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Sample records for avatar-mediated networking increasing

  1. Avatar-Mediated Networking: Increasing Social Presence and Interpersonal Trust in Net-Based Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bente, Gary; Ruggenberg, Sabine; Kramer, Nicole C.; Eschenburg, Felix

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzes the influence of avatars on social presence, interpersonal trust, perceived communication quality, nonverbal behavior, and visual attention in Net-based collaborations using a comparative approach. A real-time communication window including a special avatar interface was integrated into a shared collaborative workspace.…

  2. Minimal Increase Network Coding for Dynamic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Because of the mobility, computing power and changeable topology of dynamic networks, it is difficult for random linear network coding (RLNC) in static networks to satisfy the requirements of dynamic networks. To alleviate this problem, a minimal increase network coding (MINC) algorithm is proposed. By identifying the nonzero elements of an encoding vector, it selects blocks to be encoded on the basis of relationship between the nonzero elements that the controls changes in the degrees of the blocks; then, the encoding time is shortened in a dynamic network. The results of simulations show that, compared with existing encoding algorithms, the MINC algorithm provides reduced computational complexity of encoding and an increased probability of delivery. PMID:26867211

  3. Minimal Increase Network Coding for Dynamic Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoyin; Fan, Xu; Wu, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Because of the mobility, computing power and changeable topology of dynamic networks, it is difficult for random linear network coding (RLNC) in static networks to satisfy the requirements of dynamic networks. To alleviate this problem, a minimal increase network coding (MINC) algorithm is proposed. By identifying the nonzero elements of an encoding vector, it selects blocks to be encoded on the basis of relationship between the nonzero elements that the controls changes in the degrees of the blocks; then, the encoding time is shortened in a dynamic network. The results of simulations show that, compared with existing encoding algorithms, the MINC algorithm provides reduced computational complexity of encoding and an increased probability of delivery. PMID:26867211

  4. Networking for philanthropy: increasing volunteer behavior via social networking sites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoojung; Lee, Wei-Na

    2014-03-01

    Social networking sites (SNSs) provide a unique social venue to engage the young generation in philanthropy through their networking capabilities. An integrated model that incorporates social capital into the Theory of Reasoned Action is developed to explain volunteer behavior through social networks. As expected, volunteer behavior was predicted by volunteer intention, which was influenced by attitudes and subjective norms. In addition, social capital, an outcome of the extensive use of SNSs, was as an important driver of users' attitude and subjective norms toward volunteering via SNSs. PMID:24102569

  5. Increases in Network Ties Are Associated With Increased Cohesion Among Intervention Participants.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Sabina B; Barkin, Shari L; Sommer, Evan C; Thompson, Jessica R; Valente, Thomas W

    2016-04-01

    Objective Many behavior change programs are delivered in group settings to manage implementation costs and to foster support and interactions among group members in order to facilitate behavior change. Understanding the group dynamics that evolve in group settings (e.g., weight management, Alcoholics Anonymous) is important, yet rarely measured. This article examined the relationship between social network ties and group cohesion in a group-based intervention to prevent obesity in children.Method The data reported are process measures from an ongoing community-based randomized controlled trial. A total of 305 parents with a child (3-6 years) at risk of developing obesity were assigned to an intervention that taught parents healthy lifestyles. Parents met weekly for 12 weeks in small consistent groups. Two measures were collected at Weeks 3 and 6: a social network survey (people in the group with whom one discusses healthy lifestyles) and the validated Perceived Cohesion Scale. We used lagged random and fixed effects regression models to analyze the data.Results Cohesion increased from 6.51 to 6.71 (t= 4.4,p< .01). Network nominations tended to increase over the 3-week period in each network. In the combined discussion and advice network, the number of nominations increased from 1.76 to 1.95 (z= 2.59,p< .01). Cohesion at Week 3 was the strongest predictor of cohesion at Week 6 (b= 0.55,p< .01). Number of new network nominations at Week 6 was positively related to cohesion at Week 6 (b= 0.06,p< .01). In sum, being able to name new network contacts was associated with feelings of cohesion.Conclusion This is the first study to demonstrate how network changes affect perceived group cohesion within a behavioral intervention. Given that many behavioral interventions occur in group settings, intentionally building new social networks could be promising to augment desired outcomes. PMID:26286298

  6. Increases in New Social Network Ties are Associated with Increased Cohesion among Intervention Participants

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Sabina B.; Barkin, Shari L.; Sommer, Evan C.; Thompson, Jessica R.; Valente, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many behavior change programs are delivered in group settings to manage implementation costs and to foster support and interactions among group members to facilitate behavior change. Understanding the group dynamics that evolve in group settings (e.g., weight management, Alcoholics Anonymous) is important, yet rarely measured. This paper examined the relationship between social network ties and group cohesion in a group-based intervention to prevent obesity in children. Method The data reported are process measures from an ongoing community-based randomized controlled trial. 305 parents with a child (3-6 years) at risk of developing obesity were assigned to an intervention that taught parents healthy lifestyles. Parents met weekly for 12 weeks in small consistent groups. Two measures were collected at weeks 3 and 6: a social network survey (people in the group with whom one discusses healthy lifestyles); and the validated Perceived Cohesion Scale (Bollen & Hoyle, 1990). We used lagged random and fixed effects regression models to analyze the data. Results Cohesion increased from 6.51 to 6.71 (t=4.4, p<0.01). Network nominations tended to increase over the 3-week period in each network. In the combined discussion and advice network, the number of nominations increased from 1.76 to 1.95 (z=2.59, p<0.01). Cohesion at week 3 was the strongest predictor of cohesion at week 6 (b=0.55, p<0.01). Number of new network nominations at week 6 was positively related to cohesion at week 6 (b=0.06, p<.01). In sum, being able to name new network contacts was associated with feelings of cohesion. Conclusion This is the first study to demonstrate how network changes affect perceived group cohesion within a behavioral intervention. Given that many behavioral interventions occur in group settings, intentionally building new social networks could be promising to augment desired outcomes. PMID:26286298

  7. Increasing urban flood magnitudes: Is it the drainage network?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahner, J. A.; Ogden, F. L.

    2004-05-01

    It has been long thought that increases in impervious area had the greatest impact on urban runoff volume and increased flood peaks. This theory was recently challenged by a study in Charlotte, North Carolina that concluded that the increase in storm drainage connectivity and hence hydraulic efficiency played the greatest role in increasing flood magnitudes. Prediction of hydrologic conditions in urbanized watersheds is increasingly turning to distributed-parameter models, as these methods are capable of describing land-surface modifications and heterogeneity. One major deficiency of many of these models, however, is their inability to explicitly handle storm drainage networks. The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of subsurface storm drainage networks on the formation of floods. Factors considered include changes in network topology as described by the drainage width function and the relative importance of improved drainage efficiency relative to imperviousness. The Gridded Surface/Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA), a square-grid (raster) hydrologic model that solves the equations of transport of mass, energy, and momentum, has been modified to include storm drainage capability. This has made it possible to more accurately model the complexity of an urban watershed. The SUPERLINK scheme was chosen to model flow in closed conduits. This method solves the St. Venant equations in one dimension and employs the widely used "Preissmann slot" to extend their applicability to storm sewer flow. The SUPERLINK scheme is significantly different from the Preissmann scheme in that it is able to robustly simulate traditional flows as well as moving shocks. The coupled GSSHA SUPERLINK model will be used to simulate the effect of a subsurface drainage network on an urbanizing catchment.

  8. Increasing link utilization in IP over WDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucci, Antonio; Taft, Nina; Thiran, Patrick; Zang, Hui; Diot, Christophe

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we study an approach to Quality of Service that offers end-users the choice between two classes of service defined according to their level of transmission protection. The first class of service, called Fully Protected (FP), offers end-users a guarantee of survivability in the case of a single failure; all FP traffic is protected using either a 1:1 or 1+1 protection scheme at the WDM layer. The second class of service, called Best-Effort Protected (BEP), is not protected; when a failure occurs, the network does the best it can by restoring at the IP layer only as much BEP traffic as possible. The FP service class mimics what Internet users receive today. The motivation of this approach is to increase the amount of bandwidth used on backbone networks by offering a lower quality of service that does not affect the current QoS provided by the network. We design an ILP model, for finding primary and backup paths at the optical layer, that incorporates a number of carriers' common practices. Namely we allow the FP demand to be specified via a traffic matrix at the IP layer, we include an overprovisioning factor that specifies the portion of each link that must be left unused, and we incorporate a minimal fairness requirement on how the BEP traffic is allocated. Our goal is thus to quantify how much BEP traffic can be carried in addition to the FP traffic, without impacting the protection quality of the FP traffic even in the case of failure, and without impacting the FP load. We show that by having two such classes of service, the load on a network can be increased by a factor of 4 to 7 (depending upon the network). Even if carriers want to overprovision their networks by 50%, we can still triple the total network load. We illustrate that the location of the bottleneck can affect whether or not we see a difference in performance between 1:1 or 1+1 protection schemes. Finally we evaluate the tradeoff between the two carrier requirements of overprovisioning

  9. On Increasing Network Lifetime in Body Area Networks Using Global Routing with Energy Consumption Balancing

    PubMed Central

    Tsouri, Gill R.; Prieto, Alvaro; Argade, Nikhil

    2012-01-01

    Global routing protocols in wireless body area networks are considered. Global routing is augmented with a novel link cost function designed to balance energy consumption across the network. The result is a substantial increase in network lifetime at the expense of a marginal increase in energy per bit. Network maintenance requirements are reduced as well, since balancing energy consumption means all batteries need to be serviced at the same time and less frequently. The proposed routing protocol is evaluated using a hardware experimental setup comprising multiple nodes and an access point. The setup is used to assess network architectures, including an on-body access point and an off-body access point with varying number of antennas. Real-time experiments are conducted in indoor environments to assess performance gains. In addition, the setup is used to record channel attenuation data which are then processed in extensive computer simulations providing insight on the effect of protocol parameters on performance. Results demonstrate efficient balancing of energy consumption across all nodes, an average increase of up to 40% in network lifetime corresponding to a modest average increase of 0.4 dB in energy per bit, and a cutoff effect on required transmission power to achieve reliable connectivity. PMID:23201987

  10. Increased functional connectivity within mesocortical networks in open people.

    PubMed

    Passamonti, L; Terracciano, A; Riccelli, R; Donzuso, G; Cerasa, A; Vaccaro, Mg; Novellino, F; Fera, F; Quattrone, A

    2015-01-01

    Openness is a personality trait reflecting absorption in sensory experience, preference for novelty, and creativity, and is thus considered a driving force of human evolution. At the brain level, a relation between openness and dopaminergic circuits has been proposed, although evidence to support this hypothesis is lacking. Recent behavioral research has also found that people with mania, a psychopathological condition linked to dopaminergic dysfunctions, may display high levels of openness. However, whether openness is related to dopaminergic circuits has not been determined thus far. We addressed this issue via three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments in n=46 healthy volunteers. In the first experiment participants lied at rest in the scanner while in the other two experiments they performed active tasks that included the presentation of pleasant odors and pictures of food. Individual differences in openness and other personality traits were assessed via the NEO-PI-R questionnaire (NEO-Personality Inventory-Revised), a widely employed measure of the five-factor model personality traits. Correlation between fMRI and personality data was analyzed via state-of-art methods assessing resting-state and task-related functional connectivity within specific brain networks. Openness was positively associated with the functional connectivity between the right substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area, the major source of dopaminergic inputs in the brain, and the ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), a key region in encoding, maintaining, and updating information that is relevant for adaptive behaviors. Of note, the same connectivity pattern was consistently found across all of the three fMRI experiments. Given the critical role of dopaminergic signal in gating information in DLPFC, the increased functional connectivity within mesocortical networks in open people may explain why these individuals display a wide "mental permeability" to

  11. Both novelty and expertise increase action observation network activity

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Sook-Lei; Sheng, Tong; Margetis, John L.; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Our experiences with others affect how we perceive their actions. In particular, activity in bilateral premotor and parietal cortices during action observation, collectively known as the action observation network (AON), is modulated by one's expertise with the observed actions or individuals. However, conflicting reports suggest that AON activity is greatest both for familiar and unfamiliar actions. The current study examines the effects of different types and amounts of experience (e.g., visual, interpersonal, personal) on AON activation. fMRI was used to scan 16 healthy participants without prior experience with individuals with amputations (novices), 11 experienced occupational therapists (OTs) who had varying amounts of experience with individuals with amputations, and one individual born with below-elbow residual limbs (participant CJ), as they viewed video clips of goal-matched actions performed by an individual with residual limbs and by an individual with hands. Participants were given increased visual exposure to actions performed by both effectors midway through the scanning procedure. Novices demonstrated a large AON response to the initial viewing of an individual with residual limbs compared to one with hands, but this signal was attenuated after they received visual exposure to both effectors. In contrast, OTs, who had moderate familiarity with residual limbs, demonstrated a lower AON response upon initial viewing—similar to novices after they received visual exposure. At the other extreme, CJ, who has extreme familiarity with residual limbs both visually and motorically, shows a largely increased left-lateralized AON response, exceeding that of novices and experienced OTs, when viewing the residual limb compared to hand actions. These results suggest that a nuanced model of AON engagement is needed to explain how cases of both extreme experience (CJ) and extreme novelty (novices) can result in the greatest AON activity. PMID:24062656

  12. Increasing the efficiency of a neural network through unlearning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hemmen, J. L.; Ioffe, L. B.; Kühn, R.; Vaas, M.

    1990-02-01

    It has been suggested that dream (REM) sleep leads to unlearning of parasitic or spurious states. Here we present the results of an extensive numerical study of unlearning in a network of formal neurons (Ising spins) whose activity may vary. Our results are threefold. First, unlearning greatly improves the performance of the network; e.g., the storage capacity may be more than quadrupled. Second, the optimal number of unlearning steps (“dreams”) does not depend on the activity. Third, using the simplest form of Hebbian learning, the network can store and retrieve patterns whose activity differs. A microscopic picture of the underlying processes is presented.

  13. Increasing cellular coverage within integrated terrestrial/satellite mobile networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Jonathan P.

    1995-01-01

    When applying the hierarchical cellular concept, the satellite acts as giant umbrella cell covering a region with some terrestrial cells. If a mobile terminal traversing the region arrives to the border-line or limits of a regular cellular ground service, network transition occurs and the satellite system continues the mobile coverage. To adequately assess the boundaries of service of a mobile satellite system an a cellular network within an integrated environment, this paper provides an optimized scheme to predict when a network transition may be necessary. Under the assumption of a classified propagation phenomenon and Lognormal shadowing, the study applies an analytical approach to estimate the location of a mobile terminal based on a reception of the signal strength emitted by a base station.

  14. Increasing capacity of baseband digital data communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Frankel, R.S.; Herman, A.

    This invention provides broadbank network capabilities for baseband digital collision detection transceiver equipment for communication between a plurality of data stations by affording simultaneous transmission of multiple channels over a broadband pass transmission link such as a coaxial cable. Thus, a fundamental carrier wave is transmitted on said link, received at local data stations and used to detect signals on different baseband channels for reception. For transmission the carrier wave typically is used for segregating a plurality of at least two transmission channels into typically single sideband upper and lower pass bands of baseband bandwidth capability adequately separated with guard bands to permit simple separation for receiving by means of pass band filters, etc.

  15. Increasing capacity of baseband digital data communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Frankel, Robert S.; Herman, Alexander

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides broadband network capabilities for baseband digital collision detection transceiver equipment for communication between a plurality of data stations by affording simultaneous transmission of multiple channels over a broadband pass transmission link such as a coaxial cable. Thus, a fundamental carrier wave is transmitted on said link, received at local data stations and used to detect signals on different baseband channels for reception. For transmission the carrier wave typically is used for segregating a plurality of at least two transmission channels into typically single sideband upper and lower pass bands of baseband bandwidth capability adequately separated with guard bands to permit simple separation for receiving by means of pass band filters, etc.

  16. Intrinsic bursters increase the robustness of rhythm generation in an excitatory network.

    PubMed

    Purvis, L K; Smith, J C; Koizumi, H; Butera, R J

    2007-02-01

    The pre-Botzinger complex (pBC) is a vital subcircuit of the respiratory central pattern generator. Although the existence of neurons with pacemaker-like bursting properties in this network is not questioned, their role in network rhythmogenesis is unresolved. Modeling is ideally suited to address this debate because of the ease with which biophysical parameters of individual cells and network architecture can be manipulated. We modeled the parameter variability of experimental data from pBC bursting pacemaker and nonpacemaker neurons using a modified version of our previously developed pBC neuron and network models. To investigate the role of pacemakers in networkwide rhythmogenesis, we simulated networks of these neurons and varied the fraction of the population made up of pacemakers. For each number of pacemaker neurons, we varied the amount of tonic drive to the network and measured the frequency of synchronous networkwide bursting produced. Both excitatory networks with all-to-all coupling and sparsely connected networks were explored for several levels of synaptic coupling strength. Networks containing only nonpacemakers were able to produce networkwide bursting, but with a low probability of bursting and low input and output ranges. Our results indicate that inclusion of pacemakers in an excitatory network increases robustness of the network by more than tripling the input and output ranges compared with networks containing no pacemakers. The largest increase in dynamic range occurs when the number of pacemakers in the network is greater than 20% of the population. Experimental tests of our model predictions are proposed. PMID:17167061

  17. Magnetoencephalography Reveals a Widespread Increase in Network Connectivity in Idiopathic/Genetic Generalized Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Elshahabi, Adham; Klamer, Silke; Sahib, Ashish Kaul; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Focke, Niels K

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE) is characterized by seizures, which start and rapidly engage widely distributed networks, and result in symptoms such as absences, generalized myoclonic and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although routine magnetic resonance imaging is apparently normal, many studies have reported structural alterations in IGE/GGE patients using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Changes have also been reported in functional networks during generalized spike wave discharges. However, network function in the resting-state without epileptiforme discharges has been less well studied. We hypothesize that resting-state networks are more representative of the underlying pathophysiology and abnormal network synchrony. We studied functional network connectivity derived from whole-brain magnetoencephalography recordings in thirteen IGE/GGE and nineteen healthy controls. Using graph theoretical network analysis, we found a widespread increase in connectivity in patients compared to controls. These changes were most pronounced in the motor network, the mesio-frontal and temporal cortex. We did not, however, find any significant difference between the normalized clustering coefficients, indicating preserved gross network architecture. Our findings suggest that increased resting state connectivity could be an important factor for seizure spread and/or generation in IGE/GGE, and could serve as a biomarker for the disease. PMID:26368933

  18. Magnetoencephalography Reveals a Widespread Increase in Network Connectivity in Idiopathic/Genetic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Elshahabi, Adham; Klamer, Silke; Sahib, Ashish Kaul; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Focke, Niels K.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE) is characterized by seizures, which start and rapidly engage widely distributed networks, and result in symptoms such as absences, generalized myoclonic and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although routine magnetic resonance imaging is apparently normal, many studies have reported structural alterations in IGE/GGE patients using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Changes have also been reported in functional networks during generalized spike wave discharges. However, network function in the resting-state without epileptiforme discharges has been less well studied. We hypothesize that resting-state networks are more representative of the underlying pathophysiology and abnormal network synchrony. We studied functional network connectivity derived from whole-brain magnetoencephalography recordings in thirteen IGE/GGE and nineteen healthy controls. Using graph theoretical network analysis, we found a widespread increase in connectivity in patients compared to controls. These changes were most pronounced in the motor network, the mesio-frontal and temporal cortex. We did not, however, find any significant difference between the normalized clustering coefficients, indicating preserved gross network architecture. Our findings suggest that increased resting state connectivity could be an important factor for seizure spread and/or generation in IGE/GGE, and could serve as a biomarker for the disease. PMID:26368933

  19. Chronic electrical stimulation homeostatically decreases spontaneous activity, but paradoxically increases evoked network activity

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Anubhuti

    2013-01-01

    Neural dynamics generated within cortical networks play a fundamental role in brain function. However, the learning rules that allow recurrent networks to generate functional dynamic regimes, and the degree to which these regimes are themselves plastic, are not known. In this study we examined plasticity of network dynamics in cortical organotypic slices in response to chronic changes in activity. Studies have typically manipulated network activity pharmacologically; we used chronic electrical stimulation to increase activity in in vitro cortical circuits in a more physiological manner. Slices were stimulated with “implanted” electrodes for 4 days. Chronic electrical stimulation or treatment with bicuculline decreased spontaneous activity as predicted by homeostatic learning rules. Paradoxically, however, whereas bicuculline decreased evoked network activity, chronic stimulation actually increased the likelihood that evoked stimulation elicited polysynaptic activity, despite a decrease in evoked monosynaptic strength. Furthermore, there was an inverse correlation between spontaneous and evoked activity, suggesting a homeostatic tradeoff between spontaneous and evoked activity. Within-slice experiments revealed that cells close to the stimulated electrode exhibited more evoked polysynaptic activity and less spontaneous activity than cells close to a control electrode. Collectively, our results establish that chronic stimulation changes the dynamic regimes of networks. In vitro studies of homeostatic plasticity typically lack any external input, and thus neurons must rely on “spontaneous” activity to reach homeostatic “set points.” However, in the presence of external input we propose that homeostatic learning rules seem to shift networks from spontaneous to evoked regimes. PMID:23324317

  20. Interactions between default mode and control networks as a function of increasing cognitive reasoning complexity.

    PubMed

    Hearne, Luke; Cocchi, Luca; Zalesky, Andrew; Mattingley, Jason B

    2015-07-01

    Successful performance of challenging cognitive tasks depends on a consistent functional segregation of activity within the default-mode network, on the one hand, and control networks encompassing frontoparietal and cingulo-opercular areas on the other. Recent work, however, has suggested that in some cognitive control contexts nodes within the default-mode and control networks may actually cooperate to achieve optimal task performance. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether the ability to relate variables while solving a cognitive reasoning problem involves transient increases in connectivity between default-mode and control regions. Participants performed a modified version of the classic Wason selection task, in which the number of variables to be related is systematically varied across trials. As expected, areas within the default-mode network showed a parametric deactivation with increases in relational complexity, compared with neural activity in null trials. Critically, some of these areas also showed enhanced connectivity with task-positive control regions. Specifically, task-based connectivity between the striatum and the angular gyri, and between the thalamus and right temporal pole, increased as a function of relational complexity. These findings challenge the notion that functional segregation between regions within default-mode and control networks invariably support cognitive task performance, and reveal previously unknown roles for the striatum and thalamus in managing network dynamics during cognitive reasoning. PMID:25833189

  1. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Banerji, Christopher R S; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology. PMID:25919796

  2. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology. PMID:25919796

  3. Beaver dams maintain fish biodiversity by increasing habitat heterogeneity throughout a low-gradient stream network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Joseph M.; Mather, Martha E.

    2013-01-01

    In summary, within a stream network, beaver dams maintained fish biodiversity by altering in-stream habitat and increasing habitat heterogeneity. Understanding the relationship between habitat heterogeneity and biodiversity can advance basic freshwater ecology and provide science-based support for applied aquatic conservation

  4. A lack of default network suppression is linked to increased distractibility in ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Fassbender, Catherine; Zhang, Hao; Buzy, Wendy M.; Cortes, Carlos R.; Mizuiri, Danielle; Beckett, Laurel; Schweitzer, Julie B.

    2015-01-01

    Heightened distractibility in participants with ADHD as indexed by increased reaction time (RT) variability has been hypothesized to be due to a failure to sufficiently suppress activation in the default attention network during cognitively demanding situations. The present study utilized fMRI to examine the relationship between intra-individual variability (IIV) in task RT and suppression of BOLD response in regions of the default network, using a working memory paradigm and two levels of control tasks. IIV was calculated separately for thirteen healthy control and twelve children with ADHD, Combined Type. Children with ADHD displayed significantly more RT variability than controls. Neural measures showed that although both groups displayed a pattern of increasing deactivation of the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) with increasing task difficulty, the ADHD group was significantly less deactive than controls. Correlations between IIV and brain activation suggested that greater variability was associated with a failure to deactivate ventromedial PFC with increasing task difficulty. T-tests on brain activation between participants with ADHD with low versus high IIV implicated a similar region so that high variability was associated with greater activity in this region. These data provide support for the theory that increased distractibility in at least some participants with ADHD may be due to an inability to sufficiently suppress activity in the default attention network in response to increasing task difficulty. PMID:19281801

  5. Frontotemporal Network Connectivity during Memory Encoding Is Increased with Aging and Disrupted by Beta-Amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of cognitively normal older adults harbor brain β-amyloid (Aβ), a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease associated with neural alterations and episodic memory decline. We examined how aging and Aβ deposition affect neural function during memory encoding of visual scenes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans. Thirty-six cognitively normal older people underwent fMRI scanning, and positron emission tomography with [11C] Pittsburgh compound B to measure fibrillar brain Aβ; 15 young subjects were studied with fMRI. Older adults without Aβ deposition showed reduced regional brain activation (compared with young subjects) with decreased task-independent functional connectivity between parahippocampal gyrus and prefrontal cortex. In this network, task-related connectivity was increased compared with young subjects, and the degree of connectivity was related to memory performance. In contrast, older individuals with Aβ deposition showed no such increased task-related network connectivity, but did display increased regional activity unassociated with performance. These findings suggest that network connectivity plays a significant role in compensating for reduced regional activity during successful memory encoding in aging without Aβ deposition, while in those with Aβ this network compensation fails and is accompanied by inefficient regional hyperactivation. PMID:24259567

  6. An Increase in Tobacco Craving Is Associated with Enhanced Medial Prefrontal Cortex Network Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Amy C.; Farmer, Stacey; Frederick, Blaise deB.; Nickerson, Lisa D.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Craving is a key aspect of drug dependence that is thought to motivate continued drug use. Numerous brain regions have been associated with craving, suggesting that craving is mediated by a distributed brain network. Whether an increase in subjective craving is associated with enhanced interactions among brain regions was evaluated using resting state functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) in nicotine dependent participants. We focused on craving-related changes in the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex (OMPFC) network, which also included the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) extending into the ventral striatum. Brain regions in the OMPFC network are not only implicated in addiction and reward, but, due to their rich anatomic interconnections, may serve as the site of integration across craving-related brain regions. Subjective craving and resting state fMRI were evaluated twice with an ∼1 hour delay between the scans. Cigarette craving was significantly increased at the end, relative to the beginning of the scan session. Enhanced craving was associated with heightened coupling between the OMPFC network and other cortical, limbic, striatal, and visceromotor brain regions that are both anatomically interconnected with the OMPFC, and have been implicated in addiction and craving. This is the first demonstration confirming that an increase in craving is associated with enhanced brain region interactions, which may play a role in the experience of craving. PMID:24505440

  7. A Novel Clustering Algorithm for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Based on Determination of Virtual Links' Weight to Increase Network Stability

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Abbas; Afsharfarnia, Abbas; Zarafshan, Faraneh; Al-Haddad, S. A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The stability of clusters is a serious issue in mobile ad hoc networks. Low stability of clusters may lead to rapid failure of clusters, high energy consumption for reclustering, and decrease in the overall network stability in mobile ad hoc network. In order to improve the stability of clusters, weight-based clustering algorithms are utilized. However, these algorithms only use limited features of the nodes. Thus, they decrease the weight accuracy in determining node's competency and lead to incorrect selection of cluster heads. A new weight-based algorithm presented in this paper not only determines node's weight using its own features, but also considers the direct effect of feature of adjacent nodes. It determines the weight of virtual links between nodes and the effect of the weights on determining node's final weight. By using this strategy, the highest weight is assigned to the best choices for being the cluster heads and the accuracy of nodes selection increases. The performance of new algorithm is analyzed by using computer simulation. The results show that produced clusters have longer lifetime and higher stability. Mathematical simulation shows that this algorithm has high availability in case of failure. PMID:25114965

  8. Increased cortical-limbic anatomical network connectivity in major depression revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Fang, Peng; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Wang, Lubin; Li, Baojuan; Liu, Li; Hu, Dewen

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported significant functional and structural differences between depressed patients and controls. Little attention has been given, however, to the abnormalities in anatomical connectivity in depressed patients. In the present study, we aim to investigate the alterations in connectivity of whole-brain anatomical networks in those suffering from major depression by using machine learning approaches. Brain anatomical networks were extracted from diffusion magnetic resonance images obtained from both 22 first-episode, treatment-naive adults with major depressive disorder and 26 matched healthy controls. Using machine learning approaches, we differentiated depressed patients from healthy controls based on their whole-brain anatomical connectivity patterns and identified the most discriminating features that represent between-group differences. Classification results showed that 91.7% (patients=86.4%, controls=96.2%; permutation test, p<0.0001) of subjects were correctly classified via leave-one-out cross-validation. Moreover, the strengths of all the most discriminating connections were increased in depressed patients relative to the controls, and these connections were primarily located within the cortical-limbic network, especially the frontal-limbic network. These results not only provide initial steps toward the development of neurobiological diagnostic markers for major depressive disorder, but also suggest that abnormal cortical-limbic anatomical networks may contribute to the anatomical basis of emotional dysregulation and cognitive impairments associated with this disease. PMID:23049910

  9. Grey matter networks in people at increased familial risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tijms, Betty M; Sprooten, Emma; Job, Dominic; Johnstone, Eve C; Owens, David G C; Willshaw, David; Seriès, Peggy; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2015-10-01

    Grey matter brain networks are disrupted in schizophrenia, but it is still unclear at which point during the development of the illness these disruptions arise and whether these can be associated with behavioural predictors of schizophrenia. We investigated if single-subject grey matter networks were disrupted in a sample of people at familial risk of schizophrenia. Single-subject grey matter networks were extracted from structural MRI scans of 144 high risk subjects, 32 recent-onset patients and 36 healthy controls. The following network properties were calculated: size, connectivity density, degree, path length, clustering coefficient, betweenness centrality and small world properties. People at risk of schizophrenia showed decreased path length and clustering in mostly prefrontal and temporal areas. Within the high risk sample, the path length of the posterior cingulate cortex and the betweenness centrality of the left inferior frontal operculum explained 81% of the variance in schizotypal cognitions, which was previously shown to be the strongest behavioural predictor of schizophrenia in the study. In contrast, local grey matter volume measurements explained 48% of variance in schizotypy. The present results suggest that single-subject grey matter networks can quantify behaviourally relevant biological alterations in people at increased risk for schizophrenia before disease onset. PMID:26330380

  10. Increasing Susceptibility of the Global Network of Food Trade to Climate Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puma, M. J.; Bose, S.; Chon, S.; Cook, B.

    2013-12-01

    Globalization of agriculture through trade liberalization has led to a dramatic transformation of the global network of food trade. The many benefits of this globalization include greater and more efficient global agricultural production, reduced variability of regional and global food supplies, and savings in global water resources. However, a potential hidden cost is an increasingly fragile network that is more susceptible to shocks or disruptions. Recent studies suggest that complex systems, like the global food trade network, may have architectural features typically associated with the existence of tipping points and susceptibility to collapse. Here we present evidence that this global agricultural network is increasingly connected, homogeneous, and in a state where network nodes (here countries) can flip between alternate states. We use production and trade data from 1986 to 2009 to identify shifts in national self sufficiency and to quantify changes in connectivity and homogeneity of the wheat, maize and rice trade. We then simulate the possible impacts of climate and crop-disease disruptions, which could potentially trigger a global food crisis through an export-restriction-induced domino effect. Changes in self-sufficiency ratio (SSR) over time for various country groups. The SSR is computed based on production and trade of cereals and starchy roots. (Top row) Time series of SSR for the Group of Eight + Five (G8+5) countries. The '+ Five' refers to the five leading emerging economies in the world. (Bottom row) Boxplots of average SSR over two periods (1986-1990 and 2005-2009) for countries designated as 'Annex I' and 'Least Developed Countries' (LDC) by the United Nations.

