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Sample records for average treatment effect

  1. Doubly robust estimation of the local average treatment effect curve

    PubMed Central

    Ogburn, Elizabeth L.; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We consider estimation of the causal effect of a binary treatment on an outcome, conditionally on covariates, from observational studies or natural experiments in which there is a binary instrument for treatment. We describe a doubly robust, locally efficient estimator of the parameters indexing a model for the local average treatment effect conditionally on covariates V when randomization of the instrument is only true conditionally on a high dimensional vector of covariates X, possibly bigger than V. We discuss the surprising result that inference is identical to inference for the parameters of a model for an additive treatment effect on the treated conditionally on V that assumes no treatment–instrument interaction. We illustrate our methods with the estimation of the local average effect of participating in 401(k) retirement programs on savings by using data from the US Census Bureau's 1991 Survey of Income and Program Participation. PMID:25663814

  2. Generalized propensity score for estimating the average treatment effect of multiple treatments.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Zou, Qing-Ming; Fan, Ming-Yu; Li, Xiao-Song

    2012-03-30

    The propensity score method is widely used in clinical studies to estimate the effect of a treatment with two levels on patient's outcomes. However, due to the complexity of many diseases, an effective treatment often involves multiple components. For example, in the practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), an effective treatment may include multiple components, e.g. Chinese herbs, acupuncture, and massage therapy. In clinical trials involving TCM, patients could be randomly assigned to either the treatment or control group, but they or their doctors may make different choices about which treatment component to use. As a result, treatment components are not randomly assigned. Rosenbaum and Rubin proposed the propensity score method for binary treatments, and Imbens extended their work to multiple treatments. These authors defined the generalized propensity score as the conditional probability of receiving a particular level of the treatment given the pre-treatment variables. In the present work, we adopted this approach and developed a statistical methodology based on the generalized propensity score in order to estimate treatment effects in the case of multiple treatments. Two methods were discussed and compared: propensity score regression adjustment and propensity score weighting. We used these methods to assess the relative effectiveness of individual treatments in the multiple-treatment IMPACT clinical trial. The results reveal that both methods perform well when the sample size is moderate or large. PMID:21351291

  3. Estimation of average treatment effect with incompletely observed longitudinal data: Application to a smoking cessation study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua Yun; Gao, Shasha

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of estimation and inference on the average treatment effect in a smoking cessation trial where an outcome and some auxiliary information were measured longitudinally, and both were subject to missing values. Dynamic generalized linear mixed effects models linking the outcome, the auxiliary information, and the covariates are proposed. The maximum likelihood approach is applied to the estimation and inference on the model parameters. The average treatment effect is estimated by the G-computation approach, and the sensitivity of the treatment effect estimate to the nonignorable missing data mechanisms is investigated through the local sensitivity analysis approach. The proposed approach can handle missing data that form arbitrary missing patterns over time. We applied the proposed method to the analysis of the smoking cessation trial. PMID:19462416

  4. Double robust estimator of average causal treatment effect for censored medical cost data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Beste, Lauren A; Maier, Marissa M; Zhou, Xiao-Hua

    2016-08-15

    In observational studies, estimation of average causal treatment effect on a patient's response should adjust for confounders that are associated with both treatment exposure and response. In addition, the response, such as medical cost, may have incomplete follow-up. In this article, a double robust estimator is proposed for average causal treatment effect for right censored medical cost data. The estimator is double robust in the sense that it remains consistent when either the model for the treatment assignment or the regression model for the response is correctly specified. Double robust estimators increase the likelihood the results will represent a valid inference. Asymptotic normality is obtained for the proposed estimator, and an estimator for the asymptotic variance is also derived. Simulation studies show good finite sample performance of the proposed estimator and a real data analysis using the proposed method is provided as illustration. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26818601

  5. Under What Assumptions Do Site-by-Treatment Instruments Identify Average Causal Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of data from multi-site randomized trials provides a potential opportunity to use instrumental variables methods to study the effects of multiple hypothesized mediators of the effect of a treatment. We derive nine assumptions needed to identify the effects of multiple mediators when using site-by-treatment interactions…

  6. Under What Assumptions Do Site-by-Treatment Instruments Identify Average Causal Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the assumptions that must be met if this--multiple site, multiple mediator--strategy, hereafter referred to as "MSMM," is to identify the average causal effects (ATE) in the populations of interest. The authors' investigation of the assumptions of the multiple-mediator, multiple-site IV model demonstrates…

  7. Prediction of the effectiveness of long term β blocker treatment for dilated cardiomyopathy by signal averaged electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, T; Fukunami, M; Shimonagata, T; Kumagai, K; Kim, J; Sanada, S; Ogita, H; Hori, M; Hoki, N

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To determine whether the effectiveness of long term β blocker treatment for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy can be predicted by signal averaged electrocardiography (ECG).
Patients—31 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and without bundle branch block were included in a retrospective study and 16 in a prospective study.
Methods—A signal averaged ECG was recorded before β blocker treatment, and three variables were measured from the vector magnitude: QRS duration, root mean square voltage for the last 40 ms (RMS40), and duration of the terminal low amplitude signals (< 40 µV) (LAS40). In the retrospective study, these variables were compared among good responders (showing ⩾ 0.10 increase in ejection fraction 12 months after start of β blocker treatment) and poor responders without such improvement. The validity of the signal averaged ECG criteria for prediction of the response to β blocker treatment was examined in the prospective study.
Results—In the retrospective study, good responders (n = 16) had a shorter QRS duration (mean (SD): 122.9 (11) v 138 (14.4) ms, p < 0.005) and LAS40 (33.1 (8.9) v 42.5 (7.8) ms, p < 0.005), and a higher RMS40 (31.6 (16.3) v 19.0 (10.3) µV, p < 0.02) than poor responders (n = 15). Signal averaged ECG criteria for good response were defined as two or more of the following: QRS duration < 130 ms, RMS40 > 20 µV, LAS40 < 40 ms (sensitivity 81%, specificity 73%). In the prospective study, six of seven patients who met these criteria showed a good response to the β blocker treatment, while eight of nine who did not showed a poor response (χ2 = 6.1, p < 0.02). The signal averaged ECG criteria gave a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 89% for predicting the effectiveness of β blocker treatment.
Conclusions—A signal averaged ECG might be useful in predicting the effectiveness of β blocker treatment for dilated cardiomyopathy.

 Keywords: signal

  8. What Is the Minimum Information Needed to Estimate Average Treatment Effects in Education RCTs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the "gold standard" for evaluating an intervention's effectiveness. Recently, the federal government has placed increased emphasis on the use of opportunistic experiments. A key criterion for conducting opportunistic experiments, however, is that there is relatively easy access to data…

  9. Targeted estimation and inference for the sample average treatment effect in trials with and without pair-matching.

    PubMed

    Balzer, Laura B; Petersen, Maya L; van der Laan, Mark J

    2016-09-20

    In cluster randomized trials, the study units usually are not a simple random sample from some clearly defined target population. Instead, the target population tends to be hypothetical or ill-defined, and the selection of study units tends to be systematic, driven by logistical and practical considerations. As a result, the population average treatment effect (PATE) may be neither well defined nor easily interpretable. In contrast, the sample average treatment effect (SATE) is the mean difference in the counterfactual outcomes for the study units. The sample parameter is easily interpretable and arguably the most relevant when the study units are not sampled from some specific super-population of interest. Furthermore, in most settings, the sample parameter will be estimated more efficiently than the population parameter. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to propose using targeted maximum likelihood estimation (TMLE) for estimation and inference of the sample effect in trials with and without pair-matching. We study the asymptotic and finite sample properties of the TMLE for the sample effect and provide a conservative variance estimator. Finite sample simulations illustrate the potential gains in precision and power from selecting the sample effect as the target of inference. This work is motivated by the Sustainable East Africa Research in Community Health (SEARCH) study, a pair-matched, community randomized trial to estimate the effect of population-based HIV testing and streamlined ART on the 5-year cumulative HIV incidence (NCT01864603). The proposed methodology will be used in the primary analysis for the SEARCH trial. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27087478

  10. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  11. Identifying the Average Causal Mediation Effects with Multiple Mediators in the Presence of Treatment Non-Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Soojin

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the causal mechanisms is becoming more essential in social and medical sciences. In the presence of treatment non-compliance, the Intent-To-Treated effect (hereafter, ITT effect) is identified as long as the treatment is randomized (Angrist et al., 1996). However, the mediated portion of effect is not identified without additional…

  12. Treatment compliance and effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural intervention for low back pain: a complier average causal effect approach to the BeST data set

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Group cognitive behavioural intervention (CBI) is effective in reducing low-back pain and disability in comparison to advice in primary care. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the impact of compliance on estimates of treatment effect and to identify factors associated with compliance. Methods In this multicentre trial, 701 adults with troublesome sub-acute or chronic low-back pain were recruited from 56 general practices. Participants were randomised to advice (control n = 233) or advice plus CBI (n = 468). Compliance was specified a priori as attending a minimum of three group sessions and the individual assessment. We estimated the complier average causal effect (CACE) of treatment. Results Comparison of the CACE estimate of the mean treatment difference to the intention-to-treat (ITT) estimate at 12 months showed a greater benefit of CBI amongst participants compliant with treatment on the Roland Morris Questionnaire (CACE: 1.6 points, 95% CI 0.51 to 2.74; ITT: 1.3 points, 95% CI 0.55 to 2.07), the Modified Von Korff disability score (CACE: 12.1 points, 95% CI 6.07 to 18.17; ITT: 8.6 points, 95% CI 4.58 to 12.64) and the Modified von Korff pain score (CACE: 10.4 points, 95% CI 4.64 to 16.10; ITT: 7.0 points, 95% CI 3.26 to 10.74). People who were non-compliant were younger and had higher pain scores at randomisation. Conclusions Treatment compliance is important in the effectiveness of group CBI. Younger people and those with more pain are at greater risk of non-compliance. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN54717854 PMID:24423146

  13. Technical Methods Report: The Estimation of Average Treatment Effects for Clustered RCTs of Education Interventions. NCEE 2009-0061 rev.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the estimation of two-stage clustered RCT designs in education research using the Neyman causal inference framework that underlies experiments. The key distinction between the considered causal models is whether potential treatment and control group outcomes are considered to be fixed for the study population (the…

  14. The balanced survivor average causal effect.

    PubMed

    Greene, Tom; Joffe, Marshall; Hu, Bo; Li, Liang; Boucher, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analysis of longitudinal outcomes is often complicated by the absence of observable values in patients who die prior to their scheduled measurement. In such cases, the longitudinal data are said to be "truncated by death" to emphasize that the longitudinal measurements are not simply missing, but are undefined after death. Recently, the truncation by death problem has been investigated using the framework of principal stratification to define the target estimand as the survivor average causal effect (SACE), which in the context of a two-group randomized clinical trial is the mean difference in the longitudinal outcome between the treatment and control groups for the principal stratum of always-survivors. The SACE is not identified without untestable assumptions. These assumptions have often been formulated in terms of a monotonicity constraint requiring that the treatment does not reduce survival in any patient, in conjunction with assumed values for mean differences in the longitudinal outcome between certain principal strata. In this paper, we introduce an alternative estimand, the balanced-SACE, which is defined as the average causal effect on the longitudinal outcome in a particular subset of the always-survivors that is balanced with respect to the potential survival times under the treatment and control. We propose a simple estimator of the balanced-SACE that compares the longitudinal outcomes between equivalent fractions of the longest surviving patients between the treatment and control groups and does not require a monotonicity assumption. We provide expressions for the large sample bias of the estimator, along with sensitivity analyses and strategies to minimize this bias. We consider statistical inference under a bootstrap resampling procedure. PMID:23658214

  15. TH-E-BRE-03: A Novel Method to Account for Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect in a Commercial Treatment Planning System Through Convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B; Li, J; Liu, C; Yan, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Fourier-based deconvolution approaches used to eliminate ion chamber volume averaging effect (VAE) suffer from measurement noise. This work aims to investigate a novel method to account for ion chamber VAE through convolution in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: Beam profiles of various field sizes and depths of an Elekta Synergy were collected with a finite size ion chamber (CC13) to derive a clinically acceptable beam model for a commercial TPS (Pinnacle{sup 3}), following the vendor-recommended modeling process. The TPS-calculated profiles were then externally convolved with a Gaussian function representing the chamber (σ = chamber radius). The agreement between the convolved profiles and measured profiles was evaluated with a one dimensional Gamma analysis (1%/1mm) as an objective function for optimization. TPS beam model parameters for focal and extra-focal sources were optimized and loaded back into the TPS for new calculation. This process was repeated until the objective function converged using a Simplex optimization method. Planar dose of 30 IMRT beams were calculated with both the clinical and the re-optimized beam models and compared with MapCHEC™ measurements to evaluate the new beam model. Results: After re-optimization, the two orthogonal source sizes for the focal source reduced from 0.20/0.16 cm to 0.01/0.01 cm, which were the minimal allowed values in Pinnacle. No significant change in the parameters for the extra-focal source was observed. With the re-optimized beam model, average Gamma passing rate for the 30 IMRT beams increased from 92.1% to 99.5% with a 3%/3mm criterion and from 82.6% to 97.2% with a 2%/2mm criterion. Conclusion: We proposed a novel method to account for ion chamber VAE in a commercial TPS through convolution. The reoptimized beam model, with VAE accounted for through a reliable and easy-to-implement convolution and optimization approach, outperforms the original beam model in standard IMRT QA

  16. Clarifying the Relationship between Average Excesses and Average Effects of Allele Substitutions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Castro, José M; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2012-01-01

    Fisher's concepts of average effects and average excesses are at the core of the quantitative genetics theory. Their meaning and relationship have regularly been discussed and clarified. Here we develop a generalized set of one locus two-allele orthogonal contrasts for average excesses and average effects, based on the concept of the effective gene content of alleles. Our developments help understand the average excesses of alleles for the biallelic case. We dissect how average excesses relate to the average effects and to the decomposition of the genetic variance. PMID:22509178

  17. 27 CFR 19.37 - Average effective tax rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Average effective tax rate... effective tax rate. (a) The proprietor may establish an average effective tax rate for any eligible... recompute the average effective tax rate so as to include only the immediately preceding 6-month period....

  18. The causal meaning of Fisher’s average effect

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JAMES J.; CHOW, CARSON C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In order to formulate the Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection, Fisher defined the average excess and average effect of a gene substitution. Finding these notions to be somewhat opaque, some authors have recommended reformulating Fisher’s ideas in terms of covariance and regression, which are classical concepts of statistics. We argue that Fisher intended his two averages to express a distinction between correlation and causation. On this view, the average effect is a specific weighted average of the actual phenotypic changes that result from physically changing the allelic states of homologous genes. We show that the statistical and causal conceptions of the average effect, perceived as inconsistent by Falconer, can be reconciled if certain relationships between the genotype frequencies and non-additive residuals are conserved. There are certain theory-internal considerations favouring Fisher’s original formulation in terms of causality; for example, the frequency-weighted mean of the average effects equaling zero at each locus becomes a derivable consequence rather than an arbitrary constraint. More broadly, Fisher’s distinction between correlation and causation is of critical importance to gene-trait mapping studies and the foundations of evolutionary biology. PMID:23938113

  19. Effects of spatial variability and scale on areal -average evapotranspiration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of spatial variability and scale on areally-averaged evapotranspiration. A spatially-distributed water and energy balance model is employed to determine the effect of explicit patterns of model parameters and atmospheric forcing on modeled areally-averaged evapotranspiration over a range of increasing spatial scales. The analysis is performed from the local scale to the catchment scale. The study area is King's Creek catchment, an 11.7 sq km watershed located on the native tallgrass prairie of Kansas. The dominant controls on the scaling behavior of catchment-average evapotranspiration are investigated by simulation, as is the existence of a threshold scale for evapotranspiration modeling, with implications for explicit versus statistical representation of important process controls. It appears that some of our findings are fairly general, and will therefore provide a framework for understanding the scaling behavior of areally-averaged evapotranspiration at the catchment and larger scales.

  20. The Health Effects of Income Inequality: Averages and Disparities.

    PubMed

    Truesdale, Beth C; Jencks, Christopher

    2016-03-18

    Much research has investigated the association of income inequality with average life expectancy, usually finding negative correlations that are not very robust. A smaller body of work has investigated socioeconomic disparities in life expectancy, which have widened in many countries since 1980. These two lines of work should be seen as complementary because changes in average life expectancy are unlikely to affect all socioeconomic groups equally. Although most theories imply long and variable lags between changes in income inequality and changes in health, empirical evidence is confined largely to short-term effects. Rising income inequality can affect individuals in two ways. Direct effects change individuals' own income. Indirect effects change other people's income, which can then change a society's politics, customs, and ideals, altering the behavior even of those whose own income remains unchanged. Indirect effects can thus change both average health and the slope of the relationship between individual income and health. PMID:26735427

  1. Effects of velocity averaging on the shapes of absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    The velocity averaging of collision cross sections produces non-Lorentz line shapes, even at densities where Doppler broadening is not apparent. The magnitude of the effects will be described using a model in which the collision broadening depends on a simple velocity power law. The effect of the modified profile on experimental measures of linewidth, shift and amplitude will be examined and an improved approximate line shape will be derived.

  2. Analyzing average and conditional effects with multigroup multilevel structural equation models

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Axel; Nagengast, Benjamin; Fletcher, John; Steyer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, multilevel analysis of covariance (ML-ANCOVA) has been the recommended approach for analyzing treatment effects in quasi-experimental multilevel designs with treatment application at the cluster-level. In this paper, we introduce the generalized ML-ANCOVA with linear effect functions that identifies average and conditional treatment effects in the presence of treatment-covariate interactions. We show how the generalized ML-ANCOVA model can be estimated with multigroup multilevel structural equation models that offer considerable advantages compared to traditional ML-ANCOVA. The proposed model takes into account measurement error in the covariates, sampling error in contextual covariates, treatment-covariate interactions, and stochastic predictors. We illustrate the implementation of ML-ANCOVA with an example from educational effectiveness research where we estimate average and conditional effects of early transition to secondary schooling on reading comprehension. PMID:24795668

  3. The Lake Wobegon Effect: Are All Cancer Patients above Average?

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Jacqueline H; Wolf, Kevin S

    2013-01-01

    Context When elderly patients face a terminal illness such as lung cancer, most are unaware that what we term in this article “the Lake Wobegon effect” taints the treatment advice imparted to them by their oncologists. In framing treatment plans, cancer specialists tend to intimate that elderly patients are like the children living in Garrison Keillor's mythical Lake Wobegon: above average and thus likely to exceed expectations. In this article, we use the story of our mother's death from lung cancer to investigate the consequences of elderly people's inability to reconcile the grave reality of their illness with the overly optimistic predictions of their physicians. Methods In this narrative analysis, we examine the routine treatment of elderly, terminally ill cancer patients through alternating lenses: the lens of a historian of medicine who also teaches ethics to medical students and the lens of an actuary who is able to assess physicians’ claims for the outcome of medical treatments. Findings We recognize that a desire to instill hope in patients shapes physicians’ messages. We argue, however, that the automatic optimism conveyed to elderly, dying patients by cancer specialists prompts those patients to choose treatment that is ineffective and debilitating. Rather than primarily prolong life, treatments most notably diminish patients’ quality of life, weaken the ability of patients and their families to prepare for their deaths, and contribute significantly to the unsustainable costs of the U.S. health care system. Conclusions The case described in this article suggests how physicians can better help elderly, terminally ill patients make medical decisions that are less damaging to them and less costly to the health care system. PMID:24320166

  4. Thermal effects in high average power optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, Jan; Demmler, Stefan; Hädrich, Steffen; Peschel, Thomas; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) have the reputation of being average power scalable due to the instantaneous nature of the parametric process (zero quantum defect). This Letter reveals serious challenges originating from thermal load in the nonlinear crystal caused by absorption. We investigate these thermal effects in high average power OPAs based on beta barium borate. Absorption of both pump and idler waves is identified to contribute significantly to heating of the nonlinear crystal. A temperature increase of up to 148 K with respect to the environment is observed and mechanical tensile stress up to 40 MPa is found, indicating a high risk of crystal fracture under such conditions. By restricting the idler to a wavelength range far from absorption bands and removing the crystal coating we reduce the peak temperature and the resulting temperature gradient significantly. Guidelines for further power scaling of OPAs and other nonlinear devices are given. PMID:23455291

  5. Estimation and Identification of the Complier Average Causal Effect Parameter in Education RCTs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.; Chiang, Hanley S.

    2011-01-01

    In randomized control trials (RCTs) in the education field, the complier average causal effect (CACE) parameter is often of policy interest, because it pertains to intervention effects for students who receive a meaningful dose of treatment services. This article uses a causal inference and instrumental variables framework to examine the…

  6. Note on scaling arguments in the effective average action formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The effective average action (EAA) is a scale-dependent effective action where a scale k is introduced via an infrared regulator. The k dependence of the EAA is governed by an exact flow equation to which one associates a boundary condition at a scale μ . We show that the μ dependence of the EAA is controlled by an equation fully analogous to the Callan-Symanzik equation which allows one to define scaling quantities straightforwardly. Particular attention is paid to composite operators which are introduced along with new sources. We discuss some simple solutions to the flow equation for composite operators and comment on their implications in the case of a local potential approximation.

  7. Optimal Dose of Vitamin D3 400 I.U. for Average Adults has A Significant Anti-Cancer Effect, While Widely Used 2000 I.U. or Higher Promotes Cancer: Marked Reduction of Taurine & 1α, 25(OH)2D3 Was Found In Various Cancer Tissues and Oral Intake of Optimal Dose of Taurine 175mg for Average Adults, Rather Than 500mg, Was Found to Be A New Potentially Safe and More Effective Method of Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Lu, Dominic; Jones, Marilyn K; Nihrane, Abdallah; Duvvi, Harsha; Yapor, Dario; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2016-01-01

    During the past 10 years, the author had found that the optimal dose of Vitamin D3 400 I.U. has safe & effective anticancer effects, while commonly used 2000-5000 I.U. of Vit. D3 often creates a 2-3 time increase in cancer markers. We examined the concentration of Taurine in normal internal organs and in cancer using Bi-Digital O-Ring Test. We found that Taurine levels in normal tissue are 4-6ng. But, the amount of Taurine of average normal value of 5.0-5.25ng was strikingly reduced to 0.0025-0.0028ng in this study of several examples in adenocarcinomas of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas, colon, prostate, and lung, as well as breast cancer. The lowest Taurine levels of 0.0002-0.0005ng were found in so called Zika virus infected babies from Brazil with microcephaly. While Vitamin D3 receptor stimulant 1α, 25 (OH)2D3 in normal tissues was 0.45-0.53ng, they were reduced to 0.025-0.006ng in cancers (1/100th-1/200th of normal value), particularly in various adenocarcinomas. All of these adenocarcinomas had about 1500ng HPV-16 viral infection. In 500 breast cancers, about 97% had HPV-16. The optimal dose of Taurine for average adult has been found to be about 175mg, rather than the widely used 500mg. In addition, since Taurine is markedly reduced to close to 1/1000th-1/2000th of its normal value in these cancer tissues, we examined the effect of the optimal dose of Taurine on cancer patients. Optimal dose of Taurine produced a very significant decrease in cancer-associated parameters, such as Oncogene C-fosAb2 & Integrin α5β1 being reduced to less than 1/1,000th, and 8-OH-dG (which increases in the presence of DNA mutation) reduced to less than 1/10th. The optimal dose of Taurine 175mg for average adult various cancer patient 3 times a day alone provide beneficial effects with very significant anti-cancer effects with strikingly increased urinary excretion of bacteria, viruses, & funguses, asbestos, toxic metals & other toxic substances. However, optimal doses of

  8. Microstructural effects on the average properties in porous battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, Ramiro; García, R. Edwin

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical framework is formulated to analytically quantify the effects of the microstructure on the average properties of porous electrodes, including reactive area density and the through-thickness tortuosity as observed in experimentally-determined tomographic sections. The proposed formulation includes the microstructural non-idealities but also captures the well-known perfectly spherical limit. Results demonstrate that in the absence of any particle alignment, the through-thickness Bruggeman exponent α, reaches an asymptotic value of α ∼ 2 / 3 as the shape of the particles become increasingly prolate (needle- or fiber-like). In contrast, the Bruggeman exponent diverges as the shape of the particles become increasingly oblate, regardless of the degree of particle alignment. For aligned particles, tortuosity can be dramatically suppressed, e.g., α → 1 / 10 for ra → 1 / 10 and MRD ∼ 40 . Particle size polydispersity impacts the porosity-tortuosity relation when the average particle size is comparable to the thickness of the electrode layers. Electrode reactivity density can be arbitrarily increased as the particles become increasingly oblate, but asymptotically reach a minimum value as the particles become increasingly prolate. In the limit of a porous electrode comprised of fiber-like particles, the area density decreases by 24% , with respect to a distribution of perfectly spherical particles.

  9. Effects of breast and colorectal cancer on labour market outcomes-average effects and educational gradients.

    PubMed

    Heinesen, Eskil; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    We estimate causal effects of breast and colorectal cancer on labour market outcomes 1-3 years after the diagnosis. Based on Danish administrative data we estimate average treatment effects on the treated by propensity score weighting methods using persons with no cancer diagnosis as control group. We conduct robustness checks using matching, difference-in-differences methods and an alternative control group of later cancer patients. The different methods give approximately the same results. Cancer increases the risks of leaving the labour force and receiving disability pension, and the effects are larger for the less educated. Effects on income are small and mostly insignificant. We investigate some of the mechanisms which may be important in explaining the educational gradient in effects of cancer on labour market attachment. PMID:24096321

  10. Effects of Polynomial Trends on Detrending Moving Average Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ying-Hui; Gu, Gao-Feng; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2015-07-01

    The detrending moving average (DMA) algorithm is one of the best performing methods to quantify the long-term correlations in nonstationary time series. As many long-term correlated time series in real systems contain various trends, we investigate the effects of polynomial trends on the scaling behaviors and the performances of three widely used DMA methods including backward algorithm (BDMA), centered algorithm (CDMA) and forward algorithm (FDMA). We derive a general framework for polynomial trends and obtain analytical results for constant shifts and linear trends. We find that the behavior of the CDMA method is not influenced by constant shifts. In contrast, linear trends cause a crossover in the CDMA fluctuation functions. We also find that constant shifts and linear trends cause crossovers in the fluctuation functions obtained from the BDMA and FDMA methods. When a crossover exists, the scaling behavior at small scales comes from the intrinsic time series while that at large scales is dominated by the constant shifts or linear trends. We also derive analytically the expressions of crossover scales and show that the crossover scale depends on the strength of the polynomial trends, the Hurst index, and in some cases (linear trends for BDMA and FDMA) the length of the time series. In all cases, the BDMA and the FDMA behave almost the same under the influence of constant shifts or linear trends. Extensive numerical experiments confirm excellently the analytical derivations. We conclude that the CDMA method outperforms the BDMA and FDMA methods in the presence of polynomial trends.

  11. Quasi-analytical treatment of spatially averaged radiation transfer in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LöWe, H.; Helbig, N.

    2012-10-01

    We provide a new quasi-analytical method to compute the subgrid topographic influences on the shortwave radiation fluxes and the effective albedo in complex terrain as required for large-scale meteorological, land surface, or climate models. We investigate radiative transfer in complex terrain via the radiosity equation on isotropic Gaussian random fields. Under controlled approximations we derive expressions for domain-averaged fluxes of direct, diffuse, and terrain radiation and the sky view factor. Domain-averaged quantities can be related to a type of level-crossing probability of the random field, which is approximated by long-standing results developed for acoustic scattering at ocean boundaries. This allows us to express all nonlocal horizon effects in terms of a local terrain parameter, namely, the mean-square slope. Emerging integrals are computed numerically, and fit formulas are given for practical purposes. As an implication of our approach, we provide an expression for the effective albedo of complex terrain in terms of the Sun elevation angle, mean-square slope, the area-averaged surface albedo, and the ratio of atmospheric direct beam to diffuse radiation. For demonstration we compute the decrease of the effective albedo relative to the area-averaged albedo in Switzerland for idealized snow-covered and clear-sky conditions at noon in winter. We find an average decrease of 5.8% and spatial patterns which originate from characteristics of the underlying relief. Limitations and possible generalizations of the method are discussed.

  12. Uncertainty in Propensity Score Estimation: Bayesian Methods for Variable Selection and Model Averaged Causal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zigler, Corwin Matthew; Dominici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Causal inference with observational data frequently relies on the notion of the propensity score (PS) to adjust treatment comparisons for observed confounding factors. As decisions in the era of “big data” are increasingly reliant on large and complex collections of digital data, researchers are frequently confronted with decisions regarding which of a high-dimensional covariate set to include in the PS model in order to satisfy the assumptions necessary for estimating average causal effects. Typically, simple or ad-hoc methods are employed to arrive at a single PS model, without acknowledging the uncertainty associated with the model selection. We propose three Bayesian methods for PS variable selection and model averaging that 1) select relevant variables from a set of candidate variables to include in the PS model and 2) estimate causal treatment effects as weighted averages of estimates under different PS models. The associated weight for each PS model reflects the data-driven support for that model’s ability to adjust for the necessary variables. We illustrate features of our proposed approaches with a simulation study, and ultimately use our methods to compare the effectiveness of surgical vs. nonsurgical treatment for brain tumors among 2,606 Medicare beneficiaries. Supplementary materials are available online. PMID:24696528

  13. Quasi-analytical treatment of spatially averaged radiation transfer in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwe, H.; Helbig, N.

    2012-04-01

    We provide a new quasi-analytical method to compute the topographic influence on the effective albedo of complex topography as required for meteorological, land-surface or climate models. We investigate radiative transfer in complex terrain via the radiosity equation on isotropic Gaussian random fields. Under controlled approximations we derive expressions for domain averages of direct, diffuse and terrain radiation and the sky view factor. Domain averaged quantities are related to a type of level-crossing probability of the random field which is approximated by longstanding results developed for acoustic scattering at ocean boundaries. This allows us to express all non-local horizon effects in terms of a local terrain parameter, namely the mean squared slope. Emerging integrals are computed numerically and fit formulas are given for practical purposes. As an implication of our approach we provide an expression for the effective albedo of complex terrain in terms of the sun elevation angle, mean squared slope, the area averaged surface albedo, and the direct-to-diffuse ratio of solar radiation. As an application, we compute the effective albedo for the Swiss Alps and discuss possible generalizations of the method.

  14. Pulsar polarisation below 200 MHz: Average profiles and propagation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noutsos, A.; Sobey, C.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Weltevrede, P.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Karastergiou, A.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Alexov, A.; Breton, R. P.; Bilous, A. V.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Keane, E. F.; Osłowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B. W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zagkouris, K.; Anderson, K.; Bähren, L.; Bell, M.; Broderick, J.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Coenen, T.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fender, R.; Garsden, H.; Jonker, P.; Law, C.; Markoff, S.; Masters, J.; Miller-Jones, J.; Molenaar, G.; Osten, R.; Pietka, M.; Rol, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Scheers, B.; Spreeuw, H.; Staley, T.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J.; Wijers, R.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M.; Zarka, P.; van der Horst, A.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We present the highest-quality polarisation profiles to date of 16 non-recycled pulsars and four millisecond pulsars, observed below 200 MHz with the LOFAR high-band antennas. Based on the observed profiles, we perform an initial investigation of expected observational effects resulting from the propagation of polarised emission in the pulsar magnetosphere and the interstellar medium. Methods: The polarisation data presented in this paper have been calibrated for the geometric-projection and beam-shape effects that distort the polarised information as detected with the LOFAR antennas. We have used RM Synthesis to determine the amount of Faraday rotation in the data at the time of the observations. The ionospheric contribution to the measured Faraday rotation was estimated using a model of the ionosphere. To study the propagation effects, we have compared our low-frequency polarisation observations with archival data at 240, 400, 600, and 1400 MHz. Results: The predictions of magnetospheric birefringence in pulsars have been tested using spectra of the pulse width and fractional polarisation from multifrequency data. The derived spectra offer only partial support for the expected effects of birefringence on the polarisation properties, with only about half of our sample being consistent with the model's predictions. It is noted that for some pulsars these measurements are contaminated by the effects of interstellar scattering. For a number of pulsars in our sample, we have observed significant variations in the amount of Faraday rotation as a function of pulse phase, which is possibly an artefact of scattering. These variations are typically two orders of magnitude smaller than that observed at 1400 MHz by Noutsos et al. (2009), for a different sample of southern pulsars. In this paper we present a possible explanation for the difference in magnitude of this effect between the two frequencies, based on scattering. Finally, we have estimated the magnetospheric

  15. Ceria co-doping: synergistic or average effect?

    PubMed

    Burbano, Mario; Nadin, Sian; Marrocchelli, Dario; Salanne, Mathieu; Watson, Graeme W

    2014-05-14

    Ceria (CeO2) co-doping has been suggested as a means to achieve ionic conductivities that are significantly higher than those in singly doped systems. Rekindled interest in this topic over the last decade has given rise to claims of much improved performance. The present study makes use of computer simulations to investigate the bulk ionic conductivity of rare earth (RE) doped ceria, where RE = Sc, Gd, Sm, Nd and La. The results from the singly doped systems are compared to those from ceria co-doped with Nd/Sm and Sc/La. The pattern that emerges from the conductivity data is consistent with the dominance of local lattice strains from individual defects, rather than the synergistic co-doping effect reported recently, and as a result, no enhancement in the conductivity of co-doped samples is observed. PMID:24658460

  16. Technical Methods Report: Estimation and Identification of the Complier Average Causal Effect Parameter in Education RCTs. NCEE 2009-4040

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.; Chiang, Hanley

    2009-01-01

    In randomized control trials (RCTs) in the education field, the complier average causal effect (CACE) parameter is often of policy interest, because it pertains to intervention effects for students who receive a meaningful dose of treatment services. This report uses a causal inference and instrumental variables framework to examine the…

  17. Digital filter suppresses effects of nonstatistical noise bursts on multichannel scaler digital averaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, L. S.; Salter, F. O.

    1968-01-01

    Digital filter suppresses the effects of nonstatistical noise bursts on data averaged over multichannel scaler. Interposed between the sampled channels and the digital averaging system, it uses binary logic circuitry to compare the number of counts per channel with the average number of counts per channel.

  18. Exact confidence intervals for the average causal effect on a binary outcome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinran; Ding, Peng

    2016-03-15

    Based on the physical randomization of completely randomized experiments, in a recent article in Statistics in Medicine, Rigdon and Hudgens propose two approaches to obtaining exact confidence intervals for the average causal effect on a binary outcome. They construct the first confidence interval by combining, with the Bonferroni adjustment, the prediction sets for treatment effects among treatment and control groups, and the second one by inverting a series of randomization tests. With sample size n, their second approach requires performing O(n(4) )randomization tests. We demonstrate that the physical randomization also justifies other ways to constructing exact confidence intervals that are more computationally efficient. By exploiting recent advances in hypergeometric confidence intervals and the stochastic order information of randomization tests, we propose approaches that either do not need to invoke Monte Carlo or require performing at most O(n(2) )randomization tests. We provide technical details and R code in the Supporting Information. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26833798

  19. Accounting for Uncertainty in Confounder and Effect Modifier Selection when Estimating Average Causal Effects in Generalized Linear Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi; Dominici, Francesca; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Zigler, Corwin Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Summary Confounder selection and adjustment are essential elements of assessing the causal effect of an exposure or treatment in observational studies. Building upon work by Wang et al. (2012) and Lefebvre et al. (2014), we propose and evaluate a Bayesian method to estimate average causal effects in studies with a large number of potential confounders, relatively few observations, likely interactions between confounders and the exposure of interest, and uncertainty on which confounders and interaction terms should be included. Our method is applicable across all exposures and outcomes that can be handled through generalized linear models. In this general setting, estimation of the average causal effect is different from estimation of the exposure coefficient in the outcome model due to non-collapsibility. We implement a Bayesian bootstrap procedure to integrate over the distribution of potential confounders and to estimate the causal effect. Our method permits estimation of both the overall population causal effect and effects in specified subpopulations, providing clear characterization of heterogeneous exposure effects that may vary considerably across different covariate profiles. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed method performs well in small sample size situations with 100 to 150 observations and 50 covariates. The method is applied to data on 15060 US Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor between 2000 and 2009 to evaluate whether surgery reduces hospital readmissions within thirty days of diagnosis. PMID:25899155

  20. Analysis of average density difference effect in a new two-lane lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Geng; Sun, Di-Hua; Zhao, Min; Liu, Wei-Ning; Cheng, Sen-Lin

    2015-11-01

    A new lattice model is proposed by taking the average density difference effect into account for two-lane traffic system according to Transportation Cyber-physical Systems. The influence of average density difference effect on the stability of traffic flow is investigated through linear stability theory and nonlinear reductive perturbation method. The linear analysis results reveal that the unstable region would be reduced by considering the average density difference effect. The nonlinear kink-antikink soliton solution derived from the mKdV equation is analyzed to describe the properties of traffic jamming transition near the critical point. Numerical simulations confirm the analytical results showing that traffic jam can be suppressed efficiently by considering the average density difference effect for two-lane traffic system.

  1. Treatment of a Psychotic Trainable Retarded Child in a Day Hospital for Children with Average Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zang, Louis C.; Cohen, Jonathan L.

    The case study describes the progress of a psychotic trainable mentally retarded child who at age seven entered a day psychiatric hospital for disturbed children with average intelligence. The boy's therapist describes changes in the child's peer interaction, academic performance, group psychotherapy participation, and psychological test…

  2. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goethe, Martin; Fita, Ignacio; Rubi, J. Miguel

    2016-03-01

    As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances) are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  3. The Better-than-Average Effect and 1 Corinthians 13: A Classroom Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, John Eric, III; Schneller, Gregory R.; Henderson, Joy Ann

    2014-01-01

    People tend to evaluate themselves more favorably than they evaluate others, a tendency that is known as the better-than-average effect (BTA effect; Alicke, 1985; Brown, 1986). In an attempt to demonstrate the concept of the BTA effect, a classroom exercise was conducted with 78 undergraduate students in an "Introduction to Psychology"…

  4. The Dopaminergic Midbrain Mediates an Effect of Average Reward on Pavlovian Vigor.

    PubMed

    Rigoli, Francesco; Chew, Benjamin; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    Dopamine plays a key role in motivation. Phasic dopamine response reflects a reinforcement prediction error (RPE), whereas tonic dopamine activity is postulated to represent an average reward that mediates motivational vigor. However, it has been hard to find evidence concerning the neural encoding of average reward that is uncorrupted by influences of RPEs. We circumvented this difficulty in a novel visual search task where we measured participants' button pressing vigor in a context where information (underlying an RPE) about future average reward was provided well before the average reward itself. Despite no instrumental consequence, participants' pressing force increased for greater current average reward, consistent with a form of Pavlovian effect on motivational vigor. We recorded participants' brain activity during task performance with fMRI. Greater average reward was associated with enhanced activity in dopaminergic midbrain to a degree that correlated with the relationship between average reward and pressing vigor. Interestingly, an opposite pattern was observed in subgenual cingulate cortex, a region implicated in negative mood and motivational inhibition. These findings highlight a crucial role for dopaminergic midbrain in representing aspects of average reward and motivational vigor. PMID:27082045

  5. GI Joe or Average Joe? The impact of average-size and muscular male fashion models on men's and women's body image and advertisement effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Lee, Christina

    2010-06-01

    Increasing body size and shape diversity in media imagery may promote positive body image. While research has largely focused on female models and women's body image, men may also be affected by unrealistic images. We examined the impact of average-size and muscular male fashion models on men's and women's body image and perceived advertisement effectiveness. A sample of 330 men and 289 women viewed one of four advertisement conditions: no models, muscular, average-slim or average-large models. Men and women rated average-size models as equally effective in advertisements as muscular models. For men, exposure to average-size models was associated with more positive body image in comparison to viewing no models, but no difference was found in comparison to muscular models. Similar results were found for women. Internalisation of beauty ideals did not moderate these effects. These findings suggest that average-size male models can promote positive body image and appeal to consumers. PMID:20488770

  6. Comparison of effects of unsteady lift and spanwise averaging in flight through turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. H.; Lichtenstein, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Gust loads on aircraft flying through random atmospheric turbulence are attenuated at high frequencies by the effects of unsteady lift and spanwise averaging. Previously derived theoretical results for these two effects are placed in a form which makes direct comparison possible. The attenuation effects from each cause are found to be of approximately equal magnitude for unswept wings of moderate aspect ratio. For small values of the ratio of wingspan to scale of turbulence, the attenuation due to spanwise averaging is a function only of reduced frequency based on wingspan and is independent of the ratio of wingspan to scale of turbulence.

  7. The effect of sensor sheltering and averaging techniques on wind measurements at the Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents results of a field study of the effect of sheltering of wind sensors by nearby foliage on the validity of wind measurements at the Space Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). Standard measurements are made at one second intervals from 30-feet (9.1-m) towers located 500 feet (152 m) from the SLF centerline. The centerline winds are not exactly the same as those measured by the towers. A companion study, Merceret (1995), quantifies the differences as a function of statistics of the observed winds and distance between the measurements and points of interest. This work examines the effect of nearby foliage on the accuracy of the measurements made by any one sensor, and the effects of averaging on interpretation of the measurements. The field program used logarithmically spaced portable wind towers to measure wind speed and direction over a range of conditions as a function of distance from the obstructing foliage. Appropriate statistics were computed. The results suggest that accurate measurements require foliage be cut back to OFCM standards. Analysis of averaging techniques showed that there is no significant difference between vector and scalar averages. Longer averaging periods reduce measurement error but do not otherwise change the measurement in reasonably steady flow regimes. In rapidly changing conditions, shorter averaging periods may be required to capture trends.

  8. Better-than-Average Effects in Secondary Education: A 3-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuyper, Hans; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the "better-than-average" (BTA) effect among secondary school students during 3 consecutive years. It was hypothesized that boys would overestimate their abilities relative to their classmates more than girls and that comparative evaluations of liking would be positively related to comparative evaluations of ability.…

  9. The Nexus between the Above-Average Effect and Cooperative Learning in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breneiser, Jennifer E.; Monetti, David M.; Adams, Katharine S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the above-average effect (Chambers & Windschitl, 2004; Moore & Small, 2007) in assessments of task performance. Participants completed self-estimates of performance and group estimates of performance, before and after completing a task. Participants completed a task individually and in groups. Groups were…

  10. Estimation of genetic parameters for average daily gain using models with competition effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Components of variance for ADG with models including competition effects were estimated from data provided by Pig Improvement Company on 11,235 pigs from 4 selected lines of swine. Fifteen pigs with average age of 71 d were randomly assigned to a pen by line and sex and taken off test after approxi...

  11. Raven's Test Performance of Sub-Saharan Africans: Average Performance, Psychometric Properties, and the Flynn Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicherts, Jelte M.; Dolan, Conor V.; Carlson, Jerry S.; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic review of published data on the performance of sub-Saharan Africans on Raven's Progressive Matrices. The specific goals were to estimate the average level of performance, to study the Flynn Effect in African samples, and to examine the psychometric meaning of Raven's test scores as measures of general intelligence.…

  12. Fixation probability with multiple alleles and projected average allelic effect on selection.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sabin; Lahaie, Philippe

    2009-06-01

    The first-order effect of selection on the probability of fixation of an allele, with respect to an intensity of selection s>0 in a diploid population of fixed finite size N, undergoing discrete, non-overlapping generations, is shown to be given by the sum of the average effects of that allele on the coefficient of selection in the current generation and all future generations, given the population state in the current generation. This projected average allelic effect is a weighted sum of average allelic effects in allozygous and autozygous offspring in the initial generation, with weights given in terms of expected coalescence times, under neutrality, for the lineages of two or three gametes chosen at random in the same generation. This is shown in the framework of multiple alleles at one locus, with genotypic values determining either viability or fertility differences, and with either multinomial or exchangeable reproduction schemes. In the limit of weak selection in a large population such that Ns tends to zero, the initial average allelic effects in allozygous offspring and autozygous offspring have the same weight on the fixation probability only in the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent. With frequency-dependent selection in a linear-game-theoretic context with two phenotypes determined by additive gene action, the first-order effect on the fixation probability is a combination of two effects of frequency-independent selection, one in a haploid population, the other in a diploid population. In the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent as the population size goes to infinity and Ns to zero, the first effect is three times more important than the second effect. This explains the one-third law of evolutionary dynamics in this domain, and shows how this law can be extended beyond this domain. PMID:19249322

  13. Is Scientifically Based Reading Instruction Effective for Students with Below-Average IQs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allor, Jill H.; Mathes, Patricia G.; Roberts, J. Kyle; Cheatham, Jennifer P.; Al Otaiba, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal randomized-control trial investigated the effectiveness of scientifically based reading instruction for students with IQs ranging from 40 to 80, including students with intellectual disability (ID). Students were randomly assigned into treatment (n = 76) and contrast (n = 65) groups. Students in the treatment group received…

  14. On the Correlation of Effective Terahertz Refractive Index and Average Surface Roughness of Pharmaceutical Tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bawuah, Prince; Tan, Nicholas; Ervasti, Tuomas; Pääkkönen, Pertti; Zeitler, J. Axel; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have studied terahertz (THz) pulse time delay of porous pharmaceutical microcrystalline compacts and also pharmaceutical tablets that contain indomethacin (painkiller) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and microcrystalline cellulose as the matrix of the tablet. The porosity of a pharmaceutical tablet is important because it affects the release of drug substance. In addition, surface roughness of the tablet has much importance regarding dissolution of the tablet and hence the rate of drug release. Here, we show, using a training set of tablets containing API and with a priori known tablet's quality parameters, that the effective refractive index (obtained from THz time delay data) of such porous tablets correlates with the average surface roughness of a tablet. Hence, THz pulse time delay measurement in the transmission mode provides information on both porosity and the average surface roughness of a compact. This is demonstrated for two different sets of pharmaceutical tablets having different porosity and average surface roughness values.

