} (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerative disorders. Clinical manifestations include night-blindness, with variable age of onset, followed by constriction of the visual field that may progress to total loss of sight in later life. Previous studies have shown that RP is caused by mutations within different genes and may be inherited as an X-linked recessive (XLRRP), autosomal recessive (ARRP), or autosomal dominant (ADRP) trait. The AD form of this group of conditions has been found to be caused by mutations within the rhodopsin gene in some families and the peripherin/RDS gene in others. In addition, some ADRP families have been found to be linked to anonymous markers on 8cen, 7p, 7q,19q, and, more recently, 17p. The ADRP gene locus on the short arm of chromosome 17 was identified in a large South African family (ADRP-SA) of British origin. The phenotypic expression of the disorder, which has been described elsewhere is consistent in the pedigree with an early onset of disease symptoms. In all affected subjects in the family, onset of symptoms commenced before the age of 10 years. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Multiple mtDNA deletions features in autosomal dominant and recessive diseases suggest distinct pathogeneses.

    PubMed

    Carrozzo, R; Hirano, M; Fromenty, B; Casali, C; Santorelli, F M; Bonilla, E; DiMauro, S; Schon, E A; Miranda, A F

    1998-01-01

    Multiple mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions have been described in patients with autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (AD-PEO) and in autosomal recessive disorders including mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) and autosomal recessive cardiomyopathy ophthalmoplegia (ARCO). The pathogenic bases of these disorders are unknown. We studied three patients with AD-PEO and three patients with autosomal recessive (AR)-PEO (two patients with MNGIE and one patient with ARCO). Histochemistry and Southern blot analyses of DNA were performed in skeletal muscle from the patients. Muscle mtDNA was used to characterize the pattern and amounts of the multiple mtDNA rearrangements; PCR analysis was performed to obtain finer maps of the deleted regions in both conditions. The patients with AD-PEO had myopathic features; the patients with AR-PEO had multisystem disorders. The percentage of ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers tended to be higher in muscle from the patients with AD-PEO (19% +/- 13.9, 29.7 +/- 26.3) than in muscle from the patients with AR-PEO (1.4% +/- 1.4, 3.3% +/- 3.2; p < 0.10). The sizes of the multiple mtDNA deletions ranged from approximately 4.0 to 10.0 kilobases in muscle from both groups of patients, and in both groups, we identified only deleted and no duplicated mtDNA molecules. Patients with AD-PEO harbored a greater proportion of deleted mtDNA species in muscle (31% +/- 5.3) than did patients with AR-PEO (9.7% +/- 9.1; p < 0.05). In the patients with AD-PEO, we identified a deletion that included the mtDNA heavy strand promoter (HSP) region, which had been previously described as the HSP deletion. The HSP deletion was not present in the patients with AR-PEO. Our findings show the clinical, histologic, and molecular genetic heterogeneity of these complex disorders. In particular, the proportions of multiple mtDNA deletions were higher in muscle samples from patients with AD-PEO than in those from

  4. DISTAL MYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Over a century ago, Gowers described two young patients in whom distal muscles weakness involved the hand, foot, sternocleidomastoid, and facial muscles in the other case the shoulder and distal leg musculature. Soon after, , similar distal myopathy cases were reported whereby the absence of sensory symptoms and of pathologic changes in the peripheral nerves and spinal cord at postmortem examination allowed differentiation from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In 1951, Welander described autosomal dominant (AD) distal arm myopathy in a large Scandanavian cohort. Since then the number of well-characterized distal myopathies has continued to grow such that the distal myopathies have formed a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Affected kindred commonly manifest weakness that is limited to foot and toe muscles even in advanced stages of the disease, with variable mild proximal leg, distal arm, neck and laryngeal muscle involvement in selected individuals. An interesting consequence of the molecular characterization of the distal myopathies has been the recognition that mutation in a single gene can lead to more than one clinical disorder. For example, Myoshi myopathy (MM) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2B are allelic disorders due to defects in the gene that encodes dysferlin. The six well described distal myopathy syndromes are shown in Table 1. Table 2 lists advances in our understanding of the myofibrillar myopathy group and Table 3 includes more recently delineated and less common distal myopathies. In the same manner, the first section of this review pertains to the more traditional six distal myopathies followed by discussion of the myofibrillar myopathies. In the third section, we review other clinically and genetically distinctive distal myopathy syndromes usually based upon single or smaller family cohorts. The fourth section considers other neuromuscular disorders that are important to recognize as they display prominent

  5. Autosomal Dominant Hypercalciuria in a Mouse Model Due to a Mutation of the Epithelial Calcium Channel, TRPV5

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Nellie Y.; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Tammaro, Paolo; Gorvin, Caroline M.; Stechman, Michael J.; Ahmad, Bushra N.; Hannan, Fadil M.; Piret, Sian E.; Evans, Holly; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Hough, Tertius A.; Fraser, William D.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Brown, Steve D. M.; Bindels, René J. M.; Cox, Roger D.; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Hypercalciuria is a major cause of nephrolithiasis, and is a common and complex disorder involving genetic and environmental factors. Identification of genetic factors for monogenic forms of hypercalciuria is hampered by the limited availability of large families, and to facilitate such studies, we screened for hypercalciuria in mice from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis programme. We identified a mouse with autosomal dominant hypercalciuria (HCALC1). Linkage studies mapped the Hcalc1 locus to a 11.94 Mb region on chromosome 6 containing the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, members 5 (Trpv5) and 6 (Trpv6) genes. DNA sequence analysis of coding regions, intron-exon boundaries and promoters of Trpv5 and Trpv6 identified a novel T to C transition in codon 682 of TRPV5, mutating a conserved serine to a proline (S682P). Compared to wild-type littermates, heterozygous (Trpv5682P/+) and homozygous (Trpv5682P/682P) mutant mice had hypercalciuria, polyuria, hyperphosphaturia and a more acidic urine, and ∼10% of males developed tubulointerstitial nephritis. Trpv5682P/682P mice also had normal plasma parathyroid hormone but increased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations without increased bone resorption, consistent with a renal defect for the hypercalciuria. Expression of the S682P mutation in human embryonic kidney cells revealed that TRPV5-S682P-expressing cells had a lower baseline intracellular calcium concentration than wild-type TRPV5-expressing cells, suggesting an altered calcium permeability. Immunohistological studies revealed a selective decrease in TRPV5-expression from the renal distal convoluted tubules of Trpv5682P/+ and Trpv5682P/682P mice consistent with a trafficking defect. In addition, Trpv5682P/682P mice had a reduction in renal expression of the intracellular calcium-binding protein, calbindin-D28K, consistent with a specific defect in TRPV5-mediated renal calcium reabsorption. Thus, our findings indicate that the TRPV5

  6. Autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy and speech dyspraxia: a new syndrome with anticipation.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, I E; Jones, L; Pozzebon, M; Howell, R A; Saling, M M; Berkovic, S F

    1995-10-01

    We describe a family of 9 affected individuals in three generations with nocturnal oro-facio-brachial partial seizures, secondarily generalized partial seizures, and centro-temporal epileptiform discharges, associated with oral and speech dyspraxia and cognitive impairment. The speech disorder was prominent, but differed from that of Landau-Kleffner syndrome and of epilepsy with continuous spike and wave during slow-wave sleep. The electroclinical features of this new syndrome of autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy resemble those of benign rolandic epilepsy, a common inherited epilepsy of childhood. This family shows clinical anticipation of the seizure disorder, the oral and speech dyspraxia, and cognitive dysfunction, suggesting that the genetic mechanism could be expansion of an unstable triplet repeat. Molecular studies on this syndrome, where the inheritance pattern is clear, could also be relevant to identifying a gene for benign rolandic epilepsy where anticipation does not occur and the mode of inheritance is uncertain. PMID:7574460

  7. Perinatal Management of Pregnancy Complicated by Autosomal Dominant Emery–Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Megumi; Shirasawa, Hiromitsu; Makino, Kenichi; Miura, Hiroshi; Sato, Wataru; Shimizu, Dai; Sato, Naoki; Kumagai, Jin; Sato, Akira; Terada, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autosomal dominant Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (AD-EDMD) is rare compared with other forms of muscular dystrophy and is characterized by cardiac conduction defects. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with AD-EDMD during the first trimester of pregnancy who developed acute preeclampsia and subsequently, congestive heart failure (CHF) following cesarean section. Case A 36-year-old, gravida 0 para 0 woman was diagnosed with AD-EDMD by genetic testing during the first trimester of pregnancy, and she suddenly developed preeclampsia and partial HELLP (hemolytic anemia, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) syndrome at 33 weeks of gestation. The patient subsequently developed CHF following cesarean section. Conclusion CHF can occur as a direct result of the cardiac defects arising due to EDMD, and therefore, careful prenatal and postpartum management is recommended for such cases. PMID:27054045

  8. Autosomal dominant nemaline myopathy caused by a novel alpha-tropomyosin 3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Kiphuth, I C; Krause, S; Huttner, H B; Dekomien, G; Struffert, T; Schröder, R

    2010-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetically and clinically heterogenous muscle disorder, which is myopathologically characterized by nemaline bodies. Mutations in six genes have been reported to cause NM: Nebulin (NEB Pelin 1999), alpha-skeletal muscle actin (ACTA1 Nowak 1999), alpha-slow tropomyosin (TPM3 Laing 1995), beta-tropomyosin (TPM2 Donner 2002), slow troponin T (TNNT1 Johnston 2000) and cofilin 2 (CFL2 Agrawal 2007). The majority of cases are due to mutation in NEB and ACTA1. We report on the clinical, myopathological and muscle MRI findings in a German family with autosomal dominant NM due to a novel pathogenic TPM3 mutation (p.Ala156Thr). PMID:20012312

  9. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  10. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa mapping to chromosome 7p exhibits variable expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, R Y; Fitzke, F W; Moore, A T; Jay, M; Inglehearn, C; Arden, G B; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1995-01-01

    The genetic locus causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) has recently been mapped in a large English family to chromosome 7p. Eight affected members of this family were studied electrophysiologically and psychophysically with dark adapted static threshold perimetry and dark adaptometry. The phenotypes observed fell into three categories: minimally affected with no symptoms, and normal (or near normal) electrophysiology and psychophysics; moderately affected with mild symptoms, abnormal electroretinograms, and equal loss of rod and cone function in affected areas of the retina; and severely affected with extinguished electroretinograms and barely detectable dark adapted static threshold sensitivities. The mutation in the gene on 7p causing adRP in this family causes regional retinal dysfunction with greatly variable expressivity ranging from normal to profoundly abnormal in a manner not explained by age. PMID:7880785

  11. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with apparent incomplete penetrance: a clinical, electrophysiological, psychophysical, and molecular genetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A T; Fitzke, F; Jay, M; Arden, G B; Inglehearn, C F; Keen, T J; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1993-01-01

    Twenty five symptomatic individuals and six asymptomatic obligate gene carriers from four families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) showing apparent incomplete penetrance have been studied. Symptomatic individuals from three families showed early onset of night blindness, non-recordable rod electroretinograms, and marked elevation of both rod and cone thresholds in all subjects tested. In the fourth family, there was more variation in the age of onset of night blindness and some symptomatic individuals showed well preserved rod and cone function in some retinal areas. All asymptomatic individuals tested had evidence of mild abnormalities of rod and cone function, indicating that these families show marked variation in expressivity rather than true non-penetrance of the adRP gene. No mutations of the rhodopsin or RDS genes were found in these families and the precise genetic mutation(s) remain to be identified. PMID:8025041

  12. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  13. Autosomal dominant (Beukes) premature degenerative osteoarthropathy of the hip joint unlinked to COL2A1

    SciTech Connect

    Beighton, P.; Ramesar, R.; Cilliers, H.J.

    1994-12-01

    Molecular investigations have been undertaken in several separate large South African families with autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias in which premature degenerative osteoarthropathy of the hip joint was the major manifestation. There are sometimes additional minor changes in the spine and these conditions fall into the general spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) nosological category. In some kindreds, linkage between phenotype and the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) has been established, while in others there is no linkage. We have now completed molecular linkage investigations in an Afrikaner family named Beukes, in which 47 members in 6 generations have premature osteoarthropathy of the hip joint. A LOD score of minus infinity indicates that this condition is not the result of a defect of the COL2A1 gene. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Linkage disequilibrium in the region of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    SciTech Connect

    Snarey, A. ); Thomas, S.; Harris, P.C. ); Schneider, M.C. ); Pound, S.E.; Wright, A.F. ); Barton, N.; Somlo, S.; Germino, G.G.; Reeders, S.T.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located on chromosome 16p, between the flanking markers D16S84 and D16S125 (26.6 prox). This region is 750 kb long and has been cloned. The authors have looked at the association of 10 polymorphic markers from the region, with the disease and with each other. This was done in a set of Scottish families that had previously shown association with D16S94, a marker proximal to the PKD1 region. They report significant association between two CA repeat markers and the disease but have not found evidence for a single founder haplotype in these families, indicating the presence of several mutations in this population. Their results favor a location of the PKD1 gene in the proximal part of the candidate region. 25 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. High-density renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease demonstrated by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Grantham, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    Unenhanced abdominal CT scans of 35 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) showed multiple high-density (58-84 HU) renal cysts in 42.9% of patients, occasional high-density cysts in 25.7%, and no high-density cysts in 31.4%. These high-density cysts were usually subcapsular and were more frequent in patients with markedly enlarged kidneys and flank pain at the time of CT. Follow-up CT often showed a reduction in cyst densities, although some cysts developed mural calcification and calcification of their contents. Renal carcinomas occur rarely in ADPKD and may occasionally be hyperdense. However, high-density cysts may usually be distinguished from carcinomas on CT by their smooth contours, sharp interfaces with renal parenchyma, homogeneity, and lack of contrast enhancement.

  16. Refined localisation of the second gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, D.J.M.; Saris, J.J.; Spruit, L.

    1994-09-01

    The PKD1-gene responsible for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in 85% of the families maps to chromosome 16q13. Last year the PKD2-gene was localized on chromosome 4q21-23 between the markers D4S231 and D4S231 and D4S423, an interval of about 8cM. In a collaborative effort to narrow down the PKD2-region, families with recombinants have been analyzed with several markers within the interval. First, an integrated map had to be constructed which contains previously published markers of different sources. To construct this map, cosmids and/or YACs isolated with the markers have been mapped by two-color FISH and were screened with the other markers. Affected recombinants localize the disease between D4S1534 and D4S1544.

  17. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: the changing face of clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ong, Albert C M; Devuyst, Olivier; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Walz, Gerd

    2015-05-16

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most common inherited kidney disease and accounts for 7-10% of all patients on renal replacement therapy worldwide. Although first reported 500 years ago, this disorder is still regarded as untreatable and its pathogenesis is poorly understood despite much study. During the past 40 years, however, remarkable advances have transformed our understanding of how the disease develops and have led to rapid changes in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, especially during the past decade. This Review will summarise the key findings, highlight recent developments, and look ahead to the changes in clinical practice that will likely arise from the adoption of a new management framework for this major kidney disease. PMID:26090645

  18. Chronic renal failure in a patient with Sotos syndrome due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cefle, K; Yildiz, A; Palanduz, S; Ozturk, S; Ozbey, N; Kylyçaslan, I; Colakoglu, S; Balci, C

    2002-05-01

    Sotos syndrome is characterised by accelerated growth, acromegalic appearance, mental retardation and social maladjustment. Most cases are sporadic, but familial cases have also been reported. We report a case of Sotos syndrome presenting with chronic renal failure due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Ultrasonographic examination of the patient, his father and other family members revealed polycystic kidneys. Renal failure was present only in the Sotos case, who also had considerably larger cysts than other family members. We suggest that the underlying mechanism responsible from the somatic overgrowth in Sotos syndrome may also be linked with the development of larger cysts and earlier onset of renal failure in ADPKD. Although Sotos syndrome has been associated with urological abnormalities, chronic renal failure is very rare. To our knowledge, Sotos syndrome associated with ADPKD has not been reported before. PMID:12074220

  19. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Visser, Folkert W.; Drenth, Joost P.H.; Gevers, Tom J.G.; Groen, Gerbrand J.; Hogan, Marie C.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Drenth, J.P.H.; de Fijter, J.W.; Gansevoort, R.T.; Peters, D.J.M.; Wetzels, J.; Zietse, R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4–6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe, impacting physical activity and social relationships, and frequently difficult to manage. This review provides an overview of pathophysiological mechanisms that can lead to pain and discusses the sensory innervation of the kidneys and the upper abdominal organs, including the liver. In addition, the results of a systematic literature search of ADPKD-specific treatment options are presented. Based on pathophysiological knowledge and evidence derived from the literature an argumentative stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in ADPKD is proposed. PMID:25165181

  20. [Retracted] Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-07-01

    We wish to retract our article entitled 'Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy' published in Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 4273-4278, 2016. The article was submitted by the first author, Xinhong Liu, without the prior knowledge of the corresponding author, Chuanzhu Yan, or the other authors included on the paper. Furthermore, the details of the paper were not discussed by the authors prior to the submission, and all are in agreement that the paper contains data therein (and interpretations thereof) which are either inaccurate or inappropriate. All the authors agree to this retraction, and we apologize for the inconvenience caused in this regard.[the original article was published in the Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 4273-4278, 2016; DOI: 10.3892/mmr.2016.5047]. PMID:27176730

  1. [Photic sneeze reflex or autosomal dominant compelling helio-ophthalmic outburst syndrome].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, J M

    2006-01-01

    Sneeze is an ubiquitous phenomenon that happens to everyone. In spite of this, little attention has been paid to it, among medical literature in general, and even less in neurologic texts. A curious entity, called photic sneeze reflex, solar sneeze reflex, light sneeze reflex or autosomal dominant compelling helio-ophthalmic outburst syndrome, known perhaps since ancient Greek, has been scarcely described in the scientific literature, mainly as clinical notes and letters to the editor, but in a detailed way, we can find just a few reports. This reflex appears when subjects are exposed suddenly to intense sunlight and it consists of long incoercible sneeze bursts. It is usually ignored by its sufferers, who report it as a curiosity or a minor complaint, and its importance has been neglected in spite of its hereditary nature and its apparently high prevalence. We review the history, epidemiology, genetics, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and physiopathology of this reflex hereditary response. PMID:16525923

  2. Autosomal dominant zonular cataract with sutural opacities localized to chromosome 17q11-12

    SciTech Connect

    Padma, T.; Ayyagari, R.; Murty, J.S.

    1995-10-01

    Congenital cataracts constitute a morphologically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that are a major cause of childhood blindness. Different loci for hereditary congenital cataracts have been mapped to chromosomes 1, 2, 16, and 17q24. We report linkage of a gene causing a unique form of autosomal dominant zonular cataracts with Y-sutural opacities to chromosome 17q11-12 in a three-generation family exhibiting a maximum lod score of 3.9 at D17S805. Multipoint analysis gave a Mod confidence interval of 17 cM. This interval is bounded by the markers D17S799 and D17S798, a region that would encompass a number of candidate genes including that coding for {Beta}A3/A1-crystallin. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Bethlem myopathy: An autosomal dominant myopathy with flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis.