  11. Frequent Surfing on Social Health Networks is Associated With Increased Knowledge and Patient Health Activation

    PubMed Central

    Grosberg, Dafna; Grinvald, Haya; Reuveni, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Background The advent of the Internet has driven a technological revolution that has changed our lives. As part of this phenomenon, social networks have attained a prominent role in health care. A variety of medical services is provided over the Internet, including home monitoring, interactive communications between the patient and service providers, and social support, among others. This study emphasizes some of the practical implications of Web-based health social networks for patients and for health care systems. Objective The objective of this study was to assess how participation in a social network among individuals with a chronic condition contributed to patient activation, based on the Patient Activation Measure (PAM). Methods A prospective, cross-sectional survey with a retrospective component was conducted. Data were collected from Camoni, a Hebrew-language Web-based social health network, participants in the diabetes mellitus, pain, hypertension, and depression/anxiety forums, during November 2012 to 2013. Experienced users (enrolled at least 6 months) and newly enrolled received similar versions of the same questionnaire including sociodemographics and PAM. Results Among 686 participants, 154 of 337 experienced and 123 of 349 newly enrolled completed the questionnaire. Positive correlations (P<.05) were found between frequency and duration of site visits and patient activation, social relationships, and chronic disease knowledge. Men surfed longer than women (χ²3=10.104, P<.05). Experienced users with diabetes surfed more than those with other illnesses and had significantly higher PAM scores (mean, M=69.3, standard deviation, SD=19.1, PAM level 4; Z=−4.197, P<.001) than new users (M=62.8, SD=18.7, PAM level 3). Disease knowledge directly predicted PAM for all users (β=.26 and .21, respectively). Frequency and duration of social health network use were correlated with increased knowledge about a chronic disease. Experienced surfers had higher PAM

  12. Higher Physical Activity Is Associated with Increased Attentional Network Connectivity in the Healthy Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geon Ha; Im, Kiho; Kwon, Hunki; Seo, Sang Won; Ye, Byoung Seok; Cho, Hanna; Noh, Young; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Sang Eon; Kim, Hojeong; Hwang, Jung Won; Kang, Sue J.; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Na, Duk L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential alterations in structural network properties related to physical activity (PA) in healthy elderly. We recruited 76 elderly individuals with normal cognition from Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea. All participants underwent the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery and 3.0T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants were subdivided into quartiles according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire scores, which represents the amount of PA. Through graph theory based analyses, we compared global and local network topologies according to PA quartile. The higher PA group demonstrated better performance in speed processing compared to the lower PA group. Regional nodal strength also significantly increased in the higher PA group, which involved the bilateral middle frontal, bilateral inferior parietal, right medial orbitofrontal, right superior, and middle temporal gyri. These results were further replicated when the highest and the lowest quartile groups were compared in terms of regional nodal strengths and local efficiency. Our findings that the regional nodal strengths associated with the attentional network were increased in the higher PA group suggest the preventive effects of PA on age-related cognitive decline, especially in attention. PMID:27597826

  13. Higher Physical Activity Is Associated with Increased Attentional Network Connectivity in the Healthy Elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geon Ha; Im, Kiho; Kwon, Hunki; Seo, Sang Won; Ye, Byoung Seok; Cho, Hanna; Noh, Young; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Sang Eon; Kim, Hojeong; Hwang, Jung Won; Kang, Sue J; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Na, Duk L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential alterations in structural network properties related to physical activity (PA) in healthy elderly. We recruited 76 elderly individuals with normal cognition from Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea. All participants underwent the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery and 3.0T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants were subdivided into quartiles according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire scores, which represents the amount of PA. Through graph theory based analyses, we compared global and local network topologies according to PA quartile. The higher PA group demonstrated better performance in speed processing compared to the lower PA group. Regional nodal strength also significantly increased in the higher PA group, which involved the bilateral middle frontal, bilateral inferior parietal, right medial orbitofrontal, right superior, and middle temporal gyri. These results were further replicated when the highest and the lowest quartile groups were compared in terms of regional nodal strengths and local efficiency. Our findings that the regional nodal strengths associated with the attentional network were increased in the higher PA group suggest the preventive effects of PA on age-related cognitive decline, especially in attention. PMID:27597826

  14. Increased Functional Connectivity Between Subcortical and Cortical Resting-State Networks in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cerliani, Leonardo; Mennes, Maarten; Thomas, Rajat M.; Di Martino, Adriana; Thioux, Marc; Keysers, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Importance Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit severe difficulties in social interaction, motor coordination, behavioral flexibility, and atypical sensory processing, with considerable interindividual variability. This heterogeneous set of symptoms recently led to investigating the presence of abnormalities in the interaction across large-scale brain networks. To date, studies have focused either on constrained sets of brain regions or whole-brain analysis, rather than focusing on the interaction between brain networks. Objectives To compare the intrinsic functional connectivity between brain networks in a large sample of individuals with ASD and typically developing control subjects and to estimate to what extent group differences would predict autistic traits and reflect different developmental trajectories. Design, Setting, and Participants We studied 166 male individuals (mean age, 17.6 years; age range, 7-50 years) diagnosed as having DSM-IV-TR autism or Asperger syndrome and 193 typical developing male individuals (mean age, 16.9 years; age range, 6.5-39.4 years) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants were matched for age, IQ, head motion, and eye status (open or closed) in the MRI scanner. We analyzed data from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE), an aggregated MRI data set from 17 centers, made public in August 2012. Main Outcomes and Measures We estimated correlations between time courses of brain networks extracted using a data-driven method (independent component analysis). Subsequently, we associated estimates of interaction strength between networks with age and autistic traits indexed by the Social Responsiveness Scale. Results Relative to typically developing control participants, individuals with ASD showed increased functional connectivity between primary sensory networks and subcortical networks (thalamus and basal ganglia) (all t ≥ 3.13, P < .001 corrected). The strength of

  15. Increased Cognition Connectivity Network in Major Depression Disorder: A fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ting; Li, Cao; Wang, Biao; Yang, Wei-min; Zhang, Chen; Wu, Zhiguo; Qiu, Mei-hui; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence of the brain network involved in cognitive dysfunction has been inconsistent for major depressive disorder (MDD), especially during early stage of MDD. This study seeks to examine abnormal cognition connectivity network (CCN) in MDD within the whole brain. Methods Sixteen patients with MDD and 16 health controls were scanned during resting-state using 3.0 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). All patients were first episode without any history of antidepressant treatment. Both the left and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) were used as individual seeds to identify CCN by the seed-target correlation analysis. Two sample t test was used to calculate between-group differences in CCN using fisher z-transformed correlation maps. Results The CCN was constructed by bilateral seed DLPFC in two groups separately. Depressed subjects exhibited significantly increased functional connectivity (FC) by left DLPFC in one cluster, overlapping middle frontal gyrus, BA7, BA43, precuneus, BA6, BA40, superior temporal gyrus, BA22, inferior parietal lobule, precentral gyrus, BA4 and cingulate gyrus in left cerebrum. Health controls did not show any cluster with significantly greater FC compared to depressed subjects in left DLPFC network. There was no significant difference of FC in right DLPFC network between depressed subjects and the health controls. Conclusion There are differences in CCN during early stage of MDD, as identified by increased FCs among part of frontal gyrus, parietal cortex, cingulate cortex, and BA43, BA22, BA4 with left DLPFC. These brain areas might be involved in the underlying mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction in MDD. PMID:25866524

  16. Simulation study on effects of signaling network structure on the developmental increase in complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Keranen, Soile V.E.

    2003-04-02

    The developmental increase in structural complexity in multicellular life forms depends on local, often non-periodic differences in gene expression. These depend on a network of gene-gene interactions coded within the organismal genome. To better understand how genomic information generates complex expression patterns, I have modeled the pattern forming behavior of small artificial genomes in virtual blastoderm embryos. I varied several basic properties of these genomic signaling networks, such as the number of genes, the distributions of positive (inductive) and negative (repressive) interactions, and the strengths of gene-gene interactions, and analyzed their effects on developmental pattern formation. The results show how even simple genomes can generate complex non-periodic patterns under suitable conditions. They also show how the frequency of complex patterns depended on the numbers and relative arrangements of positive and negative interactions. For example, negative co-regulation of signaling pathway components increased the likelihood of (complex) patterns relative to differential negative regulation of the pathway components. Interestingly, neither quantitative differences either in strengths of signaling interactions nor multiple response thresholds to signal concentration (as in morphogen gradients) were essential for formation of multiple, spatially unique cell types. Thus, with combinatorial code of gene regulation and hierarchical signaling interactions, it is theoretically possible to organize metazoan embryogenesis with just a small fraction of the metazoan genome. Because even small networks can generate complex patterns when they contain a suitable set of connections, evolution of metazoan complexity may have depended more on selection for favourable configurations of signaling interactions than on the increase in numbers of regulatory genes.

  17. Increased functional connectivity in the resting-state basal ganglia network after acute heroin substitution

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A; Denier, N; Magon, S; Radue, E-W; Huber, C G; Riecher-Rossler, A; Wiesbeck, G A; Lang, U E; Borgwardt, S; Walter, M

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement signals in the striatum are known to be crucial for mediating the subjective rewarding effects of acute drug intake. It is proposed that these effects may be more involved in early phases of drug addiction, whereas negative reinforcement effects may occur more in later stages of the illness. This study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore whether acute heroin substitution also induced positive reinforcement effects in striatal brain regions of protracted heroin-maintained patients. Using independent component analysis and a dual regression approach, we compared resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) strengths within the basal ganglia/limbic network across a group of heroin-dependent patients receiving both an acute infusion of heroin and placebo and 20 healthy subjects who received placebo only. Subsequent correlation analyses were performed to test whether the rsFC strength under heroin exposure correlated with the subjective rewarding effect and with plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites morphine. Relative to the placebo treatment in patients, heroin significantly increased rsFC of the left putamen within the basal ganglia/limbic network, the extent of which correlated positively with patients' feelings of rush and with the plasma level of morphine. Furthermore, healthy controls revealed increased rsFC of the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus in this network relative to the placebo treatment in patients. Our results indicate that acute heroin substitution induces a subjective rewarding effect via increased striatal connectivity in heroin-dependent patients, suggesting that positive reinforcement effects in the striatum still occur after protracted maintenance therapy. PMID:25803496

  18. Leveraging modern climatology to increase adaptive capacity across protected area networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davison, J.E.; Graumlich, L.J.; Rowland, E.L.; Pederson, G.T.; Breshears, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    Human-driven changes in the global environment pose an increasingly urgent challenge for the management of ecosystems that is made all the more difficult by the uncertain future of both environmental conditions and ecological responses. Land managers need strategies to increase regional adaptive capacity, but relevant and rapid assessment approaches are lacking. To address this need, we developed a method to assess regional protected area networks across biophysically important climatic gradients often linked to biodiversity and ecosystem function. We plot the land of the southwestern United States across axes of historical climate space, and identify landscapes that may serve as strategic additions to current protected area portfolios. Considering climate space is straightforward, and it can be applied using a variety of relevant climate parameters across differing levels of land protection status. The resulting maps identify lands that are climatically distinct from existing protected areas, and may be utilized in combination with other ecological and socio-economic information essential to collaborative landscape-scale decision-making. Alongside other strategies intended to protect species of special concern, natural resources, and other ecosystem services, the methods presented herein provide another important hedging strategy intended to increase the adaptive capacity of protected area networks. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Increased Cerebellar-Default-Mode-Network Connectivity in Drug-Naive Major Depressive Disorder at Rest

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Jianrong; Yu, Miaoyu; Zhang, Zhikun; Liu, Guiying; Xiao, Changqing; Zhao, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The default-mode network (DMN) has been implicated in the neurobiology of major depressive disorder (MDD), and the cerebellum is suggested to be involved in high-order cognitive network such as the DMN. However, the specific contribution of the cerebellum to the DMN alterations remains equivocal. This study was conducted to examine the cerebellar-DMN connectivity in drug-naive MDD directly by using the cerebellum Crus I as seeds. Forty-four drug-naive MDD patients and 44 healthy controls participated in the resting-state scan. Functional connectivity (FC) was applied to analyze the images. Significantly increased FCs were observed between the right Crus I and the right inferior frontal cortex (orbital part)/superior temporal pole, bilateral MPFC (orbital part), and left middle temporal gyrus in the patients compared with the controls. There was a significantly positive correlation between the z values of the right Crus I–bilateral MPFC (orbital part) connectivity and the scores of Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire in the patients (r = 0.329, P = 0.029). The findings reveal that depressed patients have increased cerebellar-DMN connectivity with clinical significance, and thus highlight the contribution of the cerebellum to the DMN alterations in neurobiology of MDD. PMID:25738471

  20. An evolving Mars telecommunications network to enable exploration and increase science data return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Chad; Komarek, Tomas A.; Noreen, Gary K.; Wilson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    The coming decade of Mars exploration involves a variety of unique telecommunications challenges. Increasing spatial and spectral resolution of in situ science instruments drive the need for increased bandwidth. At the same time, many innovative and low-cost in situ mission concepts are enabled by energy-efficient relay communications. In response to these needs, the Mars Exploration Program has established a plan for an evolving orbital infrastructure that can provide enhancing and enabling telecommunications services to future Mars missions. We will present the evolving capabilities of this network over the coming decade in terms of specific quantitative metrics such as data volume per sol and required lander energy per Gb of returned data for representative classes of Mars exploration spacecraft.

  1. Increased Default Mode Network Connectivity in Individuals at High Familial Risk for Depression.

    PubMed

    Posner, Jonathan; Cha, Jiook; Wang, Zhishun; Talati, Ardesheer; Warner, Virginia; Gerber, Andrew; Peterson, Bradley S; Weissman, Myrna

    2016-06-01

    Research into the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) has focused largely on individuals already affected by MDD. Studies have thus been limited in their ability to disentangle effects that arise as a result of MDD from precursors of the disorder. By studying individuals at high familial risk for MDD, we aimed to identify potential biomarkers indexing risk for developing MDD, a critical step toward advancing prevention and early intervention. Using resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) and diffusion MRI (tractography), we examined connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) and between the DMN and the central executive network (CEN) in 111 individuals, aged 11-60 years, at high and low familial risk for depression. Study participants were part of a three-generation longitudinal, cohort study of familial depression. Based on rs-fcMRI, individuals at high vs low familial risk for depression showed increased DMN connectivity, as well as decreased DMN-CEN-negative connectivity. These findings remained significant after excluding individuals with a current or lifetime history of depression. Diffusion MRI measures based on tractography supported the findings of decreased DMN-CEN-negative connectivity. Path analyses indicated that decreased DMN-CEN-negative connectivity mediated a relationship between familial risk and a neuropsychological measure of impulsivity. Our findings suggest that DMN and DMN-CEN connectivity differ in those at high vs low risk for depression and thus suggest potential biomarkers for identifying individuals at risk for developing MDD. PMID:26593265

  2. An Online Social Network to Increase Walking in Dog Owners: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Kristin L.; Murphy, Deirdra; Ferrara, Cynthia; Oleski, Jessica; Panza, Emily; Savage, Clara; Gada, Kimberly; Bozzella, Brianne; Olendzki, Effie; Kern, Daniel; Lemon, Stephenie C.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Encouraging dog walking may increase physical activity in dog owners. This cluster randomized controlled trial investigated whether a social networking website (Meetup™) could be used to deliver a multi-component dog walking intervention to increase physical activity. METHODS Sedentary dog owners (n=102) participated. Eight neighborhoods were randomly assigned to the Meetup condition (Meetup) or a condition where participants received monthly emails with content from the American Heart Association on increasing physical activity (AHA). The Meetup intervention was delivered over 6 months and consisted of newsletters, dog walks, community events and an activity monitor. The primary outcome was steps; secondary outcomes included social support for walking, sense of community, perceived dog walking outcomes, barriers to dog walking and feasibility of the intervention. RESULTS Mixed model analyses examined change from baseline to post-intervention (6 months) and whether change in outcomes differed by condition. Daily steps increased over time (p=0.04, d=0.28), with no differences by condition. The time x condition interaction was significant for the perceived outcomes of dog walking (p=0.04, d=0.40), such that the Meetup condition reported an increase in the perceived positive outcomes of dog walking, whereas the AHA condition did not. Social support, sense of community and dog walking barriers did not significantly change. Meetup logins averaged 58.38 per week (SD=11.62). Within two months of the intervention ending, organization of the Meetup groups transitioned from study staff to Meetup members. CONCLUSION Results suggest that a Meetup group is feasible for increasing physical activity in dog owners. Further research is needed to understand how to increase participation in the Meetup group and facilitate greater connection among dog owners. PMID:25003777

  3. Does Posting Facebook Status Updates Increase or Decrease Loneliness? An Online Social Networking Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Deters, Fenne große; Mehl, Matthias R.

    2013-01-01

    Online social networking is a pervasive but empirically understudied phenomenon. Strong public opinions on its consequences exist but are backed up by little empirical evidence and almost no causally-conclusive, experimental research. The current study tested the psychological effects of posting status updates on Facebook using an experimental design. For one week, participants in the experimental condition were asked to post more than they usually do, whereas participants in the control condition received no instructions. Participants added a lab “Research Profile” as a Facebook friend allowing for the objective documentation of protocol compliance, participants’ status updates, and friends’ responses. Results revealed (1) that the experimentally-induced increase in status updating activity reduced loneliness, (2) that the decrease in loneliness was due to participants feeling more connected to their friends on a daily basis and (3) that the effect of posting on loneliness was independent of direct social feedback (i.e. responses) by friends. PMID:24224070

  4. Does Posting Facebook Status Updates Increase or Decrease Loneliness? An Online Social Networking Experiment.

    PubMed

    Deters, Fenne Große; Mehl, Matthias R

    2013-09-01

    Online social networking is a pervasive but empirically understudied phenomenon. Strong public opinions on its consequences exist but are backed up by little empirical evidence and almost no causally-conclusive, experimental research. The current study tested the psychological effects of posting status updates on Facebook using an experimental design. For one week, participants in the experimental condition were asked to post more than they usually do, whereas participants in the control condition received no instructions. Participants added a lab "Research Profile" as a Facebook friend allowing for the objective documentation of protocol compliance, participants' status updates, and friends' responses. Results revealed (1) that the experimentally-induced increase in status updating activity reduced loneliness, (2) that the decrease in loneliness was due to participants feeling more connected to their friends on a daily basis and (3) that the effect of posting on loneliness was independent of direct social feedback (i.e. responses) by friends. PMID:24224070

  5. 3-way Networks: Application of Hypergraphs for Modelling Increased Complexity in Comparative Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Weighill, Deborah A.; Jacobson, Daniel A.

    2015-03-27

    Herein we present and develop the theory of 3-way networks, a type of hypergraph in which each edge models relationships between triplets of objects as opposed to pairs of objects as done by standard network models. We explore approaches of how to prune these 3-way networks, illustrate their utility in comparative genomics and demonstrate how they find relationships which would be missed by standard 2-way network models using a phylogenomic dataset of 211 bacterial genomes.

  6. Support or competition? How online social networks increase physical activity: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwen; Brackbill, Devon; Yang, Sijia; Becker, Joshua; Herbert, Natalie; Centola, Damon

    2016-12-01

    To identify what features of online social networks can increase physical activity, we conducted a 4-arm randomized controlled trial in 2014 in Philadelphia, PA. Students (n = 790, mean age = 25.2) at an university were randomly assigned to one of four conditions composed of either supportive or competitive relationships and either with individual or team incentives for attending exercise classes. The social comparison condition placed participants into 6-person competitive networks with individual incentives. The social support condition placed participants into 6-person teams with team incentives. The combined condition with both supportive and competitive relationships placed participants into 6-person teams, where participants could compare their team's performance to 5 other teams' performances. The control condition only allowed participants to attend classes with individual incentives. Rewards were based on the total number of classes attended by an individual, or the average number of classes attended by the members of a team. The outcome was the number of classes that participants attended. Data were analyzed using multilevel models in 2014. The mean attendance numbers per week were 35.7, 38.5, 20.3, and 16.8 in the social comparison, the combined, the control, and the social support conditions. Attendance numbers were 90% higher in the social comparison and the combined conditions (mean = 1.9, SE = 0.2) in contrast to the two conditions without comparison (mean = 1.0, SE = 0.2) (p = 0.003). Social comparison was more effective for increasing physical activity than social support and its effects did not depend on individual or team incentives. PMID:27617191

  7. Finding the Sweet Spot: Network Structures and Processes for Increased Knowledge Mobilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Patricia; Pollock, Katina; Campbell, Carol; Carr-Harris, Shasta

    2015-01-01

    The use of networks in public education is one of many knowledge mobilization (KMb) strategies utilized to promote evidence-based research into practice. However, challenges exist in the ability to mobilize knowledge through networks. The purpose of this paper is to explore how networks work. Data were collected from virtual discussions for an…

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, David; Walker, Kendall; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Hampton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Dulla, Chris G.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for developing pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Although disruptions in brain circuitry are associated with TBI, the precise mechanisms by which brain injury leads to epileptiform network activity is unknown. Using controlled cortical impact (CCI) as a model of TBI, we examined how cortical excitability and glutamatergic signaling was altered following injury. We optically mapped cortical glutamate signaling using FRET-based glutamate biosensors, while simultaneously recording cortical field potentials in acute brain slices 2–4 weeks following CCI. Cortical electrical stimulation evoked polyphasic, epileptiform field potentials and disrupted the input–output relationship in deep layers of CCI-injured cortex. High-speed glutamate biosensor imaging showed that glutamate signaling was significantly increased in the injured cortex. Elevated glutamate responses correlated with epileptiform activity, were highest directly adjacent to the injury, and spread via deep cortical layers. Immunoreactivity for markers of GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased throughout CCI cortex. Lastly, spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency decreased and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current increased after CCI injury. Our results suggest that specific cortical neuronal microcircuits may initiate and facilitate the spread of epileptiform activity following TBI. Increased glutamatergic signaling due to loss of GABAergic control may provide a mechanism by which TBI can give rise to post-traumatic epilepsy. PMID:24610117

  9. Operational network improvements and increased reporting in the NOA (Greece) seismicity catalog.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouliaras, Gerasimos; Melis, Nikolaos; Drakatos, Georgios; Makropoulos, Konstantinos

    2013-04-01

    Earthquake catalogues are the basic product of seismology and of extreme importance for the assessment of seismic hazard. These data sets contain both, natural and man-made, changes. For example, seismological networks may improve their detection ability by the addition of more stations, by changing station locations for a better signal to noise condition and by improving the signal processing and analysis of seismic events. These man-made artifacts are apparent changes of the seismicity rate in earthquake catalogues and they mask the determination of real tectonic seismicity patterns. The earthquake catalog of the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) is the most detailed data set available for the Greek area containing more than 150,000 events since 1964. During this 49 year period, many changes occurred in the processing, analysis and reporting procedures, as well as changes in the configuration and infrastructure of the seismological network, however the method of the magnitude determination remained undisturbed. In February 2011 major improvements were implemented in the standard procedure for analysis and reporting at NOA and most important was the change in the method and procedure for the earthquake magnitude determination. In this investigation we will demonstrate the artificial seismicity increase in the earthquake catalog of NOA due to the recent improvements in the analysis and reporting. The results indicate a significant change in the magnitude of completeness of the earthquake catalog from a value of Mc~3 prior to 2011, to a value of Mc~2 after February 1st, 2011, mainly attributed to the registration of significantly larger number of events of smaller magnitudes. In order to maintain the homogeneity of the magnitudes reported throughout the NOA catalog, synthetic frequency-magnitude distributions are employed to determine the required conversion constants.

  10. CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge: Two Institutional Networks Increasing Diversity in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, Chris David; Phillips, Cynthia B.; Povich, Matthew S.; Prather, Edward E.; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe two programs, CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge, with the common mission of increasing participation of groups traditionally underrepresented in astronomy, particularly underrepresented minorities and women, through summer research opportunities, in the case of CAMPARE, scholarships in the case of Cal-Bridge, and significant mentoring in both programs, leading to an increase in their numbers successfully pursuing a PhD in the field.CAMPARE is an innovative REU-like summer research program, currently in its sixth year, comprising a network of comprehensive universities and community colleges in Southern California and Arizona (most of which are minority serving institutions), and ten major research institutions (University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the SETI Institute, JPL, Caltech, and the five Southern California UC campuses, UCLA, UCI, UCSD, UCR, and UCSB).In its first five summers, CAMPARE sent a total of 49 students from 10 different CSU and community college campuses to 5 research sites of the program. Of these 49 participants, 25 are women and 24 are men; 22 are Hispanic, 4 are African American, and 1 is Native American, including 6 female Hispanic and 2 female African-American participants. Twenty-one (21) CAMPARE participants have graduated from college, and more than half (11) have attended or are attending a graduate program, including 8 enrolled in PhD or Master's-to-PhD programs. Over twenty CAMPARE students have presented at the AAS and other national meetings.The Cal-Bridge program is a diverse network of higher education institutions in Southern California, including 5 UC campuses, 8 CSU campuses, and 7 community colleges dedicated to the goal of increasing the number of underrepresented minority and female students attending graduate school in astronomy or related fields. We have recently selected our inaugural group of five 2014 Cal-Bridge Scholars, including four women (two Hispanic and one part Native American), and one Hispanic man

  11. CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge: Two Institutional Networks Increasing Diversity in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, Chris David; Phillips, Cynthia B.; Povich, Matthew S.; Prather, Edward E.; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe two programs, CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge, with the common mission of increasing participation of groups traditionally underrepresented in astronomy, particularly underrepresented minorities and women, through summer research opportunities, in the case of CAMPARE, scholarships in the case of Cal-Bridge, and significant mentoring in both programs, leading to an increase in their numbers successfully pursuing a PhD in the field.CAMPARE is an innovative REU-like summer research program, currently in its sixth year, comprising a network of comprehensive universities and community colleges in Southern California and Arizona (most of which are minority serving institutions), and ten major research institutions (University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the SETI Institute, JPL, Caltech, and the five Southern California UC campuses, UCLA, UCI, UCSD, UCR, and UCSB).In its first five summers, CAMPARE sent a total of 49 students from 10 different CSU and community college campuses to 5 research sites of the program. Of these 49 participants, 25 are women and 24 are men; 22 are Hispanic, 4 are African American, and 1 is Native American, including 6 female Hispanic and 2 female African-American participants. Twenty-one (21) CAMPARE participants have graduated from college, and more than half (11) have attended or are attending a graduate program, including 8 enrolled in PhD or Master's-to-PhD programs. Over twenty CAMPARE students have presented at the AAS and other national meetings.The Cal-Bridge program is a diverse network of higher education institutions in Southern California, including 5 UC campuses, 8 CSU campuses, and 7 community colleges dedicated to the goal of increasing the number of underrepresented minority and female students attending graduate school in astronomy or related fields. We have recently selected our inaugural group of five 2014 Cal-Bridge Scholars, including four women (two Hispanic and one part Native American), and one Hispanic man

  12. Federal Parity Law Associated With Increased Probability Of Using Out-Of-Network Substance Use Disorder Treatment Services

    PubMed Central

    McGinty, Emma E.; Busch, Susan H.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Gibson, Teresa B.; Goldman, Howard H.; Barry, Colleen L.

    2015-01-01

    The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 requires commercial insurers providing group coverage for substance use disorder services to offer benefits for those services at a level equal to those for medical or surgical benefits. Unlike previous parity policies instituted for federal employees and in individual states, the law extends parity to out-of-network services. We conducted an interrupted time-series analysis using insurance claims from large self-insured employers to evaluate whether federal parity was associated with changes in out-of-network treatment for 525,620 users of substance use disorder services. Federal parity was associated with an increased probability of using out-of-network services, an increased average number of out-of-network outpatient visits, and increased average total spending on out-of-network services among users of those services. Our findings were broadly consistent with the contention of federal parity proponents that extending parity to out-of-network services would broaden access to substance use disorder care obtained outside of plan networks. PMID:26240247

  13. Genes under weaker stabilizing selection increase network evolvability and rapid regulatory adaptation to an environmental shift.

    PubMed

    Laarits, T; Bordalo, P; Lemos, B

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory networks play a central role in the modulation of gene expression, the control of cellular differentiation, and the emergence of complex phenotypes. Regulatory networks could constrain or facilitate evolutionary adaptation in gene expression levels. Here, we model the adaptation of regulatory networks and gene expression levels to a shift in the environment that alters the optimal expression level of a single gene. Our analyses show signatures of natural selection on regulatory networks that both constrain and facilitate rapid evolution of gene expression level towards new optima. The analyses are interpreted from the standpoint of neutral expectations and illustrate the challenge to making inferences about network adaptation. Furthermore, we examine the consequence of variable stabilizing selection across genes on the strength and direction of interactions in regulatory networks and in their subsequent adaptation. We observe that directional selection on a highly constrained gene previously under strong stabilizing selection was more efficient when the gene was embedded within a network of partners under relaxed stabilizing selection pressure. The observation leads to the expectation that evolutionarily resilient regulatory networks will contain optimal ratios of genes whose expression is under weak and strong stabilizing selection. Altogether, our results suggest that the variable strengths of stabilizing selection across genes within regulatory networks might itself contribute to the long-term adaptation of complex phenotypes. PMID:27213992

  14. Temporal dynamics of a commensal network of cavity-nesting vertebrates: increased diversity during an insect outbreak.

    PubMed

    Cockle, Kristina L; Martin, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    Network analysis offers insight into the structure and function of ecological communities, but little is known about how empirical networks change over time during perturbations. "Nest webs" are commensal networks that link secondary cavity-nesting vertebrates (e.g., bluebirds, ducks, and squirrels, which depend on tree cavities for nesting) with the excavators (e.g., woodpeckers) that produce cavities. In central British Columbia, Canada, Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) is considered a keystone excavator, providing most cavities for secondary cavity-nesters. However, roles of species in the network, and overall network architecture, are expected to vary with population fluctuations. Many excavator species increased in abundance in association with a pulse of food (adult and larval beetles) during an outbreak of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), which peaked in 2003-2004. We studied nest-web dynamics from 1998 to 2011 to determine how network architecture changed during this resource pulse. Cavity availability increased at the onset of the beetle outbreak and peaked in 2005. During and after the outbreak, secondary cavity-nesters increased their use of cavities made by five species of beetle-eating excavators, and decreased their use of flicker cavities. We found low link turnover, with 74% of links conserved from year to year. Nevertheless, the network increased in evenness and diversity of interactions, and declined slightly in nestedness and niche overlap. These patterns remained evident seven years after the beetle outbreak, suggesting a legacy effect. In contrast to previous snapshot studies of nest webs, our dynamic approach reveals how the role of each cavity producer, and thus quantitative network architecture, can vary over time. The increase in interaction diversity with the beetle outbreak adds to growing evidence that insect outbreaks can increase components of biodiversity in forest ecosystems at various temporal scales. The observed

  15. Brain parcellation choice affects disease-related topology differences increasingly from global to local network levels.