  15. Attentional switching in intellectually gifted and average children: effects on performance and ERP.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoju; Shi, Jiannong

    2014-04-01

    The study compared the performance and brain activity of children who were intellectually gifted or of average intelligence. 13 intellectually gifted (4 girls, 9 boys; M age = 12.0 yr., SD = 0.2) and 13 average children (5 girls, 8 boys; M age = 11.9 yr., SD = 0.3) participated in a task-switching experiment. The children performed a task repeatedly (single-trial blocks) or switched between two different tasks (mixed-trial blocks). Intellectually gifted children performed quicker than the average group for both mixed and single-trial blocks. The electroencephalography P300 amplitude was larger in the mixed compared to the single-trial condition, but this effect was observed only in the gifted children. The results support the notion that gifted children are characterized by a faster maturation that leads to an 'adult-like' brain activity. PMID:24897910

  16. The Effect of Area Averaging on the Approximated Profile of the H α Spectral Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnárová, M.; Utz, D.; Rybák, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Hα line is massively used as a diagnostics of the chromosphere. Often one needs to average the line profile over some area to increase the signal to noise ratio. Thus it is important to understand how derived parameters vary with changing approximations. In this study we investigate the effect of spatial averaging of a selected area on the temporal variations of the width, the intensity and the Dopplershift of the Hα spectral line profile. The approximated profile was deduced from co-temporal observations in five points throughout the Hα line profile obtained by the tunable Lyot filter installed on the Dutch Open Telescope. We found variations of the intensity and the Doppler velocities, which were independent of the size of the area used for the computation of the area averaged Hα spectral line profile.

  17. On the Correlation of Effective Terahertz Refractive Index and Average Surface Roughness of Pharmaceutical Tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bawuah, Prince; Tan, Nicholas; Ervasti, Tuomas; Pääkkönen, Pertti; Zeitler, J. Axel; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we have studied terahertz (THz) pulse time delay of porous pharmaceutical microcrystalline compacts and also pharmaceutical tablets that contain indomethacin (painkiller) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and microcrystalline cellulose as the matrix of the tablet. The porosity of a pharmaceutical tablet is important because it affects the release of drug substance. In addition, surface roughness of the tablet has much importance regarding dissolution of the tablet and hence the rate of drug release. Here, we show, using a training set of tablets containing API and with a priori known tablet's quality parameters, that the effective refractive index (obtained from THz time delay data) of such porous tablets correlates with the average surface roughness of a tablet. Hence, THz pulse time delay measurement in the transmission mode provides information on both porosity and the average surface roughness of a compact. This is demonstrated for two different sets of pharmaceutical tablets having different porosity and average surface roughness values.

  18. DEPTH-AVERAGING EFFECTS ON HYDRAULIC HEAD FOR MEDIA WITH STOCHASTIC HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Vecchia, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity of a porous medium frequently is considered to be a single realization of a three-dimensional spatial stochastic process. The most common observation of flow in porous media are hydraulic-head measurements obtained from wells which are screened over extensive sections of the medium. These measurements represent, approximately, a one-dimensional spatial average of the actual three-dimensional head distribution, the actual head distribution being a stochastic process resulting from flow through a random hydraulic-conductivity field. This paper examines, via ensemble averages, the effect of such spatial averages of groundwater flow on the spatial autocovariance function for a simple, yet viable, stochastic model of a bounded medium. The model is taken to be three-dimensional flow in a medium that is bounded above and below and in which the hydraulic conductivity is a second-order stationary stochastic process.

  19. Cortical Effects on Ipsilateral Hindlimb Muscles Revealed with Stimulus-Triggered Averaging of EMG Activity.

    PubMed

    Messamore, William G; Van Acker, Gustaf M; Hudson, Heather M; Zhang, Hongyu Y; Kovac, Anthony; Nazzaro, Jules; Cheney, Paul D

    2016-07-01

    While a large body of evidence supports the view that ipsilateral motor cortex may make an important contribution to normal movements and to recovery of function following cortical injury (Chollet et al. 1991; Fisher 1992; Caramia et al. 2000; Feydy et al. 2002), relatively little is known about the properties of output from motor cortex to ipsilateral muscles. Our aim in this study was to characterize the organization of output effects on hindlimb muscles from ipsilateral motor cortex using stimulus-triggered averaging of EMG activity. Stimulus-triggered averages of EMG activity were computed from microstimuli applied at 60-120 μA to sites in both contralateral and ipsilateral M1 of macaque monkeys during the performance of a hindlimb push-pull task. Although the poststimulus effects (PStEs) from ipsilateral M1 were fewer in number and substantially weaker, clear and consistent effects were obtained at an intensity of 120 μA. The mean onset latency of ipsilateral poststimulus facilitation was longer than contralateral effects by an average of 0.7 ms. However, the shortest latency effects in ipsilateral muscles were as short as the shortest latency effects in the corresponding contralateral muscles suggesting a minimal synaptic linkage that is equally direct in both cases. PMID:26088970

  20. Cognitive Capitalism: Economic Freedom Moderates the Effects of Intellectual and Average Classes on Economic Productivity.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Thomas R; Rindermann, Heiner; Hancock, Dale

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive ability stimulates economic productivity. However, the effects of cognitive ability may be stronger in free and open economies, where competition rewards merit and achievement. To test this hypothesis, ability levels of intellectual classes (top 5%) and average classes (country averages) were estimated using international student assessments (Programme for International Student Assessment; Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study; and Progress in International Reading Literacy Study) (N = 99 countries). The ability levels were correlated with indicators of economic freedom (Fraser Institute), scientific achievement (patent rates), innovation (Global Innovation Index), competitiveness (Global Competitiveness Index), and wealth (gross domestic product). Ability levels of intellectual and average classes strongly predicted all economic criteria. In addition, economic freedom moderated the effects of cognitive ability (for both classes), with stronger effects at higher levels of freedom. Effects were particularly robust for scientific achievements when the full range of freedom was analyzed. The results support cognitive capitalism theory: cognitive ability stimulates economic productivity, and its effects are enhanced by economic freedom. PMID:27458006

  1. Spatial averaging effects of hydrophone on field characterization of planar transducer using Fresnel approximation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Guangzhen; Yang, Ping; He, Longbiao; Feng, Xiujuan

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve the existing models that allow spatial averaging effects of piezoelectric hydrophones to be accounted for. The model derived in the present study is valid for a planar source and was verified using transducers operating at 5 and 20MHz. It is based on Fresnel approximation and enables corrections for both on-axis and off-axis measurements. A single-integral approximate formula for the axial acoustic pressure was derived, and the validity of the Fresnel approximation in the near field of the planar transducer was examined. The numerical results obtained using 5 and 20MHz planar transmitters with an effective diameter of 12.7mm showed that the derived model could account for spatial averaging effects to within 0.2% with Beissner's exact integral (Beissner, 1981), for k(a+b)2≫π (where k is the circular wavenumber, and a and b are the effective radii of the transmitter and hydrophone, respectively). The field distributions along the acoustic axis and the beam directivity patterns are also included in the model. The spatial averaging effects of the hydrophone were generally observed to cause underestimation of the absolute pressure amplitudes of the acoustic beam, and overestimation of the cross-sectional size of the beam directivity pattern. However, the cross-sectional size of the directivity pattern was also found to be underestimated in the "far zone" (beyond Y0=a(2)/λ) of the transmitter. The results of this study indicate that the spatial averaging effect on the beam directivity pattern is negligible for π(γ(2)+4γ)s≪1 (where γ=b/a, and s is the normalized distance to the planar transducer). PMID:27268164

  2. Dosimetric comparison of treatment plans based on free breathing, maximum, and average intensity projection CTs for lung cancer SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Yuan; Wang Zhiheng; Ge Hong; Zhang Tian; Cai Jing; Kelsey, Christopher; Yoo, David; Yin Fangfang

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To determine whether there is a CT dataset may be more favorable for planning and dose calculation by comparing dosimetric characteristics between treatment plans calculated using free breathing (FB), maximum and average intensity projection (MIP and AIP, respectively) CTs for lung cancer patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Twenty lung cancer SBRT patients, treated on a linac with 2.5 mm width multileaf-collimator (MLC), were analyzed retrospectively. Both FB helical and four-dimensional CT scans were acquired for each patient. Internal target volume (ITV) was delineated based on MIP CTs and modified based on both ten-phase datasets and FB CTs. Planning target volume (PTV) was then determined by adding additional setup margin to ITV. The PTVs and beams in the optimized treatment plan based on FB CTs were copied to MIP and AIP CTs, with the same isocenters, MLC patterns and monitor units. Mean effective depth (MED) of beams, and some dosimetric parameters for both PTVs and most important organ at risk (OAR), lung minus PTV, were compared between any two datasets using two-tail paired t test. Results: The MEDs in FB and AIP plans were similar but significantly smaller (Ps < 0.001) than that in MIP plans. Minimum dose, mean dose, dose covering at least 90% and 95% of PTVs in MIP plans were slightly higher than two other plans (Ps < 0.008). The absolute volume of lung minus PTV receiving greater than 5, 10, and 20 Gy in MIP plans were significantly smaller than those in both FB and AIP plans (Ps < 0.008). Conformity index for FB plans showed a small but statistically significantly higher. Conclusions: Dosimetric characteristics of AIP plans are similar to those of FB plans. Slightly better target volume coverage and significantly lower low-dose region ({<=}30 Gy) in lung was observed in MIP plans. The decrease in low-dose region in lung was mainly caused by the change of lung volume contoured on two datasets rather than the

  3. Effects of stream-associated fluctuations upon the radial variation of average solar wind parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A numerical MHD model in both spherically symmetric time-dependent and corotating equatorial flow approximations is used to compute the effects of nonlinear fluctuations due to solar wind streams upon radial gradients of average solar wind parameters. Significant effects of correlations between fluctuations on the gradients of azimuthal magnetic field, radial velocity, density, and azimuthal velocity are found. It is found that nonlinear fluctuations are a significant effect in determining the radial gradients of the solar wind at distances as small as 0.2 AU; at distances greater than 1 AU, nonlinear fluctuations dominate the behavior of the radial gradients.

  4. Effects of stream-associated fluctuations upon the radial variation of average solar-wind parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of nonlinear fluctuations due to solar wind streams upon radial gradients of average solar wind parameters are computed, using a numerical MHD model for both spherically symmetric time dependent and corotating equatorial flow approximations. Significant effects of correlations are found between fluctuations upon the gradients of azimuthal magnetic fields, radial velocity, density and azimuthal velocity. Between 400 to 900 solar radii stream interactions have transferred the major portion of the angular momentum flux to the magnetic field; at even greater distances the plasma again carries the bulk of the angular momentum flux. The average azimuthal component of the magnetic field may decrease as much as 10% faster than the Archimedean spiral out to 6 AU due to stream interactions, but this result is dependent upon inner boundary conditions.

  5. Leading multiple teams: average and relative external leadership influences on team empowerment and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Margaret M; Mathieu, John E; Ruddy, Thomas M

    2014-03-01

    External leaders continue to be an important source of influence even when teams are empowered, but it is not always clear how they do so. Extending research on structurally empowered teams, we recognize that teams' external leaders are often responsible for multiple teams. We adopt a multilevel approach to model external leader influences at both the team level and the external leader level of analysis. In doing so, we distinguish the influence of general external leader behaviors (i.e., average external leadership) from those that are directed differently toward the teams that they lead (i.e., relative external leadership). Analysis of data collected from 451 individuals, in 101 teams, reporting to 25 external leaders, revealed that both relative and average external leadership related positively to team empowerment. In turn, team empowerment related positively to team performance and member job satisfaction. However, while the indirect effects were all positive, we found that relative external leadership was not directly related to team performance, and average external leadership evidenced a significant negative direct influence. Additionally, relative external leadership exhibited a significant direct positive influence on member job satisfaction as anticipated, whereas average external leadership did not. These findings attest to the value in distinguishing external leaders' behaviors that are exhibited consistently versus differentially across empowered teams. Implications and future directions for the study and management of external leaders overseeing multiple teams are discussed. PMID:24274582

  6. Averaging period effects on the turbulent flux and transport efficiency during haze pollution in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Yang, Ting; Sun, Yele

    2015-08-01

    Based on observations at the heights of 140 and 280 m on the Beijing 325-m meteorological tower, this study presents an assessment of the averaging period effects on eddy-covariance measurements of the momentum/scalar flux and transport efficiency during wintertime haze pollution. The study period, namely from January 6 to February 28 2013, is divided into different episodes of particulate pollution, as featured by varied amounts of the turbulent exchange and conditions of the atmospheric stability. Overall, turbulent fluxes of the momentum and scalars (heat, water vapor, and CO2) increase with the averaging period, namely from 5, 15, and 30 up to 60 min, an outcome most evident during the `transient' episodes (each lasting for 2-3 days, i.e., preceded and followed by clean-air days with mean concentrations of PM1 less than 40 μg m-3). The conventional choice of 30 min is deemed to be appropriate for calculating the momentum flux and its transport efficiency. By comparison, scalar fluxes and their transport efficiencies appear more sensitive to the choice of an averaging period, particularly at the upper level (i.e., 280 m). It is presupposed that, for urban environments, calculating the momentum and scalar fluxes could invoke separate averaging periods, rather than relying on a single prescription (e.g., 30 min). Furthermore, certain characteristics of urban turbulence are found less sensitive to the choice of an averaging period, such as the relationship between the heat-to-momentum transport efficiency and the local stability parameter.

  7. Fractional averaging of repetitive waveforms induced by self-imaging effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Cortés, Luis; Maram, Reza; Azaña, José

    2015-10-01

    We report the theoretical prediction and experimental observation of averaging of stochastic events with an equivalent result of calculating the arithmetic mean (or sum) of a rational number of realizations of the process under test, not necessarily limited to an integer record of realizations, as discrete statistical theory dictates. This concept is enabled by a passive amplification process, induced by self-imaging (Talbot) effects. In the specific implementation reported here, a combined spectral-temporal Talbot operation is shown to achieve undistorted, lossless repetition-rate division of a periodic train of noisy waveforms by a rational factor, leading to local amplification, and the associated averaging process, by the fractional rate-division factor.

  8. Effects of Time Averaging on Optical Scintillation in a Ground-to-Satellite Atmospheric Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Araki, Kenichi

    2000-04-01

    Temporal natures for a variance of turbulence-induced log-intensity fluctuations are obtained. The variance of the optical fluctuation is reduced when the optical signals are integrated in a photodetector, and we express the index of reduction (called the time-averaging factor) by using an autocovariance function of the optical fluctuation. The optical fluctuations for a ground-to-satellite path are caused by both atmospheric turbulence and the beam-pointing jitter error of the optical transmitter. The turbulence-induced optical scintillation can be discriminated from the fluctuation that is due to the beam-pointing jitter error. The compared result from the probability density function of the optical signal reveals good agreement. The temporal autocovariance functions of optical scintillation are obtained and used to calculate the time-averaging factor. The analytically expected effects of time averaging are verified by the experimental results. The estimations contribute to the link budget design for the optical tracking channel through atmospheric turbulence.

  9. Effects of time averaging on optical scintillation in a ground-to-satellite atmospheric propagation.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, M; Araki, K

    2000-04-20

    Temporal natures for a variance of turbulence-induced log-intensity fluctuations are obtained. The variance of the optical fluctuation is reduced when the optical signals are integrated in a photodetector, and we express the index of reduction (called the time-averaging factor) by using an autocovariance function of the optical fluctuation. The optical fluctuations for a ground-to-satellite path are caused by both atmospheric turbulence and the beam-pointing jitter error of the optical transmitter. The turbulence-induced optical scintillation can be discriminated from the fluctuation that is due to the beam-pointing jitter error. The compared result from the probability density function of the optical signal reveals good agreement. The temporal autocovariance functions of optical scintillation are obtained and used to calculate the time-averaging factor. The analytically expected effects of time averaging are verified by the experimental results. The estimations contribute to the link budget design for the optical tracking channel through atmospheric turbulence. PMID:18345087

  10. Solvent effects and dynamic averaging of 195Pt NMR shielding in cisplatin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Truflandier, Lionel A; Sutter, Kiplangat; Autschbach, Jochen

    2011-03-01

    The influences of solvent effects and dynamic averaging on the (195)Pt NMR shielding and chemical shifts of cisplatin and three cisplatin derivatives in aqueous solution were computed using explicit and implicit solvation models. Within the density functional theory framework, these simulations were carried out by combining ab initio molecular dynamics (aiMD) simulations for the phase space sampling with all-electron relativistic NMR shielding tensor calculations using the zeroth-order regular approximation. Structural analyses support the presence of a solvent-assisted "inverse" or "anionic" hydration previously observed in similar square-planar transition-metal complexes. Comparisons with computationally less demanding implicit solvent models show that error cancellation is ubiquitous when dealing with liquid-state NMR simulations. After aiMD averaging, the calculated chemical shifts for the four complexes are in good agreement with experiment, with relative deviations between theory and experiment of about 5% on average (1% of the Pt(II) chemical shift range). PMID:21204547

  11. The effect of three-dimensional fields on bounce averaged particle drifts in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hegna, C. C.

    2015-07-15

    The impact of applied 3D magnetic fields on the bounce-averaged precessional drifts in a tokamak plasma are calculated. Local 3D MHD equilibrium theory is used to construct solutions to the equilibrium equations in the vicinity of a magnetic surface for a large aspect ratio circular tokamak perturbed by applied 3D fields. Due to modulations of the local shear caused by near-resonant Pfirsch-Schlüter currents, relatively weak applied 3D fields can have a large effect on trapped particle precessional drifts.

  12. The role of size polydispersity in magnetic fluid hyperthermia: average vs. local infra/over-heating effects.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Menendez, Cristina; Conde-Leboran, Ivan; Baldomir, Daniel; Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana; Serantes, David

    2015-11-01

    An efficient and safe hyperthermia cancer treatment requires the accurate control of the heating performance of magnetic nanoparticles, which is directly related to their size. However, in any particle system the existence of some size polydispersity is experimentally unavoidable, which results in a different local heating output and consequently a different hyperthermia performance depending on the size of each particle. With the aim to shed some light on this significant issue, we have used a Monte Carlo technique to study the role of size polydispersity in heat dissipation at both the local (single particle) and global (macroscopic average) levels. We have systematically varied size polydispersity, temperature and interparticle dipolar interaction conditions, and evaluated local heating as a function of these parameters. Our results provide a simple guide on how to choose, for a given polydispersity degree, the more adequate average particle size so that the local variation in the released heat is kept within some limits that correspond to safety boundaries for the average-system hyperthermia performance. All together we believe that our results may help in the design of more effective magnetic hyperthermia applications. PMID:26437746

  13. Multi-Repeated Projection Lithography for High-Precision Linear Scale Based on Average Homogenization Effect.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dongxu; Zhao, Huiying; Zhang, Chupeng; Yuan, Daocheng; Xi, Jianpu; Zhu, Xueliang; Ban, Xinxing; Dong, Longchao; Gu, Yawen; Jiang, Chunye

    2016-01-01

    A multi-repeated photolithography method for manufacturing an incremental linear scale using projection lithography is presented. The method is based on the average homogenization effect that periodically superposes the light intensity of different locations of pitches in the mask to make a consistent energy distribution at a specific wavelength, from which the accuracy of a linear scale can be improved precisely using the average pitch with different step distances. The method's theoretical error is within 0.01 µm for a periodic mask with a 2-µm sine-wave error. The intensity error models in the focal plane include the rectangular grating error on the mask, static positioning error, and lithography lens focal plane alignment error, which affect pitch uniformity less than in the common linear scale projection lithography splicing process. It was analyzed and confirmed that increasing the repeat exposure number of a single stripe could improve accuracy, as could adjusting the exposure spacing to achieve a set proportion of black and white stripes. According to the experimental results, the effectiveness of the multi-repeated photolithography method is confirmed to easily realize a pitch accuracy of 43 nm in any 10 locations of 1 m, and the whole length accuracy of the linear scale is less than 1 µm/m. PMID:27089348

  14. Multi-Repeated Projection Lithography for High-Precision Linear Scale Based on Average Homogenization Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Dongxu; Zhao, Huiying; Zhang, Chupeng; Yuan, Daocheng; Xi, Jianpu; Zhu, Xueliang; Ban, Xinxing; Dong, Longchao; Gu, Yawen; Jiang, Chunye

    2016-01-01

    A multi-repeated photolithography method for manufacturing an incremental linear scale using projection lithography is presented. The method is based on the average homogenization effect that periodically superposes the light intensity of different locations of pitches in the mask to make a consistent energy distribution at a specific wavelength, from which the accuracy of a linear scale can be improved precisely using the average pitch with different step distances. The method’s theoretical error is within 0.01 µm for a periodic mask with a 2-µm sine-wave error. The intensity error models in the focal plane include the rectangular grating error on the mask, static positioning error, and lithography lens focal plane alignment error, which affect pitch uniformity less than in the common linear scale projection lithography splicing process. It was analyzed and confirmed that increasing the repeat exposure number of a single stripe could improve accuracy, as could adjusting the exposure spacing to achieve a set proportion of black and white stripes. According to the experimental results, the effectiveness of the multi-repeated photolithography method is confirmed to easily realize a pitch accuracy of 43 nm in any 10 locations of 1 m, and the whole length accuracy of the linear scale is less than 1 µm/m. PMID:27089348

  15. Effects of turbulence on average refraction angles in occultations by planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, V. R.; Haugstad, B. S.

    1978-01-01

    Four separable effects of atmospheric turbulence on average refraction angles in occultation experiments are derived from a simplified analysis, and related to more general formulations by B. S. Haugstad. The major contributors are shown to be due to gradients in height of the strength of the turbulence, and the sense of the resulting changes in refraction angles is explained in terms of Fermat's principle. Because the results of analyses of such gradient effects by W. B. Hubbard and J. R. Jokipii are expressed in other ways, a special effort is made to compare all of the predictions on a common basis. We conclude that there are fundamental differences, and use arguments based on energy conservation and Fermat's principle to help characterize the discrepancies.

  16. Effect of alloy deformation on the average spacing parameters of non-deforming particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J; Gurland, J

    1980-02-01

    It is shown on the basis of stereological definitions and a few simple experiments that the commonly used average dispersion parameters, area fraction (A/sub A/)/sub ..beta../, areal particle density N/sub A..beta../ and mean free path lambda/sub ..cap alpha../, remain invariant during plastic deformation in the case of non-deforming equiaxed particles. Directional effects on the spacing parameters N/sub A..beta../ and lambda/sub ..cap alpha../ arise during uniaxial deformation by rotation and preferred orientation of nonequiaxed particles. Particle arrangement in stringered or layered structures and the effect of deformation on nearest neighbor distances of particles and voids are briefly discussed in relation to strength and fracture theories.

  17. Scaling effects in area-averaged values of two-band spectral vegetation indices represented in a general form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Kenta; Miura, Tomoaki; Yoshioka, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Area-averaged vegetation index (VI) depends on spatial resolution and the computational approach used to calculate the VI from the data. Certain data treatments can introduce scaling effects and a systematic bias into datasets gathered from different sensors. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying the scaling effects of a two-band spectral VI defined in terms of the ratio of two linear sums of the red and near-infrared reflectances (a general form of the two-band VI). The general form of the VI model was linearly transformed to yield a common functional VI form that elucidated the nature of the monotonic behavior. An analytic investigation was conducted in which a two-band linear mixture model was assumed. The trends (increasing or decreasing) in the area-averaged VIs could be explained in terms of a single scalar index, ην, which may be expressed in terms of the spectra of the vegetation and nonvegetation endmembers as well as the coefficients unique to each VI. The maximum error bounds on the scaling effects were derived as a function of the endmember spectra and the choice of VI. The validity of the expressions was explored by conducting a set of numerical experiments that focused on the monotonic behavior and trends in several VIs.

  18. Treatment Side-Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the Signs & Symptoms? How am I Diagnosed? Treatment Options I Care About... Earlier Awareness Community Events ... are the Signs & Symptoms? How am I Diagnosed? Treatment Options I Care About... Earlier Awareness Community Events ...

  19. Facial averageness and genetic quality: Testing heritability, genetic correlation with attractiveness, and the paternal age effect

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony J.; Mitchem, Dorian G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2015-01-01

    Popular theory suggests that facial averageness is preferred in a partner for genetic benefits to offspring. However, whether facial averageness is associated with genetic quality is yet to be established. Here, we computed an objective measure of facial averageness for a large sample (N = 1,823) of identical and nonidentical twins and their siblings to test two predictions from the theory that facial averageness reflects genetic quality. First, we use biometrical modelling to estimate the heritability of facial averageness, which is necessary if it reflects genetic quality. We also test for a genetic association between facial averageness and facial attractiveness. Second, we assess whether paternal age at conception (a proxy of mutation load) is associated with facial averageness and facial attractiveness. Our findings are mixed with respect to our hypotheses. While we found that facial averageness does have a genetic component, and a significant phenotypic correlation exists between facial averageness and attractiveness, we did not find a genetic correlation between facial averageness and attractiveness (therefore, we cannot say that the genes that affect facial averageness also affect facial attractiveness) and paternal age at conception was not negatively associated with facial averageness. These findings support some of the previously untested assumptions of the ‘genetic benefits’ account of facial averageness, but cast doubt on others. PMID:26858521

  20. The effect of temperature on the average volume of Barkhausen jump on Q235 carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Shu, Di; Yin, Liang; Chen, Juan; Qi, Xin

    2016-06-01

    On the basis of the average volume of Barkhausen jump (AVBJ) vbar generated by irreversible displacement of magnetic domain wall under the effect of the incentive magnetic field on ferromagnetic materials, the functional relationship between saturation magnetization Ms and temperature T is employed in this paper to deduce the explicit mathematical expression among AVBJ vbar, stress σ, incentive magnetic field H and temperature T. Then the change law between AVBJ vbar and temperature T is researched according to the mathematical expression. Moreover, the tensile and compressive stress experiments are carried out on Q235 carbon steel specimens at different temperature to verify our theories. This paper offers a series of theoretical bases to solve the temperature compensation problem of Barkhausen testing method.

  1. Effects of stratospheric aerosol surface processes on the LLNL two-dimensional zonally averaged model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Peter S.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Burley, Joel D.; Johnston, Harold S.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of incorporating representations of heterogeneous chemical processes associated with stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosol into the LLNL two-dimensional, zonally averaged, model of the troposphere and stratosphere. Using distributions of aerosol surface area and volume density derived from SAGE II satellite observations, we were primarily interested in changes in partitioning within the Cl- and N- families in the lower stratosphere, compared to a model including only gas phase photochemical reactions. We have considered the heterogeneous hydrolysis reactions N2O5 + H2O(aerosol) yields 2 HNO3 and ClONO2 + H2O(aerosol) yields HOCl + HNO3 alone and in combination with the proposed formation of nitrosyl sulfuric acid (NSA) in the aerosol and its reaction with HCl. Inclusion of these processes produces significant changes in partitioning in the NO(y) and ClO(y) families in the middle stratosphere.

  2. Finite size effects in the averaged eigenvalue density of Wigner random-sign real symmetric matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhesi, G. S.; Ausloos, M.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, strict finite size effects must be taken into account in condensed matter problems when treated through models based on lattices or graphs. On the other hand, the cases of directed bonds or links are known to be highly relevant in topics ranging from ferroelectrics to quotation networks. Combining these two points leads us to examine finite size random matrices. To obtain basic materials properties, the Green's function associated with the matrix has to be calculated. To obtain the first finite size correction, a perturbative scheme is hereby developed within the framework of the replica method. The averaged eigenvalue spectrum and the corresponding Green's function of Wigner random sign real symmetric N ×N matrices to order 1 /N are finally obtained analytically. Related simulation results are also presented. The agreement is excellent between the analytical formulas and finite size matrix numerical diagonalization results, confirming the correctness of the first-order finite size expression.

  3. On the average temperature of airless spherical bodies and the magnitude of Earth's atmospheric thermal effect.

    PubMed

    Volokin, Den; ReLlez, Lark

    2014-01-01

    The presence of atmosphere can appreciably warm a planet's surface above the temperature of an airless environment. Known as a natural Greenhouse Effect (GE), this near-surface Atmospheric Thermal Enhancement (ATE) as named herein is presently entirely attributed to the absorption of up-welling long-wave radiation by greenhouse gases. Often quoted as 33 K for Earth, GE is estimated as a difference between planet's observed mean surface temperature and an effective radiating temperature calculated from the globally averaged absorbed solar flux using the Stefan-Boltzmann (SB) radiation law. This approach equates a planet's average temperature in the absence of greenhouse gases or atmosphere to an effective emission temperature assuming ATE ≡ GE. The SB law is also routinely employed to estimating the mean temperatures of airless bodies. We demonstrate that this formula as applied to spherical objects is mathematically incorrect owing to Hölder's inequality between integrals and leads to biased results such as a significant underestimation of Earth's ATE. We derive a new expression for the mean physical temperature of airless bodies based on an analytic integration of the SB law over a sphere that accounts for effects of regolith heat storage and cosmic background radiation on nighttime temperatures. Upon verifying our model against Moon surface temperature data provided by the NASA Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we propose it as a new analytic standard for evaluating the thermal environment of airless bodies. Physical evidence is presented that Earth's ATE should be assessed against the temperature of an equivalent airless body such as the Moon rather than a hypothetical atmosphere devoid of greenhouse gases. Employing the new temperature formula we show that Earth's total ATE is ~90 K, not 33 K, and that ATE = GE + TE, where GE is the thermal effect of greenhouse gases, while TE > 15 K is a thermodynamic enhancement independent of the

  4. Quaternion Averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Cheng, Yang; Crassidis, John L.; Oshman, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    Many applications require an algorithm that averages quaternions in an optimal manner. For example, when combining the quaternion outputs of multiple star trackers having this output capability, it is desirable to properly average the quaternions without recomputing the attitude from the the raw star tracker data. Other applications requiring some sort of optimal quaternion averaging include particle filtering and multiple-model adaptive estimation, where weighted quaternions are used to determine the quaternion estimate. For spacecraft attitude estimation applications, derives an optimal averaging scheme to compute the average of a set of weighted attitude matrices using the singular value decomposition method. Focusing on a 4-dimensional quaternion Gaussian distribution on the unit hypersphere, provides an approach to computing the average quaternion by minimizing a quaternion cost function that is equivalent to the attitude matrix cost function Motivated by and extending its results, this Note derives an algorithm that deterniines an optimal average quaternion from a set of scalar- or matrix-weighted quaternions. Rirthermore, a sufficient condition for the uniqueness of the average quaternion, and the equivalence of the mininiization problem, stated herein, to maximum likelihood estimation, are shown.

  5. Effect of filter on average glandular dose and image quality in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songsaeng, C.; Krisanachinda, A.; Theerakul, K.

    2016-03-01

    To determine the average glandular dose and entrance surface air kerma in both phantoms and patients to assess image quality for different target-filters (W/Rh and W/Ag) in digital mammography system. The compressed breast thickness, compression force, average glandular dose, entrance surface air kerma, peak kilovoltage and tube current time were recorded and compared between W/Rh and W/Ag target filter. The CNR and the figure of merit were used to determine the effect of target filter on image quality. The mean AGD of the W/Rh target filter was 1.75 mGy, the mean ESAK was 6.67 mGy, the mean CBT was 54.1 mm, the mean CF was 14 1bs. The mean AGD of W/Ag target filter was 2.7 mGy, the mean ESAK was 12.6 mGy, the mean CBT was 75.5 mm, the mean CF was 15 1bs. In phantom study, the AGD was 1.2 mGy at 4 cm, 3.3 mGy at 6 cm and 3.83 mGy at 7 cm thickness. The FOM was 24.6, CNR was 9.02 at thickness 6 cm. The FOM was 18.4, CNR was 8.6 at thickness 7 cm. The AGD from Digital Mammogram system with W/Rh of thinner CBT was lower than the AGD from W/Ag target filter.

  6. Extracurricular Activities and Their Effect on the Student's Grade Point Average: Statistical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakoban, R. A.; Aljarallah, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) are part of students' everyday life; they play important roles in students' lives. Few studies have addressed the question of how student engagements to ECA affect student's grade point average (GPA). This research was conducted to know whether the students' grade point average in King Abdulaziz University,…

  7. Estimate of effective recombination rate and average selection coefficient for HIV in chronic infection

    PubMed Central

    Batorsky, Rebecca; Kearney, Mary F.; Palmer, Sarah E.; Maldarelli, Frank; Rouzine, Igor M.; Coffin, John M.

    2011-01-01

    HIV adaptation to a host in chronic infection is simulated by means of a Monte-Carlo algorithm that includes the evolutionary factors of mutation, positive selection with varying strength among sites, random genetic drift, linkage, and recombination. By comparing two sensitive measures of linkage disequilibrium (LD) and the number of diverse sites measured in simulation to patient data from one-time samples of pol gene obtained by single-genome sequencing from representative untreated patients, we estimate the effective recombination rate and the average selection coefficient to be on the order of 1% per genome per generation (10−5 per base per generation) and 0.5%, respectively. The adaptation rate is twofold higher and fourfold lower than predicted in the absence of recombination and in the limit of very frequent recombination, respectively. The level of LD and the number of diverse sites observed in data also range between the values predicted in simulation for these two limiting cases. These results demonstrate the critical importance of finite population size, linkage, and recombination in HIV evolution. PMID:21436045

  8. Isolated and synergistic effects of PM10 and average temperature on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Samya de Lara Lins de Araujo; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Schwartz, Joel; Zanobetti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the effect of air pollution and temperature on mortality due to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. METHODS We evaluated the isolated and synergistic effects of temperature and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 10 µm (PM10) on the mortality of individuals > 40 years old due to cardiovascular disease and that of individuals > 60 years old due to respiratory diseases in Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil, between 1998 and 2008. Three methodologies were used to evaluate the isolated association: time-series analysis using Poisson regression model, bidirectional case-crossover analysis matched by period, and case-crossover analysis matched by the confounding factor, i.e., average temperature or pollutant concentration. The graphical representation of the response surface, generated by the interaction term between these factors added to the Poisson regression model, was interpreted to evaluate the synergistic effect of the risk factors. RESULTS No differences were observed between the results of the case-crossover and time-series analyses. The percentage change in the relative risk of cardiovascular and respiratory mortality was 0.85% (0.45;1.25) and 1.60% (0.74;2.46), respectively, due to an increase of 10 μg/m3 in the PM10 concentration. The pattern of correlation of the temperature with cardiovascular mortality was U-shaped and that with respiratory mortality was J-shaped, indicating an increased relative risk at high temperatures. The values for the interaction term indicated a higher relative risk for cardiovascular and respiratory mortalities at low temperatures and high temperatures, respectively, when the pollution levels reached approximately 60 μg/m3. CONCLUSIONS The positive association standardized in the Poisson regression model for pollutant concentration is not confounded by temperature, and the effect of temperature is not confounded by the pollutant levels in the time-series analysis. The simultaneous exposure

  9. Isolated and synergistic effects of PM10 and average temperature on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Samya de Lara Lins de Araujo; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Schwartz, Joel; Zanobetti, Antonella

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the effect of air pollution and temperature on mortality due to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. METHODS We evaluated the isolated and synergistic effects of temperature and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 10 µm (PM10) on the mortality of individuals > 40 years old due to cardiovascular disease and that of individuals > 60 years old due to respiratory diseases in Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil, between 1998 and 2008. Three methodologies were used to evaluate the isolated association: time-series analysis using Poisson regression model, bidirectional case-crossover analysis matched by period, and case-crossover analysis matched by the confounding factor, i.e., average temperature or pollutant concentration. The graphical representation of the response surface, generated by the interaction term between these factors added to the Poisson regression model, was interpreted to evaluate the synergistic effect of the risk factors. RESULTS No differences were observed between the results of the case-crossover and time-series analyses. The percentage change in the relative risk of cardiovascular and respiratory mortality was 0.85% (0.45;1.25) and 1.60% (0.74;2.46), respectively, due to an increase of 10 μg/m3 in the PM10 concentration. The pattern of correlation of the temperature with cardiovascular mortality was U-shaped and that with respiratory mortality was J-shaped, indicating an increased relative risk at high temperatures. The values for the interaction term indicated a higher relative risk for cardiovascular and respiratory mortalities at low temperatures and high temperatures, respectively, when the pollution levels reached approximately 60 μg/m3. CONCLUSIONS The positive association standardized in the Poisson regression model for pollutant concentration is not confounded by temperature, and the effect of temperature is not confounded by the pollutant levels in the time-series analysis. The simultaneous exposure

  10. Effect of spatial averaging on multifractal properties of meteorological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Holger; Baranowski, Piotr; Krzyszczak, Jaromir; Zubik, Monika

    2016-04-01

    Introduction The process-based models for large-scale simulations require input of agro-meteorological quantities that are often in the form of time series of coarse spatial resolution. Therefore, the knowledge about their scaling properties is fundamental for transferring locally measured fluctuations to larger scales and vice-versa. However, the scaling analysis of these quantities is complicated due to the presence of localized trends and non-stationarities. Here we assess how spatially aggregating meteorological data to coarser resolutions affects the data's temporal scaling properties. While it is known that spatial aggregation may affect spatial data properties (Hoffmann et al., 2015), it is unknown how it affects temporal data properties. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the aggregation effect (AE) with regard to both temporal and spatial input data properties considering scaling properties (i.e. statistical self-similarity) of the chosen agro-meteorological time series through multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA). Materials and Methods Time series coming from years 1982-2011 were spatially averaged from 1 to 10, 25, 50 and 100 km resolution to assess the impact of spatial aggregation. Daily minimum, mean and maximum air temperature (2 m), precipitation, global radiation, wind speed and relative humidity (Zhao et al., 2015) were used. To reveal the multifractal structure of the time series, we used the procedure described in Baranowski et al. (2015). The diversity of the studied multifractals was evaluated by the parameters of time series spectra. In order to analyse differences in multifractal properties to 1 km resolution grids, data of coarser resolutions was disaggregated to 1 km. Results and Conclusions Analysing the spatial averaging on multifractal properties we observed that spatial patterns of the multifractal spectrum (MS) of all meteorological variables differed from 1 km grids and MS-parameters were biased

  11. Effective Obesity Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Lynda H.; Calvin, James E., III; Calvin, James E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    To curb the epidemic of obesity in the United States, revised Medicare policy allows support for efficacious obesity treatments. This review summarizes the evidence from rigorous randomized trials (9 lifestyle trials, 5 drug trials, and 2 surgical trials) on the efficacy and risk-benefit profile of lifestyle, drug, and surgical interventions aimed…

  12. Effects of error covariance structure on estimation of model averaging weights and predictive performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Dan; Ye, Ming; Meyer, Philip D.; Curtis, Gary P.; Shi, Xiaoqing; Niu, Xu-Feng; Yabusaki, Steve B.

    2013-01-01

    When conducting model averaging for assessing groundwater conceptual model uncertainty, the averaging weights are often evaluated using model selection criteria such as AIC, AICc, BIC, and KIC (Akaike Information Criterion, Corrected Akaike Information Criterion, Bayesian Information Criterion, and Kashyap Information Criterion, respectively). However, this method often leads to an unrealistic situation in which the best model receives overwhelmingly large averaging weight (close to 100%), which cannot be justified by available data and knowledge. It was found in this study that this problem was caused by using the covariance matrix, CE, of measurement errors for estimating the negative log likelihood function common to all the model selection criteria. This problem can be resolved by using the covariance matrix, Cek, of total errors (including model errors and measurement errors) to account for the correlation between the total errors. An iterative two-stage method was developed in the context of maximum likelihood inverse modeling to iteratively infer the unknown Cek from the residuals during model calibration. The inferred Cek was then used in the evaluation of model selection criteria and model averaging weights. While this method was limited to serial data using time series techniques in this study, it can be extended to spatial data using geostatistical techniques. The method was first evaluated in a synthetic study and then applied to an experimental study, in which alternative surface complexation models were developed to simulate column experiments of uranium reactive transport. It was found that the total errors of the alternative models were temporally correlated due to the model errors. The iterative two-stage method using Cekresolved the problem that the best model receives 100% model averaging weight, and the resulting model averaging weights were supported by the calibration results and physical understanding of the alternative models. Using Cek

  13. Antitumor effects of electrochemical treatment

    PubMed Central

    González, Maraelys Morales; Zamora, Lisset Ortíz; Cabrales, Luis Enrique Bergues; Sierra González, Gustavo Victoriano; de Oliveira, Luciana Oliveira; Zanella, Rodrigo; Buzaid, Antonio Carlos; Parise, Orlando; Brito, Luciana Macedo; Teixeira, Cesar Augusto Antunes; Gomes, Marina das Neves; Moreno, Gleyce; Feo da Veiga, Venicio; Telló, Marcos; Holandino, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical treatment is an alternative modality for tumor treatment based on the application of a low intensity direct electric current to the tumor tissue through two or more platinum electrodes placed within the tumor zone or in the surrounding areas. This treatment is noted for its great effectiveness, minimal invasiveness and local effect. Several studies have been conducted worldwide to evaluate the antitumoral effect of this therapy. In all these studies a variety of biochemical and physiological responses of tumors to the applied treatment have been obtained. By this reason, researchers have suggested various mechanisms to explain how direct electric current destroys tumor cells. Although, it is generally accepted this treatment induces electrolysis, electroosmosis and electroporation in tumoral tissues. However, action mechanism of this alternative modality on the tumor tissue is not well understood. Although the principle of Electrochemical treatment is simple, a standardized method is not yet available. The mechanism by which Electrochemical treatment affects tumor growth and survival may represent more complex process. The present work analyzes the latest and most important research done on the electrochemical treatment of tumors. We conclude with our point of view about the destruction mechanism features of this alternative therapy. Also, we suggest some mechanisms and strategies from the thermodynamic point of view for this therapy. In the area of Electrochemical treatment of cancer this tool has been exploited very little and much work remains to be done. Electrochemical treatment constitutes a good therapeutic option for patients that have failed the conventional oncology methods. PMID:23592904

  14. Using National Data to Estimate Average Cost Effectiveness of EFNEP Outcomes by State/Territory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baral, Ranju; Davis, George C.; Blake, Stephanie; You, Wen; Serrano, Elena

    2013-01-01

    This report demonstrates how existing national data can be used to first calculate upper limits on the average cost per participant and per outcome per state/territory for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). These upper limits can then be used by state EFNEP administrators to obtain more precise estimates for their states,…

  15. Plantar Fasciitis: Prescribing Effective Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Michael; Fields, Karl B.

    2002-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is an extremely common, painful injury seen among people in running and jumping sports. While prognosis for recovery with conservative care is excellent, prolonged duration of symptoms affects sports participation. Studies on treatment options show mixed results, so finding effective treatments can be challenging. A logical…

  16. Social Comparisons in the Classroom: An Investigation of the Better than Average Effect among Secondary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuyper, Hans; Dijkstra, Pieternel; Buunk, Abraham P.; van der Werf, Margaretha P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The "better than average (BTA) effect" refers to the tendency for the majority of people to rate themselves as being higher on positive attributes and lower on negative attributes than other people. The present study examined the occurrence of the BTA effect on five important characteristics among 15,806 first-year secondary school Dutch students.…

  17. Average-atom treatment of relaxation time in x-ray Thomson scattering from warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. R.; Nilsen, J.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of finite relaxation times on Thomson scattering from warm dense plasmas is examined within the framework of the average-atom approximation. Presently most calculations use the collision-free Lindhard dielectric function to evaluate the free-electron contribution to the Thomson cross section. In this work, we use the Mermin dielectric function, which includes relaxation time explicitly. The relaxation time is evaluated by treating the average atom as an impurity in a uniform electron gas and depends critically on the transport cross section. The calculated relaxation rates agree well with values inferred from the Ziman formula for the static conductivity and also with rates inferred from a fit to the frequency-dependent conductivity. Transport cross sections determined by the phase-shift analysis in the average-atom potential are compared with those evaluated in the commonly used Born approximation. The Born approximation converges to the exact cross sections at high energies; however, differences that occur at low energies lead to corresponding differences in relaxation rates. The relative importance of including relaxation time when modeling x-ray Thomson scattering spectra is examined by comparing calculations of the free-electron dynamic structure function for Thomson scattering using Lindhard and Mermin dielectric functions. Applications are given to warm dense Be plasmas, with temperatures ranging from 2 to 32 eV and densities ranging from 2 to 64 g/cc.

  18. The latitude dependence of the variance of zonally averaged quantities. [in polar meteorology with attention to geometrical effects of earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Bell, T. L.; Cahalan, R. F.; Moeng, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Geometric characteristics of the spherical earth are shown to be responsible for the increase of variance with latitude of zonally averaged meteorological statistics. An analytic model is constructed to display the effect of a spherical geometry on zonal averages, employing a sphere labeled with radial unit vectors in a real, stochastic field expanded in complex spherical harmonics. The variance of a zonally averaged field is found to be expressible in terms of the spectrum of the vector field of the spherical harmonics. A maximum variance is then located at the poles, and the ratio of the variance to the zonally averaged grid-point variance, weighted by the cosine of the latitude, yields the zonal correlation typical of the latitude. An example is provided for the 500 mb level in the Northern Hemisphere compared to 15 years of data. Variance is determined to increase north of 60 deg latitude.