    PubMed

    Saroja, Aralikatte Onkarappa; Naik, Karkal Ravishankar; Nalini, Atcharayam; Gayathri, Narayanappa

    2013-10-01

    Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy form a spectrum of collagenopathies caused by genetic mutations encoding for any of the three subunits of collagen VI. Bethlem phenotype is relatively benign and is characterized by proximal dominant myopathy, keloids, contractures, distal hyperextensibility, and follicular hyperkeratosis. Three patients from a single family were diagnosed to have Bethlem myopathy based on European Neuromuscular Centre Bethlem Consortium criteria. Affected father and his both sons had slowly progressive proximal dominant weakness and recurrent falls from the first decade. Both children aged 18 and 20 years were ambulant at presentation. All had flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis without muscle hypertrophy. Creatinine kinase was mildly elevated and electromyography revealed myopathic features. Muscle imaging revealed severe involvement of glutei and vasti with "central shadow" in rectus femoris. Muscle biopsy in the father showed dystrophic changes with normal immmunostaining for collagen VI, sarcoglycans, and dysferlin. PMID:24339618

  4. Bethlem myopathy: An autosomal dominant myopathy with flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis

    PubMed Central

    Saroja, Aralikatte Onkarappa; Naik, Karkal Ravishankar; Nalini, Atcharayam; Gayathri, Narayanappa

    2013-01-01

    Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy form a spectrum of collagenopathies caused by genetic mutations encoding for any of the three subunits of collagen VI. Bethlem phenotype is relatively benign and is characterized by proximal dominant myopathy, keloids, contractures, distal hyperextensibility, and follicular hyperkeratosis. Three patients from a single family were diagnosed to have Bethlem myopathy based on European Neuromuscular Centre Bethlem Consortium criteria. Affected father and his both sons had slowly progressive proximal dominant weakness and recurrent falls from the first decade. Both children aged 18 and 20 years were ambulant at presentation. All had flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis without muscle hypertrophy. Creatinine kinase was mildly elevated and electromyography revealed myopathic features. Muscle imaging revealed severe involvement of glutei and vasti with “central shadow” in rectus femoris. Muscle biopsy in the father showed dystrophic changes with normal immmunostaining for collagen VI, sarcoglycans, and dysferlin. PMID:24339618

  5. CHMP4B, a Novel Gene for Autosomal Dominant Cataracts Linked to Chromosome 20q

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Alan ; Bennett, Thomas M. ; Knopf, Harry L. S. ; Yamada, Koki ; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro ; Niikawa, Norio ; Shim, Soomin ; Hanson, Phyllis I. 

    2007-01-01

    Cataracts are a clinically diverse and genetically heterogeneous disorder of the crystalline lens and a leading cause of visual impairment. Here we report linkage of autosomal dominant “progressive childhood posterior subcapsular” cataracts segregating in a white family to short tandem repeat (STR) markers D20S847 (LOD score [Z] 5.50 at recombination fraction [θ] 0.0) and D20S195 (Z=3.65 at θ=0.0) on 20q, and identify a refined disease interval (rs2057262–(3.8 Mb)–rs1291139) by use of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Mutation profiling of positional-candidate genes detected a heterozygous transversion (c.386A→T) in exon 3 of the gene for chromatin modifying protein-4B (CHMP4B) that was predicted to result in the nonconservative substitution of a valine residue for a phylogenetically conserved aspartic acid residue at codon 129 (p.D129V). In addition, we have detected a heterozygous transition (c.481G→A) in exon 3 of CHMP4B cosegregating with autosomal dominant posterior polar cataracts in a Japanese family that was predicted to result in the missense substitution of lysine for a conserved glutamic acid residue at codon 161 (p.E161K). Transfection studies of cultured cells revealed that a truncated form of recombinant D129V-CHMP4B had a different subcellular distribution than wild type and an increased capacity to inhibit release of virus-like particles from the cell surface, consistent with deleterious gain-of-function effects. These data provide the first evidence that CHMP4B, which encodes a key component of the endosome sorting complex required for the transport-III (ESCRT-III) system of mammalian cells, plays a vital role in the maintenance of lens transparency. PMID:17701905

  6. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.T.B.; Jones, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) (MIM No.18260) constitutes a clinically and genetically diverse group of disorders that share the primary feature of progressive, severe, lower extremity spasticity. FSP is classified according to the mode of inheritance and whether progressive spasticity occurs in isolation ({open_quotes}uncomplicated FSP{close_quotes}) or with other neurologic abnormalities ({open_quotes}complicated FSP{close_quotes}), including optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, or deafness. Recently, autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP was shown to be genetically heterogeneous and tightly linked to a group of microsatellite markers on chromosome 14q in one large kindred. We examined 126 members of a non-consanguineous North American kindred of Irish descent. FSP was diagnosed in 31 living subjects who developed insidiously progressive gait disturbance between ages 12 and 35 years. Using genetic linkage analysis to microsatellite DNA polymorphisms, we showed that the FSP locus on chromosome 14q was exluded from linkage with the disorder in our family. Subsequently, we searched for genetic linkage between the disorder and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms spanning approximately 50% of the genome. We observed significantly positive, two-point maximum lod scores (Z) for markers on chromosome 15q: D15S128 (Z=9.70, {theta}=0.05), D15S165 (Z=3.30, {theta}=0.10), and UT511 (Z=3.86, {theta}=0.10). Our data clearly establishes that one locus for autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP is mapped to the pericentric region of chromosome 15q. Identifying genes responsible for chromosome 15q-linked and chromosome 14q-linked FSP will greatly advance our understanding of this condition and hopefully other inherited and degenerative brain and spinal cord disorders that are also characterized by axonal degeneration.

  7. Further screening of the rhodopsin gene in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Vaithinathan, R.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1994-05-15

    Here the authors report 8 novel mutations and 8 previously reported mutations found from further analysis of the rhodopsin gene in a large set of additional patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Leukocyte DNA was purified from 122 unrelated patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa who were not included in previous analyses. The coding region and splice donor and acceptor sites of the rhodopsin gene were screened for mutations using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct genomic sequencing. They found 29 patients with varient bands that were due to mutations. Sequence analysis showed that 20 cases each had 1 of 9 previously published mutations: Pro23His, Thr58Arg, Gly89Asp, Pro171Leu, Glu181Lys, Pro347Leu, Phe45Leu, Arg135Trp, and Lys296Glu. In 9 other cases, they found 8 novel mutations. One was a 3-bp deletion (Cys264-del), and the rest were point mutations resulting in an altered amino acid: Gly51Arg (GGC [yields] CGC), Cys110Tyr (TCG [yields] TAC), Gly114Asp (GGC [yields] GAC), Ala164Glu (GCG [yields] GAG), Pro171Ser (CCA [yields] TCA), Val345Leu (GTG [yields] CTG), and Pro347Gln (CCG [yields] CAG). Each of these novel mutations was found in only one family except for Gly51Arg, which was found in two. In every family tested, the mutation cosegregated with the disease. However, in pedigree D865 only one affected member was available for analysis. About two-thirds of the mutations affect amino acids in transmembrane domains, yet only one-half of opsin's residues are in these regions. One-third of the mutations alter residues in the extracellular/intradiscal space, which includes only 25% of the protein.

  8. Autosomal dominant frontonasal dysplasia (atypical Greig syndrome): Lessons from the Xt mutant mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.L.; Nunes, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Greig syndrome is the autosomal dominant association of mild hypertelorism, variable polysyndactyly, and normal intelligence. Several families have been found to have translocations or deletions of 7p13 interrupting the normal expression of GLI3 (a zinc finger, DNA binding, transcription repressor). Recently, a mutation in the mouse homologue of GLI3 was found in the extra-toes mutant mouse (Xt). The phenotypic features of this mouse model include mild hypertelorism, postaxial polydactyly of the forelimbs, preaxial polydactyly of the hindlimbs, and variable tibial hemimelia. The homozygous mutant Xt/Xt have severe frontonasal dysplasia (FND), polysyndactyly of fore-and hindlimbs and invariable tibial hemimelia. We have recently evaluated a child with severe (type D) frontonasal dysplasia, fifth finger camptodactyly, preaxial polydactyly of one foot, and ispilateral tibial hemimelia. His father was born with a bifid nose, broad columnella, broad feet, and a two centimeter leg length discrepancy. The paternal grandmother of the proband is phenotypically normal; however, her fraternal twin died at birth with severe facial anomalies. The paternal great-grandmother of the proband is phenotypically normal however her niece was born with moderate ocular hypertelorism. This pedigree is suggestive of an autosomal dominant form of frontonasal dysplasia with variable expressivity. The phenotypic features of our case more closely resemble the Xt mouse than the previously defined features of Greig syndrome in humans. This suggests that a mutation in GLI3 may be responsible for FND in this family. We are currently using polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers flanking GLI3 in a attempt to demonstrate linkage in this pedigree. Demonstration of a GLI3 mutation in this family would broaden our view of the spectrum of phenotypes possible in Greig syndrome and could provide insight into genotype/phenotype correlation in FND.

  9. Localization of genes for autosomal dominant congenital cataracts to chromosomes 2 and 17

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyagari, R.; Scott, M.; Wozencraft, L.

    1994-09-01

    Linkage analysis was performed in a seven generation family in which 28 of 52 individuals examined had autosomal dominant congenital pulverulent cataracts and a five generation family in which 10 of 17 individuals examined had autosomal dominant congenital zonular cataracts with sutural opacities. Initial analysis with 21 microsatellite markers in 7 candidate gene regions localized the pulverulent cataract locus to the long arm of chromosome 2 near the {beta}B2-crystallin gene. A lod score of 3.6 was obtained with D2S72 ({theta}=0.12), 3.5 with CRYG ({theta}=0.06), 3.4 with ({theta}=0.05), 2.0 with D2S117 ({theta}=0.22) and 6.6 with D2S128 ({theta}=0.05). Multipoint linkage analysis gave Zmax=4.2 at D2S157 with a one lod confidence interval covering 19 cM. The closest flanking markers showing obligate recombinants are D2S157 and D2S173. The zonular cataract locus was mapped to chromosome 2 near the {gamma}-crystallin gene cluster. A maximum lod score of 3.8 was obtained with D17S805 ({theta}=0.0), 2.1 with D17S798 ({theta}=0.60), and 3.7 with NF1 ({theta}=0.0). Multipoint analysis showed Zmax=3.81 at D17S805 with a one lod confidence interval covering 17 cM based on the Genethon map, localizing cataracts between markers D17S799 and D17S800. Further efforts are being directed at refining the localization of these cataract loci and examining the nearby crystallin genes for possible mutations.

  10. Homozygous carriers of APP A713T mutation in an autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease family

    PubMed Central

    Conidi, Maria E.; Bernardi, Livia; Puccio, Gianfranco; Smirne, Nicoletta; Muraca, Maria G.; Curcio, Sabrina A.M.; Colao, Rosanna; Piscopo, Paola; Gallo, Maura; Anfossi, Maria; Frangipane, Francesca; Clodomiro, Alessandra; Mirabelli, Maria; Vasso, Franca; Cupidi, Chiara; Torchia, Giusi; Di Lorenzo, Raffaele; Mandich, Paola; Confaloni, Annamaria; Maletta, Raffaele G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report, for the first time, a large autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD) family in which the APP A713T mutation is present in the homozygous and heterozygous state. To date, the mutation has been reported as dominant, and in the heterozygous state associated with familial AD and cerebrovascular lesions. Methods: The family described here has been genealogically reconstructed over 6 generations dating back to the 19th century. Plasma β-amyloid peptide was measured. Sequencing of causative AD genes was performed. Results: Twenty-one individuals, all but 1 born from 2 consanguineous unions, were studied: 8 were described as affected through history, 5 were studied clinically and genetically, and 8 were asymptomatic at-risk subjects. The A713T mutation was detected in the homozygous state in 3 patients and in the heterozygous state in 8 subjects (6 asymptomatic and 2 affected). Conclusions: Our findings, also supported by the β-amyloid plasma assay, confirm (1) the pathogenic role of the APP A713T mutation, (2) the specific phenotype (AD with cerebrovascular lesions) associated with this mutation, and (3) the large span of age at onset, not influenced by APOE, TOMM40, and TREM2 genes. No substantial differences concerning clinical phenotype were evidenced between heterozygous and homozygous patients, in line with the classic definition of dominance. Therefore, in this study, AD followed the classic definition of a dominant disease, contrary to that reported in a previously described AD family with recessive APP mutation. This confirms that genetic AD may be considered a disease with dominant and recessive traits of inheritance. PMID:25948718

  11. Prevalence of Mutations in eyeGENE Probands With a Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Reeves, Melissa J.; Blain, Delphine; Goetz, Kerry; NDifor, Vida; Vitez, Sally; Wang, Xinjing; Tumminia, Santa J.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To screen samples from patients with presumed autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) for mutations in 12 disease genes as a contribution to the research and treatment goals of the National Ophthalmic Disease Genotyping and Phenotyping Network (eyeGENE). Methods. DNA samples were obtained from eyeGENE. A total of 170 probands with an intake diagnosis of adRP were tested through enrollment in eyeGENE. The 10 most common genes causing adRP (IMPDH1, KLHL7, NR2E3, PRPF3/RP18, PRPF31/RP11, PRPF8/RP13, PRPH2/RDS, RHO, RP1, and TOPORS) were chosen for PCR-based dideoxy sequencing, along with the two X-linked RP genes, RPGR and RP2. RHO, PRPH2, PRPF31, RPGR, and RP2 were completely sequenced, while only mutation hotspots in the other genes were analyzed. Results. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 52% of the probands. The frequencies of disease-causing mutations in the 12 genes were consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. The Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Eye Disease at the University of Texas in Houston has thus far received DNA samples from 170 families with a diagnosis of adRP from the eyeGENE Network. Disease-causing mutations in autosomal genes were identified in 48% (81/170) of these families while mutations in X-linked genes accounted for an additional 4% (7/170). Of the 55 distinct mutations detected, 19 (33%) have not been previously reported. All diagnostic results were returned by eyeGENE to participating patients via their referring clinician. These genotyped samples along with their corresponding phenotypic information are also available to researchers who may request access to them for further study of these ophthalmic disorders. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00378742.) PMID:23950152

  12. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burrage, Lindsay C.; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Willer, Jason R.; Davis, Erica E.; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S.; Akdemir, Zeynep C.; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P.; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A.; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N.; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Brunner, Han G.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R.; Lupski, James R.; Bongers, Ernie M.H.F.; Yang, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5′ end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1st coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6∗) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs∗4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5′ end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5′ to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS. PMID:26637980

  13. Longitudinal change in CSF biomarkers in autosomal-dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Anne M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Bateman, Randall J.; Goate, Alison M.; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Martins, Ralph N.; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard; Ringman, John M.; Rossor, Martin N.; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Marcus, Daniel; Cairns, Nigel J.; Buckles, Virginia D.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicopathologic evidence suggests the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD) begins many years prior to cognitive symptoms. Biomarkers are required to identify affected individuals during this asymptomatic (“pre-clinical”) stage to permit intervention with potential disease-modifying therapies designed to preserve normal brain function. Studies of families with autosomal-dominant AD (ADAD) mutations provide a unique and powerful means to investigate AD biomarker changes during the asymptomatic period. In this biomarker study comparing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), plasma and in vivo amyloid imaging, cross-sectional data obtained at baseline in individuals from ADAD families enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) demonstrate reduced concentrations of CSF amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1–42) associated with the presence of β-amyloid plaques, and elevated concentrations of CSF tau, ptau181 and VILIP-1, markers of neurofibrillary tangles and/or neuronal injury/death, in asymptomatic mutation carriers 10-20 years prior to their estimated age at symptom onset (EAO), and prior to detection of cognitive deficits. When compared longitudinally, however, the concentrations of CSF biomarkers of neuronal injury/death within-individuals decrease after their EAO, suggesting a slowing of acute neurodegenerative processes with symptomatic disease progression. These results emphasize the importance of longitudinal, within-person assessment when modeling biomarker trajectories across the course of the disease. If corroborated, this pattern may influence the definition of a positive neurodegenerative biomarker outcome in clinical trials. PMID:24598588

  14. Functional polycystin-1 dosage governs autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease severity.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Katharina; Ward, Christopher J; Hommerding, Cynthia J; Nasr, Samih H; Tuan, Han-Fang; Gainullin, Vladimir G; Rossetti, Sandro; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2012-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations to PKD1 or PKD2, triggering progressive cystogenesis and typically leading to end-stage renal disease in midlife. The phenotypic spectrum, however, ranges from in utero onset to adequate renal function at old age. Recent patient data suggest that the disease is dosage dependent, where incompletely penetrant alleles influence disease severity. Here, we have developed a knockin mouse model matching a likely disease variant, PKD1 p.R3277C (RC), and have proved that its functionally hypomorphic nature modifies the ADPKD phenotype. While Pkd1+/null mice are normal, Pkd1RC/null mice have rapidly progressive disease, and Pkd1RC/RC animals develop gradual cystogenesis. These models effectively mimic the pathophysiological features of in utero-onset and typical ADPKD, respectively, correlating the level of functional Pkd1 product with disease severity, highlighting the dosage dependence of cystogenesis. Additionally, molecular analyses identified p.R3277C as a temperature-sensitive folding/trafficking mutant, and length defects in collecting duct primary cilia, the organelle central to PKD pathogenesis, were clearly detected for the first time to our knowledge in PKD1. Altogether, this study highlights the role that in trans variants at the disease locus can play in phenotypic modification of dominant diseases and provides a truly orthologous PKD1 model, optimal for therapeutic testing. PMID:23064367

  15. Preclinical trials in autosomal dominant AD: Implementation of the DIAN-TU trial

    PubMed Central

    Mills, S.M.; Mallmann, J.; Santacruz, A.M.; Fuqua, A.; Carril, M.; Aisen, P.S.; Althage, M.C.; Belyew, S.; Benzinger, T.L.; Brooks, W.S.; Buckles, V.D.; Cairns, N.J.; Clifford, D.; Danek, A.; Fagan, A.M.; Farlow, M.; Fox, N.; Ghetti, B.; Goate, A.M.; Heinrichs, D.; Hornbeck, R.; Jack, C.; Jucker, M.; Klunk, W.E.; Marcus, D.S.; Martins, R.N.; Masters, C.M.; Mayeux, R.; McDade, E.; Morris, J.C.; Oliver, A.; Ringman, J.M.; Rossor, M.N.; Salloway, S.; Schofield, P.R.; Snider, J.; Snyder, P.; Sperling, R.A.; Stewart, C.; Thomas, R.G.; Xiong, C.; Bateman, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network Trials Unit (DIAN-TU) was formed to direct the design and management of interventional therapeutic trials of international DIAN and autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD) participants. The goal of the DIAN-TU is to implement safe trials that have the highest likelihood of success while advancing scientific understanding of these diseases and clinical effects of proposed therapies. The DIAN-TU has launched a trial design that leverages the existing infrastructure of the ongoing DIAN observational study, takes advantage of a variety of drug targets, incorporates the latest results of biomarker and cognitive data collected during the observational study, and implements biomarkers measuring Alzheimer’s disease (AD) biological processes to improve the efficiency of trial design. The DIAN-TU trial design is unique due to the sophisticated design of multiple drugs, multiple pharmaceutical partners, academics servings as sponsor, geographic distribution of a rare population and intensive safety and biomarker assessments. The implementation of the operational aspects such as home health research delivery, safety magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) at remote locations, monitoring clinical and cognitive measures, and regulatory management involving multiple pharmaceutical sponsors of the complex DIAN-TU trial are described. PMID:24016464