    PubMed

    Lord, Anton; Ehrlich, Stefan; Borchardt, Viola; Geisler, Daniel; Seidel, Maria; Huber, Stefanie; Murr, Julia; Walter, Martin

    2016-03-30

    Network-based analyses of deviant brain function have become extremely popular in psychiatric neuroimaging. Underpinning brain network analyses is the selection of appropriate regions of interest (ROIs). Although ROI selection is fundamental in network analysis, its impact on detecting disease effects remains unclear. We investigated the impact of parcellation choice when comparing results from different studies. We investigated the effects of anatomical (AAL) and literature-based (Dosenbach) parcellation schemes on comparability of group differences in 35 female patients with anorexia nervosa and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Global and local network properties, including network-based statistics (NBS), were assessed on resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained at 3T. Parcellation schemes were comparably consistent on global network properties, while NBS and local metrics differed in location, but not metric type. Location of local metric alterations varied for AAL (parietal and cingulate cortices) versus Dosenbach (insula, thalamus) parcellation approaches. However, consistency was observed for the occipital cortex. Patient-specific global network properties can be robustly observed using different parcellation schemes, while graph metrics characterizing impairments of individual nodes vary considerably. Therefore, the impact of parcellation choice on specific group differences varies depending on the level of network organization. PMID:27000302

  16. Electrogenerated thin films of microporous polymer networks with remarkably increased electrochemical response to nitroaromatic analytes.

    PubMed

    Palma-Cando, Alex; Scherf, Ullrich

    2015-06-01

    Thin films of microporous polymer networks (MPNs) have been generated by electrochemical polymerization of a series of multifunctional carbazole-based monomers. The microporous films show high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 1300 m2 g(-1) as directly measured by krypton sorption experiments. A correlation between the number of polymerizable carbazole units of the monomer and the resulting surface area is observed. Electrochemical sensing experiments with 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene as prototypical nitroaromatic analyte demonstrate an up to 180 times increased current response of MPN-modified glassy carbon electrodes in relation to the nonmodified electrode. The phenomenon probably involves intermolecular interactions between the electron-poor nitroaromatic analytes and the electron-rich, high surface area microporous deposits, with the electrochemical reduction at the MPN-modified electrodes being an adsorption-controlled process for low scan rates. We expect a high application potential of such MPN-modified electrodes for boosting the sensitivity of electrochemical sensor devices. PMID:25946727

  17. CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge: Two Institutional Networks Increasing Diversity in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, Chris David; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe two programs, CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge, with the common mission of increasing participation of groups traditionally underrepresented in astronomy, through summer research opportunities, in the case of CAMPARE, scholarships in the case of Cal-Bridge, and significant mentoring in both programs, leading to an increase in their numbers successfully pursuing a PhD in the field.In 6 years, the CAMPARE program has sent 62 students, >85% from underrepresented groups, to conduct summer research at one of twelve major research institutions in California, Arizona, and Wyoming. The graduation rate among CAMPARE scholars is 97%, and of the 37 CAMPARE scholars who have graduated with a Bachelor's degree, almost 60% (21) have completed or are pursuing graduate education in astronomy or a related field, at institutions including UCLA, USC, UC Riverside, Stanford, Univ. of Rochester, Georgia Tech, Kent State, Indiana Univ., Univ. of Oregon, Syracuse, and the Fisk-Vanderbilt Master's-to-PhD program. The Cal-Bridge program is a CSU-UC Bridge program comprised of faculty form 5 University of California (UC), 8 California State University (CSU), and 8 California Community College (CCC) campuses in Southern California. Cal-Bridge provides much deeper mentoring and professional development experiences over the last two years of undergraduate and first year of graduate school to students from this diverse network of higher education institutions. Cal-Bridge Scholars benefit from financial support, intensive, joint mentoring by CSU and UC faculty, professional development workshops, and exposure to research opportunities at the participating UC campuses.

  18. Increased default mode network activity in socially anxious individuals during reward processing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    of monetary loss. Conclusions Socially anxious individuals may increase default mode network activity during reward processing, suggesting high self-focused attention even in relation to potentially rewarding stimuli lacking explicit social connotations. Additionally, social anxiety may relate to decreased ventral striatum reactivity when anticipating potential losses. PMID:25075275

  19. Schizophrenic Patients and Their Unaffected Siblings Share Increased Resting-State Connectivity in the Task-Negative Network but Not Its Anticorrelated Task-Positive Network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haihong; Kaneko, Yoshio; Ouyang, Xuan; Li, Li; Hao, Yihui; Chen, Eric Y. H.; Jiang, Tianzi; Zhou, Yuan; Liu, Zhening

    2012-01-01

    Background: Abnormal connectivity of the anticorrelated intrinsic networks, the task-negative network (TNN), and the task-positive network (TPN) is implicated in schizophrenia. Comparisons between schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings enable further understanding of illness susceptibility and pathophysiology. We examined the resting-state connectivity differences in the intrinsic networks between schizophrenic patients, their unaffected siblings, and healthy controls. Methods: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance images were obtained from 25 individuals in each subject group. The posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were used as seed regions to identify the TNN and TPN through functional connectivity analysis. Interregional connectivity strengths were analyzed using overlapped intrinsic networks composed of regions common to all subject groups. Results: Schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings showed increased connectivity in the TNN between the bilateral inferior temporal gyri. By contrast, schizophrenic patients alone demonstrated increased connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and left inferior temporal gyrus and between the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and right lateral parietal cortex in the TNN. Schizophrenic patients exhibited increased connectivity between the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right inferior frontal gyrus in the TPN relative to their unaffected siblings, though this trend only approached statistical significance in comparison to healthy controls. Conclusion: Resting-state hyperconnectivity of the intrinsic networks may disrupt network coordination and thereby contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Similar, though milder, hyperconnectivity of the TNN in unaffected siblings of schizophrenic patients may contribute to the identification of schizophrenia endophenotypes and ultimately to the determination of schizophrenia

  20. Increased resting state functional connectivity in the fronto-parietal and default mode network in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Ilka; Geisler, Daniel; King, Joseph A.; Ritschel, Franziska; Seidel, Maria; Deza Araujo, Yacila; Petermann, Juliane; Lohmeier, Heidi; Weiss, Jessika; Walter, Martin; Roessner, Veit; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of anorexia nervosa (AN) is poorly understood. Results from functional brain imaging studies investigating the neural profile of AN using cognitive and emotional task paradigms are difficult to reconcile. Task-related imaging studies often require a high level of compliance and can only partially explore the distributed nature and complexity of brain function. In this study, resting state functional connectivity imaging was used to investigate well-characterized brain networks potentially relevant to understand the neural mechanisms underlying the symptomatology and etiology of AN. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data was obtained from 35 unmedicated female acute AN patients and 35 closely matched healthy controls female participants (HC) and decomposed using spatial group independent component analyses (ICA). Using validated templates, we identified components covering the fronto-parietal “control” network, the default mode network (DMN), the salience network, the visual and the sensory-motor network. Group comparison revealed an increased functional connectivity between the angular gyrus and the other parts of the fronto-parietal network in patients with AN in comparison to HC. Connectivity of the angular gyrus was positively associated with self-reported persistence in HC. In the DMN, AN patients also showed an increased functional connectivity strength in the anterior insula in comparison to HC. Anterior insula connectivity was associated with self-reported problems with interoceptive awareness. This study, with one of the largest sample to date, shows that acute AN is associated with abnormal brain connectivity in two major resting state networks (RSN). The finding of an increased functional connectivity in the fronto-parietal network adds novel support for the notion of AN as a disorder of excessive cognitive control, whereas the elevated functional connectivity of the anterior insula with the DMN may reflect the high

  1. Effects of Increasing Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Current Intensity on Cortical Sensorimotor Network Activation: A Time Domain fNIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Zucchelli, Lucia; Perrey, Stephane; Contini, Davide; Caffini, Matteo; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Kerr, Graham; Quaresima, Valentina; Ferrari, Marco; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked movements activate regions of the cortical sensorimotor network, including the primary sensorimotor cortex (SMC), premotor cortex (PMC), supplementary motor area (SMA), and secondary somatosensory area (S2), as well as regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) known to be involved in pain processing. The aim of this study, on nine healthy subjects, was to compare the cortical network activation profile and pain ratings during NMES of the right forearm wrist extensor muscles at increasing current intensities up to and slightly over the individual maximal tolerated intensity (MTI), and with reference to voluntary (VOL) wrist extension movements. By exploiting the capability of the multi-channel time domain functional near-infrared spectroscopy technique to relate depth information to the photon time-of-flight, the cortical and superficial oxygenated (O2Hb) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin concentrations were estimated. The O2Hb and HHb maps obtained using the General Linear Model (NIRS-SPM) analysis method, showed that the VOL and NMES-evoked movements significantly increased activation (i.e., increase in O2Hb and corresponding decrease in HHb) in the cortical layer of the contralateral sensorimotor network (SMC, PMC/SMA, and S2). However, the level and area of contralateral sensorimotor network (including PFC) activation was significantly greater for NMES than VOL. Furthermore, there was greater bilateral sensorimotor network activation with the high NMES current intensities which corresponded with increased pain ratings. In conclusion, our findings suggest that greater bilateral sensorimotor network activation profile with high NMES current intensities could be in part attributable to increased attentional/pain processing and to increased bilateral sensorimotor integration in these cortical regions. PMID:26158464

  2. The Worldviews Network: Innovative Strategies for Increasing Climate and Ecological Literacy in Your Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, R.; Yu, K.; McConville, D.; Sickler, J.; "Irving, Lindsay", L. S.; Gardiner, N.; Hamilton, H.

    2011-12-01

    Informal science Institutions (ISI) are in the unique position to convene and support community dialogues surrounding local ecological impacts of global change. The Worldviews Network-a collaboration between museums, scientists, and community-based organizations-is developing and testing innovative approaches for promoting and encouraging ecological literacy with the American public. In this session, we will share strategies for sparking and sustaining dialogue and action in local communities through high-impact visual presentations and real-world examples of successful projects that are increasing the healthy functioning of regional and global ecosystems. Educating the public about interconnected global change issues can be a daunting task. ISIs can help communities by facilitating dialogues about realistic and regionally relevant approaches for systemically addressing global challenges. Managing the complexity of these challenges requires going far beyond the standard prescriptions for behavior change; it requires inspiring participants with positive examples of system-wide solutions as well as actively involving the audience in scientifically informed design processes. This session will demonstrate how you can implement and sustain these community dialogues, using real-world examples from our partners' national events. We present visualization story templates and a model for facilitating dialogues that can be adapted at your institution. Based on video and written assessment feedback from visitors of our first Worldviews events, we will present initial evaluation findings about the impact that these strategies are having on our audiences and ISI partners. These findings show that engaging the public and NGO partners in sustainability and design dialogues is a powerful way to maintain the relevance of ISIs within their communities.

  3. COPD Hospitalization Risk Increased with Distinct Patterns of Multiple Systems Comorbidities Unveiled by Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Ji; Boyd, Andrew D.; Li, Jianrong ‘John’; Gardeux, Vincent; Kenost, Colleen; Saner, Don; Li, Haiquan; Abraham, Ivo; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Lussier, Yves A.

    2014-01-01

    Earlier studies on hospitalization risk are largely based on regression models. To our knowledge, network modeling of multiple comorbidities is novel and inherently enables multidimensional scoring and unbiased feature reduction. Network modeling was conducted using an independent validation design starting from 38,695 patients, 1,446,581 visits, and 430 distinct clinical facilities/hospitals. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated for every pair of comorbidity using patient counts and compared their tendency with hospitalization rates and ED visits. Network topology analyses were performed, defining significant comorbidity associations as having OR≥5 & False-Discovery-Rate≤10−7. Four COPD-associated comorbidity sub-networks emerged, incorporating multiple clinical systems: (i) metabolic syndrome, (ii) substance abuse and mental disorder, (iii) pregnancy-associated conditions, and (iv) fall-related injury. The latter two have not been reported yet. Features prioritized from the network are predictive of hospitalizations in an independent set (p<0.004). Therefore, we suggest that network topology is a scalable and generalizable method predictive of hospitalization. PMID:25954392

  4. Increased functional connectivity in intrinsic neural networks in individuals with aniridia

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Jordan E.; Krafft, Cynthia E.; Rodrigue, Amanda L.; Bobilev, Anastasia M.; Lauderdale, James D.; McDowell, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the PAX6 gene result in aniridia, a condition characterized by the lack of an iris and other panocular defects. Among humans with aniridia, structural abnormalities also have been reported within the brain. The current study examined the functional implications of these deficits through “resting state” or task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 12 individuals with aniridia and 12 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Using independent components analysis (ICA) and dual regression, individual patterns of functional connectivity associated with three intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs; executive control, primary visual, and default mode) were compared across groups. In all three analyses, the aniridia group exhibited regions of greater connectivity correlated with the network, while the controls did not show any such regions. These differences suggest that individuals with aniridia recruit additional neural regions to supplement function in critical intrinsic networks, possibly due to inherent structural or sensory abnormalities related to the disorder. PMID:25566032

  5. Increasing the coverage area through relay node deployment in long term evolution advanced cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldhaibani, Jaafar A.; Ahmad, R. B.; Yahya, A.; Azeez, Suzan A.

    2015-05-01

    Wireless multi-hop relay networks have become very important technologies in mobile communications. These networks ensure high throughput and coverage extension with a low cost. The poor capacity at cell edges is not enough to meet with growing demand of high capacity and throughput irrespective of user's placement in the cellular network. In this paper we propose optimal placement of relay node that provides maximum achievable rate at users and enhances the throughput and coverage at cell edge region. The proposed scheme is based on the outage probability at users and taken on account the interference between nodes. Numerical analyses along with simulation results indicated there are an improvement in capacity for users at the cell edge is 40% increment from all cell capacity.

  6. Using Computer Networking to Increase Active Teaching in General Education Math Classes Containing Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Melissa; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three middle school teachers of mainstreamed students with mild disabilities used a computer networking system to check student understanding of math concepts. Results indicated that, with coaching on how to use the data generated by the system, teachers increased the amount of time spent on active teaching and providing feedback. (Author/JDD)

  7. Efficacy of Peer Networks to Increase Social Connections among High School Students with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochman, Julia M.; Carter, Erik W.; Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Harvey, Michelle N.; Gustafson, Jenny R.

    2015-01-01

    Although peer interaction takes on increased salience during adolescence, such social connections remain elusive for many high school students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This social isolation can be particularly prevalent within unstructured school contexts. In this study, we examined the effects of a lunchtime peer network intervention…

  8. Increasing Family Child Care Providers' Professionalism through Certification and a Professional Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Louester A. S.

    Noting that in many areas, family child care providers lack both available training to enhance their professional skills and an organized professional network for continual support, this practicum project implemented and evaluated the effectiveness of a curriculum to prepare family child care providers for state certification through a community…

  9. The Use of Peer Networks to Increase Communicative Acts of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Mason, Rose; Thiemann-Bourque, Kathy; Feldmiller, Sarah; Turcotte, Amy; Miller, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Peer networks including social groups using typical peers, scripted instruction, visual text cues, and reinforcement were examined with students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A multiple baseline design across four participants was used to measure students' use of communication acts with peers during free play following instruction.…

  10. WATERS Network: Increasing Vertical Collaboration within Hydrology Research and Education Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, E. A.; Johnson, J.; Brus, C.; Carlson, P.; Giammar, D.; Grauer, B.; Hotaling, L.; Oguntimein, G.; Safferman, S.; Seiler, E.; Wentling, T.

    2006-12-01

    The WATer and Environmental Research Systems (WATERS) Network is envisioned to be a networked infrastructure of environmental field facilities that will establish a national environmental observatory and engineering analysis network to facilitate a more collaborative approach to addressing the challenges of large-scale human-stressed environmental systems. WATERS will transform our scientific understanding of how water quantity, quality and related components of the hydrologic cycle are impacted by natural and human influences by providing easily accessible real time environmental data and analysis tools to engineers, scientists, educators and policymakers. These tools include knowledge networks, a collaborative environmental modeling environment, maintenance of a real time data collection network, and a cybercollaboratory. WATERS will greatly enhance opportunities for the integration of research and education at all levels by facilitating collaboration between all the following groups: K-12 students and educators, university students and faculty and community, government, and industry stakeholders. The goal of facilitating collaboration is to strive for an evolution of educational reform objectives covering delivery of instruction, learning outcomes, and teacher/instructor training and professional development. WATERS will facilitate this advancement by providing: 1) A mechanism for communication and collaboration between educators, researchers and students via new and existing communication tools such as chat boards, blogs, etc; 2) A visually oriented data retrieval system/search engine for users to locate and collect relevant documents, images, and other forms of knowledge that exist in the public domain; 3) Access to real time data and analytical tools for discovery purposes by students from K-12 through graduate audiences; 4) A repository of lesson plans, learning activities, and learning materials that allows resource sharing; and 5) Professional development

  11. Method and computer product to increase accuracy of time-based software verification for sensor networks

    DOEpatents

    Foo Kune, Denis; Mahadevan, Karthikeyan

    2011-01-25

    A recursive verification protocol to reduce the time variance due to delays in the network by putting the subject node at most one hop from the verifier node provides for an efficient manner to test wireless sensor nodes. Since the software signatures are time based, recursive testing will give a much cleaner signal for positive verification of the software running on any one node in the sensor network. In this protocol, the main verifier checks its neighbor, who in turn checks its neighbor, and continuing this process until all nodes have been verified. This ensures minimum time delays for the software verification. Should a node fail the test, the software verification downstream is halted until an alternative path (one not including the failed node) is found. Utilizing techniques well known in the art, having a node tested twice, or not at all, can be avoided.

  12. The ESWN network as a platform to increase international collaboration between women in the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braker, Gesche; Wang, Yiming; Glessmer, Mirjam; Kirchgaessner, Amelie

    2014-05-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN; ESWNonline.org) is an international peer-mentoring network of women in the Earth Sciences, many in the early stages of their careers. ESWN's mission is to promote career development, build community, provide opportunities for informal mentoring and support, and facilitate professional collaborations. This has been accomplished via email and a listserv, on Facebook, at in-person networking events, and at professional development workshops. In an effort to facilitate international connections among women in the Earth Sciences, ESWN has developed a password protected community webpage supported by AGU and a National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant where members can create an online presence and interact with each other. For example, groups help women to connect with co-workers or center around a vast array of topics ranging from research interests, funding opportunities, work-life balance, teaching, scientific methods, and searching for a job to specific challenges faced by women in the earth sciences. Members can search past discussions and share documents like examples of research statements, useful interview materials, or model recommendation letters. Over the last 10 years, ESWN has grown by word of mouth to include more than 1600 members working on all 7 continents. ESWN also offers professional development workshops at major geologic conferences around the world and at ESWN-hosted workshops mostly exclusively throughout the United States. In 2014, ESWN offers a two day international workshop on communication and networking skills and career development. Women working in all disciplines of Earth Sciences from later PhD level up to junior professors in Europe are invited to the workshop that will be held in Kiel, Germany. The workshop offers participants an individual personality assessment and aims at providing participants with improved communication and networking skills. The second focus will be to teach them how to

  13. Systematic Analysis of Dimeric E3-RING Interactions Reveals Increased Combinatorial Complexity in Human Ubiquitination Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Woodsmith, Jonathan; Jenn, Robert C.; Sanderson, Chris M.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitination controls the stability or function of many human proteins, thereby regulating a wide range of physiological processes. In most cases the combinatorial pattern of protein interactions that facilitate substrate recognition or modification remain unclear. Moreover, the efficiency of ubiquitination reactions can be altered by the formation of homo- and heterotypic E3-RING complexes. To establish the prevalence and nature of binary E3-RING/E3-RING interactions systematic yeast two-hybrid screens were performed to test 7269 potential interactions between 124 human E3-RING proteins. These studies identified 228 dimeric interactions between 100 E3-RINGs, of which 205 were novel. Complementary co-immunoprecipitation studies were performed to test predicted network interactions, showing a high correlation (64%) with primary yeast two-hybrid data. This data was integrated with known E3-RING interactions, tissue expression profiles and proteomic ubiquitination datasets to facilitate identification of subnetworks in which E3-RING dimerization events have the potential to alter network structure. These results reveal a widespread yet selective pattern of E3-RING dimerization events, which have the potential to confer further combinatorial complexity within human ubiquitination cascades. PMID:22493164

  14. STRING v9.1: protein-protein interaction networks, with increased coverage and integration

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Andrea; Szklarczyk, Damian; Frankild, Sune; Kuhn, Michael; Simonovic, Milan; Roth, Alexander; Lin, Jianyi; Minguez, Pablo; Bork, Peer; von Mering, Christian; Jensen, Lars J.

    2013-01-01

    Complete knowledge of all direct and indirect interactions between proteins in a given cell would represent an important milestone towards a comprehensive description of cellular mechanisms and functions. Although this goal is still elusive, considerable progress has been made—particularly for certain model organisms and functional systems. Currently, protein interactions and associations are annotated at various levels of detail in online resources, ranging from raw data repositories to highly formalized pathway databases. For many applications, a global view of all the available interaction data is desirable, including lower-quality data and/or computational predictions. The STRING database (http://string-db.org/) aims to provide such a global perspective for as many organisms as feasible. Known and predicted associations are scored and integrated, resulting in comprehensive protein networks covering >1100 organisms. Here, we describe the update to version 9.1 of STRING, introducing several improvements: (i) we extend the automated mining of scientific texts for interaction information, to now also include full-text articles; (ii) we entirely re-designed the algorithm for transferring interactions from one model organism to the other; and (iii) we provide users with statistical information on any functional enrichment observed in their networks. PMID:23203871

  15. The CB1 Neutral Antagonist Tetrahydrocannabivarin Reduces Default Mode Network and Increases Executive Control Network Resting State Functional Connectivity in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Rzepa, Ewelina; Tudge, Luke

    2016-01-01

    Background: The cannabinoid cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) neutral antagonist tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCv) has been suggested as a possible treatment for obesity, but without the depressogenic side-effects of inverse antagonists such as Rimonabant. However, how THCv might affect the resting state functional connectivity of the human brain is as yet unknown. Method: We examined the effects of a single 10mg oral dose of THCv and placebo in 20 healthy volunteers in a randomized, within-subject, double-blind design. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and seed-based connectivity analyses, we selected the amygdala, insula, orbitofrontal cortex, and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) as regions of interest. Mood and subjective experience were also measured before and after drug administration using self-report scales. Results: Our results revealed, as expected, no significant differences in the subjective experience with a single dose of THCv. However, we found reduced resting state functional connectivity between the amygdala seed region and the default mode network and increased resting state functional connectivity between the amygdala seed region and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and between the dmPFC seed region and the inferior frontal gyrus/medial frontal gyrus. We also found a positive correlation under placebo for the amygdala-precuneus connectivity with the body mass index, although this correlation was not apparent under THCv. Conclusion: Our findings are the first to show that treatment with the CB1 neutral antagonist THCv decreases resting state functional connectivity in the default mode network and increases connectivity in the cognitive control network and dorsal visual stream network. This effect profile suggests possible therapeutic activity of THCv for obesity, where functional connectivity has been found to be altered in these regions. PMID:26362774

  16. Neural network learning control of robot manipulators using gradually increasing task difficulty

    SciTech Connect

    Sanger, T.D. )

    1994-06-01

    Trajectory Extension Learning is an incremental method for training an artificial neural network to approximate the inverse dynamics of a robot manipulator. Training data near a desired trajectory is obtained by slowly varying a parameter of the trajectory from a region of easy solvability of the inverse dynamics toward the desired behavior. The parameter can be average speed, path shape, feedback gain, or any other controllable variable. As learning proceeds, an approximate solution to the local inverse dynamics for each value of the parameter is used to guide learning for the next value of the parameter. Convergence conditions are given for two variations on the algorithm. Examples are shown of application to a real 2-joint direct drive robot arm and a simulated 3-joint redundant arm, both using simulated equilibrium point control.

  17. Increased Functional Connectivity in an Insula-Based Network is Associated with Improved Smoking Cessation Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Addicott, Merideth A; Sweitzer, Maggie M; Froeliger, Brett; Rose, Jed E; McClernon, Francis J

    2015-10-01

    Little is known regarding the underlying neurobiology of smoking cessation. Neuroimaging studies indicate a role for the insula in connecting the interoceptive awareness of tobacco craving with a larger brain network that motivates smoking. We investigated differences in insula-based functional connectivity between smokers who did not relapse during a quit attempt vs those who relapsed. Smokers (n=85) underwent a resting-state functional connectivity scan and were then randomized into two groups (either smoking usual brand cigarettes or smoking very low nicotine cigarettes plus nicotine replacement therapy) for 30 days before their target quit date. Following the quit date, all participants received nicotine replacement therapy and their smoking behavior was observed for 10 weeks. Participants were subsequently classified as nonrelapsed (n=44) or relapsed (i.e., seven consecutive days of smoking ⩾1 cigarette/day; n=41). The right and left insula, as well as insula subdivisions (posterior, ventroanterior, and dorsoanterior) were used as seed regions of interest in the connectivity analysis. Using the right and left whole-insula seed regions, the nonrelapsed group had greater functional connectivity than the relapsed group with the bilateral pre- and postcentral gyri. This effect was isolated to the right and left posterior insula seed regions. Our results suggest that relapse vulnerability is associated with weaker connectivity between the posterior insula and primary sensorimotor cortices. Perhaps greater connectivity in this network improves the ability to inhibit a motor response to cigarette cravings when those cravings conflict with a goal to remain abstinent. These results are consistent with recent studies demonstrating a positive relationship between insula-related functional connectivity and cessation likelihood among neurologically intact smokers. PMID:25895453

  18. Peer Network Drinking Predicts Increased Alcohol Use From Adolescence to Early Adulthood After Controlling for Genetic and Shared Environmental Selection

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Jennifer E.; Emery, Robert E.; Turkheimer, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Research consistently links adolescents' and young adults' drinking with their peers' alcohol intake. In interpreting this correlation, 2 essential questions are often overlooked. First, which peers are more important, best friends or broader social networks? Second, do peers cause increased drinking, or do young people select friends whose drinking habits match their own? The present study combines social network analyses with family (twin and sibling) designs to answer these questions via data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Analysis of peer nomination data from 134 schools (n = 82,629) and 1,846 twin and sibling pairs shows that peer network substance use predicts changes in drinking from adolescence into young adult life even after controlling for genetic and shared environmental selection, as well as best friend substance use. This effect was particularly strong for high-intensity friendships. Although the peer-adolescent drinking correlation is partially explained by selection, the present finding offers powerful evidence that peers also cause increased drinking. PMID:22390657

  19. Estimating nonnegative matrix model activations with deep neural networks to increase perceptual speech quality.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Donald S; Wang, Yuxuan; Wang, DeLiang

    2015-09-01

    As a means of speech separation, time-frequency masking applies a gain function to the time-frequency representation of noisy speech. On the other hand, nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) addresses separation by linearly combining basis vectors from speech and noise models to approximate noisy speech. This paper presents an approach for improving the perceptual quality of speech separated from background noise at low signal-to-noise ratios. An ideal ratio mask is estimated, which separates speech from noise with reasonable sound quality. A deep neural network then approximates clean speech by estimating activation weights from the ratio-masked speech, where the weights linearly combine elements from a NMF speech model. Systematic comparisons using objective metrics, including the perceptual evaluation of speech quality, show that the proposed algorithm achieves higher speech quality than related masking and NMF methods. In addition, a listening test was performed and its results show that the output of the proposed algorithm is preferred over the comparison systems in terms of speech quality. PMID:26428778

  20. Increasing Influenza and Pneumococcal Immunization Rates in a Nursing Home Network

    PubMed Central

    Nace, David A.; Perera, Subashan; Handler, Steven M.; Muder, Robert; Hoffman, Erika L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Rationale Influenza and pneumonia remain serious health concerns for long-term care (LTC) residents. Vaccination of LTC residents and health care workers are reasonable preventive strategies, although most facilities fall short of Healthy People 2010 goals. Improving immunization rates across multiple LTC facilities remains an elusive challenge. This quality improvement study sought to improve immunization rates across 6 LTC facilities and identify persistent barriers to better performance. Methods In 2002, 6 facilities associated with the University of Pittsburgh Institute on Aging established a quality improvement network addressing immunization rates. The facilities were provided with a written educational toolkit and shared information through an e-mail distribution list. To help determine optimal program structure in future years, 3 of the facilities participated in a single half-day collaborative training session. Change in immunization rates from baseline to year 2 were compared between those participating in the collaborative training and those not participating. Barriers to improved performance were sought from all groups through focus group analysis. Results Facilities participating in the single collaborative training program improved immunization rates modestly, whereas facilities not participating in the collaborative training saw decreases in immunization rates. Staff turnover was cited as a significant barrier to improved performance. Discussion It may be possible to improve immunization rates in LTC facilities, at least modestly, using a collaborative training process. Staff turnover may be an important barrier to improved LTC immunization rates. PMID:21450182

  1. The hypnotic zolpidem increases the synchrony of BOLD signal fluctuations in widespread brain networks during a resting paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Licata, Stephanie C.; Nickerson, Lisa D.; Lowen, Steven B.; Trksak, George H.; MacLean, Robert R.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Networks of brain regions having synchronized fluctuations of the blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) time-series at rest, or “resting state networks” (RSNs), are emerging as a basis for understanding intrinsic brain activity. RSNs are topographically consistent with activity-related networks subserving sensory, motor, and cognitive processes, and studying their spontaneous fluctuations following acute drug challenge may provide a way to understand better the neuroanatomical substrates of drug action. The present within-subject double-blind study used BOLD fMRI at 3T to investigate the functional networks influenced by the non-benzodiazepine hypnotic zolpidem (Ambien®). Zolpidem is a positive modulator of γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptors, and engenders sedative effects that may be explained in part by how it modulates intrinsic brain activity. Healthy participants (n= 12) underwent fMRI scanning 45 min after acute oral administration of zolpidem (0, 5, 10, or 20 mg), and changes in BOLD signal were measured while participants gazed at a static fixation point (i.e., at rest). Data were analyzed using group independent component analysis (ICA) with dual regression and results indicated that compared to placebo, the highest dose of zolpidem increased functional connectivity within a number of sensory, motor, and limbic networks. These results are consistent with previous studies showing an increase in functional connectivity at rest following administration of the positive GABAA receptor modulators midazolam and alcohol, and suggest that investigating how zolpidem modulates intrinsic brain activity may have implications for understanding the etiology of its powerful sedative effects. PMID:23296183

  2. Long-term increase in forest water-use efficiency observed across ecosystem carbon flux networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Trevor; Bohrer, Gil; Dragoni, Danilo; Hollinger, David; Munger, James W.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Richardson, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Terrestrial plants remove CO2 from the atmosphere through photo- synthesis, a process that is accompanied by the loss of water vapour from leaves. The ratio of water loss to carbon gain, or water-use efficiency, is a key characteristic of ecosystem function that is central to the global cycles of water, energy and carbon. Here we analyse direct, long-term measurements of whole-ecosystem carbon and water exchange. We find a substantial increase in water-use efficiency in temperate and boreal forests of the Northern Hemisphere over the past two decades. We systematically assess various competing hypotheses to explain this trend, and find that the observed increase is most consistent with a strong CO2 fertilization effect. The results suggest a partial closure of stomata - small pores on the leaf surface that regulate gas exchange - to maintain a near- constant concentration of CO2 inside the leaf even under continually increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. The observed increase in forest water-use efficiency is larger than that predicted by existing theory and 13 terrestrial biosphere models. The increase is associated with trends of increasing ecosystem-level photosynthesis and net carbon uptake, and decreasing evapotranspiration. Our findings demonstrate the utility of maintaining long-term eddy-covariance flux measurement sites. The results suggest a shift in the carbon- and water-based economics of terrestrial vegetation, which may require a reassessment of the role of stomatal control in regulating interactions between forests and climate change, and a re-evaluation of coupled vegetation-climate models.