  19. Empirical Treatment Effectiveness Models for Binary Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Jarrod E; Dawson, Neal V; Sessler, Daniel I; Schold, Jesse D; Love, Thomas E; Kattan, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Randomized trials provide strong evidence regarding efficacy of interventions but are limited in their capacity to address potential heterogeneity in effectiveness within broad clinical populations. For example, a treatment that on average is superior may be distinctly worse in certain patients. We propose a technique for using large electronic health registries to develop and validate decision models that measure-for distinct combinations of covariate values-the difference in predicted outcomes among 2 alternative treatments. We demonstrate the methodology in a prototype analysis of in-hospital mortality under alternative revascularization treatments. First, we developed prediction models for a binary outcome of interest for each treatment. Decision criteria were then defined based on the treatment-specific model predictions. Patients were then classified as receiving concordant or discordant care (in relation to the model recommendation), and the association between discordance and outcomes was evaluated. We then present alternative decision criteria and validation methodologies, as well as sensitivity analyses that investigate 1) the imbalance between treatments on observed covariates and 2) the aggregate impact of unobserved covariates. Our methodology supplements population-average clinical trial results by modeling heterogeneity in outcomes according to specific covariate values. It thus allows for assessment of current practice, from which cogent hypotheses for improved care can be derived. Newly emerging large population registries will allow for accurate predictions of outcome risk under competing treatments, as complex functions of predictor variables. Whether or not the models might be used to inform decision making depends on the extent to which important predictors are available. Further work is needed to understand the strengths and limitations of this approach, particularly in relation to those based on randomized trials. PMID:25852080

  20. Distributions and averages of electron density parameters: Explaining the effects of gradient corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupan, Ales; Burke, Kieron; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Perdew, John P.

    1997-06-01

    We analyze the electron densities n(r) of atoms, molecules, solids, and surfaces. The distributions of values of the Seitz radius rs=(3/4πn)1/3 and the reduced density gradient s=|∇n|/(2(3π2)1/3n4/3) in an electron density indicate which ranges of these variables are significant for physical processes. We also define energy-weighted averages of these variables, and , from which local spin density (LSD) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation energies may be estimated. The changes in these averages upon rearrangement of the nuclei (atomization of molecules or solids, stretching of bond lengths or lattice parameters, change of crystal structure, etc.) are used to explain why GGA corrects LSD in the way it does. A thermodynamic-like inequality (essentially d/>d/2) determines whether the gradient corrections drive a process forward. We use this analysis to explain why gradient corrections usually stretch bonds (but not for example H-H bonds), reduce atomization and surface energies, and raise energy barriers to formation at transition states.

  1. Effects of anisotropic turbulence on average polarizability of Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams through ocean link.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Minyu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the spatial power spectrum of the refractive index of anisotropic turbulence, the average polarizability of the Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams and lateral coherence length of the spherical wave propagating through the ocean water channel are derived. Numerical results show that, in strong temperature fluctuation, the depolarization effects of anisotropic turbulence are inferior to isotropic turbulence, as the other parameters of two links are the same. The depolarization effects of salinity fluctuation are less than the effects of the temperature fluctuation; the average polarizability of beams increases when increasing the inner scale of turbulence and the source's transverse size; and the larger rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid enhances the average polarizability of beams. The region of the receiving radius is smaller than the characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is smaller than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence. However, the receiving radius region is larger than a characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is larger than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence. PMID:27409215

  2. Underestimating Calorie Content When Healthy Foods Are Present: An Averaging Effect or a Reference-Dependent Anchoring Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Forwood, Suzanna E.; Ahern, Amy; Hollands, Gareth J.; Fletcher, Paul C.; Marteau, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have shown that estimations of the calorie content of an unhealthy main meal food tend to be lower when the food is shown alongside a healthy item (e.g. fruit or vegetables) than when shown alone. This effect has been called the negative calorie illusion and has been attributed to averaging the unhealthy (vice) and healthy (virtue) foods leading to increased perceived healthiness and reduced calorie estimates. The current study aimed to replicate and extend these findings to test the hypothesized mediating effect of ratings of healthiness of foods on calorie estimates. Methods In three online studies, participants were invited to make calorie estimates of combinations of foods. Healthiness ratings of the food were also assessed. Results The first two studies failed to replicate the negative calorie illusion. In a final study, the use of a reference food, closely following a procedure from a previously published study, did elicit a negative calorie illusion. No evidence was found for a mediating role of healthiness estimates. Conclusion The negative calorie illusion appears to be a function of the contrast between a food being judged and a reference, supporting the hypothesis that the negative calorie illusion arises from the use of a reference-dependent anchoring and adjustment heuristic and not from an ‘averaging’ effect, as initially proposed. This finding is consistent with existing data on sequential calorie estimates, and highlights a significant impact of the order in which foods are viewed on how foods are evaluated. PMID:23967216

  3. The Effects of Part-Time Employment on High School Students' Grade Point Averages and Rate of School Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffez, Jack

    To determine what effects employment will have on high school students' grade point averages and rate of school attendance, the author involved fifty-six students in an experiment. Twenty-eight students were employed part-time under the Youth Incentive Entitlement Project (YIEP). The twenty-eight students in the control group were eligible for…

  4. The Effect on Non-Normal Distributions on the Integrated Moving Average Model of Time-Series Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerann-George, Judith

    The Integrated Moving Average (IMA) model of time series, and the analysis of intervention effects based on it, assume random shocks which are normally distributed. To determine the robustness of the analysis to violations of this assumption, empirical sampling methods were employed. Samples were generated from three populations; normal,…

  5. Effects of metabolizable energy intake on tympanic temperature and average daily gain of steers finished in southern Chile during wintertime

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 24 Angus x Hereford steers (BW = 479.8 ± 4.48) were used to assess the effect of Metabolizable Energy Intake (MEI) on Average Daily Gain (ADG) and Tympanic Temperature (TT) during the wintertime in southern Chile. The study was conducted at the experimental field of the Catholic Universit...

  6. The Effect of Computer Based Instructional Technique for the Learning of Elementary Level Mathematics among High, Average and Low Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afzal, Muhammad Tanveer; Gondal, Bashir; Fatima, Nuzhat

    2014-01-01

    The major objective of the study was to elicit the effect of three instructional methods for teaching of mathematics on low, average and high achiever elementary school students. Three methods: traditional instructional method, computer assisted instruction (CAI) and teacher facilitated mathematics learning software were employed for the teaching…

  7. A group's physical attractiveness is greater than the average attractiveness of its members: the group attractiveness effect.

    PubMed

    van Osch, Yvette; Blanken, Irene; Meijs, Maartje H J; van Wolferen, Job

    2015-04-01

    We tested whether the perceived physical attractiveness of a group is greater than the average attractiveness of its members. In nine studies, we find evidence for the so-called group attractiveness effect (GA-effect), using female, male, and mixed-gender groups, indicating that group impressions of physical attractiveness are more positive than the average ratings of the group members. A meta-analysis on 33 comparisons reveals that the effect is medium to large (Cohen's d = 0.60) and moderated by group size. We explored two explanations for the GA-effect: (a) selective attention to attractive group members, and (b) the Gestalt principle of similarity. The results of our studies are in favor of the selective attention account: People selectively attend to the most attractive members of a group and their attractiveness has a greater influence on the evaluation of the group. PMID:25733515

  8. Doppler broadening effect on collision cross section functions - Deconvolution of the thermal averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The surprising feature of the Doppler problem in threshold determination is the 'amplification effect' of the target's thermal energy spread. The small thermal energy spread of the target molecules results in a large dispersion in relative kinetic energy. The Doppler broadening effect in connection with thermal energy beam experiments is discussed, and a procedure is recommended for the deconvolution of molecular scattering cross-section functions whose dominant dependence upon relative velocity is approximately that of the standard low-energy form.

  9. The effect of averaging adjacent planes for artifact reduction in matrix inversion tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Devon J.; Page McAdams, H.; Dobbins, James T. III

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) uses linear systems theory and knowledge of the imaging geometry to remove tomographic blur that is present in conventional backprojection tomosynthesis reconstructions, leaving in-plane detail rendered clearly. The use of partial-pixel interpolation during the backprojection process introduces imprecision in the MITS modeling of tomographic blur, and creates low-contrast artifacts in some MITS planes. This paper examines the use of MITS slabs, created by averaging several adjacent MITS planes, as a method for suppressing partial-pixel artifacts. Methods: Human chest tomosynthesis projection data, acquired as part of an IRB-approved pilot study, were used to generate MITS planes, three-plane MITS slabs (MITSa3), five-plane MITS slabs (MITSa5), and seven-plane MITS slabs (MITSa7). These were qualitatively examined for partial-pixel artifacts and the visibility of normal and abnormal anatomy. Additionally, small (5 mm) subtle pulmonary nodules were simulated and digitally superimposed upon human chest tomosynthesis projection images, and their visibility was qualitatively assessed in the different reconstruction techniques. Simulated images of a thin wire were used to generate modulation transfer function (MTF) and slice-sensitivity profile curves for the different MITS and MITS slab techniques, and these were examined for indications of partial-pixel artifacts and frequency response uniformity. Finally, mean-subtracted, exposure-normalized noise power spectra (ENNPS) estimates were computed and compared for MITS and MITS slab reconstructions, generated from 10 sets of tomosynthesis projection data of an acrylic slab. The simulated in-plane MTF response of each technique was also combined with the square root of the ENNPS estimate to yield stochastic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) information about the different reconstruction techniques. Results: For scan angles of 20 Degree-Sign and 5 mm plane separation, seven MITS

  10. Strategy Precedes Operational Effectiveness: Aligning High Graduation Rankings with Competitive Graduation Grade Point Averages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apprey, Maurice; Bassett, Kimberley C.; Preston-Grimes, Patrice; Lewis, Dion W.; Wood, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    Two pivotal and interconnected claims are addressed in this article. First, strategy precedes program effectiveness. Second, graduation rates and rankings are insufficient in any account of academic progress for African American students. In this article, graduation is regarded as the floor and not the ceiling, as it were. The ideal situation in…

  11. Effects of Social Interactions on Empirical Responses to Selection for Average Daily Gain of Boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of competition on responses to selection for ADG were examined with records of 9,720 boars from dam lines (1 and 2) and sire lines (3 and 4) provided by Pig Improvement Company. Each line was analyzed separately. Pens contained 15 boars. Gains (ADG) were measured from about 71 to 161 d of...

  12. The effect of capsule-filling machine vibrations on average fill weight.

    PubMed

    Llusa, Marcos; Faulhammer, Eva; Biserni, Stefano; Calzolari, Vittorio; Lawrence, Simon; Bresciani, Massimo; Khinast, Johannes

    2013-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the effect of the speed of capsule filling and the inherent machine vibrations on fill weight for a dosator-nozzle machine. The results show that increasing speed of capsule filling amplifies the vibration intensity (as measured by Laser Doppler vibrometer) of the machine frame, which leads to powder densification. The mass of the powder (fill weight) collected via the nozzle is significantly larger at a higher capsule filling speed. Therefore, there is a correlation between powder densification under more intense vibrations and larger fill weights. Quality-by Design of powder based products should evaluate the effect of environmental vibrations on material attributes, which in turn may affect product quality. PMID:23872302

  13. Effects of Coordinate Rotation and Averaging Period on Energy Closure Characteristics of Eddy Covariance Measurements over Mountainous Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Chen, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Coordinate rotation is typically applied to align measured turbulence data along the stream wise direction before calculating turbulent fluxes. A standard averaging period (30 min) is commonly used when estimating these fluxes. Different rotation approaches with various averaging periods can cause systemic bias and significant variations in flux estimations. Thus, measuring surface fluxes over a non-flat terrain requires that an appropriate rotation technique and optimal averaging period are applied. In this study, two coordinate rotation approaches (double and planar-fit rotations) and no-rotation, in associated with averaging periods of 15-240 min, were applied to compute heat and water vapor fluxes over a mountainous terrain using the eddy covariance method. Measurements were conducted in an experimental watershed, the Lien-Hua-Chih (LHC) watershed, located in the central Taiwan. This watershed has considerable meso-scale circulation and mountainous terrain. Vegetation type is a mixture of natural deciduous forest and shrubs; canopy height is about 17 m. A 22 m tall observation tower was built inside the canopy. The prevailing wind direction is NW during daytime and ES during the night time at the LHC site in both the dry and wet seasons. Turbulence data above the canopy were measured with an eddy covariance system comprising a 3-D sonic anemometer (Young 81000) and a krypton hygrometer (Campbell KH20). Raw data of 10 Hz were recorded simultaneously with a data logger (CR1000) and a CF card. Air temperature/humidity profiles were measured to calculate the heat/moisture storage inside the canopy layer. Air pressure data were used to correct the effect of air density fluctuations on surface fluxes. The effects of coordinate rotation approaches with various averaging periods on the average daily energy closure fraction are presented. The criteria of the best energy closure fraction and minimum uncertainty indicate that planar-fit rotation with an averaging period

  14. The effect of gravity level on the average primary dendritic spacing of a directionally solidified superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.; Lee, J. E.; Curreri, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of alternating low (0.01 g) and high (1.8 g) gravity force on the primary spacings in the dendrite structure in a directionally solidified Ni-based superalloy (PWA 1480, containing 5 pct Co, 10 pct Cr, 4 pct W, 12 pct Ta, 5 pct Al, 1.5 pct Ti, and the balance Ni) was investigated using samples solidified in a directional solidification furnace aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft that made a series of low-g parabolas. The cross-section slices for each growth rate were polished and etched with Kallings II, and the primary dendritic arm spacings were measured using the method of Jacobi and Schwerdtfeger (1976). The arm spacings were found to fluctuate with gravity force, increasing as the gravity level decreased, and growing finer as gravity increased.

  15. Measurements of time average series resonance effect in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Chuaqui, H.; Kakati, M.

    2011-10-15

    Self-excited plasma series resonance is observed in low pressure capacitvely coupled radio frequency discharges as high-frequency oscillations superimposed on the normal radio frequency current. This high-frequency contribution to the radio frequency current is generated by a series resonance between the capacitive sheath and the inductive and resistive bulk plasma. In this report, we present an experimental method to measure the plasma series resonance in a capacitively coupled radio frequency argon plasma by modifying the homogeneous discharge model. The homogeneous discharge model is modified by introducing a correction factor to the plasma resistance. Plasma parameters are also calculated by considering the plasma series resonances effect. Experimental measurements show that the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance, which arises in capacitive discharge due to the nonlinear interaction of plasma bulk and sheath, significantly enhances both the Ohmic and stochastic heating. The experimentally measured total dissipation, which is the sum of the Ohmic and stochastic heating, is found to increase significantly with decreasing pressure.

  16. The effect of antagonistic pleiotropy on the estimation of the average coefficient of dominance of deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Fernández, B; García-Dorado, A; Caballero, A

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the impact of antagonistic pleiotropy on the most widely used methods of estimation of the average coefficient of dominance of deleterious mutations from segregating populations. A proportion of the deleterious mutations affecting a given studied fitness component are assumed to have an advantageous effect on another one, generating overdominance on global fitness. Using diffusion approximations and transition matrix methods, we obtain the distribution of gene frequencies for nonpleiotropic and pleiotropic mutations in populations at the mutation-selection-drift balance. From these distributions we build homozygous and heterozygous chromosomes and assess the behavior of the estimators of dominance. A very small number of deleterious mutations with antagonistic pleiotropy produces substantial increases on the estimate of the average degree of dominance of mutations affecting the fitness component under study. For example, estimates are increased three- to fivefold when 2% of segregating loci are over-dominant for fitness. In contrast, strengthening pleiotropy, where pleiotropic effects are assumed to be also deleterious, has little effect on the estimates of the average degree of dominance, supporting previous results. The antagonistic pleiotropy model considered, applied under mutational parameters described in the literature, produces patterns for the distribution of chromosomal viabilities, levels of genetic variance, and homozygous mutation load generally consistent with those observed empirically for viability in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:16118193

  17. The difference between laboratory and in-situ pixel-averaged emissivity: The effects on temperature-emissivity separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsunaga, Tsuneo

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a Japanese future imaging sensor which has five channels in thermal infrared (TIR) region. To extract spectral emissivity information from ASTER and/or TIMS data, various temperature-emissivity (T-E) separation methods have been developed to date. Most of them require assumptions on surface emissivity, in which emissivity measured in a laboratory is often used instead of in-situ pixel-averaged emissivity. But if these two emissivities are different, accuracies of separated emissivity and surface temperature are reduced. In this study, the difference between laboratory and in-situ pixel-averaged emissivity and its effect on T-E separation are discussed. TIMS data of an area containing both rocks and vegetation were also processed to retrieve emissivity spectra using two T-E separation methods.

  18. Impact of trees on pollutant dispersion in street canyons: A numerical study of the annual average effects in Antwerp, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vranckx, Stijn; Vos, Peter; Maiheu, Bino; Janssen, Stijn

    2015-11-01

    Effects of vegetation on pollutant dispersion receive increased attention in attempts to reduce air pollutant concentration levels in the urban environment. In this study, we examine the influence of vegetation on the concentrations of traffic pollutants in urban street canyons using numerical simulations with the CFD code OpenFOAM. This CFD approach is validated against literature wind tunnel data of traffic pollutant dispersion in street canyons. The impact of trees is simulated for a variety of vegetation types and the full range of approaching wind directions at 15° interval. All these results are combined using meteo statistics, including effects of seasonal leaf loss, to determine the annual average effect of trees in street canyons. This analysis is performed for two pollutants, elemental carbon (EC) and PM10, using background concentrations and emission strengths for the city of Antwerp, Belgium. The results show that due to the presence of trees the annual average pollutant concentrations increase with about 8% (range of 1% to 13%) for EC and with about 1.4% (range of 0.2 to 2.6%) for PM10. The study indicates that this annual effect is considerably smaller than earlier estimates which are generally based on a specific set of governing conditions (1 wind direction, full leafed trees and peak hour traffic emissions). PMID:26100726

  19. Identification of Average Treatment Effects in Social Experiments under Alternative Forms of Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Martin

    2012-01-01

    As any empirical method used for causal analysis, social experiments are prone to attrition which may flaw the validity of the results. This article considers the problem of partially missing outcomes in experiments. First, it systematically reveals under which forms of attrition--in terms of its relation to observable and/or unobservable…

  20. Treatment Effect Heterogeneity in a Science Professional Development Initiative: The Case for School Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruch, Sarah; Grigg, Jeffrey; Hanselman, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on how the treatment effects of a teacher professional development initiative in science differed by school capacity. In other words, the authors are primarily concerned with treatment effect heterogeneity. As such, this paper complements ongoing evaluation of the average treatment effects of the initiative over time. The…

  1. Assessment of annual average effective dose status in the cohort of medical staff in Lithuania during 1991-2013.

    PubMed

    Samerdokiene, Vitalija; Mastauskas, Albinas; Atkocius, Vydmantas

    2015-12-01

    The use of radiation sources for various medical purposes is closely related to irradiation of the medical staff, which causes harmful effects to health and an increased risk of cancer. In total, 1463 medical staff who have been occupationally exposed to sources of ionising radiation (IR) had been monitored. Records with annual dose measurements (N = 19 157) were collected and regularly analysed for a 23-y period: from 01 January 1991 to 31 December 2013. The collected annual average effective dose (AAED) data have been analysed according to different socio-demographic parameters and will be used in future investigation in order to assess cancer risk among medical staff occupationally exposed to sources of IR. A thorough analysis of data extracted from medical staff's dose records allows one to conclude that the average annual effective dose of Lithuanian medical staff occupationally exposed to sources of IR was consistently decreased from 1991 (1.75 mSv) to 2013 (0.27 mSv) (p < 0.0001). PMID:25614631

  2. Application of a generalized matrix averaging method for the calculation of the effective properties of thin multiferroic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Starkov, A. S.; Starkov, I. A.

    2014-11-15

    It is proposed to use a generalized matrix averaging (GMA) method for calculating the parameters of an effective medium with physical properties equivalent to those of a set of thin multiferroic layers. This approach obviates the need to solve a complex system of magnetoelectroelasticity equations. The required effective characteristics of a system of multiferroic layers are obtained using only operations with matrices, which significantly simplifies calculations and allows multilayer systems to be described. The proposed approach is applicable to thin-layer systems, in which the total thickness is much less than the system length, radius of curvature, and wavelengths of waves that can propagate in the system (long-wave approximation). Using the GMA method, it is also possible to obtain the effective characteristics of a periodic structure with each period comprising a number of thin multiferroic layers.

  3. SU-D-213-04: Accounting for Volume Averaging and Material Composition Effects in An Ionization Chamber Array for Patient Specific QA

    SciTech Connect

    Fugal, M; McDonald, D; Jacqmin, D; Koch, N; Ellis, A; Peng, J; Ashenafi, M; Vanek, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study explores novel methods to address two significant challenges affecting measurement of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) with IBA’s Matrixx Evolution™ ionization chamber array. First, dose calculation algorithms often struggle to accurately determine dose to the chamber array due to CT artifact and algorithm limitations. Second, finite chamber size and volume averaging effects cause additional deviation from the calculated dose. Methods: QA measurements were taken with the Matrixx positioned on the treatment table in a solid-water Multi-Cube™ phantom. To reduce the effect of CT artifact, the Matrixx CT image set was masked with appropriate materials and densities. Individual ionization chambers were masked as air, while the high-z electronic backplane and remaining solid-water material were masked as aluminum and water, respectively. Dose calculation was done using Varian’s Acuros XB™ (V11) algorithm, which is capable of predicting dose more accurately in non-biologic materials due to its consideration of each material’s atomic properties. Finally, the exported TPS dose was processed using an in-house algorithm (MATLAB) to assign the volume averaged TPS dose to each element of a corresponding 2-D matrix. This matrix was used for comparison with the measured dose. Square fields at regularly-spaced gantry angles, as well as selected patient plans were analyzed. Results: Analyzed plans showed improved agreement, with the average gamma passing rate increasing from 94 to 98%. Correction factors necessary for chamber angular dependence were reduced by 67% compared to factors measured previously, indicating that previously measured factors corrected for dose calculation errors in addition to true chamber angular dependence. Conclusion: By comparing volume averaged dose, calculated with a capable dose engine, on a phantom masked with correct materials and densities, QA results obtained with the Matrixx Evolution™ can be significantly

  4. The Effect of Cumulus Cloud Field Anisotropy on Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes and Atmospheric Heating Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkelman, Laura M.; Evans, K. Franklin; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Cumulus clouds can become tilted or elongated in the presence of wind shear. Nevertheless, most studies of the interaction of cumulus clouds and radiation have assumed these clouds to be isotropic. This paper describes an investigation of the effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain-averaged solar fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of cloud scenes from a large eddy simulation. Progressively greater degrees of x-z plane tilting and horizontal stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes was produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. The mechanisms by which anisotropy interacts with solar fluxes were investigated by comparisons to independent pixel approximation and tilted independent pixel approximation computations for the same scenes. Cumulus anisotropy was found to most strongly impact solar radiative transfer by changing the effective cloud fraction, i.e., the cloud fraction when the field is projected on a surface perpendicular to the direction of the incident solar beam.

  5. Evidence for Context Switching in the Effects of Average Item Length and Item-Length Variability on Internal Consistency.

    PubMed

    Hamby, Tyler; Ickes, William; Babcock, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of 3 item characteristics-the average number of words per item, within-scale variability in item length, and item "direction"-on internal consistency reliability and interitem correlation. In Study 1, we examined the effects of these variables on overall scale-level reliability using 444 subscales from 9 personality scales. In Study 2, we examined interitem correlation at the paired-item level using 477 nonredundant item pairs from 14 personality scales. Lower scale reliability was associated with more average words per item, greater within-scale variability in item length, and a greater percentage of reverse-keyed items. Similarly, smaller interitem correlations were associated with a greater degree of mismatch in item length between the paired items and with a mismatch (vs. match) in the items' respective "directions." The pattern of results across both studies supports our notion that lower internal consistency results from increased context switching; that is, from the confusion that occurs when respondents must switch back and forth between the interpretive frames pertaining to short versus long items, or between items pertaining to one pole of a personality dimension and its "opposite" pole. Suggestions for maximizing the internal consistency of personality scales are proposed. PMID:26959763

  6. Effects of Probiotic and Prebiotic on Average Daily Gain, Fecal Shedding of Escherichia Coli, and Immune System Status in Newborn Female Calves

    PubMed Central

    Roodposhti, Pezhman Mohamadi; Dabiri, Najafgholi

    2012-01-01

    Thirty two Holstein female calves (initial body weight = 40±3.0 kg) were used to investigate the effects of probiotic and prebiotic on average daily gain (ADG), fecal E. coli count, white blood cell count, plasma IgG1 level and cell-mediated immune response to injection of phytohemagglutinin in suckling female calves. Calves were assigned randomly to one of the four treatments, including whole milk without additives (control), whole milk containing probiotic, whole milk containing prebiotic and whole milk containing probiotic and prebiotic (synbiotic). Average daily gain was greater in calves fed probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic at weeks 6, 7 and 8 (p<0.05). E. coli count was significantly lower in calves fed probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic on d 56 (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between treatments in blood samples and cell-mediated response. This study showed that addition of probiotic, prebiotic and combination of these additives to milk enhanced ADG and reduced fecal E. coli count in preruminant calves. PMID:25049688

  7. The effect of pasture pregrazing herbage mass on methane emissions, ruminal fermentation, and average daily gain of grazing beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Boland, T M; Quinlan, C; Pierce, K M; Lynch, M B; Kenny, D A; Kelly, A K; Purcell, P J

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of pregrazing pasture herbage mass (HM) on CH4 emissions, ruminal fermentation, and ADG of grazing beef heifers at 2 stages of the grazing season. Thirty Limousin cross heifers were allocated to 1 of 2 target pregrazing HM treatments [a low HM (LHM) or high HM (HHM) treatment] for 126 d in a randomized block design experiment. Pasture herbage and heifer rumen fluid samples were collected, and enteric CH4 emissions were determined using an SF6 tracer technique during two 5-d measurement periods [MP; MP 1 (25 to 29 May) and MP 2 (6 to 10 September)]. Both DMI and GE intake (GEI) were measured during MP 2, and ADG of the heifers was measured every 14 d throughout the 126-d grazing period. Mean HM for the LHM and HHM treatments were 1,300 and 2,000 kg DM/ha, respectively, during MP 1 and 2,800 and 3,200 kg DM/ha, respectively, during MP 2. The CP concentration of the offered herbage was greater (P < 0.01) for the LHM treatment during MP 1 and tended (P < 0.1) to be greater for the LHM herbage during MP 2. No difference (P > 0.10) in the NDF concentration of the herbage was found between the HM treatments during MP 1 or 2. There was no effect (P > 0.10) of HM treatment on total CH4 emissions (g/d) for either MP [mean value across HM treatments of 121 (SED 5.4) g/d during MP 1 and 132 (8.8) g/d during MP 2], but CH4 emissions (g) per kilogram of ADG were reduced (P < 0.05) from heifers fed the LHM treatment during MP 1 and 2 [mean values for LHM and HHM of 135 and 163 (SED 9.5) g/kg, respectively, during MP 1 and corresponding values of 150 and 194 (9.9) g/kg during MP 2]. Heifers fed the LHM treatment had greater (P < 0.001) ADG throughout the grazing period [mean value across the 126-d grazing period of 0.88 (SEM 0.032) kg/d] than those fed the HHM treatment [corresponding value of 0.73 (0.034)]. For MP 2, CH4 emissions per kilogram of DMI (g CH4/kg DMI) and per megajoule of GEI (MJ CH4/MJ GEI) tended (P ≤ 0

  8. Intra-event isotope and raindrop size data of tropical rain reveal effects concealed by event averaged data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managave, S. R.; Jani, R. A.; Narayana Rao, T.; Sunilkumar, K.; Satheeshkumar, S.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-08-01

    Evaporation of rain is known to contribute water vapor, a potent greenhouse gas, to the atmosphere. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions (δ18O and, δD, respectively) of precipitation, usually measured/presented as values integrated over rain events or monthly mean values, are important tools for detecting evaporation effects. The slope ~8 of the linear relationship between such time-averaged values of δD and δ18O (called the meteoric water line) is widely accepted as a proof of condensation under isotopic equilibrium and absence of evaporation of rain during atmospheric fall. Here, through a simultaneous investigation of the isotopic and drop size distributions of seventeen rain events sampled on an intra-event scale at Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), southern India, we demonstrate that the evaporation effects, not evident in the time-averaged data, are significantly manifested in the sub-samples of individual rain events. We detect this through (1) slopes significantly less than 8 for the δD-δ18O relation on intra-event scale and (2) significant positive correlations between deuterium excess ( d-excess = δD - 8*δ18O; lower values in rain indicate evaporation) and the mass-weighted mean diameter of the raindrops ( D m ). An estimated ~44 % of rain is influenced by evaporation. This study also reveals a signature of isotopic equilibration of rain with the cloud base vapor, the processes important for modeling isotopic composition of precipitation. d-excess values of rain are modified by the post-condensation processes and the present approach offers a way to identify the d-excess values least affected by such processes. Isotope-enabled global circulation models could be improved by incorporating intra-event isotopic data and raindrop size dependent isotopic effects.

  9. Intra-event isotope and raindrop size data of tropical rain reveal effects concealed by event averaged data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managave, S. R.; Jani, R. A.; Narayana Rao, T.; Sunilkumar, K.; Satheeshkumar, S.; Ramesh, R.

    2015-11-01

    Evaporation of rain is known to contribute water vapor, a potent greenhouse gas, to the atmosphere. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions (δ18O and, δD, respectively) of precipitation, usually measured/presented as values integrated over rain events or monthly mean values, are important tools for detecting evaporation effects. The slope ~8 of the linear relationship between such time-averaged values of δD and δ18O (called the meteoric water line) is widely accepted as a proof of condensation under isotopic equilibrium and absence of evaporation of rain during atmospheric fall. Here, through a simultaneous investigation of the isotopic and drop size distributions of seventeen rain events sampled on an intra-event scale at Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), southern India, we demonstrate that the evaporation effects, not evident in the time-averaged data, are significantly manifested in the sub-samples of individual rain events. We detect this through (1) slopes significantly less than 8 for the δD-δ18O relation on intra-event scale and (2) significant positive correlations between deuterium excess (d-excess = δD - 8*δ18O; lower values in rain indicate evaporation) and the mass-weighted mean diameter of the raindrops (D m ). An estimated ~44 % of rain is influenced by evaporation. This study also reveals a signature of isotopic equilibration of rain with the cloud base vapor, the processes important for modeling isotopic composition of precipitation. d-excess values of rain are modified by the post-condensation processes and the present approach offers a way to identify the d-excess values least affected by such processes. Isotope-enabled global circulation models could be improved by incorporating intra-event isotopic data and raindrop size dependent isotopic effects.

  10. Relativistic effects on electric properties of many-electron systems in spin-averaged Douglas-Kroll and Pauli approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellö, Vladimir; Sadlej, Andrzej J.; Hess, Bernd A.

    1996-08-01

    Relativistic effects and electron correlation effects on the dipole moments of the coinage metal hydrides are investigated and compared employing one-component (scalar) relativistic approximations based on the mass-velocity and Darwin operator and, alternatively, the Douglas-Kroll-transformed spin-averaged no-pair Hamiltonian. The former of the two operators is found to perform quite accurately for CuH and AgH. For AuH the limits of the Pauli approximation seem to be reached, as can be inferred from a comparison with the values obtained within the spin-averaged Douglas-Kroll no-pair formalism. The coupled cluster calculations in the Douglas-Kroll no-pair approximation for relativistic effects establish the dipole moment values of the coinage metal hydrides as equal to 1.05 a.u. for CuH, 1.14 a.u. for AgH and 0.52 for AuH. The corresponding non-relativistic results are 1.14 a.u., 1.36 a.u., and 1.22 a.u., respectively. Some formal problems arising in applications of the Douglas-Kroll no-pair approximation are discussed. It is shown that the Hellmann-Feynman theorem leads to a rather complicated form of the first-order energy change due to external perturbation. The usual expectation value formula is, however, valid through terms proportional to 1/c4 and can be used in most applications. The invariance property with respect to a shift in the external potential is addressed for the Douglas-Kroll no-pair approximation in a finite basis set.

  11. A depth-averaged debris-flow model that includes the effects of evolving dilatancy. I. physical basis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.; George, David L.

    2014-01-01

    To simulate debris-flow behaviour from initiation to deposition, we derive a depth-averaged, two-phase model that combines concepts of critical-state soil mechanics, grain-flow mechanics and fluid mechanics. The model's balance equations describe coupled evolution of the solid volume fraction, m, basal pore-fluid pressure, flow thickness and two components of flow velocity. Basal friction is evaluated using a generalized Coulomb rule, and fluid motion is evaluated in a frame of reference that translates with the velocity of the granular phase, vs. Source terms in each of the depth-averaged balance equations account for the influence of the granular dilation rate, defined as the depth integral of ∇⋅vs. Calculation of the dilation rate involves the effects of an elastic compressibility and an inelastic dilatancy angle proportional to m−meq, where meq is the value of m in equilibrium with the ambient stress state and flow rate. Normalization of the model equations shows that predicted debris-flow behaviour depends principally on the initial value of m−meq and on the ratio of two fundamental timescales. One of these timescales governs downslope debris-flow motion, and the other governs pore-pressure relaxation that modifies Coulomb friction and regulates evolution of m. A companion paper presents a suite of model predictions and tests.

  12. Effects of volume averaging on the line spectra of vertical velocity from multiple-Doppler radar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Chen, T.; Wyngaard, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations of the ratio of the true one-dimensional spectrum of vertical velocity and that measured with multiple-Doppler radar beams are presented. It was assumed that the effects of pulse volume averaging and objective analysis routines is replacement of a point measurement with a volume integral. A u and v estimate was assumed to be feasible when orthogonal radars are not available. Also, the target fluid was configured as having an infinite vertical dimension, zero vertical velocity at the top and bottom, and having homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with a Kolmogorov energy spectrum. The ratio obtained indicated that equal resolutions among radars yields a monotonically decreasing, wavenumber-dependent response function. A gain of 0.95 was demonstrated in an experimental situation with 40 levels. Possible errors introduced when using unequal resolution radars were discussed. Finally, it was found that, for some flows, the extent of attenuation depends on the number of vertical levels resolvable by the radars.

  13. Big Fish in Little Ponds Aspire More: Mediation and Cross-Cultural Generalizability of School-Average Ability Effects on Self-Concept and Career Aspirations in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagengast, Benjamin; Marsh, Herbert W.

    2012-01-01

    Being schooled with other high-achieving peers has a detrimental influence on students' self-perceptions: School-average and class-average achievement have a negative effect on academic self-concept and career aspirations--the big-fish-little-pond effect. Individual achievement, on the other hand, predicts academic self-concept and career…

  14. Non-adiabatic effects within a single thermally averaged potential energy surface: thermal expansion and reaction rates of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Alonso, J L; Castro, A; Clemente-Gallardo, J; Echenique, P; Mazo, J J; Polo, V; Rubio, A; Zueco, D

    2012-12-14

    At non-zero temperature and when a system has low-lying excited electronic states, the ground-state Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down and the low-lying electronic states are involved in any chemical process. In this work, we use a temperature-dependent effective potential for the nuclei which can accommodate the influence of an arbitrary number of electronic states in a simple way, while at the same time producing the correct Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for the electronic part. With the help of this effective potential, we show that thermally activated low-lying electronic states can have a significant effect in molecular properties for which electronic excitations are oftentimes ignored. We study the thermal expansion of the Manganese dimer, Mn(2), where we find that the average bond length experiences a change larger than the present experimental accuracy upon the inclusion of the excited states into the picture. We also show that, when these states are taken into account, reaction-rate constants are modified. In particular, we study the opening of the ozone molecule, O(3), and show that in this case the rate is modified as much as a 20% with respect to the ground-state Born-Oppenheimer prediction. PMID:23249070

  15. Inhaled antimicrobial therapy - barriers to effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Weers, Jeffry

    2015-05-01

    Inhaled antibiotics dramatically improve targeting of drug to the site of respiratory infections, while simultaneously minimizing systemic exposure and associated toxicity. The high local concentrations of antibiotic may enable more effective treatment of multi-drug resistant pathogens. This review explores barriers to effective treatment with inhaled antibiotics. In addition, potential opportunities for improvements in treatment are reviewed. PMID:25193067

  16. Effectiveness of postfire erosion control treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To mitigate potential postfire erosion and flooding, various erosion control treatments are applied on highly erodible areas with downstream resources in need of protection. Recent efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of postfire erosion mitigation treatments have used natural rainfall experiments...

  17. Effect of spectral time-lag correlation coefficient and signal averaging on airborne CO2 DIAL measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Avishai; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Gotoff, Steven W.; D'Amico, Francis M.

    1997-10-01

    The effects of flight geometry, signal averaging and time- lag correlation coefficient on airborne CO2 dial lidar measurements are shown in simulations and field measurements. These factors have implications for multi- vapor measurements and also for measuring a shingle vapor with a wide absorption spectra for which one would like to make DIAL measurements at many wavelengths across the absorption spectra of the gas. Thus it is of interest to know how many wavelengths and how many groups of wavelengths can be used effectively in DIAL measurements. Our data indicate that for our lidar about 80 wavelengths can be used for DIAL measurements of a stationary vapor. The lidar signal is composed of fluctuations with three time scales: a very short time scale due to system noise which is faster than the data acquisition sampling rate of the receiver, a medium time scale due to atmospheric turbulence, and a long time scale due to slow atmospheric transmission drift from aerosol in homogeneities. The decorrelation time scale of fluctuations for airborne lidar measurements depends on the flight geometry.

  18. How robust are the estimated effects of air pollution on health? Accounting for model uncertainty using Bayesian model averaging.

    PubMed

    Pannullo, Francesca; Lee, Duncan; Waclawski, Eugene; Leyland, Alastair H

    2016-08-01

    The long-term impact of air pollution on human health can be estimated from small-area ecological studies in which the health outcome is regressed against air pollution concentrations and other covariates, such as socio-economic deprivation. Socio-economic deprivation is multi-factorial and difficult to measure, and includes aspects of income, education, and housing as well as others. However, these variables are potentially highly correlated, meaning one can either create an overall deprivation index, or use the individual characteristics, which can result in a variety of pollution-health effects. Other aspects of model choice may affect the pollution-health estimate, such as the estimation of pollution, and spatial autocorrelation model. Therefore, we propose a Bayesian model averaging approach to combine the results from multiple statistical models to produce a more robust representation of the overall pollution-health effect. We investigate the relationship between nitrogen dioxide concentrations and cardio-respiratory mortality in West Central Scotland between 2006 and 2012. PMID:27494960

  19. The effect of stress and incentive magnetic field on the average volume of magnetic Barkhausen jump in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Di; Guo, Lei; Yin, Liang; Chen, Zhaoyang; Chen, Juan; Qi, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The average volume of magnetic Barkhausen jump (AVMBJ) v bar generated by magnetic domain wall irreversible displacement under the effect of the incentive magnetic field H for ferromagnetic materials and the relationship between irreversible magnetic susceptibility χirr and stress σ are adopted in this paper to study the theoretical relationship among AVMBJ v bar(magneto-elasticity noise) and the incentive magnetic field H. Then the numerical relationship among AVMBJ v bar, stress σ and the incentive magnetic field H is deduced. Utilizing this numerical relationship, the displacement process of magnetic domain wall for single crystal is analyzed and the effect of the incentive magnetic field H and the stress σ on the AVMBJ v bar (magneto-elasticity noise) is explained from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The saturation velocity of Barkhausen jump characteristic value curve is different when tensile or compressive stress is applied on ferromagnetic materials, because the resistance of magnetic domain wall displacement is different. The idea of critical magnetic field in the process of magnetic domain wall displacement is introduced in this paper, which solves the supersaturated calibration problem of AVMBJ - σ calibration curve.

  20. Directed-inquiry approach to learning science process skills: treatment effects and aptitude-treatment interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germann, Paul J.

    The directed-inquiry approach to learning science process skills and scientific problem solving [DIAL(SPS)2] was developed to help high-school students gain the critical thinking skills required to solve problems in the biology lab. This curriculum integrated several learning strategies into a single approach: advance organizers, the learning cycle, concept maps, Vee diagrams, a focusing strategy, and writing. Two general questions were addressed. First, was the DIAL(SPS)2 treatment more effective than a conventional treatment? Second, was there evidence of an aptitude-treatment interaction? Four high-school biology classes taught by this investigator were used to test the DIAL(SPS)2 curriculum. Scheduling of students involved ability grouping. To test the curriculum in the most rigorous way, the experimental group consisted of average ability students and the comparison group consisted of above-average students. Both the groups were pretested in August and posttested in May. In the intervening time, the experimental group received the DIAL(SPS)2 treatment while the comparison group received a more traditional approach. Analysis of covariance revealed that the DIAL(SPS)2 curriculum had no significant effect on the learning of science process skills or on cognitive development. Aptitude-treatment interaction analyses revealed an interaction of DIAL(SPS)2 treatment and cognitive development.

  1. On the Berdichevsky average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rung-Arunwan, Tawat; Siripunvaraporn, Weerachai; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-04-01

    Through a large number of magnetotelluric (MT) observations conducted in a study area, one can obtain regional one-dimensional (1-D) features of the subsurface electrical conductivity structure simply by taking the geometric average of determinant invariants of observed impedances. This method was proposed by Berdichevsky and coworkers, which is based on the expectation that distortion effects due to near-surface electrical heterogeneities will be statistically smoothed out. A good estimation of a regional mean 1-D model is useful, especially in recent years, to be used as a priori (or a starting) model in 3-D inversion. However, the original theory was derived before the establishment of the present knowledge on galvanic distortion. This paper, therefore, reexamines the meaning of the Berdichevsky average by using the conventional formulation of galvanic distortion. A simple derivation shows that the determinant invariant of distorted impedance and its Berdichevsky average is always downward biased by the distortion parameters of shear and splitting. This means that the regional mean 1-D model obtained from the Berdichevsky average tends to be more conductive. As an alternative rotational invariant, the sum of the squared elements (ssq) invariant is found to be less affected by bias from distortion parameters; thus, we conclude that its geometric average would be more suitable for estimating the regional structure. We find that the combination of determinant and ssq invariants provides parameters useful in dealing with a set of distorted MT impedances.

  2. Averaging the inhomogeneous universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem

    2012-03-01

    A basic assumption of modern cosmology is that the universe is homogeneous and isotropic on the largest observable scales. This greatly simplifies Einstein's general relativistic field equations applied at these large scales, and allows a straightforward comparison between theoretical models and observed data. However, Einstein's equations should ideally be imposed at length scales comparable to, say, the solar system, since this is where these equations have been tested. We know that at these scales the universe is highly inhomogeneous. It is therefore essential to perform an explicit averaging of the field equations in order to apply them at large scales. It has long been known that due to the nonlinear nature of Einstein's equations, any explicit averaging scheme will necessarily lead to corrections in the equations applied at large scales. Estimating the magnitude and behavior of these corrections is a challenging task, due to difficulties associated with defining averages in the context of general relativity (GR). It has recently become possible to estimate these effects in a rigorous manner, and we will review some of the averaging schemes that have been proposed in the literature. A tantalizing possibility explored by several authors is that the corrections due to averaging may in fact account for the apparent acceleration of the expansion of the universe. We will explore this idea, reviewing some of the work done in the literature to date. We will argue however, that this rather attractive idea is in fact not viable as a solution of the dark energy problem, when confronted with observational constraints.

  3. The Chicken Soup Effect: The Role of Recreation and Intramural Participation in Boosting Freshman Grade Point Average

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbison, Godfrey A.; Henry, Tracyann L.; Perkins-Brown, Jayne

    2011-01-01

    Freshman grade point average, in particular first semester grade point average, is an important predictor of survival and eventual student success in college. As many institutions of higher learning are searching for ways to improve student success, one would hope that policies geared towards the success of freshmen have long term benefits…

  4. Effect of fringe-artifact correction on sub-tomogram averaging from Zernike phase-plate cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Kishchenko, Gregory P; Danev, Radostin; Fisher, Rebecca; He, Jie; Hsieh, Chyongere; Marko, Michael; Sui, Haixin

    2015-09-01

    Zernike phase-plate (ZPP) imaging greatly increases contrast in cryo-electron microscopy, however fringe artifacts appear in the images. A computational de-fringing method has been proposed, but it has not been widely employed, perhaps because the importance of de-fringing has not been clearly demonstrated. For testing purposes, we employed Zernike phase-plate imaging in a cryo-electron tomographic study of radial-spoke complexes attached to microtubule doublets. We found that the contrast enhancement by ZPP imaging made nonlinear denoising insensitive to the filtering parameters, such that simple low-frequency band-pass filtering made the same improvement in map quality. We employed sub-tomogram averaging, which compensates for the effect of the "missing wedge" and considerably improves map quality. We found that fringes (caused by the abrupt cut-on of the central hole in the phase plate) can lead to incorrect representation of a structure that is well-known from the literature. The expected structure was restored by amplitude scaling, as proposed in the literature. Our results show that de-fringing is an important part of image-processing for cryo-electron tomography of macromolecular complexes with ZPP imaging. PMID:26210582

  5. On the wavelength dependence of the effects of turbulence on average refraction angles in occultations by planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugstad, B. S.; Eshleman, V. R.