  16. Functional polycystin-1 dosage governs autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Katharina; Ward, Christopher J.; Hommerding, Cynthia J.; Nasr, Samih H.; Tuan, Han-Fang; Gainullin, Vladimir G.; Rossetti, Sandro; Torres, Vicente E.; Harris, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations to PKD1 or PKD2, triggering progressive cystogenesis and typically leading to end-stage renal disease in midlife. The phenotypic spectrum, however, ranges from in utero onset to adequate renal function at old age. Recent patient data suggest that the disease is dosage dependent, where incompletely penetrant alleles influence disease severity. Here, we have developed a knockin mouse model matching a likely disease variant, PKD1 p.R3277C (RC), and have proved that its functionally hypomorphic nature modifies the ADPKD phenotype. While Pkd1+/null mice are normal, Pkd1RC/null mice have rapidly progressive disease, and Pkd1RC/RC animals develop gradual cystogenesis. These models effectively mimic the pathophysiological features of in utero–onset and typical ADPKD, respectively, correlating the level of functional Pkd1 product with disease severity, highlighting the dosage dependence of cystogenesis. Additionally, molecular analyses identified p.R3277C as a temperature-sensitive folding/trafficking mutant, and length defects in collecting duct primary cilia, the organelle central to PKD pathogenesis, were clearly detected for the first time to our knowledge in PKD1. Altogether, this study highlights the role that in trans variants at the disease locus can play in phenotypic modification of dominant diseases and provides a truly orthologous PKD1 model, optimal for therapeutic testing. PMID:23064367

  17. Self-reported disability following distal radius fractures: the influence of hand dominance.

    PubMed

    Beaulé, P E; Dervin, G F; Giachino, A A; Rody, K; Grabowski, J; Fazekas, A

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to record the spectrum of self-reported disability following distal radius fractures and to gauge for differences in hand dominance in the use of subjective outcome data. Items were generated through patient interviews, literature review, and peer consultation. Fifty-three items were evaluated by a group of 55 patients recovering from a fracture of the distal radius, which established the prevalence, mean severity score, and overall severity score (or impact) of each item as it related to physical function and social/emotional impact. Hand dominance, age, and gender were also recorded. The results confirm that many patients who sustain distal radius fractures experience substantial impairment across a spectrum of quality of life domains. Because patients who sustain a dominant wrist injury are likely to report greater functional impairment across a wider range of activities, they also possess a greater potential for improvement. The practical implication is that outcome studies for the treatment of distal radius fractures should take hand dominance into account. PMID:10811752

  18. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: A review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) characterized by ataxia with other neurological signs, including oculomotor disturbances, cognitive deficits, pyramidal and extrapyramidal dysfunction, bulbar, spinal and peripheral nervous system involvement. The global prevalence of this disease is not known. The most common type I ADCA is SCA3 followed by SCA2, SCA1, and SCA8, in descending order. Founder effects no doubt contribute to the variable prevalence between populations. Onset is usually in adulthood but cases of presentation in childhood have been reported. Clinical features vary depending on the SCA subtype but by definition include ataxia associated with other neurological manifestations. The clinical spectrum ranges from pure cerebellar signs to constellations including spinal cord and peripheral nerve disease, cognitive impairment, cerebellar or supranuclear ophthalmologic signs, psychiatric problems, and seizures. Cerebellar ataxia can affect virtually any body part causing movement abnormalities. Gait, truncal, and limb ataxia are often the most obvious cerebellar findings though nystagmus, saccadic abnormalities, and dysarthria are usually associated. To date, 21 subtypes have been identified: SCA1-SCA4, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12-SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA17-SCA23, SCA25, SCA27, SCA28 and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Type I ADCA can be further divided based on the proposed pathogenetic mechanism into 3 subclasses: subclass 1 includes type I ADCA caused by CAG repeat expansions such as SCA1-SCA3, SCA17, and DRPLA, subclass 2 includes trinucleotide repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding regions of the disease gene including SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12. Subclass 3 contains disorders caused by specific gene deletions, missense mutation, and nonsense mutation and includes SCA13, SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA27 and SCA28. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, physical examination, genetic molecular

  19. Exome sequencing reveals a heterozygous DLX5 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal-dominant split-hand/foot malformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Xin, Qian; Li, Lin; Li, Jiangxia; Zhang, Changwu; Qiu, Rongfang; Qian, Chenmin; Zhao, Hailing; Liu, Yongchao; Shan, Shan; Dang, Jie; Bian, Xianli; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Qiji

    2014-09-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a congenital limb deformity due to the absence or dysplasia of central rays of the autopod. Six SHFM loci have already been identified. Here we describe a Chinese family with autosomal-dominant SHFM1 that has previously been mapped to 7q21.2-21.3. The two affected family members, mother and son, showed deep median clefts between toes, ectrodactyly and syndactyly; the mother also showed triphalangeal thumbs. Exome sequencing and variant screening of candidate genes in the six loci known to be responsible for SHFM revealed a novel heterozygous mutation, c.558G>T (p.(Gln186His)), in distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5). As DLX5 encodes a transcription factor capable of transactivating MYC, we also tested whether the mutation could affect DLX5 transcription acitivity. Results from luciferase reporter assay revealed that a mutation in DLX5 compromised its transcriptional activity. This is the first report of a mutation in DLX5 leading to autosomal-dominant SHFM1. PMID:24496061

  20. BEST1-related autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy: a degenerative disease with a range of developmental ocular anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, A; McAlister, C; VandenHoven, C; Héon, E

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the spectrum of phenotypic characteristics of BEST1-related autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC) in a family with p.V86M mutation. Methods A retrospective review of the clinical, psychophysical, and electrophysiological phenotypes of six subjects with ADVIRC. Five family members were sequenced for mutations in the BEST1gene. Results A heterozygous change, p.V86M (c.256G>A), was identified in the BEST1gene in the three affected subjects tested, and was shown to segregate with the disease phenotype. The distance visual acuity ranged from ⩾20/25 to absent perception of light. Clinical features observed included angle closure glaucoma (n=2), microcornea with shallow anterior chamber (n=1), iris dysgenesis (n=2), cataracts (n=4), classical peripheral concentric band of retinal hyperpigmentation (n=5), and optic nerve dysplasia (n=1). Full-field electroretinogram response amplitudes ranged from low normal (two cases; 27 and 32 years) to non-recordable (two cases; 42 and 63 years). Goldmann fields were normal in two (27 and 28 years) but were abnormal in two older subjects. Optical coherence tomography showed macular thinning in the proband, whereas his affected daughter had normal macular thickness. Electro-oculography showed borderline Arden's ratio (1.50) in the lone case tested (27 years). Conclusion ADVIRC is a slowly progressive vitreoretinal degeneration that demonstrates marked intra-familial phenotypic variability. Optic nerve dysplasia and iris dysgenesis are novel observations that extend the ocular phenotype of ADVIRC. PMID:21072067

  1. A Mutation in a Skin-Specific Isoform of SMARCAD1 Causes Autosomal-Dominant Adermatoglyphia

    PubMed Central

    Nousbeck, Janna; Burger, Bettina; Fuchs-Telem, Dana; Pavlovsky, Mor; Fenig, Shlomit; Sarig, Ofer; Itin, Peter; Sprecher, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Monogenic disorders offer unique opportunities for researchers to shed light upon fundamental physiological processes in humans. We investigated a large family affected with autosomal-dominant adermatoglyphia (absence of fingerprints) also known as the “immigration delay disease.” Using linkage and haplotype analyses, we mapped the disease phenotype to 4q22. One of the genes located in this interval is SMARCAD1, a member of the SNF subfamily of the helicase protein superfamily. We demonstrated the existence of a short isoform of SMARCAD1 exclusively expressed in the skin. Sequencing of all SMARCAD1 coding and noncoding exons revealed a heterozygous transversion predicted to disrupt a conserved donor splice site adjacent to the 3′ end of a noncoding exon uniquely present in the skin-specific short isoform of the gene. This mutation segregated with the disease phenotype throughout the entire family. Using a minigene system, we found that this mutation causes aberrant splicing, resulting in decreased stability of the short RNA isoform as predicted by computational analysis and shown by RT-PCR. Taken together, the present findings implicate a skin-specific isoform of SMARCAD1 in the regulation of dermatoglyph development. PMID:21820097

  2. A mutation in a skin-specific isoform of SMARCAD1 causes autosomal-dominant adermatoglyphia.

    PubMed

    Nousbeck, Janna; Burger, Bettina; Fuchs-Telem, Dana; Pavlovsky, Mor; Fenig, Shlomit; Sarig, Ofer; Itin, Peter; Sprecher, Eli

    2011-08-12

    Monogenic disorders offer unique opportunities for researchers to shed light upon fundamental physiological processes in humans. We investigated a large family affected with autosomal-dominant adermatoglyphia (absence of fingerprints) also known as the "immigration delay disease." Using linkage and haplotype analyses, we mapped the disease phenotype to 4q22. One of the genes located in this interval is SMARCAD1, a member of the SNF subfamily of the helicase protein superfamily. We demonstrated the existence of a short isoform of SMARCAD1 exclusively expressed in the skin. Sequencing of all SMARCAD1 coding and noncoding exons revealed a heterozygous transversion predicted to disrupt a conserved donor splice site adjacent to the 3' end of a noncoding exon uniquely present in the skin-specific short isoform of the gene. This mutation segregated with the disease phenotype throughout the entire family. Using a minigene system, we found that this mutation causes aberrant splicing, resulting in decreased stability of the short RNA isoform as predicted by computational analysis and shown by RT-PCR. Taken together, the present findings implicate a skin-specific isoform of SMARCAD1 in the regulation of dermatoglyph development. PMID:21820097

  3. Molecular genetic study of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in Lithuanian patients.

    PubMed

    Kucinskas, V; Payne, A M; Ambrasiene, D; Jurgelevicius, V; Steponaviciūte, D; Arciuliene, J V; Daktaraviciene, E; Bhattacharya, S

    1999-03-01

    Lithuanian patients with visual problems were clinically examined for retinitis pigmentosa (RP). A total of 33 unrelated families with autosomal dominant RP (adRP) were identified. Screening for mutations in the rhodopsin (RHO) and peripherin/RDS (RDS) genes was performed using DNA heteroduplex analysis. Direct DNA sequencing in the cases of heteroduplex formation showed the presence of the following mutations and polymorphisms in 14 adRP patients: RHO gene - Lys248Arg (1 case), and Pro347Leu (2 cases); RDS gene - Glu304Gln (12 cases), Lys310Arg (5 cases), and Gly338Asp (12 cases). The presence of these mutations (except Lys248Arg in the RHO gene) was confirmed by relevant restriction enzyme digestion. The frequency of the RDS gene mutations Glu304Gln and Gly338Asp was estimated to be 36.4%, while mutation Lys310Arg was less frequent (15.2%). These 3 RDS gene mutations appear to be polypeptide polymorphisms not related to adRP. PMID:10077725

  4. Further refinement of the location for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 7p (RP9).

    PubMed Central

    Inglehearn, C. F.; Keen, T. J.; al-Maghtheh, M.; Gregory, C. Y.; Jay, M. R.; Moore, A. T.; Bird, A. C.; Bhattacharya, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    A form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) mapping to chromosome 7p was recently reported by this laboratory, in a single large family from southeastern England. Further sampling of the family and the use a number of genetic markers from 7p have facilitated the construction of a series of multipoint linkage maps of the region with the most likely disease gene location. From this and haplotype data, the locus can now be placed between the markers D7S484 and D7S526, in an interval estimated to be 1.6-4 cM. Genetic distances between the markers previously reported to be linked to this region and those described in the recent whole-genome poly-CA map were estimated from data in this and other families. These data should assist in the construction of a physical map of the region and will help to identify candidate genes for the 7p adRP locus. PMID:8128965

  5. Angiogenic growth factors correlate with disease severity in young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Reed, Berenice Y; Masoumi, Amirali; Elhassan, Elwaleed; McFann, Kim; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Schrier, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Renal cysts, pain, and hematuria are common presentations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in children. Renal function, however, is typically preserved in these patients despite increased renal volume. Since angiogenesis has been implicated in promotion of renal cyst growth in ADPKD, we measured the serum level of various angiogenic factors and early renal structural changes and cardiovascular parameters in 71 patients with ADPKD, with a mean age of 16 years. Renal structure and left ventricular mass index were measured by magnetic resonance imaging or by echocardiogram. Renal function was assessed by creatinine clearance and urinary protein excretion. Serum growth factor levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Because of skewed distributions, the various parameters are reported as log(10). Serum log(10) vascular endothelial growth factor was positively correlated with renal and cardiac structure, but negatively with creatinine clearance. Serum angiopoietin 1 levels significantly correlated with structural change in both the kidney and the heart and with urinary protein. Thus, the correlation between angiogenic growth factors with both renal and cardiac disease severity is compatible with a possible role for angiogenesis in the early progression of disease in ADPKD. PMID:20881939

  6. Angiogenic growth factors correlate with disease severity in young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Berenice; Masoumi, Amirali; Elhassan, Elwaleed; McFann, Kim; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa; Maahs, David; Snell-Bergeon, Janet; Schrier, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Renal cysts, pain and hematuria are common presentations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in children. Renal function, however, is typically preserved in these patients despite increased renal volume. Since angiogenesis has been implicated in promotion of renal cyst growth in ADPKD we measured the serum level of various angiogenic factors and early renal structural changes and cardiovascular parameters in 71 patients with ADPKD with a mean age of 16 years. Renal structure and left ventricular mass index were measured by magnetic resonance imaging or by echocardiogram. Renal function was assessed by creatinine clearance, and urinary protein excretion. Serum growth factor levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Because of skewed distributions, the various parameters are reported as log10. Serum Log10 vascular endothelial growth factor was positively correlated with renal and cardiac structure, but negatively correlated with creatinine clearance. Serum angiopoietin 1 levels significantly correlated with structural change in both the kidney and the heart and with urinary protein. Thus, the correlation between angiogenic growth factors with both renal and cardiac disease severity is compatible with a possible role for angiogenesis in the early progression of disease in ADPKD. PMID:20881939

  7. Liver cysts in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: clinical and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Cook, L.T.; Grantham, J.J.

    1985-08-01

    Hepatic CT findings were analyzed in 44 patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease and were correlated with liver and renal function tests and liver, splenic, and renal CT volume measurements. CT showed many large liver cysts in 31.8% of patients, small liver cysts in 25%, and no liver cysts in 43.2%. Patients with many large cysts often showed increased liver volumes. There was no correlation between severity of liver involvement and extent of renal cystic disease as determined from urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and renal volumes. Liver function tests were normal except in two patients, one with a cholangiocarcinoma, which may have arisen from a cyst, and the other with an infected liver cyst and chronic active hepatitis. Accordingly, if liver function tests are abnormal, an attempt should be made to identify complications of polycystic liver disease such as tumor cyst infection, and biliary obstruction. CT is a useful method for detecting liver cysts and identifying patients at risk for these complications.

  8. Identification of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene, PKD1

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.C.; Zhang, F.; Geng, L.

    1994-09-01

    The PKDl gene was localized to an {approximately}480 kb interval of chromosome 16pl3. More than 20 independent transcripts were found in the interval. In view of the high new mutation rate in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases (ADPKD), we anticipated the PKD1 gene would be large. The largest transcript in the region was represented by five cDNA clones located adjacent to the tuberin gene (TSC2). Two of these clones, KG8 and NKG9, contain {approximately}4.5 kb of contiguous sequence corresponding to the 3{prime} end of the 14 kb mRNA which is transcribed from telomeric to centromeric. They spans 11 exons, and to evaluate the reading frame of the cDNA, we have compared the human and monkey sequence using human primers, and found 90-94% identity at the DNA level, and by observing amino acid conservation, determined the reading frame. To date, our open-reading frame of {approximately}800 amino-acids contained only a potential threonine kinase site, but no other recognizable peptide motifs or repeats, and was not homologous to sequences in Swissprot and GenBank. No Southern blot abnormalities have been detected with the cDNA probes used. However, an exon-by-exon scan of 8 exons for mutations by SSCP and genomic sequencing (predicted missense changes) has identified 3 patients with mutations not found in normals, and identify the KG8 gene as the PKD1 gene.

  9. Molecular diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Adrian Y; Michaeel, Alber; Liu, Genyan; Elemento, Olivier; Blumenfeld, Jon; Donahue, Stephanie; Parker, Tom; Levine, Daniel; Rennert, Hanna

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations in PKD1 and PKD2. However, genetic analysis is complicated by six PKD1 pseudogenes, large gene sizes, and allelic heterogeneity. We developed a new clinical assay for PKD gene analysis using paired-end next-generation sequencing (NGS) by multiplexing individually bar-coded long-range PCR libraries and analyzing them in one Illumina MiSeq flow cell. The data analysis pipeline has been optimized and automated with Unix shell scripts to accommodate variant calls. This approach was validated using a cohort of 25 patients with ADPKD previously analyzed by Sanger sequencing. A total of 250 genetic variants were identified by NGS, spanning the entire exonic and adjacent intronic regions of PKD1 and PKD2, including all 16 pathogenic mutations. In addition, we identified three novel mutations in a mutation-negative cohort of 24 patients with ADPKD previously analyzed by Sanger sequencing. This NGS method achieved sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI, 96.8%-99.9%) and specificity of 99.9% (95% CI, 99.7%-100.0%), with cost and turnaround time reduced by as much as 70%. Prospective NGS analysis of 25 patients with ADPKD demonstrated a detection rate comparable with Sanger standards. In conclusion, the NGS method was superior to Sanger sequencing for detecting PKD gene mutations, achieving high sensitivity and improved gene coverage. These characteristics suggest that NGS would be an appropriate new standard for clinical genetic testing of ADPKD. PMID:24374109

  10. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease caused by somatic and germline mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Tan, A Y; Blumenfeld, J; Michaeel, A; Donahue, S; Bobb, W; Parker, T; Levine, D; Rennert, H

    2015-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder caused by loss of function mutations of PKD1 or PKD2 genes. Although PKD1 is highly polymorphic and the new mutation rate is relatively high, the role of mosaicism is incompletely defined. Herein, we describe the molecular analysis of ADPKD in a 19-year-old female proband and her father. The proband had a PKD1 truncation mutation c.10745dupC (p.Val3584ArgfsX43), which was absent in paternal peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). However, very low quantities of this mutation were detected in the father's sperm DNA, but not in DNA from his buccal cells or urine sediment. Next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis determined the level of this mutation in the father's PBL, buccal cells and sperm to be ∼3%, 4.5% and 10%, respectively, consistent with somatic and germline mosaicism. The PKD1 mutation in ∼10% of her father's sperm indicates that it probably occurred early in embryogenesis. In ADPKD cases where a de novo mutation is suspected because of negative PKD gene testing of PBL, additional evaluation with more sensitive methods (e.g. NGS) of the proband PBL and paternal sperm can enhance detection of mosaicism and facilitate genetic counseling. PMID:24641620

  11. Mechanism-based therapeutics for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent progress and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Yang; Ong, Albert C M

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disease, accounting for up to 10% of patients on renal replacement therapy. There are presently no proven treatments for ADPKD and an effective disease-modifying drug would have significant implications for patients and their families. Since the identification of PKD1 and PKD2, there has been an explosion in knowledge identifying new disease mechanisms and testing new drugs. Currently, the three major treatment strategies are to: (1) reduce cAMP levels; (2) inhibit cell proliferation, and (3) reduce fluid secretion. Several compounds shown to be effective in preclinical models have already undergone clinical trials and more are planned. In addition, a whole raft of other compounds have been developed from preclinical studies. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the results of recent published trials, review current trials and highlight the most promising compounds in the pipeline. There appears to be no shortage of potential candidates, but several key issues need to be addressed to facilitate clinical translation. PMID:22205396