  3. Increasing Health Research Literacy through Outreach and Networking: Why Translational Research Should Matter to Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer-White, Molly; Choate, Celeste; Markel, Dorene S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increasingly clinical and health research awareness is a priority for health and medical research communities. Translational research, including the prevention and treatment of conditions, relies upon proper funding as well as public participation in research studies. This requires executing more effective communication strategies to…

  4. A sustained increase in plasma NEFA upregulates the Toll-like receptor network in human muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hussey, Sophie E.; Lum, Helen; Alvarez, Andrea; Cipriani, Yolanda; Garduño-Garcia, José de Jesús; Anaya, Luis; Dube, John; Musi, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Insulin-sensitive tissues (muscle, liver) of individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are in a state of low-grade inflammation, characterised by increased Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and TLR-driven signalling. However, the cause of this mild inflammatory state is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that a prolonged mild increase in plasma NEFA will increase TLR expression and TLR-driven signalling (nuclear factor κB [NFκB] and mitogen-activated kinase [MAPK]) and impair insulin action in muscle of lean healthy individuals. Methods Twelve lean, normal-glucose-tolerant participants were randomised to receive a 48 h infusion (30 ml/h) of saline or Intralipid followed by a euglycaemic–hyperinsulinaemic clamp. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were performed before and during the clamp. Results Lipid infusion impaired insulin-stimulated IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity (p < 0.01). The elevation in circulating NEFA increased expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TLR5, and several MAPK (MAPK8, MAP4K4, MAP2K3) and inhibitor of κB kinase-NFκB (CHUK [IKKA], c-REL [REL] and p65 [RELA, NFKB3,p65]) signalling genes (p < 0.05). The lipid infusion also increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation (p < 0.05) and tended to reduce the content of nuclear factor of light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor α (p = 0.09). The muscle content of most diacyglycerol, ceramide and acylcarnitine species was unaffected. In summary, insulin resistance induced by prolonged low-dose lipid infusion occurs together with increased TLR-driven inflammatory signalling and impaired insulin-stimulated IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Conclusions/interpretation A sustained, mild elevation in plasma NEFA is sufficient to increase TLR expression and TLR-driven signalling (NFκB and MAPK) in lean individuals. The activation of this pathway by NEFA may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin

  5. INCREASE - an Integrated Network on Climate Change REsearch Activities on Shrubland Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappel Schmidt, Inger; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Beier, Claus; Tietema, Albert; Emmett, Bridget; De Angelis, Paolo; Duce, Pierpaolo; Cesaraccio, Carla; Spano, Donatella; Kroel-Dulay, Gyuri; Jones, Davey

    2013-04-01

    Climate change poses a serious challenge for the scientific communities to develop new concepts for research and modeling to provide better and more realistic answers and predictions of what the impact will be. INCREASE is an EU-funded research infrastructure based upon large scale field experiments with non-intrusive manipulations of temperature and precipitation since 1999. The experiments are placed in vulnerable scrubland ecosystems across Europe. Shrubland ecosystems were chosen because they represent an important natural resource, which are known to be sensitive to observed changes in environmental pressures. The experiments combine 2 different approaches to study climate effects on ecosystems. The first approach is known as "space for time" substitution, where the long term effect of a pressure on an ecosystem at any particular site is studied by moving to another site along temperature and precipitation gradients. This was done by carrying out the same studies in comparable ecosystems in UK, Denmark, the Netherlands, Hungary, Spain and Italy - which are naturally exposed to large differences in the climatic conditions. The other approach applied is "ecosystem manipulations", which means that the ecosystem is exposed to the changes in the field by realistic manipulations of temperature and water and in one experiment in combination with CO2. This combination of gradients and experimental manipulation increases the potential for evaluating the generality of the observed responses to the changes in the climatic drivers. Within INCREASE we improve the technology and methodology for studies of climate change effects on European shrublands and stimulate collaboration within the scientific community around climate manipulation experiments. In addition, data and results from the research infrastructures were collected into an integrated database (INCREASE DB) with the aim to improve capacities in the protection, management and storage of data and to provide a web

  6. Cellular and circuit models of increased resting-state network gamma activity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    White, R S; Siegel, S J

    2016-05-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a disorder characterized by positive symptoms (hallucinations, delusions), negative symptoms (blunted affect, alogia, reduced sociability, and anhedonia), as well as persistent cognitive deficits (memory, concentration, and learning). While the biology underlying subjective experiences is difficult to study, abnormalities in electroencephalographic (EEG) measures offer a means to dissect potential circuit and cellular changes in brain function. EEG is indispensable for studying cerebral information processing due to the introduction of techniques for the decomposition of event-related activity into its frequency components. Specifically, brain activity in the gamma frequency range (30-80Hz) is thought to underlie cognitive function and may be used as an endophenotype to aid in diagnosis and treatment of SCZ. In this review we address evidence indicating that there is increased resting-state gamma power in SCZ. We address how modeling this aspect of the illness in animals may help treatment development as well as providing insights into the etiology of SCZ. PMID:26577758

  7. Network meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase the uptake of smoke alarms.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Nicola J; Kendrick, Denise; Achana, Felix; Dhiman, Paula; He, Zhimin; Wynn, Persephone; Le Cozannet, Elodie; Saramago, Pedro; Sutton, Alex J

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first known to use network meta-analysis to simultaneously evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase the prevalence of functioning smoke alarms in households with children. The authors identified 24 primary studies from a systematic review of reviews and of more recently published primary studies, of which 23 (17 randomized controlled trials and 6 nonrandomized comparative studies) were included in 1 of the following 2 network meta-analyses: 1) possession of a functioning alarm: interventions that were more "intensive" (i.e., included components providing equipment (with or without fitting), home inspection, or both, in addition to education) generally were more effective. The intervention containing all of the aforementioned components was identified as being the most likely to be the most effective (probability (best) = 0.66), with an odds ratio versus usual care of 7.15 (95% credible interval: 2.40, 22.73); 2) type of battery-powered alarms: ionization alarms with lithium batteries were most likely to be the best type for increasing functioning possession (probability (best) = 0.69). Smoke alarm promotion programs should ensure they provide the combination of interventions most likely to be effective. PMID:22128085

  8. The phylogenetic structure of plant-pollinator networks increases with habitat size and isolation.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Marcelo A; Gleiser, Gabriela; Sabatino, Malena; Gilarranz, Luis J; Bascompte, Jordi; Verdú, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Similarity among species in traits related to ecological interactions is frequently associated with common ancestry. Thus, closely related species usually interact with ecologically similar partners, which can be reinforced by diverse co-evolutionary processes. The effect of habitat fragmentation on the phylogenetic signal in interspecific interactions and correspondence between plant and animal phylogenies is, however, unknown. Here, we address to what extent phylogenetic signal and co-phylogenetic congruence of plant-animal interactions depend on habitat size and isolation by analysing the phylogenetic structure of 12 pollination webs from isolated Pampean hills. Phylogenetic signal in interspecific interactions differed among webs, being stronger for flower-visiting insects than plants. Phylogenetic signal and overall co-phylogenetic congruence increased independently with hill size and isolation. We propose that habitat fragmentation would erode the phylogenetic structure of interaction webs. A decrease in phylogenetic signal and co-phylogenetic correspondence in plant-pollinator interactions could be associated with less reliable mutualism and erratic co-evolutionary change. PMID:26493295

  9. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.; Petitto, Karen R.; McLaughlin, Don

    2001-01-01

    Describes the connectivity features and options of modern campus communication and information system networks, including signal transmission (wire-based and wireless), signal switching, convergence of networks, and network assessment variables, to enable campus leaders to make sound future-oriented decisions. (EV)

  10. Transparent and accurate reporting increases reliability, utility, and impact of your research: reporting guidelines and the EQUATOR Network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although current electronic methods of scientific publishing offer increased opportunities for publishing all research studies and describing them in sufficient detail, health research literature still suffers from many shortcomings. These shortcomings seriously undermine the value and utility of the literature and waste scarce resources invested in the research. In recent years there have been several positive steps aimed at improving this situation, such as a strengthening of journals' policies on research publication and the wide requirement to register clinical trials. The EQUATOR (Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research) Network is an international initiative set up to advance high quality reporting of health research studies; it promotes good reporting practices including the wider implementation of reporting guidelines. EQUATOR provides free online resources http://www.equator-network.org supported by education and training activities and assists in the development of robust reporting guidelines. This paper outlines EQUATOR's goals and activities and offers suggestions for organizations and individuals involved in health research on how to strengthen research reporting. PMID:20420659

  11. Increased Malonyl Coenzyme A Biosynthesis by Tuning the Escherichia coli Metabolic Network and Its Application to Flavanone Production▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Zachary L.; Gikandi, William W.; Koffas, Mattheos A. G.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of genetic targets able to bring about changes to the metabolite profiles of microorganisms continues to be a challenging task. We have independently developed a cipher of evolutionary design (CiED) to identify genetic perturbations, such as gene deletions and other network modifications, that result in optimal phenotypes for the production of end products, such as recombinant natural products. Coupled to an evolutionary search, our method demonstrates the utility of a purely stoichiometric network to predict improved Escherichia coli genotypes that more effectively channel carbon flux toward malonyl coenzyme A (CoA) and other cofactors in an effort to generate recombinant strains with enhanced flavonoid production capacity. The engineered E. coli strains were constructed first by the targeted deletion of native genes predicted by CiED and then second by incorporating selected overexpressions, including those of genes required for the coexpression of the plant-derived flavanones, acetate assimilation, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and the biosynthesis of coenzyme A. As a result, the specific flavanone production from our optimally engineered strains was increased by over 660% for naringenin (15 to 100 mg/liter/optical density unit [OD]) and by over 420% for eriodictyol (13 to 55 mg/liter/OD). PMID:19633125

  12. Impulsivity is Associated with Increased Metabolism in the Fronto-Insular Network in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasian, Masoud; Rochhausen, Luisa; Maier, Franziska; Williamson, Kim L.; Drzezga, Alexander; Timmermann, Lars; Van Eimeren, Thilo; Eggers, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Various neuroimaging studies demonstrated that the fronto-insular network is implicated in impulsive behavior. We compared glucose metabolism (as a proxy measure of neural activity) among 24 patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) who presented with low or high levels of impulsivity based on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11 (BIS) scores. Subjects underwent 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and the voxel-wise group difference of FDG-metabolism was analyzed in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8). Subsequently, we performed a partial correlation analysis between the FDG-metabolism and BIS scores, controlling for covariates (i.e., age, sex, severity of disease and levodopa equivalent daily doses). Voxel-wise group comparison revealed higher FDG-metabolism in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and right insula in patients with higher impulsivity scores. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the FDG-metabolism and BIS scores. Our findings provide evidence that high impulsivity is associated with increased FDG-metabolism within the fronto-insular network in PD. PMID:26648853

  13. Expression of a tumor-related gene network increases in the mammalian hypothalamus at the time of female puberty.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christian L; Mastronardi, Claudio; Lomniczi, Alejandro; Wright, Hollis; Cabrera, Ricardo; Mungenast, Alison E; Heger, Sabine; Jung, Heike; Dubay, Christopher; Ojeda, Sergio R

    2007-11-01

    Much has been learned in recent years about the central mechanisms controlling the initiation of mammalian puberty. It is now clear that this process requires the interactive participation of several genes. Using a combination of high throughput, molecular, and bioinformatics strategies, in combination with a system biology approach, we singled out from the hypothalamus of nonhuman primates and rats a group of related genes whose expression increases at the time of female puberty. Although these genes [henceforth termed tumor-related genes (TRGs)] have diverse cellular functions, they share the common feature of having been earlier identified as involved in tumor suppression/tumor formation. A prominent member of this group is KiSS1, a gene recently shown to be essential for the occurrence of puberty. Cis-regulatory analysis revealed the presence of a hierarchically arranged gene set containing five major hubs (CDP/CUTL1, MAF, p53, YY1, and USF2) controlling the network at the transcriptional level. In turn, these hubs are heavily connected to non-TRGs involved in the transcriptional regulation of the pubertal process. TRGs may be expressed in the mammalian hypothalamus as components of a regulatory gene network that facilitates and integrates cellular and cell-cell communication programs required for the acquisition of female reproductive competence. PMID:17615149

  14. Rapid increase of spines by dihydrotestosterone and testosterone in hippocampal neurons: Dependence on synaptic androgen receptor and kinase networks.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Hojo, Yasushi; Mukai, Hideo; Murakami, Gen; Komatsuzaki, Yoshimasa; Kim, Jonghyuk; Ikeda, Muneki; Hiragushi, Ayako; Kimoto, Tetsuya; Kawato, Suguru

    2015-09-24

    Rapid modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by locally synthesized androgen is important in addition to circulating androgen. Here, we investigated the rapid changes of dendritic spines in response to the elevation of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone (T), by using hippocampal slices from adult male rats, in order to clarify whether these signaling processes include synaptic/extranuclear androgen receptor (AR) and activation of kinases. We found that the application of 10nM DHT and 10nM T increased the total density of spines by approximately 1.3-fold within 2h, by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected CA1 pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, DHT and T increased different head-sized spines. While DHT increased middle- and large-head spines, T increased small-head spines. Androgen-induced spinogenesis was suppressed by individually blocking Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC, p38 MAPK, LIMK or calcineurin. On the other hand, blocking CaMKII did not inhibit spinogenesis. Blocking PI3K altered the spine head diameter distribution, but did not change the total spine density. Blocking mRNA and protein synthesis did not suppress the enhancing effects induced by DHT or T. The enhanced spinogenesis by androgens was blocked by AR antagonist, which AR was localized postsynaptically. Taken together, these results imply that enhanced spinogenesis by DHT and T is mediated by synaptic/extranuclear AR which rapidly drives the kinase networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25511993

  15. A possible trend suggesting increased abuse from Coricidin exposures reported to the Texas Poison Network: comparing 1998 to 1999.

    PubMed

    Baker, S David; Borys, Douglas J

    2002-06-01

    Coricidin products seemed to be one of the over-the-counter medications being reportedly abused by adolescents, as observed from the Texas Poison Center Network data. This retrospective chart review investigated the occurrence of abuse, developed a patient profile, and defined the clinical effects resulting from the abuse of Coricidin products. Data collected from the Texas Poison Center Network Toxic Exposure Surveillance System database included human exposures between 1998 and 1999, patients > or = 10y old, intentional use or abuse, and single substance ingestion of I of the tablet formulations of Coricidin. Thirty-three cases from 1998 and 59 cases from 1999 were reviewed. Of these cases, 85% met the inclusion criteria. Of the 7 medications searched, only 4 substances were coded for: Coricidin D, Coricidin D (long acting), Coricidin D (cold, flu & sinus) and Coriciding HBP. These contain a combination of dextromethorphan hydrobromide, chlorpheniramine maleate, phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride, and acetaminophen. Of the 78 cases, 63% were male and 38% were female. The mean age was 14.67 years, 77% being between 13 to 17 years old. Eighteen different symptoms were reported: tachycardia 50%, somnolence 24.4%, mydriasis and hypertension 16.7%, agitation 12.8%, disorientation 10.3%, slurred speech 9%, ataxia 6.4%, vomiting 5.1%, dry mouth and hallucinations 3.9%, tremor 2.6%, and headache, dizziness, syncope, seizure, chest pain, and nystagmus each 1.3%; 12.8% of the calls originated from the school nurse. The incidence of abuse reported increased 60% from 1998 to 1999. This worrisome trend suggests increased abuse of these products. PMID:12046973

  16. Distractibility during retrieval of long-term memory: domain-general interference, neural networks and increased susceptibility in normal aging

    PubMed Central

    Wais, Peter E.; Gazzaley, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The mere presence of irrelevant external stimuli results in interference with the fidelity of details retrieved from long-term memory (LTM). Recent studies suggest that distractibility during LTM retrieval occurs when the focus of resource-limited, top-down mechanisms that guide the selection of relevant mnemonic details is disrupted by representations of external distractors. We review findings from four studies that reveal distractibility during episodic retrieval. The approach cued participants to recall previously studied visual details when their eyes were closed, or were open and irrelevant visual information was present. The results showed a negative impact of the distractors on the fidelity of details retrieved from LTM. An fMRI experiment using the same paradigm replicated the behavioral results and found that diminished episodic memory was associated with the disruption of functional connectivity in whole-brain networks. Specifically, network connectivity supported recollection of details based on visual imagery when eyes were closed, but connectivity declined in the presence of visual distractors. Another experiment using auditory distractors found equivalent effects for auditory and visual distraction during cued recall, suggesting that the negative impact of distractibility is a domain-general phenomenon in LTM. Comparisons between older and younger adults revealed an aging-related increase in the negative impact of distractibility on retrieval of LTM. Finally, a new study that compared categorization abilities between younger and older adults suggests a cause underlying age-related decline of visual details in LTM. The sum of our findings suggests that cognitive control resources, although limited, have the capability to resolve interference from distractors during tasks of moderate effort, but these resources are overwhelmed when additional processes associated with episodic retrieval, or categorization of complex prototypes, are required. PMID

  17. No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kirrilly; Every, Danielle; Rainbird, Sophia; Cornell, Victoria; Smith, Bradley; Trigg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to members of the community who are already considered vulnerable? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes seven particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. It concludes that animal attachment could provide a novel conduit for accessing, communicating with and motivating vulnerable people to engage in resilience building behaviors that promote survival and facilitate recovery. Abstract Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc.) and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves). The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to vulnerable members of the community who own pets or other animals? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. Despite different vulnerabilities, animals were found to be important to the disaster resilience of seven vulnerable groups in Australia. Animal attachment and animal-related activities and networks are identified as underexplored devices for disseminating or ‘piggybacking’ disaster-related information and engaging vulnerable people in resilience building behaviors (in addition to including animals in disaster planning initiatives in general). Animals may provide the kind of innovative approach required

  18. Dielectric effects of step-increased pressure on the mass- and diffusion-controlled linear chain and network macromolecules growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasylyshyn, D. A.; Johari, G. P.

    1998-10-01

    The dielectric properties of four stoichiometric liquid mixtures of a diepoxide with two monoamines and two diamines have been studied in real time during the mixture's polymerization isothermally to a linear-chain polymer in two cases and a network polymer in the other two cases, at 1 and 200 bar. The pressure was applied: (a) at the beginning of polymerization, (b) after a small extent of polymerization when the viscosity was low, and (c) after a relatively large extent of polymerization when the viscosity was high. For a fixed polymerization period, pressure increased the dielectric relaxation time much more than any other quantity in all cases, without a change in the distribution of relaxation times. Contributions to the dielectric permittivity and loss from physical and chemical effects have been considered and related to the changes in the dielectric relaxation time, viscosity and polymerization-rate constant as the extent of polymerization increased with time. Pressure is expected to decrease the polymerization rate for all conditions, but the decrease is relatively insignificant at the early stage, when polymerization is mass-controlled. Here other effects override the effect of viscosity increase, and the polymerization rate instead increases. The decrease in the rate becomes significant and predominates only when polymerization becomes diffusion-controlled. Since theories of diffusion-controlled reactions do not consider the mutual slowing of the molecular diffusion and the rate of chemical reactions leading to a macromolecule's growth until its vitrification isothermally, a method for determining the onset of diffusion control was needed. It is shown that this onset can be determined from plotting the rate of polymerization against the dielectric relaxation time. Expressed in terms of the dielectric loss, these plots cross each other. The cross-over point indicates the onset of diffusion control. Thus, the effect of pressure on the dielectric behaviour

  19. Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Betty

    Networking is an information giving and receiving system, a support system, and a means whereby women can get ahead in careers--either in new jobs or in current positions. Networking information can create many opportunities: women can talk about how other women handle situations and tasks, and previously established contacts can be used in…

  20. Functional Changes in the Language Network in Response to Increased Amyloid β Deposition in Cognitively Intact Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Adamczuk, Katarzyna; De Weer, An-Sofie; Nelissen, Natalie; Dupont, Patrick; Sunaert, Stefan; Bettens, Karolien; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Van Laere, Koen; Vandenberghe, Rik

    2016-01-01

    Word finding symptoms are frequent early in the course of Alzheimer's disease and relate principally to functional changes in left posterior temporal cortex. In cognitively intact older adults, we examined whether amyloid load affects the network for language and associative-semantic processing. Fifty-six community-recruited subjects (52-74 years), stratified for apolipoprotein E and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype, received a neurolinguistic assessment, (18)F-flutemetamol positron emission tomography, and a functional MRI of the associative-semantic system. The primary measure of amyloid load was the cerebral-to-cerebellar gray matter standardized uptake value ratio in a composite cortical volume of interest (SUVR(comp)). The primary outcome analysis consisted of a whole-brain voxelwise linear regression between SUVR(comp) and fMRI response during associative-semantic versus visuoperceptual processing. Higher activity in one region, the posterior left middle temporal gyrus, correlated positively with increased amyloid load. The correlation remained significant when only the word conditions were contrasted but not for pictures. According to a stepwise linear regression analysis, offline naming reaction times correlated positively with SUVR(comp). A binary classification into amyloid-positive and amyloid-negative cases confirmed our findings. The left posterior temporal activity increase may reflect higher demands for semantic control in the presence of a higher amyloid burden. PMID:25452579

  1. Increased Intrinsic Connectivity of the Default Mode Network in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Evidence from Resting-State MEG Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Fu-Jung; Yu, Hsiang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Ta; Kwan, Shang-Yeong; Chen, Chien; Yen, Der-Jen; Yiu, Chun-Hing; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The electrophysiological signature of resting state oscillatory functional connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) during spike-free periods in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains unclear. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings, this study investigated how the connectivity within the DMN was altered in TLE, and we examined the effect of lateralized TLE on functional connectivity. Sixteen medically intractable TLE patients and 22 controls participated in this study. Whole-scalp 306-channel MEG epochs without interictal spikes generated from both MEG and EEG data were analyzed using a minimum norm estimate (MNE) and source-based imaginary coherence analysis. With this processing, we obtained the cortical activation and functional connectivity within the DMN. The functional connectivity was increased between DMN and the right medial temporal (MT) region at the delta band and between DMN and the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) regions at the theta band. The functional change was associated with the lateralization of TLE. The right TLE showed enhanced DMN connectivity with the right MT while the left TLE demonstrated increased DMN connectivity with the bilateral MT. There was no lateralization effect of TLE upon the DMN connectivity with ACC. These findings suggest that the resting-state functional connectivity within the DMN is reinforced in temporal lobe epilepsy during spike-free periods. Future studies are needed to examine if the altered functional connectivity can be used as a biomarker for treatment responses, cognitive dysfunction and prognosis in patients with TLE. PMID:26035750

  2. Increased Intrinsic Connectivity of the Default Mode Network in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Evidence from Resting-State MEG Recordings.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Fu-Jung; Yu, Hsiang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Ta; Kwan, Shang-Yeong; Chen, Chien; Yen, Der-Jen; Yiu, Chun-Hing; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The electrophysiological signature of resting state oscillatory functional connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) during spike-free periods in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains unclear. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings, this study investigated how the connectivity within the DMN was altered in TLE, and we examined the effect of lateralized TLE on functional connectivity. Sixteen medically intractable TLE patients and 22 controls participated in this study. Whole-scalp 306-channel MEG epochs without interictal spikes generated from both MEG and EEG data were analyzed using a minimum norm estimate (MNE) and source-based imaginary coherence analysis. With this processing, we obtained the cortical activation and functional connectivity within the DMN. The functional connectivity was increased between DMN and the right medial temporal (MT) region at the delta band and between DMN and the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) regions at the theta band. The functional change was associated with the lateralization of TLE. The right TLE showed enhanced DMN connectivity with the right MT while the left TLE demonstrated increased DMN connectivity with the bilateral MT. There was no lateralization effect of TLE upon the DMN connectivity with ACC. These findings suggest that the resting-state functional connectivity within the DMN is reinforced in temporal lobe epilepsy during spike-free periods. Future studies are needed to examine if the altered functional connectivity can be used as a biomarker for treatment responses, cognitive dysfunction and prognosis in patients with TLE. PMID:26035750

  3. Exotic plant infestation is associated with decreased modularity and increased numbers of connectors in mixed-grass prairie pollination networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Diane L.; Rabie, Paul A.; Droege, Sam; Larson, Jennifer L.; Haar, Milton

    2016-01-01

    The majority of pollinating insects are generalists whose lifetimes overlap flowering periods of many potentially suitable plant species. Such generality is instrumental in allowing exotic plant species to invade pollination networks. The particulars of how existing networks change in response to an invasive plant over the course of its phenology are not well characterized, but may shed light on the probability of long-term effects on plant-pollinator interactions and the stability of network structure. Here we describe changes in network topology and modular structure of infested and non-infested networks during the flowering season of the generalist non-native flowering plant, Cirsium arvense in mixed-grass prairie at Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA. Objectives were to compare network-level effects of infestation as they propagate over the season in infested and non-infested (with respect to C. arvense) networks. We characterized plant-pollinator networks on 5 non-infested and 7 infested 1-ha plots during 4 sample periods that collectively covered the length of C. arvense flowering period. Two other abundantly-flowering invasive plants were present during this time: Melilotus officinalis had highly variable floral abundance in both C. arvense-infested and non-infested plots andConvolvulus arvensis, which occurred almost exclusively in infested plots and peaked early in the season. Modularity, including roles of individual species, and network topology were assessed for each sample period as well as in pooled infested and non-infested networks. Differences in modularity and network metrics between infested and non-infested networks were limited to the third and fourth sample periods, during flower senescence of C. arvenseand the other invasive species; generality of pollinators rose concurrently, suggesting rewiring of the network and a lag effect of earlier floral abundance. Modularity was lower and number of connectors higher in infested

  4. Exotic Plant Infestation Is Associated with Decreased Modularity and Increased Numbers of Connectors in Mixed-Grass Prairie Pollination Networks

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Diane L.; Rabie, Paul A.; Droege, Sam; Larson, Jennifer L.; Haar, Milton

    2016-01-01

    The majority of pollinating insects are generalists whose lifetimes overlap flowering periods of many potentially suitable plant species. Such generality is instrumental in allowing exotic plant species to invade pollination networks. The particulars of how existing networks change in response to an invasive plant over the course of its phenology are not well characterized, but may shed light on the probability of long-term effects on plant-pollinator interactions and the stability of network structure. Here we describe changes in network topology and modular structure of infested and non-infested networks during the flowering season of the generalist non-native flowering plant, Cirsium arvense in mixed-grass prairie at Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA. Objectives were to compare network-level effects of infestation as they propagate over the season in infested and non-infested (with respect to C. arvense) networks. We characterized plant-pollinator networks on 5 non-infested and 7 infested 1-ha plots during 4 sample periods that collectively covered the length of C. arvense flowering period. Two other abundantly-flowering invasive plants were present during this time: Melilotus officinalis had highly variable floral abundance in both C. arvense-infested and non-infested plots and Convolvulus arvensis, which occurred almost exclusively in infested plots and peaked early in the season. Modularity, including roles of individual species, and network topology were assessed for each sample period as well as in pooled infested and non-infested networks. Differences in modularity and network metrics between infested and non-infested networks were limited to the third and fourth sample periods, during flower senescence of C. arvense and the other invasive species; generality of pollinators rose concurrently, suggesting rewiring of the network and a lag effect of earlier floral abundance. Modularity was lower and number of connectors higher in infested networks

  5. Exotic Plant Infestation Is Associated with Decreased Modularity and Increased Numbers of Connectors in Mixed-Grass Prairie Pollination Networks.

    PubMed

    Larson, Diane L; Rabie, Paul A; Droege, Sam; Larson, Jennifer L; Haar, Milton

    2016-01-01

    The majority of pollinating insects are generalists whose lifetimes overlap flowering periods of many potentially suitable plant species. Such generality is instrumental in allowing exotic plant species to invade pollination networks. The particulars of how existing networks change in response to an invasive plant over the course of its phenology are not well characterized, but may shed light on the probability of long-term effects on plant-pollinator interactions and the stability of network structure. Here we describe changes in network topology and modular structure of infested and non-infested networks during the flowering season of the generalist non-native flowering plant, Cirsium arvense in mixed-grass prairie at Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA. Objectives were to compare network-level effects of infestation as they propagate over the season in infested and non-infested (with respect to C. arvense) networks. We characterized plant-pollinator networks on 5 non-infested and 7 infested 1-ha plots during 4 sample periods that collectively covered the length of C. arvense flowering period. Two other abundantly-flowering invasive plants were present during this time: Melilotus officinalis had highly variable floral abundance in both C. arvense-infested and non-infested plots and Convolvulus arvensis, which occurred almost exclusively in infested plots and peaked early in the season. Modularity, including roles of individual species, and network topology were assessed for each sample period as well as in pooled infested and non-infested networks. Differences in modularity and network metrics between infested and non-infested networks were limited to the third and fourth sample periods, during flower senescence of C. arvense and the other invasive species; generality of pollinators rose concurrently, suggesting rewiring of the network and a lag effect of earlier floral abundance. Modularity was lower and number of connectors higher in infested networks

  6. The central nervous norepinephrine network links a diminished sense of emotional well-being to an increased body weight

    PubMed Central

    Melasch, J; Rullmann, M; Hilbert, A; Luthardt, J; Becker, GA; Patt, M; Villringer, A; Arelin, K; Meyer, PM; Lobsien, D; Ding, Y-S; Müller, K; Sabri, O; Hesse, S; Pleger, B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The neurobiological mechanisms linking obesity to emotional distress remain largely undiscovered. METHODS In this pilot study, we combined positron emission tomography, using the norepinephrine transporter (NET) tracer [11C]-O-methylreboxetine, with functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging, the Beck depression inventory (BDI), and the impact of weight on quality of life-Lite questionnaire (IWQOL–Lite), to investigate the role of norepinephrine in the severity of depression (BDI), as well as in the loss of emotional well-being with body weight (IWQOL–Lite). RESULTS In a small group of lean-to-morbidly obese individuals (n = 20), we show that an increased body mass index (BMI) is related to a lowered NET availability within the hypothalamus, known as the brain’s homeostatic control site. The hypothalamus displayed a strengthened connectivity in relation to the individual hypothalamic NET availability to the anterior insula/frontal operculum, as well as the medial orbitofrontal cortex, assumed to host the primary and secondary gustatory cortex, respectively (n = 19). The resting-state activity in these two regions was correlated positively to the BMI and IWQOL–Lite scores, but not to the BDI, suggesting that the higher the resting-state activity in these regions, and hence the higher the BMI, the stronger the negative impact of the body weight on the individual’s emotional well-being was. CONCLUSIONS This pilot study suggests that the loss in emotional well-being with weight is embedded within the central norepinephrine network. PMID:26620766

  7. Negative functional coupling between the right fronto-parietal and limbic resting state networks predicts increased self-control and later substance use onset in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Telzer, Eva H

    2016-08-01

    Recent developmental brain imaging studies have demonstrated that negatively coupled prefrontal-limbic circuitry implicates the maturation of brain development in adolescents. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and independent component analysis (ICA), the present study examined functional network coupling between prefrontal and limbic systems and links to self-control and substance use onset in adolescents. Results suggest that negative network coupling (anti-correlated temporal dynamics) between the right fronto-parietal and limbic resting state networks is associated with greater self-control and later substance use onset in adolescents. These findings increase our understanding of the developmental importance of prefrontal-limbic circuitry for adolescent substance use at the resting-state network level. PMID:27344035

  8. Mycelium-Like Networks Increase Bacterial Dispersal, Growth, and Biodegradation in a Model Ecosystem at Various Water Potentials.