    1979-01-01

    The dependence of the effects of planetary atmospheric turbulence on radio or optical wavelength in occultation experiments is discussed, and the analysis of Hubbard and Jokipii (1977) is criticized. It is argued that in deriving a necessary condition for the applicability of their method, Hubbard and Jokipii neglect a factor proportional to the square of the ratio of atmospheric or local Fresnel zone radius and the inner scale of turbulence, and fail to establish sufficient conditions, thereby omitting the square of the ratio of atmospheric scale height and the local Fresnel zone radius. The total discrepancy is said to mean that the results correspond to geometrical optics instead of wave optics, as claimed, thus being inapplicable in a dicussion of wavelength dependence. Calculations based on geometrical optics show that the bias in the average bending angle depends on the wavelength in the same way as does the bias in phase path caused by turbulence in a homogeneous atmosphere. Hubbard and Jokipii comment that the criterion of Haugstad and Eshleman is incorrect and show that there is a large wave optical domain where the results are independent of wavelength.

  6. The effect of New Neonatal Porcine Diarrhoea Syndrome (NNPDS) on average daily gain and mortality in 4 Danish pig herds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The study evaluated the effect of New Neonatal Porcine Diarrhoea Syndrome (NNPDS) on average daily gain (ADG) and mortality and described the clinical manifestations in four herds suffering from the syndrome. NNPDS is a diarrhoeic syndrome affecting piglets within the first week of life, which is not caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) type A/C, Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), rotavirus A, coronavirus, Cystoisospora suis, Strongyloides ransomi, Giardia spp or Cryptosporidium spp. Results Piglets were estimated to have a negative ADG of 9 and 14 g when diarrhoeic for 1 day and >1 day respectively. However, if only diarrhoeic on the day of birth, no negative effect on ADG was seen. Piglets originating from severely affected litters were estimated to have a reduced ADG of 38 g. The study did not show an overall effect of diarrhoea on mortality, but herd of origin, sow parity, birth weight, and gender were significantly associated with mortality. In one of the herds, approximately 25% of the diarrhoeic piglets vs. 6% of the non-diarrhoeic piglets died, and 74% of necropsied piglets were diagnosed with enteritis. These findings indicate that the high mortality seen in this herd was due to diarrhoea. Conclusions NNPDS negatively affected ADG in piglets, and even piglets that were diarrhoeic for one day only experienced a reduction in ADG. However, the study showed that diarrhoea restricted to the day of birth did not affect ADG and suggested this phenomenon to be unrelated to the syndrome. Since the diarrhoeal status of the litter had important effects on ADG, future research on NNPDS probably ought to focus on piglets from severely affected litters. The study showed important dissimilarities in the course of diarrhoea between the herds, and one herd was considerably more affected than the others. Within this herd, NNPDS seemed to be associated with a higher mortality, whereas in general the

  7. An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rafa, S. Molins; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Shen, C.

    2012-02-01

    The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. Here, the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media is investigated by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is comprised of high performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high resolution model is used to demonstrate that non-uniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. The effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

  8. Effective psychiatric day treatment: historical lessons.

    PubMed

    Rosie, J S; Azim, H F; Piper, W E; Joyce, A S

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a successful day treatment program that provides four months of intensive psychodynamic group-oriented milieu treatment for patients with long-standing personality disorders, who commonly experience recurrent major depression, dysthymia, and excessive anxiety. The authors outline three factors that have contributed to the success of the program--optimal treatment-patientmatching, judicious use of authority in milieu therapy, and careful attention to maintaining close working relationships with referral sources. They provide an overview of the historical evolution of day treatment programs from earlier day hospital model to show day programs' neglect of these factors may have led to treatment failures. Such failures may have spurred recent suggestions that psychiatric day treatment programs should be replaced entirely by assertive community treatment. The authors argue that such a move could amount to abdication of psychiatry's responsibility to provide intensive milieu treatment that can be effectively offered only on a day treatment basis. PMID:8829782

  9. Deleterious effects in mice of fish-associated methylmercury contained in a diet mimicking the Western populations' average fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Fujimura, Masatake; Laclau, Muriel; Sawada, Masumi; Yasutake, Akira

    2011-02-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin, and human beings are mainly exposed to this pollutant through fish consumption. Only a few contradictory epidemiological studies are currently available examining the impact of fish consumption on human populations. In the present study, we wanted to address whether a diet mimicking the fish consumption of Western populations could result in observable adverse effects in mice, and whether beneficial nutriments from fish were able to counterbalance the deleterious effects of MeHg, if any. In Europe and the United States, fish consumption varies widely between countries, from 11 to 100 g fish/day. A mid-range value of 25 g fish/day corresponds to a fish contribution to the total diet of 1.25% on a dry weight basis. We decided to supplement a vegetarian-based mouse diet with 1.25% of lyophilized salmon flesh (SAL diet), or 1.25% of a blend of lyophilized cod, tuna, and swordfish (CTS diet). Total mercury contents were 1.15±0.15, 2.3±0.1 and 35.75±0.15 ng Hg/g of food pellets for the control, SAL and CTS diets, respectively. After two months feeding, the CTS diet resulted in significant observable effects as compared to the control and SAL diets, encompassing decreased body growth, altered behavioral performance and increased anxiety level, modification of mitochondrial respiratory protein subunit concentrations in kidney and brain structures, modified gene expression patterns in kidneys, liver and muscles, and a decrease of dopamine concentrations in the hypothalamus and striatum. Our findings have health implications, firstly because 1.25% of CTS flesh in the diet corresponds to an average exposure to MeHg below the WHO provisory tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) (1.6 μg MeHg/kg of body weight/week), and secondly because many people in Western populations, among them women of child-bearing age, are exceeding the PTWI value (for instance, 35% of the French population inhabiting the Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts). PMID

  10. Reconsidering Findings of "No Effects" in Randomized Control Trials: Modeling Differences in Treatment Impacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Bradford

    2016-01-01

    The primary technique that many researchers use to analyze data from randomized control trials (RCTs)--detecting the average treatment effect (ATE)--imposes assumptions upon the data that often are not correct. Both theory and past research suggest that treatments may have significant impacts on subgroups even when showing no overall effect.…

  11. The Effect of Sensory Integration Treatment on Children with Multiple Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Din, Feng S.; Lodato, Donna M.

    Six children with multiple disabilities (ages 5 to 8) participated in this evaluation of the effect of sensory integration treatment on sensorimotor function and academic learning. The children had cognitive abilities ranging from sub-average to significantly sub-average, three were non-ambulatory, one had severe behavioral problems, and each…

  12. Effect of scale-up on average shear rates for aerated non-Newtonian liquids in external loop airlift reactors.

    PubMed

    Al-Masry

    1999-02-01

    Average shear rates have been estimated experimentally in a 700-dm3 external loop airlift reactor. Aqueous pseudoplastic carboxymethylcellulose and xanthan gum solutions were used to simulate non-Newtonian behavior of biological media. Average shear rates of non-Newtonian solutions were found by analogy with Newtonian glycerol solutions using downcomer liquid velocity as the measurable parameter. Due to the complexity of local shear rate measurement, an average shear rate was assumed to exist and is proportional to superficial gas velocity. The data from this work and those in the literature were used in producing a new correlation for estimating average shear rates as a function of superficial gas velocity, geometry, and dispersion height. Wall shear rates were found to be significant. The ratio of wall shear rates to bulk shear rates were varied from 5% to 40%. Furthermore, it has been found that shear rates generated in airlift loop reactors are lower than those generated in bubble columns. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10099557

  13. EFFECTS OF THERMAL TREATMENT OF SLUDGE ON MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT COSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data for estimating average construction costs and operation and maintenance requirements are presented for thermal treatment of municipal wastewater sludges; for handling, treatment, and disposal of the strong liquor generated; and for controlling odors produced. Size ranges cov...

  14. Cost-Effective Fuel Treatment Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitler, J.; Thompson, M.; Vaillant, N.

    2014-12-01

    The cost of fighting large wildland fires in the western United States has grown dramatically over the past decade. This trend will likely continue with growth of the WUI into fire prone ecosystems, dangerous fuel conditions from decades of fire suppression, and a potentially increasing effect from prolonged drought and climate change. Fuel treatments are often considered the primary pre-fire mechanism to reduce the exposure of values at risk to wildland fire, and a growing suite of fire models and tools are employed to prioritize where treatments could mitigate wildland fire damages. Assessments using the likelihood and consequence of fire are critical because funds are insufficient to reduce risk on all lands needing treatment, therefore prioritization is required to maximize the effectiveness of fuel treatment budgets. Cost-effectiveness, doing the most good per dollar, would seem to be an important fuel treatment metric, yet studies or plans that prioritize fuel treatments using costs or cost-effectiveness measures are absent from the literature. Therefore, to explore the effect of using costs in fuel treatment planning we test four prioritization algorithms designed to reduce risk in a case study examining fuel treatments on the Sisters Ranger District of central Oregon. For benefits we model sediment retention and standing biomass, and measure the effectiveness of each algorithm by comparing the differences among treatment and no treat alternative scenarios. Our objective is to maximize the averted loss of net benefits subject to a representative fuel treatment budget. We model costs across the study landscape using the My Fuel Treatment Planner software, tree list data, local mill prices, and GIS-measured site characteristics. We use fire simulations to generate burn probabilities, and estimate fire intensity as conditional flame length at each pixel. Two prioritization algorithms target treatments based on cost-effectiveness and show improvements over those

  15. Americans' Average Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2000-08-11

    We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

  16. Comparison of wing-span averaging effects on lift, rolling moment, and bending moment for two span load distributions and for two turbulence representations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical method of computing the averaging effect of wing-span size on the loading of a wing induced by random turbulence was adapted for use on a digital electronic computer. The turbulence input was assumed to have a Dryden power spectral density. The computations were made for lift, rolling moment, and bending moment for two span load distributions, rectangular and elliptic. Data are presented to show the wing-span averaging effect for wing-span ratios encompassing current airplane sizes. The rectangular wing-span loading showed a slightly greater averaging effect than did the elliptic loading. In the frequency range most bothersome to airplane passengers, the wing-span averaging effect can reduce the normal lift load, and thus the acceleration, by about 7 percent for a typical medium-sized transport. Some calculations were made to evaluate the effect of using a Von Karman turbulence representation. These results showed that using the Von Karman representation generally resulted in a span averaging effect about 3 percent larger.

  17. Impact of Treatment Integrity on Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryling, Mitch J.; Wallace, Michele D.; Yassine, Jordan N.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity has cogent implications for intervention effectiveness. Understanding these implications is an important, but often neglected, undertaking in behavior analysis. This paper reviews current research on treatment integrity in applied behavior analysis. Specifically, we review research evaluating the relation between integrity…

  18. Generalization and Maintenance of Classroom Treatment Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Hill M.; And Others

    Reported were two experiments which investigated, respectively, the maintenance of appropriate classroom behavior in children with behavior problems following treatment in an experimental classroom and cross situational consistency and generalization of treatment effects. In the first experiment followup performances of two groups of five subjects…

  19. Three Essays on Estimating Causal Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutsch, Jonah

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is composed of three distinct chapters, each of which addresses issues of estimating treatment effects. The first chapter empirically tests the Value-Added (VA) model using school lotteries. The second chapter, co-authored with Michael Wood, considers properties of inverse probability weighting (IPW) in simple treatment effect…

  20. Analysis of aperture averaging measurements. [laser scintillation data on the effect of atmospheric turbulence on signal fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Laser scintillation data obtained by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center balloon flight no. 5 from White Sands Missile Range on 19 October 1973 are analyzed. The measurement data, taken with various size receiver apertures, were related to predictions of aperture averaging theory, and it is concluded that the data are in reasonable agreement with theory. The following parameters are assigned to the vertical distribution of the strength of turbulence during the period of the measurements (daytime), for lambda = 0.633 microns, and the source at the zenith; the aperture averaging length is d sub o = 0.125 m, and the log-amplitude variance is (beta sub l)2 = 0.084 square nepers. This corresponds to a normalized point intensity variance of 0.40.

  1. Effects of Long-Term Averaging of Quantitative Blood Pressure Traits on the Detection of Genetic Associations

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Santhi K.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Larson, Martin G.; Guo, Xiuqing; Verwoert, Germain; Bis, Joshua C.; Gu, Xiangjun; Smith, Albert V.; Yang, Min-Lee; Zhang, Yan; Ehret, Georg; Rose, Lynda M.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Papanicolau, George J.; Sijbrands, Eric J.; Rice, Kenneth; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Pihur, Vasyl; Ridker, Paul M.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Johnson, Toby; Gateva, Vesela; Tobin, Martin D.; Bochud, Murielle; Coin, Lachlan; Najjar, Samer S.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon C.; Eyheramendy, Susana; Papadakis, Konstantinos; Voight, Benjamin F.; Scott, Laura J.; Zhang, Feng; Farrall, Martin; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wallace, Chris; Chambers, John C.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Nilsson, Peter; van der Harst, Pim; Polidoro, Silvia; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Bots, Michiel L.; Wain, Louise V.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Teumer, Alexander; Luan, Jian’an; Lucas, Gavin; Kuusisto, Johanna; Burton, Paul R.; Hadley, David; McArdle, Wendy L.; Brown, Morris; Dominiczak, Anna; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Webster, John; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bergmann, Sven; Lim, Noha; Song, Kijoung; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Yuan, Xin; Groop, Leif; Orho-Melander, Marju; Allione, Alessandra; Di Gregorio, Alessandra; Guarrera, Simonetta; Panico, Salvatore; Ricceri, Fulvio; Romanazzi, Valeria; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Vineis, Paolo; Barroso, Inês; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Luben, Robert N.; Crawford, Gabriel J.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Perola, Markus; Boehnke, Michael; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Collins, Francis S.; Jackson, Anne U.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Stringham, Heather M.; Valle, Timo T.; Willer, Cristen J.; Bergman, Richard N.; Morken, Mario A.; Döring, Angela; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Org, Elin; Pfeufer, Arne; Wichmann, H. Erich; Kathiresan, Sekar; Marrugat, Jaume; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Subirana, Isaac; Freimer, Nelson B.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; McCarthy, Mark I.; O’Reilly, Paul F.; Peltonen, Leena; Pouta, Anneli; de Jong, Paul E.; Snieder, Harold; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Clarke, Robert; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tognoni, Giovanni; Lakatta, Edward G.; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Scuteri, Angelo; Dörr, Marcus; Ernst, Florian; Felix, Stephan B.; Homuth, Georg; Lorbeer, Roberto; Reffelmann, Thorsten; Rettig, Rainer; Völker, Uwe; Galan, Pilar; Gut, Ivo G.; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, G. Mark; Zeleneka, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Soranzo, Nicole; Williams, Frances M.; Zhai, Guangju; Salomaa, Veikko; Laakso, Markku; Elosua, Roberto; Forouhi, Nita G.; Völzke, Henry; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Numans, Mattijs E.; Matullo, Giuseppe; Navis, Gerjan; Berglund, Göran; Bingham, Sheila A.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Connell, John M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi; Watkins, Hugh; Spector, Tim D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Altshuler, David; Strachan, David P.; Laan, Maris; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Uda, Manuela; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Melander, Olle; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Elliott, Paul; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Caulfield, Mark; Munroe, Patricia B.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Amin, Najaf; Rotter, Jerome I.; Liu, Kiang; Launer, Lenore J.; Xu, Ming; Caulfield, Mark; Morrison, Alanna C.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Dehghan, Abbas; Li, Guo; Bouchard, Claude; Harris, Tamara B.; Zhang, He; Boerwinkle, Eric; Siscovick, David S.; Gao, Wei; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Willer, Cristen J.; Franco, Oscar H.; Huo, Yong; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Palmas, Walter; van Duijn, Cornelia; Fornage, Myriam; Levy, Daniel; Psaty, Bruce M.; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable, quantitative trait with intraindividual variability and susceptibility to measurement error. Genetic studies of BP generally use single-visit measurements and thus cannot remove variability occurring over months or years. We leveraged the idea that averaging BP measured across time would improve phenotypic accuracy and thereby increase statistical power to detect genetic associations. We studied systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP) averaged over multiple years in 46,629 individuals of European ancestry. We identified 39 trait-variant associations across 19 independent loci (p < 5 × 10−8); five associations (in four loci) uniquely identified by our LTA analyses included those of SBP and MAP at 2p23 (rs1275988, near KCNK3), DBP at 2q11.2 (rs7599598, in FER1L5), and PP at 6p21 (rs10948071, near CRIP3) and 7p13 (rs2949837, near IGFBP3). Replication analyses conducted in cohorts with single-visit BP data showed positive replication of associations and a nominal association (p < 0.05). We estimated a 20% gain in statistical power with long-term average (LTA) as compared to single-visit BP association studies. Using LTA analysis, we identified genetic loci influencing BP. LTA might be one way of increasing the power of genetic associations for continuous traits in extant samples for other phenotypes that are measured serially over time. PMID:24975945

  2. Nonlinear effects of team tenure on team psychological safety climate and climate strength: Implications for average team member performance.

    PubMed

    Koopmann, Jaclyn; Lanaj, Klodiana; Wang, Mo; Zhou, Le; Shi, Junqi

    2016-07-01

    The teams literature suggests that team tenure improves team psychological safety climate and climate strength in a linear fashion, but the empirical findings to date have been mixed. Alternatively, theories of group formation suggest that new and longer tenured teams experience greater team psychological safety climate than moderately tenured teams. Adopting this second perspective, we used a sample of 115 research and development teams and found that team tenure had a curvilinear relationship with team psychological safety climate and climate strength. Supporting group formation theories, team psychological safety climate and climate strength were higher in new and longer tenured teams compared with moderately tenured teams. Moreover, we found a curvilinear relationship between team tenure and average team member creative performance as partially mediated by team psychological safety climate. Team psychological safety climate improved average team member task performance only when team psychological safety climate was strong. Likewise, team tenure influenced average team member task performance in a curvilinear manner via team psychological safety climate only when team psychological safety climate was strong. We discuss theoretical and practical implications and offer several directions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26949818

  3. Coping with Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... coping with the most common cosmetic side effects. Hair Loss Hair thinning or hair loss is often one of the first real ... chemotherapy or radiation treatment. Although some kids take hair loss in stride, others find it very traumatic. ...

  4. Effects of exercise interventions during different treatments in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fairman, Ciaran M; Focht, Brian C; Lucas, Alexander R; Lustberg, Maryam B

    2016-05-01

    Previous findings suggest that exercise is a safe and efficacious means of improving physiological and psychosocial outcomes in female breast cancer survivors. To date, most research has focused on post-treatment interventions. However, given that the type and severity of treatment-related adverse effects may be dependent on the type of treatment, and that the effects are substantially more pronounced during treatment, an assessment of the safety and efficacy of exercise during treatment is warranted. In this review, we present and evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted during breast cancer treatment. We conducted literature searches to identify studies examining exercise interventions in breast cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy or radiation. Data were extracted on physiological and psychosocial outcomes. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for each outcome. A total of 17 studies involving 1,175 participants undergoing active cancer therapy met the inclusion criteria. Findings revealed that, on average, exercise interventions resulted in moderate to large improvements in muscular strength: resistance exercise (RE, = 0.86), aerobic exercise (AE, = 0.55), small to moderate improvements in cardiovascular functioning (RE, = 0.45; AE, = 0.17, combination exercise (COMB, = 0.31) and quality of life (QoL; RE, = 0.30; AE, = 0.50; COMB, = 0.63). The results of this review suggest that exercise is a safe, feasible, and efficacious intervention in breast cancer patients who are undergoing different types of treatment. Additional research addressing the different modes of exercise during each type of treatment is warranted to assess the comparable efficacy of the various exercise modes during established breast cancer treatments. PMID:27258052

  5. Averaging Models: Parameters Estimation with the R-Average Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidotto, G.; Massidda, D.; Noventa, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Functional Measurement approach, proposed within the theoretical framework of Information Integration Theory (Anderson, 1981, 1982), can be a useful multi-attribute analysis tool. Compared to the majority of statistical models, the averaging model can account for interaction effects without adding complexity. The R-Average method (Vidotto &…

  6. Pharmacological Treatment Effects on Eye Movement Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, James L.; Lencer, Rebekka; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Keedy, Sarah; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing use of eye movement paradigms to assess the functional integrity of brain systems involved in sensorimotor and cognitive processing in clinical disorders requires greater attention to effects of pharmacological treatments on these systems. This is needed to better differentiate disease and medication effects in clinical samples, to…

  7. Negative Effects from Psychological Treatments: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The author offers a 40-year perspective on the observation and study of negative effects from psychotherapy or psychological treatments. This perspective is placed in the context of the enormous progress in refining methodologies for psychotherapy research over that period of time, resulting in the clear demonstration of positive effects from…

  8. Virtual Averaging Making Nonframe-Averaged Optical Coherence Tomography Images Comparable to Frame-Averaged Images

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Developing a novel image enhancement method so that nonframe-averaged optical coherence tomography (OCT) images become comparable to active eye-tracking frame-averaged OCT images. Methods Twenty-one eyes of 21 healthy volunteers were scanned with noneye-tracking nonframe-averaged OCT device and active eye-tracking frame-averaged OCT device. Virtual averaging was applied to nonframe-averaged images with voxel resampling and adding amplitude deviation with 15-time repetitions. Signal-to-noise (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR), and the distance between the end of visible nasal retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and the foveola were assessed to evaluate the image enhancement effect and retinal layer visibility. Retinal thicknesses before and after processing were also measured. Results All virtual-averaged nonframe-averaged images showed notable improvement and clear resemblance to active eye-tracking frame-averaged images. Signal-to-noise and CNR were significantly improved (SNR: 30.5 vs. 47.6 dB, CNR: 4.4 vs. 6.4 dB, original versus processed, P < 0.0001, paired t-test). The distance between the end of visible nasal RNFL and the foveola was significantly different before (681.4 vs. 446.5 μm, Cirrus versus Spectralis, P < 0.0001) but not after processing (442.9 vs. 446.5 μm, P = 0.76). Sectoral macular total retinal and circumpapillary RNFL thicknesses showed systematic differences between Cirrus and Spectralis that became not significant after processing. Conclusion The virtual averaging method successfully improved nontracking nonframe-averaged OCT image quality and made the images comparable to active eye-tracking frame-averaged OCT images. Translational Relevance Virtual averaging may enable detailed retinal structure studies on images acquired using a mixture of nonframe-averaged and frame-averaged OCT devices without concerning about systematic differences in both qualitative and quantitative aspects. PMID:26835180

  9. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  11. Is the Above-Average Effect Measurable at All? The Validity of the Self-Reported Happiness Minus Others' Perceived Happiness Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vautier, Stephane; Bonnefon, Jean-Francois

    2008-01-01

    Individuals routinely rate themselves higher than their peers on a number of attributes and capabilities, including their satisfaction with life. However, the construct validity of this above-average effect requires specific psychometric properties of ratings of one's contentment and ratings of others' perceived contentment. This article tests…

  12. The effects of reward magnitude on reward processing: An averaged and single trial event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Caroline C; Gable, Philip A; Lohse, Keith R; Miller, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    From a neurobiological and motivational perspective, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and reward positivity (RewP) event-related potential (ERP) components should increase with reward magnitude (reward associated with valence (success/failure) feedback). To test this hypothesis, we recorded participants' electroencephalograms while presenting them with potential monetary rewards ($0.00-$4.96) pre-trial for each trial of a reaction time task and presenting them with valence feedback post-trial. Averaged ERPs time-locked to valence feedback were extracted, and results revealed a valence by magnitude interaction for neural activity in the FRN/RewP time window. This interaction was driven by magnitude affecting RewP, but not FRN, amplitude. Moreover, single trial ERP analyses revealed a reliable correlation between magnitude and RewP, but not FRN, amplitude. Finally, P3b and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes were affected by magnitude. Results partly support the neurobiological (dopamine) account of the FRN/RewP and suggest motivation affects feedback processing, as indicated by multiple ERP components. PMID:27288743

  13. Musical hallucinations: review of treatment effects

    PubMed Central

    Coebergh, Jan A. F.; Lauw, R. F.; Bots, R.; Sommer, I. E. C.; Blom, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite an increased scientific interest in musical hallucinations over the past 25 years, treatment protocols are still lacking. This may well be due to the fact that musical hallucinations have multiple causes, and that published cases are relatively rare. Objective: To review the effects of published treatment methods for musical hallucinations. Methods: A literature search yielded 175 articles discussing a total number of 516 cases, of which 147 articles discussed treatment in 276 individuals. We analyzed the treatment results in relation to the etiological factor considered responsible for the mediation of the musical hallucinations, i.e., idiopathic/hypoacusis, psychiatric disorder, brain lesion, and other pathology, epilepsy or intoxication/pharmacology. Results: Musical hallucinations can disappear without intervention. When hallucinations are bearable, patients can be reassured without any other treatment. However, in other patients musical hallucinations are so disturbing that treatment is indicated. Distinct etiological groups appear to respond differently to treatment. In the hypoacusis group, treating the hearing impairment can yield significant improvement and coping strategies (e.g., more acoustic stimulation) are frequently helpful. Pharmacological treatment methods can also be successful, with antidepressants being possibly more helpful than antiepileptics (which are still better than antipsychotics). The limited use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors has looked promising. Musical hallucinations occurring as part of a psychiatric disorder tend to respond well to psychopharmacological treatments targeting the underlying disorder. Musical hallucinations experienced in the context of brain injuries and epilepsy tend to respond well to antiepileptics, but their natural course is often benign, irrespective of any pharmacological treatment. When intoxication/pharmacology is the main etiological factor, it is important to stop or switch the

  14. SU-C-304-01: Investigation of Various Detector Response Functions and Their Geometry Dependence in a Novel Method to Address Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B; Lebron, S; Li, J; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, C; Yan, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel convolution-based approach has been proposed to address ion chamber (IC) volume averaging effect (VAE) for the commissioning of commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). We investigate the use of various convolution kernels and its impact on the accuracy of beam models. Methods: Our approach simulates the VAE by iteratively convolving the calculated beam profiles with a detector response function (DRF) while optimizing the beam model. At convergence, the convolved profiles match the measured profiles, indicating the calculated profiles match the “true” beam profiles. To validate the approach, beam profiles of an Elekta LINAC were repeatedly collected with ICs of various volumes (CC04, CC13 and SNC 125) to obtain clinically acceptable beam models. The TPS-calculated profiles were convolved externally with the DRF of respective IC. The beam model parameters were reoptimized using Nelder-Mead method by forcing the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. We evaluated three types of DRFs (Gaussian, Lorentzian, and parabolic) and the impact of kernel dependence on field geometry (depth and field size). The profiles calculated with beam models were compared with SNC EDGE diode-measured profiles. Results: The method was successfully implemented with Pinnacle Scripting and Matlab. The reoptimization converged in ∼10 minutes. For all tested ICs and DRFs, penumbra widths of the TPS-calculated profiles and diode-measured profiles were within 1.0 mm. Gaussian function had the best performance with mean penumbra width difference within 0.5 mm. The use of geometry dependent DRFs showed marginal improvement, reducing the penumbra width differences to less than 0.3 mm. Significant increase in IMRT QA passing rates was achieved with the optimized beam model. Conclusion: The proposed approach significantly improved the accuracy of the TPS beam model. Gaussian functions as the convolution kernel performed consistently better than Lorentzian and

  15. Effectiveness of Psychological and Pharmacological Treatments for Nocturnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houts, Arthur C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Assesses overall effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological treatments, relative effectiveness of specific treatments, and moderators of treatment effectiveness for nocturnal enuretic children via quantitative integration of research. Findings confirm that more children benefit from psychological than from pharmacological interventions and…

  16. Effect of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) load in serum on average daily weight gain during the postweaning period.

    PubMed

    López-Soria, S; Sibila, M; Nofrarías, M; Calsamiglia, M; Manzanilla, E G; Ramírez-Mendoza, H; Mínguez, A; Serrano, J M; Marín, O; Joisel, F; Charreyre, C; Segalés, J

    2014-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is a ubiquitous virus that mainly affects nursery and fattening pigs causing systemic disease (PCV2-SD) or subclinical infection. A characteristic sign in both presentations is reduction of average daily weight gain (ADWG). The present study aimed to assess the relationship between PCV2 load in serum and ADWG from 3 (weaning) to 21 weeks of age (slaughter) (ADWG 3-21). Thus, three different boar lines were used to inseminate sows from two PCV2-SD affected farms. One or two pigs per sow were selected (60, 61 and 51 piglets from Pietrain, Pietrain×Large White and Duroc×Large White boar lines, respectively). Pigs were bled at 3, 9, 15 and 21 weeks of age and weighted at 3 and 21 weeks. Area under the curve of the viral load at all sampling times (AUCqPCR 3-21) was calculated for each animal according to standard and real time quantitative PCR results; this variable was categorized as "negative or low" (<10(4.3) PCV2 genome copies/ml of serum), "medium" (≥10(4.3) to ≤10(5.3)) and "high" (>10(5.3)). Data regarding sex, PCV2 antibody titre at weaning and sow parity was also collected. A generalized linear model was performed, obtaining that paternal genetic line and AUCqPCR 3-21 were related to ADWG 3-21. ADWG 3-21 (mean±typical error) for "negative or low", "medium" and "high" AUCqPCR 3-21 was 672±9, 650±12 and 603±16 g/day, respectively, showing significant differences among them. This study describes different ADWG performances in 3 pig populations that suffered from different degrees of PCV2 viraemia. PMID:25448444

  17. Monitoring the effects of wastewater treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    de-la-Ossa-Carretero, J A; Del-Pilar-Ruso, Y; Giménez-Casalduero, F; Sánchez-Lizaso, J L

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater disposal in coastal waters causes widespread environmental problems. Secondary treatment is expected to reduce the adverse effects of insufficiently treated wastewater. The environmental impact of sewage disposal via 18 wastewater treatment plants was analysed using the benthic opportunistic polychaetes and amphipods (BOPA) index. In previous studies this index proved to be an effective tool for monitoring sewage pollution. The impact of these discharges was highly related to treatment level, which ranged from pre-treatment to biological, as well as to flow rates and outfall position. Locations affected by pre-treated wastewater showed environmental degradation, especially marked near outfalls with higher flow rates. At most locations, biologically treated wastewater did not cause a significant impact and an improvement in ecological integrity was detected after this secondary treatment had been implemented. The impact of discharge was highly related to chemical oxygen demand (COD), suspended solids and nutrient concentrations, which are all lower in biologically treated wastewater. A 'moderate' ecological status was observed not only near sewage outfalls with high wastewater flow rates (>1,500,000 m(3)/month) with a COD over 200 mg/l but also near those with lower flow rates but with a COD over 400 mg/l. To reduce the impact of sewage disposal, it is necessary to carry out adequate treatment, have site outfalls deep enough, and implement water recycling. PMID:26801153

  18. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Studies of Low Reynolds Number Effects on the Losses in a Low Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data from jet-engine tests have indicated that unsteady blade-row interaction effects can have a significant impact on the efficiency of low-pressure turbine stages. Measured turbine efficiencies at takeoff can be as much as two points higher than those at cruise conditions. Preliminary studies indicate that Reynolds number effects may contribute to the lower efficiencies at cruise conditions. In the current study, numerical experiments have been performed to quantify the Reynolds number dependence of unsteady wake/separation bubble interaction on the performance of a low-pressure turbine.

  19. Effects of hormone treatment on hemostasis variables.

    PubMed

    Kluft, C

    2007-10-01

    A survey was made of the changes in hemostasis and related inflammatory biomarkers for hormone treatments (HT) of women. Treatments included were oral and non-oral estrogens combined or not with progestogens, raloxifene, tamoxifene, tibolone and ethinylestradiol in oral contraceptives with non-androgenic progestogens. Special attention was given to dosages lower than the present standard dose and we explored how treatment variants approached a situation of minimal changes in biomarkers. For oral unopposed estrogens, dose reduction effectively reduced the changes in some hemostasis markers, but not in a specific set of anticoagulant variables (antithrombin, protein S, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, and the endogenous thrombin potential assay for resistance to activated protein C). Inflammation markers from the liver showed a dose-dependent reduction but effects were not nullified at the lowest dose tested. It was concluded that adequate reduction of estrogen dose for these effects will coincide with the dose-range of efficacy. Androgenic progestogens may be suitable for further reducing the impact of estrogens on some of the anticoagulant variables; reductions of estrogen-induced C-reactive protein increases appear possible with specific progestogens (medroxyprogesterone actate, nomegestrol acetate). For non-oral unopposed estrogens, all variables except inflammation biomarkers from the vascular wall showed minimal changes. Reduction in vascular inflammatory biomarkers, considered to mark anti-inflammatory effects, is augmented by medroxyprogesterone actate or norethisterone acetate. It was concluded that unopposed, non-oral estrogen treatment is the present best available option approaching minimal effects of treatment on biomarkers. Progestogen selection requires more data. We postulated that minimal effects on all cardiovascular biomarkers should define the HT with maximal safety for venous and arterial vascular events. The survey has identified specific

  20. Neurocognitive Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert W.; Haser, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    We review research on the neuropsychological effects that central nervous system (CNS) cancer treatments have on the cognitive abilities of children and adolescents. The authors focus on the two most common malignancies of childhood: leukemias and brain tumors. The literature review is structured so as to separate out earlier studies, generally…

  1. The effect of average cycling current on total energy of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, Anup; Uddin, Kotub; Widanalage, W. D.; McGordon, Andrew; Jennings, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the remaining range of a battery reliably, accurately and simply is imperative for effective power management of electrified vehicles and reducing driver anxiety resulting from perceived low driving range. Techniques for predicting the remaining range of an electric vehicle exist; in the best cases they are scaled by factors that account for expected energy losses due to driving style, environmental conditions and the use of on-board energy consuming devices such as air-conditioning. In this work, experimental results that establish the dependence of remaining electrical energy on the vehicle battery immediate cycling history are presented. A method to estimate the remaining energy given short-term cycling history is presented. This method differs from the traditional state of charge methods typically used in battery management systems by considering energy throughput more directly.

  2. Toxic Stress: Effects, Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Hillary A.

    2014-01-01

    Children who experience early life toxic stress are at risk of long-term adverse health effects that may not manifest until adulthood. This article briefly summarizes the findings in recent studies on toxic stress and childhood adversity following the publication of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Policy Report on the effects of toxic stress. A review of toxic stress and its effects is described, including factors of vulnerability, resilience, and the relaxation response. An integrative approach to the prevention and treatment of toxic stress necessitates individual, community and national focus. PMID:27417486

  3. The Averaging Problem in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem

    2009-06-01

    This thesis deals with the averaging problem in cosmology, which has gained considerable interest in recent years, and is concerned with correction terms (after averaging inhomogeneities) that appear in the Einstein equations when working on the large scales appropriate for cosmology. It has been claimed in the literature that these terms may account for the phenomenon of dark energy which causes the late time universe to accelerate. We investigate the nature of these terms by using averaging schemes available in the literature and further developed to be applicable to the problem at hand. We show that the effect of these terms when calculated carefully, remains negligible and cannot explain the late time acceleration.

  4. Treatment of childhood cancers: late effects.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    In France, about 1 in 1000 young adults aged 20 to 30 years is a survivor of childhood cancer and is thus faced with late effects of their cancer and its treatment (radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy). What are the late effects of childhood cancer therapy? A systematic review by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) provides useful information based on European and North American data. Cancer treatments can have many long-term consequences that depend on the drugs and doses used, radiation therapy protocols and irradiated organs, and age at the time of treatment. Cytotoxic drugs and radiation can both cause infertility. Abdominopelvic radiation therapy in girls has been linked to an increased risk of premature delivery and other complications of pregnancy. No increase in birth defects has been reported among children born to childhood cancer survivors. Anthracyclines and radiation therapy can cause cardiomyopathy. Neck irradiation can lead to thyroid disorders, and cranial irradiation to growth retardation. Chemotherapy can cause osteonecrosis and loss of bone density, but without an increased risk of fracture. The risk of cognitive impairment and structural abnormalities of the brain is higher when the child is younger or receives a high cumulative dose of cranial irradiation or total irradiation dosage. Some cytotoxic drugs can damage the kidneys. Cranial radiation therapy can cause long-term neuroendocrine disorders and growth disorders, especially when the dose exceeds 18 Gy. Cytotoxic drugs (alkylating agents, etoposide, etc.) and radiation therapy can cause second cancers of a different histological type. One analysis of second cancers showed a median time to onset of 7 years for solid tumours and 2.5 years for lymphoma and leukaemia. Better knowledge of the late effects of childhood cancer therapy can help orient the choice of treatment towards less harmful options or, if necessary, implement measures aimed at preventing late adverse

  5. High average power pockels cell

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A high average power pockels cell is disclosed which reduces the effect of thermally induced strains in high average power laser technology. The pockels cell includes an elongated, substantially rectangular crystalline structure formed from a KDP-type material to eliminate shear strains. The X- and Y-axes are oriented substantially perpendicular to the edges of the crystal cross-section and to the C-axis direction of propagation to eliminate shear strains.

  6. Effect of beef heifer development system on average daily gain, reproduction, and adaptation to corn residue during first pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Summers, A F; Weber, S P; Lardner, H A; Funston, R N

    2014-06-01

    Postweaning heifer development systems were evaluated at 2 locations in a 4-yr study for their effect on performance and subsequent adaptation to grazing corn residue as a pregnant heifer. In Exp. 1, heifers were blocked by BW and randomly assigned to graze winter range (WR) or graze winter range and corn residue (CR). In Exp. 2, heifers were assigned to graze winter range and corn residue (CR) or graze winter range and placed in a drylot (DL). Artificial insemination and natural mating were used at breeding on the basis of location. In Exp. 1, heifers developed on corn residue tended (P = 0.11) to have reduced ADG compared with WR heifers. Subsequently, BW at the end of the 82-d corn residue grazing period tended (P = 0.09) to be lower for CR compared with WR heifers. However, the proportion of heifers attaining puberty before the breeding season and pregnancy rates were similar (P ≥ 0.29) for CR and WR heifers. Developing heifers on winter range tended (P = 0.09) to reduce heifer development costs $36/pregnant heifer compared with CR heifers. In Exp. 2, DL heifers had greater (P < 0.01) overall ADG during development compared with CR heifers, resulting in greater (P < 0.01) prebreeding BW for DL heifers compared with CR heifers (355 vs. 322 ± 9 kg). At pregnancy diagnosis BW remained greater (P = 0.02) for DL compared with CR heifers (423 vs. 406 ± 7 kg). Corn-residue-developed heifers had increased (P = 0.03) AI conception rates compared with DL heifers (78% vs. 67% ± 6%). However, there was no difference (P ≥ 0.21) in percent pubertal before the breeding season or final pregnancy rates for CR and DL heifers. Developing heifers on corn residue reduced (P = 0.02) heifer development costs $38/pregnant heifer compared with DL-developed heifers. A subset of pregnant heifers from both experiments grazed corn residue fields in late gestation. As pregnant heifers grazing corn residue, WR heifers (Exp. 1) tended to have reduced ADG compared with CR heifers (0

  7. The economic effects of whole-herd versus selective anthelmintic treatment strategies in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Charlier, J; Levecke, B; Devleesschauwer, B; Vercruysse, J; Hogeveen, H

    2012-06-01

    Current control practices against gastrointestinal nematodes in dairy cows rely strongly on anthelmintic use. To reduce the development of anthelmintic resistance or disposition of drug residues in the environment, novel control approaches are currently proposed that target anthelmintic treatment to individual animals instead of the whole herd. However, such selective treatment strategies come with additional costs for labor and diagnostics and, so far, no studies have addressed whether they could be economically sustainable. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate the economic effects at farm level of whole-herd versus more selective anthelmintic treatment strategies in adult dairy cows, and (2) determine how these economic effects depend on level of infection and herd size. A Monte Carlo simulation, fed by current epidemiological and economical knowledge, was used to estimate the expected economic effects and possible variation of different control strategies under Belgian conditions. Four treatment strategies were compared with a baseline situation in which no treatments were applied: whole herd at calving (S1), selective at calving with (S2) or without (S3) treatment of the first-calf cows, and whole-herd when animals are moved from grazing to the barn in the fall (housing treatment, S4). The benefit per lactation for an average dairy herd varied between -$2 and $131 (average $64) for S1, between -$2 and $127 (average $62) for S2, between -$17 and $104 (average $43) for S3, and between -$41 and $72 (average $15) for S4. The farmer's risk associated with any treatment strategy, as indicated by the width of the 95% credible intervals of economic benefit of anthelmintic treatment, decreased with increasing level of exposure, as assessed by bulk tank milk ELISA. The order of the different strategies when sorted by expected benefit was robust to changes in economic input parameters. We conclude that, on average, strategies applying anthelmintic

  8. Female urinary incontinence: effective treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Castro, R A; Arruda, R M; Bortolini, M A T

    2015-04-01

    Urinary incontinence is a dysfunction that tremendously affects women's quality of life, involving social, emotional and economic aspects. Although various treatments for urinary incontinence have been described, it is important to know which of them are truly effective. This review seeks to determine the current available therapies for women with stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome, based on the best scientific evidence. PMID:25307986

  9. Psoriasis: characteristics, psychosocial effects and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sheila

    Psoriasis is a complex chronic non-infectious inflammatory skin disease with many different presentations. The classic presentation is of well-defined red plaques with silver scale. The characteristic scale makes the disorder highly visible and intrusive on the patient's lifestyle. The visible nature of the disease ensures that psoriasis has both physical and psychosocial effects. In normal skin, epidermal cell reproduction and proliferation takes 28 days. In psoriasis, this process is considerably accelerated to approximately four days, resulting in the deposit of immature cells on the skin. While the exact cause of this process is unknown, certain environmental and genetic factors are known to be provoking factors. Disease management will be dependent on disease severity, psychosocial effects and the patient's lifestyle. To effectively treat this disease the nurse must be skilled in psoriasis management, and in patient education and motivation. This article reviews the characteristics, aetiology, psychosocial effects and treatment strategies of psoriasis. PMID:18414290

  10. Low to Moderate Average Alcohol Consumption and Binge Drinking in Early Pregnancy: Effects on Choice Reaction Time and Information Processing Time in Five-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, Tina R.; Eriksen, Hanne-Lise Falgreen; Underbjerg, Mette; Thorsen, Poul; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Landrø, Nils Inge; Bakketeig, Leiv S.; Grove, Jakob; Sværke, Claus; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2015-01-01

    Background Deficits in information processing may be a core deficit after fetal alcohol exposure. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of weekly low to moderate maternal alcohol consumption and binge drinking episodes in early pregnancy on choice reaction time (CRT) and information processing time (IPT) in young children. Method Participants were sampled based on maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy. At the age of 60–64 months, 1,333 children were administered a modified version of the Sternberg paradigm to assess CRT and IPT. In addition, a test of general intelligence (WPPSI-R) was administered. Results Adjusted for a wide range of potential confounders, this study showed no significant effects of average weekly maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy on CRT or IPT. There was, however, an indication of slower CRT associated with binge drinking episodes in gestational weeks 1–4. Conclusion This study observed no significant effects of average weekly maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy on CRT or IPT as assessed by the Sternberg paradigm. However, there were some indications of CRT being associated with binge drinking during very early pregnancy. Further large-scale studies are needed to investigate effects of different patterns of maternal alcohol consumption on basic cognitive processes in offspring. PMID:26382068

  11. Modeling psychiatric disorders for developing effective treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Tobias; Feng, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    The recent advance in identifying risk genes has provided an unprecedented opportunity for developing animal models for psychiatric disease research with the goal of attaining translational utility to ultimately develop novel treatments. However, at this early stage, successful translation has yet to be achieved. Here, we review recent advances in modeling psychiatric disease, discuss utility and limitations of animal models, and emphasize the importance of shifting from behavioral analysis to identifying neurophysiological defects, which are likely more conserved across species and thus increase translatability. Looking forward, we envision that preclinical research will align with clinical research to build a common framework of comparable neurobiological abnormalities and form subgroups of patients based on similar pathophysiology. Experimental neuroscience can then use animal models to discover mechanisms underlying distinct abnormalities and develop strategies for effective treatments. PMID:26340119

  12. Effect of average litter weight in pigs on growth performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality of the offspring as depending on birth weight.

    PubMed

    Pardo, C E; Kreuzer, M; Bee, G

    2013-11-01

    Offspring born from normal litter size (10 to 15 piglets) but classified as having lower than average birth weight (average of the sow herd used: 1.46 ± 0.2 kg; mean ± s.d.) carry at birth negative phenotypic traits normally associated with intrauterine growth restriction, such as brain-sparing and impaired myofiber hyperplasia. The objective of the study was to assess long-term effects of intrauterine crowding by comparing postnatal performance, carcass characteristics and pork quality of offspring born from litters with higher (>1.7 kg) or lower (<1.3 kg) than average litter birth weight. From a population of multiparous Swiss Large White sows (parity 2 to 6), 16 litters with high (H = 1.75 kg) or low (L = 1.26 kg) average litter birth weight were selected. At farrowing, two female pigs and two castrated pigs were chosen from each litter: from the H-litters those with the intermediate (HI = 1.79 kg) and lowest (HL = 1.40 kg) birth weight, and from L-litters those with the highest (LH = 1.49 kg) and intermediate (LI = 1.26 kg) birth weight. Average birth weight of the selected HI and LI piglets differed (P < 0.05), whereas birth weight of the HL- and LH-piglets were similar (P > 0.05). These pigs were fattened in group pen and slaughtered at 165 days of age. Pre-weaning performance of the litters and growth performance, carcass and meat quality traits of the selected pigs were assessed. Number of stillborn and pig mortality were greater (P < 0.05) in L- than in H-litters. Consequently, fewer (P < 0.05) piglets were weaned and average litter weaning weight decreased by 38% (P < 0.05). The selected pigs of the L-litters displayed catch-up growth during the starter and grower-finisher periods, leading to similar (P > 0.05) slaughter weight at 165 days of age. However, HL-gilts were more feed efficient and had leaner carcasses than HI-, LH- and LI-pigs (birth weight class × gender interaction P < 0.05). Meat quality traits were mostly similar between groups. The

  13. Scaling effects on area-averaged fraction of vegetation cover derived using a linear mixture model with two-band spectral vegetation index constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Kenta; Huete, Alfredo R.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanisms underlying the scaling effects that apply to a fraction of vegetation cover (FVC) estimates derived using two-band spectral vegetation index (VI) isoline-based linear mixture models (VI isoline-based LMM). The VIs included the normalized difference vegetation index, a soil-adjusted vegetation index, and a two-band enhanced vegetation index (EVI2). This study focused in part on the monotonicity of an area-averaged FVC estimate as a function of spatial resolution. The proof of monotonicity yielded measures of the intrinsic area-averaged FVC uncertainties due to scaling effects. The derived results demonstrate that a factor ξ, which was defined as a function of "true" and "estimated" endmember spectra of the vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces, was responsible for conveying monotonicity or nonmonotonicity. The monotonic FVC values displayed a uniform increasing or decreasing trend that was independent of the choice of the two-band VI. Conditions under which scaling effects were eliminated from the FVC were identified. Numerical simulations verifying the monotonicity and the practical utility of the scaling theory were evaluated using numerical experiments applied to Landsat7-Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data. The findings contribute to developing scale-invariant FVC estimation algorithms for multisensor and data continuity.