  12. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: genetics, mutations and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying-Cai; Blumenfeld, Jon; Rennert, Hanna

    2011-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common, monogenic multi-systemic disorder characterized by the development of renal cysts and various extrarenal manifestations. Worldwide, it is a common cause of end-stage renal disease. ADPKD is caused by mutation in either one of two principal genes, PKD1 and PKD2, but has large phenotypic variability among affected individuals, attributable to PKD genic and allelic variability and, possibly, modifier gene effects. Recent studies have generated considerable information regarding the genetic basis and molecular diagnosis of this disease, its pathogenesis, and potential strategies for targeted treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, including mechanisms responsible for disease development, the role of gene variations and mutations in disease presentation, and the putative role of microRNAs in ADPKD etiology. The emerging and important role of genetic testing and the advent of novel molecular diagnostic applications also are reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Polycystic Kidney Disease. PMID:21392578

  13. Delayed diagnosis of primary aldosteronism in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chih-Chin; Wu, Vin-Cent; Kuo, Chin-Chi; Lin, Yen-Hung; Hu, Ya-Hui; Tsai, Yao-Chou; Wu, Che-Hsiung; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2013-06-01

    Hypertension is a frequent early manifestation of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Several mechanisms can cause hypertension in ADPKD patients, although, primary aldosteronism (PA) as a possible manifestation of hypertension in ADPKD is extremely rare. We retrospectively reviewed the Taiwan Primary Aldosteronism Investigation (TAIPAI) database, which listed a total of 346 patients diagnosed with PA. Of these 346 patients, only three cases of concurrent PA and ADPKD were identified. These patients presented with hypertensive crisis and hypokalemia, and subsequent testing revealed aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) that were removed by laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Postoperatively, aldosterone-renin ratios (ARRs) and potassium levels normalized, and blood pressure improved. The diagnosis of PA in ADPKD is extremely challenging because multiple renal cysts can obscure the identification of adrenal adenomas, and ADPKD is associated with hypertension in almost all cases.(1) Because of frequent delays in the diagnosis of PA in ADPKD patients, future prospective studies to screen PA in hypertensive ADPKD patients may be necessary to evaluate the exact prevalence of coexistence of PA and ADPKD. PMID:22791703

  14. Helicobacter cinaedi kidney cyst infection and bacteremia in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mandai, Shintaro; Kasagi, Yuri; Kusaka, Keita; Shikuma, Satomi; Akita, Wataru; Kuwahara, Michio

    2014-11-01

    A 48-year-old man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) was admitted to our hospital with a 5-day history of lower right back pain, high-grade fever, and arthralgia. He was diagnosed with right kidney cyst infection and bacteremia due to Helicobacter cinaedi (H. cinaedi) based on these symptoms, highly elevated CRP (32.25 mg/dL), abdominal magnetic resonance imaging findings, and the identification of H. cinaedi from blood cultures using PCR and sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene. Intravenous cefotaxime 0.5 g twice daily followed by meropenem 0.5 g twice daily and ciprofloxacin 200 mg twice daily were partially effective; oral doxycycline added at 200 mg/day finally eradicated the infection. Total duration of antimicrobial therapy was 9 weeks. H. cinaedi infections typically present as bacteremia with or without cellulitis in immunocompromised patients such as those with AIDS or malignant disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing an ADPKD patient with H. cinaedi cyst infection. Although H. cinaedi infections are increasingly recognized, even in immunocompetent subjects, numerous cases may still be overlooked given that this bacterium is slow-growing, and is difficult to culture, be Gram-stained, and identify on phenotypic tests. Consideration of this bacterium as a possible pathogen and sufficient duration of incubation with molecular testing are necessary in treating ADPKD patients with cyst infection. PMID:25131293

  15. Identification and functional analysis of two novel connexin 50 mutations associated with autosome dominant congenital cataracts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhui; Wu, Menghan; Chen, Xinyi; Zhu, Yanan; Gong, Xiaohua; Yao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant congenital cataracts (ADCC) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases. The present study recruited two Chinese families with bilateral nuclear cataract or zonular pulverulent phenotype. Direct sequencing of candidate genes identified two novel missense mutations of Cx50, Cx50P59A (c.175C > G) and Cx50R76H (c.227G > A), both co-segregated well with all affected individuals. Bioinformatics analysis predicted deleterious for both mutations. Functional and cellular behaviors of wild type and mutant Cx50 examined by stably transfecting recombinant systems revealed similar protein expression levels. Protein distribution pattern by fluorescence microscopy showed that Cx50R76H localized at appositional membranes forming gap junctions with enormous cytoplasmic protein accumulation, whereas the Cx50P59A mutation was found inefficient at forming detectable plaques. Cell growth test by MTT assay showed that induction of Cx50P59A decreased cell viability. Our study constitutes the first report that the Cx50P59A and Cx50R76H mutations are associated with ADCC and expands the mutation spectrum of Cx50 in association with congenital cataracts. The genetic, cellular, and functional data suggest that the altered intercellular communication governed by mutated Cx50 proteins may act as the molecular mechanism underlying ADCC, which further confirms the role of Cx50 in the maintenance of human lens transparency. PMID:27216975

  16. Identification and functional analysis of two novel connexin 50 mutations associated with autosome dominant congenital cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yinhui; Wu, Menghan; Chen, Xinyi; Zhu, Yanan; Gong, Xiaohua; Yao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant congenital cataracts (ADCC) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases. The present study recruited two Chinese families with bilateral nuclear cataract or zonular pulverulent phenotype. Direct sequencing of candidate genes identified two novel missense mutations of Cx50, Cx50P59A (c.175C > G) and Cx50R76H (c.227G > A), both co-segregated well with all affected individuals. Bioinformatics analysis predicted deleterious for both mutations. Functional and cellular behaviors of wild type and mutant Cx50 examined by stably transfecting recombinant systems revealed similar protein expression levels. Protein distribution pattern by fluorescence microscopy showed that Cx50R76H localized at appositional membranes forming gap junctions with enormous cytoplasmic protein accumulation, whereas the Cx50P59A mutation was found inefficient at forming detectable plaques. Cell growth test by MTT assay showed that induction of Cx50P59A decreased cell viability. Our study constitutes the first report that the Cx50P59A and Cx50R76H mutations are associated with ADCC and expands the mutation spectrum of Cx50 in association with congenital cataracts. The genetic, cellular, and functional data suggest that the altered intercellular communication governed by mutated Cx50 proteins may act as the molecular mechanism underlying ADCC, which further confirms the role of Cx50 in the maintenance of human lens transparency. PMID:27216975

  17. A new autosomal dominant eye and lung syndrome linked to mutations in TIMP3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Isabelle; Bocquet, Béatrice; Labesse, Gilles; Zeitz, Christina; Defoort-Dhellemmes, Sabine; Lacroux, Annie; Mauget-Faysse, Martine; Drumare, Isabelle; Gamez, Anne-Sophie; Mathieu, Cyril; Marquette, Virginie; Sagot, Lola; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Arndt, Carl; Carroll, Patrick; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Cohen, Salomon Yves; Sahel, José-Alain; Puech, Bernard; Audo, Isabelle; Mrejen, Sarah; Hamel, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    To revisit the autosomal dominant Sorsby fundus dystrophy (SFD) as a syndromic condition including late-onset pulmonary disease. We report clinical and imaging data of ten affected individuals from 2 unrelated families with SFD and carrying heterozygous TIMP3 mutations (c.572A > G, p.Y191C, exon 5, in family 1 and c.113C > G, p.S38C, exon 1, in family 2). In family 1, all SFD patients older than 50 (two generations) had also a severe emphysema, despite no history of smoking or asthma. In the preceding generation, the mother died of pulmonary emphysema and she was blind after the age of 50. Her two great-grandsons (<20 years), had abnormal Bruch Membrane thickness, a sign of eye disease. In family 2, eye and lung diseases were also associated in two generations, both occurred later, and lung disease was moderate (bronchiectasis). This is the first report of a syndromic SFD in line with the mouse model uncovering the role of TIMP3 in human lung morphogenesis and functions. The TIMP3 gene should be screened in familial pulmonary diseases with bronchiectasis, associated with a medical history of visual loss. In addition, SFD patients should be advised to avoid tobacco consumption, to practice sports, and to undergo regular pulmonary examinations. PMID:27601084

  18. A new autosomal dominant eye and lung syndrome linked to mutations in TIMP3 gene.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Isabelle; Bocquet, Béatrice; Labesse, Gilles; Zeitz, Christina; Defoort-Dhellemmes, Sabine; Lacroux, Annie; Mauget-Faysse, Martine; Drumare, Isabelle; Gamez, Anne-Sophie; Mathieu, Cyril; Marquette, Virginie; Sagot, Lola; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Arndt, Carl; Carroll, Patrick; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Cohen, Salomon Yves; Sahel, José-Alain; Puech, Bernard; Audo, Isabelle; Mrejen, Sarah; Hamel, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    To revisit the autosomal dominant Sorsby fundus dystrophy (SFD) as a syndromic condition including late-onset pulmonary disease. We report clinical and imaging data of ten affected individuals from 2 unrelated families with SFD and carrying heterozygous TIMP3 mutations (c.572A > G, p.Y191C, exon 5, in family 1 and c.113C > G, p.S38C, exon 1, in family 2). In family 1, all SFD patients older than 50 (two generations) had also a severe emphysema, despite no history of smoking or asthma. In the preceding generation, the mother died of pulmonary emphysema and she was blind after the age of 50. Her two great-grandsons (<20 years), had abnormal Bruch Membrane thickness, a sign of eye disease. In family 2, eye and lung diseases were also associated in two generations, both occurred later, and lung disease was moderate (bronchiectasis). This is the first report of a syndromic SFD in line with the mouse model uncovering the role of TIMP3 in human lung morphogenesis and functions. The TIMP3 gene should be screened in familial pulmonary diseases with bronchiectasis, associated with a medical history of visual loss. In addition, SFD patients should be advised to avoid tobacco consumption, to practice sports, and to undergo regular pulmonary examinations. PMID:27601084

  19. A Missense Mutation in HK1 Leads to Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Yandong; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Li; Lyubasyuk, Vera; Wang, Keqing; Xu, Mingchu; Li, Yumei; Wu, Frances; Wen, Cindy; Bernstein, Paul S.; Lin, Danni; Zhu, Susanna; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with over 60 causative genes known to date. Nevertheless, approximately 40% of RP cases remain genetically unsolved, suggesting that many novel disease-causing genes are yet to be identified. In this study, we aimed to identify the causative mutation for a large autosomal dominant RP (adRP) family with negative results from known retinal disease gene screening. Methods. Linkage analysis followed by whole-exome sequencing was performed. Stringent variant filtering and prioritization was carried out to identify the causative mutation. Results. Linkage analysis identified a minimal disease region of 8 Mb on chromosome 10 with a peak parametric logarithm (base 10) of odds (LOD) score of 3.500. Further whole-exome sequencing identified a heterozygous missense mutation (NM_000188.2:c.2539G>A, p.E847K) in hexokinase 1 (HK1) that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Biochemical assays showed that the E847K mutation does not affect hexokinase enzymatic activity or the protein stability, suggesting that the mutation may impact other uncharacterized function or result in a gain of function of HK1. Conclusions. Here, we identified HK1 as a novel causative gene for adRP. This is the first report that associates the glucose metabolic pathway with human retinal degenerative disease, suggesting a potential new disease mechanism. PMID:25316723

  20. Pathogenesis of Autosomal Dominant Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (SPG6) Revealed by a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Fumihiro; Arnold, William D.; Hammer, Robert E.; Ghodsizadeh, Odelia; Moti, Harmeet; Schumer, Mackenzie; Hashmi, Ahmed; Hernandez, Anthony; Sneh, Amita; Sahenk, Zarife

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower extremities that result from length-dependent central to peripheral axonal degeneration. Mutations in the non-imprinted Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome locus 1 (NIPA1) transmembrane protein cause an autosomal dominant form of HSP (SPG6). Here, we report that transgenic (Tg) rats expressing a human NIPA1/SPG6 mutation in neurons (Thy1.2-hNIPA1G106R) show marked early onset behavioral and electrophysiologic abnormalities. Detailed morphologic analyses reveal unique histopathologic findings, including the accumulation of tubulovesicular organelles with endosomal features that start at axonal and dendritic terminals, followed by multifocal vacuolar degeneration in both the CNS and peripheral nerves. In addition, the NIPA1G106R mutation in the spinal cord from older Tg rats results in an increase in bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor expression, suggesting that its degradation is impaired. This Thy1.2-hNIPA1G106R Tg rat model may serve as a valuable tool for understanding endosomal trafficking in the pathogenesis of a subgroup of HSP with an abnormal interaction with bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor, as well as for developing potential therapeutic strategies for diseases with axonal degeneration and similar pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:24128679

  1. Percutaneous Treatment of Pyocystis in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Akinci, Devrim Turkbey, Baris; Yilmaz, Rahmi; Akpinar, Erhan; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan

    2008-09-15

    The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is frequently complicated by infection of a cyst within a polycystic kidney, which is a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma damaging the clinical course of patients. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous drainage in management of infected cysts in ADPKD patients. Between May 2003 and December 2006, percutaneous drainage was performed in 16 infected renal cysts of four kidneys in three patients (two females, one male), with a mean age of 57.3 years. Cyst dimensions, total amount of drained cyst fluid, catheterization duration, isolated microorganisms, and follow-up duration were recorded. Technical, clinical success rates were 100%; the complication rate was 0%. Diameters of cysts ranged between 3 and 8 cm. Average volume of drained fluid and average duration of catheterization for one cyst were 226 ml and 9.8 days. No recurrence was encountered but one patient (no. 3), who had pyocystis in the right kidney and was treated with catheterization, referred with left flank pain due to pyocystis in her left kidney 3 months later. Follow-up durations were 35, 47, and 11 months for patients 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For patient 3, follow-up duration for the second procedure was 7 months. We conclude that percutaneous drainage with antibiotic therapy should be the initial method in management of infected cysts in ADPKD patients, with high success and low complication rates.

  2. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses. PMID:26794436

  3. A novel locus for autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy maps to chromosome 10q

    PubMed Central

    Kamenarova, Kunka; Cherninkova, Sylvia; Romero Durán, Margarita; Prescott, DeQuincy; Valdés Sánchez, Maria Lourdes; Mitev, Vanio; Kremensky, Ivo; Kaneva, Radka; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Tournev, Ivailo; Chakarova, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Here we report recruitment of a three-generation Romani (Gypsy) family with autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy (adCORD). Involvement of known adCORD genes was excluded by microsatellite (STR) genotyping and linkage analysis. Subsequently, two independent total-genome scans using STR markers and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were performed. Haplotype analysis revealed a single 6.7-Mb novel locus between markers D10S1757 and D10S1782 linked to the disease phenotype on chromosome 10q26. Linkage analysis gave a maximum LOD score of 3.31 for five fully informative STR markers within the linked interval corresponding to the expected maximum in the family. Multipoint linkage analysis of SNP genotypes yielded a maximum parametric linkage score of 2.71 with markers located in the same chromosomal interval. There is no previously mapped CORD locus in this interval, and therefore the data reported here is novel and likely to identify a new gene that may eventually contribute to new knowledge on the pathogenesis of this condition. Sequencing of several candidate genes within the mapped interval led to negative findings in terms of the underlying molecular pathogenesis of the disease in the family. Analysis by comparative genomic hybridization excluded large chromosomal aberrations as causative of adCORD in the pedigree. PMID:22929024

  4. Effective Small Interfering RNA Therapy to Treat CLCN7-dependent Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Capulli, Mattia; Maurizi, Antonio; Ventura, Luca; Rucci, Nadia; Teti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In about 70% of patients affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type 2 (ADO2), osteoclast activity is reduced by heterozygous mutations of the CLCN7 gene, encoding the ClC-7 chloride/hydrogen antiporter. CLCN7G215R-, CLCN7R767W-, and CLCN7R286W-specific siRNAs silenced transfected mutant mRNA/EGFP in HEK293 cells, in RAW264.7 cells and in human osteoclasts, with no change of CLCN7WT mRNA and no effect of scrambled siRNA on the mutant transcripts. Osteoclasts from Clcn7G213R ADO2 mice showed reduced bone resorption, a condition rescued by Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA. Treatment of ADO2 mice with Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA induced increase of bone resorption variables and decrease of trabecular bone mass, leading to an overall improvement of the osteopetrotic bone phenotype. Treatment did not induce overt adverse effects and was effective also with siRNAs specific for other mutants. These results demonstrate that a siRNA-based experimental treatment of ADO2 is feasible, and underscore a translational impact for future strategy to cure this therapeutically neglected form of osteopetrosis. PMID:26325626

  5. Functional Connectivity in Autosomal Dominant and Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jewell B; Brier, Matthew R; Bateman, Randall J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Benzinger, Tammie L; Xiong, Chengjie; Raichle, Marcus; Holtzman, David M; Sperling, Reisa A; Mayeux, Richard; Ghetti, Bernardino; Ringman, John M; Salloway, Stephen; McDade, Eric; Rossor, Martin N; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M; Fox, Nick C; Koeppe, Robert A; Jack, Clifford R; Mathis, Chester A; Oliver, Angela; Blazey, Tyler M; Moulder, Krista; Buckles, Virginia; Hornbeck, Russ; Chhatwal, Jasmeer; Schultz, Aaron P; Goate, Alison M; Fagan, Anne M; Cairns, Nigel J; Marcus, Daniel S; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau M

    2014-01-01

    Importance Autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) is caused by rare genetic mutations in three specific genes, in contrast to late-onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD), which has a more polygenetic risk profile. Design, Setting, and Participants We analyzed functional connectivity in multiple brain resting state networks (RSNs) in a cross-sectional cohort of ADAD (N=79) and LOAD (N=444) human participants using resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) at multiple international academic sites. Main Outcomes and Measures For both types of AD, we quantified and compared functional connectivity changes in RSNs as a function of dementia severity as measured by clinical dementia rating (CDR). In ADAD, we qualitatively investigated functional connectivity changes with respect to estimated years from onset of symptoms within five RSNs. Results Functional connectivity decreases with increasing CDR were similar for both LOAD and ADAD in multiple RSNs. Ordinal logistic regression models constructed in each type of AD accurately predicted CDR stage in the other, further demonstrating similarity of functional connectivity loss in each disease type. Among ADAD participants, functional connectivity in multiple RSNs appeared qualitatively lower in asymptomatic mutation carriers near their anticipated age of symptom onset compared to asymptomatic mutation non-carriers. Conclusions and Relevance rs-fcMRI changes with progressing AD severity are similar between ADAD and LOAD. Rs-fcMRI may be a useful endpoint for LOAD and ADAD therapy trials. ADAD disease process may be an effective model for LOAD disease process. PMID:25069482

  6. Further refinement of the location for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 7p (RP9)

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.F.; Keen, T.J.; Al-Maghtheh, M.; Gregory, C.Y.; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Jay, M.R.; Moore, A.T.; Bird, A.C. )

    1994-04-01

    A form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) mapping to chromosome 7p was recently reported by this laboratory, in a single large family from southeastern England. Further sampling of the family and the use a number of genetic markers from 7p have facilitated the construction of a series of multipoint linkage maps of the region with the most likely disease gene location. From this and haplotype data, the locus can now be placed between the markers D7S484 and D7S526, in an interval estimated to be 1.6-4 cM. Genetic distances between the markers previously reported to be linked to this region and those described in the recent whole-genome poly-CA map were estimated from data in this and other families. These data should assist in the construction of a physical map of the region and will help to identify candidate genes for the 7p adRP locus. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Mutation spectrum of the rhodopsin gene among patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Dryja, T.P.; Han, L.B.; Cowley, G.S.; McGee, T.L.; Berson, E.L. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors searched for point mutations in every exon of the rhodopsin gene in 150 patients from separate families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Including the 4 mutations the authors reported previously, they found a total of 17 different mutations that correlate with the disease. Each of these mutations is a single-base substitution corresponding to a single amino acid substitution. Based on current models for the structure of rhodopsin, 3 of the 17 mutant amino acids are normally located on the cytoplasmic side of the protein, 6 in transmembrane domains, and 8 on the intradiscal side. Forty-three of the 150 patients (29%) carry 1 of these mutations, and no patient has more than 1 mutation. In every family with a mutation so far analyzed, the mutation cosegregates with the disease. They found one instance of a mutation in an affected patient that was absent in both unaffected parents (i.e., a new germ-line mutation), indicating that some isolate cases of retinitis pigmentosa carry a mutation of the rhodopsin gene.