    PubMed

    Worrich, Anja; König, Sara; Miltner, Anja; Banitz, Thomas; Centler, Florian; Frank, Karin; Thullner, Martin; Harms, Hauke; Kästner, Matthias; Wick, Lukas Y

    2016-05-15

    Fungal mycelia serve as effective dispersal networks for bacteria in water-unsaturated environments, thereby allowing bacteria to maintain important functions, such as biodegradation. However, poor knowledge exists on the effects of dispersal networks at various osmotic (Ψo) and matric (Ψm) potentials, which contribute to the water potential mainly in terrestrial soil environments. Here we studied the effects of artificial mycelium-like dispersal networks on bacterial dispersal dynamics and subsequent effects on growth and benzoate biodegradation at ΔΨo and ΔΨm values between 0 and -1.5 MPa. In a multiple-microcosm approach, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged derivative of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as a model organism and sodium benzoate as a representative of polar aromatic contaminants. We found that decreasing ΔΨo and ΔΨm values slowed bacterial dispersal in the system, leading to decelerated growth and benzoate degradation. In contrast, dispersal networks facilitated bacterial movement at ΔΨo and ΔΨm values between 0 and -0.5 MPa and thus improved the absolute biodegradation performance by up to 52 and 119% for ΔΨo and ΔΨm, respectively. This strong functional interrelationship was further emphasized by a high positive correlation between population dispersal, population growth, and degradation. We propose that dispersal networks may sustain the functionality of microbial ecosystems at low osmotic and matric potentials. PMID:26944849

  9. How Structured Is the Entangled Bank? The Surprisingly Simple Organization of Multiplex Ecological Networks Leads to Increased Persistence and Resilience.

    PubMed

    Kéfi, Sonia; Miele, Vincent; Wieters, Evie A; Navarrete, Sergio A; Berlow, Eric L

    2016-08-01

    Species are linked to each other by a myriad of positive and negative interactions. This complex spectrum of interactions constitutes a network of links that mediates ecological communities' response to perturbations, such as exploitation and climate change. In the last decades, there have been great advances in the study of intricate ecological networks. We have, nonetheless, lacked both the data and the tools to more rigorously understand the patterning of multiple interaction types between species (i.e., "multiplex networks"), as well as their consequences for community dynamics. Using network statistical modeling applied to a comprehensive ecological network, which includes trophic and diverse non-trophic links, we provide a first glimpse at what the full "entangled bank" of species looks like. The community exhibits clear multidimensional structure, which is taxonomically coherent and broadly predictable from species traits. Moreover, dynamic simulations suggest that this non-random patterning of how diverse non-trophic interactions map onto the food web could allow for higher species persistence and higher total biomass than expected by chance and tends to promote a higher robustness to extinctions. PMID:27487303

  10. Whole-brain analytic measures of network communication reveal increased structure-function correlation in right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wirsich, Jonathan; Perry, Alistair; Ridley, Ben; Proix, Timothée; Golos, Mathieu; Bénar, Christian; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Breakspear, Michael; Jirsa, Viktor; Guye, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo structure-function relationship is key to understanding brain network reorganization due to pathologies. This relationship is likely to be particularly complex in brain network diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy, in which disturbed large-scale systems are involved in both transient electrical events and long-lasting functional and structural impairments. Herein, we estimated this relationship by analyzing the correlation between structural connectivity and functional connectivity in terms of analytical network communication parameters. As such, we targeted the gradual topological structure-function reorganization caused by the pathology not only at the whole brain scale but also both in core and peripheral regions of the brain. We acquired diffusion (dMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) data in seven right-lateralized TLE (rTLE) patients and fourteen healthy controls and analyzed the structure-function relationship by using analytical network communication metrics derived from the structural connectome. In rTLE patients, we found a widespread hypercorrelated functional network. Network communication analysis revealed greater unspecific branching of the shortest path (search information) in the structural connectome and a higher global correlation between the structural and functional connectivity for the patient group. We also found evidence for a preserved structural rich-club in the patient group. In sum, global augmentation of structure-function correlation might be linked to a smaller functional repertoire in rTLE patients, while sparing the central core of the brain which may represent a pathway that facilitates the spread of seizures. PMID:27330970

  11. Does Academic Apprenticeship Increase Networking Ties among Participants? A Case Study of an Energy Efficiency Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hytönen, Kaisa; Palonen, Tuire; Lehtinen, Erno; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the requirements of future education in different fields of academic professional activity, a model called Academic Apprenticeship Education was initiated in Finland in 2009. The aim of this article is to analyse the development of expert networks in the context of a 1-year Academic Apprenticeship Education model in the field…

  12. How Structured Is the Entangled Bank? The Surprisingly Simple Organization of Multiplex Ecological Networks Leads to Increased Persistence and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Wieters, Evie A.; Navarrete, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    Species are linked to each other by a myriad of positive and negative interactions. This complex spectrum of interactions constitutes a network of links that mediates ecological communities’ response to perturbations, such as exploitation and climate change. In the last decades, there have been great advances in the study of intricate ecological networks. We have, nonetheless, lacked both the data and the tools to more rigorously understand the patterning of multiple interaction types between species (i.e., “multiplex networks”), as well as their consequences for community dynamics. Using network statistical modeling applied to a comprehensive ecological network, which includes trophic and diverse non-trophic links, we provide a first glimpse at what the full “entangled bank” of species looks like. The community exhibits clear multidimensional structure, which is taxonomically coherent and broadly predictable from species traits. Moreover, dynamic simulations suggest that this non-random patterning of how diverse non-trophic interactions map onto the food web could allow for higher species persistence and higher total biomass than expected by chance and tends to promote a higher robustness to extinctions. PMID:27487303

  13. A Qualitative Study to Examine Feasibility and Design of an Online Social Networking Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Teenage Girls

    PubMed Central

    Van Kessel, Gisela; Kavanagh, Madeleine; Maher, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background Online social networks present wide-reaching and flexible platforms through which to deliver health interventions to targeted populations. This study used a social marketing approach to explore teenage girls’ perceptions of physical activity and the potential use of online social networks to receive a physical activity intervention. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with 19 Australian teenage girls (ages 13 to 18 years) with varying levels of physical activity and socioeconomic status. A semi-structured format was used, with groups discussion transcribed verbatim. Content analysis identified emergent themes, with triangulation and memos used to ensure accuracy. Results Physical activity was most appealing when it emphasised sport, exercise and fitness, along with opportunities for socialisation with friends and self-improvement. Participants were receptive to delivery of a physical activity intervention via online social networks, with Facebook the most widely reported site. Participants commonly accessed online social networks via mobile devices and particularly smartphones. Undesirable features included promotion of physical activity in terms of walking; use of cartoon imagery; use of humour; and promotion of the intervention via schools, each of which were considered “uncool”. Participants noted that their parents were likely to be supportive of them using an online social networking physical activity intervention, particularly if not promoted as a weight loss intervention. Conclusion This study identified key features likely to increase the feasibility and retention of an online social networking physical activity intervention for teenage girls. Guidelines for the design of interventions for teenage girls are provided for future applications. PMID:26934191

  14. Stress-induced recruitment of epiplakin to keratin networks increases their resistance to hyperphosphorylation-induced disruption.

    PubMed

    Spazierer, Daniel; Raberger, Julia; Gross, Karin; Fuchs, Peter; Wiche, Gerhard

    2008-03-15

    Epiplakin is a large (>725 kDa) cytoskeletal protein exclusively expressed in epithelial tissues. It has a unique structure, consisting entirely of plakin repeat domains (PRDs), one of the hallmarks of spectraplakin protein family members. Previous studies, including the phenotypic analyses of knockout mice, failed to reveal the biological function of epiplakin. Using in vitro binding assays, we show here that all but one of the 16 PRDs of mouse epiplakin bind to keratins of basal keratinocytes. Nevertheless, in primary keratinocyte cell cultures, epiplakin only partially colocalized with keratin intermediate filament networks. However, upon application of cellular stress in the form of keratin hyperphosphorylation, osmotic shock or UV irradiation, the entire cytoplasmic epiplakin pool became associated with keratin. In response to such types of stress, epiplakin initially translocated to the still-intact keratin filament network and remained associated with keratin after its disruption and transformation into granular aggregates. Time-course experiments revealed that serine/threonine (okadaic acid) and tyrosine (orthovanadate) phosphatase inhibitor-induced filament disruption in differentiated keratinocytes proceeded faster in epiplakin-deficient cells compared with wild-type cells. Our data suggest that epiplakin plays a role in keratin filament reorganization in response to stress, probably by protecting keratin filaments against disruption in a chaperone-like fashion. PMID:18285451

  15. Increased Resting-State Functional Connectivity in the Cingulo-Opercular Cognitive-Control Network after Intervention in Children with Reading Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi; Toro-Serey, Claudio; DiFrancesco, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Dyslexia, or reading difficulty, is characterized by slow, inaccurate reading accompanied by executive dysfunction. Reading training using the Reading Acceleration Program improves reading and executive functions in both children with dyslexia and typical readers. This improvement is associated with increased activation in and functional connectivity between the anterior cingulate cortex, part of the cingulo-opercular cognitive-control network, and the fusiform gyrus during a reading task after training. The objective of the current study was to determine whether the training also has an effect on functional connectivity of the cingulo-opercular and fronto-parietal cognitive-control networks during rest in children with dyslexia and typical readers. Fifteen children with reading difficulty and 17 typical readers (8-12 years old) were included in the study. Reading and executive functions behavioral measures and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected before and after reading training. Imaging data were analyzed using a graphical network-modeling tool. Both reading groups had increased reading and executive-functions scores after training, with greater gains among the dyslexia group. Training may have less effect on cognitive control in typical readers and a more direct effect on the visual area, as previously reported. Statistical analysis revealed that compared to typical readers, children with reading difficulty had significantly greater functional connectivity in the cingulo-opercular network after training, which may demonstrate the importance of cognitive control during reading in this population. These results support previous findings of increased error-monitoring activation after reading training in children with dyslexia and confirm greater gains with training in this group. PMID:26197049

  16. Increased Resting-State Functional Connectivity in the Cingulo-Opercular Cognitive-Control Network after Intervention in Children with Reading Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi; Toro-Serey, Claudio; DiFrancesco, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Dyslexia, or reading difficulty, is characterized by slow, inaccurate reading accompanied by executive dysfunction. Reading training using the Reading Acceleration Program improves reading and executive functions in both children with dyslexia and typical readers. This improvement is associated with increased activation in and functional connectivity between the anterior cingulate cortex, part of the cingulo-opercular cognitive-control network, and the fusiform gyrus during a reading task after training. The objective of the current study was to determine whether the training also has an effect on functional connectivity of the cingulo-opercular and fronto-parietal cognitive-control networks during rest in children with dyslexia and typical readers. Fifteen children with reading difficulty and 17 typical readers (8-12 years old) were included in the study. Reading and executive functions behavioral measures and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected before and after reading training. Imaging data were analyzed using a graphical network-modeling tool. Both reading groups had increased reading and executive-functions scores after training, with greater gains among the dyslexia group. Training may have less effect on cognitive control in typical readers and a more direct effect on the visual area, as previously reported. Statistical analysis revealed that compared to typical readers, children with reading difficulty had significantly greater functional connectivity in the cingulo-opercular network after training, which may demonstrate the importance of cognitive control during reading in this population. These results support previous findings of increased error-monitoring activation after reading training in children with dyslexia and confirm greater gains with training in this group. PMID:26197049

  17. The Neural Basis of Recollection Rejection: Increases in Hippocampal-Prefrontal Connectivity in the Absence of a Shared Recall-to-Reject and Target Recollection Network.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Caitlin R; Dennis, Nancy A

    2016-08-01

    Recollection rejection or "recall-to-reject" is a mechanism that has been posited to help maintain accurate memory by preventing the occurrence of false memories. Recollection rejection occurs when the presentation of a new item during recognition triggers recall of an associated target, a mismatch in features between the new and old items is registered, and the lure is correctly rejected. Critically, this characterization of recollection rejection involves a recall signal that is conceptually similar to recollection as elicited by a target. However, previous neuroimaging studies have not evaluated the extent to which recollection rejection and target recollection rely on a common neural signal but have instead focused on recollection rejection as a postretrieval monitoring process. This study utilized a false memory paradigm in conjunction with an adapted remember-know-new response paradigm that separated "new" responses based on recollection rejection from those that were based on a lack of familiarity with the item. This procedure allowed for parallel recollection rejection and target recollection contrasts to be computed. Results revealed that, contrary to predictions from theoretical and behavioral literature, there was virtually no evidence of a common retrieval mechanism supporting recollection rejection and target recollection. Instead of the typical target recollection network, recollection rejection recruited a network of lateral prefrontal and bilateral parietal regions that is consistent with the retrieval monitoring network identified in previous neuroimaging studies of recollection rejection. However, a functional connectivity analysis revealed a component of the frontoparietal rejection network that showed increased coupling with the right hippocampus during recollection rejection responses. As such, we demonstrate a possible link between PFC monitoring network and basic retrieval mechanisms within the hippocampus that was not revealed with

  18. Resilience to childhood maltreatment is associated with increased resting-state functional connectivity of the salience network with the lingual gyrus.

    PubMed

    van der Werff, Steven J A; Pannekoek, J Nienke; Veer, Ilya M; van Tol, Marie-José; Aleman, André; Veltman, Dick J; Zitman, Frans G; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Elzinga, Bernet M; van der Wee, Nic J A

    2013-11-01

    The experience of childhood maltreatment is related to an increased risk of developing a variety of psychiatric disorders, as well as a change in the structure of the brain. However, not much is known about the neurobiological basis of resilience to childhood maltreatment. This study aims to identify resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) patterns specific for resilience to childhood maltreatment, focusing on the default mode and salience network and networks seeded from the amygdala and left dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Resting-state functional MRI scans were obtained in 33 individuals. Seeds in the bilateral amygdala, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), the posterior cingulate cortex and the left dorsomedial prefrontal cortex were defined and used to examine whether resilient individuals differed from vulnerable individuals and healthy controls in RSFC with other brain regions. Within the salience network, the resilient group was associated with increased RSFC between the left dACC and a region containing the bilateral lingual gyrus and the occipital fusiform gyrus compared to both the vulnerable group and the healthy controls. In this study, we found RSFC patterns specific for resilient individuals. Regions that are implicated are related on a functional level to declarative memory and the processing of emotional stimuli. PMID:23948312

  19. Increasing scientific standards, independence and transparency in post-authorisation studies: the role of the European Network of Centres for Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Blake, Kevin V; Devries, Corinne S; Arlett, Peter; Kurz, Xavier; Fitt, Henry

    2012-07-01

    PURPOSE: The European Network of Centres for Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacovigilance (ENCePP), an initiative coordinated by the European Medicines Agency, aims to build capacity for and increase trust in post-authorisation studies to further support medicine decision making. METHODS: ENCePP seeks to promote and support high standards throughout the post-authorisation research process based on robust methodologies, transparency and scientific independence. RESULTS: ENCePP provides a point of access to researchers for industry, academia and regulatory authorities seeking collaboration for the conduct of post-authorisation studies. As of 30 November 2011, the network consisted of 98 research centres, 13 networks and 18 data sources, mostly academic and publicly funded institutions but also data source providers and contract research organisations with expertise in the conduct of post-authorisation studies. All are listed in the free, public and fully searchable electronic Database of Research Resources. A guide and a checklist on methodological standards have been published; the concept of an 'ENCePP study', including a Code of Conduct, introduced; and an electronic register of studies have been launched. CONCLUSION: It is envisaged that application of the ENCePP study concept will result in an increase in trust in post-authorisation studies of medicines. The register of studies will allow for ready access to study protocols and results, thereby enhancing transparency and facilitating review. Through the network, standards, transparency and clarity of relationships, ENCePP is expected to add to the European Union capacity to conduct robust post-authorisation studies, thereby benefiting public health. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22522622

  20. Long-term increase in forest water-use efficiency observed across ecosystem carbon flux networks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, T. F.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bohrer, G.; Dragoni, D.; Munger, J. W.; Schmid, H. E.; Richardson, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial plants remove CO2 from the atmosphere through photo- synthesis, a process that is accompanied by the loss of water vapour from leaves. The ratio of water loss to carbon gain, or water-use efficiency, is a key characteristic of ecosystem function that is central to the global cycles of water, energy and carbon. Here we analyse direct, long-term measurements of whole-ecosystem carbon and water exchange. We find a substantial increase in water-use efficiency in temperate and boreal forests of the Northern Hemisphere over the past two decades. We systematically assess various competing hypotheses to explain this trend, and find that the observed increase is most consistent with a strong CO2 fertilization effect. The results suggest a partial closure of stomata - small pores on the leaf surface that regulate gas exchange - to maintain a near- constant concentration of CO2 inside the leaf even under continually increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. The observed increase in forest water-use efficiency is larger than that predicted by existing theory and 13 terrestrial biosphere models. The increase is associated with trends of increasing ecosystem-level photosynthesis and net carbon uptake, and decreasing evapotranspiration. Our findings demonstrate the utility of maintaining long-term eddy-covariance flux measurement sites. The results suggest a shift in the carbon- and water-based economics of terrestrial vegetation, which may require a reassessment of the role of stomatal control in regulating interactions between forests and climate change, and a re-evaluation of coupled vegetation-climate models.

  1. The Cervix Cancer Research Network: Increasing Access to Cancer Clinical Trials in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Suneja, Gita; Bacon, Monica; Small, William; Ryu, Sang Y.; Kitchener, Henry C.; Gaffney, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The burden of cervical cancer is large and growing in developing countries, due in large part to limited access to screening services and lack of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. In spite of modern advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, outcomes from cervical cancer have not markedly improved in recent years. Novel clinical trials are urgently needed to improve outcomes from cervical cancer worldwide. Methods: The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN), a subsidiary of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup, is a multi-national, multi-institutional consortium of physicians and scientists focused on improving cervical cancer outcomes worldwide by making cancer clinical trials available in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Standard operating procedures for participation in CCRN include a pre-qualifying questionnaire to evaluate clinical activities and research infrastructure, followed by a site visit. Once a site is approved, they may choose to participate in one of four currently accruing clinical trials. Results: To date, 13 different CCRN site visits have been performed. Of these 13 sites visited, 10 have been approved as CCRN sites including Tata Memorial Hospital, India; Bangalore, India; Trivandrum, India; Ramathibodi, Thailand; Siriaj, Thailand; Pramongkutklao, Thailand; Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam; Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center; the Hertzen Moscow Cancer Research Institute; and the Russian Scientific Center of Roentgenoradiology. The four currently accruing clinical trials are TACO, OUTBACK, INTERLACE, and SHAPE. Discussion: The CCRN has successfully enrolled eight sites in developing countries to participate in four randomized clinical trials. The primary objectives are to provide novel therapeutics to regions with the greatest need and to improve the validity and generalizability of clinical trial results by enrolling a diverse sample of patients. PMID:25745604

  2. Increased functional connectivity between cortical hand areas and praxis network associated with training-related improvements in non-dominant hand precision drawing.

    PubMed

    Philip, Benjamin A; Frey, Scott H

    2016-07-01

    Chronic forced use of the non-dominant left hand yields substantial improvements in the precision and quality of writing and drawing. These changes may arise from increased access by the non-dominant (right) hemisphere to dominant (left) hemisphere mechanisms specialized for end-point precision control. To evaluate this prediction, 22 healthy right-handed adults underwent resting state functional connectivity (FC) MRI scans before and after 10 days of training on a left hand precision drawing task. 89% of participants significantly improved left hand speed, accuracy, and smoothness. Smoothness gains were specific to the trained left hand and persistent: 6 months after training, 71% of participants exhibited above-baseline movement smoothness. Contrary to expectations, we found no evidence of increased FC between right and left hemisphere hand areas. Instead, training-related improvements in left hand movement smoothness were associated with increased FC between both sensorimotor hand areas and a left-lateralized parieto-prefrontal network implicated in manual praxis. By contrast, skill retention at 6 months was predicted by changes including decreased FC between the representation of the trained left hand and bilateral sensorimotor, parietal, and premotor cortices, possibly reflecting consolidation and a disengagement of early learning processes. These data indicate that modest amounts of training (<200min total) can induce substantial, persistent improvements the precision and quality of non-dominant hand control in healthy adults, supported by strengthened connectivity between bilateral sensorimotor hand areas and a left-lateralized parieto-prefrontal praxis network. PMID:27212059

  3. Engineering a Dual-Layer Chitosan-Lactide Hydrogel To Create Endothelial Cell Aggregate-Induced Microvascular Networks In Vitro and Increase Blood Perfusion In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwoo; Kawai, Toshiyuki; Wang, Derek; Yang, Yunzhi

    2016-08-01

    Here, we report the use of chemically cross-linked and photo-cross-linked hydrogels to engineer human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) aggregate-induced microvascular networks to increase blood perfusion in vivo. First, we studied the effect of chemically cross-linked and photo-cross-linked chitosan-lactide hydrogels on stiffness, degradation rates, and HUVEC behaviors. The photo-cross-linked hydrogel was relatively stiff (E = ∼15 kPa) and possessed more compact networks, denser surface texture, and lower enzymatic degradation rates than the relatively soft, chemically cross-linked hydrogel (E = ∼2 kPa). While both hydrogels exhibited nontoxicity, the soft chemically cross-linked hydrogels expedited the formation of cell aggregates compared to the photo-cross-linked hydrogels. Cells on the less stiff, chemically cross-linked hydrogels expressed more matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity than the stiffer, photo-cross-linked hydrogel. This difference in MMP activity resulted in a more dramatic decrease in mechanical stiffness after 3 days of incubation for the chemically cross-linked hydrogel, as compared to the photo-cross-linked one. After determining the physical and biological properties of each hydrogel, we accordingly engineered a dual-layer hydrogel construct consisting of the relatively soft, chemically cross-linked hydrogel layer for HUVEC encapsulation, and the relatively stiff, acellular, photo-cross-linked hydrogel for retention of cell-laden microvasculature above. This dual-layer hydrogel construct enabled a lasting HUVEC aggregate-induced microvascular network due to the combination of stable substrate, enriched cell adhesion molecules, and extracellular matrix proteins. We tested the dual-layer hydrogel construct in a mouse model of hind-limb ischemia, where the HUVEC aggregate-induced microvascular networks significantly enhanced blood perfusion rate to ischemic legs and decreased tissue necrosis compared with both no treatment and

  4. Increased Substance Use and Risky Sexual Behavior among Migratory Homeless Youth: Exploring the Role of Social Network Composition

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Steven C.; Tucker, Joan S.; Ryan, Gery; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Munjas, Brett

    2011-01-01

    Travelers are a migratory subgroup of homeless youth who may be especially prone to engaging in risky behavior. This study compared the substance use and sexual behavior of young homeless travelers and non-travelers to evaluate the extent and possible sources of travelers' increased risk. Data came from face-to-face interviews with 419 homeless youth (36.6% female, 34.0% white, 23.9% African American, and 20.0% Hispanic) between the ages of 13 and 24 years (M = 20.1 years, SD = 2.5) who were randomly sampled from 41 shelters, drop-in centers, and street sites in Los Angeles. Travelers were almost twice as likely as non-travelers to exhibit recent heavy drinking, 37% more likely to exhibit recent marijuana use, and five times as likely to have injected drugs. Travelers also had more recent sex partners and were more likely to report having casual or need-based sexual partners and combining sex with substance use. Mediation analyses suggest that travelers' deviant peer associations and disconnection to conventional individuals and institutions may drive their elevated substance use. Differences in sexual risk behaviors are likely attributable to demographic differences between the two groups. Overall, these differences between travelers and non-travelers suggest different service needs and the need for different service approaches. PMID:21400037

  5. Forced KLF4 expression increases the generation of mature plasma cells and uncovers a network linked with plasma cell stage.

    PubMed

    Schoenhals, Matthieu; Jourdan, Michel; Seckinger, Anja; Pantesco, Véronique; Hose, Dirk; Kassambara, Alboukadel; Moreaux, Jérôme; Klein, Bernard

    2016-07-17

    A role of the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) in the generation of mature plasma cells (PC) is unknown. Indeed, KLF4 is critical in controlling the differentiation of various cell linages, particularly monocytes and epithelial cells. KLF4 is expressed at low levels in pro-B cells and its expression increases as they mature into pre-B cells, resting naïve B cells and memory B cells. We show here that KLF4 is expressed in human bone marrow plasma cells and its function was studied using an in vitro model of differentiation of memory B cells into long lived plasma cells. KLF4 is rapidly lost when memory B cells differentiate into highly cell cycling plasmablasts, poorly cycling early plasma cells and then quiescent long-lived plasma cells. A forced expression of KLF4 in plasmablasts enhances the yield of their differentiation into early plasma cell and long lived plasma cells, by inhibiting apoptosis and upregulating previously unknown plasma cell pathways. PMID:27230497

  6. Connectivity-based parcellation increases network detection sensitivity in resting state fMRI: An investigation into the cingulate cortex in autism.

    PubMed

    Balsters, Joshua H; Mantini, Dante; Apps, Matthew A J; Eickhoff, Simon B; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Although resting state fMRI (RS-fMRI) is increasingly used to generate biomarkers of psychiatric illnesses, analytical choices such as seed size and placement can lead to variable findings. Seed placement especially impacts on RS-fMRI studies of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), because individuals with ASD are known to possess more variable network topographies. Here, we present a novel pipeline for analysing RS-fMRI in ASD using the cingulate cortex as an exemplar anatomical region of interest. Rather than using seeds based on previous literature, or gross morphology, we used a combination of structural information, task-independent (RS-fMRI) and task-dependent functional connectivity (Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modeling) to partition the cingulate cortex into six subregions with unique connectivity fingerprints and diverse behavioural profiles. This parcellation was consistent between groups and highly replicable across individuals (up to 93% detection) suggesting that the organisation of cortico-cingulo connections is highly similar between groups. However, our results showed an age-related increase in connectivity between the anterior middle cingulate cortex and right lateral prefrontal cortex in ASD, whilst this connectivity decreased in controls. There was also a Group × Grey Matter (GM) interaction, showing increased connectivity between the anterior cingulate cortex and the rectal gyrus in concert with increasing rectal gyrus GM in controls. By comparing our approach to previously established methods we revealed that our approach improves network detection in both groups, and that the ability to detect group differences using 4 mm radius spheres varies greatly with seed placement. Using our multi-modal approach we find disrupted cortico-cingulo circuits that, based on task-dependent information, may contribute to ASD deficits in attention and social interaction. Moreover, we highlight how more sensitive approaches to RS-fMRI are crucial for establishing

  7. Connectivity-based parcellation increases network detection sensitivity in resting state fMRI: An investigation into the cingulate cortex in autism

    PubMed Central

    Balsters, Joshua H.; Mantini, Dante; Apps, Matthew A.J.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Although resting state fMRI (RS-fMRI) is increasingly used to generate biomarkers of psychiatric illnesses, analytical choices such as seed size and placement can lead to variable findings. Seed placement especially impacts on RS-fMRI studies of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), because individuals with ASD are known to possess more variable network topographies. Here, we present a novel pipeline for analysing RS-fMRI in ASD using the cingulate cortex as an exemplar anatomical region of interest. Rather than using seeds based on previous literature, or gross morphology, we used a combination of structural information, task-independent (RS-fMRI) and task-dependent functional connectivity (Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modeling) to partition the cingulate cortex into six subregions with unique connectivity fingerprints and diverse behavioural profiles. This parcellation was consistent between groups and highly replicable across individuals (up to 93% detection) suggesting that the organisation of cortico-cingulo connections is highly similar between groups. However, our results showed an age-related increase in connectivity between the anterior middle cingulate cortex and right lateral prefrontal cortex in ASD, whilst this connectivity decreased in controls. There was also a Group × Grey Matter (GM) interaction, showing increased connectivity between the anterior cingulate cortex and the rectal gyrus in concert with increasing rectal gyrus GM in controls. By comparing our approach to previously established methods we revealed that our approach improves network detection in both groups, and that the ability to detect group differences using 4 mm radius spheres varies greatly with seed placement. Using our multi-modal approach we find disrupted cortico-cingulo circuits that, based on task-dependent information, may contribute to ASD deficits in attention and social interaction. Moreover, we highlight how more sensitive approaches to RS-fMRI are crucial for establishing

  8. Clinical significance of increased cerebellar default-mode network connectivity in resting-state patients with drug-naive somatization disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Houliang; Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Wu, Renrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Yu, Miaoyu; Li, Lehua; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cerebellum has been proven to be connected to the brain network, as in the default-mode network (DMN), among healthy subjects and patients with psychiatric disorders. However, whether or not abnormal cerebellar DMN connectivity exists and what its clinical significance is among drug-naive patients with somatization disorder (SD) at rest remain unclear. A total of 25 drug-naive patients with SD and 28 healthy controls were enrolled for a resting-state scan. The imaging data were analyzed using the seed-based functional connectivity (FC) method. Compared with the controls, patients with SD showed increased left/right Crus I-left/right angular gyrus (AG) connectivity and Lobule IX-left superior medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) connectivity. The FC values of the left/right Crus I-right AG connectivity of the patients were positively correlated with their scores in the somatization subscale of the symptom checklist-90 (Scl-90). A trend level of correlations was observed between the FC values of the left Crus I-left AG connectivity of the patients and their scores for the somatization subscale of Scl-90, as well as between the FC values of their Lobule IX-left superior MPFC connectivity and their scores for the Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ) extraversion. Our findings show the increased cerebellar DMN connectivity in patients with SD and therefore highlight the importance of the DMN in the neurobiology of SD. Increased cerebellar DMN connectivities are also correlated with their somatization severity and personality, both of which bear clinical significance. PMID:27428190

  9. Patients with first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia and subjects at ultra-high risk of psychosis shared increased cerebellar-default mode network connectivity at rest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Houliang; Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Wang, Guodong; Lyu, Hailong; Wu, Renrong; Chen, Jindong; Wang, Shuai; Li, Lehua; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Increased cerebellar-default mode network (DMN) connectivity has been observed in first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia. However, it remains unclear whether increased cerebellar-DMN connectivity starts earlier than disease onset. Thirty-four ultra-high risk (UHR) subjects, 31 first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia and 37 healthy controls were enrolled for a resting-state scan. The imaging data were analyzed using the seed-based functional connectivity (FC) method. Compared with the controls, UHR subjects and patients with schizophrenia shared increased connectivity between the right Crus I and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and between Lobule IX and the left superior medial prefrontal cortex. There are positive correlations between the right Crus I-bilateral precuneus connectivity and clinical variables (Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes/Positive and Negative Symptom Scale negative symptoms/total scores) in the UHR subjects. Increased cerebellar-DMN connectivity shared by the UHR subjects and the patients not only highlights the importance of the DMN in the pathophysiology of psychosis but also may be a trait alteration for psychosis. PMID:27188233

  10. Patients with first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia and subjects at ultra-high risk of psychosis shared increased cerebellar-default mode network connectivity at rest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Houliang; Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Wang, Guodong; Lyu, Hailong; Wu, Renrong; Chen, Jindong; Wang, Shuai; Li, Lehua; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Increased cerebellar-default mode network (DMN) connectivity has been observed in first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia. However, it remains unclear whether increased cerebellar-DMN connectivity starts earlier than disease onset. Thirty-four ultra-high risk (UHR) subjects, 31 first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia and 37 healthy controls were enrolled for a resting-state scan. The imaging data were analyzed using the seed-based functional connectivity (FC) method. Compared with the controls, UHR subjects and patients with schizophrenia shared increased connectivity between the right Crus I and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and between Lobule IX and the left superior medial prefrontal cortex. There are positive correlations between the right Crus I-bilateral precuneus connectivity and clinical variables (Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes/Positive and Negative Symptom Scale negative symptoms/total scores) in the UHR subjects. Increased cerebellar-DMN connectivity shared by the UHR subjects and the patients not only highlights the importance of the DMN in the pathophysiology of psychosis but also may be a trait alteration for psychosis. PMID:27188233

  11. GABA-A receptor antagonists increase firing, bursting and synchrony of spontaneous activity in neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays: a step towards chemical "fingerprinting"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of effects on spontaneous network activity in neurons grown on MEAs is a proposed method to screen chemicals for potential neurotoxicity. In addition, differential effects on network activity (chemical "fingerprints") could be used to classify chemical modes of action....