  14. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Hardening of aluminium by YAG : Nd laser radiation with an average power of 0.8 kW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovsh, Ivan B.; Strekalova, M. S.

    1994-02-01

    An investigation is reported of the effects of a surface heat treatment of aluminium by a YAG : Nd laser beam with a power up to 0.8 kW. In particular, a study was made of the influence of the treatment conditions on the microhardness, as well as on the residual stresses and their sign in hardened surface layers of aluminium. The efficiency of aluminium hardening by radiation from a cw YAG : Nd laser was found to be considerably higher than in the case of a cw CO2 laser.

  15. Gender Variations in the Effects of Number of Organizational Memberships, Number of Social Networking Sites, and Grade-Point Average on Global Social Responsibility in Filipino University Students

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Romeo B.; Baring, Rito V.; Sta. Maria, Madelene A.

    2016-01-01

    The study seeks to estimate gender variations in the direct effects of (a) number of organizational memberships, (b) number of social networking sites (SNS), and (c) grade-point average (GPA) on global social responsibility (GSR); and in the indirect effects of (a) and of (b) through (c) on GSR. Cross-sectional survey data were drawn from questionnaire interviews involving 3,173 Filipino university students. Based on a path model, the three factors were tested to determine their inter-relationships and their relationships with GSR. The direct and total effects of the exogenous factors on the dependent variable are statistically significantly robust. The indirect effects of organizational memberships on GSR through GPA are also statistically significant, but the indirect effects of SNS on GSR through GPA are marginal. Men and women significantly differ only in terms of the total effects of their organizational memberships on GSR. The lack of broad gender variations in the effects of SNS, organizational memberships and GPA on GSR may be linked to the relatively homogenous characteristics and experiences of the university students interviewed. There is a need for more path models to better understand the predictors of GSR in local students. PMID:27247700

  16. Gender Variations in the Effects of Number of Organizational Memberships, Number of Social Networking Sites, and Grade-Point Average on Global Social Responsibility in Filipino University Students.

    PubMed

    Lee, Romeo B; Baring, Rito V; Sta Maria, Madelene A

    2016-02-01

    The study seeks to estimate gender variations in the direct effects of (a) number of organizational memberships, (b) number of social networking sites (SNS), and (c) grade-point average (GPA) on global social responsibility (GSR); and in the indirect effects of (a) and of (b) through (c) on GSR. Cross-sectional survey data were drawn from questionnaire interviews involving 3,173 Filipino university students. Based on a path model, the three factors were tested to determine their inter-relationships and their relationships with GSR. The direct and total effects of the exogenous factors on the dependent variable are statistically significantly robust. The indirect effects of organizational memberships on GSR through GPA are also statistically significant, but the indirect effects of SNS on GSR through GPA are marginal. Men and women significantly differ only in terms of the total effects of their organizational memberships on GSR. The lack of broad gender variations in the effects of SNS, organizational memberships and GPA on GSR may be linked to the relatively homogenous characteristics and experiences of the university students interviewed. There is a need for more path models to better understand the predictors of GSR in local students. PMID:27247700

  17. Covariant approximation averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani, Eigo; Arthur, Rudy; Blum, Thomas; Izubuchi, Taku; Jung, Chulwoo; Lehner, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    We present a new class of statistical error reduction techniques for Monte Carlo simulations. Using covariant symmetries, we show that correlation functions can be constructed from inexpensive approximations without introducing any systematic bias in the final result. We introduce a new class of covariant approximation averaging techniques, known as all-mode averaging (AMA), in which the approximation takes account of contributions of all eigenmodes through the inverse of the Dirac operator computed from the conjugate gradient method with a relaxed stopping condition. In this paper we compare the performance and computational cost of our new method with traditional methods using correlation functions and masses of the pion, nucleon, and vector meson in Nf=2 +1 lattice QCD using domain-wall fermions. This comparison indicates that AMA significantly reduces statistical errors in Monte Carlo calculations over conventional methods for the same cost.

  18. Average density in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnor, W.B.

    1987-05-01

    The Einstein-Straus (1945) vacuole is here used to represent a bound cluster of galaxies embedded in a standard pressure-free cosmological model, and the average density of the cluster is compared with the density of the surrounding cosmic fluid. The two are nearly but not quite equal, and the more condensed the cluster, the greater the difference. A theoretical consequence of the discrepancy between the two densities is discussed. 25 references.

  19. Estimation of causal effects of binary treatments in unconfounded studies

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Roee; Rubin, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of causal effects in non-randomized studies comprises two distinct phases: design, without outcome data, and analysis of the outcome data according to a specified protocol. Recently, Gutman and Rubin (2013) proposed a new analysis-phase method for estimating treatment effects when the outcome is binary and there is only one covariate, which viewed causal effect estimation explicitly as a missing data problem. Here, we extend this method to situations with continuous outcomes and multiple covariates and compare it with other commonly used methods (such as matching, subclassification, weighting, and covariance adjustment). We show, using an extensive simulation, that of all methods considered, and in many of the experimental conditions examined, our new ‘multiple-imputation using two subclassification splines’ method appears to be the most efficient and has coverage levels that are closest to nominal. In addition, it can estimate finite population average causal effects as well as non-linear causal estimands. This type of analysis also allows the identification of subgroups of units for which the effect appears to be especially beneficial or harmful. PMID:26013308

  20. [Thyrostatic treatment and its adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Dokupilová, A; Payer, J

    2013-11-01

    Antithyroid drugs are relatively simple molecules known as thionamides, which contain a sulfhydryl group and a thiourea moiety within a heterocyclic structure. Propylthiouracil (6- propyl 2- sulfanylidene 1,2,3,4- tetrahydropyrimidin4- one) and methimazole (1- metyl 2,3- dihydro1H imidazole 2- thione) are the antithyroid drugs used in the United States. Methimazole is used in most of Europe and Asia, and carbimazole -  methimazole analogue, is used in the United Kingdom and parts of the former British Commonwealth. Their primary effect is to inhibit thyroid hormone synthesis by interfering with thyroid peroxidase mediated iodination of tyrosine residues in thyroglobulin and is an important step in the synthesis of thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Propylthiouracil (but not methimazole or carbimazole), can block the conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine within the thyroid and in peripheral tissues. Antithyroid drugs may have clinically important immunosuppressive effects. Side effects of thionamides are usually mild, serious untoward effects are observed in < 5% of cases, more frequently during the initial phases of treatment, when the drug daily dose is higher. PMID:24279443

  1. The Effects of Positive Patient Testimonials on PTSD Treatment Choice

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Larry D.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Feeny, Norah C.; Caldwell, Daniel; Hanson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Despite the existence of effective treatment options for PTSD, these treatments are failing to reach those that stand to benefit from PTSD treatment. Understanding the processes underlying an individual’s treatment seeking behavior holds the potential for reducing treatment-seeking barriers. The current study investigates the effects that positive treatment testimonials have on decisions regarding PTSD treatment. An undergraduate (N = 439) and a trauma-exposed community (N = 203) sample were provided with videotaped treatment rationales for prolonged exposure (PE) and sertraline treatments of PTSD. Half of each sample also viewed testimonials, detailing a fictional patient’s treatment experience. All participants then chose among treatment options and rated the credibility of- and personal reactions toward- those options. Among treatment naïve undergraduates, testimonials increased the proportion choosing PE alone; and among treatment naïve members of the trauma-exposed community sample, testimonials increased the proportion choosing a combined PE plus sertraline treatment. These effects were not observed for those with prior history of either psychotherapeutic or pharmacological treatment. Major barriers exist that prevent individuals with PTSD from seeking treatment. For a critical unreached treatment sample, those who are treatment naïve, positive patient testimonials offer a mechanism in which to make effective treatments more appealing and accessible. PMID:23103234

  2. Vocal attractiveness increases by averaging.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Laetitia; Bestelmeyer, Patricia; Latinus, Marianne; Rouger, Julien; Charest, Ian; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Kawahara, Hideki; Belin, Pascal

    2010-01-26

    Vocal attractiveness has a profound influence on listeners-a bias known as the "what sounds beautiful is good" vocal attractiveness stereotype [1]-with tangible impact on a voice owner's success at mating, job applications, and/or elections. The prevailing view holds that attractive voices are those that signal desirable attributes in a potential mate [2-4]-e.g., lower pitch in male voices. However, this account does not explain our preferences in more general social contexts in which voices of both genders are evaluated. Here we show that averaging voices via auditory morphing [5] results in more attractive voices, irrespective of the speaker's or listener's gender. Moreover, we show that this phenomenon is largely explained by two independent by-products of averaging: a smoother voice texture (reduced aperiodicities) and a greater similarity in pitch and timbre with the average of all voices (reduced "distance to mean"). These results provide the first evidence for a phenomenon of vocal attractiveness increases by averaging, analogous to a well-established effect of facial averaging [6, 7]. They highlight prototype-based coding [8] as a central feature of voice perception, emphasizing the similarity in the mechanisms of face and voice perception. PMID:20129047

  3. Validity analysis on merged and averaged data using within and between analysis: focus on effect of qualitative social capital on self-rated health

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: With an increasing number of studies highlighting regional social capital (SC) as a determinant of health, many studies are using multi-level analysis with merged and averaged scores of community residents’ survey responses calculated from community SC data. Sufficient examination is required to validate if the merged and averaged data can represent the community. Therefore, this study analyzes the validity of the selected indicators and their applicability in multi-level analysis. METHODS: Within and between analysis (WABA) was performed after creating community variables using merged and averaged data of community residents’ responses from the 2013 Community Health Survey in Korea, using subjective self-rated health assessment as a dependent variable. Further analysis was performed following the model suggested by WABA result. RESULTS: Both E-test results (1) and WABA results (2) revealed that single-level analysis needs to be performed using qualitative SC variable with cluster mean centering. Through single-level multivariate regression analysis, qualitative SC with cluster mean centering showed positive effect on self-rated health (0.054, p<0.001), although there was no substantial difference in comparison to analysis using SC variables without cluster mean centering or multi-level analysis. CONCLUSIONS: As modification in qualitative SC was larger within the community than between communities, we validate that relational analysis of individual self-rated health can be performed within the group, using cluster mean centering. Other tests besides the WABA can be performed in the future to confirm the validity of using community variables and their applicability in multi-level analysis. PMID:27292102

  4. Cost-effectiveness of a worksite hypertension treatment program.

    PubMed

    Logan, A G; Milne, B J; Achber, C; Campbell, W P; Haynes, R B

    1981-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of treating hypertension at the patient's place of work was compared in a randomized controlled trial with care delivered in a community. The average total cost per patient for worksite care in this 12-month study was not significantly different from that for regular care ($242.86 +/- 6.94 vs $211.34 +/- 18.66, mean +/- SEM). The worksite health system cost was significantly more expensive ($197.36 +/- 4.99 vs $129.33 +/- 13.34, p less than 0.001) but the patient cost was significantly less ($45.40 +/- 3.23 vs $82.00 +/- 6.20, p less than 0.01). The mean reduction in diastolic blood pressure (BP) at the year-end assessment was significantly greater in the worksite group (12.1 +/- 0.6 vs 6.5 +/- 0.6 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $5.63 per mm Hg for worksite care was less than the base cost-effectiveness ratio of $32.51 per mm Hg for regular care, indicating that the worksite program was substantially more cost-effective. Our findings support health policies that favor allocating resources to work-based hypertension treatment programs for the target group identified in this study. PMID:6783519

  5. [Effectiveness of dietetic treatment in nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calleja Fernández, A; López Gómez, J J; Vidal Casariego, A; Cano Rodríguez, I; Ballesteros Pomar, M D

    2009-01-01

    We present the case of a male patient suffering from a primary amyloidosis and a nephrotic syndrome who came to dietotherapy clinic. In the first visit we made a nutritional record including an anthropometric evaluation, body composition, biochemistry, and food intake. The patient had an excess of body water, proteinuria, low plasma protein, albumin, prealbumin and HDL cholesterol levels, and high concentrations of total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides. The consumption of protein and sodium was higher than the recommendation. An individualized diet was made. Six months later, his weight and the excess of body water decreased, but the fat free mass remained unchanged. The levels of albumin and prealbumin increased, the proteinuria decreased. Total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides decreased until normal levels. Dietetary treatment in nephrotic syndrome is effective to decrease proteinuria, improve cholesterol and triglycerides levels, and to prevent malnutrition. PMID:20049380

  6. Effects of a dressed quark-gluon vertex in vector heavy-light mesons and theory average of the Bc* meson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Rocha, M.; Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A.

    2016-04-01

    We extend earlier investigations of heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons to the vector case, using a simple model in the context of the Dyson-Schwinger-Bethe-Salpeter approach. We investigate the effects of a dressed quark-gluon vertex in a systematic fashion and illustrate and attempt to quantify corrections beyond the phenomenologically very useful and successful rainbow-ladder truncation. In particular we investigate the dressed quark-photon vertex in such a setup and make a prediction for the experimentally as yet unknown mass of the Bc* , which we obtain at 6.334 GeV well in line with predictions from other approaches. Furthermore, we combine a comprehensive set of results from the theoretical literature. The theoretical average for the mass of the Bc* meson is 6.336 ±0.002 GeV .

  7. Effects of clofibrate treatment in laying hens.

    PubMed

    König, B; Kluge, H; Haase, K; Brandsch, C; Stangl, G I; Eder, K

    2007-06-01

    Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) has been shown in liver of chicks, but effects of its activation have not yet been investigated. In this study, laying hens were treated with clofibrate, a synthetic PPARalpha agonist, to investigate the effects of PPARalpha activation on liver lipid metabolism. Hens receiving a diet containing 5 g of clofibrate/kg had a lower food intake and higher liver mRNA concentrations of typical PPARalpha target genes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase, bifunctional enzyme, lipoprotein lipase) involved in hepatic mitochondrial and peroxisomal beta-oxidation and plasma triglyceride clearance than control hens that received the same diet without clofibrate (P<0.05). Hens treated with clofibrate also had lower mRNA concentrations of fatty acid synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, and low-density lipoprotein receptor, proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake, than hens fed the control diet (P<0.05). These changes in clofibrate-treated hens were accompanied by reduced liver triglyceride concentrations, strongly diminished very low density triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations (P<0.05), a disturbed maturation of egg follicles, a complete stop of egg production, and a markedly reduced plasma 17-beta-estradiol concentration (P<0.05). In conclusion, it is shown that clofibrate has complex effects on hepatic lipid metabolism in laying hens that mimic PPARalpha activation in mammals, affect maturation of egg follicles, and lead to a stop of egg production. Because clofibrate treatment strongly reduced food intake in the hens, some of these effects (i.e., egg production) may have been due to a low energy and nutrient intake. PMID:17495091

  8. Effect of mastication and other mechanical treatments on fuel structure in chaparral

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brennan, Teresa J.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical fuel treatments are a common pre-fire strategy for reducing wildfire hazard that alters fuel structure by converting live canopy fuels to a compacted layer of dead surface fuels. Current knowledge concerning their effectiveness, however, comes primarily from forest-dominated ecosystems. Our objectives were to quantify and compare changes in shrub-dominated chaparral following crushing, mastication, re-mastication and mastication-plus-burning treatments, and to assess treatment longevity. Results from analysis of variance (ANOVA) identified significant differences in all fuel components by treatment type, vegetation type and time since treatment. Live woody fuel components of height, cover and mass were positively correlated with time since treatment, whereas downed woody fuel components were negatively correlated. Herbaceous fuels, conversely, were not correlated, and exhibited a 5-fold increase in cover across treatment types in comparison to controls. Average live woody fuel recovery was 50% across all treatment and vegetation types. Differences in recovery between time-since-treatment years 1–8 ranged from 32–65% and exhibited significant positive correlations with time since treatment. These results suggest that treatment effectiveness is short term due to the rapid regrowth of shrubs in these systems and is compromised by the substantial increase in herbaceous fuels. Consequences of not having a full understanding of these treatments are serious and leave concern for their widespread use on chaparral-dominated landscapes.

  9. Feedback from Outcome Measures and Treatment Effectiveness, Treatment Efficiency, and Collaborative Practice: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gondek, Dawid; Edbrooke-Childs, Julian; Fink, Elian; Deighton, Jessica; Wolpert, Miranda

    2016-05-01

    Due to recent increases in the use of feedback from outcome measures in mental health settings, we systematically reviewed evidence regarding the impact of feedback from outcome measures on treatment effectiveness, treatment efficiency, and collaborative practice. In over half of 32 studies reviewed, the feedback condition had significantly higher levels of treatment effectiveness on at least one treatment outcome variable. Feedback was particularly effective for not-on-track patients or when it was provided to both clinicians and patients. The findings for treatment efficiency and collaborative practice were less consistent. Given the heterogeneity of studies, more research is needed to determine when and for whom feedback is most effective. PMID:26744316

  10. Psychological Mechanisms of Effective Cognitive–Behavioral Treatments for PTSD

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several psychotherapies have been established as effective treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) including prolonged exposure, cognitive processing therapy, and cognitive therapy for PTSD. Understanding the key mechanisms of these treatments, i.e., how these treatments lead to therapeutic benefits, will enable us to maximize the efficacy, effectiveness, and efficiency of these therapies. This article provides an overview of the theorized mechanisms for each of these treatments, reviews the recent empirical evidence on psychological mechanisms of these treatments, discusses the ongoing debates in the field, and provides recommendations for future research. Few studies to date have examined whether changes in purported treatment mechanisms predict subsequent changes in treatment outcomes. Future clinical trials examining treatments for PTSD should use study designs that enable researchers to establish the temporal precedence of change in treatment mechanisms prior to symptom reduction. Moreover, further research is needed that explores the links between specific treatment components, underlying change mechanisms, and treatment outcomes. PMID:25749748

  11. Averaging Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Iain A.; Robbers, Georg; Behrend, Juliane

    2009-04-01

    The cosmological backreaction arises when one directly averages the Einstein equations to recover an effective Robertson-Walker cosmology, rather than assuming a background a priori. While usually discussed in the context of dark energy, strictly speaking any cosmological model should be recovered from such a procedure. We apply the scalar spatial averaging formalism for the first time to linear Robertson-Walker universes containing matter, radiation and dark energy. The formalism employed is general and incorporates systems of multiple fluids with ease, allowing us to consider quantitatively the universe from deep radiation domination up to the present day in a natural, unified manner. Employing modified Boltzmann codes we evaluate numerically the discrepancies between the assumed and the averaged behaviour arising from the quadratic terms, finding the largest deviations for an Einstein-de Sitter universe, increasing rapidly with Hubble rate to a 0.01% effect for h = 0.701. For the ΛCDM concordance model, the backreaction is of the order of Ωeff0 approx 4 × 10-6, with those for dark energy models being within a factor of two or three. The impacts at recombination are of the order of 10-8 and those in deep radiation domination asymptote to a constant value. While the effective equations of state of the backreactions in Einstein-de Sitter, concordance and quintessence models are generally dust-like, a backreaction with an equation of state weff < -1/3 can be found for strongly phantom models.

  12. Curative effects of head γ-SRT for the treatment of functional pituitary macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Wei; Wang, Ren Zhi; Xing, Bing; Yao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the curative effects and proper radiotherapy plan of head γ-stereotactic radiotherapy (γ-SRT) for the treatment of functional pituitary macroadenoma. Clinical samples of 30 patients that underwent γ-SRT (radiotherapy group) and 26 patients that underwent pituitary adenoma resection via single nasal-sphenoidal approach (surgery group) were analyzed retrospectively and their curative effects were compared. The results showed that in the radiotherapy group, 12 cases accepted single fraction irradiation, with an average maximum diameter of tumor body of 1.8±0.6 cm, average volume of 0.6±0.4 cm3, average dose of the central point of 52.6±18.7 Gy, average dose of the peripheral point of 24.7±10.2 mGy, and isodose curve of 50–70%. The remaining 18 cases accepted multiple fraction irradiation, with an average irradiation of 3.7±1.6 times, maximum average diameter of tumor body of 4.3±1.8 cm, average volume of 4.8±2.7 cm3, average dose of the central point of 24.6±12.5 Gy, average dose of the peripheral point of 13.6±7.4 mGy, and isodose curve of 50–70%. Following treatment, the tumor volumes of patients in the radiotherapy group that received single and multiple irradiation were significantly reduced and the visual acuity and visual field were improved (p<0.05). The two groups were followed up for an average of 3.8 years, and the follow-up results showed that differences of the two groups on the tumor control, mortality and hypopituitarism rates were not statistically significant (p>0.05). In addition, the incidence of complications of the radiotherapy group was significantly decreased as compared to that of the surgery group (p<0.05). In conclusion, γ-SRT was safe and effective for the treatment of functional pituitary adenomas. Its curative effects were equivalent to that of the microscopic single nasal-sphenoidal approach with fewer complications. PMID:27446365

  13. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on the average properties of a bidisperse suspension of high Reynolds number, low Weber number bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, V.; Koch, Donald L.

    1993-05-01

    The hydrodynamic interaction between a pair of nondeformable bubbles (low Weber number limit) in potential flow (high Reynolds number limit) was analyzed. The velocity potential was determined using twin spherical expansions, and the equations of motion were calculated by enforcing the zero net force condition on the surface of the bubbles. The acceleration due to the interaction is expressed in a perturbation series in the parameter (ai/R), where ai is the radius of bubble i, R is the distance between the bubbles, and the leading-order acceleration was found to decrease as (ai/R)4. The effect of potential flow interactions on the trajectory of a pair of bubbles of different sizes (size ratio greater than 1.07 at a Reynolds number of 200) rising due to gravity was studied. A salient feature of the trajectories is that the surfaces of the bubble do not come into contact during the interaction, except when the smaller bubble radius is less than 0.233 times the larger bubble radius when the Reynolds number based on the larger bubble is 200. In the latter case, however, the Reynolds number based on the radius of the smaller bubble is not large enough to justify the potential flow approximation. For interactions where collisions do not occur, the mean-square fluctuating velocity in a uniform suspension and the hydrodynamic diffusivities in a nonuniform suspension were calculated by performing an ensemble average over pair interactions. The pair averaging procedure is valid for dilute suspensions (V≪18/Re, where V is the volume fraction of the bubbles and Re is the Reynolds number based on the bubble radius and its terminal velocity).

  14. Effective over-the-counter acne treatments.

    PubMed

    Bowe, Whitney P; Shalita, Alan R

    2008-09-01

    Acne is the most common disease of the skin, yet only a fraction of acne sufferers are treated with prescription products by physicians. There is, however, a large and expanding market for over-the-counter (OTC) medications, many of which are not only effective but also well tolerated and cosmetically elegant. Given the presence of OTC acne medications on the television, the Internet, and store shelves, patients will be acutely aware of these OTC remedies and will have questions. Patients will expect dermatologists to advise them regarding products to use either as a sole therapy or in combination with prescription drugs. Recently, combinations of OTC acne medications in treatment regimens or "kits" have gained popularity and appear to have increased patient compliance. Quality-of-life outcomes from OTC medication use, in at least one study, have demonstrated good benefit. The most common OTC ingredients include benzoyl peroxide, a potent antibacterial agent, and salicylic acid, a mild comedolytic and antiinflammatory medication. Other, less-common OTC ingredients include sulfur, sodium sulfacetamide, and alpha hydroxy acids. Zinc, vitamin A, tea tree oil, and ayurvedic therapies also are available OTC for acne. Additional and better studies are needed to clarify the benefit of these latter medications. PMID:18786494

  15. Effects of ibuprofen treatment on the developing preterm baboon kidney.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Megan R; Yoder, Bradley A; McCurnin, Donald; Seidner, Steven; Gubhaju, Lina; Clyman, Ronald I; Black, M Jane

    2012-05-15

    Preterm neonates are commonly exposed postnatally to pharmacological treatments for a patent ductus arteriosus. Exposure of the developing kidney to nephrotoxic medications may adversely impact renal development. This study aimed to determine the effect of early postnatal ibuprofen treatment, both alone and in combination with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (NOSi), on renal development and morphology. Baboon neonates were delivered prematurely at 125-day (125d) gestation (term = 185d) and were euthanized at birth or postnatal day 6. Neonates were divided into four groups: 125d gestational controls (n = 8), Untreated (n = 8), Ibuprofen (n = 6), and ibuprofen (Ibu)+NOSi (n = 4). Animals in the Ibuprofen and Ibu+NOSi groups received five doses of ibuprofen, with the Ibuprofen+NOSi animals additionally administered a NOS inhibitor (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine). There was no difference among groups in body weight, kidney weight, or glomerular generation number. Nephrogenic zone width was significantly reduced in the Ibuprofen group (123.5 ± 7.4 μm) compared with the 125d gestational control (176.1 ± 6.9 μm) and Untreated animals (169.7 ± 78.8 μm). In the Ibu+NOSi group, nephrogenic zone width averaged 152.7 ± 3.9 μm, which was not significantly different from any other group. Morphologically abnormal glomeruli were present at a range of 0.0-22.9% in the Untreated group, 0.0-6.1% in the Ibuprofen group, and 0.0-1.4% in the Ibu+NOSi group. In conclusion, early postnatal ibuprofen exposure is associated with a reduced nephrogenic zone width, which may suggest the early cessation of nephrogenesis following treatment. Ultimately, this may impact the number of nephrons formed in the preterm kidney. PMID:22357916

  16. Nilotinib Effective and Safe in Initial Treatment of CML

    Cancer.gov

    Preliminary results from a phase III trial testing nilotinib (Tasigna) against imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) as first-line treatment for chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) indicate that nilotinib is effective and safe as initial treatment for

  17. Effect of surface treatments on radiation buildup in steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    A study of the effect of surface preparation on the radiation buildup of steam generator materials of construction was conducted. The tests consisted of exposing treated manway seal plates to primary reactor coolant during the second through the fifth fuel cycle of the Chinon B1 pressurized water reactor. The pretreatments included: mechanical polishing, electropolishing (either on the as received surface or on a surface which had been previously mechanically polished), and passivation via the RCT (laboratory) process or the Framatome (in situ) process. Radioactivity buildup was determined at the end of each fuel cycle. A selected number of the seal plates were removed from the steam generators after each exposure cycle for destructive examinations. The electropolished surfaces exhibited a significantly lower radioactive buildup rate; an average factor of five less buildup compared to an as-received surface. Passivation of the electropolished surface, especially via the RCT process, reduced the buildup rate still further by a factor of two over the electropolished-only surface. Examination of the surfaces by profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, etc., after exposure indicated no detrimental effects on the surface characteristics attributable to the surface treatments. A program has now been instituted to electropolish the steam generator channel heads of all new reactors in France, as well as the steam generators intended for replacement in existing plants. 1 ref., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. The Negative Effect of School-Average Ability on Science Self-Concept in the UK, the UK Countries and the World: The Big-Fish-Little-Pond-Effect for PISA 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagengast, Benjamin; Marsh, Herbert W.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the relation between students' achievement (ACH) and their academic self-concept (ASC) has consistently shown a Big-Fish-Little-Pond-Effect (BFLPE); ASC is positively affected by individual ACH, but negatively affected by school-average ACH. Surprisingly, however, there are few good UK studies of the BFLPE and few anywhere in the world…

  19. Dissociating Averageness and Attractiveness: Attractive Faces Are Not Always Average

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruine, Lisa M.; Jones, Benedict C.; Unger, Layla; Little, Anthony C.; Feinberg, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Although the averageness hypothesis of facial attractiveness proposes that the attractiveness of faces is mostly a consequence of their averageness, 1 study has shown that caricaturing highly attractive faces makes them mathematically less average but more attractive. Here the authors systematically test the averageness hypothesis in 5 experiments…

  20. Effective Correctional Treatment: Bibliotherapy for Cynics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gendreau, Paul; Ross, Bob

    1979-01-01

    Presents recent evidence, obtained from a review of the literature on correctional treatment published since 1973, appealing the verdict that correctional rehabilitation is ineffective. There are several types of intervention programs that have proved successful with offender populations. (Author)

  1. Averaging Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Iain A.; Robbers, Georg; Behrend, Juliane E-mail: G.Robbers@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2009-04-15

    The cosmological backreaction arises when one directly averages the Einstein equations to recover an effective Robertson-Walker cosmology, rather than assuming a background a priori. While usually discussed in the context of dark energy, strictly speaking any cosmological model should be recovered from such a procedure. We apply the scalar spatial averaging formalism for the first time to linear Robertson-Walker universes containing matter, radiation and dark energy. The formalism employed is general and incorporates systems of multiple fluids with ease, allowing us to consider quantitatively the universe from deep radiation domination up to the present day in a natural, unified manner. Employing modified Boltzmann codes we evaluate numerically the discrepancies between the assumed and the averaged behaviour arising from the quadratic terms, finding the largest deviations for an Einstein-de Sitter universe, increasing rapidly with Hubble rate to a 0.01% effect for h = 0.701. For the {Lambda}CDM concordance model, the backreaction is of the order of {Omega}{sub eff}{sup 0} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, with those for dark energy models being within a factor of two or three. The impacts at recombination are of the order of 10{sup -8} and those in deep radiation domination asymptote to a constant value. While the effective equations of state of the backreactions in Einstein-de Sitter, concordance and quintessence models are generally dust-like, a backreaction with an equation of state w{sub eff} < -1/3 can be found for strongly phantom models.

  2. Effective dose evaluation for BNCT treatment in the epithermal neutron beam at THOR.

    PubMed

    Wang, J N; Huang, C K; Tsai, W C; Liu, Y H; Jiang, S H

    2011-12-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the effective dose as well as equivalent doses of several organs of an adult hermaphrodite mathematical phantom according to the definition of ICRP Publication 60 for BNCT treatments of brain tumors in the epithermal neutron beam at THOR. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code was used for the calculation of the average absorbed dose of each organ. The effective doses for a typical brain tumor treatment with a tumor treatment dose of 20 Gy-eq were evaluated to be 0.59 and 0.35 Sv for the LLAT and TOP irradiation geometries, respectively. In addition to the stochastic effect, it was found that it is also likely to produce deterministic effects, such as cataracts and depression of haematopoiesis. PMID:21530281

  3. Effect of particle size on the average heat-transfer rate from a cylinder in a liquid-penetrated granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, V. V.; Rzaev, A. I.

    1992-08-01

    Experimental results on the average heat transfer from a cylinder in a liquid-penetrated granular bed are presented and the dependence of the heat transfer rate on the particle size in the bed is found.

  4. Steady and Unsteady Flow Effects of Circumferential Grooves Casing Treatment in a Transonic Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2011-01-01

    The current paper reports on an investigation of steady and unsteady flow effects of circumferential grooves casing treatment in a transonic compressor rotor. Circumferential grooves casing treatment is used mainly to increase stall margin in axial compressors with a relatively small decrease in aerodynamic efficiency. It is widely believed that flow mechanisms of circumferential grooves casing treatment near stall conditions are not yet well understood even though this treatment has been used widely in real engines. Numerical analysis based on steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) has been the primary tool used to understand flow mechanism for circumferential grooves casing treatment. Although steady RANS explains some flow effects of circumferential grooves casing treatment, it does not calculate all the measured changes in the compressor characteristics. Therefore, design optimization of circumferential grooves with steady RANS has not been very successful. As a compressor operates toward the stall condition, the flow field becomes transient. Major sources of self-generated flow unsteadiness are shock oscillation and interaction between the passage shock and the tip leakage vortex. In the present paper, an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach is applied to study the effects of circumferential grooves in a transonic compressor. The results from URANS are compared with the results from RANS and measured data. The current investigation shows that there are significant unsteady flow effects on the performance of the circumferential grooves casing treatment. For the currently investigated rotor, the unsteady effects are of the same magnitude as the steady effects in terms of extending the compressor stall margin.

  5. Nonparametric Bounds and Sensitivity Analysis of Treatment Effects

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Amy; Hudgens, Michael G.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Fine, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers conducting inference about the effect of a treatment (or exposure) on an outcome of interest. In the ideal setting where treatment is assigned randomly, under certain assumptions the treatment effect is identifiable from the observable data and inference is straightforward. However, in other settings such as observational studies or randomized trials with noncompliance, the treatment effect is no longer identifiable without relying on untestable assumptions. Nonetheless, the observable data often do provide some information about the effect of treatment, that is, the parameter of interest is partially identifiable. Two approaches are often employed in this setting: (i) bounds are derived for the treatment effect under minimal assumptions, or (ii) additional untestable assumptions are invoked that render the treatment effect identifiable and then sensitivity analysis is conducted to assess how inference about the treatment effect changes as the untestable assumptions are varied. Approaches (i) and (ii) are considered in various settings, including assessing principal strata effects, direct and indirect effects and effects of time-varying exposures. Methods for drawing formal inference about partially identified parameters are also discussed. PMID:25663743

  6. [Effectiveness of Nilzan and Dovenix in the treatment of fascioliasis in cattle and sheep].

    PubMed

    Vyhnálek, J; Kocman, J; Skaloud, J

    1976-07-01

    The authors tested the effectivity of the foreign preparations Nilzan (tetramisole ++ oxyclozanide) and Dovenix (nitroxynil) in the treatment of cattle and sheep naturally invaded by Fasciola hepatica. The effectiveness of the two preparations was evaluated on the basis of the results of coprological examination in the test and control animals prior to treatment and in two intervals after treatment. In slightly invaded cattle (the average egg number in 3 g of faeces in 28 test cows was 1.46 per animal) the last examination (4 weeks after treatment) showed 100-per-cent extenseffectiveness and intenseffectiveness of both preparations. When the test was finished in sheep (average number of eggs in 3 g of faeces in 45 test ewes--5.40 per animal) six weeks after treatment, the EE of Nilzan was 86.7% and IE 97.4%; in Dovenix EE was 93.4% and IE 99.0%. Both preparations were accepted well, without any side-effects or unfavourable phenomena related to their application. PMID:827048

  7. Making and breaking the sediment record - characterising effects of tsunamis, storms and average conditions on dune erosion and recovery: a forward modelling exploration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelvink, Dano; Costas, Susana

    2015-04-01

    Geological records contain a wealth of information about accretionary episodes in the life of a coastal profile, such as age and type of the deposits and circumstances during which the accretion took place; of erosional events mainly the final limit of the erosion and circumstances under which the erosion took place can be estimated. To obtain a more complete picture of the events shaping the sedimentary record and transport processes involved, process-based modelling can be a useful tool (e.g. Apotsos et al., 2011). However, application of such modelling to different types of events remains a challenge. In our presentation we intend to show examples of the effects of different events on the stratigraphic record and to discuss the challenges related to the modelling of each of these types of events. The test site chosen is the Costa da Caparica, south of Lisbon, Portugal. The stratigraphic record and progradation rates of the coastal were obtained combining geophysical (Ground Penetrating Radar) and dating (Optically Stimulating Luminescence) techniques, which document very recent ages for the preserved coastal barrier. Within the record, we focus on a period around the big tsunami of 1755, during which the shoreline experienced a long-term prograding trend with evidence of severe erosion events. Rather than trying to exactly reproduce the stratigraphy observed here, we will carry out exploratory simulations to create 'building blocks' of stratigraphy related to the different types of events, which we can loosely compare with observations reported in Rebelo et al. (2013). The model applied for all simulations is XBeach (Roelvink et al., 2009), which is used in three different modes (no short waves, time-varying wave action balance, stationary wave action balance, respectively) to accommodate the impact of tsunamis, storms, and average conditions; for the latter we include the dune and associated processes in a simplified aeolian transport and response model. In all

  8. Cost-effectiveness of trachoma control measures: comparing targeted household treatment and mass treatment of children.

    PubMed Central

    Frick, K. D.; Lietman, T. M.; Holm, S. O.; Jha, H. C.; Chaudhary, J. S.; Bhatta, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study compares the cost-effectiveness of targeted household treatment and mass treatment of children in the most westerly part of Nepal. METHODS: Effectiveness was measured as the percentage point change in the prevalence of trachoma. Resource measures included personnel time required for treatment, transportation, the time that study subjects had to wait to receive treatment, and the quantity of azithromycin used. The costs of the programme were calculated from the perspectives of the public health programme sponsor, the study subjects, and the society as a whole. FINDINGS: Previous studies have indicated no statistically significant differences in effectiveness, and the present work showed no significant differences in total personnel and transportation costs per child aged 1-10 years, the total time that adults spent waiting, or the quantity of azithromycin per child. However, the mass treatment of children was slightly more effective and used less of each resource per child aged 1-10 years than the targeted treatment of households. CONCLUSION: From all perspectives, the mass treatment of children is at least as effective and no more expensive than targeted household treatment, notwithstanding the absence of statistically significant differences. Less expensive targeting methods are required in order to make targeted household treatment more cost-effective. PMID:11285663

  9. Estimation of the hydraulic conductivity of a two-dimensional fracture network using effective medium theory and power-law averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, R. W.; Leung, C. T.

    2009-12-01

    Most oil and gas reservoirs, as well as most potential sites for nuclear waste disposal, are naturally fractured. In these sites, the network of fractures will provide the main path for fluid to flow through the rock mass. In many cases, the fracture density is so high as to make it impractical to model it with a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. For such rock masses, it would be useful to have recourse to analytical, or semi-analytical, methods to estimate the macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the fracture network. We have investigated single-phase fluid flow through generated stochastically two-dimensional fracture networks. The centers and orientations of the fractures are uniformly distributed, whereas their lengths follow a lognormal distribution. The aperture of each fracture is correlated with its length, either through direct proportionality, or through a nonlinear relationship. The discrete fracture network flow and transport simulator NAPSAC, developed by Serco (Didcot, UK), is used to establish the “true” macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the network. We then attempt to match this value by starting with the individual fracture conductances, and using various upscaling methods. Kirkpatrick’s effective medium approximation, which works well for pore networks on a core scale, generally underestimates the conductivity of the fracture networks. We attribute this to the fact that the conductances of individual fracture segments (between adjacent intersections with other fractures) are correlated with each other, whereas Kirkpatrick’s approximation assumes no correlation. The power-law averaging approach proposed by Desbarats for porous media is able to match the numerical value, using power-law exponents that generally lie between 0 (geometric mean) and 1 (harmonic mean). The appropriate exponent can be correlated with statistical parameters that characterize the fracture density.

  10. HEALTH EFFECTS OF A WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data obtained as part of a comprehensive community health study conducted during 1965-1971 were utilized to examine the incidence of acute illness in a population surrounding an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant and a control location in Tecumseh, Michigan. Study partic...

  11. The effective treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Lucy Anne

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for 75% of all skin cancers and its incidence is rising by between 3-8% each year (Szeimies and Karrer, 2006). As a result, the development of new therapeutic strategies and treatment methods for the removal of BCC is crucial in combating what is a growing problem. Surgical techniques, such as Mohs micrographic surgery, cryotherapy/cryosurgery, curettage and carbon dioxide laser therapy, as well as non-surgical techniques, such as radiotherapy, are recognized as potential options. The aim of this article is to critically review some of the current literature in order to substantiate the efficacy of destructive and non-surgical techniques as reliable alternatives to surgery for the management/removal of BCCs. The success rate, cosmetic outcome, pain and discomfort, recurrence rates, and the cost associated with each method are explored and discussed. Results of the review indicate that no one treatment is completely superior. According to the research, simple excision and Mohs micrographic surgery provide the lowest recurrence rates. However, in relation to success rates, patients tolerance of the treatment and cosmetic outcomes, and depending on the type of BCC involved, other treatment methods do offer reliable alternatives. PMID:19329898

  12. Personality and Treatment Effectiveness in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skoog, Dagna K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared pre- and posttreatment Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory profiles of female inpatients (N=12) with anorexia nervosa. Results showed change after treatment, and found that pretreatment profiles obtained at a different hospital were remarkably similar, which suggests a common constellation of personality characteristics in…

  13. Effective Treatment in Home-Based Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simboli, Tim; Darou, Wes G.

    The use of home-based treatment programs has become increasingly popular over the last few years. Such a program is offered by the Youth Services Bureau of Ottawa-Carleton through its Detached Worker Program. This program uses paraprofessionals who employ an eclectic combination of behavioral, client-centered, family and reality therapies. Two…

  14. Neutron resonance averaging with filtered beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron resonance averaging using filtered beams from a reactor source has proven to be an effective nuclear structure tool within certain limitations. These limitations are imposed by the nature of the averaging process, which produces fluctuations in radiative intensities. The fluctuations have been studied quantitatively. Resonance averaging also gives us information about initial or capture state parameters, in particular the photon strength function. Suitable modifications of the filtered beams are suggested for the enhancement of non-resonant processes.

  15. Making treatment effect inferences from multiple-baseline data: the utility of multilevel modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Ferron, John M; Bell, Bethany A; Hess, Melinda R; Rendina-Gobioff, Gianna; Hibbard, Susan T

    2009-05-01

    Multiple-baseline studies are prevalent in behavioral research, but questions remain about how to best analyze the resulting data. Monte Carlo methods were used to examine the utility of multilevel models for multiple-baseline data under conditions that varied in the number of participants, number of repeated observations per participant, variance in baseline levels, variance in treatment effects, and amount of autocorrelation in the Level 1 errors. Interval estimates of the average treatment effect were examined for two specifications of the Level 1 error structure (sigma(2)I and first-order autoregressive) and for five different methods of estimating the degrees of freedom (containment, residual, between-within, Satterthwaite, and Kenward-Roger). When the Satterthwaite or Kenward-Roger method was used and an autoregressive Level 1 error structure was specified, the interval estimates of the average treatment effect were relatively accurate. Conversely, the interval estimates of the treatment effect variance were inaccurate, and the corresponding point estimates were biased. PMID:19363177

  16. Heterogeneous Treatment Effects: What Does a Regression Estimate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, William

    2010-01-01

    Regressions that control for confounding factors are the workhorse of evaluation research. When treatment effects are heterogeneous, however, the workhorse regression leads to estimated treatment effects that lack behavioral interpretations even when the selection on observables assumption holds. Regressions that use propensity scores as weights…

  17. Effect of chiropractic treatment on hip extension ability and running velocity among young male running athletes☆

    PubMed Central

    Sandell, Jörgen; Palmgren, Per J.; Björndahl, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study investigates the effect of chiropractic treatment on hip joint extension ability and running velocity. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, controlled experimental pilot study. Seventeen healthy male junior athletes (age, 17-20 years) training in middle distance running were recruited from local Swedish athletic associations. Hip extension ability and running velocity were measured before and after the study period. Chiropractic investigations comprised motion palpation of the sacroiliac and hip joints and modified Thomas test of the ability to extend the leg. In the treatment group, findings of restrictive joint dysfunctions formed the basis for the choice of chiropractic treatment. The interventions were based on a pragmatic approach consisting of high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulations targeted toward, but not exclusively to, the sacroiliac joints. Results The treatment group showed significantly greater hip extension ability after chiropractic treatment than did controls (P < .05). Participants in the treatment group did not show a significant decrease in time for running 30 m after treatment (average, −0.065 seconds; P = .0572), whereas the difference was even smaller for the control subjects (average, −0.003; P = .7344). Conclusions The results imply that chiropractic treatment can improve hip extensibility in subjects with restriction as measured by the modified Thomas test. It could be speculated that the running step was amplified by increasing the angle of step through facilitated hip joint extension ability. The possible effect of chiropractic treatment to enhance the running velocity, by increasing the hip joint extension ability and thereby increasing the running step, remains unproven. PMID:19674719

  18. The effects of the variations in sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability in the estimation of average wind speed by SEASAT-SASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    The average wind speeds from the scatterometer (SASS) on the ocean observing satellite SEASAT are found to be generally higher than the average wind speeds from ship reports. In this study, two factors, sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability, are identified which affect microwave scatter and, therefore, wave development. The problem of relating satellite observations to a fictitious quantity, such as the neutral wind, that has to be derived from in situ observations with models is examined. The study also demonstrates the dependence of SASS winds on sea surface temperature at low wind speeds, possibly due to temperature-dependent factors, such as water viscosity, which affect wave development.