  8. Localization of a new autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa gene on chromosome 17p screeningof candidate genes

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J.; Goliath, R.; Shugart, Y.Y.

    1994-09-01

    A new gene locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) on 17p has been identified in a large South African (SA) family consisting of 28 living affected individuals in 4 successive generations. This is the first ADRP gene to be reported from SA. The human recoverin (RCVN) gene, which codes for a retinal-specific protein important in recovery to the dark state after visual excitation, has been mapped to 17p13.1 and was considered as a prime candidate gene for the disorder in this family. Mutation screening (using 8 different electrophoretic conditions to resolve heteroduplexes and SSCPs) did not produce any evidence of RCVN being involved in the pathogenesis of ADRP in this SA family. In addition, a mobility shift detected within exon 1 of the RCVN gene did not track with the ADRP phenotype. RP patients from 77 SA families and 30 normal individuals are being examined to establish the frequency of this polymorphism in the SA population. Highly polymorphic markers from 17p13 are now being sought in order to establish the minimum region containing this novel ADRP-SA gene. Two additional recently described retinal-expressed cDNAs, guanylyl cyclase and pigment epithelium-derived factor, which map to 17p13.1, will be tested for tight linkage to ADRP-SA.

  9. A gene for autosomal dominant hearing loss on the short arm of chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Camp, G.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Hearing loss is the most common form of sensory impairment and many cases are attributable to genetic causes. The genetic defects underlying several syndromic forms of deafness have been identified, but little is known about the causes of non-syndromic hereditary deafness which accounts for the majority of inherited hearing loss. We report here a large Indonesian family with non-syndromal postlingual hearing loss starting in the high frequencies and showing autosomal dominant inheritance. To locate the gene responsible for the hearing loss in this family, we performed a genome search by genetic linkage analysis with microsatellite markers distributed over the whole genome. We have mapped the gene causing deafness in an extended Indonesian family to chromosome 1p with a multipoint lod score higher than 7. Two other smaller families, showing a similar hereditary hearing loss, were also tested for linkage with chromosome 1p. One family originating from the U.S. was linked to this new locus with a multipoint lod score exceeding 5. In another family from the Netherlands this locus was excluded. The flanking markers D1S255 and D1S211 define a region of 6 cM on chromosome 1p which is likely to contain the deafness gene present in the Indonesian and American family.

  10. Peritoneal dialysis for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a retrospective study*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xi-shao; Xie, Zhou-tao; Xiang, Shi-long; Yan, Xing-qun; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Shou, Zhang-fei; Chen, Jiang-hua

    2016-01-01

    To describe the long-term clinical outcomes of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) who are on peritoneal dialysis (PD) therapy. We performed a retrospective matched-cohort analysis comparing the clinical outcomes of 30 ADPKD patients with those of 30 non-diabetic patients who had bilateral small kidneys between July 1 2007 and July 31 2014. The patient groups were matched by age, gender, and time of PD initiation. There were no significant differences in the demographic or biochemical parameters, comorbid conditions, residual glomerular filtration rate, or Charlson comorbidity score at the beginning of PD. The median renal volume was 1315 ml for the ADPKD group and 213 ml for the control group. Patients with ADPKD had similar 3-year patient survival (90.6% versus 86.3%, P=0.807) and technique survival (89.2% versus 74.3%, P=0.506) compared with non-ADPKD patients. Also, there was no significant difference in the peritonitis-free survival between the ADPKD and control groups (P=0.22), and rates of peritonitis were similar (0.19 versus 0.21 episodes per patient-year, P=0.26). No differences were observed in the incidence of PD-related complications, such as hernia and dialysate leak. ADPKD is not a contraindication for PD, and a subgroup of ADPKD patients with relatively small kidney volume can be treated using PD. PMID:27143265

  11. A recurrent deletion mutation in OPA1 causes autosomal dominant optic atrophy in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Shi, Wei; Song, Liming; Zhang, Xiao; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Ge, Xianglian; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Min, Qingjie; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is the most frequent form of hereditary optic neuropathy and occurs due to the degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells. To identify the genetic defect in a family with putative ADOA, we performed capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) to screen known retinal disease genes. However, six exons failed to be sequenced by CNGS in optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1). Sequencing of those exons identified a 4 bp deletion mutation (c.2983-1_2985del) in OPA1. Furthermore, we sequenced the transcripts of OPA1 from the patient skin fibroblasts and found there is six-nucleotide deletion (c.2984-c.2989, AGAAAG). Quantitative-PCR and Western blotting showed that OPA1 mRNA and its protein expression have no obvious difference between patient skin fibroblast and control. The analysis of protein structure by molecular modeling suggests that the mutation may change the structure of OPA1 by formation of an alpha helix protruding into an existing pocket. Taken together, we identified an OPA1 mutation in a family with ADOA by filling the missing CNGS data. We also showed that this mutation affects the structural intactness of OPA1. It provides molecular insights for clinical genetic diagnosis and treatment of optic atrophy. PMID:25374051

  12. A recurrent deletion mutation in OPA1 causes autosomal dominant optic atrophy in a Chinese family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping; Shi, Wei; Song, Liming; Zhang, Xiao; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Ge, Xianglian; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Min, Qingjie; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is the most frequent form of hereditary optic neuropathy and occurs due to the degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells. To identify the genetic defect in a family with putative ADOA, we performed capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) to screen known retinal disease genes. However, six exons failed to be sequenced by CNGS in optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1). Sequencing of those exons identified a 4 bp deletion mutation (c.2983-1_2985del) in OPA1. Furthermore, we sequenced the transcripts of OPA1 from the patient skin fibroblasts and found there is six-nucleotide deletion (c.2984-c.2989, AGAAAG). Quantitative-PCR and Western blotting showed that OPA1 mRNA and its protein expression have no obvious difference between patient skin fibroblast and control. The analysis of protein structure by molecular modeling suggests that the mutation may change the structure of OPA1 by formation of an alpha helix protruding into an existing pocket. Taken together, we identified an OPA1 mutation in a family with ADOA by filling the missing CNGS data. We also showed that this mutation affects the structural intactness of OPA1. It provides molecular insights for clinical genetic diagnosis and treatment of optic atrophy.

  13. Role of follicle-stimulating hormone on biliary cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Onori, Paolo; Mancinelli, Romina; Franchitto, Antonio; Carpino, Guido; Renzi, Anastasia; Brozzetti, Stefania; Venter, Julie; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Jefferson, Douglas M.; Alpini, Gianfranco; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the progressive development of renal and hepatic cysts. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) has been demonstrated to be a trophic factor for biliary cells in normal rats and experimental cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Aims To assess the effect of FSH on cholangiocyte proliferation during ADPKD using both in vivo and in vitro models. Methods Evaluation of FSH receptor (FSHR), FSH, phospho-extracellular-regulated kinase (pERK) and c-myc expression in liver fragments from normal patients and patients with ADPKD. In vitro, we studied proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cAMP levels in a human immortalized, non-malignant cholangiocyte cell line (H69) and in an immortalized cell line obtained from the epithelium lining the hepatic cysts from the patients with ADPKD (LCDE) with or without transient silencing of the FSH gene. Results Follicle-stimulating hormone is linked to the active proliferation of the cystic wall and to the localization of p-ERK and c-myc. This hormone sustains the biliary growth by activation of the cAMP/ERK signalling pathway. Conclusion These results showed that FSH has an important function in cystic growth acting on the cAMP pathway, demonstrating that it provides a target for medical therapy of hepatic cysts during ADPKD. PMID:23617956

  14. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in patients with autosomal dominant keratitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, F.; Pearce, W.G.; MacDonald, I.M.; Walter, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disorder chiefly characterized by corneal opacification and vascularization and by foveal hypoplasia. Aniridia (shown recently to result from mutations in the PAX6 gene) has overlapping clinical findings and a similar pattern of inheritance with ADK. On the basis of these similarities, we used a candidate-gene approach to investigate whether mutations in the PAX6 gene also result in ADK. Significant linkage was found between two polymorphic loci in the PAX6 region and ADK in a family with 15 affected members in four generations (peak LOD score = 4.45; {theta} = .00 with D11S914), consistent with PAX6 mutations being responsible for ADK. SSCP analysis and direct sequencing revealed a mutation in the PAX6 exon 11 splice-acceptor site. The predicted consequent incorrect splicing results in truncation of the PAX6 proline-serine-threonine activation domain. The Sey{sup Neu} mouse results from a mutation in the Pax-6 exon 10 splice-donor site that produces a PAX6 protein truncated from the same point as occurs in our family with ADK. Therefore, the Sey{sup Neu} mouse is an excellent animal model of ADK. The finding that mutations in PAX6 also underlie Peters anomaly implicates PAX6 broadly in human anterior segment malformations. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. High frequency of potentially pathogenic SORL1 mutations in autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pottier, C; Hannequin, D; Coutant, S; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Wallon, D; Rousseau, S; Legallic, S; Paquet, C; Bombois, S; Pariente, J; Thomas-Anterion, C; Michon, A; Croisile, B; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Berr, C; Dartigues, J-F; Amouyel, P; Dauchel, H; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, C; Thauvin, C; Frebourg, T; Lambert, J-C; Campion, D

    2012-09-01

    Performing exome sequencing in 14 autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) index cases without mutation on known genes (amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin1 (PSEN1) and presenilin2 (PSEN2)), we found that in five patients, the SORL1 gene harbored unknown nonsense (n=1) or missense (n=4) mutations. These mutations were not retrieved in 1500 controls of same ethnic origin. In a replication sample, including 15 ADEOAD cases, 2 unknown non-synonymous mutations (1 missense, 1 nonsense) were retrieved, thus yielding to a total of 7/29 unknown mutations in the combined sample. Using in silico predictions, we conclude that these seven private mutations are likely to have a pathogenic effect. SORL1 encodes the Sortilin-related receptor LR11/SorLA, a protein involved in the control of amyloid beta peptide production. Our results suggest that besides the involvement of the APP and PSEN genes, further genetic heterogeneity, involving another gene of the same pathway is present in ADEOAD. PMID:22472873

  16. Peritoneal dialysis for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi-Shao; Xie, Zhou-Tao; Xiang, Shi-Long; Yan, Xing-Qun; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Shou, Zhang-Fei; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2016-05-01

    To describe the long-term clinical outcomes of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) who are on peritoneal dialysis (PD) therapy. We performed a retrospective matched-cohort analysis comparing the clinical outcomes of 30 ADPKD patients with those of 30 non-diabetic patients who had bilateral small kidneys between July 1 2007 and July 31 2014. The patient groups were matched by age, gender, and time of PD initiation. There were no significant differences in the demographic or biochemical parameters, comorbid conditions, residual glomerular filtration rate, or Charlson comorbidity score at the beginning of PD. The median renal volume was 1315 ml for the ADPKD group and 213 ml for the control group. Patients with ADPKD had similar 3-year patient survival (90.6% versus 86.3%, P=0.807) and technique survival (89.2% versus 74.3%, P=0.506) compared with non-ADPKD patients. Also, there was no significant difference in the peritonitis-free survival between the ADPKD and control groups (P=0.22), and rates of peritonitis were similar (0.19 versus 0.21 episodes per patient-year, P=0.26). No differences were observed in the incidence of PD-related complications, such as hernia and dialysate leak. ADPKD is not a contraindication for PD, and a subgroup of ADPKD patients with relatively small kidney volume can be treated using PD. PMID:27143265

  17. Genetic analysis of Iranian autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: new insight to haplotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Entezam, M; Khatami, M R; Saddadi, F; Ayati, M; Roozbeh, J; Saghafi, H; Keramatipour, M

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) caused by mutations in two PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Due to the complexity of the PKD1 gene, its direct mutation screening is an expensive and time-consuming procedure. Pedigree-based haplotype analysis is a useful indirect approach to identify the responsible gene in families with multiple affected individuals, before direct mutation analysis. Here, we applied this approach to investigate 15 appropriate unrelated ADPKD families, selected from 25 families, who referred for genetic counseling. Four polymorphic microsatellite markers were selected around each PKD1 and PKD2 loci. In addition, by investigating the genomic regions, two novel flanking tetranucleotide STR markers were identified. Haplotype analysis and calculating Lod score confirmed linkage to PKD1 in 9 families (60%) and to PKD2 in 2 families (13%). Linkage to both loci was excluded in one family (6.6%). In 2 families (13%) the Lod scores were inconclusive. Causative mutation was identified successfully by direct analysis in two families with confirmed linkage, one to PKD1 and another to PKD2 locus. The study showed that determining the causative locus prior to direct mutation analysis is an efficient strategy to reduce the resources required for genetic analysis of ADPKD families. This is more prominent in PKD2-linked families. Selection of suitable markers, and appropriate PCR multiplexing strategy, using fluorescent labeled primers and 3 primer system, will also add value to this approach. PMID:26950445

  18. Neuropathology of Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease in the National Alzheimer Coordinating Center Database

    PubMed Central

    Ringman, John M.; Monsell, Sarah; Ng, Denise W.; Zhou, Yan; Nguyen, Andy; Coppola, Giovanni; Van Berlo, Victoria; Mendez, Mario F.; Tung, Spencer; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Bigio, Eileen H.; Gitelman, Darren R.; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda O.; Albin, Roger L.; Vinters, Harry V.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) represents a genetically heterogeneous entity. To elucidate neuropathologic features of autosomal dominant AD ([ADAD] due to PSEN1, APP, or PSEN2 mutations), we compared hallmark AD pathologic findings in 60 cases of ADAD and 120 cases of sporadic AD matched for sex, race, ethnicity, and disease duration. Greater degrees of neuritic plaque and neurofibrillary tangle formation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) were found in ADAD (p values < 0.01). Moderate to severe CAA was more prevalent in ADAD (63.3% vs. 39.2%, p = 0.003), and persons with PSEN1 mutations beyond codon 200 had higher average Braak scores and severity and prevalence of CAA than those with mutations before codon 200. Lewy body pathology was less extensive in ADAD but was present in 27.1% of cases. We also describe a novel pathogenic PSEN1 mutation (P267A). The finding of more severe neurofibrillary pathology and CAA in ADAD, particularly in carriers of PSEN1 mutations beyond codon 200, warrants consideration when designing trials to treat or prevent ADAD. The finding of Lewy body pathology in a substantial minority of ADAD cases supports the assertion that development of Lewy bodies may be in part driven by abnormal β-amyloid protein precursor processing. PMID:26888304

  19. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in patients with autosomal dominant keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, F; Pearce, W G; MacDonald, I M; Walter, M A

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disorder chiefly characterized by corneal opacification and vascularization and by foveal hypoplasia. Aniridia (shown recently to result from mutations in the PAX6 gene) has overlapping clinical findings and a similar pattern of inheritance with ADK. On the basis of these similarities, we used a candidate-gene approach to investigate whether mutations in the PAX6 gene also result in ADK. Significant linkage was found between two polymorphic loci in the PAX6 region and ADK in a family with 15 affected members in four generations (peak LOD score = 4.45; theta = .00 with D11S914), consistent with PAX6 mutations being responsible for ADK. SSCP analysis and direct sequencing revealed a mutation in the PAX6 exon 11 splice-acceptor site. The predicted consequent incorrect splicing results in truncation of the PAX6 proline-serine-threonine activation domain. The SeyNeu mouse results from a mutation in the Pax-6 exon 10 splice-donor site that produces a PAX6 protein truncated from the same point as occurs in our family with ADK. Therefore, the SeyNeu mouse is an excellent animal model of ADK. The finding that mutations in PAX6 underlie ADK, along with a recent report that mutations in PAX6 also underlie Peters anomaly, implicates PAX6 broadly in human anterior segment malformations. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7668281

  20. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses. PMID:26794436

  1. Neuropathology of Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease in the National Alzheimer Coordinating Center Database.