  12. A novel design of an automatic lighting control system for a wireless sensor network with increased sensor lifetime and reduced sensor numbers.

    PubMed

    Mohamaddoust, Reza; Haghighat, Abolfazl Toroghi; Sharif, Mohamad Javad Motahari; Capanni, Niccolo

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) are currently being applied to energy conservation applications such as light control. We propose a design for such a system called a lighting automatic control system (LACS). The LACS system contains a centralized or distributed architecture determined by application requirements and space usage. The system optimizes the calculations and communications for lighting intensity, incorporates user illumination requirements according to their activities and performs adjustments based on external lighting effects in external sensor and external sensor-less architectures. Methods are proposed for reducing the number of sensors required and increasing the lifetime of those used, for considerably reduced energy consumption. Additionally we suggest methods for improving uniformity of illuminance distribution on a workplane's surface, which improves user satisfaction. Finally simulation results are presented to verify the effectiveness of our design. PMID:22164114

  13. Dietary Fucoxanthin Increases Metabolic Rate and Upregulated mRNA Expressions of the PGC-1alpha Network, Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Fusion Genes in White Adipose Tissues of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng-Ting; Chou, Hong-Nong; Huang, Ching-jang

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism for how fucoxanthin (FX) suppressed adipose accumulation is unclear. We aim to investigate the effects of FX on metabolic rate and expressions of genes related to thermogenesis, mitochondria biogenesis and homeostasis. Using a 2 × 2 factorial design, four groups of mice were respectively fed a high sucrose (50% sucrose) or a high-fat diet (23% butter + 7% soybean oil) supplemented with or without 0.2% FX. FX significantly increased oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production and reduced white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. The mRNA expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), cell death-inducing DFFA-like effecter a (CIDEA), PPARα, PPARγ, estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), β3-adrenergic receptor (β3-AR) and deiodinase 2 (Dio2) were significantly upregulated in inguinal WAT (iWAT) and epididymal WAT (eWAT) by FX. Mitochondrial biogenic genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) and NRF2, were increased in eWAT by FX. Noticeably, FX upregulated genes of mitochondrial fusion, mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), Mfn2 and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), but not mitochondrial fission, Fission 1, in both iWAT and eWAT. In conclusion, dietary FX enhanced the metabolic rate and lowered adipose mass irrespective of the diet. These were associated with upregulated genes of the PGC-1α network and mitochondrial fusion in eWAT and iWAT. PMID:24534841

  14. Ectopic Expression of α6 and δ GABAA Receptor Subunits in Hilar Somatostatin Neurons Increases Tonic Inhibition and Alters Network Activity in the Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiaoping; Peng, Zechun; Zhang, Nianhui; Cetina, Yliana; Huang, Christine S.; Wallner, Martin; Otis, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The role of GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated tonic inhibition in interneurons remains unclear and may vary among subgroups. Somatostatin (SOM) interneurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus show negligible expression of nonsynaptic GABAAR subunits and very low tonic inhibition. To determine the effects of ectopic expression of tonic GABAAR subtypes in these neurons, Cre-dependent viral vectors were used to express GFP-tagged GABAAR subunits (α6 and δ) selectively in hilar SOM neurons in SOM-Cre mice. In single-transfected animals, immunohistochemistry demonstrated strong expression of either the α6 or δ subunit; in cotransfected animals, both subunits were consistently expressed in the same neurons. Electrophysiology revealed a robust increase of tonic current, with progressively larger increases following transfection of δ, α6, and α6/δ subunits, respectively, indicating formation of functional receptors in all conditions and likely coassembly of the subunits in the same receptor following cotransfection. An in vitro model of repetitive bursting was used to determine the effects of increased tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons on circuit activity in the dentate gyrus. Upon cotransfection, the frequency of GABAAR-mediated bursting in granule cells was reduced, consistent with a reduction in synchronous firing among hilar SOM interneurons. Moreover, in vivo studies of Fos expression demonstrated reduced activation of α6/δ-cotransfected neurons following acute seizure induction by pentylenetetrazole. The findings demonstrate that increasing tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons can alter dentate gyrus circuit activity during strong stimulation and suggest that tonic inhibition of interneurons could play a role in regulating excessive synchrony within the network. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In contrast to many hippocampal interneurons, somatostatin (SOM) neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus have very low levels of nonsynaptic GABAARs and exhibit

  15. Increased functional connectivity in the default mode network in mild cognitive impairment: a maladaptive compensatory mechanism associated with poor semantic memory performance.

    PubMed

    Gardini, Simona; Venneri, Annalena; Sambataro, Fabio; Cuetos, Fernando; Fasano, Fabrizio; Marchi, Massimo; Crisi, Girolamo; Caffarra, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Semantic memory decline and changes of default mode network (DMN) connectivity have been reported in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Only a few studies, however, have investigated the role of changes of activity in the DMN on semantic memory in this clinical condition. The present study aimed to investigate more extensively the relationship between semantic memory impairment and DMN intrinsic connectivity in MCI. Twenty-one MCI patients and 21 healthy elderly controls matched for demographic variables took part in this study. All participants underwent a comprehensive semantic battery including tasks of category fluency, visual naming and naming from definition for objects, actions and famous people, word-association for early and late acquired words and reading. A subgroup of the original sample (16 MCI patients and 20 healthy elderly controls) was also scanned with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and DMN connectivity was estimated using a seed-based approach. Compared with healthy elderly, patients showed an extensive semantic memory decline in category fluency, visual naming, naming from definition, words-association, and reading tasks. Patients presented increased DMN connectivity between the medial prefrontal regions and the posterior cingulate and between the posterior cingulate and the parahippocampus and anterior hippocampus. MCI patients also showed a significant negative correlation of medial prefrontal gyrus connectivity with parahippocampus and posterior hippocampus and visual naming performance. Our findings suggest that increasing DMN connectivity may contribute to semantic memory deficits in MCI, specifically in visual naming. Increased DMN connectivity with posterior cingulate and medio-temporal regions seems to represent a maladaptive reorganization of brain functions in MCI, which detrimentally contributes to cognitive impairment in this clinical population. PMID:25547636

  16. Increasing Signal Specificity of the TOL Network of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by Rewiring the Connectivity of the Master Regulator XylR

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Aitor; Fraile, Sofia; de Lorenzo, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotic transcription factors (TFs) that bind small xenobiotic molecules (e.g., TFs that drive genes that respond to environmental pollutants) often display a promiscuous effector profile for analogs of the bona fide chemical signals. XylR, the master TF for expression of the m-xylene biodegradation operons encoded in the TOL plasmid pWW0 of Pseudomonas putida, responds not only to the aromatic compound but also, albeit to a lesser extent, to many other aromatic compounds, such as 3-methylbenzylalcohol (3MBA). We have examined whether such a relaxed regulatory scenario can be reshaped into a high-capacity/high-specificity regime by changing the connectivity of this effector-sensing TF within the rest of the circuit rather than modifying XylR structure itself. To this end, the natural negative feedback loop that operates on xylR transcription was modified with a translational attenuator that brings down the response to 3MBA while maintaining the transcriptional output induced by m-xylene (as measured with a luxCDABE reporter system). XylR expression was then subject to a positive feedback loop in which the TF was transcribed from its own target promoters, each known to hold different input/output transfer functions. In the first case (xylR under the strong promoter of the upper TOL operon, Pu), the reporter system displayed an increased transcriptional capacity in the resulting network for both the optimal and the suboptimal XylR effectors. In contrast, when xylR was expressed under the weaker Ps promoter, the resulting circuit unmistakably discriminated m-xylene from 3MBA. The non-natural connectivity engineered in the network resulted both in a higher promoter activity and also in a much-increased signal-to-background ratio. These results indicate that the working regimes of given genetic circuits can be dramatically altered through simple changes in the way upstream transcription factors are self-regulated by positive or negative feedback loops. PMID:23071444

  17. Piloting a Social Networks Strategy to Increase HIV Testing and Counseling Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Greater Accra and Ashanti Region, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Girault, Philippe; Green, Kimberly; Clement, Nana Fosua; Rahman, Yussif Ahmed Abdul; Adams, Bashiru; Wambugu, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    The 2011 Ghana Men's Study identified a high prevalence of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Accra/Tema (34.4 %) and in Kumasi (13.6 %), whereas the HIV rate among MSM referred through peer educators (PEs) to HIV testing and counseling (HTC) services in these two sites was substantially lower (8.4 %). These findings raised questions about possible limitations of the peer-education strategy to reach high-risk MSM. Therefore, a pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility of using a social network strategy (SNS) to identify and refer MSM to HTC services. Within 3 months, 166 MSM were reached and referred to HTC services: 62.7 % reported no recent exposure to PEs; 61.5 % were unaware of their recent HIV serostatus; and 32.9 % were newly diagnosed HIV positive. This pilot study suggests that an SNS could be an important strategy to reach MSM and to increase the uptake of HTC. PMID:25903507

  18. Resting-state activity in the left executive control network is associated with behavioral approach and is increased in substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Krmpotich, Theodore D.; Tregellas, Jason R.; Thompson, Laetitia L.; Banich, Marie T.; Klenk, Amanda M.; Tanabe, Jody L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with drug addictions report increased willingness to approach rewards. Approach behaviors are thought to involve executive control processes and are more strongly represented in the left compared to right prefrontal cortex. A direct link between approach tendencies and left hemisphere activity has not been shown in the resting brain. We hypothesized that compared to controls, substance dependent individuals (SDI) would have greater left hemisphere activity in the left executive control network (ECN) at rest. Methods Twenty-five SDI and 25 controls completed a Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS) questionnaire and underwent a resting-state fMRI scan. Group independent component analysis was performed. We used template matching to identify the left and right ECN separately and compared the corresponding components across groups. Across group, BAS scores were correlated with signal fluctuations in the left ECN and BIS scores with right ECN. Results BAS scores were higher in SDI compared to controls (p<.003) and correlated with signal fluctuation in the left ECN. SDI showed significantly more activity than controls in the left prefrontal cortex of the left ECN. Conversely, SDI showed less activity than controls in the right prefrontal cortex of the right ECN. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that approach tendencies are related to the left ECN, even during rest. Higher resting-state signal in the left ECN may play a role in heightened approach tendencies that contribute to drug-seeking behavior. PMID:23428318

  19. A single session of exercise increases connectivity in sensorimotor-related brain networks: a resting-state fMRI study in young healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Rajab, Ahmad S; Crane, David E; Middleton, Laura E; Robertson, Andrew D; Hampson, Michelle; MacIntosh, Bradley J

    2014-01-01

    Habitual long term physical activity is known to have beneficial cognitive, structural, and neuro-protective brain effects, but to date there is limited knowledge on whether a single session of exercise can alter the brain's functional connectivity, as assessed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). The primary objective of this study was to characterize potential session effects in resting-state networks (RSNs). We examined the acute effects of exercise on the functional connectivity of young healthy adults (N = 15) by collecting rs-fMRI before and after 20 min of moderate intensity aerobic exercise and compared this with a no-exercise control group (N = 15). Data were analyzed using independent component analysis, denoising and dual regression procedures. Regions of interest-based group session effect statistics were calculated in RSNs of interest using voxel-wise permutation testing and Cohen's D effect size. Group analysis in the exercising group data set revealed a session effect in sub-regions of three sensorimotor related areas: the pre and/or postcentral gyri, secondary somatosensory area and thalamus, characterized by increased co-activation after exercise (corrected p < 0.05). Cohen's D analysis also showed a significant effect of session in these three RSNs (p< 0.05), corroborating the voxel-wise findings. Analyses of the no-exercise dataset produced no significant results, thereby providing support for the exercise findings and establishing the inherent test-retest reliability of the analysis pipeline on the RSNs of interest. This study establishes the feasibility of rs-fMRI to localize brain regions that are associated with acute exercise, as well as an analysis consideration to improve sensitivity to a session effect. PMID:25177284

  20. A single session of exercise increases connectivity in sensorimotor-related brain networks: a resting-state fMRI study in young healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Rajab, Ahmad S.; Crane, David E.; Middleton, Laura E.; Robertson, Andrew D.; Hampson, Michelle; MacIntosh, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    Habitual long term physical activity is known to have beneficial cognitive, structural, and neuro-protective brain effects, but to date there is limited knowledge on whether a single session of exercise can alter the brain’s functional connectivity, as assessed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). The primary objective of this study was to characterize potential session effects in resting-state networks (RSNs). We examined the acute effects of exercise on the functional connectivity of young healthy adults (N = 15) by collecting rs-fMRI before and after 20 min of moderate intensity aerobic exercise and compared this with a no-exercise control group (N = 15). Data were analyzed using independent component analysis, denoising and dual regression procedures. Regions of interest-based group session effect statistics were calculated in RSNs of interest using voxel-wise permutation testing and Cohen’s D effect size. Group analysis in the exercising group data set revealed a session effect in sub-regions of three sensorimotor related areas: the pre and/or postcentral gyri, secondary somatosensory area and thalamus, characterized by increased co-activation after exercise (corrected p < 0.05). Cohen’s D analysis also showed a significant effect of session in these three RSNs (p< 0.05), corroborating the voxel-wise findings. Analyses of the no-exercise dataset produced no significant results, thereby providing support for the exercise findings and establishing the inherent test–retest reliability of the analysis pipeline on the RSNs of interest. This study establishes the feasibility of rs-fMRI to localize brain regions that are associated with acute exercise, as well as an analysis consideration to improve sensitivity to a session effect. PMID:25177284

  1. Significant increase in Young's modulus of ATDC5 cells during chondrogenic differentiation induced by PAMPS/PDMAAm double-network gel: comparison with induction by insulin.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Eijiro; Tsutsumi, Takehiro; Kitamura, Nobuto; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Ping Gong, Jian; Yasuda, Kazunori; Ohashi, Toshiro

    2014-10-17

    A double-network (DN) gel, which was composed of poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) and poly(N,N'-dimethyl acrylamide) (PAMPS/PDMAAm), has the potential to induce chondrogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. The present study investigated the biomechanical and biological responses of chondrogenic progenitor ATDC5 cells cultured on the DN gel. ATDC5 cells were cultured on a polystyrene surface without insulin (Culture 1) and with insulin (Culture 2), and on the DN gel without insulin (Culture 3). The cultured cells were evaluated using micropipette aspiration for cell Young's modulus and qPCR for gene expression of chondrogenic and actin organization markers on days 3, 7 and 14. On day 3, the cells in Culture 3 formed nodules, in which the cells exhibited an actin cortical layer inside them, and gene expression of type-II collagen, aggrecan, and SOX9 was significantly higher in Culture 3 than Cultures 1 and 2 (p<0.05). Young's modulus in Culture 3 was significantly higher than that in Culture 1 throughout the testing period (p<0.05) and that in Culture 2 on day 14 (p<0.01). There was continuous expression of actin organization markers in Culture 3. This study highlights that the cells on the DN gel increased the modulus and mRNA expression of chondrogenic markers at an earlier time point with a greater magnitude compared to those on the polystyrene surface with insulin. This study also demonstrates a possible strong interrelation among alteration of cell mechanical properties, changes in actin organization and the induction of chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:25110167

  2. Vulnerability of network of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, S.; Kenett, D. Y.; Bashan, A.; Gao, J.; Stanley, H. E.

    2014-10-01

    Our dependence on networks - be they infrastructure, economic, social or others - leaves us prone to crises caused by the vulnerabilities of these networks. There is a great need to develop new methods to protect infrastructure networks and prevent cascade of failures (especially in cases of coupled networks). Terrorist attacks on transportation networks have traumatized modern societies. With a single blast, it has become possible to paralyze airline traffic, electric power supply, ground transportation or Internet communication. How, and at which cost can one restructure the network such that it will become more robust against malicious attacks? The gradual increase in attacks on the networks society depends on - Internet, mobile phone, transportation, air travel, banking, etc. - emphasize the need to develop new strategies to protect and defend these crucial networks of communication and infrastructure networks. One example is the threat of liquid explosives a few years ago, which completely shut down air travel for days, and has created extreme changes in regulations. Such threats and dangers warrant the need for new tools and strategies to defend critical infrastructure. In this paper we review recent advances in the theoretical understanding of the vulnerabilities of interdependent networks with and without spatial embedding, attack strategies and their affect on such networks of networks as well as recently developed strategies to optimize and repair failures caused by such attacks.

  3. Motor Readiness Increases Brain Connectivity Between Default-Mode Network and Motor Cortex: Impact on Sampling Resting Periods from fMRI Event-Related Studies.

    PubMed

    Bazán, Paulo Rodrigo; Biazoli, Claudinei Eduardo; Sato, João Ricardo; Amaro, Edson

    2015-12-01

    The default-mode network (DMN) has been implicated in many conditions. One particular function relates to its role in motor preparation. However, the possibly complex relationship between DMN activity and motor preparation has not been fully explored. Dynamic interactions between default mode and motor networks may compromise the ability to evaluate intrinsic connectivity using resting period data extracted from task-based experiments. In this study, we investigated alterations in connectivity between the DMN and the motor network that are associated with motor readiness during the intervals between motor task trials. fMRI data from 20 normal subjects were acquired under three conditions: pure resting state; resting state interleaved with brief, cued right-hand movements at constant intervals (lower readiness); and resting state interleaved with the same movements at unpredictable intervals (higher readiness). The functional connectivity between regions of motor and DMNs was assessed separately for movement periods and intertask intervals. We found a negative relationship between the DMN and the left sensorimotor cortex during the task periods for both motor conditions. Furthermore, during the intertask intervals of the unpredictable condition, the DMN showed a positive relationship with right sensorimotor cortex and a negative relation with the left sensorimotor cortex. These findings indicate a specific modulation on motor processing according to the state of motor readiness. Therefore, connectivity studies using task-based fMRI to probe DMN should consider the influence of motor system modulation when interpreting the results. PMID:26414865

  4. Why Network? Theoretical Perspectives on Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muijs, Daniel; West, Mel; Ainscow, Mel

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, networking and collaboration have become increasingly popular in education. However, there is at present a lack of attention to the theoretical basis of networking, which could illuminate when and when not to network and under what conditions networks are likely to be successful. In this paper, we will attempt to sketch the…

  5. Using Grindr, a Smartphone Social-Networking Application, to Increase HIV Self-Testing Among Black and Latino Men Who Have Sex With Men in Los Angeles, 2014.

    PubMed

    Huang, Emily; Marlin, Robert W; Young, Sean D; Medline, Alex; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-01

    In Los Angeles County, about 25% of men who have sex with men (MSM) are HIV-positive but unaware of their status. An advertisement publicizing free HIV self-tests was placed on Grindr, a smartphone social-networking application, from April 17 to May 29, 2014. Users were linked to http://freehivselftests.weebly.com/ to choose a self-test delivery method: U.S. mail, a Walgreens voucher, or from a vending machine. Black or Latino MSM ≥ 18 years old were invited to take a testing experiences survey. During the campaign, the website received 11,939 unique visitors (average: 284 per day) and 334 self-test requests. Among 57 survey respondents, 55 (97%) reported that using the self-test was easy; two persons reported testing HIV positive and both sought medical care. Social networking application self-testing promotion resulted in a large number of self-test requests and has high potential to reach untested high-risk populations who will link to care if they test positive. PMID:27427928

  6. Increasing Ethnic Minority Participation in Substance Abuse Clinical Trials: Lessons Learned in the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Clinical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Burlew, Kathleen; Larios, Sandra; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Holmes, Beverly; Venner, Kamilla; Chavez, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Underrepresentation in clinical trials limits the extent to which ethnic minorities benefit from advances in substance abuse treatment. The objective of this article is to share the knowledge gained within the Clinical Trials Network (CTN) of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and other research on recruiting and retaining ethnic minorities into substance abuse clinical trials. The article includes a discussion of two broad areas for improving inclusion— community involvement and cultural adaptation. CTN case studies are included to illustrate three promising strategies for improving ethnic minority inclusion: respondent-driven sampling, community-based participatory research, and the cultural adaptation of the recruitment and retention procedures. The article concludes with two sections describing a number of methodological concerns in the current research base and our proposed research agenda for improving ethnic minority inclusion that builds on the CTN experience. PMID:21988575

  7. Development and Implementation of a Training Program To Increase the Usage of a Network Computer System by Computer Law Enforcement Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stivers, John L.

    A practicum project involved the development and implementation of a program to increase the positive attitudes and knowledge of 15 members of a target group in a county sheriff's office and thereby increase the productive use of the computer information system (IS). The people involved were county law enforcement officers and support staff in a…

  8. Real-time relationship between PKA biochemical signal network dynamics and increased action potential firing rate in heart pacemaker cells: Kinetics of PKA activation in heart pacemaker cells.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Yang, Dongmei; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Levchenko, Andre; Zhang, Jin; Lakatta, Edward G

    2015-09-01

    cAMP-PKA protein kinase is a key nodal signaling pathway that regulates a wide range of heart pacemaker cell functions. These functions are predicted to be involved in regulation of spontaneous action potential (AP) generation of these cells. Here we investigate if the kinetics and stoichiometry of increase in PKA activity match the increase in AP firing rate in response to β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, that alters the AP firing rate of heart sinoatrial pacemaker cells. In cultured adult rabbit pacemaker cells infected with an adenovirus expressing the FRET sensor AKAR3, the EC50 in response to graded increases in the intensity of β-AR stimulation (by Isoproterenol) the magnitude of the increases in PKA activity and the spontaneous AP firing rate were similar (0.4±0.1nM vs. 0.6±0.15nM, respectively). Moreover, the kinetics (t1/2) of the increases in PKA activity and spontaneous AP firing rate in response to β-AR stimulation or PDE inhibition were tightly linked. We characterized the system rate-limiting biochemical reactions by integrating these experimentally derived data into a mechanistic-computational model. Model simulations predicted that phospholamban phosphorylation is a potent target of the increase in PKA activity that links to increase in spontaneous AP firing rate. In summary, the kinetics and stoichiometry of increases in PKA activity in response to a physiological (β-AR stimulation) or pharmacological (PDE inhibitor) stimuli match those of changes in the AP firing rate. Thus Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-dependent phosphorylation limits the rate and magnitude of increase in spontaneous AP firing rate. PMID:26241846

  9. Network Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Richard; Perumalla, Kalyan S; Riley, George F.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed introduction to the design, implementation and use of network simulation tools is presented. The requirements and issues faced in the design of simulators for wired and wireless networks are discussed. Abstractions such as packet- and fluid-level network models are covered. Several existing simulations are given as examples, with details and rationales regarding design decisions presented. Issues regarding performance and scalability are discussed in detail, describing how one can utilize distributed simulation methods to increase the scale and performance of a simulation environment. Finally, a case study of two simulation tools is presented that have been developed using distributed simulation techniques. This text is essential to any student, researcher or network architect desiring a detailed understanding of how network simulation tools are designed, implemented, and used.

  10. The Effect of Increased Frequency of Hemodialysis on Volume-Related Outcomes: A Secondary Analysis of the Frequent Hemodialysis Network Trials.

    PubMed

    Raimann, Jochen G; Chan, Christopher T; Daugirdas, John T; Depner, Tom; Gotch, Frank A; Greene, Tom; Kaysen, George A; Kliger, Alan S; Kotanko, Peter; Larive, Brett; Lindsay, Robert; Rocco, Michael V; Chertow, Glenn M; Levin, Nathan W

    2016-01-01

    In previous reports of the Frequent Hemodialysis Network trials, frequent hemodialysis (HD) reduced extracellular fluid (ECF) and left ventricular mass (LVM), with more pronounced effects observed among patients with low urine volume (UVol). We analyzed the effect of frequent HD on interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) and a time-integrated estimate of ECF load (TIFL). We also explored whether volume and sodium loading contributed to the change in LVM over the study period. Treatment effects on volume parameters were analyzed for modification by UVol and the dialysate-to-serum sodium gradient. Predictors of change in LVM were determined using linear regression. Frequent HD reduced IDWG and TIFL in the Daily Trial. Among patients with UVol <100 ml/day, reduction in TIFL was associated with LVM reduction. This suggests that achievement of better volume control could attenuate changes in LVM associated with mortality and cardiovascular morbidity. TIFL may prove more useful than IDWG alone in guiding HD practice. Video Journal Club 'Cappuccino with Claudio Ronco' at http://www.karger.com/?doi=441966. PMID:26795100

  11. Network bipartivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik; Edling, Christofer R.; Kim, Beom Jun

    2003-11-01

    Systems with two types of agents with a preference for heterophilous interaction produce networks that are more or less close to bipartite. We propose two measures quantifying the notion of bipartivity. The two measures—one well known and natural, but computationally intractable, and the other computationally less complex, but also less intuitive—are examined on model networks that continuously interpolate between bipartite graphs and graphs with many odd circuits. We find that the bipartivity measures increase as we tune the control parameters of the test networks to intuitively increase the bipartivity, and thus conclude that the measures are quite relevant. We also measure and discuss the values of our bipartivity measures for empirical social networks (constructed from professional collaborations, Internet communities, and field surveys). Here we find, as expected, that networks arising from romantic online interaction have high, and professional collaboration networks have low, bipartivity values. In some other cases, probably due to low average degree of the network, the bipartivity measures cannot distinguish between romantic and friendship oriented interaction.

  12. A randomized trial to increase colonoscopy screening in members of high risk families in the Colorectal Cancer Family Registry and Cancer Genetics Network

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jan T; Horick, Nora; Kinney, Anita Y; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Garrett, Kathleen; Haile, Robert W; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Sandler, Robert S.; Burke, Carol; Hill, Deirdre A.; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with a strong family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) have significant risk for CRC, though adherence to colonoscopy screening in these groups remains low. This study assessed whether a tailored, telephone counseling intervention can increase adherence to colonoscopy in members of high risk families in a randomized, controlled trial. Methods Eligible participants were recruited from two national cancer registries if they had a first-degree relative with CRC under age 60 or multiple affected family members, which included families that met Amsterdam criteria for Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colon Cancer, and if they were due for colonoscopy within 24-months. Participants were randomized to receive a tailored, telephone intervention grounded in behavioral theory or a mailed packet with general information about screening. Colonoscopy status was assessed through follow-up surveys and endoscopy reports. Cox-proportional hazards models were used to assess intervention effect. Results Of the 632 participants (aged 25–80), 60% were female, the majority were White, non-Hispanic, educated and had health insurance. Colonoscopy adherence increased 11 percentage points in the tailored, telephone intervention group, compared to no significant change in the mailed group. The telephone intervention was associated with a 32% increase in screening adherence compared to the mailed intervention (Hazard Ratio=1.32; p=0.01). Conclusions A tailored, telephone intervention can effectively increase colonoscopy adherence in high risk persons. This intervention has the potential for broad dissemination to health-care organizations or other high risk populations. Impact Increasing adherence to colonoscopy among persons with increased CRC risk could effectively reduce incidence and mortality from this disease. PMID:24501379

  13. Increased resting-state functional connectivity of visual- and cognitive-control brain networks after training in children with reading difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi; DiFrancesco, Mark; Kay, Benjamin; Wang, Yingying; Holland, Scott K.

    2015-01-01

    The Reading Acceleration Program, a computerized reading-training program, increases activation in neural circuits related to reading. We examined the effect of the training on the functional connectivity between independent components related to visual processing, executive functions, attention, memory, and language during rest after the training. Children 8–12 years old with reading difficulties and typical readers participated in the study. Behavioral testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging were performed before and after the training. Imaging data were analyzed using an independent component analysis approach. After training, both reading groups showed increased single-word contextual reading and reading comprehension scores. Greater positive correlations between the visual-processing component and the executive functions, attention, memory, or language components were found after training in children with reading difficulties. Training-related increases in connectivity between the visual and attention components and between the visual and executive function components were positively correlated with increased word reading and reading comprehension, respectively. Our findings suggest that the effect of the Reading Acceleration Program on basic cognitive domains can be detected even in the absence of an ongoing reading task. PMID:26199874

  14. Increased Putamen and Callosal Motor Subregion in Treatment-Naive Boys with Tourette Syndrome Indicates Changes in the Bihemispheric Motor Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessner, Veit; Overlack, Sebastian; Schmidt-Samoa, Carsten; Baudewig, Jurgen; Dechent, Peter; Rothenberger, Aribert; Helms, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite an increasing number of studies, findings of structural brain alterations in patients with Tourette syndrome are still inconsistent. Several confounders (comorbid conditions, medication, gender, age, IQ) might explain these discrepancies. In the present study, these confounders were excluded to identify differences in basal…

  15. Increased resting-state functional connectivity of visual- and cognitive-control brain networks after training in children with reading difficulties.