  19. Duration Effects in Contingency Management Treatment of Methamphetamine Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Roll, John M.; Chudzynski, Joy; Cameron, Jennifer M.; Howell, Donelle N.; McPherson, Sterling

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether different durations of contingency management (CM) in conjunction with psychosocial treatment produced different rates of abstinence among methamphetamine dependent individuals. Participants were randomized to one of four 16-week treatment conditions: standard psychosocial treatment or psychosocial treatment plus one of three durations of CM (one-month, two-month, or four-month). A total of 118 participants were randomized to the four treatment conditions. There were significant differences across treatment conditions for number of consecutive days of methamphetamine abstinence (p < 0.05). These differences were in the hypothesized direction, as participants were more likely to remain abstinent through the 16-week trial as CM duration increased. A significant effect of treatment condition (p < 0.05) and time (p < 0.05) on abstinence over time was also found. Longer durations of CM were more effective for maintaining methamphetamine abstinence. PMID:23708468

  20. Effect of 3 postmortem electrical stimulation treatments on the quality of early deboned broiler breast meat.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, H; Savage, E M; Lawrence, K

    2010-08-01

    The present experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) immediately prescalding (PS), ES immediately postdefeathering (PD), or PS combined with PD (PSPD) on the quality of early deboned (2 h) broiler breast muscles, pectoralis major (fillets), and pectoralis minor (tenders). No stimulation, early-deboned (2 h), and 24-h deboned (24 h) fillets were used for the comparison. The 42-d-old broiler carcasses were electrically stimulated with pulsed current at 200 V for 30 s over a 90-s time interval (total of 1 min over 180 s for PSPD), and breast meat was deboned 2 h postmortem. Quality indicators evaluated were CIE L*, a*, and b* color and pH of the raw fillets and cook yields and Warner-Bratzler (WB) shear force of the fillets and tenders. There were no differences in raw fillet color, pH, and cook yields of both the fillets and tenders between the 3 ES treatments. Effects of different ES treatments on meat WB shear force values varied with breast muscles. For the fillets, the average WB shear force values of both the PS and PSPD samples, which were not different from each other, were significantly lower than those of the PD samples. For the tenders, there were no differences in the average shear force values between the 3 ES treatments. Regardless of ES treatment and breast muscle, early deboned broiler breast meat from ES carcasses required significantly less force to shear than the 2-h control. These results indicate that ES can tenderize early deboned poultry breast muscles; however, the effectiveness of ES tenderization varies with ES treatments for the fillets. The PS treatment is more effective in reducing fillet shear values than PD, and there is no further reduction in shear values with PSPD compared with the PS treatment. PMID:20634531

  1. Experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the phase averaged performance characteristics of marine current turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luznik, L.; Lust, E.; Flack, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are few studies describing the interaction between marine current turbines and an overlying surface gravity wave field. In this work we present an experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the wave phase averaged performance characteristics of a marine current turbine model. Measurements are performed with a 1/25 scale (diameter D=0.8m) two bladed horizontal axis turbine towed in the large (116m long) towing tank at the U.S. Naval Academy equipped with a dual-flap, servo-controlled wave maker. Three regular waves with wavelengths of 15.8, 8.8 and 3.9m with wave heights adjusted such that all waveforms have the same energy input per unit width are produced by the wave maker and model turbine is towed into the waves at constant carriage speed of 1.68 m/s. This representing the case of waves travelling in the same direction as the mean current. Thrust and torque developed by the model turbine are measured using a dynamometer mounted in line with the turbine shaft. Shaft rotation speed and blade position are measured using in in-house designed shaft position indexing system. The tip speed ratio (TSR) is adjusted using a hysteresis brake which is attached to the output shaft. Free surface elevation and wave parameters are measured with two optical wave height sensors, one located in the turbine rotor plane and other one diameter upstream of the rotor. All instruments are synchronized in time and data is sampled at a rate of 700 Hz. All measured quantities are conditionally sampled as a function of the measured surface elevation and transformed to wave phase space using the Hilbert Transform. Phenomena observed in earlier experiments with the same turbine such as phase lag in the torque signal and an increase in thrust due to Stokes drift are examined and presented with the present data as well as spectral analysis of the torque and thrust data.

  2. Strategies for maximizing clinical effectiveness in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Rajiv; Targum, Steven D; Nasrallah, Henry A; Ross, Ruth

    2006-11-01

    The ultimate clinical objective in the treatment of schizophrenia is to enable affected individuals to lead maximally productive and personally meaningful lives. As with other chronic diseases that lack a definitive cure, the individual's service/recovery plan must include treatment interventions directed towards decreasing manifestations of the illness, rehabilitative services directed towards enhancing adaptive skills, and social support mobilization aimed at optimizing function and quality of life. In this review, we provide a conceptual framework for considering approaches for maximizing the effectiveness of the array of treatments and other services towards promoting recovery of persons with schizophrenia. We discuss pharmacological, psychological, and social strategies that decrease the burden of the disease of schizophrenia on affected individuals and their families while adding the least possible burden of treatment. In view of the multitude of treatments necessary to optimize outcomes for individuals with schizophrenia, effective coordination of these services is essential. In addition to providing best possible clinical assessment and pharmacological treatment, the psychiatrist must function as an effective leader of the treatment team. To do so, however, the psychiatrist must be knowledgeable about the range of available services, must have skills in clinical-administrative leadership, and must accept the responsibility of coordinating the planning and delivery of this multidimensional array of treatments and services. Finally, the effectiveness of providing optimal individualized treatment/rehabilitation is best gauged by measuring progress on multiple effectiveness domains. Approaches for efficient and reliable assessment are discussed. PMID:17122696

  3. The effects of sweep numbers per average and protocol type on the accuracy of the p300-based concealed information test.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Ariana B; Hu, Xiaoqing; Rosenfeld, J Peter

    2014-03-01

    In the first of two experiments, we compared the accuracy of the P300 concealed information test protocol as a function of numbers of trials experienced by subjects and ERP averages analyzed by investigators. Contrary to Farwell et al. (Cogn Neurodyn 6(2):115-154, 2012), we found no evidence that 100 trial based averages are more accurate than 66 or 33 trial based averages (all numbers led to accuracies of 84-94 %). There was actually a trend favoring the lowest trial numbers. The second study compared numbers of irrelevant stimuli recalled and recognized in the 3-stimulus protocol versus the complex trial protocol (Rosenfeld in Memory detection: theory and application of the concealed information test, Cambridge University Press, New York, pp 63-89, 2011). Again, in contrast to expectations from Farwell et al. (Cogn Neurodyn 6(2):115-154, 2012), there were no differences between protocols, although there were more irrelevant stimuli recognized than recalled, and irrelevant 4-digit number group stimuli were neither recalled nor recognized as well as irrelevant city name stimuli. We therefore conclude that stimulus processing in the P300-based complex trial protocol-with no more than 33 sweep averages-is adequate to allow accurate detection of concealed information. PMID:24531833

  4. Asymmetric inhibitory treatment effects in multilingual aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Mira; Naghibolhosseini, Maryam; Conner, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Findings from recent psycholinguistic studies of bilingual processing support the hypothesis that both languages of a bilingual are always active and that bilinguals continually engage in processes of language selection. This view aligns with the convergence hypothesis of bilingual language representation (Abutalebi & Green, 2008). Furthermore, it is hypothesized that when bilinguals perform a task in one language they need to inhibit their other, non-target language(s) (e.g., Costa, Miozzo, & Caramazza, 1999) and that stronger inhibition is required when the task is performed in the weaker language than in the stronger one (e.g., Costa & Santesteban, 2004). The study of multilingual individuals who acquire aphasia resulting from a focal brain lesion offers a unique opportunity to test the convergence hypothesis and the inhibition asymmetry. We report on a trilingual person with chronic non-fluent aphasia who at the time of testing demonstrated greater impairment in her first acquired language (Persian) than in her third, later-learned language (English). She received treatment in English followed by treatment in Persian. An examination of her connected language production revealed improvement in her grammatical skills in each language following intervention in that language, but decreased grammatical accuracy in English following treatment in Persian. The increased error rate was evident in structures that are not shared by the two languages (e.g., use of auxiliary verbs). The results support the prediction that greater inhibition is applied to the stronger language than to the weaker language, regardless of their age of acquisition. We interpret the findings as consistent with convergence theories that posit overlapping neuronal representation and simultaneous activation of multiple languages, and with proficiency-dependent asymmetric inhibition in multilinguals. PMID:24499302

  5. Towards a framework for treatment effectiveness in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Juckel, Georg; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Gorwood, Philip; Mosolov, Sergey; Pani, Luca; Rossi, Alessandro; Sanjuan, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prompt administration of antipsychotic treatment that is adhered to is essential for the optimal treatment of schizophrenia. Many patients have benefited from the advent of second-generation antipsychotics, which can offer good symptomatic control with reduced incidence of extrapyramidal symptoms, although with higher risk of metabolic side effects. It is unsurprising that accounts as to whether first- and second-generation antipsychotics differ in their efficacy vary, since treatment effectiveness is a broad notion and difficult to define. Objectives Numerous factors may be used to gauge treatment effectiveness and, while it has largely been defined in terms of improvements in four domains (symptoms of disease, treatment burden, disease burden, and health and wellness), the real-world clinical utility of this consensus is unclear. Therefore, this article aims to provide a framework that can aid psychiatrists in making assessments about treatment effectiveness. Methods and results A panel of 12 psychiatrists and psychopharmacologists convened to develop and propose an accessible and globally-applicable framework for assessing the effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments in patients with schizophrenia. Following presentation of a preliminary proposal to a wider group of psychiatrists from across Europe, it was refined into a framework comprising five domains: symptomatic remission and retention of treatment; affective symptoms; cognitive functioning; treatment satisfaction; and personal and social functioning – each of which is discussed in this article. Conclusions This article provides a framework that can aid psychiatrists in making assessments about treatment effectiveness. It is anticipated that the framework outlined here may contribute to improving clinical practice through the promotion of a patient-centered approach to the assessment of treatment effectiveness, using five specified domains, in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25285010

  6. Common Language Effect Size for Multiple Treatment Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaofeng Steven

    2015-01-01

    Researchers who need to explain treatment effects to laypeople can translate Cohen's effect size (standardized mean difference) to a common language effect size--a probability of a random observation from one population being larger than a random observation from the other population. This common language effect size can be extended to represent…

  7. [Investigation of the effect of functional treatment in skeletal Class III cases on the profile facial esthetics].

    PubMed

    Altuğ, Z; Erdem, D; Rübendüz, M

    1990-04-01

    In this study, effects of chin-cap therapy on profile facial esthetics were investigated. 30 patients indicating skeletal and dental Cl III anomalies were divided into two groups. The first group, including 21 patients with the average age of 11 was treated by chin-cap therapy, average treatment time being 0.7 years. This group involved 10 females and 11 males. The second group involved 9 persons, 5 females and 4 males, with the average age of 9.7, average control period being 2 years. The investigation was carried out on the 60 lateral cephalometric films taken from both groups. 2 angular and 9 soft tissue cephalometric measurements were made on each film. The comparisons between the groups indicated that the treatment affected the soft tissue measurements positively. PMID:2101659

  8. Continuum treatment of electronic polarization effect.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu-Hong; Luo, Ray

    2007-03-01

    A continuum treatment of electronic polarization has been explored for in molecular mechanics simulations in implicit solvents. The dielectric constant for molecule interior is the only parameter in the continuum polarizable model. A value of 4 is found to yield optimal agreement with high-level ab initio quantum mechanical calculations for the tested molecular systems. Interestingly, its performance is not sensitive to the definition of molecular volume, in which the continuum electronic polarization is defined. In this model, quantum mechanical electrostatic field in different dielectric environments from vacuum, low-dielectric organic solvent, and water can be used simultaneously in atomic charge fitting to achieve consistent treatment of electrostatic interactions. The tests show that a single set of atomic charges can be used consistently in different dielectric environments and different molecular conformations, and the atomic charges transfer well from training monomers to tested dimers. The preliminary study gives us the hope of developing a continuum polarizable force field for more consistent simulations of proteins and nucleic acids in implicit solvents. PMID:17362100

  9. Continuum treatment of electronic polarization effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu-Hong; Luo, Ray

    2007-03-01

    A continuum treatment of electronic polarization has been explored for in molecular mechanics simulations in implicit solvents. The dielectric constant for molecule interior is the only parameter in the continuum polarizable model. A value of 4 is found to yield optimal agreement with high-level ab initio quantum mechanical calculations for the tested molecular systems. Interestingly, its performance is not sensitive to the definition of molecular volume, in which the continuum electronic polarization is defined. In this model, quantum mechanical electrostatic field in different dielectric environments from vacuum, low-dielectric organic solvent, and water can be used simultaneously in atomic charge fitting to achieve consistent treatment of electrostatic interactions. The tests show that a single set of atomic charges can be used consistently in different dielectric environments and different molecular conformations, and the atomic charges transfer well from training monomers to tested dimers. The preliminary study gives us the hope of developing a continuum polarizable force field for more consistent simulations of proteins and nucleic acids in implicit solvents.

  10. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  11. Inmate attitudes toward treatment: mental health service utilization and treatment effects.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Lucas B; Morgan, Robert D

    2011-08-01

    This study examined inmate attitudes toward treatment, mental health treatment utilization, and treatment effects that maximize treatment effectiveness. Participants consisted of 278 incarcerated male adult offenders from the Kansas Department of Corrections. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that inmate attitudes toward treatment were predictive of the number of mental health treatment sessions (dosage) inmates received. Hierarchical linear regression analyses indicated positive help-seeking attitudes were associated with institutional behavior (decreased number and severity of disciplinary infractions) and scores on a measure assessing risk for future criminal behavior; however, the amount of mental health treatment an inmate received (treatment dosage) was associated with problematic institutional behavior (i.e., increased severity and number of disciplinary infractions). These results indicated that treatment dosage and behavioral outcomes were impacted by inmate attitudes toward treatment. As a result, correctional psychologists may be better able to predict which inmates will receive the most benefit from services. Implications of these findings for practitioners and policy makers are discussed. PMID:20499269

  12. Effective physical treatment for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Maher, C G

    2004-01-01

    It is now feasible to adopt an evidence-based approach when providing physical treatment for patients with chronic LBP. A summary of the efficacy of a range of physical treatments is provided in Table 1. The evidence-based primary care options are exercise, laser, massage, and spinal manipulation; however, the latter three have small or transient effects that limit their value as therapies for chronic LBP. In contrast, exercise produces large reductions in pain and disability, a feature that suggests that exercise should play a major role in the management of chronic LBP. Physical treatments, such as acupuncture, backschool, hydrotherapy, lumbar supports, magnets, TENS, traction, ultrasound, Pilates therapy, Feldenkrais therapy, Alexander technique, and craniosacral therapy are either of unknown value or ineffective and so should not be considered. Outside of primary care, multidisciplinary treatment or functional restoration is effective; however, the high cost probably means that these programs should be reserved for patients who do not respond to cheaper treatment options for chronic LBP. Although there are now effective treatment options for chronic LBP, it needs to be acknowledged that the problem of chronic LBP is far from solved. Though treatments can provide marked improvements in the patient's condition, the available evidence suggests that the typical chronic LBP patient is left with some residual pain and disability. Developing new, more powerful treatments and refining the current group of known effective treatments is the challenge for the future. PMID:15062718

  13. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  14. Effects of chemical treatments on fresh-cut papaya.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Silvana; Lai Reyes, Andrés Enrique; Trigo, Juliana Moreno; Sarriés, Gabriel Adrián; Spoto, Marta Helena Fillet

    2016-01-01

    Four treatments (control, 0.1% cinnamaldehyde, 0.75% calcium chloride and combination of 0.1% cinnamaldehyde and 0.75% calcium chloride) were used to evaluate chemical effects on shelf life, quality and sensory acceptability of fresh-cut papaya (Carica papaya L.). Papaya slices were packed and covered with polypropylene film, stored at 5 °C; and evaluated after 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 days for microbiological and physicochemical changes. A sensory evaluation was performed at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 days. There was no occurrence of Salmonella, Escherichia coli or psychotropic bacteria. The cinnamaldehyde alone and a combination of cinnamaldehyde and calcium chloride treatments yielded better control of the total coliforms. The combination treatment decreased the CO2 concentration and increased the maintenance of papaya firmness. All the treatments had acceptability. The combination treatment was the most effective treatment for flavor, taste, and preservation until day 12. PMID:26213093

  15. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VKmore » model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.« less

  16. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VK model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.

  17. Estimating restricted mean treatment effects with stacked survival models.

    PubMed

    Wey, Andrew; Vock, David M; Connett, John; Rudser, Kyle

    2016-08-30

    The difference in restricted mean survival times between two groups is a clinically relevant summary measure. With observational data, there may be imbalances in confounding variables between the two groups. One approach to account for such imbalances is estimating a covariate-adjusted restricted mean difference by modeling the covariate-adjusted survival distribution and then marginalizing over the covariate distribution. Because the estimator for the restricted mean difference is defined by the estimator for the covariate-adjusted survival distribution, it is natural to expect that a better estimator of the covariate-adjusted survival distribution is associated with a better estimator of the restricted mean difference. We therefore propose estimating restricted mean differences with stacked survival models. Stacked survival models estimate a weighted average of several survival models by minimizing predicted error. By including a range of parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric models, stacked survival models can robustly estimate a covariate-adjusted survival distribution and, therefore, the restricted mean treatment effect in a wide range of scenarios. We demonstrate through a simulation study that better performance of the covariate-adjusted survival distribution often leads to better mean squared error of the restricted mean difference although there are notable exceptions. In addition, we demonstrate that the proposed estimator can perform nearly as well as Cox regression when the proportional hazards assumption is satisfied and significantly better when proportional hazards is violated. Finally, the proposed estimator is illustrated with data from the United Network for Organ Sharing to evaluate post-lung transplant survival between large-volume and small-volume centers. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26934835

  18. Treatment effects in randomized longitudinal trials with different types of nonignorable dropout.

    PubMed

    Yang, Manshu; Maxwell, Scott E

    2014-06-01

    Randomized longitudinal designs are commonly used in psychological and medical studies to investigate the treatment effect of an intervention or an experimental drug. Traditional linear mixed-effects models for randomized longitudinal designs are limited to maximum-likelihood methods that assume data are missing at random (MAR). In practice, because longitudinal data are often likely to be missing not at random (MNAR), the traditional mixed-effects model might lead to biased estimates of treatment effects. In such cases, an alternative approach is to utilize pattern-mixture models. In this article, a Monte Carlo simulation study compares the traditional mixed-effects model and 2 different approaches to pattern-mixture models (i.e., the differencing-averaging method and the averaging-differencing method) across different missing mechanisms (i.e., MAR, random-coefficient-dependent MNAR, or outcome-dependent MNAR) and different types of treatment-condition-based missingness. Results suggest that the traditional mixed-effects model is well suited for analyzing data with the MAR mechanism whereas the proposed pattern-mixture averaging-differencing model has the best overall performance for analyzing data with the MNAR mechanism. No method was found that could provide unbiased estimates under every missing mechanism, leading to a practical suggestion that researchers need to consider why data are missing and should also consider performing a sensitivity analysis to ascertain the extent to which their results are consistent across various missingness assumptions. Applications of different estimation methods are also illustrated using a real-data example. PMID:24079928

  19. Costs and water quality effects of wastewater treatment plant centralization

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C.M.; Broomfield, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    The costs and water quality impacts of two regional configurations of municipal wastewater treatment plants in Northeastern Illinois are compared. In one configuration, several small treatment plants are consolidated into a smaller number of regional facilities. In the other, the smaller plants continue to operate. Costs for modifying the plants to obtain various levels of pollutant removal are estimated using a simulation model that considers the type of equipment existing at the plants and the costs of modifying that equipment to obtain a range of effluent levels for various pollutants. A dynamic water-quality/hydrology simulation model is used to determine the water quality effects of the various treatment technologies and pollutant levels. Cost and water quality data are combined and the cost-effectiveness of the two treatment configurations is compared. The regionalized treatment-plant configuration is found to be the more cost-effective.

  20. Psychotherapy: The Humanistic (and Effective) Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampold, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well established that psychotherapy is remarkably effective, the change process in psychotherapy is not well understood. Psychotherapy is compared with medicine and cultural healing practices to argue that critical aspects of psychotherapy involve human processes that are used in religious, spiritual, and cultural healing practices.…

  1. Microbial contamination in sprouts: how effective is seed disinfection treatment?

    PubMed

    Ding, Hongliu; Fu, Tong-Jen; Smith, Michelle A

    2013-04-01

    Microbial contamination of sprouts by Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157 : H7 has been a common cause of foodborne diseases and a continuing challenge to the sprout industry. Seed disinfection treatment has been recommended as a major intervention step in a multihurdle approach to reduce the risk of illness associated with contaminated sprouts. U.S. Food and Drug Administration cited 20000 ppm calcium hypochlorite as an example treatment in its recommendation for seed treatment and this treatment has been considered the reference standard for seed disinfection treatment for over a decade. However, promising new disinfection treatments have emerged in recent years. In this study, we summarized published data and compared the efficacies of different disinfection methods in the reduction of microbial contamination on seeds. Our findings suggest that while biological interventions such as competitive exclusion and certain chemical treatments appear to be similar to 20000 ppm calcium hypochlorite for seed disinfection, physical methods especially high pressure may be more effective than the reference standard regardless of the type of bacteria or seed. The combination of 2 or more treatments, sequentially or simultaneously, may further improve disinfection results. Since treatments with high levels of chemical disinfectants, especially 20000 ppm calcium hypochlorite, can pose environmental and worker safety risks, alternative intervention approaches should be considered. Additional studies to confirm the greater efficacy of certain physical and combined seed disinfection treatments and to identify other effective management strategies are needed to further improve sprout safety. PMID:23464679

  2. Spatial limitations in averaging social cues.

    PubMed

    Florey, Joseph; Clifford, Colin W G; Dakin, Steven; Mareschal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The direction of social attention from groups provides stronger cueing than from an individual. It has previously been shown that both basic visual features such as size or orientation and more complex features such as face emotion and identity can be averaged across multiple elements. Here we used an equivalent noise procedure to compare observers' ability to average social cues with their averaging of a non-social cue. Estimates of observers' internal noise (uncertainty associated with processing any individual) and sample-size (the effective number of gaze-directions pooled) were derived by fitting equivalent noise functions to discrimination thresholds. We also used reverse correlation analysis to estimate the spatial distribution of samples used by participants. Averaging of head-rotation and cone-rotation was less noisy and more efficient than averaging of gaze direction, though presenting only the eye region of faces at a larger size improved gaze averaging performance. The reverse correlation analysis revealed greater sampling areas for head rotation compared to gaze. We attribute these differences in averaging between gaze and head cues to poorer visual processing of faces in the periphery. The similarity between head and cone averaging are examined within the framework of a general mechanism for averaging of object rotation. PMID:27573589

  3. Spatial limitations in averaging social cues

    PubMed Central

    Florey, Joseph; Clifford, Colin W. G.; Dakin, Steven; Mareschal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The direction of social attention from groups provides stronger cueing than from an individual. It has previously been shown that both basic visual features such as size or orientation and more complex features such as face emotion and identity can be averaged across multiple elements. Here we used an equivalent noise procedure to compare observers’ ability to average social cues with their averaging of a non-social cue. Estimates of observers’ internal noise (uncertainty associated with processing any individual) and sample-size (the effective number of gaze-directions pooled) were derived by fitting equivalent noise functions to discrimination thresholds. We also used reverse correlation analysis to estimate the spatial distribution of samples used by participants. Averaging of head-rotation and cone-rotation was less noisy and more efficient than averaging of gaze direction, though presenting only the eye region of faces at a larger size improved gaze averaging performance. The reverse correlation analysis revealed greater sampling areas for head rotation compared to gaze. We attribute these differences in averaging between gaze and head cues to poorer visual processing of faces in the periphery. The similarity between head and cone averaging are examined within the framework of a general mechanism for averaging of object rotation. PMID:27573589

  4. Effective treatment for malignant mediastinal teratoma.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D; Holford, C P; Begent, R H; Newlands, E S; Rustin, G J; Makey, A R; Bagshawe, K D

    1983-01-01

    Primary malignant mediastinal teratoma is a rare tumour previously regarded as inevitably fatal. In a series of eight male patients with a mean age of 24 years five remain alive and well. All patients showed raised serum concentrations of human chorionic gonadotrophin or alpha fetoprotein. The patients were treated with intermittent combination chemotherapy that included cisplatin. Six patients responded to chemotherapy with a fall in human chorionic gonadotrophin or alpha fetoprotein to near normal levels and they then had radical excision of the remaining tumour. Living malignant tumour was found in four of the specimens and these patients received postoperative chemotherapy. One patient died after eight months and the remaining five patients are alive and well 13-136 months after the start of treatment. The two patients who did not undergo surgery died at one month and 15 months. Intermittent combination chemotherapy and carefully timed radical excision of these tumours would appear to have produced better results than have been reported in other series. Images PMID:6198739

  5. Effective treatment for malignant mediastinal teratoma.

    PubMed

    Parker, D; Holford, C P; Begent, R H; Newlands, E S; Rustin, G J; Makey, A R; Bagshawe, K D

    1983-12-01

    Primary malignant mediastinal teratoma is a rare tumour previously regarded as inevitably fatal. In a series of eight male patients with a mean age of 24 years five remain alive and well. All patients showed raised serum concentrations of human chorionic gonadotrophin or alpha fetoprotein. The patients were treated with intermittent combination chemotherapy that included cisplatin. Six patients responded to chemotherapy with a fall in human chorionic gonadotrophin or alpha fetoprotein to near normal levels and they then had radical excision of the remaining tumour. Living malignant tumour was found in four of the specimens and these patients received postoperative chemotherapy. One patient died after eight months and the remaining five patients are alive and well 13-136 months after the start of treatment. The two patients who did not undergo surgery died at one month and 15 months. Intermittent combination chemotherapy and carefully timed radical excision of these tumours would appear to have produced better results than have been reported in other series. PMID:6198739

  6. Initial Conditions in the Averaging Cognitive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noventa, S.; Massidda, D.; Vidotto, G.

    2010-01-01

    The initial state parameters s[subscript 0] and w[subscript 0] are intricate issues of the averaging cognitive models in Information Integration Theory. Usually they are defined as a measure of prior information (Anderson, 1981; 1982) but there are no general rules to deal with them. In fact, there is no agreement as to their treatment except in…

  7. Probation officers' beliefs about the effectiveness of alcohol treatment.

    PubMed

    Polcin, Douglas L

    2004-06-01

    Research has shown that a large number of individuals on probation have alcohol problems but only a fraction of them receive treatment. This study surveyed 145 probation officers about their views on alcohol problems among probationers. A previous analysis of the data found that two beliefs predicted probation officers' use of coercion to mandate probationers to alcohol treatment: the belief that treatment was effective and the belief that one's peers were using coercion to mandate treatment. The analysis reported here examined factors associated with probation officers' belief that treatment works. Multiple regression found that several factors predicted the belief that treatment is effective. Officers who had a family member with a drinking problem (current or family of origin), those who had a strong belief about their self-efficacy in handling alcohol problems, and those who were more likely to make coerced referrals had stronger beliefs that treatment was effective. Strategies for facilitating accurate beliefs about the effectiveness of treatment and increasing self-efficacy among probation officers are reviewed. PMID:15369210

  8. Reducing Aversion to Side Effects in Preventive Medical Treatment Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Erika A.; Weinstein, Neil D.; Colditz, Graham A.; Emmons, Karen M.

    2007-01-01

    Laypeople tend to be overly sensitive to side effects of treatments that prevent illness, possibly leading them to refuse beneficial therapies. This Internet-based study attempted to reduce such side effect aversion by adding graphic displays to the numerical risk probabilities. It also explored whether graphics reduce side effect aversion by…

  9. New theoretical methodology for elucidating the solution structure of peptides from NMR data. II. Free energy of dominant microstates of Leu-enkephalin and population-weighted average nuclear Overhauser effects intensities.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, E; Meirovitch, H

    1996-01-01

    . The NOE of MC microstate i is calculated as the average <1/r(3)>i(2), and an effective interatomic distance ri(eff) is defined as ri(eff) = i(-1/3), where r is the distance between two protons. Under "initial rate approximation," and neglecting angular modulations, the overall I is the average over ri(eff-6), weighted by the populations of the MC microstates. This treatment is justified under the assumption that the rates at which conformations interconvert within, and among, microstates are faster and slower, respectively, than the rotational reorientation of the molecule. I(-6) leads to the virtual theoretical distances, compared to the corresponding virtual experimental distances, which were obtained previously from a cryoprotective solution of Leu-enkephalin at 280 K. A reasonable fit is found between theory and experiment. Future research directions are outlined. PMID:8679943

  10. Hormonal effects on Tetrahymena: change in case of combined treatment.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Lajkó, Eszter; Pállinger, Eva

    2010-12-01

    In order to approach their natural conditions, populations of Tetrahymena were kept in Losina-Losinky's salt solution for 1 h, than in the tryptone+yeast medium. During this time they were treated with histamine, serotonin or insulin, or with the combinations of these hormones. Effect of the combined treatments on the production of serotonin (5HT), or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or triiodothyronine (T₃) by the cells was compared to the effect of single-hormone treatments. Significant differences were seen between the results obtained following the single or combined treatments. There was no summation of the effects, however an elevation or diminution of the hormone production was observed after the combined treatment, as compared with the untreated controls or with the use of one of the hormones in the samples. The experiments demonstrate that there is a hormonal regulation between the Tetrahymena cells and the hormones influence each other's effect. PMID:21183424

  11. The effective field theory treatment of quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, John F.

    2012-09-24

    This is a pedagogical introduction to the treatment of quantum general relativity as an effective field theory. It starts with an overview of the methods of effective field theory and includes an explicit example. Quantum general relativity matches this framework and I discuss gravitational examples as well as the limits of the effective field theory. I also discuss the insights from effective field theory on the gravitational effects on running couplings in the perturbative regime.

  12. The effects of treatment on itch in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, Kevin B.; Neuhaus, Kristin J.; Simpson, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Pruritus causes significant impairment in the quality of life of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Treatments for itch in atopic dermatitis range from simple avoidance of pruritus triggers to more complicated systemic therapy. Several treatments aim to target specific mediators of itch in atopic dermatitis, while others improve pruritus by reducing inflammation. Currently, the most effective treatments for atopic dermatitis-associated itch are primarily topical or systemic anti-inflammatory agents. Better management of pruritus in atopic dermatitis is an important goal, and necessitates the development of novel targeted treatments as well as efficient use of current therapies. PMID:23551368

  13. Effect of delay time and grid voltage changes on the average molecular mass of polydisperse polymers and polymeric blends determined by delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Placido; Vitalini, Daniele; Scamporrino, Emilio; Bazzano, Sebastiano; Alicata, Rossana

    2005-01-01

    The dependence of the calculated average molecular mass of a polyethylene glycol with a large polydispersity on the instrumental parameters adopted in the acquisition of mass spectra using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE MALDI-TOFMS) was investigated. It has been shown that a combined effect of delay times and potential gradients can act on the ion cloud in the source chamber affecting both mass resolution and average molecular mass value of the analyzed polymeric sample. Also examined was a blend of two different polymers (a PEG and a PMMA commercial sample having a similar average molecular mass), which presents an additional problem concerning the discrimination among the different polymer species as a function of the experimental conditions. In this work, the best instrumental conditions to obtain both good resolution and a correct average molecular mass for the examined polydisperse sample are reported. PMID:16134231

  14. Migraine treatment: a chain of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Veloso, Tiago Sousa; Cambão, Mariana Seixas

    2015-01-01

    This clinical vignette presents a 14 years old female, with a past medical history relevant only for migraine with typical aura of less than monthly frequency, complaining of a severe unilateral headache with rising intensity for the previous 4 h, associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia. This episode of migraine with aura in a patient with recurrent migraine was complicated by side effects of medical diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (extrapyramidal symptoms, delirium, post-lumbar puncture headache, hospital admission) all of which could have been prevented-quaternary prevention. This case illustrates several important messages in migraine management: (1) use of acetaminophen is not based in high-quality evidence and better options exist; (2) among youngsters, domperidone should be preferred over metoclopramide because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier; (3) moderate to severe migraine crisis can be managed with triptans in teenagers over 12 years old; (4) it is important to recognize adverse drug effects; (5) harmful consequences of medical interventions do occur; (6) the school community must be informed about chronic diseases of the young. PMID:26266080

  15. Estimating causal effects for multivalued treatments: a comparison of approaches.

    PubMed

    Linden, Ariel; Uysal, S Derya; Ryan, Andrew; Adams, John L

    2016-02-20

    Interventions with multivalued treatments are common in medical and health research, such as when comparing the efficacy of competing drugs or interventions, or comparing between various doses of a particular drug. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development of multivalued treatment effect estimators using observational data. In this paper, we compare the performance of commonly used regression-based methods that estimate multivalued treatment effects based on the unconfoundedness assumption. These estimation methods fall into three general categories: (i) estimators based on a model for the outcome variable using conventional regression adjustment; (ii) weighted estimators based on a model for the treatment assignment; and (iii) 'doubly-robust' estimators that model both the treatment assignment and outcome variable within the same framework. We assess the performance of these models using Monte Carlo simulation and demonstrate their application with empirical data. Our results show that (i) when models estimating both the treatment and outcome are correctly specified, all adjustment methods provide similar unbiased estimates; (ii) when the outcome model is misspecified, regression adjustment performs poorly, while all the weighting methods provide unbiased estimates; (iii) when the treatment model is misspecified, methods based solely on modeling the treatment perform poorly, while regression adjustment and the doubly robust models provide unbiased estimates; and (iv) when both the treatment and outcome models are misspecified, all methods perform poorly. Given that researchers will rarely know which of the two models is misspecified, our results support the use of doubly robust estimation. PMID:26482211

  16. The Hubble rate in averaged cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Umeh, Obinna; Larena, Julien; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: julien.larena@gmail.com

    2011-03-01

    The calculation of the averaged Hubble expansion rate in an averaged perturbed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmology leads to small corrections to the background value of the expansion rate, which could be important for measuring the Hubble constant from local observations. It also predicts an intrinsic variance associated with the finite scale of any measurement of H{sub 0}, the Hubble rate today. Both the mean Hubble rate and its variance depend on both the definition of the Hubble rate and the spatial surface on which the average is performed. We quantitatively study different definitions of the averaged Hubble rate encountered in the literature by consistently calculating the backreaction effect at second order in perturbation theory, and compare the results. We employ for the first time a recently developed gauge-invariant definition of an averaged scalar. We also discuss the variance of the Hubble rate for the different definitions.

  17. The effect of cancer treatment on cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Asher, Arash; Myers, Jamie S

    2015-07-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is an increasingly recognized complication of cancer and its treatment. Most research in this arena has found that a subset of patients appear to be vulnerable to this complication even after treatment has ended, and often have difficulties with multitasking, short-term memory, word-finding, attention, or concentration. The mechanisms underlying these cognitive changes are not fully elucidated but may include direct neurotoxic effects of therapy, oxidative damage, and genetic predisposition. Compelling evidence has accumulated for the role of immune dysregulation and neurotoxicity from inflammatory cytokines. A gold standard for subjective or objective assessment of cancer treatment-related cognitive changes has yet to be established. Current options to assess cognitive function include neuropsychological testing, functional neuroimaging, and subjective assessments. Pharmacologic treatment options for this clinical problem are modest and limited. Nonpharmacologic treatments, including cognitive rehabilitation programs, are an emerging area of research for the management of cancer treatment-related cognitive changes. PMID:26353040

  18. Moving towards best practice when using inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) using the propensity score to estimate causal treatment effects in observational studies.

    PubMed

    Austin, Peter C; Stuart, Elizabeth A

    2015-12-10

    The propensity score is defined as a subject's probability of treatment selection, conditional on observed baseline covariates. Weighting subjects by the inverse probability of treatment received creates a synthetic sample in which treatment assignment is independent of measured baseline covariates. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) using the propensity score allows one to obtain unbiased estimates of average treatment effects. However, these estimates are only valid if there are no residual systematic differences in observed baseline characteristics between treated and control subjects in the sample weighted by the estimated inverse probability of treatment. We report on a systematic literature review, in which we found that the use of IPTW has increased rapidly in recent years, but that in the most recent year, a majority of studies did not formally examine whether weighting balanced measured covariates between treatment groups. We then proceed to describe a suite of quantitative and qualitative methods that allow one to assess whether measured baseline covariates are balanced between treatment groups in the weighted sample. The quantitative methods use the weighted standardized difference to compare means, prevalences, higher-order moments, and interactions. The qualitative methods employ graphical methods to compare the distribution of continuous baseline covariates between treated and control subjects in the weighted sample. Finally, we illustrate the application of these methods in an empirical case study. We propose a formal set of balance diagnostics that contribute towards an evolving concept of 'best practice' when using IPTW to estimate causal treatment effects using observational data. PMID:26238958

  19. Integrating Fasciolosis Control in the Dry Cow Management: The Effect of Closantel Treatment on Milk Production

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Johannes; Hostens, Miel; Jacobs, Jos; Van Ranst, Bonny; Duchateau, Luc; Vercruysse, Jozef

    2012-01-01

    The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica is a parasite of ruminants with a worldwide distribution and an apparent increasing incidence in EU member states. Effective control in dairy cattle is hampered by the lack of flukicides with a zero-withdrawal time for milk, leaving the dry period as the only time that preventive treatment can be applied. Here, we present the results of a blinded, randomized and placebo-controlled trial on 11 dairy herds (402 animals) exposed to F. hepatica to 1) assess the effect of closantel treatment at dry-off (or 80–42 days before calving in first-calving heifers) on milk production parameters and 2) evaluate if a number of easy-to-use animal parameters is related to the milk production response after treatment. Closantel treatment resulted in a noticeable decrease of anti-F. hepatica antibody levels from 3–6 months after treatment onwards, a higher peak production (1.06 kg) and a slightly higher persistence (9%) of the lactation, resulting in a 305-day milk production increase of 303 kg. No effects of anthelmintic treatment were found on the average protein and fat content of the milk. Milk production responses after treatment were poor in meagre animals and clinically relevant higher milk production responses were observed in first-lactation animals and in cows with a high (0.3–0.5 optical density ratio (ODR)), but not a very high (≥0.5 ODR) F. hepatica ELISA result on a milk sample from the previous lactation. We conclude that in dairy herds exposed to F. hepatica, flukicide treatment at dry-off is a useful strategy to reduce levels of exposure and increase milk production in the subsequent lactation. Moreover, the results suggest that treatment approaches that only target selected animals within a herd can be developed based on easy-to-use parameters. PMID:22916226

  20. Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical

  1. Averaging Internal Consistency Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldt, Leonard S.; Charter, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Seven approaches to averaging reliability coefficients are presented. Each approach starts with a unique definition of the concept of "average," and no approach is more correct than the others. Six of the approaches are applicable to internal consistency coefficients. The seventh approach is specific to alternate-forms coefficients. Although the…

  2. Is acupuncture effective in the treatment of pain in endometriosis?

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Iréne; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endometriosis is a multifactorial, estrogen-dependent, inflammatory gynecological condition – often with long-lasting visceral pelvic pain of different origin, and infertility among women. Current management options for patients’ are often inadequate, with side effects for many for whom acupuncture techniques could be an alternative. Earlier studies have discussed the efficacy of acupuncture, but not its methodological aspects. Objectives To summarize the documented clinical effects of acupuncture on rated visceral pelvic endometriosis-related pain, and associated variables among individuals, within and between studied groups, and to discuss the methodological treatment aspects. Methods Published full text clinical studies, case reports, and observational studies with abstracts written in English were searched by using the keywords “Acupuncture and Endometriosis” in databases such as PubMed, Web of Science, and CINAHL. The reporting guidelines, Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture was used for the methodological report. Results Three studies were found including 99 women, 13–40 years old, with diagnosed endometriosis. The studies were different in research design, needle stimulation techniques, and evaluation instruments. Methodological similarities were seven to12 needle insertions per subject/session, and 15–25 minutes of needle retention time. The needles were placed in lower back/pelvic-abdominal area, in the shank, feet, and hands. Treatment numbers varied from nine to 16 and patients received one to two treatments per week. Similarity in reported treatment effects in the quoted studies, irrespective of research design or treatment technique, was reported decrease of rated pain intensity. Discussion Meta-analysis is the standard procedure for the evaluation of evidence of treatment effects, ie, on a group level, usually without analysis of the individual responses even with obvious spread in the

  3. Late effects of Hodgkin's disease and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Ng, Andrea K; Mauch, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    Long-term survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma are at increased risk for a number of late complications, including development of second malignancies and cardiovascular disease. Treatment-related factors and other modifying risk factors contributing to the risk of late effects have been identified. Survivors deemed at increased risk based on their treatment history and other exposures may benefit from early detection for late complications and risk reduction strategies. However, the optimal screening tests and prevention program, and their timing and frequency are not clear. It should be noted that treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma has undergone considerable changes over the last several decades. Most of the current data on late effects after Hodgkin's lymphoma are based on patients treated with outdated chemotherapy and radiation therapy. As Hodgkin's lymphoma therapy evolve over time, continued documentation of late effects associated with newer treatment will be important for the follow-up of patients treated in the modern era. PMID:19390314

  4. Effect of ozone treatment on different cariogenic microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fagrell, Tobias G; Dietz, Wolfram; Lingström, Peter; Steiniger, Frank; Norén, Jörgen G

    2008-01-01

    Ozone treatment has been presented and discussed in the literature, as one of the "new" ways to treat dental caries. The aim of this paper was to study the in vitro effect of ozone on some common oral microorganisms related to dental caries using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of ozone was tested on three different strains of mutans streptococci and one Lactobacillus strain. After exposure of bacteria to ozone treatment for 0 to 60 sec, cultivation on different chair side strips and agar plates took place. Preparation and performance of scanning electron analyses in a field emission scanning electron microscope at 10 kV was then carried out. It was found that gaseous ozone treatment for 20 seconds or more was effective to kill the different microorganisms in vitro. Treatment of 20, 40 and 60 seconds of ozone prevented the bacteria to grow on the different media. Treatment times shorter than 20 seconds resulted in varying results with a limited effect on bacterial growth for treatments of 5-10 sec, respectively. The difference between ozone-treated and untreated specimens was macroscopically readily discernable. None of the strains treated with ozone for 60 seconds showed any bacterial growth. Only samples with untreated bacteria could be found in the SEM analyses in form of large and high colonies. This study presents a clear result of the bactericide effect of ozon (in vitro) on four different strains of bacteria associated with dental caries. PMID:18973084

  5. Effects of Decompression Treatment for Controlling the Powderpost Beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne, (Coleoptera: Lyctinae).

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kazushi; Hiraku, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Izumi; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of decompression treatment as a non-destructive method to control larvae of the powderpost beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne, was evaluated in the laboratory using various combinations of two pressure levels, 1.1 kPa and 40 kPa, and three temperature levels, 20, 25, and 40 °C. Larval mortality generally depended on weight reduction while decreases in the oxygen level had relatively little effect. The lower pressure, 1.1 kPa, significantly affected mortality, and no larvae survived after 12 h of this pressure treatment, at 25 °C. The average body weight was reduced with treatment time and temperature, and the reduction rate at 25 °C was higher than that at the lower temperature, 20 °C. Effects on larvae of the higher pressure treatment, 40 kPa, with a CO₂ gas purge, were tested to determine the feasibility of decompression treatment in the manufacturing process. Although higher pressure resulted in low mortality, the body weight was dramatically decreased using the CO₂ purge. These results present important information on the possibility of using decompression treatment for wood products. PMID:27429007

  6. The Average of Rates and the Average Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Defines arithmetic, harmonic, and weighted harmonic means, and discusses their properties. Describes the application of these properties in problems involving fuel economy estimates and average rates of motion. Gives example problems and solutions. (CW)

  7. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S; Miller, Mark L.

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  8. Preliminary observations on the effects of vector-averaged gravity on the embryonic and larval development of the gastropod mollusk, Ilyanassa obsoleta Stimpson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, G. W.; Stephens, A. P.; Conrad, A. H.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Fertilized eggs of Ilyanassa obsoleta Stimpson were collected immediately after their deposition in egg capsules. Unopened egg capsules then were affixed to glass slides, and incubated either statically (controls) or on a clinostat (experimentals). After incubation for 9-14 days, hatching occurred sooner and in a higher percentage of clinostated capsules than in controls. Embryos that hatched while undergoing clinostat incubation were abnormal in morphology, whereas other embryos present in non-hatched capsules in the same tubes appeared normal, as did embryos in the control tubes. Although the results are compatible with a conclusion that vector-averaged gravity in the experimental tubes caused the altered development, some other aspects of how the incubations were done may have contributed to the differences between the control and experimental results.

  9. Effect of variation of average pore size and specific surface area of ZnO electrode (WE) on efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized with tremendous increase in specific surface area of up to 578 m2/g which was 5.54 m2/g in previous reports (J. Phys. Chem. C 113:14676-14680, 2009). Different mesoporous ZnO nanoparticles with average pore sizes ranging from 7.22 to 13.43 nm and specific surface area ranging from 50.41 to 578 m2/g were prepared through the sol-gel method via a simple evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The hydrolysis rate of zinc acetate was varied using different concentrations of sodium hydroxide. Morphology, crystallinity, porosity, and J-V characteristics of the materials have been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET nitrogen adsorption/desorption, and Keithley instruments. PMID:25339855

  10. Light propagation in the averaged universe

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, Samae; Schwarz, Dominik J. E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2014-10-01

    Cosmic structures determine how light propagates through the Universe and consequently must be taken into account in the interpretation of observations. In the standard cosmological model at the largest scales, such structures are either ignored or treated as small perturbations to an isotropic and homogeneous Universe. This isotropic and homogeneous model is commonly assumed to emerge from some averaging process at the largest scales. We assume that there exists an averaging procedure that preserves the causal structure of space-time. Based on that assumption, we study the effects of averaging the geometry of space-time and derive an averaged version of the null geodesic equation of motion. For the averaged geometry we then assume a flat Friedmann-Lemaître (FL) model and find that light propagation in this averaged FL model is not given by null geodesics of that model, but rather by a modified light propagation equation that contains an effective Hubble expansion rate, which differs from the Hubble rate of the averaged space-time.