    PubMed

    Ringman, John M; Monsell, Sarah; Ng, Denise W; Zhou, Yan; Nguyen, Andy; Coppola, Giovanni; Van Berlo, Victoria; Mendez, Mario F; Tung, Spencer; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Bigio, Eileen H; Gitelman, Darren R; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda O; Albin, Roger L; Vinters, Harry V

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) represents a genetically heterogeneous entity. To elucidate neuropathologic features of autosomal dominant AD ([ADAD] due to PSEN1, APP, or PSEN2 mutations), we compared hallmark AD pathologic findings in 60 cases of ADAD and 120 cases of sporadic AD matched for sex, race, ethnicity, and disease duration. Greater degrees of neuritic plaque and neurofibrillary tangle formation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) were found in ADAD (p values < 0.01). Moderate to severe CAA was more prevalent in ADAD (63.3% vs. 39.2%, p = 0.003), and persons with PSEN1 mutations beyond codon 200 had higher average Braak scores and severity and prevalence of CAA than those with mutations before codon 200. Lewy body pathology was less extensive in ADAD but was present in 27.1% of cases. We also describe a novel pathogenic PSEN1 mutation (P267A). The finding of more severe neurofibrillary pathology and CAA in ADAD, particularly in carriers of PSEN1 mutations beyond codon 200, warrants consideration when designing trials to treat or prevent ADAD. The finding of Lewy body pathology in a substantial minority of ADAD cases supports the assertion that development of Lewy bodies may be in part driven by abnormal β-amyloid protein precursor processing. PMID:26888304

  2. Cyst growth, polycystins, and primary cilia in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hun; Somlo, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The primary cilium of renal epithelia acts as a transducer of extracellular stimuli. Polycystin (PC)1 is the protein encoded by the PKD1 gene that is responsible for the most common and severe form of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). PC1 forms a complex with PC2 via their respective carboxy-terminal tails. Both proteins are expressed in the primary cilia. Mutations in either gene affect the normal architecture of renal tubules, giving rise to ADPKD. PC1 has been proposed as a receptor that modulates calcium signals via the PC2 channel protein. The effect of PC1 dosage has been described as the rate-limiting modulator of cystic disease. Reduced levels of PC1 or disruption of the balance in PC1/PC2 level can lead to the clinical features of ADPKD, without complete inactivation. Recent data show that ADPKD resulting from inactivation of polycystins can be markedly slowed if structurally intact cilia are also disrupted at the same time. Despite the fact that no single model or mechanism from these has been able to describe exclusively the pathogenesis of cystic kidney disease, these findings suggest the existence of a novel cilia-dependent, cyst-promoting pathway that is normally repressed by polycystin function. The results enable us to rethink our current understanding of genetics and cilia signaling pathways of ADPKD. PMID:26877954

  3. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: new treatment options and how to test their efficacy.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Serra, Andreas L; Kistler, Andreas D

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) represents a slowly progressing cystic kidney disorder which evolves into end-stage renal disease in the majority of patients. Currently, there are no established treatments to retard the progression of the disease, but several promising therapeutic options are being tested in ongoing clinical trials. An inherent dilemma for the investigation of therapies in ADPKD is the dissociation of the early onset and constant rate of cyst growth from the delayed but accelerated loss of renal function. In order to prevent the latter, one needs to act on the former, i.e. current belief by experts in the field is that (1) retardation of cyst growth will ultimately improve the loss of glomerular filtration rate, and (2) cyst volume is an ideal surrogate parameter for outcome in early ADPKD. The present review will discuss the utility and the techniques for kidney and cyst volume measurements to assess disease progression in ADPKD, and summarizes ongoing clinical trials testing novel therapeutic options. PMID:19887826

  4. Determinants of renal volume in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Grantham, J J; Cook, L T; Torres, V E; Bost, J E; Chapman, A B; Harris, P C; Guay-Woodford, L M; Bae, K T

    2008-01-01

    The Consortium of Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP) recently showed that renal enlargement in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease mimicked exponential growth. We determined the effects of cyst initiation rate, total number, and growth rate on the time-dependent change of total cyst volume (TCV). Mathematical models with equations integrating cyst surface area, volume, and an invariant growth rate constant were used to compute the time-dependent change in volume of solitary and multiple cysts. Multiple expanding cysts increased TCV in an exponential-like pattern even when individual cysts formed at different rates or exhibited different but constant growth rates. TCV depended on the rate of cyst initiation and on the total number of cysts; however, the compounding effect of exponential-like growth was the most powerful determinant of long-term cyst expansion. Extrapolation of TCV data plots for individual subjects back to an age of 18 predicted TCV values within an established range. We conclude that cysts started early in life were the main contributor to eventual TCV while their growth rate primarily determined renal size; although the rate of formation and the ultimate number of cysts also contributed. The good fit between the exponential models and the extrapolated CRISP data indicates that the TCV growth rate is a defining trait for individual patients and may be used as a prognostic marker. PMID:17960141

  5. Identification of Gene Mutations in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease through Targeted Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Katharina; Sikkink, Robert A.; Sundsbak, Jamie L.; Lee, Yean Kit; Kubly, Vickie; Eckloff, Bruce W.; Ward, Christopher J.; Winearls, Christopher G.; Torres, Vicente E.; Harris, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in two large multi-exon genes, PKD1 and PKD2, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The duplication of PKD1 exons 1–32 as six pseudogenes on chromosome 16, the high level of allelic heterogeneity, and the cost of Sanger sequencing complicate mutation analysis, which can aid diagnostics of ADPKD. We developed and validated a strategy to analyze both the PKD1 and PKD2 genes using next-generation sequencing by pooling long-range PCR amplicons and multiplexing bar-coded libraries. We used this approach to characterize a cohort of 230 patients with ADPKD. This process detected definitely and likely pathogenic variants in 115 (63%) of 183 patients with typical ADPKD. In addition, we identified atypical mutations, a gene conversion, and one missed mutation resulting from allele dropout, and we characterized the pattern of deep intronic variation for both genes. In summary, this strategy involving next-generation sequencing is a model for future genetic characterization of large ADPKD populations. PMID:22383692

  6. Global molecular analysis and APOE mutations in a cohort of autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia patients in France.

    PubMed

    Wintjens, René; Bozon, Dominique; Belabbas, Khaldia; MBou, Félicien; Girardet, Jean-Philippe; Tounian, Patrick; Jolly, Mathilde; Boccara, Franck; Cohen, Ariel; Karsenty, Alexandra; Dubern, Béatrice; Carel, Jean-Claude; Azar-Kolakez, Ahlam; Feillet, François; Labarthe, François; Gorsky, Anne-Marie Colin; Horovitz, Alice; Tamarindi, Catherine; Kieffer, Pierre; Lienhardt, Anne; Lascols, Olivier; Di Filippo, Mathilde; Dufernez, Fabienne

    2016-03-01

    Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH) is a human disorder characterized phenotypically by isolated high-cholesterol levels. Mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), APOB, and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) genes are well known to be associated with the disease. To characterize the genetic background associated with ADH in France, the three ADH-associated genes were sequenced in a cohort of 120 children and 109 adult patients. Fifty-one percent of the cohort had a possible deleterious variant in LDLR, 3.1% in APOB, and 1.7% in PCSK9. We identified 18 new variants in LDLR and 2 in PCSK9. Three LDLR variants, including two newly identified, were studied by minigene reporter assay confirming the predicted effects on splicing. Additionally, as recently an in-frame deletion in the APOE gene was found to be linked to ADH, the sequencing of this latter gene was performed in patients without a deleterious variant in the three former genes. An APOE variant was identified in three patients with isolated severe hypercholesterolemia giving a frequency of 1.3% in the cohort. Therefore, even though LDLR mutations are the major cause of ADH with a large mutation spectrum, APOE variants were found to be significantly associated with the disease. Furthermore, using structural analysis and modeling, the identified APOE sequence changes were predicted to impact protein function. PMID:26802169

  7. Fatty Acid Oxidation is Impaired in An Orthologous Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Luis F.; Lin, Cheng-Chao; Zhou, Fang; Germino, Gregory G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The major gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was first identified over 20 years ago, yet its function remains poorly understood. We have used a systems-based approach to examine the effects of acquired loss of Pkd1 in adult mouse kidney as it transitions from normal to cystic state. Methods We performed transcriptional profiling of a large set of male and female kidneys, along with metabolomics and lipidomics analyses of a subset of male kidneys. We also assessed the effects of a modest diet change on cyst progression in young cystic mice. Fatty acid oxidation and glycolytic rates were measured in five control and mutant pairs of epithelial cells. Results We find that females have a significantly less severe kidney phenotype and correlate this protection with differences in lipid metabolism. We show that sex is a major determinant of the transcriptional profile of mouse kidneys and that some of this difference is due to genes involved in lipid metabolism. Pkd1 mutant mice have transcriptional profiles consistent with changes in lipid metabolism and distinct metabolite and complex lipid profiles in kidneys. We also show that cells lacking Pkd1 have an intrinsic fatty acid oxidation defect and that manipulation of lipid content of mouse chow modifies cystic disease. Interpretation Our results suggest PKD could be a disease of altered cellular metabolism. PMID:27077126

  8. Erythropoietin Slows Photoreceptor Cell Death in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kasmala, Lorraine; Bond, Wesley S.; de Lucas Cerrillo, Ana M.; Wynn, Kristi; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the efficacy of systemic gene delivery of a mutant form of erythropoietin (EPO-R76E) that has attenuated erythropoietic activity, in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Ten-day old mice carrying one copy of human rhodopsin with the P23H mutation and both copies of wild-type mouse rhodopsin (hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+) were injected into the quadriceps with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) carrying either enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or EpoR76E. Visual function (electroretinogram) and retina structure (optical coherence tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry) were assessed at 7 and 12 months of age. Results The outer nuclear layer thickness decreased over time at a slower rate in rAAV.EpoR76E treated as compared to the rAAV.eGFP injected mice. There was a statistically significant preservation of the electroretinogram at 7, but not 12 months of age. Conclusions Systemic EPO-R76E slows death of the photoreceptors and vision loss in hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+ mice. Treatment with EPO-R76E may widen the therapeutic window for retinal degeneration patients by increasing the number of viable cells. Future studies might investigate if co-treatment with EPO-R76E and gene replacement therapy is more effective than gene replacement therapy alone. PMID:27299810

  9. A missense mutation in KCTD17 causes autosomal dominant myoclonus-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mencacci, Niccolo E; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H R; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M P; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W

    2015-06-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%-50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  10. A novel OPA1 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Yuan, Yimin; Lin, Bing; Feng, Hao; Li, Yan; Dai, Xianning; Zhou, Huihui; Dong, Xujie; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Guan, Min-Xin

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the characterization of a four-generation large Chinese family with ADOA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find a new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G in OPA1 gene which may be a novel pathogenic mutation in this pedigree. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We do not find any mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with optic atrophy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree. -- Abstract: A large four-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) was investigated in the present study. Eight of the family members were affected in this pedigree. The affected family members exhibited early-onset and progressive visual impairment, resulting in mild to profound loss of visual acuity. The average age-at-onset was 15.9 years. A new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G was identified by sequence analysis of the 12th exon of the OPA1 gene. This mutation resulted in a proline to alanine substitution at codon 400, which was located in an evolutionarily conserved region. This missense mutation in the GTPase domain was supposed to result in a loss of function for the encoded protein and act through a dominant negative effect. No other mutations associated with optic atrophy were found in our present study. The c.C1198G heterozygous mutation in the OPA1 gene may be a novel key pathogenic mutation in this pedigree with ADOA. Furthermore, additional nuclear modifier genes, environmental factors, and psychological factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree.

  11. A Missense Mutation in KCTD17 Causes Autosomal Dominant Myoclonus-Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M.P.; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C.; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M.; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%–50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  12. Further evidence for a locus for autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma on chromosome 1q and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.; Paglinauan, C.; Stawski, S.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a term used to describe a group of disorders which have in common a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve associated with typical visual field defects and usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Two percent of white Americans and 6-10% of black Americans are affected by the disease. Compelling data indicate that susceptibility to many types of glaucoma is inherited. Hereditary juvenile glaucoma is one form of glaucoma that develops in children and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance. Using a single large Caucasian pedigree affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma, Sheffield discovered positive linkage to a group of markers that map to a 30 cM region on the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q21-q31). We have subsequently identified three unrelated Caucasian pedigrees affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that also demonstrate linkage to this region on chromosome 1, with the highest combined lod score of 5.12 at theta = .05 for marker D1S218. The identification of critical recombinant individuals in our three pedigrees has allowed us to further localize the disease gene to a 12 cM region between markers D1S242 and D1S431. In addition, we have identified several pedigrees which do not demonstrate linkage to chromosome 1q, including a black family affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that is indistinguishable clinically from the disorder affecting the caucasian pedigrees and three pedigrees affected with pigmentary dispersion syndrome, a form of glaucoma that also affects the juvenile population and is also inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. These findings provide evidence for genetic heterogeneity in juvenile glaucoma.

  13. The effect of caffeine on renal epithelial cells from patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Belibi, Franck A; Wallace, Darren P; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Christensen, Marcy; Reif, Gail; Grantham, Jared J

    2002-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disorder characterized by the progressive enlargement of cysts derived from tubules. Tubule cell proliferation and chloride-dependent fluid accumulation, mechanisms underlying cyst expansion, are accelerated by adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). This study examined the extent to which caffeine may stimulate the production of cAMP by cyst epithelial cells, thereby adversely increasing proliferation and fluid secretion. Mural epithelial cells from ADPKD cysts and normal human kidney cortex cells (HKC) were cultured, and cAMP levels were determined in response to caffeine and receptor-mediated agonists linked to adenylyl cyclase. Caffeine, a methylxanthine, slightly increased basal levels of cAMP, as did other nonselective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors, 1-methyl-3- isobutyl xanthine and theophylline and rolipram, a specific PDE IV inhibitor. More importantly, clinically relevant concentrations of caffeine (10 to 50 micro M) potentiated the effects of desmopressin (DDAVP), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and isoproterenol to increase cAMP levels in both ADPKD and HKC cells. By contrast, at concentrations that augmented the DDAVP response, caffeine attenuated cAMP accumulation by adenosine, implicating an action apart from the inhibition of PDE. Caffeine enhanced the effect of DDAVP to stimulate transepithelial short-circuit current of polarized ADPKD monolayers, reflecting an increase in chloride secretion. Caffeine potentiated the effect of DDAVP and PGE(2) to increase the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (P-ERK). By contrast, P-ERK levels in HKC cells were not raised by increased intracellular concentrations of cAMP. It is concluded that PDE inhibition by caffeine increases the accumulation of cAMP, and through this mechanism activates the ERK pathway to cellular proliferation and increases transepithelial fluid secretion in ADPKD cystic epithelium. Caffeine

  14. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: no evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar-Singh, R; Wang, H; Humphries, P; Farrar, G J

    1993-01-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue we have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. We performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test we obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses we have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, we have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Zm) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, we have mapped (Zm = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. PMID:8430695

  15. Segmentation of Individual Renal Cysts from MR Images in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyungsoo; Park, Bumwoo; Sun, Hongliang; Wang, Jinhong; Tao, Cheng; Chapman, Arlene B.; Torres, Vicente E.; Grantham, Jared J.; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M.; Flessner, Michael F.; Landsittel, Doug P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To evaluate the performance of a semi-automated method for the segmentation of individual renal cysts from magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Design, setting, participants, & measurements This semi-automated method was based on a morphologic watershed technique with shape-detection level set for segmentation of renal cysts from MR images. T2-weighted MR image sets of 40 kidneys were selected from 20 patients with mild to moderate renal cyst burden (kidney volume < 1500 ml) in the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP). The performance of the semi-automated method was assessed in terms of two reference metrics in each kidney: the total number of cysts measured by manual counting and the total volume of cysts measured with a region-based thresholding method. The proposed and reference measurements were compared using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Results Individual renal cysts were successfully segmented with the semi-automated method in all 20 cases. The total number of cysts in each kidney measured with the two methods correlated well (ICC, 0.99), with a very small relative bias (0.3% increase with the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 15.2% reduction to 17.2% increase). The total volume of cysts measured using both methods also correlated well (ICC, 1.00), with a small relative bias of <10% (9.0% decrease in the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 17.1% increase to 43.3% decrease). Conclusion This semi-automated method to segment individual renal cysts in ADPKD kidneys provides a quantitative indicator of severity in early and moderate stages of the disease. PMID:23520042

  16. Refining Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young-Hwan; Conklin, John; Chan, Winnie; Roslin, Nicole M; Liu, Jannel; He, Ning; Wang, Kairong; Sundsbak, Jamie L; Heyer, Christina M; Haider, Masoom; Paterson, Andrew D; Harris, Peter C; Pei, York

    2016-06-01

    Renal disease variability in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is strongly influenced by the gene locus (PKD1 versus PKD2). Recent studies identified nontruncating PKD1 mutations in approximately 30% of patients who underwent comprehensive mutation screening, but the clinical significance of these mutations is not well defined. We examined the genotype-renal function correlation in a prospective cohort of 220 unrelated ADPKD families ascertained through probands with serum creatinine ≤1.4 mg/dl at recruitment. We screened these families for PKD1 and PKD2 mutations and reviewed the clinical outcomes of the probands and affected family members. Height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) was obtained in 161 affected subjects. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling for renal and patient survival was performed in 707 affected probands and family members. Overall, we identified pathogenic mutations in 84.5% of our families, in which the prevalence of PKD1 truncating, PKD1 in-frame insertion/deletion, PKD1 nontruncating, and PKD2 mutations was 38.3%, 4.3%, 27.1%, and 30.3%, respectively. Compared with patients with PKD1 truncating mutations, patients with PKD1 in-frame insertion/deletion, PKD1 nontruncating, or PKD2 mutations have smaller htTKV and reduced risks (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]) of ESRD (0.35 [0.14 to 0.91], 0.10 [0.05 to 0.18], and 0.03 [0.01 to 0.05], respectively) and death (0.31 [0.11 to 0.87], 0.20 [0.11 to 0.38], and 0.18 [0.11 to 0.31], respectively). Refined genotype-renal disease correlation coupled with targeted next generation sequencing of PKD1 and PKD2 may provide useful clinical prognostication for ADPKD. PMID:26453610

  17. White Matter Abnormalities Track Disease Progression in PSEN1 Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Monté, Gemma C; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Bosch, Beatriz; Fortea, Juan; Lladó, Albert; Antonell, Anna; Balasa, Mircea; Bargalló, Nuria; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2016-02-20

    PSEN1 mutations are the most frequent cause of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD), and show nearly full penetrance. There is presently increasing interest in the study of biomarkers that track disease progression in order to test therapeutic interventions in ADAD. We used white mater (WM) volumetric characteristics and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics to investigate correlations with the normalized time to expected symptoms onset (relative age ratio) and group differences in a cohort of 36 subjects from PSEN1 ADAD families: 22 mutation carriers, 10 symptomatic (SMC) and 12 asymptomatic (AMC), and 14 non-carriers (NC). Subjects underwent a 3T MRI. WM morphometric data and DTI metrics were analyzed. We found that PSEN1 MC showed significant negative correlation between fractional anisotropy (FA) and the relative age ratio in the genus and body of corpus callosum and corona radiate (p <  0.05 Family-wise error correction (FWE) at cluster level) and positive correlation with mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AxD), and radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium of corpus callosum. SMC presented WM volume loss, reduced FA and increased MD, AxD, and RD in the anterior and posterior corona radiate, corpus callosum (p <  0.05 FWE) compared with NC. No significant differences were observed between AMC and NC in WM volume or DTI measures. These findings suggest that the integrity of the WM deteriorates linearly in PSEN1 ADAD from the early phases of the disease; thus DTI metrics might be useful to monitor the disease progression. However, the lack of significant alterations at the preclinical stages suggests that these indexes might not be good candidates for early markers of the disease. PMID:26923015

  18. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Becchetti, Andrea; Aracri, Patrizia; Meneghini, Simone; Brusco, Simone; Amadeo, Alida

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is a focal epilepsy with attacks typically arising in the frontal lobe during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. It is characterized by clusters of complex and stereotyped hypermotor seizures, frequently accompanied by sudden arousals. Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms may be also observed. Approximately 12% of the ADNFLE families carry mutations on genes coding for subunits of the heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). This is consistent with the widespread expression of these receptors, particularly the α4β2* subtype, in the neocortex and thalamus. However, understanding how mutant nAChRs lead to partial frontal epilepsy is far from being straightforward because of the complexity of the cholinergic regulation in both developing and mature brains. The relation with the sleep-waking cycle must be also explained. We discuss some possible pathogenetic mechanisms in the light of recent advances about the nAChR role in prefrontal regions as well as the studies carried out in murine models of ADNFLE. Functional evidence points to alterations in prefrontal GABA release, and the synaptic unbalance probably arises during the cortical circuit maturation. Although most of the available functional evidence concerns mutations on nAChR subunit genes, other genes have been recently implicated in the disease, such as KCNT1 (coding for a Na+-dependent K+ channel), DEPD5 (Disheveled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin Domain-containing protein 5), and CRH (Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone). Overall, the uncertainties about both the etiology and the pathogenesis of ADNFLE point to the current gaps in our knowledge the regulation of neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex. PMID:25717303

  19. Phosphodiesterase Isoform Regulation of Cell Proliferation and Fluid Secretion in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cibele S; Raman, Archana; Reif, Gail A; Magenheimer, Brenda S; White, Corey; Calvet, James P; Wallace, Darren P

    2016-04-01

    cAMP stimulates cell proliferation and Cl(-)-dependent fluid secretion, promoting the progressive enlargement of renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Intracellular cAMP levels are determined by the balance of cAMP synthesis by adenylyl cyclases and degradation by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Therefore, PDE isoform expression and activity strongly influence global and compartmentalized cAMP levels. We report here that PDE3 and PDE4 expression levels are lower in human ADPKD tissue and cells compared with those of normal human kidneys (NHKs), whereas PDE1 levels are not significantly different. Inhibition of PDE4 caused a greater increase in basal and vasopressin (AVP)-stimulated cAMP levels and Cl(-) secretion by ADPKD cells than inhibition of PDE1, and inhibition of PDE4 induced cyst-like dilations in cultured mouse Pkd1(-/-) embryonic kidneys. In contrast, inhibition of PDE1 caused greater stimulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and proliferation of ADPKD cells than inhibition of PDE4, and inhibition of PDE1 enhanced AVP-induced ERK activation. Notably, inhibition of PDE1, the only family of Ca(2+)-regulated PDEs, also induced a mitogenic response to AVP in NHK cells, similar to the effect of restricting intracellular Ca(2+). PDE1 coimmunoprecipitated with B-Raf and A-kinase anchoring protein 79, and AVP increased this interaction in ADPKD but not NHK cells. These data suggest that whereas PDE4 is the major PDE isoform involved in the regulation of global intracellular cAMP and Cl(-) secretion, PDE1 specifically affects the cAMP signal to the B-Raf/MEK/ERK pathway and regulates AVP-induced proliferation of ADPKD cells. PMID:26289612

  20. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sundal, Christina; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments. PMID:23331413

  1. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: No evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar-Singh, R.; He Wang; Humphries, P.; Farrar, G.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue the authors have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. They performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test they obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses they have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, they have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Z[sub m]) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, they have mapped (Z[sub m] = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. 27 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Evidence against a second autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.; Bhattacharya, S. ); Farrar, J.; Humphries, P. ); Denton, M. ); Gal, A. )

    1993-08-01

    In 1989 McWilliam et al. reported close linkage of the autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) locus to chromosome 3q marker D3S47 in a large Irish pedigree (McWilliam et al 1989). Subsequent studies confirmed linkage in two other adRP families (Lester et al 1990; Olsson et al. 1990). Shortly afterward, utations in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, mapping to 3q21-24, were implicated in disease causation, and it is now known that around one-third of adRP results from such mutations (Dryja et al. 1991; Sung et al. 1991; Inglchearn et al. 1992a). At that time, sequencing studies had failed to find rhodopsin mutations in the three families first linked to 3q. Several adRP families in which rhodopsin mutations had been found gave lod scores that, when pooled, had a peak of 4.47 at a theta of .12 (Inglehearn et al. 1992b). The apparent lack of mutations in families TCDM1, adRP3, and 20 together with the linkage data in these and the proved RHO-RP families, led to speculation that two adRP loci existed on chromosome 3q (Olsson et al. 1990; Inglehearn et al. 1992b). However this situation has been reversed by more recent analysis, since rhodopsin mutations have now been found in all three families. There is therefore no longer any evidence to support the hypothesis that a second adRP locus exists close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q.