    PubMed

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi; DiFrancesco, Mark; Kay, Benjamin; Wang, Yingying; Holland, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    The Reading Acceleration Program, a computerized reading-training program, increases activation in neural circuits related to reading. We examined the effect of the training on the functional connectivity between independent components related to visual processing, executive functions, attention, memory, and language during rest after the training. Children 8-12 years old with reading difficulties and typical readers participated in the study. Behavioral testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging were performed before and after the training. Imaging data were analyzed using an independent component analysis approach. After training, both reading groups showed increased single-word contextual reading and reading comprehension scores. Greater positive correlations between the visual-processing component and the executive functions, attention, memory, or language components were found after training in children with reading difficulties. Training-related increases in connectivity between the visual and attention components and between the visual and executive function components were positively correlated with increased word reading and reading comprehension, respectively. Our findings suggest that the effect of the Reading Acceleration Program on basic cognitive domains can be detected even in the absence of an ongoing reading task. PMID:26199874

  16. Parvalbumin Cell Ablation of NMDA-R1 Causes Increased Resting Network Excitability with Associated Social and Self-Care Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Billingslea, Eddie N; Tatard-Leitman, Valerie M; Anguiano, Jaynie; Jutzeler, Catherine R; Suh, Jimmy; Saunders, John A; Morita, Susumu; Featherstone, Robert E; Ortinski, Pavel I; Gandal, Michael J; Lin, Robert; Liang, Yuling; Gur, Raquel E; Carlson, Gregory C; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Siegel, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    NMDA-receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction is strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Several convergent lines of evidence suggest that net excitation propagated by impaired NMDAR signaling on GABAergic interneurons may be of particular interest in mediating several aspects of schizophrenia. However, it is unclear which behavioral domains are governed by a net increase of excitation and whether modulating downstream GABAergic signaling can reverse neural and thus behavioral deficits. The current study determines the selective contributions of NMDAR dysfunction on PV-containing interneurons to electrophysiological, cognitive, and negative-symptom-related behavioral phenotypes of schizophrenia using mice with a PVcre-NR1flox-driven ablation of NR1 on PV-containing interneurons. In addition, we assessed the efficacy of one agent that directly modulates GABAergic signaling (baclofen) and one agent that indirectly modifies NMDAR-mediated signaling through antagonism of mGluR5 receptors (2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine (MPEP)). The data indicate that loss of NMDAR function on PV interneurons impairs self-care and sociability while increasing N1 latency and baseline gamma power, and reducing induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation. Baclofen normalized baseline gamma power without corresponding effects on behavior. MPEP further increased N1 latency and reduced social behavior in PVcre/NR1+/+ mice. These two indices were negatively correlated before and following MPEP such that as N1 latency increases, sociability decreases. This finding suggests a predictive role for N1 latency with respect to social function. Although previous data suggest that MPEP may be beneficial for core features of autism spectrum disorders, current data suggest that such effects require intact function of NMDAR on PV interneurons. PMID:24525709

  17. Hydrogen bond network in the hydration layer of the water confined in nanotubes increasing the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenpeng; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-09-21

    The water confined in nanotubes has been extensively studied, because of the potential usages in drug delivery and desalination. The radial distribution of the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis was obtained by molecular dynamics simulations in a carbon nanotube and a nanotube with a very small van der Waals potential. The confined water was divided into two parts, the middle part water and the hydration water. In both cases, the hydrogen bond orientation of the middle water is isotropic, while the hydrogen bonds in hydration layers are apt to parallel along the nanotube axis. Therefore, the hydration water has higher dipole correlations increasing the dielectric constant along the nanotube axis. PMID:26395729

  18. Overexpression of BDNF Increases Excitability of the Lumbar Spinal Network and Leads to Robust Early Locomotor Recovery in Completely Spinalized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ziemlińska, Ewelina; Kügler, Sebastian; Schachner, Melitta; Wewiór, Iwona; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Strategies to induce recovery from lesions of the spinal cord have not fully resulted in clinical applications. This is a consequence of a number of impediments that axons encounter when trying to regrow beyond the lesion site, and that intraspinal rearrangements are subjected to. In the present study we evaluated (1) the possibility to improve locomotor recovery after complete transection of the spinal cord by means of an adeno-associated (AAV) viral vector expressing the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in lumbar spinal neurons caudal to the lesion site and (2) how the spinal cord transection and BDNF treatment affected neurotransmission in the segments caudal to the lesion site. BDNF overexpression resulted in clear increases in expression levels of molecules involved in glutamatergic (VGluT2) and GABAergic (GABA, GAD65, GAD67) neurotransmission in parallel with a reduction of the potassium-chloride co-transporter (KCC2) which contributes to an inhibitory neurotransmission. BDNF treated animals showed significant improvements in assisted locomotor performance, and performed locomotor movements with body weight support and plantar foot placement on a moving treadmill. These positive effects of BDNF local overexpression were detectable as early as two weeks after spinal cord transection and viral vector application and lasted for at least 7 weeks. Gradually increasing frequencies of clonic movements at the end of the experiment attenuated the quality of treadmill walking. These data indicate that BDNF has the potential to enhance the functionality of isolated lumbar circuits, but also that BDNF levels have to be tightly controlled to prevent hyperexcitability. PMID:24551172

  19. Coupled adaptive complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shai, S.; Dobson, S.

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive networks, which combine topological evolution of the network with dynamics on the network, are ubiquitous across disciplines. Examples include technical distribution networks such as road networks and the internet, natural and biological networks, and social science networks. These networks often interact with or depend upon other networks, resulting in coupled adaptive networks. In this paper we study susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic dynamics on coupled adaptive networks, where susceptible nodes are able to avoid contact with infected nodes by rewiring their intranetwork connections. However, infected nodes can pass the disease through internetwork connections, which do not change with time: The dependencies between the coupled networks remain constant. We develop an analytical formalism for these systems and validate it using extensive numerical simulation. We find that stability is increased by increasing the number of internetwork links, in the sense that the range of parameters over which both endemic and healthy states coexist (both states are reachable depending on the initial conditions) becomes smaller. Finally, we find a new stable state that does not appear in the case of a single adaptive network but only in the case of weakly coupled networks, in which the infection is endemic in one network but neither becomes endemic nor dies out in the other. Instead, it persists only at the nodes that are coupled to nodes in the other network through internetwork links. We speculate on the implications of these findings.

  20. An evaluation of the global network of field epidemiology and laboratory training programmes: a resource for improving public health capacity and increasing the number of public health professionals worldwide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given that many infectious diseases spread rapidly, across borders and species, there is a growing worldwide need to increase the number of public health professionals skilled in controlling infectious epidemics. Needed also are more public health professionals skilled in non-communicable disease surveillance and interventions. As a result, we surveyed all 57 field epidemiology training programmes (FETPs) that are members of the Training Program in Epidemiology and Public Health Interventions Network (TEPHINET), to evaluate the progress of the FETPs, the only global applied epidemiology network, toward increasing public health capacity globally. Methods Data on the FETP programmes and the training they provide were abstracted from TEPHINET membership surveys and verified with FETP directors for all FETPs that were members of TEPHINET in 2012. Data on abstracts submitted to the recent TEPHINET Global Scientific Conference, on recent accomplishments by each FETP, and on quality improvement were also compiled to provide a worldwide view of the public health human resource capacity produced by these programmes. Results A total of 6980 public health professionals worldwide have graduated from an FETP or from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Epidemiology Intelligence Service (EIS). FETP residents and graduates participate in key public health prevention, control, and response activities. Each FETP has adapted its curriculum and objectives over time to align with its country’s public health priorities. FETPs are well integrated into their national public health infrastructures, and they have many partners at the national, regional and global levels. Conclusion FETPs are a competent and diverse source of highly skilled public health professionals who contribute significantly to public health’s global human resource needs. This finding is evidenced by 1) the training curricula that were adapted over time to meet public health’s human

  1. Library Networks '74-'75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Martin R., Ed.

    Libraries are using computers and telecommunications networks to share resources and centralize processing tasks. Networks allow handling of increasing amounts of material with limited funds. New developments in communications technology encourage network growth. The Ohio College Library Center is the current leader in networking. Network efforts…

  2. Network Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Louis

    2010-01-01

    The world changed in 2008. The financial crisis brought with it a deepening sense of insecurity, and the desire to be connected to a network increased. Throughout the summer and fall of 2008, events were unfolding with alarming rapidity. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Alumni Association wanted to respond to this change in the…

  3. Networking in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peake, Dorothy G.

    1976-01-01

    The last few years have seen increasing interest in library networking in Australia from a number of different groups. All the projects have concerned networks of similar libraries and no parallel to U.S.A. developments of networks encompassing a variety of types of libraries has yet appeared. (Author)

  4. Building new access network using reconfigurable optical grid network and wireless network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yinghui; Wu, Runze; Ji, Yuefeng; Xu, Daxiong

    2007-11-01

    Recently wireless mesh network has been gaining increasing attention and early versions are being deployed as municipal access solutions to eliminate the wired drop to every wireless router at customer premise. In this paper, we propose a novel access network using reconfigurable optical burst switching grid network and wireless mesh network. The proposed access network architecture saves network deployment cost because fiber need not penetrate to each end user. We also propose a hierarchical routing protocol to enhance the routing efficiency.

  5. Theorizing Network-Centric Activity in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HaLevi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Networks and network-centric activity are increasingly prevalent in schools and school districts. In addition to ubiquitous social network tools like Facebook and Twitter, educational leaders deal with a wide variety of network organizational forms that include professional development, advocacy, informational networks and network-centric reforms.…

  6. Optimal Network-Topology Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor O. K.; Yuen, Joseph H.; Hou, Ting-Chao; Lam, Yuen Fung

    1987-01-01

    Candidate network designs tested for acceptability and cost. Optimal Network Topology Design computer program developed as part of study on topology design and analysis of performance of Space Station Information System (SSIS) network. Uses efficient algorithm to generate candidate network designs consisting of subsets of set of all network components, in increasing order of total costs and checks each design to see whether it forms acceptable network. Technique gives true cost-optimal network and particularly useful when network has many constraints and not too many components. Program written in PASCAL.

  7. Extracting information from multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-06-01

    Multiplex networks are generalized network structures that are able to describe networks in which the same set of nodes are connected by links that have different connotations. Multiplex networks are ubiquitous since they describe social, financial, engineering, and biological networks as well. Extending our ability to analyze complex networks to multiplex network structures increases greatly the level of information that is possible to extract from big data. For these reasons, characterizing the centrality of nodes in multiplex networks and finding new ways to solve challenging inference problems defined on multiplex networks are fundamental questions of network science. In this paper, we discuss the relevance of the Multiplex PageRank algorithm for measuring the centrality of nodes in multilayer networks and we characterize the utility of the recently introduced indicator function Θ ˜ S for describing their mesoscale organization and community structure. As working examples for studying these measures, we consider three multiplex network datasets coming for social science.

  8. Extracting information from multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-06-01

    Multiplex networks are generalized network structures that are able to describe networks in which the same set of nodes are connected by links that have different connotations. Multiplex networks are ubiquitous since they describe social, financial, engineering, and biological networks as well. Extending our ability to analyze complex networks to multiplex network structures increases greatly the level of information that is possible to extract from big data. For these reasons, characterizing the centrality of nodes in multiplex networks and finding new ways to solve challenging inference problems defined on multiplex networks are fundamental questions of network science. In this paper, we discuss the relevance of the Multiplex PageRank algorithm for measuring the centrality of nodes in multilayer networks and we characterize the utility of the recently introduced indicator function Θ̃(S) for describing their mesoscale organization and community structure. As working examples for studying these measures, we consider three multiplex network datasets coming for social science. PMID:27368796

  9. Concurrency and network disassortativity.

    PubMed

    Khor, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between a network's degree-degree correlation and a loose version of graph coloring is studied on networks with broad degree distributions. We find that, given similar conditions on the number of nodes, number of links, and clustering levels, fewer colors are needed to color disassortative than assortative networks. Since fewer colors create fewer independent sets, our finding implies that disassortative networks may have higher concurrency potential than assortative networks. This in turn suggests another reason for the disassortative mixing pattern observed in biological networks such as those of protein-protein interaction and gene regulation. In addition to the functional specificity and stability suggested by Maslov and Sneppen, a disassortative network topology may also enhance the ability of cells to perform crucial tasks concurrently. Hence, increased concurrency may also be a driving force in the evolution of biological networks. PMID:20586579

  10. Network structure of production

    PubMed Central

    Atalay, Enghin; Hortaçsu, Ali; Roberts, James; Syverson, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Complex social networks have received increasing attention from researchers. Recent work has focused on mechanisms that produce scale-free networks. We theoretically and empirically characterize the buyer–supplier network of the US economy and find that purely scale-free models have trouble matching key attributes of the network. We construct an alternative model that incorporates realistic features of firms’ buyer–supplier relationships and estimate the model’s parameters using microdata on firms’ self-reported customers. This alternative framework is better able to match the attributes of the actual economic network and aids in further understanding several important economic phenomena. PMID:21402924

  11. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  12. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-01-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems. PMID:25985280

  13. Statistical mechanics of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka; Barabási, Albert-László

    2002-01-01

    Complex networks describe a wide range of systems in nature and society. Frequently cited examples include the cell, a network of chemicals linked by chemical reactions, and the Internet, a network of routers and computers connected by physical links. While traditionally these systems have been modeled as random graphs, it is increasingly recognized that the topology and evolution of real networks are governed by robust organizing principles. This article reviews the recent advances in the field of complex networks, focusing on the statistical mechanics of network topology and dynamics. After reviewing the empirical data that motivated the recent interest in networks, the authors discuss the main models and analytical tools, covering random graphs, small-world and scale-free networks, the emerging theory of evolving networks, and the interplay between topology and the network's robustness against failures and attacks.

  14. Network Cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  15. Wireless Sensors Network (Sensornet)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, J.

    2003-01-01

    The Wireless Sensor Network System presented in this paper provides a flexible reconfigurable architecture that could be used in a broad range of applications. It also provides a sensor network with increased reliability; decreased maintainability costs, and assured data availability by autonomously and automatically reconfiguring to overcome communication interferences.

  16. Community Wireless Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feld, Harold

    2005-01-01

    With increasing frequency, communities are seeing the arrival of a new class of noncommercial broadband providers: community wireless networks (CWNs). Utilizing the same wireless technologies that many colleges and universities have used to create wireless networks on campus, CWNs are creating broadband access for free or at costs well below…

  17. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  18. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan; Jersey Inst Ansari, New; Jersey Inst, New

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  19. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  20. Network Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vietzke, Robert; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This special section explains the latest developments in networking technologies, profiles school districts benefiting from successful implementations, and reviews new products for building networks. Highlights include ATM (asynchronous transfer mode), cable modems, networking switches, Internet screening software, file servers, network management…

  1. Cognitive Network Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Medaglia, John D.; Lynall, Mary-Ellen; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2016-01-01

    Network science provides theoretical, computational, and empirical tools that can be used to understand the structure and function of the human brain in novel ways using simple concepts and mathematical representations. Network neuroscience is a rapidly growing field that is providing considerable insight into human structural connectivity, functional connectivity while at rest, changes in functional networks over time (dynamics), and how these properties differ in clinical populations. In addition, a number of studies have begun to quantify network characteristics in a variety of cognitive processes and provide a context for understanding cognition from a network perspective. In this review, we outline the contributions of network science to cognitive neuroscience. We describe the methodology of network science as applied to the particular case of neuroimaging data and review its uses in investigating a range of cognitive functions including sensory processing, language, emotion, attention, cognitive control, learning, and memory. In conclusion, we discuss current frontiers and the specific challenges that must be overcome to integrate these complementary disciplines of network science and cognitive neuroscience. Increased communication between cognitive neuroscientists and network scientists could lead to significant discoveries under an emerging scientific intersection known as cognitive network neuroscience. PMID:25803596

  2. Promoting Social Network Awareness: A Social Network Monitoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadima, Rita; Ferreira, Carlos; Monguet, Josep; Ojeda, Jordi; Fernandez, Joaquin

    2010-01-01

    To increase communication and collaboration opportunities, members of a community must be aware of the social networks that exist within that community. This paper describes a social network monitoring system--the KIWI system--that enables users to register their interactions and visualize their social networks. The system was implemented in a…

  3. Networking standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Mark

    1991-01-01

    The enterprise network is currently a multivendor environment consisting of many defacto and proprietary standards. During the 1990s, these networks will evolve towards networks which are based on international standards in both Local Area Network (LAN) and Wide Area Network (WAN) space. Also, you can expect to see the higher level functions and applications begin the same transition. Additional information is given in viewgraph form.

  4. Fluvial network organization imprints on microbial co-occurrence networks.

    PubMed

    Widder, Stefanie; Besemer, Katharina; Singer, Gabriel A; Ceola, Serena; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Quince, Christopher; Sloan, William T; Rinaldo, Andrea; Battin, Tom J

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies highlight linkages among the architecture of ecological networks, their persistence facing environmental disturbance, and the related patterns of biodiversity. A hitherto unresolved question is whether the structure of the landscape inhabited by organisms leaves an imprint on their ecological networks. We analyzed, based on pyrosequencing profiling of the biofilm communities in 114 streams, how features inherent to fluvial networks affect the co-occurrence networks that the microorganisms form in these biofilms. Our findings suggest that hydrology and metacommunity dynamics, both changing predictably across fluvial networks, affect the fragmentation of the microbial co-occurrence networks throughout the fluvial network. The loss of taxa from co-occurrence networks demonstrates that the removal of gatekeepers disproportionately contributed to network fragmentation, which has potential implications for the functions biofilms fulfill in stream ecosystems. Our findings are critical because of increased anthropogenic pressures deteriorating stream ecosystem integrity and biodiversity. PMID:25136087

  5. Fluvial network organization imprints on microbial co-occurrence networks

    PubMed Central

    Widder, Stefanie; Besemer, Katharina; Singer, Gabriel A.; Ceola, Serena; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Quince, Christopher; Sloan, William T.; Rinaldo, Andrea; Battin, Tom J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies highlight linkages among the architecture of ecological networks, their persistence facing environmental disturbance, and the related patterns of biodiversity. A hitherto unresolved question is whether the structure of the landscape inhabited by organisms leaves an imprint on their ecological networks. We analyzed, based on pyrosequencing profiling of the biofilm communities in 114 streams, how features inherent to fluvial networks affect the co-occurrence networks that the microorganisms form in these biofilms. Our findings suggest that hydrology and metacommunity dynamics, both changing predictably across fluvial networks, affect the fragmentation of the microbial co-occurrence networks throughout the fluvial network. The loss of taxa from co-occurrence networks demonstrates that the removal of gatekeepers disproportionately contributed to network fragmentation, which has potential implications for the functions biofilms fulfill in stream ecosystems. Our findings are critical because of increased anthropogenic pressures deteriorating stream ecosystem integrity and biodiversity. PMID:25136087

  6. Semantic Networks and Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the need for social network metadata within semantic metadata. Design/methodology/approach: Surveys properties of social networks and the semantic web, suggests that social network analysis applies to semantic content, argues that semantic content is more searchable if social network metadata is merged with semantic web…

  7. Deep space network energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesema, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    If the Deep Space Network is to exist in a cost effective and reliable manner in the next decade, the problems presented by international energy cost increases and energy availability must be addressed. The Deep Space Network Energy Program was established to implement solutions compatible with the ongoing development of the total network.

  8. Increased Spreading Activation in Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Yung, Raegan C.; Branch, Kaylei K.; Stringer, Kristi; Ferguson, Brad J.; Sullivan, William; Drago, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is implicated in depressive disorders and research has also shown that dopamine constricts lexical/semantic networks by reducing spreading activation. Hence, depression, which is linked to reductions of dopamine, may be associated with increased spreading activation. However, research has generally found no effects of…

  9. Optical network democratization.

    PubMed

    Nejabati, Reza; Peng, Shuping; Simeonidou, Dimitra

    2016-03-01

    The current Internet infrastructure is not able to support independent evolution and innovation at physical and network layer functionalities, protocols and services, while at same time supporting the increasing bandwidth demands of evolving and heterogeneous applications. This paper addresses this problem by proposing a completely democratized optical network infrastructure. It introduces the novel concepts of the optical white box and bare metal optical switch as key technology enablers for democratizing optical networks. These are programmable optical switches whose hardware is loosely connected internally and is completely separated from their control software. To alleviate their complexity, a multi-dimensional abstraction mechanism using software-defined network technology is proposed. It creates a universal model of the proposed switches without exposing their technological details. It also enables a conventional network programmer to develop network applications for control of the optical network without specific technical knowledge of the physical layer. Furthermore, a novel optical network virtualization mechanism is proposed, enabling the composition and operation of multiple coexisting and application-specific virtual optical networks sharing the same physical infrastructure. Finally, the optical white box and the abstraction mechanism are experimentally evaluated, while the virtualization mechanism is evaluated with simulation. PMID:26809571

  10. Code 672 observational science branch computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Shirk, H. G.

    1988-01-01

    In general, networking increases productivity due to the speed of transmission, easy access to remote computers, ability to share files, and increased availability of peripherals. Two different networks within the Observational Science Branch are described in detail.

  11. Fermionic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2016-08-01

    We study the structure of fermionic networks, i.e. a model of networks based on the behavior of fermionic gases, and we analyze dynamical processes over them. In this model, particle dynamics have been mapped to the domain of networks, hence a parameter representing the temperature controls the evolution of the system. In doing so, it is possible to generate adaptive networks, i.e. networks whose structure varies over time. As shown in previous works, networks generated by quantum statistics can undergo critical phenomena as phase transitions and, moreover, they can be considered as thermodynamic systems. In this study, we analyze fermionic networks and opinion dynamics processes over them, framing this network model as a computational model useful to represent complex and adaptive systems. Results highlight that a strong relation holds between the gas temperature and the structure of the achieved networks. Notably, both the degree distribution and the assortativity vary as the temperature varies, hence we can state that fermionic networks behave as adaptive networks. On the other hand, it is worth to highlight that we did not finding relation between outcomes of opinion dynamics processes and the gas temperature. Therefore, although the latter plays a fundamental role in gas dynamics, on the network domain, its importance is related only to structural properties of fermionic networks.

  12. Network Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    1992-01-01

    Explains how users can find and access information resources available on the Internet. Highlights include network information centers (NICs); lists, both formal and informal; computer networking protocols, including international standards; electronic mail; remote log-in; and file transfer. (LRW)

  13. Easily repairable networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a simple class of distribution networks which withstand damage by being repairable instead of redundant. Instead of asking how hard it is to disconnect nodes through damage, we ask how easy it is to reconnect nodes after damage. We prove that optimal networks on regular lattices have an expected cost of reconnection proportional to the lattice length, and that such networks have exactly three levels of structural hierarchy. We extend our results to networks subject to repeated attacks, in which the repairs themselves must be repairable. We find that, in exchange for a modest increase in repair cost, such networks are able to withstand any number of attacks. We acknowledge support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, BCG and EU FP7 (Growthcom).

  14. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  15. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  16. Optimal Phase Oscillatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follmann, Rosangela

    2013-03-01

    Important topics as preventive detection of epidemics, collective self-organization, information flow and systemic robustness in clusters are typical examples of processes that can be studied in the context of the theory of complex networks. It is an emerging theory in a field, which has recently attracted much interest, involving the synchronization of dynamical systems associated to nodes, or vertices, of the network. Studies have shown that synchronization in oscillatory networks depends not only on the individual dynamics of each element, but also on the combination of the topology of the connections as well as on the properties of the interactions of these elements. Moreover, the response of the network to small damages, caused at strategic points, can enhance the global performance of the whole network. In this presentation we explore an optimal phase oscillatory network altered by an additional term in the coupling function. The application to associative-memory network shows improvement on the correct information retrieval as well as increase of the storage capacity. The inclusion of some small deviations on the nodes, when solutions are attracted to a false state, results in additional enhancement of the performance of the associative-memory network. Supported by FAPESP - Sao Paulo Research Foundation, grant number 2012/12555-4

  17. Spatial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthélemy, Marc

    2011-02-01

    Complex systems are very often organized under the form of networks where nodes and edges are embedded in space. Transportation and mobility networks, Internet, mobile phone networks, power grids, social and contact networks, and neural networks, are all examples where space is relevant and where topology alone does not contain all the information. Characterizing and understanding the structure and the evolution of spatial networks is thus crucial for many different fields, ranging from urbanism to epidemiology. An important consequence of space on networks is that there is a cost associated with the length of edges which in turn has dramatic effects on the topological structure of these networks. We will thoroughly explain the current state of our understanding of how the spatial constraints affect the structure and properties of these networks. We will review the most recent empirical observations and the most important models of spatial networks. We will also discuss various processes which take place on these spatial networks, such as phase transitions, random walks, synchronization, navigation, resilience, and disease spread.

  18. Thin Watts-Strogatz networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moura, Alessandro P. S.

    2006-01-01

    A modified version of the Watts-Strogatz (WS) network model is proposed, in which the number of shortcuts scales with the network size N as Nα , with α<1 . In these networks, the ratio of the number of shortcuts to the network size approaches zero as N→∞ , whereas in the original WS model, this ratio is constant. We call such networks “thin Watts-Strogatz networks.” We show that even though the fraction of shortcuts becomes vanishingly small for large networks, they still cause a kind of small-world effect, in the sense that the length L of the network increases sublinearly with the size. We develop a mean-field theory for these networks, which predicts that the length scales as N1-αlnN for large N . We also study how a search using only local information works in thin WS networks. We find that the search performance is enhanced compared to the regular network, and we predict that the search time τ scales as N1-α/2 . These theoretical results are tested using numerical simulations. We comment on the possible relevance of thin WS networks for the design of high-performance low-cost communication networks.

  19. Breakdown of interdependent directed networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueming; Stanley, H Eugene; Gao, Jianxi

    2016-02-01

    Increasing evidence shows that real-world systems interact with one another via dependency connectivities. Failing connectivities are the mechanism behind the breakdown of interacting complex systems, e.g., blackouts caused by the interdependence of power grids and communication networks. Previous research analyzing the robustness of interdependent networks has been limited to undirected networks. However, most real-world networks are directed, their in-degrees and out-degrees may be correlated, and they are often coupled to one another as interdependent directed networks. To understand the breakdown and robustness of interdependent directed networks, we develop a theoretical framework based on generating functions and percolation theory. We find that for interdependent Erdős-Rényi networks the directionality within each network increases their vulnerability and exhibits hybrid phase transitions. We also find that the percolation behavior of interdependent directed scale-free networks with and without degree correlations is so complex that two criteria are needed to quantify and compare their robustness: the percolation threshold and the integrated size of the giant component during an entire attack process. Interestingly, we find that the in-degree and out-degree correlations in each network layer increase the robustness of interdependent degree heterogeneous networks that most real networks are, but decrease the robustness of interdependent networks with homogeneous degree distribution and with strong coupling strengths. Moreover, by applying our theoretical analysis to real interdependent international trade networks, we find that the robustness of these real-world systems increases with the in-degree and out-degree correlations, confirming our theoretical analysis. PMID:26787907

  20. Querying Large Biological Network Datasets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulsoy, Gunhan

    2013-01-01

    New experimental methods has resulted in increasing amount of genetic interaction data to be generated every day. Biological networks are used to store genetic interaction data gathered. Increasing amount of data available requires fast large scale analysis methods. Therefore, we address the problem of querying large biological network datasets.…

  1. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  2. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks

    Guest Editors Jun Zheng, University of Ottawa Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

    Background

    With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the

  3. OPTIMAL NETWORK TOPOLOGY DESIGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed as part of a research study on the topology design and performance analysis for the Space Station Information System (SSIS) network. It uses an efficient algorithm to generate candidate network designs (consisting of subsets of the set of all network components) in increasing order of their total costs, and checks each design to see if it forms an acceptable network. This technique gives the true cost-optimal network, and is particularly useful when the network has many constraints and not too many components. It is intended that this new design technique consider all important performance measures explicitly and take into account the constraints due to various technical feasibilities. In the current program, technical constraints are taken care of by the user properly forming the starting set of candidate components (e.g. nonfeasible links are not included). As subsets are generated, they are tested to see if they form an acceptable network by checking that all requirements are satisfied. Thus the first acceptable subset encountered gives the cost-optimal topology satisfying all given constraints. The user must sort the set of "feasible" link elements in increasing order of their costs. The program prompts the user for the following information for each link: 1) cost, 2) connectivity (number of stations connected by the link), and 3) the stations connected by that link. Unless instructed to stop, the program generates all possible acceptable networks in increasing order of their total costs. The program is written only to generate topologies that are simply connected. Tests on reliability, delay, and other performance measures are discussed in the documentation, but have not been incorporated into the program. This program is written in PASCAL for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC series computer operating under PC DOS. The disk contains source code only. This program was developed in 1985.

  4. Network morphospace

    PubMed Central

    Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Goñi, Joaquín; Solé, Ricard; Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    The structure of complex networks has attracted much attention in recent years. It has been noted that many real-world examples of networked systems share a set of common architectural features. This raises important questions about their origin, for example whether such network attributes reflect common design principles or constraints imposed by selectional forces that have shaped the evolution of network topology. Is it possible to place the many patterns and forms of complex networks into a common space that reveals their relations, and what are the main rules and driving forces that determine which positions in such a space are occupied by systems that have actually evolved? We suggest that these questions can be addressed by combining concepts from two currently relatively unconnected fields. One is theoretical morphology, which has conceptualized the relations between morphological traits defined by mathematical models of biological form. The second is network science, which provides numerous quantitative tools to measure and classify different patterns of local and global network architecture across disparate types of systems. Here, we explore a new theoretical concept that lies at the intersection between both fields, the ‘network morphospace’. Defined by axes that represent specific network traits, each point within such a space represents a location occupied by networks that share a set of common ‘morphological’ characteristics related to aspects of their connectivity. Mapping a network morphospace reveals the extent to which the space is filled by existing networks, thus allowing a distinction between actual and impossible designs and highlighting the generative potential of rules and constraints that pervade the evolution of complex systems. PMID:25540237

  5. Channel Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rigon, Riccardo

    This review proceeds from Luna Leopold's and Ronald Shreve's lasting accomplishments dealing with the study of random-walk and topologically random channel networks. According to the random perspective, which has had a profound influence on the interpretation of natural landforms, nature's resiliency in producing recurrent networks and landforms was interpreted to be the consequence of chance. In fact, central to models of topologically random networks is the assumption of equal likelihood of any tree-like configuration. However, a general framework of analysis exists that argues that all possible network configurations draining a fixed area are not necessarily equally likely. Rather, a probability P(s) is assigned to a particular spanning tree configuration, say s, which can be generally assumed to obey a Boltzmann distribution: P(s) % e^-H(s)/T, where T is a parameter and H(s) is a global property of the network configuration s related to energetic characters, i.e. its Hamiltonian. One extreme case is the random topology model where all trees are equally likely, i.e. the limit case for T6 4 . The other extreme case is T 6 0, and this corresponds to network configurations that tend to minimize their total energy dissipation to improve their likelihood. Networks obtained in this manner are termed optimal channel networks (OCNs). Observational evidence suggests that the characters of real river networks are reproduced extremely well by OCNs. Scaling properties of energy and entropy of OCNs suggest that large network development is likely to effectively occur at zero temperature (i.e. minimizing its Hamiltonian). We suggest a corollary of dynamic accessibility of a network configuration and speculate towards a thermodynamics of critical self-organization. We thus conclude that both chance and necessity are equally important ingredients for the dynamic origin of channel networks---and perhaps of the geometry of nature.

  6. Network morphospace.

    PubMed

    Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Goñi, Joaquín; Solé, Ricard; Sporns, Olaf

    2015-02-01

    The structure of complex networks has attracted much attention in recent years. It has been noted that many real-world examples of networked systems share a set of common architectural features. This raises important questions about their origin, for example whether such network attributes reflect common design principles or constraints imposed by selectional forces that have shaped the evolution of network topology. Is it possible to place the many patterns and forms of complex networks into a common space that reveals their relations, and what are the main rules and driving forces that determine which positions in such a space are occupied by systems that have actually evolved? We suggest that these questions can be addressed by combining concepts from two currently relatively unconnected fields. One is theoretical morphology, which has conceptualized the relations between morphological traits defined by mathematical models of biological form. The second is network science, which provides numerous quantitative tools to measure and classify different patterns of local and global network architecture across disparate types of systems. Here, we explore a new theoretical concept that lies at the intersection between both fields, the 'network morphospace'. Defined by axes that represent specific network traits, each point within such a space represents a location occupied by networks that share a set of common 'morphological' characteristics related to aspects of their connectivity. Mapping a network morphospace reveals the extent to which the space is filled by existing networks, thus allowing a distinction between actual and impossible designs and highlighting the generative potential of rules and constraints that pervade the evolution of complex systems. PMID:25540237

  7. Network architecture in a converged optical + IP network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakim, Walid; Zottmann, Harald

    2012-01-01

    As demands on Provider Networks continue to grow at exponential rates, providers are forced to evaluate how to continue to grow the network while increasing service velocity, enhancing resiliency while decreasing the total cost of ownership (TCO). The bandwidth growth that networks are experiencing is in the form packet based multimedia services such as video, video conferencing, gaming, etc... mixed with Over the Top (OTT) content providers such as Netflix, and the customer's expectations that best effort is not enough you end up with a situation that forces the provider to analyze how to gain more out of the network with less cost. In this paper we will discuss changes in the network that are driving us to a tighter integration between packet and optical layers and how to improve on today's multi - layer inefficiencies to drive down network TCO and provide for a fully integrated and dynamic network that will decrease time to revenue.