  11. Psychosocial Treatment of Bipolar Disorders: Clinician Knowledge, Common Approaches, and Barriers to Effective Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Bradley D.; Celedonia, Karen L.; Swartz, Holly A.; Burns, Rachel; Sorbero, Mark J; Brindley, Rayni A.; Frank, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To survey non-physician mental health clinicians in order to understand their knowledge about bipolar disorders, treatment approaches, and perceived barriers to optimal treatment. Methods 55 non-physician mental health clinicians from five community mental health clinics self-reported therapeutic approach, knowledge, and skill in treating bipolar disorders. We calculated descriptive statistics and used chi-square and t-tests to test for differences by clinician characteristics. Results Most clinicians wished to improve their treatment for bipolar disorders. Clinicians reported feeling best prepared to provide counseling and least prepared to identify medication side effects. Among psychotherapies, they were most familiar with CBT. Clinicians were knowledgeable about bipolar disorders overall, but less knowledgeable about pharmacotherapy for treating them. The most commonly reported treatment barrier was comorbid substance use disorders. Conclusion Clinicians would benefit from additional training in effective therapeutic approaches, principles of pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorders, and approaches to supporting individuals with comorbid substance use problems. PMID:26325453

  12. Cosmic Inhomogeneities and Averaged Cosmological Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Singh, T. P.

    2008-10-01

    If general relativity (GR) describes the expansion of the Universe, the observed cosmic acceleration implies the existence of a “dark energy.” However, while the Universe is on average homogeneous on large scales, it is inhomogeneous on smaller scales. While GR governs the dynamics of the inhomogeneous Universe, the averaged homogeneous Universe obeys modified Einstein equations. Can such modifications alone explain the acceleration? For a simple generic model with realistic initial conditions, we show the answer to be “no.” Averaging effects negligibly influence the cosmological dynamics.

  13. Treatment effectiveness and adherence in patients with schizophrenia treated with risperidone long-acting injection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chen-Lin; Tzeng, Dong-Sheng; Lung, For-Wey

    2010-11-30

    This study investigated the variables related to the effectiveness and adherence to treatment with risperidone long-acting injection (RLAI) in patients with schizophrenia. We performed a retrospective medical chart review of 137 patients with schizophrenia who were prescribed RLAI between July 2004 and December 2006. Cox regression analysis showed that the effectiveness of treatment in patients treated with RLAI was affected significantly by the provision of home care and the use of illicit drugs. The adherence of patients to treatment with RLAI was affected most by the provision of home care. Bayesian analysis showed that patients who received the provision of home care or who had no history of illicit drug use continued treatment for, on average, 15.27 and 17.14days longer, respectively, than those who did not receive such care or take illicit drugs. Patients who received the provision of home care adhered to treatment for 343.98 more days than those who did not. Even though patients taking RLAI show better adherence than those taking oral risperidone, home care services can have a significant additional effect on adherence. Randomized clinical follow-up trial studies are necessary to explore the risk factors for nonadherence in more detail. PMID:20488552

  14. A study of the effectiveness of sewage treatment plants in Delhi region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Sandeep Kumar; Sharma, Divya; Tripathi, Jayant Kumar; Ahirwar, Saroj; Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2013-03-01

    This is a conventional kind of monitoring study. The objective of the study was to assess and monitor the physicochemical parameters in wastewater at inlet and outlet of sewage treatment plant (STP) and also to study the effectiveness of the STPs. The average concentration of parameters at inlet sampling site pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, are 7.16, 2,169 μS/cm, 766.06 mg/l, and major ions bicarbonate, nitrate, sulphate, phosphate, chloride, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium values 515.88, 4.28, 82.85, 15.17, 7.01, 23.08, 29.34, 4.14 and 84.31 mg/l. While the average concentration of these parameters, after treatment shows following values 7.47, 2,161.43 (μS/cm), 695.81, 436.52, 1.25, 99.22, 12.69, 6.83, 23.18, 29.07, 4.40 and 82.65 mg/l, respectively. Further, to check the Na % and sodium absorption ratio at inlet and outlet which 27.89 %, 0.67 and 28.19 %, 0.68, respectively, for the suitability of the wastewater. Finally, the agglomerative hierarchical clustering techniques were used to study the similarity in the sewage treatment plants. The result suggests that there is considerable improvement in the wastewater quality after treatment except at the Pappankalan and Coronation Pillar, Timarpur.

  15. The impact of breathing motion versus heterogeneity effects in lung cancer treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Rosu, Mihaela; Chetty, Indrin J.; Tatro, Daniel S.; Haken, Randall K. ten

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of tissue heterogeneity and breathing-induced motion/deformation on conformal treatment planning for pulmonary tumors and to compare the magnitude and the clinical importance of changes induced by these effects. Treatment planning scans were acquired at normal exhale/inhale breathing states for fifteen patients. The internal target volume (ITV) was defined as the union of exhale and inhale gross tumor volumes uniformly expanded by 5 mm. Anterior/posterior opposed beams (AP/PA) and three-dimensional (3D)-conformal plans were designed using the unit-density exhale (''static'') dataset. These plans were further used to calculate (a) density-corrected (''heterogeneous'') static dose and (b) heterogeneous cumulative dose, including breathing deformations. The DPM Monte Carlo code was used for dose computations. For larger than coin-sized tumors, relative to unit-density plans, tumor and lung doses increased in the heterogeneity-corrected plans. In comparing cumulative and static plans, larger normal tissue complication probability changes were observed for tumors with larger motion amplitudes and uncompensated breathing-induced hot/cold spots in lung. Accounting for tissue heterogeneity resulted in average increases of 9% and 7% in mean lung dose (MLD) for the 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams, respectively. Breathing-induced effects resulted in approximately 1% and 2% average decreases in MLD from the static value, for the 6 and 15 MV photon beams, respectively. The magnitude of these effects was not found to correlate with the treatment plan technique, i.e., AP/PA versus 3D-CRT. Given a properly designed ITV, tissue heterogeneity effects are likely to have a larger clinical significance on tumor and normal lung treatment evaluation metrics than four-dimensional respiratory-induced changes.

  16. Assessing fuel treatment effectiveness using satellite imagery and spatial statistics.

    PubMed

    Wimberly, Michael C; Cochrane, Mark A; Baer, Adam D; Pabst, Kari

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the influences of forest management practices on wildfire severity is critical in fire-prone ecosystems of the western United States. Newly available geospatial data sets characterizing vegetation, fuels, topography, and burn severity offer new opportunities for studying fuel treatment effectiveness at regional to national scales. In this study, we used ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression and sequential autoregression (SAR) to analyze fuel treatment effects on burn severity for three recent wildfires: the Camp 32 fire in western Montana, the School fire in southeastern Washington, and the Warm fire in northern Arizona. Burn severity was measured using differenced normalized burn ratio (dNBR) maps developed by the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project. Geospatial data sets from the LANDFIRE project were used to control for prefire variability in canopy cover, fuels, and topography. Across all three fires, treatments that incorporated prescribed burning were more effective than thinning alone. Treatment effect sizes were lower, and standard errors were higher in the SAR models than in the OLS models. Spatial error terms in the SAR models indirectly controlled for confounding variables not captured in the LANDFIRE data, including spatiotemporal variability in fire weather and landscape-level effects of reduced fire severity outside the treated areas. This research demonstrates the feasibility of carrying out assessments of fuel treatment effectiveness using geospatial data sets and highlights the potential for using spatial autoregression to control for unmeasured confounding factors. PMID:19769087

  17. Some adverse effects of antipsychotics: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lader, M

    1999-01-01

    Antipsychotic medication causes a wide range of adverse effects, which can be serious and may further imperil both the physical and psychological health of schizophrenic patients. The range of side effects patients commonly encounter includes weight gain, endocrine disturbances, sedation, anticholinergic effects, hypotension, seizures, and extrapyramidal symptoms. Less common and unpredictable reactions are blood dyscrasias, cardiotoxicity, sudden death, and the neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Antipsychotic drugs differ significantly regarding their propensity to cause these reactions. Patients should undergo comprehensive health checks before an antipsychotic is prescribed, and drug therapy should be individualized to take account of any preexisting symptoms. Side effects and the wider implications of drug treatment, such as effects on occupational and social functioning, should be discussed with the patient before initiating therapy. Patients should be regularly monitored for side effects during treatment and switched to alternative therapy if side effects are serious and/or persistent. PMID:10372605

  18. Effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on erosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of mechanical surface treatments as well as heat treatments on the erosion resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy and 1045 steel were studied. Mechanical surface treatments were found to have little or no effect on the erosion resistance. This is due to the formation by particle impact of a work hardened surface layer regardless of the initial surface condition. The erosion resistance of Al single crystals is found to be independent of orientation. This is due to destruction of the surface microstructure and formation of a polycrystalline surface layer by the impact of erodant particles as observed by X-ray diffraction. While upon solution treatment of annealed 6061 aluminum the increase in hardness is accompanied by an increase in erosion resistance, precipitation treatment which causes a further increase in hardness results in slightly lower erosion resistance. Using two types of erodant particles, glass beads and crushed glass, the erosion rate is found to be strongly dependent on erodant particle shape, being an order of magnitude higher for erosion with crushed glass as compared to glass beads. While for erosion with glass beads heat treatment of 1045 steel had a profound effect on its erosion resistance, little or no such effect was observed for erosion with crushed glass.

  19. Effects of maternal plasmid GHRH treatment on offspring growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To differentiate prenatal effects of plasmid growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) treatment from maternal effects mediated by lactation on long-term growth of offspring, a cross-fostering study was designed. Pregnant sows (n = 12) were untreated (n = 6), or received either a Wt-GHRH (n = 2), or H...

  20. Effect of Cedar Honey in the Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Sanatkhani, Majid; Mosannen Mozafari, Pegah; Amirchaghmaghi, Maryam; Najafi Fathi, Mohsen; Sanatkhani, Mohammad; Sarjami, Naghmeh; Azarian, Amir Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disease with an immunological etiology. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of cedar honey in the treatment of erosive- atrophic OLP. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with a confirmed clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of OLP participated in this randomized clinical trial in Mashhad Dental School. Patients were randomly allocated into one of two groups. Both groups received standard OLP treatment (dexamethasone mouthwash 0.5 mg three times daily and fluconazole capsule 100 mg daily). The intervention group received cedar honey (20 ml three times daily, via a swish and swallow technique) in addition to standard treatment. The patients were followed for 4 weeks. The pain and severity of the lesions were recorded at the initial visit and follow ups. All recorded data were analyzed using the chi-square test, T-test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) using SPSS version 11.5. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Both groups had a marked reduction in pain, size of erosive area, and atrophic lesions, particularly in the first follow-up period, but there was no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05). Honey was effective in the healing of ulcerative lesions (average recovery in the experimental group was 69% while the average relief of ulcerative lesion in the control group was 50%), but the difference was not significant (P=0.896). Conclusion: No significant difference was found in the treatment of atrophic and erosive lesions of OLP through use of honey as an alternative treatment. However, this approach may be effective in managing ulcerative lesions of OLP; although more research with a larger sample size is necessary. PMID:25009805

  1. Bronchoscopic diathermy resection and stent insertion: a cost effective treatment for tracheobronchial obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, M.; Kaplan, D.; Goldstraw, P.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Major airways obstruction is a distressing cause of morbidity and mortality. For disease that is extensive and recurrent, there is a need for a safe and cost effective technique for palliation. METHODS--The results of 29 patients with tracheobronchial obstruction (24 malignant and five benign) treated by diathermy resection alone or in combination with endobronchial stenting have been reviewed. RESULTS--The major site of obstruction was the trachea in 14, main carina in seven, right main bronchus in six, and left main bronchus in two patients. Fifteen had received other forms of treatment beforehand including external radiotherapy, endoscopic dilatation, and laser resection (Nd:YAG). Five patients required two or more treatment sessions for symptom recurrence. Ten patients also received additional treatment with a stent (nine) or insertion of gold grains (one). There were no intraoperative deaths or complications and the average length of stay was five days (range 2-14). Twenty eight patients reported immediate symptomatic relief, and objective improvement in the results of lung function tests was seen in eight patients whose condition was less acute and where preoperative lung function tests could be undertaken (average improvement in FEV1 of 53.1% and in FVC of 20.6%). CONCLUSIONS--Bronchoscopic diathermy resection is an effective and safe method for relieving the symptoms of tracheobronchial obstruction at appreciably less cost than laser resection. Images PMID:8296261

  2. Working positively with sexual offenders: maximizing the effectiveness of treatment.

    PubMed

    Marshall, William L; Ward, Tony; Mann, Ruth E; Moulden, Heather; Fernandez, Yolanda M; Serran, Geris; Marshall, Liam E

    2005-09-01

    In this article, the authors draw on literatures outside sexual offending and make suggestions for working more positively and constructively with these offenders. Although the management of risk is a necessary feature of treatment, it needs to occur in conjunction with a strength-based approach. An exclusive focus on risk can lead to overly confrontational therapeutic encounters, a lack of rapport between offenders and clinicians, and fragmented and mechanistic treatment delivery. The authors suggest that the goals of sexual offender treatment should be the attainment of good lives, which is achieved by enhancing hope, increasing self-esteem, developing approach goals, and working collaboratively with the offenders. Examples are provided of how these targets may be met. When this is done within a therapeutic context where the treatment providers display empathy and warmth and are rewarding and directive, the authors suggest that treatment effects will be maximized. PMID:16051729

  3. Money Matters: Cost Effectiveness of Juvenile Drug Court with and without Evidence-Based Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Sheidow, Ashli J.; Jayawardhana, Jayani; Bradford, W. David; Henggeler, Scott W.; Shapiro, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    The 12-month cost effectiveness of juvenile drug court and evidence-based treatments within Court were compared with traditional Family Court for 128 substance abusing/dependent juvenile offenders participating in a four-condition randomized trial. Intervention conditions included Family Court with community services (FC), Drug Court with community services (DC), Drug Court with Multisystemic Therapy (DC/MST), and Drug Court with MST enhanced with a contingency management program (DC/MST/CM). Average cost effectiveness ratios for substance use and criminal behavior outcomes revealed that economic efficiency in achieving outcomes generally improved from FC to DC, with the addition of evidence-based treatments improving efficiency in obtaining substance use outcomes. PMID:22389577

  4. Money Matters: Cost Effectiveness of Juvenile Drug Court with and without Evidence-Based Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sheidow, Ashli J; Jayawardhana, Jayani; Bradford, W David; Henggeler, Scott W; Shapiro, Steven B

    2012-01-01

    The 12-month cost effectiveness of juvenile drug court and evidence-based treatments within Court were compared with traditional Family Court for 128 substance abusing/dependent juvenile offenders participating in a four-condition randomized trial. Intervention conditions included Family Court with community services (FC), Drug Court with community services (DC), Drug Court with Multisystemic Therapy (DC/MST), and Drug Court with MST enhanced with a contingency management program (DC/MST/CM). Average cost effectiveness ratios for substance use and criminal behavior outcomes revealed that economic efficiency in achieving outcomes generally improved from FC to DC, with the addition of evidence-based treatments improving efficiency in obtaining substance use outcomes. PMID:22389577

  5. EEG neurofeedback effects in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Nina; Unterrainer, Human-Friedrich; Skliris, Dimitris; Shaheen, Sandra; Dunitz-Scheer, Marguerite; Wood, Guilherme; Scheer, Peter Jaron Zwi; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra Johanna; Neuper, Christa

    2016-01-01

    A pre-post design including 22 females was used to evaluate the effectiveness of neurofeedback in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa. Resting EEG measures and a psychological test-battery assessing eating behavior traits, clinical symptoms, emotionality, and mood were obtained. While both the experimental (n = 10) and control group (n = 12) received their usual maintenance treatment, the experimental group received 10 sessions of individual alpha frequency training over a period of 5 weeks as additional treatment. Significant training effects were shown in eating behavior traits, emotion regulation, and in relative theta power in the eyes closed condition. Although the results are limited due to the small sample size, these are the first empirical data demonstrating the benefits of neurofeedback as a treatment adjunct in individuals with anorexia nervosa. PMID:27027700

  6. Clinical competencies for the effective treatment of foster children.

    PubMed

    Zilberstein, Karen; Popper, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Despite a high level of documented mental health needs among children who have experienced foster care, research indicates that treatment outcomes are often disappointing. In order to improve outcomes, evidence-based treatments for attachment, trauma and behavioral difficulties are often promoted for this population. However, little research exists on whether or not those interventions effectively address the unique and complex mental health needs of many foster children. While a rather robust literature exists on foster children's multifaceted difficulties, most treatments do not fully represent that range and complexity in their interventions. This article attempts to begin to fill that gap by outlining the knowledge and skills clinicians must acquire if they are to effectively treat foster children. Treatment of foster children should be seen as a subspecialty within the field of child mental health, and trainings that help clinicians gain more knowledge of foster children's unique needs should be more available. PMID:25172873

  7. Differential Effects on Student Demographic Groups of Using ACT® College Readiness Assessment Composite Score, Act Benchmarks, and High School Grade Point Average for Predicting Long-Term College Success through Degree Completion. ACT Research Report Series, 2013 (5)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radunzel, Justine; Noble, Julie

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the differential effects on racial/ethnic, family income, and gender groups of using ACT® College Readiness Assessment Composite score and high school grade point average (HSGPA) for predicting long-term college success. Outcomes included annual progress towards a degree (based on cumulative credit-bearing hours…

  8. A depth-averaged debris-flow model that includes the effects of evolving dilatancy: II. Numerical predictions and experimental tests.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new depth-averaged mathematical model that is designed to simulate all stages of debris-flow motion, from initiation to deposition. A companion paper shows how the model’s five governing equations describe simultaneous evolution of flow thickness, solid volume fraction, basal pore-fluid pressure, and two components of flow momentum. Each equation contains a source term that represents the influence of state-dependent granular dilatancy. Here we recapitulate the equations and analyze their eigenstructure to show that they form a hyperbolic system with desirable stability properties. To solve the equations we use a shock-capturing numerical scheme with adaptive mesh refinement, implemented in an open-source software package we call D-Claw. As tests of D-Claw, we compare model output with results from two sets of large-scale debris-flow experiments. One set focuses on flow initiation from landslides triggered by rising pore-water pressures, and the other focuses on downstream flow dynamics, runout, and deposition. D-Claw performs well in predicting evolution of flow speeds, thicknesses, and basal pore-fluid pressures measured in each type of experiment. Computational results illustrate the critical role of dilatancy in linking coevolution of the solid volume fraction and pore-fluid pressure, which mediates basal Coulomb friction and thereby regulates debris-flow dynamics.

  9. Eroticization as a factor influencing erectile dysfunction treatment effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kukula, K C; Jackowich, R A; Wassersug, R J

    2014-01-01

    We review both the medical and psychosocial literature on factors influencing male potency in order to better understand why erectile dysfunction (ED) treatments, PDE5 drugs in particular, are abandoned when otherwise effective. We incorporate anecdotal data from websites and list serves dedicated to helping patients deal with iatrogenic ED. Our goal is to distinguish between ED treatments that are medicalized versus eroticized, and how partner participation may influence their effectiveness. Recently it has been shown that ED treatment effectiveness is aided by the involvement of the patient's partner. This permits an erotic association between the partner and the ED 'aid'. We extend this idea to suggest that having the partner involved as early as possible in the discussion of treatment, and their presence at the time of prescription, should improve ED aid effectiveness. Eroticization of ED aids shifts the focus from a perceived disability of the patient toward the sexual pleasure provided by the partner. We further suggest that ED aids used without the partner's knowledge will undermine intimacy and ultimately the treatment's effectiveness. Unpartnered patients should be advised about the importance of informing potential partners about their use of such aids, as openness and honesty may increase intimacy in the long run. PMID:23823215

  10. Posttraumatic stress disorder: The development of effective psychological treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Anke; Clark, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has only relatively recently been introduced into the diagnostic classification of mental disorders. Building on advances in the treatment of other anxiety disorders, a range of effective psychological treatments for PTSD has been developed. The most effective of these treatments focus on the patient’s memory for the traumatic event and its meaning. This paper briefly reviews the currently available evidence for these treatments. It then illustrates the process of developing effective psychological treatments by discussing how a combination of phenomenological, experimental and treatment development studies and theoretical considerations was used to develop a trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral treatment, Cognitive Therapy (CT) for PTSD. This treatment program builds on Ehlers and Clark’s (2000) model of PTSD, which specifies two core cognitive abnormalities in PTSD. First, people with chronic PTSD show idiosyncratic personal meanings (appraisals) of the trauma and/or its sequelae that lead to a sense of serious current threat. Second, the nature of the trauma memory explains the occurrence of reexperiencing symptoms. It is further proposed that the idiosyncratic appraisals motivate a series of dysfunctional behaviors (such as safety-seeking behaviors) and cognitive strategies (such as thought suppression and rumination) that are intended to reduce the sense of current threat, but maintain the problem by preventing change in the appraisals and trauma memory, and/or lead to increases in symptoms. CT addresses the cognitive abnormalities and maintaining behaviors in an individualized, but focused, way. Four randomized controlled trials and two dissemination studies showed that CT for PTSD is acceptable and effective. PMID:18752113

  11. Amblyopia: prevalence, natural history, functional effects and treatment.

    PubMed

    Webber, Ann L; Wood, Joanne

    2005-11-01

    Amblyopia, defined as poor vision due to abnormal visual experience early in life, affects approximately three per cent of the population and carries a projected lifetime risk of visual loss of at least 1.2 per cent. The presence of amblyopia or its risk factors, mainly strabismus or refractive error, have been primary conditions targeted in childhood vision screenings. Continued support for such screenings requires evidence-based understanding of the prevalence and natural history of amblyopia and its predisposing conditions, and proof that treatment is effective in the long term with minimal negative impact on the patient and family. This review summarises recent research relevant to the clinical understanding of amblyopia, including prevalence data, risk factors, the functional impact of amblyopia and optimum treatment regimes and their justification from a vision and life skills perspective. Collectively, these studies indicate that treatment for amblyopia is effective in reducing the overall prevalence and severity of visual loss from amblyopia. Correction of refractive error alone has been shown to significantly reduce amblyopia and less frequent occlusion can be just as effective as more extensive occlusion. Occlusion or penalisation in amblyopia treatment can create negative changes in behaviour in children and impact on family life, and these factors should be considered in prescribing treatment, particularly because of their influence on compliance. Ongoing treatment trials are being undertaken to determine both the maximum age at which treatment of amblyopia can still be effective and the importance of near activities during occlusion. This review highlights the expansion of current knowledge regarding amblyopia and its treatment to help clinicians provide the best level of care for their amblyopic patients that current knowledge allows. PMID:16329744

  12. Effect of mechanical treatment on the silicate lattice of kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulumyan, N. H.; Papakhchyan, L. R.; Isahakyan, A. R.; Beglaryan, H. A.; Aloyan, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray diffraction, differential thermal and chemical analysis have been used to investigate the effect of mechanical treatment on the crystalline lattice of kaolinite. It was established that mechanical treatment leads to amorphization of the mineral and the release of hydroxyl water, but the continuity of kaolinite's silicate lattice remains intact despite certain deformations, and the phase transformations of the mineral thus occur without any noticeable change in temperature.

  13. Effects of heat treatment parameters on liquid whole egg proteins.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Reyhan Selin; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Soykut, Esra Acar; Ertaş, Nusret

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of heat treatment parameters on liquid whole egg (LWE) proteins by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Heat treatment (at 60-68°C for 1-5min) was applied to LWE. Treated LWE was centrifuged and supernatant was taken for measurement of UV-VIS spectroscopy and CE. The change in UV absorbance showed loss of protein solubility depending on heat treatments parameters. Electropherograms of samples demonstrated the effect of treatment parameters on composition of LWE proteins. It was found that conalbumin and lysozyme were influenced by the treatment, while ovalbumin and ovomucoid were not affected. CE combined with principal component analysis (PCA) was used for classification of samples untreated or treated and treated at different treatment parameters. The results of the study revealed that the extent of heat treatment in LWE samples could be determined with PCA of the CE measurements. PMID:27596410

  14. Arithmetic averaging: A versatile technique for smoothing and trend removal

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.L.

    1993-12-31

    Arithmetic averaging is simple, stable, and can be very effective in attenuating the undesirable components in a complex signal, thereby providing smoothing or trend removal. An arithmetic average is easy to calculate. However, the resulting modifications to the data, in both the time and frequency domains, are not well understood by many experimentalists. This paper discusses the following aspects of averaging: (1) types of averages -- simple, cumulative, and moving; and (2) time and frequency domain effects of the averaging process.

  15. Total volatile fatty acid concentrations are unreliable estimators of treatment effects on ruminal fermentation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hall, M B; Nennich, T D; Doane, P H; Brink, G E

    2015-06-01

    Volatile fatty acid concentrations ([VFA], mM) have long been used to assess the effect of dietary treatments on ruminal fermentation in vivo. However, discrepancies in statistical results between [VFA] and VFA pool size (VFAmol) possibly related to ruminal digesta liquid amount (LIQ, kg) indicate potential issues with the use of [VFA]. We investigated relationships among [VFA], VFAmol, and LIQ measured 2 h postfeeding using individual lactating cow data (n=175) from 7 separate feeding studies. Regression analyses were performed using mixed models with "study" as a discrete random variable. The mean across studies and average range of values within studies, respectively, were 151 and 75 for [VFA], 11.2 and 9.8 for VFAmol, 73.3 and 41.0 for LIQ, and 289 and 83 mmol/kg for rumen fluid osmolality. Liquid amount changed with VFAmol (3.76 VFAmol+31.2; average within-study R2=0.69), but the relationship was weak between [VFA] and LIQ (0.524 LIQ+112.8; average within-study R2=0.12). The relationship between LIQ and VFAmol was likely a function of the osmotic gradient between rumen liquid and blood. The VFA are a major ruminal solute; VFAmol amounts can affect water flux in the rumen as similar tonicities of rumen fluid and blood are maintained. This also has a damping effect on ruminal solute concentration, creating the weak relationship between [VFA] and LIQ. Within studies, similar [VFA] were found in LIQ differing by 30 kg or more. The difference between minimum and maximum LIQ within cow within study was 12.7 kg (standard deviation=7.1), so inclusion of "cow" in analyses did not correct for the variation in LIQ. To allow valid comparisons of experimental treatments, responses must be on an equivalent basis; concentrations in different LIQ are not on an equivalent basis and so are not valid to use for comparing treatment effects. The [VFA] changed with VFAmol (5.80 VFAmol+86.3; average within-study R2=0.56). However, the ratio of [VFA] to VFAmol ranged from 9.0 to 24

  16. The effect of three different head-neck positions on the average EMG activity of three important neck muscles in the horse.

    PubMed

    Kienapfel, K

    2015-02-01

    The Knowledge of muscle activity in common head-neck positions (HNPs) is a necessary precondition for making judgements on HNPs. The aim of the study was to record the surface electromyography activities of important muscles of the horse's neck in various HNPs. The electrical activities of the m. splenius, brachiocephalicus and trapezius were recorded on both sides. Five horses, both with and without a rider, were examined in all three gaits on both hands in three different HNPs: a 'free' position, a 'gathered' (head higher, neck more flexed) position with the noseline in front of the vertical and a 'hyperflexed' position. Averages of ten consecutive gait cycles in each HNP were evaluated and compared by standard statistical methods. No difference between ridden and unridden horses could be detected. The m. brachiocephalicus was in the hyperflexed position in all gaits significantly (p < 0.01) more active than in the gathered and free position, which were not significantly different. By contrast, the m. splenius was in the hyperflexed position less active than in the free position (p < 0.02), in which it always showed the highest activity. In walking, the muscle activities in the free and gathered positions deviated significantly (p < 0.01). The m. trapezius was in the hyperflexed posture during walking significantly less active than in the free (p < 0.01) and gathered (p < 0.01) positions with the strongest activities in the free position. Again, the free and gathered positions differed significantly (p < 0.01). In trot, the same pattern occured, although the gathered and hyperflexed positions did not differ significantly. In the canter, the activities of the m. trapezius showed no differences between HNPs. In HNPs with the noseline in front of the vertical, the muscles of the topline (m. splenius, m. trapezius) are activated and trained. In the hyperflexed position, however, a major muscle of the lower topline (m. brachiocephalicus) is activated and trained. PMID

  17. Recidivism after treatment in a forensic youth-psychiatric setting: the effect of treatment characteristics.

    PubMed

    van der Put, Claudia E; Asscher, Jessica J; Stams, Geert Jan J M; van der Laan, Peter H; Breuk, Rene; Jongman, Erik; Doreleijers, Theo

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of treatment characteristics on recidivism in a forensic youth-psychiatric outpatient clinic. The treatment offered comprised functional family therapy (FFT), individual cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), or CBT in combination with parent training. Some of the youth additionally participated in aggression replacement training (ART). FFT and ART were implemented as a trial version, meaning that most therapists had not received formal training yet. Treatment characteristics related to recidivism were length of treatment, type of treatment, number of sessions, and the therapist. The longer the period of treatment and the greater the number of sessions, the higher the recidivism, even after controlling for risk of recidivism based on static risk factors. Juveniles who participated in ART reoffended more often than juveniles who had not participated in such training. Given the fact that FFT and ART were not well-implemented trial versions, it can be concluded that poorly implemented treatment leads to poor outcomes. PMID:22811475

  18. Effects of inlet treatment location and treatment cavity depth on compressor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The ability of acoustic liners to reduce compressor noise inside and in front of an inlet was studied. An axial flow research compressor and a specially designed inlet were used inside an anechoic chamber. Acoustic and performance data were obtained for a range of inlet treatment locations and cavity depths to determine their effects on inlet noise over a range of blade passing frequencies. The greatest noise reductions in front of the inlet were obtained with acoustic treatment located close to the compressor and backed with the deepest cavities tested. Inside the inlet the maximum noise level reductions were obtained in the area of the treatment regardless of treatment location. No appreciable losses in compressor performance were measured.

  19. Iatrogenic effects of group treatment for antisocial youths.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Bahr; Caron, Annalise; Ball, Shelly; Tapp, Julie; Johnson, Margaret; Weisz, John R

    2005-12-01

    It has been argued that group treatment of antisocial adolescents may increase rather than decrease conduct problems. One mechanism that has been suggested to underlie this effect is "deviancy training," wherein during group sessions deviant peers reinforce each other's antisocial actions and words. These 2 hypotheses have important implications and warrant close review at conceptual and empirical levels. In this article, the authors present such a review. Conceptually, deviancy training potential of treatment sessions appears less significant than the more extensive peer influences outside treatment. Empirical findings previously cited in support of iatrogenic effects appear on close examination to provide little support. Finally, 17 of 18 new meta-analytic tests produced results not supportive of iatrogenic or deviancy training effects. PMID:16392977

  20. Late effects of treatment of cancer in infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, G.; Antonelli, R.; Fine, W.; Li, F.P.; Sallan, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-six children were diagnosed with cancer in infancy, followed for at lest 5 years, and assessed for late effects of disease and therapy. One child subsequently died from respiratory failure and 3 died from second primary cancers. Another patient survived second primary cancers of the skin. The high frequency of new cancers (4 observed, 0.09 expected) was attributable to host susceptibility factors and treatment effects. Kyphoscoliosis was diagnosed in 44 patients, 40 of whom had received radiotherapy to the spine. Other patients had neurologic deficits, pulmonary fibrosis, hypoplastic breasts, bowel adhesions, thyroid nodules, musculoskeletal defects, and liver fibrosis associated with tumor therapy. Sequelae of cancer were more common after treatment in infancy than in later childhood. Improved treatments and knowledge of natural history can reduce adverse effects of therapy.

  1. Iatrogenic Effects of Group Treatment for Antisocial Youth

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Bahr; Caron, Annalise; Ball, Shelly; Tapp, Julie; Johnson, Margaret; Weisz, John R.

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that group treatment of antisocial adolescents may increase rather than decrease conduct problems. One mechanism that has been suggested to underlie this effect is “deviancy training” wherein during group sessions deviant peers reinforce each other’s antisocial actions and words. These two hypotheses have important implications, and warrant close review at conceptual and empirical levels. In this paper we present such a review. Conceptually, deviancy training potential of treatment sessions appears less significant than the more extensive peer influences outside treatment. Empirical findings previously cited in support of iatrogenic effects appear on close examination to provide little support. Finally, seventeen of eighteen new meta-analytic tests produced results not supportive of iatrogenic or deviancy training effects. PMID:16392977

  2. Clinical Supervision in Treatment Transport: Effects on Adherence and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Chapman, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    This non-experimental study used Mixed-Effects Regression Models (MRMs) to examine relations among supervisor adherence to a clinical supervision protocol, therapist adherence, and changes in the behavior and functioning of youth with serious antisocial behavior treated with an empirically supported treatment (i.e., Multisystemic Therapy), one-year post treatment. Participants were 1979 youth and families treated by 429 clinicians across 45 provider organizations in North America. Four dimensions of clinical supervision were examined. MRM results showed one dimension, supervisor focus on adherence to treatment principles, predicted greater therapist adherence. Two supervision dimensions, adherence to the structure and process of supervision, and focus on clinician development, predicted changes in youth behavior. Conditions required to test hypothesized mediation by therapist adherence of supervisor adherence effects on youth outcomes were not met, and direct effects of each were observed in models including both supervisor and therapist adherence. PMID:19485583

  3. Effect of Se treatment on the volatile compounds in broccoli.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jiayu; Wu, Jie; Zuo, Jinhua; Fan, Linlin; Shi, Junyan; Gao, Lipu; Li, Miao; Wang, Qing

    2017-02-01

    Broccoli contains high levels of bioactive compounds but deteriorates and senesces easily. In the present study, freshly harvested broccoli was treated with selenite and stored at two different temperatures. The effect of selenite treatment on sensory quality and postharvest physiology were analyzed. Volatile components were assessed by HS-SPME combined with GC-MS and EN. The metabolism of Se and S was also examined. Results indicated that Se treatment had a significant effect on maintaining the sensory quality, suppressing the respiration intensity and ethylene production, as well as increasing the content of Se and decreasing the content of S. In particular, significant differences in the composition of volatile compounds were present between control and Se-treated. The differences were mainly due to differences in alcohols and sulfide compounds. These results demonstrate that Se treatment can have a positive effect on maintaining quality and enhancing its sensory quality through the release of volatile compounds. PMID:27596413

  4. Effectiveness of sex offender treatment for psychopathic sexual offenders.

    PubMed

    Doren, Dennis M; Yates, Pamela M

    2008-04-01

    Meta-analyses have suggested that sexual offender treatment (SOT) completion is associated with lowered sexual recidivism rates for convicted sexual offenders. The paucity of properly designed studies allows for the alternative explanation of less recidivism among treated samples as reflecting that lower risk offenders disproportionately self-select into treatment. A test of the "self-selection explanation" can occur by investigating treatment effect on known high-risk offenders. Psychopathy correlates with increased sexual recidivism risk, such that an exploration of the SOT effect on psychopathic offenders could clarify the accuracy of the self-selection hypothesis. Additionally, the debated degree to which psychopaths are treatable might obtain clarification by a research review. This article examines empirical findings concerning the effectiveness of SOT for psychopathic sexual offenders. Ten studies were found to meet the minimal quality standards used, stemming from only four data sources. Shortcomings of existing research precluded clear conclusions, though trends in the data are delineated. PMID:17615428

  5. The cost-effectiveness of an intensive treatment protocol for severe dyslexia in children.

    PubMed

    Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona; Goettsch, Wim G; Ekkebus, Michel; Gerretsen, Patty; Stolk, Elly A

    2011-08-01

    Studies of interventions for dyslexia have focused entirely on outcomes related to literacy. In this study, we considered a broader picture assessing improved quality of life compared with costs. A model served as a tool to compare costs and effects of treatment according to a new protocol and care as usual. Quality of life was measured and valued by proxies using a general quality-of-life instrument (EQ-5D). We considered medical cost and non-medical cost (e.g. remedial teaching). The model computed cost per successful treatment and cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) in time. About 75% of the total costs was related to diagnostic tests to distinguish between children with severe dyslexia and children who have reading difficulties for other reasons. The costs per successful treatment of severe dyslexia were €36 366. Successful treatment showed a quality-of-life gain of about 11%. At primary school, the average cost per QALY for severe dyslexia amounted to €58 647. In the long term, the cost per QALY decreased to €26 386 at secondary school and €17 663 thereafter. The results of this study provide evidence that treatment of severe dyslexia is cost-effective when the investigated protocol is followed. PMID:21793122

  6. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Seminatural Wetlands and Activated Sludge Wastewater-Treatment Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannino, Ilda; Franco, Daniel; Piccioni, Enrico; Favero, Laura; Mattiuzzo, Erika; Zanetto, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to evaluate the competitiveness of seminatural Free Water Surface (FWS) wetlands compared to traditional wastewater-treatment plants. Six scenarios of the service costs of three FWS wetlands and three different wastewater-treatment plants based on active sludge processes were compared. The six scenarios were all equally effective in their wastewater-treatment capacity. The service costs were estimated using real accounting data from an experimental wetland and by means of a market survey. Some assumptions had to be made to perform the analysis. A reference wastewater situation was established to solve the problem of the different levels of dilution that characterize the inflow water of the different systems; the land purchase cost was excluded from the analysis, considering the use of public land as shared social services, and an equal life span for both seminatural and traditional wastewater-treatment plants was set. The results suggest that seminatural systems are competitive with traditional biotechnological systems, with an average service cost improvement of 2.1-fold to 8-fold, according to the specific solution and discount rate. The main improvement factor was the lower maintenance cost of the seminatural systems, due to the self-regulating, low artificial energy inputs and the absence of waste to be disposed. In this work, only the waste-treatment capacity of wetlands was considered as a parameter for the economic competitiveness analysis. Other goods/services and environmental benefits provided by FWS wetlands were not considered.

  7. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-03-21

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  8. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  9. Total-pressure averaging in pulsating flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a nonsteady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonance which further increased the indicated pressure was encountered with the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles.

  10. Total pressure averaging in pulsating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a non-steady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonance which further increased the indicated pressure was encountered within the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure, and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles. The experiments were performed at a pressure level of 1 bar, for Mach number up to near 1, and frequencies up to 3 kHz.

  11. Cost-effective treatment for the couple with infertility.

    PubMed

    Van Voorhis, B J; Syrop, C H

    2000-12-01

    Although the evaluation of cost-effective approaches to infertility treatment remains in its infancy, several important principles have emerged from the initial studies in this field. Currently, in treating couples with infertility without tubal disease or severe male-factor infertility, the most cost-effective approach is to start with IUI or superovulation-IUI treatments before resorting to IVF procedures. The woman's age and number of sperm present for insemination are significant factors influencing cost-effectiveness. The influence of certain diagnoses on the cost-effectiveness of infertility treatments requires further study. Even when accounting for the costs associated with multiple gestations and premature deliveries, the cost of IVF decreases within the range of other cost-effective medical procedures and decreases to less than the willingness to pay for these procedures. Indeed, for patients with severe tubal disease, IVF has been found to be more cost-effective than surgical repair. The cost-effectiveness of IVF will likely improve as success rates show continued improvements over the course of time. In addition, usefulness of embryo selection and practices to reduce the likelihood of high-order multiple pregnancies, without reductions in pregnancy rates, will significantly impact cost-effectiveness. The exclusion of infertility treatments from insurance plans is unfortunate and accentuates the importance of physicians understanding the economics of infertility treatment with costs that are often passed directly to the patient. The erroneous economic policies and judgments that have led to inequities in access to infertility health care should not be tolerated. PMID:11100309

  12. No cytogenetic effects of quinolone treatment in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Mitelman, F; Kolnig, A M; Strömbeck, B; Norrby, R; Kromann-Andersen, B; Sommer, P; Wadstein, J

    1988-01-01

    Cytogenetic effects of ciprofloxacin (500 to 2,000 mg daily) and ofloxacin (200 mg daily) were studied in lymphocytes from 31 patients treated for 1 to 10 weeks. Blood samples for cytogenetic analysis were taken before the start of treatment from all patients, after 1 week from 25 patients, and after 2, 4, 6, and 10 weeks from six patients. No chromosome-damaging effect could be demonstrated in any treatment group. The mean aberration yields for each cytogenetic parameter studied and the total number of aberrations were all normal at each sampling occasion. PMID:3166361

  13. Determining GPS average performance metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    Analytic and semi-analytic methods are used to show that users of the GPS constellation can expect performance variations based on their location. Specifically, performance is shown to be a function of both altitude and latitude. These results stem from the fact that the GPS constellation is itself non-uniform. For example, GPS satellites are over four times as likely to be directly over Tierra del Fuego than over Hawaii or Singapore. Inevitable performance variations due to user location occur for ground, sea, air and space GPS users. These performance variations can be studied in an average relative sense. A semi-analytic tool which symmetrically allocates GPS satellite latitude belt dwell times among longitude points is used to compute average performance metrics. These metrics include average number of GPS vehicles visible, relative average accuracies in the radial, intrack and crosstrack (or radial, north/south, east/west) directions, and relative average PDOP or GDOP. The tool can be quickly changed to incorporate various user antenna obscuration models and various GPS constellation designs. Among other applications, tool results can be used in studies to: predict locations and geometries of best/worst case performance, design GPS constellations, determine optimal user antenna location and understand performance trends among various users.

  14. Clinical Therapeutic Effects of the Application of Doxycycline in the Treatment of Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spasovski, Spiro; Belazelkoska, Zlatanka; Popovska, Mirjana; Atanasovska-Stojanovska, Aneta; Radojkova-Nikolovska, Vera; Muratovska, Ilijana; Toseska-Spasova, Natasa; Dzipunova, Biljana; Nikolovski, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the therapeutic effects of the application of doxycycline-full dose (100 mg) and sub-dose (20 mg) in the treatment of periodontal disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 60 patients with periodontal disease were examined. Patients are divided into two groups: A) treated with antimicrobial dose of 100 mg doxycycline once daily for 30 days, and B) treated with 2 x 20 mg/day. doxycycline, during 75 days. Among all patients a conservative treatment was carried out and ordinated the proper dose doxycycline in total dose during treatment from 3 gr. Index of dental plaque by Löe-Sillness, index of gingival inflammation and gingival bleeding by Cowell were followed. RESULTS: Values of dental plaque in relation first examination, 10th, 20th day, 1 month and 2.5 months, showed that after 2.5 months, average value (x = 0.83) of dental plaque in second group is slightly less than the value (x = 0.93) of dental plaque in the first group. The average value (x = 0.17) of gingival inflammation in second group is significantly less than the value (x = 0.50) of gingival inflammation in the first group. The average value (x = 0.97) of gingival bleeding in patients from the first group was significantly higher than value(x = 0.37) of gingival bleeding in the second group. CONCLUSION: Patients whose therapy was helped by a sub-dose doxycycline demonstrated positive therapeutic effects on gingival inflammation and bleeding. PMID:27275351

  15. Methaphylactic effect of tulathromycin treatment on rumen fluid parameters in feedlot beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Enrico; Armato, Leonardo; Morgante, Massimo; Muraro, Michele; Boso, Matteo; Gianesella, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tulathromycin as a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) metaphylactic treatment on rumen fluid parameters in feedlot cattle in an intensive livestock production farm. One hundred beef cattle, immediately after housing, were divided in 2 equal groups: 50 animals with metaphylactic treatment against BRD (treated group; tulathromycin at 2.5 mg/kg BW) and 50 animals with placebo treatment (control group). Rumen fluid samples were collected from each animal by rumenocentesis in 3 periods: 1 d (T1), 8 d (T8), and 15 d (T15) after treatment. Rumen pH was determined by ruminal fluid using portable pH meter. Total volatile fatty acids (total VFA) were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). All animals were singularly weighed at T1 and T15. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine significant effects of treatment (treated group versus control group) and period (T1, T8, and T15) on rumen fluid parameters and body weight. No clinical signs of BRD or other related diseases were recorded during the periods of study from any animal. Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between treated group and control group for mean values of ruminal pH (6.02 versus 5.89) and total VFA (5.84 versus 5.13) at 8 d after treatment. The weight gain (Δ) showed an average increase of 8.6 kg in treated group (P < 0.05). The trends of ruminal pH and VFA values suggest an effect of tulathromycin as BRD metaphylactic treatment on the modulation of rumen fermentation, particularly 8 d after administration. PMID:26733733

  16. Effect of treatment temperature on the microstructure of asphalt binders: insights on the development of dispersed domains.

    PubMed

    Menapace, I; Masad, E; Bhasin, A

    2016-04-01

    This paper offers important insights on the development of the microstructure in asphalt binders as a function of the treatment temperature. Different treatment temperatures are useful to understand how dispersed domains form when different driving energies for the mobility of molecular species are provided. Small and flat dispersed domains, with average diameter between 0.02 and 0.70 μm, were detected on the surface of two binders at room temperature, and these domains were observed to grow with an increase in treatment temperature (up to over 2 μm). Bee-like structures started to appear after treatment at or above 100°C. Moreover, the effect of the binder thickness on its microstructure at room temperature and at higher treatment temperatures was investigated and is discussed in this paper. At room temperature, the average size of the dispersed domains increased as the binder thickness decreased. A hypothesis that conciliates current theories on the origin and development of dispersed domains is proposed. Small dispersed domains (average diameter around 0.02 μm) are present in the bulk of the binder, whereas larger domains and bee-like structures develop on the surface, following heat treatment or mechanical disturbance that reduces the film thickness. Molecular mobility and association are the key factors in the development of binder microstructure. PMID:26540203

  17. The Long Term Effects of Social Skills Training in Elevating Overall Academic Grade Point Average, School Attendance, Health Level, and Resistance to Drug Use and Peer Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Nancy; Smith, Manuel J.