  3. Radiologic and Clinical Bronchiectasis Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moua, Teng; Zand, Ladan; Hartman, Robert P.; Hartman, Thomas E.; Qin, Dingxin; Peikert, Tobias; Qian, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystin 1 and 2, the protein abnormalities associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), are also found in airway cilia and smooth muscle cells. There is evidence of increased radiologic bronchiectasis associated with ADPKD, though the clinical and functional implications of this association are unknown. We hypothesized an increased prevalence of both radiologic and clinical bronchiectasis is associated with APDKD as compared to non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD) controls. Materials and Methods A retrospective case-control study was performed at our institution involving consecutive ADPKD and non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients seen over a 13 year period with both chest CT and PFT. CTs were independently reviewed by two blinded thoracic radiologists. Manually collected clinical data included symptoms, smoker status, transplant history, and PFT findings. Results Ninety-two ADPKD and 95 non-ADPKD CKD control patients were compared. Increased prevalence of radiologic bronchiectasis, predominantly mild lower lobe disease, was found in ADPKD patients compared to CKD control (19 vs. 9%, P = 0.032, OR 2.49 (CI 1.1–5.8)). After adjustment for covariates, ADPKD was associated with increased risk of radiologic bronchiectasis (OR 2.78 (CI 1.16–7.12)). Symptomatic bronchiectasis occurred in approximately a third of ADPKD patients with radiologic disease. Smoking was associated with increased radiologic bronchiectasis in ADPKD patients (OR 3.59, CI 1.23–12.1). Conclusions Radiological bronchiectasis is increased in patients with ADPKD particularly those with smoking history as compared to non-ADPKD CKD controls. A third of such patients have symptomatic disease. Bronchiectasis should be considered in the differential in ADPKD patients with respiratory symptoms and smoking history. PMID:24747723

  4. Screening for Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Survey of 420 Nephrologists

    PubMed Central

    Flahault, Adrien; Trystram, Denis; Fouchard, Marie; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Nataf, François; Joly, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite a high prevalence of intracranial aneurysm (ICA) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), rupture events are rare. The current recommendations for ICA screening are based on expert opinions and studies with low levels of evidence. Objectives The aim of our study was to describe the attitudes of practicing nephrologists in Europe towards screening for ICA using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Methods We conducted a web-based survey among 1315 European French-speaking nephrologists and nephrology residents. An anonymous, electronic questionnaire including 24 independent questions related to ICA screening modalities, indications and participant profiles was sent by email between September and December 2014. Four hundred and twenty nephrologists (mostly from France) participated, including 31 nephrology residents; the response rate was 32%. Results Systematic screening for ICA was advocated by 28% of the nephrologists. A family history of ICA rupture, sudden death, stroke and migraine were consensual indications for screening (> 90% of the panel). In other clinical situations largely not covered by the recommendations (pregnancy, nephrectomy, kidney transplantation, cardiac or hepatic surgery, uncontrolled hypertension, lack of familial ADPKD history, at-risk activity, tobacco use), the attitudes towards screening were highly divergent. ICA screening was influenced by nephrologists experience with ADPKD and by their practice setting. The majority of participants (57%) would not repeat a normal ICA screening. Only a few participants (22%) knew that non-contrast MRA was the reference diagnostic tool for ICA screening, whereas most participants thought that contrast enhancement was necessary to screen for ICA. The results from the nephrology residents were analyzed separately and yielded similar results. Conclusion This practice survey revealed that most nephrologists follow the current recommendations for the initial screening of

  5. Suitability of Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease for Renal Transcatheter Arterial Embolization.

    PubMed

    Suwabe, Tatsuya; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Mise, Koki; Ueno, Toshiharu; Sumida, Keiichi; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Hayami, Noriko; Hoshino, Junichi; Kawada, Masahiro; Imafuku, Aya; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Hasegawa, Eiko; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei

    2016-07-01

    In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), massive renal enlargement is a serious problem. Renal transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) can reduce renal volume (RV), but effectiveness varies widely, and the reasons remain unclear. We investigated factors affecting renal volume reduction rate (RVRR) after renal TAE in all 449 patients with ADPKD who received renal TAE at Toranomon Hospital from January of 2006 to July of 2013, including 228 men and 221 women (mean age =57.0±9.1 years old). One year after renal TAE, the RVRR ranged from 3.9% to 84.8%, and the least squares mean RVRR calculated using a linear mixed model was 45.5% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 44.2% to 46.8%). Multivariate analysis using the linear mixed model revealed that RVRR was affected by the presence of large cysts with wall thickening (regression coefficient [RC], -6.10; 95% CI, -9.04 to -3.16; P<0.001), age (RC, -0.82; 95% CI, -1.03 to -0.60; P<0.001), dialysis duration (RC, -0.10; 95% CI, -0.18 to -0.03; P<0.01), systolic BP (RC, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.59; P<0.001), and the number of microcoils used for renal TAE (RC, 1.35; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.86; P<0.001). Significantly more microcoils were needed to achieve renal TAE in patients with younger age and shorter dialysis duration. In conclusion, cyst wall thickening had an important effect on cyst volume reduction. Renal TAE was more effective in patients who were younger, had shorter dialysis duration, or had hypertension, parameters that might associate with cyst wall stiffness and renal artery blood flow. PMID:26620095

  6. The impact of type II diabetes mellitus in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Berenice; Helal, Imed; McFann, Kim; Wang, Wei; Yan, Xiang-Dong; Schrier, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Background The epidemic of obesity and diabetes is increasing within the USA and worldwide. We have previously shown that body mass index has increased significantly in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) subjects seen at our center in more recent years. However, the impact of Type II diabetes in ADPKD patients has not been well studied. Methods This retrospective cohort study compared clinical characteristics in 44 pre-renal transplant patients with ADPKD and diabetes and 88 age- and sex-matched non-diabetic patients with ADPKD who were seen at the University of Colorado between 1977 and 2008. The primary outcomes in this study were renal volume determined by renal ultrasonography, renal function assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate and time to onset of end-stage renal disease or death by Kaplan–Meier analyses. Results Diabetic patients had significantly larger kidney volumes than those with ADPKD alone [geometric mean (95% confidence interval (CI)]: 2456 (1510–3992) versus 1358 (1186–1556) cm3, P = 0.02. Among those whose age at hypertension diagnosis was known, the diabetic ADPKD patients had earlier median (95% CI) age at onset of hypertension compared to those with ADPKD alone: 32.5 (28–40) versus 38 (35–42) years, P = 0.04. Diabetic ADPKD patients tended to have an earlier median age of death than those with ADPKD alone. Conclusions Patients with ADPKD and type II diabetes have larger renal volumes, earlier age at diagnosis of hypertension and may die at a younger age compared to those patients with ADPKD alone. This study emphasizes the importance of diabetes risk management in ADPKD. PMID:22207329

  7. Does increased water intake prevent disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease?

    PubMed Central

    Higashihara, Eiji; Nutahara, Kikuo; Tanbo, Mitsuhiro; Hara, Hidehiko; Miyazaki, Isao; Kobayashi, Kuninori; Nitatori, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical effects of increased water intake on autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) progression are unknown. Methods ADPKD patients with creatinine clearance ≧50 mL/min/1.73 m2 were divided into high (H-, n = 18) and free (F-, n = 16) water-intake groups, mainly according to their preference. Prior to the study, 30 patients underwent annual evaluation of total kidney volume (TKV) and 24-h urine for an average of 33 months. During the 1-year study period, TKV and 24-h urine were analyzed at the beginning and end of the study and every 4 months, respectively. Results During the pre-study period, urine volume (UV) in the H-group was higher (P = 0.034), but TKV and kidney function and their slopes were not significantly different between the two groups. After the study commenced, UV further increased (P < 0.001) in the H-group but not in the F-group. During the study period, TKV and kidney function slopes were not significantly different between the two groups (primary endpoint). Plasma copeptin was lower (P = 0.024) in the H-group than in the F-group. TKV and kidney function slopes became worse (P = 0.047 and 0.011, respectively) after high water intake (H-group) but not in the F-group. High UV was associated with increased urine sodium, and urine sodium positively correlated with the % TKV slope (P = 0.014). Conclusions Although the main endpoint was not significant, high water intake enhanced disease progression in the H-group when compared with the pre-study period. These findings necessitate a long-term randomized study before drawing a final conclusion. PMID:24739484

  8. A new locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on the short arm of chromosome 17.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J; Goliath, R; Beighton, P; Ramesar, R

    1994-06-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous retinopathies, some of which have been shown to result from mutations in two different known retinal genes, rhodopsin (3q) and peripherin-rds (6p). Three additional anonymous loci at 7p, 7q and pericentric 8 have been implicated by linkage studies. There are still, however, a few families in which all known loci have been excluded. In this report we present data indicating a location, on the short arm of chromosome 17, for the autosomal dominant RP (ADRP) locus in a large South African (SA) family of British ancestry. Positive two-point lod scores have been obtained for nine markers (D17S938, Z = 5.43; D17S796, Z = 4.82; D17S849, Z = 3.6; D17S786, Z = 3.55; TP53, Z = 3.55; D17S578, Z = 3.29; D17S960, Z = 3.16; D17S926, Z = 1.51; D17S804, Z = 0.47 all at theta = 0.10 except D17S804 and D17S926, theta = 0.20). These data provide definitive evidence for the localization of an ADRP gene on chromosome 17p. The human recoverin gene has been localized to 17p13.1 and was consequently a prime candidate for ADRP in the family studied. However, mutation screening of the three exons of this gene failed to produce any evidence of recoverin being the gene involved in the pathogenesis of ADRP in this SA family. PMID:7951236

  9. [Pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment options for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Noël, Natacha; Rieu, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the leading genetic cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Its prevalence is evaluated according to studies and population between 1/1000 and 1/4000 live births and it accounts for 6 to 8% of incident ESRD patients in developed countries. ADPKD is characterized by numerous cysts in both kidneys and various extrarenal manifestations that are detailed in this review. Clinico-radiological and genetic diagnosis are also discussed. Mutations in the PKD1 and PKD2 codifying for polycystin-1 (PC-1) and polycystin-2 (PC-2) are responsible for the 85 and 15% of ADPKD cases, respectively. In primary cilia of normal kidney epithelial cells, PC-1 and PC-2 interact forming a complex involved in flow- and cilia-dependant signalling pathways where intracellular calcium and cAMP play a central role. Alteration of these multiple signal transduction pathways leads to cystogenesis accompanied by dysregulated planar cell polarity, excessive cell proliferation and fluid secretion, and pathogenic interactions of epithelial cells with an abnormal extracellular matrix. The mass effect of expanding cyst is responsible for the decline in glomerular filtration rate that occurs late in the course of the disease. For many decades, the treatment for ADPKD aims to lessen the condition's symptoms, limit kidney damage, and prevent complications. Recently, the development of promising specific treatment raises the hope to slow the growth of cysts and delay the disease. Treatment strategies targeting cAMP signalling such as vasopressin receptor antagonists or somatostatin analogs have been tested successfully in clinical trials with relative safety. Newer treatments supported by preclinical trials will become available in the next future. Recognizing early markers of renal progression (clinical, imaging, and genetic markers) to identify high-risk patients and multidrug approaches with synergistic effects may provide new opportunities

  10. A Novel Retinal Oscillation Mechanism in an Autosomal Dominant Photoreceptor Degeneration Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hung-Ya; Chen, Yu-Jiun; McQuiston, Adam R; Chiao, Chuan-Chin; Chen, Ching-Kang

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown in rd1 and rd10 models of photoreceptor degeneration (PD) that inner retinal neurons display spontaneous and rhythmic activities. Furthermore, the rhythmic activity has been shown to require the gap junction protein connexin 36, which is likely located in AII amacrine cells (AII-ACs). In the present study, an autosomal dominant PD model called rhoΔCTA, whose rods overexpress a C-terminally truncated mutant rhodopsin and degenerate with a rate similar to that of rd1, was used to investigate the generality and mechanisms of heightened inner retinal activity following PD. To fluorescently identify cholinergic starburst amacrine cells (SACs), the rhoΔCTA mouse was introduced into a combined ChAT-IRES-Cre and Ai9 background. In this mouse, we observed excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) oscillation and non-rhythmic inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) in both ON- and OFF-SACs. The IPSCs were more noticeable in OFF- than in ON-SACs. Similar to reported retinal ganglion cell (RGC) oscillation in rd1 mice, EPSC oscillation was synaptically driven by glutamate and sensitive to blockade of NaV channels and gap junctions. These data suggest that akin to rd1 mice, AII-AC is a prominent oscillator in rhoΔCTA mice. Surprisingly, OFF-SAC but not ON-SAC EPSC oscillation could readily be enhanced by GABAergic blockade. More importantly, weakening the AII-AC gap junction network by activating retinal dopamine receptors abolished oscillations in ON-SACs but not in OFF-SACs. Furthermore, the latter persisted in the presence of flupirtine, an M-type potassium channel activator recently reported to dampen intrinsic AII-AC bursting. These data suggest the existence of a novel oscillation mechanism in mice with PD. PMID:26793064

  11. A Novel Retinal Oscillation Mechanism in an Autosomal Dominant Photoreceptor Degeneration Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Hung-Ya; Chen, Yu-Jiun; McQuiston, Adam R.; Chiao, Chuan-Chin; Chen, Ching-Kang

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown in rd1 and rd10 models of photoreceptor degeneration (PD) that inner retinal neurons display spontaneous and rhythmic activities. Furthermore, the rhythmic activity has been shown to require the gap junction protein connexin 36, which is likely located in AII amacrine cells (AII-ACs). In the present study, an autosomal dominant PD model called rhoΔCTA, whose rods overexpress a C-terminally truncated mutant rhodopsin and degenerate with a rate similar to that of rd1, was used to investigate the generality and mechanisms of heightened inner retinal activity following PD. To fluorescently identify cholinergic starburst amacrine cells (SACs), the rhoΔCTA mouse was introduced into a combined ChAT-IRES-Cre and Ai9 background. In this mouse, we observed excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) oscillation and non-rhythmic inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) in both ON- and OFF-SACs. The IPSCs were more noticeable in OFF- than in ON-SACs. Similar to reported retinal ganglion cell (RGC) oscillation in rd1 mice, EPSC oscillation was synaptically driven by glutamate and sensitive to blockade of NaV channels and gap junctions. These data suggest that akin to rd1 mice, AII-AC is a prominent oscillator in rhoΔCTA mice. Surprisingly, OFF-SAC but not ON-SAC EPSC oscillation could readily be enhanced by GABAergic blockade. More importantly, weakening the AII-AC gap junction network by activating retinal dopamine receptors abolished oscillations in ON-SACs but not in OFF-SACs. Furthermore, the latter persisted in the presence of flupirtine, an M-type potassium channel activator recently reported to dampen intrinsic AII-AC bursting. These data suggest the existence of a novel oscillation mechanism in mice with PD. PMID:26793064

  12. Reduced methotrexate clearance and renal impairment in a boy with osteosarcoma and earlier undetected autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

    PubMed

    Alberer, Martin; Hoefele, Julia; Bergmann, Carsten; Hartrampf, Steffen; Hilberath, Jutta; Pawlita, Ingo; Albert, Michael H; Benz, Marcus R; Weber, Lutz T; Schmid, Irene

    2010-11-01

    We report a 12-year-old boy with osteoblastic osteosarcoma of the right femur. He was started on chemotherapy according to the EURAMOS/COSS 1 protocol. Chemotherapy with doxorubicin/cisplatin resulted in reversible acute renal failure and methotrexate levels were repeatedly elevated. Family history suggested an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Genetic testing revealed a novel mutation c.10707_10712del (p.Val3569_3570del) in exon 36 of the PKD1 gene. Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may be at risk for acute renal failure during chemotherapy without signs of renal impairment. A careful family history is important to exclude risk factors for renal impairment before introducing high-dose chemotherapy. PMID:20921908

  13. A novel frameshift mutation of POU4F3 gene associated with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee Keun; Park, Hong-Joon; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Park, Rekil; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2010-06-04

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the transcription factor POU4F3 gene are associated with non-syndromic hearing loss in humans; however, there have been few reports of mutations in this gene worldwide. We performed a mutation analysis of the POU4F3 gene in 42 unrelated Koreans with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss, identifying a novel 14-bp deletion mutation in exon 2 (c.662del14) in one patient. Audiometric examination revealed severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in this patient. The novel mutation led to a truncated protein that lacked both functional POU domains. We further investigated the functional distinction between wild-type and mutant POU4F3 proteins using in vitro assays. The wild-type protein was completely localized in the nucleus, while the truncation of protein seriously affected its nuclear localization. In addition, the mutant failed to activate reporter gene expression. This is the first report of a POU4F3 mutation in Asia, and moreover our data suggest that further investigation will need to delineate ethnicity-specific genetic background for autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss within Asian populations.