  8. Innovation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyka, Andreas; Scharnhorst, Andrea

    The idea for this book started when we organized a topical workshop entitled "Innovation Networks - New Approaches in Modeling and Analyzing" (held in Augsburg, Germany in October 2005), under the auspices of Exystence, a network of excellence funded in the European Union's Fifth Framework Program. Unlike other conferences on innovation and networks, however, this workshop brought together scientists from economics, sociology, communication science, science and technology studies, and physics. With this book we aim to build further on a bridge connecting the bodies of knowledge on networks in economics, the social sciences and, more recently, statistical physics.

  9. Network reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1985-01-01

    Network control (or network management) functions are essential for efficient and reliable operation of a network. Some control functions are currently included as part of the Open System Interconnection model. For local area networks, it is widely recognized that there is a need for additional control functions, including fault isolation functions, monitoring functions, and configuration functions. These functions can be implemented in either a central or distributed manner. The Fiber Distributed Data Interface Medium Access Control and Station Management protocols provide an example of distributed implementation. Relative information is presented here in outline form.

  10. Pattern formation in multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Kouvaris, Nikos E.; Hata, Shigefumi; Guilera, Albert Díaz-

    2015-01-01

    The advances in understanding complex networks have generated increasing interest in dynamical processes occurring on them. Pattern formation in activator-inhibitor systems has been studied in networks, revealing differences from the classical continuous media. Here we study pattern formation in a new framework, namely multiplex networks. These are systems where activator and inhibitor species occupy separate nodes in different layers. Species react across layers but diffuse only within their own layer of distinct network topology. This multiplicity generates heterogeneous patterns with significant differences from those observed in single-layer networks. Remarkably, diffusion-induced instability can occur even if the two species have the same mobility rates; condition which can never destabilize single-layer networks. The instability condition is revealed using perturbation theory and expressed by a combination of degrees in the different layers. Our theory demonstrates that the existence of such topology-driven instabilities is generic in multiplex networks, providing a new mechanism of pattern formation. PMID:26042606

  11. Compressively sensed complex networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Ray, Jaideep; Pinar, Ali

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this project is to develop low dimension parametric (deterministic) models of complex networks, to use compressive sensing (CS) and multiscale analysis to do so and to exploit the structure of complex networks (some are self-similar under coarsening). CS provides a new way of sampling and reconstructing networks. The approach is based on multiresolution decomposition of the adjacency matrix and its efficient sampling. It requires preprocessing of the adjacency matrix to make it 'blocky' which is the biggest (combinatorial) algorithm challenge. Current CS reconstruction algorithm makes no use of the structure of a graph, its very general (and so not very efficient/customized). Other model-based CS techniques exist, but not yet adapted to networks. Obvious starting point for future work is to increase the efficiency of reconstruction.

  12. Network Event Recording Device: An automated system for Network anomaly detection, and notification. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, D.G.; Wilkins, R.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of the Network Event Recording Device (NERD) is to provide a flexible autonomous system for network logging and notification when significant network anomalies occur. The NERD is also charged with increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of currently implemented network security procedures. While it has always been possible for network and security managers to review log files for evidence of network irregularities, the NERD provides real-time display of network activity, as well as constant monitoring and notification services for managers. Similarly, real-time display and notification of possible security breaches will provide improved effectiveness in combating resource infiltration from both inside and outside the immediate network environment.

  13. Are Nested Networks More Robust to Disturbance? A Test Using Epiphyte-Tree, Comensalistic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Piazzon, Martín; Larrinaga, Asier R.; Santamaría, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Recent research on ecological networks suggests that mutualistic networks are more nested than antagonistic ones and, as a result, they are more robust against chains of extinctions caused by disturbances. We evaluate whether mutualistic networks are more nested than comensalistic and antagonistic networks, and whether highly nested, host-epiphyte comensalistic networks fit the prediction of high robustness against disturbance. A review of 59 networks including mutualistic, antagonistic and comensalistic relationships showed that comensalistic networks are significantly more nested than antagonistic and mutualistic networks, which did not differ between themselves. Epiphyte-host networks from old-growth forests differed from those from disturbed forest in several topological parameters based on both qualitative and quantitative matrices. Network robustness increased with network size, but the slope of this relationship varied with nestedness and connectance. Our results indicate that interaction networks show complex responses to disturbances, which influence their topology and indirectly affect their robustness against species extinctions. PMID:21589931

  14. Diophantine networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogne', C.; Masucci, A. P.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a new class of deterministic networks by associating networks with Diophantine equations, thus relating network topology to algebraic properties. The network is formed by representing integers as vertices and by drawing cliques between M vertices every time that M distinct integers satisfy the equation. We analyse the network generated by the Pythagorean equation x2 +y2 =z2 showing that its degree distribution is well approximated by a power law with exponential cut-off. We also show that the properties of this network differ considerably from the features of scale-free networks generated through preferential attachment. Remarkably we also recover a power law for the clustering coefficient. We then study the network associated with the equation x2 +y2 = z showing that the degree distribution is consistent with a power law for several decades of values of k and that, after having reached a minimum, the distribution begins rising again. The power-law exponent, in this case, is given by γ ∼ 4.5 We then analyse clustering and ageing and compare our results to the ones obtained in the Pythagorean case.

  15. Adaptive Transfer Function Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. |

    1993-06-01

    Real-time pattern classification and time-series forecasting applications continue to drive artificial neural network (ANN) technology. As ANNs increase in complexity, the throughput of digital computer simulations decreases. A novel ANN, the Adaptive Transfer Function Network (ATF-Net), directly addresses the issue of throughput. ATF-Nets are global mapping equations generated by the superposition of ensembles of neurodes having arbitrary continuous functions receiving encoded input data. ATF-Nets may be implemented on parallel digital computers. An example is presented which illustrates a four-fold increase in computational throughput.

  16. Adaptive Transfer Function Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. Portland State Univ., OR . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Real-time pattern classification and time-series forecasting applications continue to drive artificial neural network (ANN) technology. As ANNs increase in complexity, the throughput of digital computer simulations decreases. A novel ANN, the Adaptive Transfer Function Network (ATF-Net), directly addresses the issue of throughput. ATF-Nets are global mapping equations generated by the superposition of ensembles of neurodes having arbitrary continuous functions receiving encoded input data. ATF-Nets may be implemented on parallel digital computers. An example is presented which illustrates a four-fold increase in computational throughput.

  17. Temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari

    2012-10-01

    A great variety of systems in nature, society and technology-from the web of sexual contacts to the Internet, from the nervous system to power grids-can be modeled as graphs of vertices coupled by edges. The network structure, describing how the graph is wired, helps us understand, predict and optimize the behavior of dynamical systems. In many cases, however, the edges are not continuously active. As an example, in networks of communication via e-mail, text messages, or phone calls, edges represent sequences of instantaneous or practically instantaneous contacts. In some cases, edges are active for non-negligible periods of time: e.g., the proximity patterns of inpatients at hospitals can be represented by a graph where an edge between two individuals is on throughout the time they are at the same ward. Like network topology, the temporal structure of edge activations can affect dynamics of systems interacting through the network, from disease contagion on the network of patients to information diffusion over an e-mail network. In this review, we present the emergent field of temporal networks, and discuss methods for analyzing topological and temporal structure and models for elucidating their relation to the behavior of dynamical systems. In the light of traditional network theory, one can see this framework as moving the information of when things happen from the dynamical system on the network, to the network itself. Since fundamental properties, such as the transitivity of edges, do not necessarily hold in temporal networks, many of these methods need to be quite different from those for static networks. The study of temporal networks is very interdisciplinary in nature. Reflecting this, even the object of study has many names-temporal graphs, evolving graphs, time-varying graphs, time-aggregated graphs, time-stamped graphs, dynamic networks, dynamic graphs, dynamical graphs, and so on. This review covers different fields where temporal graphs are considered

  18. Cross-disciplinary detection and analysis of network motifs.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; DeLuccia, Luke; McDonald, Aidan F; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The detection of network motifs has recently become an important part of network analysis across all disciplines. In this work, we detected and analyzed network motifs from undirected and directed networks of several different disciplines, including biological network, social network, ecological network, as well as other networks such as airlines, power grid, and co-purchase of political books networks. Our analysis revealed that undirected networks are similar at the basic three and four nodes, while the analysis of directed networks revealed the distinction between networks of different disciplines. The study showed that larger motifs contained the three-node motif as a subgraph. Topological analysis revealed that similar networks have similar small motifs, but as the motif size increases, differences arise. Pearson correlation coefficient showed strong positive relationship between some undirected networks but inverse relationship between some directed networks. The study suggests that the three-node motif is a building block of larger motifs. It also suggests that undirected networks share similar low-level structures. Moreover, similar networks share similar small motifs, but larger motifs define the unique structure of individuals. Pearson correlation coefficient suggests that protein structure networks, dolphin social network, and co-authorships in network science belong to a superfamily. In addition, yeast protein-protein interaction network, primary school contact network, Zachary's karate club network, and co-purchase of political books network can be classified into a superfamily. PMID:25983553

  19. Cross-Disciplinary Detection and Analysis of Network Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; DeLuccia, Luke; McDonald, Aidan F; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The detection of network motifs has recently become an important part of network analysis across all disciplines. In this work, we detected and analyzed network motifs from undirected and directed networks of several different disciplines, including biological network, social network, ecological network, as well as other networks such as airlines, power grid, and co-purchase of political books networks. Our analysis revealed that undirected networks are similar at the basic three and four nodes, while the analysis of directed networks revealed the distinction between networks of different disciplines. The study showed that larger motifs contained the three-node motif as a subgraph. Topological analysis revealed that similar networks have similar small motifs, but as the motif size increases, differences arise. Pearson correlation coefficient showed strong positive relationship between some undirected networks but inverse relationship between some directed networks. The study suggests that the three-node motif is a building block of larger motifs. It also suggests that undirected networks share similar low-level structures. Moreover, similar networks share similar small motifs, but larger motifs define the unique structure of individuals. Pearson correlation coefficient suggests that protein structure networks, dolphin social network, and co-authorships in network science belong to a superfamily. In addition, yeast protein–protein interaction network, primary school contact network, Zachary’s karate club network, and co-purchase of political books network can be classified into a superfamily. PMID:25983553

  20. Technological Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Bivas

    The study of networks in the form of mathematical graph theory is one of the fundamental pillars of discrete mathematics. However, recent years have witnessed a substantial new movement in network research. The focus of the research is shifting away from the analysis of small graphs and the properties of individual vertices or edges to consideration of statistical properties of large scale networks. This new approach has been driven largely by the availability of technological networks like the Internet [12], World Wide Web network [2], etc. that allow us to gather and analyze data on a scale far larger than previously possible. At the same time, technological networks have evolved as a socio-technological system, as the concepts of social systems that are based on self-organization theory have become unified in technological networks [13]. In today’s society, we have a simple and universal access to great amounts of information and services. These information services are based upon the infrastructure of the Internet and the World Wide Web. The Internet is the system composed of ‘computers’ connected by cables or some other form of physical connections. Over this physical network, it is possible to exchange e-mails, transfer files, etc. On the other hand, the World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked hypertext documents accessed via the Internet where nodes represent web pages and links represent hyperlinks between the pages. Peer-to-peer (P2P) networks [26] also have recently become a popular medium through which huge amounts of data can be shared. P2P file sharing systems, where files are searched and downloaded among peers without the help of central servers, have emerged as a major component of Internet traffic. An important advantage in P2P networks is that all clients provide resources, including bandwidth, storage space, and computing power. In this chapter, we discuss these technological networks in detail. The review

  1. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-02-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  2. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking

  3. Entropy and order in urban street networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2013-11-01

    Many complex networks erase parts of their geometry as they develop, so that their evolution is difficult to quantify and trace. Here we introduce entropy measures for quantifying the complexity of street orientations and length variations within planar networks and apply them to the street networks of 41 British cities, whose geometric evolution over centuries can be explored. The results show that the street networks of the old central parts of the cities have lower orientation/length entropies - the streets are more tightly ordered and form denser networks - than the outer and more recent parts. Entropy and street length increase, because of spreading, with distance from the network centre. Tracing the 400-year evolution of one network indicates growth through densification (streets are added within the existing network) and expansion (streets are added at the margin of the network) and a gradual increase in entropy over time.

  4. Improving Network Transport Efficiency by Edge Rewiring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhong-Yuan; Liang, Man-Gui; Guo, Dong-Chao

    2013-03-01

    Considering the heterogeneous structure of scale-free networks causing low traffic capacity of network, we propose to improve the network transport efficiency by rewiring a fraction of edges for the network. In this paper, six edge rewiring strategies are discussed and extensive simulations on Barabási-Albert (BA) scale-free networks confirm the effectiveness of these strategies. From another perspective, rewiring edges for scale-free networks directly reuse the removed edges under some edge-removal strategies [Z. Liu, M. B. Hu, R. Jiang, W. X. Wang and Q. S. Wu, Phys. Rev. E76 (2007) 037101; G. Q. Zhang, D. Wang and G. J. Li, Phys. Rev. E76 (2007) 017101], and can significantly enhance the traffic capacity of the network at the expense of increasing a little average path length. After the edge rewiring process, the network structure becomes significantly homogeneous. This work is helpful for network design and network performance optimization.

  5. Social network structures and bank runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouwei; Li, Jiaheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the impact of social network structures of depositors on bank runs. The analyzed network structures include random networks, small-world networks and scale-free networks. Simulation results show that the probability of bank run occurrence in random networks is larger than that in small-world networks, but the probability of bank run occurrence in scale-free networks drops from the highest to the lowest among the three types of network structures with the increase of the proportion of impatient depositors. The average degree of depositor networks has a significant impact on bank runs, but this impact is related to the proportion of impatient depositors and the confidence levels of depositors in banks.

  6. Topological Analysis of Urban Drainage Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Soohyun; Paik, Kyungrock; McGrath, Gavan; Rao, Suresh

    2016-04-01

    Urban drainage networks are an essential component of infrastructure, and comprise the aggregation of underground pipe networks carrying storm water and domestic waste water for eventual discharge to natural stream networks. Growing urbanization has contributed to rapid expansion of sewer networks, vastly increasing their complexity and scale. Importance of sewer networks has been well studied from an engineering perspective, including resilient management, optimal design, and malfunctioning impact. Yet, analysis of the urban drainage networks using complex networks approach are lacking. Urban drainage networks consist of manholes and conduits, which correspond to nodes and edges, analogous to junctions and streams in river networks. Converging water flows in these two networks are driven by elevation gradient. In this sense, engineered urban drainage networks share several attributes of flows in river networks. These similarities between the two directed, converging flow networks serve the basis for us to hypothesize that the functional topology of sewer networks, like river networks, is scale-invariant. We analyzed the exceedance probability distribution of upstream area for practical sewer networks in South Korea. We found that the exceedance probability distributions of upstream area follow power-law, implying that the sewer networks exhibit topological self-similarity. The power-law exponents for the sewer networks were similar, and within the range reported from analysis of natural river networks. Thus, in line with our hypothesis, these results suggest that engineered urban drainage networks share functional topological attributes regardless of their structural dissimilarity or different underlying network evolution processes (natural vs. engineered). Implications of these findings for optimal design of sewer networks and for modeling sewer flows will be discussed.

  7. Editorial: Next Generation Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, Marco; Cincotti, Gabriella; Pizzinat, Anna; Vetter, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade we have seen an increasing number of operators deploying Fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) solutions in access networks, in order to provide home users with a much needed network access upgrade, to support higher peak rates, higher sustained rates and a better and more uniform broadband coverage of the territory.

  8. European Schoolnet: Enabling School Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scimeca, Santi; Dumitru, Petru; Durando, Marc; Gilleran, Anne; Joyce, Alexa; Vuorikari, Riina

    2009-01-01

    School networking is increasingly important in a globalised world, where schools themselves can be actors on an international stage. This article builds on the activities and experience of the longest established European initiative in this area, European Schoolnet (EUN), a network of 31 Ministries of Education. First, we offer an introduction…

  9. Information Networking in Population Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    The rapidly increasing body of knowledge in population education has created the need for systematic and effective information services. Information networking entails sharing resources so that the information needs of all network participants are met. The goals of this manual are to: (1) instill in population education specialists a more…

  10. High speed optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Michael Y.; Livas, Jeff

    2005-02-01

    This overview will discuss core network technology and cost trade-offs inherent in choosing between "analog" architectures with high optical transparency, and ones heavily dependent on frequent "digital" signal regeneration. The exact balance will be related to the specific technology choices in each area outlined above, as well as the network needs such as node geographic spread, physical connectivity patterns, and demand loading. Over the course of a decade, optical networks have evolved from simple single-channel SONET regenerator-based links to multi-span multi-channel optically amplified ultra-long haul systems, fueled by high demand for bandwidth at reduced cost. In general, the cost of a well-designed high capacity system is dominated by the number of optical to electrical (OE) and electrical to optical (EO) conversions required. As the reach and channel capacity of the transport systems continued to increase, it became necessary to improve the granularity of the demand connections by introducing (optical add/drop multiplexers) OADMs. Thus, if a node requires only small demand connectivity, most of the optical channels are expressed through without regeneration (OEO). The network costs are correspondingly reduced, partially balanced by the increased cost of the OADM nodes. Lately, the industry has been aggressively pursuing a natural extension of this philosophy towards all-optical "analog" core networks, with each demand touching electrical digital circuitry only at the in/egress nodes. This is expected to produce a substantial elimination of OEO costs, increase in network capacity, and a notionally simpler operation and service turn-up. At the same time, such optical "analog" network requires a large amount of complicated hardware and software for monitoring and manipulating high bit rate optical signals. New and more complex modulation formats that provide resiliency to both optical noise and nonlinear propagation effects are important for extended

  11. An Investigation of Synchrony in Transport Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.; Alexandrov, Natalia M.; Holroyd, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The cumulative degree distributions of transport networks, such as air transportation networks and respiratory neuronal networks, follow power laws. The significance of power laws with respect to other network performance measures, such as throughput and synchronization, remains an open question. Evolving methods for the analysis and design of air transportation networks must address network performance in the face of increasing demands and the need to contain and control local network disturbances, such as congestion. Toward this end, we investigate functional relationships that govern the performance of transport networks; for example, the links between the first nontrivial eigenvalue of a network's Laplacian matrix - a quantitative measure of network synchronizability - and other global network parameters. In particular, among networks with a fixed degree distribution and fixed network assortativity (a measure of a network's preference to attach nodes based on a similarity or difference), those with the small eigenvalue are shown to be poor synchronizers, to have much longer shortest paths and to have greater clustering in comparison to those with large. A simulation of a respiratory network adds data to our investigation. This study is a beginning step in developing metrics and design variables for the analysis and active design of air transport networks.

  12. Sentinel Network

    Cancer.gov

    The Sentinel Network is an integrated, electronic, national medical product safety initiative that compiles information about the safe and effective use of medical products accessible to patients and healthcare practitioners.

  13. Simulating synchronization in neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Christian G.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss several techniques used in simulating neuronal networks by exploring how a network's connectivity structure affects its propensity for synchronous spiking. Network connectivity is generated using the Watts-Strogatz small-world algorithm, and two key measures of network structure are described. These measures quantify structural characteristics that influence collective neuronal spiking, which is simulated using the leaky integrate-and-fire model. Simulations show that adding a small number of random connections to an otherwise lattice-like connectivity structure leads to a dramatic increase in neuronal synchronization.

  14. Economic networks: the new challenges.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Frank; Fagiolo, Giorgio; Sornette, Didier; Vega-Redondo, Fernando; Vespignani, Alessandro; White, Douglas R

    2009-07-24

    The current economic crisis illustrates a critical need for new and fundamental understanding of the structure and dynamics of economic networks. Economic systems are increasingly built on interdependencies, implemented through trans-national credit and investment networks, trade relations, or supply chains that have proven difficult to predict and control. We need, therefore, an approach that stresses the systemic complexity of economic networks and that can be used to revise and extend established paradigms in economic theory. This will facilitate the design of policies that reduce conflicts between individual interests and global efficiency, as well as reduce the risk of global failure by making economic networks more robust. PMID:19628858

  15. Ocean Sciences: Carbonate Network Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaelsen, Bjarne

    2004-08-01

    The Carbonate Network is a new Internet-based international network (www.carbonet.net) for carbonate researchers. The network aims to stimulate an increased exchange of knowledge between carbonate researchers from different geological institutions, and to provide a scientific forum for discussing carbonate-related issues. The discussion forum (www.carbonet.net/forum), which is the essence of the Carbonate Network, includes information about meetings, publications, excursions, courses, Internet resources, and specific scientific topics (geophysics, sedimentology, geochemistry, paleontology, petrophysics, mineralogy, among others).

  16. Developer Network

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-21

    NREL's Developer Network, developer.nrel.gov, provides data that users can access to provide data to their own analyses, mobile and web applications. Developers can retrieve the data through a Web services API (application programming interface). The Developer Network handles overhead of serving up web services such as key management, authentication, analytics, reporting, documentation standards, and throttling in a common architecture, while allowing web services and APIs to be maintained and managed independently.

  17. Sentient networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.

    1998-03-01

    The engineering problems of constructing autonomous networks of sensors and data processors that can provide alerts for dangerous situations provide a new context for debating the question whether man-made systems can emulate the cognitive capabilities of the mammalian brain. In this paper we consider the question whether a distributed network of sensors and data processors can form ``perceptions`` based on sensory data. Because sensory data can have exponentially many explanations, the use of a central data processor to analyze the outputs from a large ensemble of sensors will in general introduce unacceptable latencies for responding to dangerous situations. A better idea is to use a distributed ``Helmholtz machine`` architecture in which the sensors are connected to a network of simple processors, and the collective state of the network as a whole provides an explanation for the sensory data. In general communication within such a network will require time division multiplexing, which opens the door to the possibility that with certain refinements to the Helmholtz machine architecture it may be possible to build sensor networks that exhibit a form of artificial consciousness.

  18. Tinnitus: network pathophysiology-network pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Elgoyhen, Ana B.; Langguth, Berthold; Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus, the phantom perception of sound, is a prevalent disorder. One in 10 adults has clinically significant subjective tinnitus, and for one in 100, tinnitus severely affects their quality of life. Despite the significant unmet clinical need for a safe and effective drug targeting tinnitus relief, there is currently not a single Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug on the market. The search for drugs that target tinnitus is hampered by the lack of a deep knowledge of the underlying neural substrates of this pathology. Recent studies are increasingly demonstrating that, as described for other central nervous system (CNS) disorders, tinnitus is a pathology of brain networks. The application of graph theoretical analysis to brain networks has recently provided new information concerning their topology, their robustness and their vulnerability to attacks. Moreover, the philosophy behind drug design and pharmacotherapy in CNS pathologies is changing from that of “magic bullets” that target individual chemoreceptors or “disease-causing genes” into that of “magic shotguns,” “promiscuous” or “dirty drugs” that target “disease-causing networks,” also known as network pharmacology. In the present work we provide some insight into how this knowledge could be applied to tinnitus pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy. PMID:22291622

  19. Predictive Habitat Modelling as a Tool to Assess the Change in Distribution and Extent of an OSPAR Priority Habitat under an Increased Ocean Temperature Scenario: Consequences for Marine Protected Area Networks and Management

    PubMed Central

    Gormley, Kate S. G.; Porter, Joanne S.; Bell, Michael C.; Hull, Angela D.; Sanderson, William G.

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the extent and distribution of an OSPAR priority habitat under current baseline ocean temperatures; to illustrate the prospect for habitat loss under a changing ocean temperature scenario; and to demonstrate the potential application of predictive habitat mapping in “future-proofing” conservation and biodiversity management. Maxent modelling and GIS environmental envelope analysis of the biogenic bed forming species, Modiolus modiolus was carried out. The Maxent model was tested and validated using 75%/25% training/test occurrence records and validated against two sampling biases (the whole study area and a 20km buffer). The model was compared to the envelope analysis and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Area Under the curve; AUC) was evaluated. The performance of the Maxent model was rated as ‘good’ to ‘excellent’ on all replicated runs and low variation in the runs was recorded from the AUC values. The extent of “most suitable”, “less suitable” and “unsuitable” habitat was calculated for the baseline year (2009) and the projected increased ocean temperature scenarios (2030, 2050, 2080 and 2100). A loss of 100% of “most suitable” habitat was reported by 2080. Maintaining a suitable level of protection of marine habitats/species of conservation importance may require management of the decline and migration rather than maintenance of present extent. Methods applied in this study provide the initial application of a plausible “conservation management tool”. PMID:23894298

  20. Network Bandwidth Utilization Forecast Model on High Bandwidth Network

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Wucherl; Sim, Alex

    2014-07-07

    With the increasing number of geographically distributed scientific collaborations and the scale of the data size growth, it has become more challenging for users to achieve the best possible network performance on a shared network. We have developed a forecast model to predict expected bandwidth utilization for high-bandwidth wide area network. The forecast model can improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling data movements on high-bandwidth network to accommodate ever increasing data volume for large-scale scientific data applications. Univariate model is developed with STL and ARIMA on SNMP path utilization data. Compared with traditional approach such as Box-Jenkins methodology, our forecast model reduces computation time by 83.2percent. It also shows resilience against abrupt network usage change. The accuracy of the forecast model is within the standard deviation of the monitored measurements.

  1. Robustness and structure of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai

    are much more vulnerable to localized attack compared with random attack. In the second part, we extend the tree-like generating function method to incorporating clustering structure in complex networks. We study the robustness of a complex network system, especially a network of networks (NON) with clustering structure in each network. We find that the system becomes less robust as we increase the clustering coefficient of each network. For a partially dependent network system, we also find that the influence of the clustering coefficient on network robustness decreases as we decrease the coupling strength, and the critical coupling strength qc, at which the first-order phase transition changes to second-order, increases as we increase the clustering coefficient.

  2. Networks advocate for youth services.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses the role of networks in promoting reproductive health for youth in Ghana. The Suhum-Kraboa-Coaltar Network and the New Juaben Network are situated in the eastern region of Ghana. These two programs advocate for client-centered programs and for policy change at every level. Since the 1994 ICPD Plan of Action, these networks have worked to increase and improve health services for youth and to improve cooperation between government and nongovernmental groups. These networks provide family planning, reproductive health (RH), and, most importantly, promotion of adolescent health. CEDPA realized that many organizations had the capacity to extend services to youth and to fulfill other mandates of the 1994 ICPD Program of Action. But, these organizations lacked advocacy and networking skills for effectively challenging community policies and programs. CEDPA, in collaboration with others, initiated the POLICY project in 1996 in Ghana. The aim was to create a supportive policy context for family planning and RH programs by formation of a participatory policy process. The POLICY project in Ghana helped networks develop advocacy plans targeted to local decision-makers. The aim was to increase funding for adolescent RH in district plans and budgets. The first action taken by the POLICY project was to conduct a survey, which found that 67% of adolescent females and 53% of adolescent males were sexually active. Only 10% used contraceptives. Advocacy did not increase funding but did result in a supportive network of policy-makers. There are POLICY projects in over 12 countries. PMID:12294636

  3. Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Patrick I.

    2003-09-23

    Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output while using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing

  4. Social networking and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fuld, Gilbert L

    2009-04-01

    Online social networking is a 21st century innovation increasingly embraced by today's young people. It provides new opportunities for communication that expand an adolescent's world. Yet adults, often suspicious of new trends and technologies initially embraced by youth, often see these new environments as perilous places to visit. These fears have been accentuated by media hype, especially about sexual predators. How dangerous are they? Because the rush to go on these sites is a new phenomenon, research is as yet scant. This review explores current beliefs and knowledge about the dangers of social networking sites. PMID:19492691

  5. Nested neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1988-01-01

    Nested neural networks, consisting of small interconnected subnetworks, allow for the storage and retrieval of neural state patterns of different sizes. The subnetworks are naturally categorized by layers of corresponding to spatial frequencies in the pattern field. The storage capacity and the error correction capability of the subnetworks generally increase with the degree of connectivity between layers (the nesting degree). Storage of only few subpatterns in each subnetworks results in a vast storage capacity of patterns and subpatterns in the nested network, maintaining high stability and error correction capability.

  6. Network management tools for a GPS datalink network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, Padhraic; Chauvin, Todd; Oliver, Gordon; Statman, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The availability of GPS (Global Position Satellite) information in real-time via a datalink system is shown to significantly increase the capacity of flight test and training ranges in terms of missions supported. This increase in mission activity. imposes demands on mission planning in the range-operations environment. In this context, network management tools which can improve the capability of range personnel to plan, monitor, and control network resources, are of significant interest. The application of both simulation and artificial intelligence techniques is described to develop such network managements tools.

  7. Dynamic and interacting complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickison, Mark E.

    individuals protect themselves by disconnecting their links to infected neighbors with probability w and reconnecting them to other susceptible individuals chosen at random. Starting from a single infected individual, we show by an analytical approach and simulations that there is a phase transition at a critical rewiring (quarantine) threshold wc separating a phase (w < wc) where the disease reaches a large fraction of the population from a phase (w > wc) where the disease does not spread out. We find that in our model the topology of the network strongly affects the size of the propagation and that wc increases with the mean degree and heterogeneity of the network. We also find that wc is reduced if we perform a preferential rewiring, in which the rewiring probability is proportional to the degree of infected nodes. In the fourth chapter, we study epidemic processes on interconnected network systems, and find two distinct regimes. In strongly-coupled network systems, epidemics occur simultaneously across the entire system at a critical value betac. In contrast, in weakly-coupled network systems, a mixed phase exists below betac where an epidemic occurs in one network but does not spread to the coupled network. We derive an expression for the network and disease parameters that allow this mixed phase and verify it numerically. Public health implications of communities comprising these two classes of network systems are also mentioned.

  8. Behavioral Interpretations of Intrinsic Connectivity Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Angela R.; Fox, P. Mickle; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Turner, Jessica A.; Ray, Kimberly L.; McKay, D. Reese; Glahn, David C.; Beckmann, Christian F.; Smith, Stephen M.; Fox, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    An increasingly large number of neuroimaging studies have investigated functionally connected networks during rest, providing insight into human brain architecture. Assessment of the functional qualities of resting state networks has been limited by the task-independent state, which results in an inability to relate these networks to specific…

  9. Global Electricity Trade Network: Structures and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ling; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nations increasingly trade electricity, and understanding the structure of the global power grid can help identify nations that are critical for its reliability. This study examines the global grid as a network with nations as nodes and international electricity trade as links. We analyze the structure of the global electricity trade network and find that the network consists of four sub-networks, and provide a detailed analysis of the largest network, Eurasia. Russia, China, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan have high betweenness measures in the Eurasian sub-network, indicating the degrees of centrality of the positions they hold. The analysis reveals that the Eurasian sub-network consists of seven communities based on the network structure. We find that the communities do not fully align with geographical proximity, and that the present international electricity trade in the Eurasian sub-network causes an approximately 11 million additional tons of CO2 emissions. PMID:27504825

  10. Global Electricity Trade Network: Structures and Implications.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ling; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S F; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nations increasingly trade electricity, and understanding the structure of the global power grid can help identify nations that are critical for its reliability. This study examines the global grid as a network with nations as nodes and international electricity trade as links. We analyze the structure of the global electricity trade network and find that the network consists of four sub-networks, and provide a detailed analysis of the largest network, Eurasia. Russia, China, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan have high betweenness measures in the Eurasian sub-network, indicating the degrees of centrality of the positions they hold. The analysis reveals that the Eurasian sub-network consists of seven communities based on the network structure. We find that the communities do not fully align with geographical proximity, and that the present international electricity trade in the Eurasian sub-network causes an approximately 11 million additional tons of CO2 emissions. PMID:27504825