  14. Mutations of RagA GTPase in mTORC1 Pathway Are Associated with Autosomal Dominant Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Huan; Huang, Chukai; Yin, Shengjie; Liang, Jiajian; Xu, Ciyan; Huang, Yuqiang; Cen, Ling-Ping; Zheng, Ce; Zhang, Shaobin; Pang, Chi-Pui; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2016-01-01

    Cataracts are a significant public health problem with no proven methods for prevention. Discovery of novel disease mechanisms to delineate new therapeutic targets is of importance in cataract prevention and therapy. Herein, we report that mutations in the RagA GTPase (RRAGA), a key regulator of the mechanistic rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), are associated with autosomal dominant cataracts. We performed whole exome sequencing in a family with autosomal dominant juvenile-onset cataracts, and identified a novel p.Leu60Arg mutation in RRAGA that co-segregated with the disease, after filtering against the dbSNP database, and at least 123,000 control chromosomes from public and in-house exome databases. In a follow-up direct screening of RRAGA in another 22 families and 142 unrelated patients with congenital or juvenile-onset cataracts, RRAGA was found to be mutated in two unrelated patients (p.Leu60Arg and c.-16G>A respectively). Functional studies in human lens epithelial cells revealed that the RRAGA mutations exerted deleterious effects on mTORC1 signaling, including increased relocation of RRAGA to the lysosomes, up-regulated mTORC1 phosphorylation, down-regulated autophagy, altered cell growth or compromised promoter activity. These data indicate that the RRAGA mutations, associated with autosomal dominant cataracts, play a role in the disease by acting through disruption of mTORC1 signaling. PMID:27294265

  15. Mutations of RagA GTPase in mTORC1 Pathway Are Associated with Autosomal Dominant Cataracts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Huan; Huang, Chukai; Zhang, Bining; Yin, Shengjie; Liang, Jiajian; Xu, Ciyan; Huang, Yuqiang; Cen, Ling-Ping; Ng, Tsz-Kin; Zheng, Ce; Zhang, Shaobin; Chen, Haoyu; Pang, Chi-Pui; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2016-06-01

    Cataracts are a significant public health problem with no proven methods for prevention. Discovery of novel disease mechanisms to delineate new therapeutic targets is of importance in cataract prevention and therapy. Herein, we report that mutations in the RagA GTPase (RRAGA), a key regulator of the mechanistic rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), are associated with autosomal dominant cataracts. We performed whole exome sequencing in a family with autosomal dominant juvenile-onset cataracts, and identified a novel p.Leu60Arg mutation in RRAGA that co-segregated with the disease, after filtering against the dbSNP database, and at least 123,000 control chromosomes from public and in-house exome databases. In a follow-up direct screening of RRAGA in another 22 families and 142 unrelated patients with congenital or juvenile-onset cataracts, RRAGA was found to be mutated in two unrelated patients (p.Leu60Arg and c.-16G>A respectively). Functional studies in human lens epithelial cells revealed that the RRAGA mutations exerted deleterious effects on mTORC1 signaling, including increased relocation of RRAGA to the lysosomes, up-regulated mTORC1 phosphorylation, down-regulated autophagy, altered cell growth or compromised promoter activity. These data indicate that the RRAGA mutations, associated with autosomal dominant cataracts, play a role in the disease by acting through disruption of mTORC1 signaling. PMID:27294265

  16. Mutation in the zonadhesin-like domain of alpha-tectorin associated with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Alloisio, N; Morlé, L; Bozon, M; Godet, J; Verhoeven, K; Van Camp, G; Plauchu, H; Muller, P; Collet, L; Lina-Granade, G

    1999-01-01

    A gene responsible for autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment in two families (DFNA8 and DFNA12) has recently been identified as TECTA encoding alpha-tectorin, a major component of the tectorial membrane. In these families, missense mutations within the zona pellucida domain of alpha-tectorin were associated with stable severe mid-frequency hearing loss. The present study reports linkage to DFNA12 in a new family with autosomal dominant high frequency hearing loss progressing from mild to moderate severity. The candidate region refined to 3.8 cM still contained the TECTA gene. A missense mutation (C1619S) was identified in the zonadhesin-like domain. This mutation abolishes the first of the vicinal cysteines (1619Cys-Gly-Leu- 1622Cys) present in the D4 von Willebrand factor (vWf) type D repeat. These results further support the involvement of TECTA mutations in autosomal dominant hearing impairment, and suggest that vicinal cysteines are involved in tectorial membrane matrix assembly. PMID:10196713

  17. Simultaneous Native Nephrectomy and Kidney Transplantation in Patients With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Zerbo, Domenico; Basile, Giusi; Gozzo, Cecilia; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Sanfiorenzo, Angelo; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous unilateral nephrectomy with kidney transplantation and to determine the effect of this procedure on perioperative morbidity and mortality and graft and patient survival. Methods Between January 2000 and May 2015, 145 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) underwent kidney transplantation. Of those, 40 (27.5%) underwent concurrent ipsilateral native nephrectomy (group NT). Patients in group NT were compared with patients with ADPKD not undergoing concurrent nephrectomy (group NT-) and asymptomatic patients undergoing pretransplant nephrectomy (group PNT). Results The average follow-up was 66 months. The graft survival rate at 1 and 5 years was 95% and 87.5% versus 93% and 76.2% in the NT and NT- groups, respectively (P = .903 and P = .544, respectively); 1-year patient survival was 100% for NT and 97% for NT- patients (P = .288), whereas 5-year patient survival was 100% and 92% for NT and NT- groups, respectively (P = .128). After propensity score matching (34 patients per group) no significant differences were observed in 1-year (97.1% in NT and 94.1%; P = 1) and 5-year (88.2% in NT and 91.2% in NT-; P = 1) graft survival, and in 1-year (100% for both groups; P = 1) and 5-year (100% in NT and 94.1% in NT-; P = 1) patient survival. Perioperative mortality was 0% among NT and 1.2% among NT- patients, whereas perioperative surgical complications were similar in both groups. One- and 5-year graft and patient survival were similar between the NT and PNT groups, but patients in the PNT group had significantly lower levels of hemoglobin and residual diuresis volumes at the time of transplant. Moreover, PNT patients had a longer pretransplant dialysis and a longer time on the waiting list. Conclusions Simultaneous unilateral nephrectomy does not have a negative effect on patient and graft survival in patients with ADPKD and is associated with low morbidity. Pretransplant nephrectomy should

  18. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Senno, Laura del; Aguiari, Gianluca

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  19. Two novel mutations of CLCN7 gene in Chinese families with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (type II).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Shao, Chong; Zheng, Yan; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO-II) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or rugger-jersey spine), the pelvis ("bone-within-bone" structures) and the skull base. Chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) has been reported to be the causative gene. In this study, we aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation in four Chinese families with ADO-II. All 25 exons of the CLCN7 gene, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified and sequenced directly in four probands from the Chinese families with ADO-II. The mutation site was then identified in other family members and 250 healthy controls. In family 1, a known missense mutation c.296A>G in exon 4 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in a tyrosine (UAU) to cysteine (UGU) substitution at p.99 (Y99C); the mutation was also identified in his affected father. In family 2, a novel missense mutation c.865G>C in exon 10 was identified in the proband, resulting in a valine (GUC) to leucine (CUC) substitution at p.289 (V289L); the mutation was also identified in her healthy mother and sister. In family 3, a novel missense mutation c.1625C>T in exon 17 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in an alanine (GCG) to valine (GUG) substitution at p.542 (A542V); the mutation was also identified in her father. In family 4, a hot spot, R767W (c.2299C>T, CGG>TGG), in exon 24 was found in the proband which once again proved the susceptibility of the site or the similar genetic background in different races. Moreover, two novel mutations, V289L and A542V, occurred at a highly conserved position, found by a comparison of the protein sequences from eight vertebrates, and were predicted to have a pathogenic effect by PolyPhen-2 software, which showed "probably damaging" with a score of approximately 1. These mutation sites were not identified in 250 healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that the novel missense

  20. Hyperaldosteronism and cardiovascular risk in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Silvia; Petramala, Luigi; Mastroluca, Daniela; Petraglia, Emanuela; Di Gaeta, Alessandro; Indino, Elena; Panebianco, Valeria; Ciccariello, Mauro; Shahabadi, Hossein H; Galani, Alessandro; Letizia, Claudio; D'Angelo, Anna Rita

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is commonly associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), often discovered before the onset of renal failure, albeit the pathogenetic mechanisms are not well elucidated. Hyperaldosteronism in ADPKD may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, and progression of cardiorenal disease. The aim of study was to evaluate the prevalence of primary aldosteronism (PA) in ADPKD patients and identify some surrogate biomarkers of cardiovascular risk.We have enrolled 27 hypertensive ADPKD patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 60 mL/min, evaluating the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), inflammatory indexes, nutritional status, homocysteine (Hcy), homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), mineral metabolism, microalbuminuria, and surrogate markers of atherosclerosis [carotid intima media thickness (cIMT), ankle/brachial index (ABI), flow mediated dilation (FMD), renal resistive index (RRI) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI)]. Furthermore, we have carried out the morpho-functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high-field 3 T Magnetom Avanto.We have divided patients into group A, with normal plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) and group B with PA, present in 9 (33%) of overall ADPKD patients. Respect to group A, group B showed a significant higher mean value of LVMI, HOMA-IR and Hcy (P = 0.001, P = 0.004, P = 0.018; respectively), and a lower value of FMD and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-VitD) (P = 0.037, P = 0.019; respectively) with a higher prevalence of non-dipper pattern at Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) (65% vs 40%, P < 0.05) at an early stage of the disease.In this study, we showed a high prevalence of PA in ADPKD patients, associated to higher LVMI, HOMA-IR, Hcy, lower FMD, and 25-OH-VitD, considered as surrogate markers of atherosclerosis, compared to ADPKD patients with normal PAC values. Our

  1. COL4A4 gene study of a European population: description of new mutations causing autosomal dominant Alport syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Consolación; Bueno, Elena; Felipe, Carmen; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autosomal forms of Alport syndrome represent 20% of all patients (15% recessive and 5% dominant). They are caused by mutations in the COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes, which encode a-3 and a-4 collagen IV chains of the glomerular basement membrane, cochlea and eye. Thin basement membrane nephropathy may affect up to 1% of the population. The pattern of inheritance in the 40% of cases is the same as autosomal dominant Alport syndrome: heterozygous mutations in these genes. The aim of this study is to detect new pathogenic mutations in the COL4A4 gene in the patients previously diagnosed with autosomal Alport syndrome and thin basement membrane nephropathy in our hospital. Methods: We conducted a clinical and genetic study in eleven patients belonging to six unrelated families with aforementioned clinical symptoms and a negative study of COL4A3 gene. The molecular study was made by conformation of sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) and direct sequencing of the fragments that show an altered electrophoretic migration pattern. Results: We found two pathogenic mutations, not yet described: IVS3 + 1G > C is a replacement of Guanine to Cytosine in position +1 of intron 3, in the splicing region, which leads to a pathogenic mutation. c.4267C > T; p.P1423S is a missense mutation, also considered pathogenic. We also found seven new polymorphisms. Conclusions: We describe two new pathogenic mutations, responsible for autosomal dominant Alport syndrome. The other families of the study were undiagnosed owing to problems in the method employed and the possibility of mutations in other genes, giving rise to other diseases with similar symptoms. PMID:25755845

  2. Mutations in the pre-mRNA splicing factor gene PRPC8 in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP13).

    PubMed

    McKie, A B; McHale, J C; Keen, T J; Tarttelin, E E; Goliath, R; van Lith-Verhoeven, J J; Greenberg, J; Ramesar, R S; Hoyng, C B; Cremers, F P; Mackey, D A; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C; Markham, A F; Inglehearn, C F

    2001-07-15

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of the peripheral retina leading to night blindness and loss of visual fields. With an incidence of approximately 1 in 4000, RP can be inherited in X-linked, autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive modes. The RP13 locus for autosomal dominant RP (adRP) was placed on chromosome 17p13.3 by linkage mapping in a large South African adRP family. Using a positional cloning and candidate gene strategy, we have identified seven different missense mutations in the splicing factor gene PRPC8 in adRP families. Three of the mutations cosegregate within three RP13 linked families including the original large South African pedigree, and four additional mutations have been identified in other unrelated adRP families. The seven mutations are clustered within a 14 codon stretch within the last exon of this large 7 kb transcript. The altered amino acid residues at the C-terminus exhibit a high degree of conservation across species as diverse as humans, Arabidopsis and trypanosome, suggesting that some functional significance is associated with this part of the protein. These mutations in this ubiquitous and highly conserved splicing factor offer compelling evidence for a novel pathway to retinal degeneration. PMID:11468273

  3. Weill-Marchesani syndrome - possible linkage of the autosomal dominant form to 15q21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Rust, K.

    1996-10-02

    Weill-Marchesani syndrome comprises short stature, brachydactyly, microspherophakia, glaucoma, and ectopia lentis is regarded as an autosomal recessive trait. We present two families each with affected individuals in 3 generations demonstrating autosomal dominant inheritance of Weill-Marchesani syndrome. Linkage analysis in these 2 families suggests a gene for Weill-Marchesani syndrome maps to 15q21.1. The dislocated lenses and connective tissue disorder in these families suggests that fibrillin-1 and microfibril-associated protein 1, which both map to 15q21.1, are candidate genes for Weill-Marchesani syndrome. Immunohistochemistry staining of skin sections from family 1 showed an apparent decrease in fibrillin staining compared to control individuals. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. High prevalence of mutations in peripherin/RDS in autosomal dominant macular dystrophies in a Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Gamundi, María José; Hernan, Imma; Muntanyola, Marta; Trujillo, María José; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Ayuso, Carmen; Baiget, Montserrat

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the peripherin/retinal degeneration slow (RDS) gene are a known cause of various types of central retinal dystrophies. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene in Spanish patients with different types of autosomal dominant macular dystrophy. Methods Ophthalmic and electrophysiological examination was performed in patients from 61 unrelated autosomal dominant macular dystrophy (adMD) Spanish families. Screening for mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and direct genomic sequencing was performed in index patients and extended to the family when positive. Results We report four novel mutations in peripherin/RDS and a relatively high frequency (23%) of mutations in this gene in families with adMD. Thirteen different mutations were found in fifteen adMD families. Three novel missense, four nonsense and a cis-acting splicing mutation IVS2+2T>C, were found in a Spanish population while five more missense mutations were also reported in other populations. The Arg142Trp and Arg172Trp mutations, present in several populations, were both detected in two independent Spanish families. All the missense mutations produce an amino acid substitution in the second intradiscal loop of the peripherin, while the nonsense mutations presumably generate a truncated protein. Conclusions A high frequency (23%) of mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene was found in a cohort of 61 unrelated patients with various types of autosomal dominant central retinal dystrophies as compared with a low prevalence (1.3%) of mutations in this gene causing retinitis pigmentosa in a Spanish population. Different macular dystrophy phenotypes according to the mutations in peripherin/RDS are shown. However, a limited phenotype variation was observed for these mutations within the family. PMID:17653047

  5. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind

    PubMed Central

    Quartier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. PMID:25645939

  6. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Bertrand; Quartier, Pierre; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-02-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. PMID:25645939

  7. Early structural anomalies observed by high-resolution imaging in two related cases of autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Pyo; Lee, Winston; Bae, Eun Jin; Greenstein, Vivianne; Sin, Bum Ho; Chang, Stanley; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the use of adaptive-optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) to investigate RHO, D190N autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa in two siblings (11 and 16 years old, respectively). Each patient exhibited distinct hyperautofluorescence patterns in which the outer borders corresponded to inner segment ellipsoid band disruption. Areas within the hyperautofluorescence patterns exhibited normal photoreceptor outer segments and retinal pigment epithelium. However, AO-SLO imaging revealed noticeable spacing irregularities in the cone mosaic. AO-SLO allows researchers to characterize retinal structural abnormalities with precision so that early structural changes in retinitis pigmentosa can be identified and reconciled with genetic findings. PMID:25215869

  8. Whole Exome Sequencing Identified MCM2 as a Novel Causative Gene for Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Deafness in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cheng; Chen, Siqi; Qi, Yu; Liu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    We report the genetic analysis of autosomal dominant, nonsyndromic, progressive sensorineural hearing loss in a Chinese family. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a missense variant (c.130C>T, p.R44C) in the MCM2 gene, which has a pro-apoptosis effect and is involved in the initiation of eukaryotic genome replication. This missense variant is very likely to be the disease causing variant. It segregated with hearing loss in this pedigree, and was not found in the dbSNP database or databases of genomes and SNP in the Chinese population, in 76 patients with sporadic hearing loss, or in 145 normal individuals. We performed western blot and immunofluorescence to test the MCM2 protein expression in the cochlea of rats and guinea pigs, demonstrating that MCM2 was widely expressed in the cochlea and was also surprisingly expressed in the cytoplasm of terminally differentiated hair cells. We then transiently expressed the variant MCM2 cDNA in HEK293 cells, and found that these cells displayed a slight increase in apoptosis without any changes in proliferation or cell cycle, supporting the view that this variant is pathogenic. In summary, we have identified MCM2 as a novel gene responsible for nonsyndromic hearing loss of autosomal dominant inheritance in a Chinese family. PMID:26196677

  9. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Mutation in EYA4 as a Novel Cause of Autosomal Dominant Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Hu, Jiongjiong; Xia, Wenjun; Hao, Lili; Ma, Jing; Ma, Duan; Ma, Zhaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss is highly heterogeneous, and eyes absent 4 (EYA4) is a disease-causing gene. Most EYA4 mutations founded in the Eya-homologous region, however, no deafness causative missense mutation in variable region of EYA4 have previously been found. In this study, we identified a pathogenic missense mutation located in the variable region of the EYA4 gene for the first time in a four-generation Chinese family with 57 members. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on samples from one unaffected and two affected individuals to systematically search for deafness susceptibility genes, and the candidate mutations and the co-segregation of the phenotype were verified by polymerase chain reaction amplification and by Sanger sequencing in all of the family members. Then, we identified a novel EYA4 mutation in exon 8, c.511G>C; p.G171R, which segregated with postlingual and progressive autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). This report is the first to describe a missense mutation in the variable region domain of the EYA4 gene, which is not highly conserved in many species, indicating that the potential unconserved role of 171G>R in human EYA4 function is extremely important. PMID:25961296

  10. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Mutation in EYA4 as a Novel Cause of Autosomal Dominant Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenjun; Hao, Lili; Ma, Jing; Ma, Duan; Ma, Zhaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss is highly heterogeneous, and eyes absent 4 (EYA4) is a disease-causing gene. Most EYA4 mutations founded in the Eya-homologous region, however, no deafness causative missense mutation in variable region of EYA4 have previously been found. In this study, we identified a pathogenic missense mutation located in the variable region of the EYA4 gene for the first time in a four-generation Chinese family with 57 members. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on samples from one unaffected and two affected individuals to systematically search for deafness susceptibility genes, and the candidate mutations and the co-segregation of the phenotype were verified by polymerase chain reaction amplification and by Sanger sequencing in all of the family members. Then, we identified a novel EYA4 mutation in exon 8, c.511G>C; p.G171R, which segregated with postlingual and progressive autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). This report is the first to describe a missense mutation in the variable region domain of the EYA4 gene, which is not highly conserved in many species, indicating that the potential unconserved role of 171G>R in human EYA4 function is extremely important. PMID:25961296