    Project STAR (Social Thinking and Reasoning Program) is a classroom-based social skills program for students in grades 5-8. To assess the long-term effectiveness of this program, students participated in the project (N=331) were compared with control students (N=191) during 1980-83. The hypothesis that there are significant differences in current…

  18. Microsieving in primary treatment: effect of chemical dosing.

    PubMed

    Väänänen, J; Cimbritz, M; la Cour Jansen, J

    2016-01-01

    Primary and chemically enhanced primary wastewater treatment with microsieving (disc or drum filtration) was studied at the large pilot scale at seven municipal wastewater treatment plants in Europe. Without chemical dosing, the reduction of suspended solids (SS) was (on average) 50% (20-65%). By introducing chemically enhanced primary treatment and dosing with cationic polymer only, SS removal could be controlled and increased to >80%. A maximum SS removal of >90% was achieved with a chemical dosing of >0.007 mg polymer/mg influent SS and 20 mg Al(3+)/L or 30 mg Fe(3+)/L. When comparing sieve pore sizes of 30-40 μm with 100 μm, the effluent SS was comparable, indicating that the larger sieve pore size could be used due to the higher loading capacity for the solids. Phosphorus removal was adjusted with the coagulant dose, and a removal of 95-97% was achieved. Moreover, microsieving offers favourable conditions for automated dosing control due to the low retention time in the filter. PMID:27438249

  19. Treatment and Posttreatment Effects of Residential Treatment Using a Re-education Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Elaine; Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.; Apperson, Joy; Mustillo, Sarah; Simmers, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    This study examined preliminary effectiveness of one of the first Project Re-ED (Re-education of Emotionally Disturbed children) residential treatment centers for children. Data were collected at admission, at discharge, and up to 6 months postdischarge. Findings show substantial decreases in problem behaviors and improvements in personal…

  20. Effective dose evaluation for BNCT brain tumor treatment based on voxel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jeng-Ning; Lee, Kuo-Wei; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2014-06-01

    For BNCT treatments, in addition to tumor target doses, non-negligible doses will result in all the remaining organs of the body. This work aims to evaluate the effective dose as well as the average absorbed doses of each of organs of patients with brain tumor treated in the BNCT epithermal neutron beam at THOR. The effective doses were evaluated according to the definitions of ICRP Publications 60 and 103 for the reference male and female computational phantoms developed in ICRP Publication 110 by using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code with the THOR-Y09 beam source. The effective dose acquired in this work was compared with the results of our previous work calculated for an adult hermaphrodite mathematical phantom. It was found that the effective dose for the female voxel phantom is larger than that for the male voxel phantom by a factor of 1.2-1.5 and the effective dose for the voxel phantom is larger than that for the mathematical phantom by a factor of 1.3-1.6. For a typical brain tumor BNCT, the effective dose was calculated to be 1.51Sv and the average absorbed dose for eye lenses was 1.07Gy. PMID:24411557

  1. Effectiveness of plasma treatment on pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    HATTORI, NORIFUMI; YAMADA, SUGURU; TORII, KOJI; TAKEDA, SHIGEOMI; NAKAMURA, KAE; TANAKA, HIROMASA; KAJIYAMA, HIROAKI; KANDA, MITSURO; FUJII, TSUTOMU; NAKAYAMA, GORO; SUGIMOTO, HIROYUKI; KOIKE, MASAHIKO; NOMOTO, SHUJI; FUJIWARA, MICHITAKA; MIZUNO, MASAAKI; HORI, MASARU; KODERA, YASUHIRO

    2015-01-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has attracted attention in cancer therapy. We explored the indirect effect of NEAPP through plasma-activated medium (PAM) on pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, four pancreatic cancer cell lines were used and the antitumor effects of PAM treatment were evaluated using a cell proliferation assay. To explore functional mechanisms, morphological change and caspase-3/7 activation in cells were also assessed. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in cells was examined and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an intracellular ROS scavenger, was tested. Finally, the antitumor effect of local injection of PAM was investigated in a mouse xenograft model. We found that PAM treatment had lethal effect on pancreatic cancer cells. Typical morphological findings suggestive of apoptosis such as vacuolization of cell membranes, small and round cells and aggregation of cell nuclei, were observed in the PAM treated cells. Caspase-3/7 activation was detected in accordance with the observed morphological changes. Additionally, ROS uptake was observed in all cell lines tested, while the antitumor effects of PAM were completely inhibited with NAC. In the mouse xenograft model, the calculated tumor volume on day 28 in the PAM treatment group was significantly smaller compared with the control group [28±22 vs. 89±38 (mm3 ± SD), p=0.0031]. These results show that PAM treatment of pancreatic cancer might be a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26351772

  2. Evaluations of average level spacings

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, H.I.

    1980-01-01

    The average level spacing for highly excited nuclei is a key parameter in cross section formulas based on statistical nuclear models, and also plays an important role in determining many physics quantities. Various methods to evaluate average level spacings are reviewed. Because of the finite experimental resolution, to detect a complete sequence of levels without mixing other parities is extremely difficult, if not totally impossible. Most methods derive the average level spacings by applying a fit, with different degrees of generality, to the truncated Porter-Thomas distribution for reduced neutron widths. A method that tests both distributions of level widths and positions is discussed extensivey with an example of /sup 168/Er data. 19 figures, 2 tables.

  3. IMPACT OF AVERAGE PLANT SPACING AND PLANT PATTERN ON YIELD AND CANPOY COVERAGE FOR NON-IRRIGATED PEANUTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field experiments were conducted in Terrell County, GA from 1997 to 1999 to determine the effect of average plant spacing on pod mass per plant and yield for single row peanuts grown under nonirrigated conditions. Plants within treatments were thinned at random until average plant spacings of 23, 3...

  4. Effect of Surface Treatment on the Properties of Wool Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, C. W.; Yuen, C. W. M.; Chan, C. K.; Lau, M. P.

    Wool fiber is commonly used in textile industry, however, it has some technical problems which affect the quality and performance of the finished products such as felting shrinkage, handle, lustre, pilling, and dyeability. These problems may be attributed mainly in the presence of wool scales on the fiber surface. Recently, chemical treatments such as oxidation and reduction are the commonly used descaling methods in the industry. However, as a result of the pollution caused by various chemical treatments, physical treatment such as low temperature plasma (LTP) treatment has been introduced recently because it is similarly capable of achieving a comparable descaling effect. Most of the discussions on the applications of LTP treatment on wool fiber were focused on applying this technique for improving the surface wettability and shrink resistance. Meanwhile, little discussion has been made on the mechanical properties, thermal properties, and the air permeability. In this paper, wool fabric was treated with LTP treatment with the use of a non-polymerizing gas, namely oxygen. After the LTP treatment, the fabrics low-stress mechanical properties, air permeability, and thermal properties were evaluated and discussed.

  5. Effect of water treatment processes on Cryptosporidium infectivity.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Alexandra; Daminato, David; Saint, Christopher P; Monis, Paul T

    2008-03-01

    Conventional water treatment processes have the ability to remove Cryptosporidium oocysts through coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation and filtration, provided there is efficient management of plant performance. The potential exists for the breakthrough of oocysts through the treatment train. The effect of the water treatment chemical aluminium sulphate (alum) on Cryptosporidium oocyst infectivity has been assessed using an assay that combines cell culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction techniques. The infectivity of fresh and temperature-aged oocysts (stored up to 6 months at 4 or 15 degrees C) was unaffected by exposure to a range of doses of alum in standard jar test procedures and dissolved air flotation processes and subsequent exposure to chlorine or chloramine. Removal efficiencies and infectivity measures are important in determining risk to public health and will reflect the ability of water treatment plants to act as a barrier to these pathogens. PMID:18067945

  6. Dose Specific Effects of Olanzapine in the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Rae A.; Claus, Eric D.; Arenella, Pamela; Bogenschutz, Michael; Karoly, Hollis; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W.; Bryan, Angela D.; Hutchison, Kent E.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale It is well-established that the rewarding effects of alcohol are modulated by the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. Olanzapine, a D2 dopamine antagonist, has been shown to reduce alcohol craving and consumption. Objective To clarify whether olanzapine has clinical utility in the treatment of alcohol dependence, a 12-week, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted. Methods One-hundred twenty-nine treatment-seeking alcohol dependent adults were randomly assigned to 12-weeks of olanzapine (5mg vs. 2.5mg) or placebo. Outcomes examined were average drinks per drinking day (DDD), proportion of drinking days to total days in treatment (PDD), alcohol craving, and impaired control over alcohol use. Mixed models were used to examine medication effects during the course of treatment on specified outcomes. Results All of the analyses indicated a main effect for time, such that there were reductions in alcohol use and craving and an increase in control over alcohol use across treatment conditions. Dose-response analyses indicated that, in comparison to placebo, participants in the 5mg group experienced reduced craving for alcohol and participants in the 2.5mg group decreased in PDD and increased in their control over alcohol use. Better control over alcohol use remained significant 6 months post-treatment for the 2.5mg group. Subjective experiences of the medication suggest that 2.5mg and 5mg were equally well-tolerated. Conclusions Results provide some support for the notion that dosage is an important consideration in relation to effectiveness; however, the cost-benefit balance does not support the clinical utility of olanzapine in treating alcohol dependence. PMID:25304864

  7. Effect of fluctuations on time-averaged multi-line NO-LIF thermometry measurements of the gas-phase temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feroughi, Omid M.; Kronemayer, Helmut; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2015-09-01

    Multi-line NO laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) thermometry enables accurate gas-phase temperature imaging in combustion systems through least-squares fitting of excitation spectra. The required excitation wavelength scan takes several minutes which systematic biases the results in case of temperature fluctuations. In this work, the effect of various types (linear, Gaussian and bimodal) and amplitudes of temperature fluctuations is quantified based on simulated NO-LIF excitation spectra. Temperature fluctuations of less than ±5 % result in a negligible error of less than ±1 % in temperature for all cases. Bimodal temperature distributions have the largest effect on the determined temperature. Symmetric temperature fluctuations around 900 K have a negligible effect. At lower mean temperatures, fluctuations cause a positive bias leading to over-predicted mean temperatures, while at higher temperatures the bias is negative. The results of the theoretical analysis were applied as a guide for interpreting experimental multi-line NO-LIF temperature measurements in a mildly turbulent pilot-plant scale flame reactor dedicated for nanoparticle synthesis.

  8. On generalized averaged Gaussian formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalevic, Miodrag M.

    2007-09-01

    We present a simple numerical method for constructing the optimal (generalized) averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas which are the optimal stratified extensions of Gauss quadrature formulas. These extensions exist in many cases in which real positive Kronrod formulas do not exist. For the Jacobi weight functions w(x)equiv w^{(alpha,beta)}(x)D(1-x)^alpha(1+x)^beta ( alpha,beta>-1 ) we give a necessary and sufficient condition on the parameters alpha and beta such that the optimal averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas are internal.

  9. Effects of Heat Treatment on Microstructural Modification of As-Cast Gamma-TiAl Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Hosseini, Seyed Rahman; Hadavi, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    Effects of normalizing and annealing treatments on the microstructure of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb (at.%) were investigated. Normalizing processes were done at 1385 ± 5 °C in α-phase domain with the heating rate of 10 °C/min, the average cooling rate of 30 °C/min, and the holding times of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min. The annealing process was done at the same temperature and heating rate, the holding time of 15 min, and the average cooling rate of 2 °C/min. Microstructures, phases, and hardness levels were studied by optical and field emission electron microscopic observations, x-ray diffractometry (XRD), and microhardness testing, respectively. Also, crystallographic texture variations were analyzed by means of texture coefficient and XRD results. Experimental results showed a linear direct relationship between treatment time and grain size, up to 15 min. A linear reversed behavior was observed for longer times. The untreated alloy consisted of γ and α2 phases with a columnar morphology with the length of about 300 μm. A near-lamellar microstructure with equiaxed gamma grains, Widmansttäten, and laminar γ + α2 colonies was obtained by the normalizing process. The maximum reduction of the grain size was about 70%, as achieved by normalizing with the 15 min holding time. A texture-free microstructure was acquired by normalizing treatment in comparison with strong texture of the as-cast and annealed alloys.

  10. Effects of Heat Treatment on Microstructural Modification of As-Cast Gamma-TiAl Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Hosseini, Seyed Rahman; Hadavi, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    Effects of normalizing and annealing treatments on the microstructure of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb (at.%) were investigated. Normalizing processes were done at 1385 ± 5 °C in α-phase domain with the heating rate of 10 °C/min, the average cooling rate of 30 °C/min, and the holding times of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min. The annealing process was done at the same temperature and heating rate, the holding time of 15 min, and the average cooling rate of 2 °C/min. Microstructures, phases, and hardness levels were studied by optical and field emission electron microscopic observations, x-ray diffractometry (XRD), and microhardness testing, respectively. Also, crystallographic texture variations were analyzed by means of texture coefficient and XRD results. Experimental results showed a linear direct relationship between treatment time and grain size, up to 15 min. A linear reversed behavior was observed for longer times. The untreated alloy consisted of γ and α2 phases with a columnar morphology with the length of about 300 μm. A near-lamellar microstructure with equiaxed gamma grains, Widmansttäten, and laminar γ + α2 colonies was obtained by the normalizing process. The maximum reduction of the grain size was about 70%, as achieved by normalizing with the 15 min holding time. A texture-free microstructure was acquired by normalizing treatment in comparison with strong texture of the as-cast and annealed alloys.

  11. [Treatment of overactive bladder in older women increased doses of antimuscarinic drugs safe and effective alternative to existing methods].

    PubMed

    Kosilov, K V; Loparev, S A; Krasnykh, M A; Kosilova, L V

    2014-01-01

    The study included 95 female patients of 65 to 74 years (average age 67,1 years), who previously (more than 6 months before this study) took a course of monotherapy with hydrochloride trospium in higher dosages with unstable or weak effect. In this study, all patients were divided into three groups and were treated with two antimuscarinic drugs. The majority of older women suffering from OAB and treatment-resistant taking one antimuscarinic drug in high doses showed a significant positive progress in a state by adding a second antimuscarinic agent. The received side effects do not exceed thereof in comparison with treatment with a single drug. PMID:25051773

  12. Neuroimaging the Effectiveness of Substance Use Disorder Treatments.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Elizabeth A; Wiers, Corinde E; Lindgren, Elsa; Miller, Gregg; Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack

    2016-09-01

    Neuroimaging techniques to measure the function and biochemistry of the human brain such as positron emission tomography (PET), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), are powerful tools for assessing neurobiological mechanisms underlying the response to treatments in substance use disorders. Here, we review the neuroimaging literature on pharmacological and behavioral treatment in substance use disorder. We focus on neural effects of medications that reduce craving (e.g., naltrexone, bupropion hydrochloride, baclofen, methadone, varenicline) and that improve cognitive control (e.g., modafinil, N-acetylcysteine), of behavioral treatments for substance use disorders (e.g., cognitive bias modification training, virtual reality, motivational interventions) and neuromodulatory interventions such as neurofeedback and transcranial magnetic stimulation. A consistent finding for the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions identifies the improvement of executive control networks and the dampening of limbic activation, highlighting their values as targets for therapeutic interventions in substance use disorders. PMID:27184387

  13. Effect of Heat Treatment on Properties of Glass Nanocomposite Sealants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Bok; Ha, Su-Jeong; Jang, Dong-Hoon; Park, Sung; Bae, Joongmyeon; Lee, Jae Chun

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of heat treatments on the viscosities and electrical conductivities of glass sealants to be used in solid oxide fuel cells. Glass-based sealants, both with and without an alumina nanopowder added as a nanofiller, were heat treated at temperatures ranging from 750 degrees C to 770 degrees C for periods of up to 240 h. The effects of heat treatments on the viscosities, electrical conductivities and phase transformations of the sealants were investigated. The results showed that alumina nanopowder added to the glass increased both high-temperature electrical conductivities and the viscosities of the sintered glass nanocomposite sealants. However, lengthy heat treatments decreased the electrical conductivities of the glass nanocomposite sealants. This decrease in the conductivities of the heat-treated glass nanocomposites was attributed to the crystallization of glass phase, owing to the dissolution of the alumina nanofiller in the sealing glass. PMID:26328386

  14. Effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on erosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of erosion by glass beads and crushed glass and by heat treatments on the erosional resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy and 1045 steel were studied. The aluminum alloy's erosion resistance was found to be insensitive to mechanical surface treatment applied before testing, and was determined to depend on the properties of the work-hardened surface layer; this was also demonstrated for aluminum alloy single crystals. The aluminum alloy heat treatments included annealing, solution, and precipitation. Solution was found to increase erosion resistance but precipitation had the opposite effect. Hardness showed no correlation with erosion resistance for either aluminum alloy steel. The steel tests showed that crushed glass provides an order of magnitude more erosion than glass beads.

  15. Effects of chronic buspirone treatment on cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Fivel, Peter A; Kohut, Stephen J; Bergman, Jack

    2013-02-01

    Cocaine abuse and dependence is a major public health problem that continues to challenge medication-based treatment. Buspirone (Buspar) is a clinically available, non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic medication that acts on both serotonin and dopamine systems. In recent preclinical studies, acute buspirone treatment reduced cocaine self-administration at doses that did not also decrease food-reinforced behavior in rhesus monkeys (Bergman et al, 2012). The present study evaluated the effectiveness of chronic buspirone treatment on self-administration of cocaine and food. Five adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to self-administer cocaine and food during four 1-h daily sessions under a second-order schedule of reinforcement (FR2 [VR 16:S]). Buspirone (0.32 and 0.56 mg/kg/h) was administered intravenously through one lumen of a double-lumen catheter every 20 min for 23 h each day for 7-10 consecutive days. Each buspirone treatment period was followed by saline control treatment until drug- and food-maintained responding returned to baseline levels. Buspirone significantly reduced responding maintained by cocaine, and shifted the dose-effect curve downwards. Buspirone had minimal effects on food-maintained responding. In cocaine discrimination studies, buspirone (0.1-0.32 mg/kg, IM) did not antagonize the discriminative stimulus and rate-altering effects of cocaine in four of six monkeys. These findings indicate that buspirone selectively attenuates the reinforcing effects of cocaine in a nonhuman primate model of cocaine self-administration, and has variable effects on cocaine discrimination. PMID:23072835

  16. Effects Of The Inhomogeneity of Brachytherapy Sources In Cancer Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onumah, Nnenna

    2006-03-01

    Uniformity of radioactive sources is vital in delivering accurate doses in Brachytherapy. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) defines source uniformity as no more than a 20 % deviation from the average value of the dose along a transverse region. Brachytherapy induced cell damages occur at the microdosimetric levels, and as such, small deviations in dose delivered from different geometrical positions on the source can lead to huge deviations in proper treatment. A Geant4 simulation of a uniform source and a non-uniform source was simulated to check the validity of IAEA's proposed definition. A realistic source of non-uniformity, air bubbles of differing diameters (from 20 to 80 microns) were simulated and their uniformity checked against the model suggested by IAEA in two ways: (1) using the average obtained from the non-uniform source (2) using that obtained from the uniform source. Significant deviations of up to 50% were observed. These results validate the need for the scintillating fiber based detector currently in development within our research group.

  17. Therapeutic effect of intravitreal injections of ranibizumab for the treatment of macular choroidal neovascularization caused by pathological myopia

    PubMed Central

    JI, LEIBING; LV, WENJUAN; XIAO, YUN; XU, ZHENGHUA; ZHANG, XIAOLING; ZHANG, WEI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of intravitreal ranibizumab injections for the treatment of macular choroidal neovascularization (CNV) caused by pathological myopia. Between one and four intravitreal injections of ranibizumab were administered to 61 eyes from 61 patients who were diagnosed with macular CNV caused by pathological myopia. Following injection, the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central macular thickness (CMT) and fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) findings were evaluated monthly for a period of 6 months. Among the 61 eyes, 10 eyes received one injection, 44 received two injections, six received three injections and one received four injections (average, 1.97 injections). The BCVA was 0.02±0.01 prior to treatment and 0.30±0.03 subsequent to treatment, and this difference was statistically significant (P<0.01). The CMT was reduced by an average of 45.1 µm. Regarding the FFA results, 56 eyes had no CNV fluorescence leakage and five eyes had CNV fluorescence leakage following treatment; however, the intensity of CNV fluorescence leakage in the five eyes following treatment was lower than that prior to treatment. As a treatment for pathological myopia-induced macular CNV, intravitreal injections of ranibizumab may improve eyesight as well as the macular retinal tissue structure; thus, this is a safe and effective treatment method. PMID:26622450

  18. Instrument to average 100 data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, G. B.; Birchenough, A. G.; Rice, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    An instrumentation system is currently under development which will measure many of the important parameters associated with the operation of an internal combustion engine. Some of these parameters include mass-fraction burn rate, ignition energy, and the indicated mean effective pressure. One of the characteristics of an internal combustion engine is the cycle-to-cycle variation of these parameters. A curve-averaging instrument has been produced which will generate the average curve, over 100 cycles, of any engine parameter. the average curve is described by 2048 discrete points which are displayed on an oscilloscope screen to facilitate recording and is available in real time. Input can be any parameter which is expressed as a + or - 10-volt signal. Operation of the curve-averaging instrument is defined between 100 and 6000 rpm. Provisions have also been made for averaging as many as four parameters simultaneously, with a subsequent decrease in resolution. This provides the means to correlate and perhaps interrelate the phenomena occurring in an internal combustion engine. This instrument has been used successfully on a 1975 Chevrolet V8 engine, and on a Continental 6-cylinder aircraft engine. While this instrument was designed for use on an internal combustion engine, with some modification it can be used to average any cyclically varying waveform.

  19. Treatment Modifications and Treatment-Limiting Toxicities or Side Effects: Risk Factors and Temporal Trends.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, Nikos; Psichogiou, Mina; Paparizos, Vassilios; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Chini, Maria; Protopapas, Konstantinos; Sipsas, Nikolaos V; Panos, George; Chrysos, George; Sambatakou, Helen; Katsarou, Olga; Touloumi, Giota

    2015-07-01

    Combined antiretroviral treatment (cART) modifications are often required due to treatment failure or side effects. We investigate cART regimens' durability, frequency of treatment-limiting adverse events, and potential risk factors and temporal trends. Data were derived from the Athens Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (AMACS). Statistical analyses were based on survival techniques, allowing for multiple contributions per individual. Overall, 2,756 individuals, aged >15 years, initiated cART. cART regimens were grouped by their initiation date into four calendar periods (1995-1998, 1999-2002, 2003-2006, and 2007+). Median [95% confidence interval (CI)] time to first treatment modification was 2.11 (1.95-2.33) years; cumulative probabilities at 1 year were 31.6%, 29.0%, 33.1%, and 29.6% for the four periods, respectively. cART modifications were less frequent in more recent years (adjusted HR=0.96 per year; p<0.001). Longer treatment duration was associated with lower HIV-RNA, higher CD4 counts, and being previously ART naive. cART modifications due to treatment failure became less frequent in recent years (adjusted HR=0.91 per year; p<0.001). Estimated (95% CI) 1 year cumulative probabilities of treatment-limiting side effects were 16.4% (12.0-21.3%), 19.3% (15.6-23.3%), 24.9% (20.3-29.7%), and 21.1% (13.4-29.9%) for the four periods, respectively, with no significant temporal trends. Risk of side effects was lower in nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens or triple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-based cART regimens. Treatment modifications have become less frequent in more recent years. This could be partly attributed to the lower risk for side effects of NNRTI-based cART regimens and mainly to the improved efficacy of newer drugs. However, the rate of drugs substitutions due to adverse events remains substantially high. PMID:25950848

  20. Effects of Video Modeling on Treatment Integrity of Behavioral Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGennaro-Reed, Florence D.; Codding, Robin; Catania, Cynthia N.; Maguire, Helena

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effects of individualized video modeling on the accurate implementation of behavioral interventions using a multiple baseline design across 3 teachers. During video modeling, treatment integrity improved above baseline levels; however, teacher performance remained variable. The addition of verbal performance feedback increased…

  1. Health Effects Associated with Wastewater Treatment and Disposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, N. E.; Pahren, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the potential health effects associated with: (1) wastewater treatment plants; (2) land application of municipal wastewater; and (3) use of renovated water. This review covers the publications of 1976-77. A list of 96 references is also presented. (HM)

  2. Childhood Resiliency Effects from Schoolwide Treatment: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinerman, Krystal M.; Hull, Darrell M.; Hayes, DeMarquis; Powell, Marvin G.; Ferguson, Sarah; Naslund-Hadley, Emma I.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the Childhood Resiliency Effects from Schoolwide Treatment (CREST) Pilot was to implement a comprehensive school wide social and character development program aimed at decreasing violence among students and assisting students exposed to violence in Belize City. This one-year pilot program implemented portions of the Positive Action…

  3. Effective treatment of migraine. Terminating acute attacks, reducing their frequency.

    PubMed

    Pringsheim, Tamara; Edmeads, John

    2004-04-01

    Migraine is the headache most commonly encountered in primary care practice. In one US population survey, 17.6% of women and 6% of men reported migraine. Specific, effective treatment options for migraine are increasingly available, helping to reinforce how important it is that this common and sometimes disabling condition be recognized by primary care physicians. PMID:15095534

  4. EFFECT OF CHLORINE TREATMENT ON INFECTIVITY OF HEPATITIS A VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the effect of chlorine treatment on the infectivity of hepatitis A virus (HAV). Prodromal chimpanzee feces, shown to induce hepatitis in marmosets (Saguinus sp.), was clarified, and the virus was precipitated with 7% polyethylene glycol 6000, harvested and res...

  5. PERMEABLE TREATMENT WALL EFFECTIVENESS MONITORING PROJECT, NEVADA STEWART MINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 39, Permeable Treatment Wall Effectiveness Monitoring Project, implemented and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. De...

  6. Effect Size for Single-Subject Design in Phonological Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Dickinson, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document, validate, and corroborate effect size (ES) for single­-subject design in treatment of children with functional phonological disorders; to evaluate potential child-­specific contributing variables relative to ES; and to establish benchmarks for interpretation of ES for the population. Method: Data…

  7. Clinical Supervision in Treatment Transport: Effects on Adherence and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Chapman, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    This nonexperimental study used mixed-effects regression models to examine relations among supervisor adherence to a clinical supervision protocol, therapist adherence, and changes in the behavior and functioning of youths with serious antisocial behavior treated with an empirically supported treatment (i.e., multisystemic therapy [MST]) 1 year…

  8. Training Implications of Harmful Effects of Psychological Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castonguay, Louis G.; Boswell, James F.; Constantino, Michael J.; Goldfried, Marvin R.; Hill, Clara E.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this article is to delineate training implications regarding harmful effects associated with psychotherapy. The authors strongly recommend that trainees be made aware of (and encouraged to examine carefully) the potentially harmful treatments that have been recently identified (Lilienfeld, 2007). Consistent with a broad perspective on…

  9. EFFECT OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL SPILLS ON BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of over 250 chemical substances on biological treatment processes are presented in a format which permits its use as an operations handbook. The information, arranged in a matrix form with the chemical substances presented in alphabetical order, includes descriptions ...

  10. Polyhedral Painting with Group Averaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Frank A.; Tsao, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The technique of "group-averaging" produces colorings of a sphere that have the symmetries of various polyhedra. The concepts are accessible at the undergraduate level, without being well-known in typical courses on algebra or geometry. The material makes an excellent discovery project, especially for students with some background in…

  11. Averaged Electroencephalic Audiometry in Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, William E.; McCandless, Geary A.

    1971-01-01

    Normal, preterm, and high-risk infants were tested at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of age using averaged electroencephalic audiometry (AEA) to determine the usefulness of AEA as a measurement technique for assessing auditory acuity in infants, and to delineate some of the procedural and technical problems often encountered. (KW)

  12. Averaging inhomogeneous cosmologies - a dialogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, T.

    The averaging problem for inhomogeneous cosmologies is discussed in the form of a disputation between two cosmologists, one of them (RED) advocating the standard model, the other (GREEN) advancing some arguments against it. Technical explanations of these arguments as well as the conclusions of this debate are given by BLUE.

  13. Averaging inhomogenous cosmologies - a dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, T.

    The averaging problem for inhomogeneous cosmologies is discussed in the form of a disputation between two cosmologists, one of them (RED) advocating the standard model, the other (GREEN) advancing some arguments against it. Technical explanations of these arguments as well as the conclusions of this debate are given by BLUE.

  14. Averaging facial expression over time

    PubMed Central

    Haberman, Jason; Harp, Tom; Whitney, David

    2010-01-01

    The visual system groups similar features, objects, and motion (e.g., Gestalt grouping). Recent work suggests that the computation underlying perceptual grouping may be one of summary statistical representation. Summary representation occurs for low-level features, such as size, motion, and position, and even for high level stimuli, including faces; for example, observers accurately perceive the average expression in a group of faces (J. Haberman & D. Whitney, 2007, 2009). The purpose of the present experiments was to characterize the time-course of this facial integration mechanism. In a series of three experiments, we measured observers’ abilities to recognize the average expression of a temporal sequence of distinct faces. Faces were presented in sets of 4, 12, or 20, at temporal frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 21.3 Hz. The results revealed that observers perceived the average expression in a temporal sequence of different faces as precisely as they perceived a single face presented repeatedly. The facial averaging was independent of temporal frequency or set size, but depended on the total duration of exposed faces, with a time constant of ~800 ms. These experiments provide evidence that the visual system is sensitive to the ensemble characteristics of complex objects presented over time. PMID:20053064

  15. Average Cost of Common Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Fred; Tweeten, Luther

    The paper shows costs of elementary and secondary schools applicable to Oklahoma rural areas, including the long-run average cost curve which indicates the minimum per student cost for educating various numbers of students and the application of the cost curves determining the optimum school district size. In a stratified sample, the school…

  16. Study of Convective Flow Effects in Endwall Casing Treatments in Transonic Compressor Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Mueller, Martin W.; Schiffer, Heinz-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The unsteady convective flow effects in a transonic compressor rotor with a circumferential-groove casing treatment are investigated in this paper. Experimental results show that the circumferential-groove casing treatment increases the compressor stall margin by almost 50% for the current transonic compressor rotor. Steady flow simulation of the current casing treatment, however, yields only a 15% gain in stall margin. The flow field at near-stall operation is highly unsteady due to several self-induced flow phenomena. These include shock oscillation, vortex shedding at the trailing edge, and interaction between the passage shock and the tip clearance vortex. The primary focus of the current investigation is to assess the effects of flow unsteadiness and unsteady flow convection on the circumferential-groove casing treatment. Unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) techniques were applied in addition to steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) to simulate the flow field at near-stall operation and to determine changes in stall margin. The current investigation reveals that unsteady flow effects are as important as steady flow effects on the performance of the circumferential grooves casing treatment in extending the stall margin of the current transonic compressor rotor. The primary unsteady flow mechanism is unsteady flow injection from the grooves into the main flow near the casing. Flows moving into and out of the grooves are caused due to local pressure difference near the grooves. As the pressure field becomes transient due to self-induced flow oscillation, flow injection from the grooves also becomes unsteady. The unsteady flow simulation shows that this unsteady flow injection from the grooves is substantial and contributes significantly to extending the compressor stall margin. Unsteady flows into and out of the grooves have as large a role as steady flows in the circumferential grooves. While the

  17. Experimental Study of the Effects of Blade Treatments on the Tip Vortex Characteristics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchenko, Vera

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the effects of blade tip treatments on the characteristics of a wind turbine blade tip vortex. Three blade tip shapes including a blunt edge, leading edge comb, and a winglet were designed and tested in a low speed wind tunnel. The rotor with a blunt edge was considered to be a baseline case corresponding to an untreated blade tip. The leading-edge comb rotor was designed with leading edge tubercles extending from the tip of the blade inward, 6 percent of rotor diameter. The winglet located at the tip of the winglet rotor had a cant angle of 45 degrees. The wind turbine operated at a tip speed ratio of 5 and a tip Reynolds number of 14,000. The tip treatments were intended to weaken the tip vortices by encouraging dissipation (leading edge comb) or promoting the formation of weaker vortices (winglet). Time-resolved and phase-averaged PIV was used to measure the velocity field behind the rotor. The time-averaged velocity field was subtracted from the phase-averaged velocity field to isolate the time-varying components of the flow. The vorticity of the phase-averaged time-varying field was calculated, and the tip vortices were identified using a vortex identification method. Vortex characteristics such as core radius and vortex strength were calculated and compared for the three rotors. The analysis of the vorticity showed that the winglet rotor had weaker tip vortices with a larger core radius, while the serrated tip rotor had strong tip vortices with the same core radius as the baseline case.

  18. Effectiveness of a sex offender treatment programme: a risk band analysis.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, Anna C; Bright, David A

    2011-02-01

    This article reports an evaluation of a New South Wales Department of Corrective Services custody-based treatment programme for adult male sexual offenders. A risk band analysis was used to compare observed and predicted sexual and violent recidivism rates in a sample of 117 treated and released offenders. Risk bands and predicted recidivism were determined using the Static-99 risk assessment measure. Results demonstrated that during an average follow-up period of 3.75 years, observed sexual recidivism rates were lower than Static-99 predictions for the overall sample (8.5% vs. 26%). The same pattern was observed for violent recidivism (12.8% vs. 36%). At each Static-99 level of risk (low, low-moderate, moderate-high, and high), observed sexual and violent recidivism rates were lower than predicted rates. These findings were consistent with the general consensus that well-implemented cognitive-behavioural treatment can have a positive effect on offending behaviour. PMID:20081095

  19. [Effectiveness of Portable Thoracic Drainage Kit for Outpatient Treatment of Spontaneous Pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Sato, Nobuyuki; Abe, Koutaro; Ishibashi, Naoya; Imai, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    The demand for outpatient management of spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) has been increased, therefore we evaluated the effectiveness of Thoracic Egg(TE), a portable thoracic drainage kit for SP. We studied 43 SP patients who had received TE treatment between May 2008 and October 2010. Ages were ranged 12~73 years (mean:29.1), with 39 males, 4 females, 25 had primary, 18 had recurrent, pneumothorax. Of the 43 patients, 23 were treated outpatient therapy with TE only, 20 were required hospitalization for persistent air leakage, poor expansion or intent to surgery. Surgical intervention was undergone in 18 patients for persistent air leaks or recurrent pneumothorax. The average length of treatment was 8.4 days for outpatient therapy only cases. Of 25 patients who had primary SP, 18( 72%) were not required hospitalization. Outpatient therapy using TE was considered very useful for SP, especially for primary cases. PMID:27246123

  20. Exact averaging of laminar dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnakar, Ram R.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri

    2011-02-01

    We use the Liapunov-Schmidt (LS) technique of bifurcation theory to derive a low-dimensional model for laminar dispersion of a nonreactive solute in a tube. The LS formalism leads to an exact averaged model, consisting of the governing equation for the cross-section averaged concentration, along with the initial and inlet conditions, to all orders in the transverse diffusion time. We use the averaged model to analyze the temporal evolution of the spatial moments of the solute and show that they do not have the centroid displacement or variance deficit predicted by the coarse-grained models derived by other methods. We also present a detailed analysis of the first three spatial moments for short and long times as a function of the radial Peclet number and identify three clearly defined time intervals for the evolution of the solute concentration profile. By examining the skewness in some detail, we show that the skewness increases initially, attains a maximum for time scales of the order of transverse diffusion time, and the solute concentration profile never attains the Gaussian shape at any finite time. Finally, we reason that there is a fundamental physical inconsistency in representing laminar (Taylor) dispersion phenomena using truncated averaged models in terms of a single cross-section averaged concentration and its large scale gradient. Our approach evaluates the dispersion flux using a local gradient between the dominant diffusive and convective modes. We present and analyze a truncated regularized hyperbolic model in terms of the cup-mixing concentration for the classical Taylor-Aris dispersion that has a larger domain of validity compared to the traditional parabolic model. By analyzing the temporal moments, we show that the hyperbolic model has no physical inconsistencies that are associated with the parabolic model and can describe the dispersion process to first order accuracy in the transverse diffusion time.

  1. Comparative Effectiveness of Guided Mastery and Exposure Treatments for Intractable Phobias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, S. Lloyd; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared two models of phobia treatment. Severe height and driving phobics (N=32) were assigned to either mastery-oriented treatment based on self-efficacy theory, exposure treatment, or no treatment. Mastery treatment proved to be significantly more effective. Results indicated that treatments effect behavioral change through their intervening…

  2. AB200. Treatment effect of TURP plus urethral sphincter botox A injection on male neurogenic micturition dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao; Jiang, Hai; Shen, Yuehong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the treatment effect of TURP plus urethral sphincter botox A injection on male neurogenic micturition dysfunction. Methods Sixteen cases of male neurogenic bladder dysfunction patients. Age from 50 to 68 years old. Average 56 years old. All patients have dysuria symptom with normal bladder capacity. Detrusor underactivity 15 cases. Normal detrusor contractility 1 case. Reasons for neurogenic bladder: spinal cord injury 8 cases, spinal cord tumor 3 cases, postencephalitic 1 case, unknown reasons 4 cases, re-injection 1 case. Residual urine from 80 to 220 mL. Different degrees of prostatic hyperplasia were verified by ultrasound in 15 cases. Routine TURP were administrated under plasma cystoscopy. 100u botox A was injected into urethral sphincter muscle in 10 spots evenly. Symptom scores and ultrasound residual urine were recorded before and 4 weeks after surgery. Results were analyzed for treatment effect estimation. Results The average residual urine volume reduced from 154.8sidua to 57.3erage mL (P<0.01). Three cases stress urinary incontinence were observed, and reduced or recovered after 2–3 months pelvic floor muscle training. All patients were satisfied with the treatment results. The treatment effect lasted more than 15 months. Conclusions TURP plus urethral sphincter botox A injection is an effective and economic treatment on male neurogenic micturition dysfunction.

  3. Cancer targeted magic bullets for effective treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Aneja, Preeti; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Beg, Sarwar; Aneja, Shivali; Dhingra, Vishal; Chugh, Rupali

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multifaceted disorder with serious threat across the globe. The vision for accomplishing an effective treatment strategy for cancer has always been a major concern worldwide. Although conventional drug therapy, esp. the chemotherapeutics provide benefits upto certain extent for treatment and management of cancers, yet it possesses umpteen challenges in terms of the associated side effects and adverse effects, lack of targeting ability, multi-drug resistance, poor patient acceptance and compliance, etc. at the desired site. To overcome these problems, the nanomedicines have been evolved as an effective and cost-effectual alternative for treatment of cancer. Inspiring from the concept of magic bullet, the world is moving towards developing the surface modified nanocarriers, which not only provide effective drug delivery but also allows site-specific monitoring of the cancer cells through in vivo diagnostic imaging. The present review endeavors to provide an explicit account on various drug targeting strategies employed for nanomedicines like active targeting, passive targeting, magnetic targeting, physical targeting and ultrasound targeting, etc, followed by their utility in the treatment of a particular type of cancer. According to the recent market survey, many nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems have been approved by USFDA, EMEA, MHRA and other global regulatory agencies, testify the high degrees of acceptance of the nanomedicines for treatment of cancer, while many products are under the preclinical and clinical development phases. Thus, for the translation of such technologies into the clinic, the pharma industry needs to be metamorphosing for a change in its culture of developing the traditional therapeutics. PMID:25876849

  4. Percutaneous Ethanol Sclerotherapy of Symptomatic Nodules Is Effective and Safe in Pregnant Women: A Study of 13 Patients with an Average Follow-Up of 6.8 Years

    PubMed Central

    Solymosi, Tamas; Melczer, Zsolt; Szabolcs, Istvan; Nagy, Endre V.; Goth, Miklos

    2015-01-01

    Background. Because of the increased risk of surgery, thyroid nodules causing compression signs and/or hyperthyroidism are concerning during pregnancy. Patients and Methods. Six patients with nontoxic cystic, four with nontoxic solid, and three with overt hyperthyroidism caused by toxic nodules were treated with percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEI). An average of 0.68 mL ethanol per 1 mL nodule volume was administered. Mean number of PEI treatments for patients was 2.9. Success was defined as the shrinkage of the nodule by more than 50% of the pretreatment volume (V0) and the normalization of TSH and FT4 levels. The average V0 was 15.3 mL. Short-term success was measured prior to labor, whereas long-term success was determined during the final follow-up (an average of 6.8 years). Results. The pressure symptoms decreased in all but one patient after PEI and did not worsen until delivery. The PEI was successful in 11 (85%) and 7 (54%) patients at short-term and long-term follow-up, respectively. Three patients underwent repeat PEI which was successful in 2 patients. Conclusions. PEI is a safe tool and seems to have good short-term results in treating selected symptomatic pregnant patients. Long-term success may require repeat PEI. PMID:26697066

  5. The effects of delays in radiotherapy treatment on tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, R. M.; Beddoe, A. H.; Dale, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    There is often a considerable delay from initial tumour diagnosis to the start of radiotherapy treatment, which may be due to factors such as waiting lists and referral delays. This paper uses widely published models and clinical parameters to calculate the effect of delays in treatment on local tumour control for four different types of tumour - squamous cell carcinoma (head and neck), breast, cervix and prostate. The Poisson model for tumour control probability (TCP), an exponential function for tumour growth and the linear quadratic model of cell kill are used to calculate the change in TCP for delays between diagnosis and treatment of up to 100 days. Typical values of the clinical parameters have been taken from the literature; these include α and β, σα, tumour size at diagnosis, pre-treatment doubling time, delay in onset of accelerated repopulation and doubling time during treatment. It is acknowledged that there are limitations in the reliability of these data for predicting absolute values of tumour control, but models are still useful for predicting how changes in treatment parameters are likely to affect the outcome. It is shown that for fast-growing tumours a delay of 1-2 months can have a significant adverse effect on the outcome, whereas for slow-growing tumours such as Ca prostate a delay of a few months does not significantly reduce the probability of tumour control. These calculations show the importance of ensuring that delays from diagnosis through to treatment are minimized, especially for patients with rapidly proliferating tumours.

  6. A cost/effectiveness evaluation of lay therapy treatment for child abusing and high risk parents.

    PubMed

    Hornick, J P; Clarke, M E

    1986-01-01

    This longitudinal investigation tested the effectiveness and cost-efficiency of a lay therapy treatment program in comparison with a standard social work treatment approach. A pretest-extended posttest research design was used to follow a group of child abusing and high risk mothers who received lay therapy (N = 27) and a randomized control group of similar clients (N = 28) over a 12-month period. Outcome data were obtained through interview and direct observation of the parents and children at six-month intervals. A variety of standardized instruments were used including Cattell's 16 Personality Factor Test, Coopersmith's Self-Opinion Form, and the Nurturance and Parent Observation Scales, adapted from Baumrind. Treatment success was defined as progression toward the mean scores of a matched comparison group (N = 21) obtained from the general population of the community during the pretest. The results indicated a trend toward improvement on the outcome measures for both treatment groups. The group receiving lay therapy treatment improved only slightly more than the group receiving standard treatment; however, there was also significantly less attrition with the lay therapy group. Analysis of time budget study data indicated that the lay therapists spent an average of 17.46 hours per month with each of their clients thus permitting the social workers to spend considerably less time with lay therapy clients. Analysis of the direct costs of the programs, based on time budget information, indicated that the lay therapy treatment involved more direct client contact than the standard treatment approach and was also substantially more costly. The high cost of the program was attributed to low caseloads and redundancy in supervision. This study presents several practical program and research recommendations. PMID:3091196

  7. Effect of spatial averaging of Doppler LIDARs on turbulence statistics within the atmospheric boundary layer and validation of a correction procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugger, Peter; Träumner, Katja; Stawiarski, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Doppler LIDARs have a systematic bias in measurements of the turbulent wind field, which leads to a turbulence reduction in Doppler LIDAR measurements. The bias is caused by the spatial extend of the laser pulse and the sampling frequency of the backscattered light from the atmosphere. This error is an inherent effect of the Doppler LIDAR measurement principle and becomes especially important for powerful Doppler LIDARs with a large range, which are most useful for dual or triple Doppler LIDAR measurements of virtual towers. In case of our Wind Tracer system from Lockheed Martin Coherent Technology the bias without any corrections for the variance of the turbulent velocity fluctuations was 47% in comparison of time series with an ultrasonic anemometer. A theoretical analysis of this bias was done by Frehlich (1997) and a correction procedure was developed by Frehlich and Cornman (2002). Although the correction procedure was already used on data from field experiments, a validation by a high frequency in-situ measurement near a range gate center of a Doppler LIDAR was still missing. We show a comparison of turbulent velocity fluctuation variances and the outer scales of turbulence from an ultrasonic anemometer with those from our Doppler LIDAR to validate the correction procedure. The correction procedure could reduce the bias of the velocity variance by 29% and for the outer scale of turbulence by 43%. Both turbulence parameters had a remaining bias, which could not be explained.

  8. Fall rice straw management and winter flooding treatment effects on a subsequent soybean crop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anders, M.M.; Windham, T.E.; McNew, R.W.; Reinecke, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of fall rice (Oryza sativa L.) straw management and winter flooding on the yield and profitability of subsequent irrigated and dryland soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] crops were studied for 3 years. Rice straw treatments consisted of disking, rolling, or standing stubble. Winter flooding treatments consisted of maintaining a minimum water depth of 10 cm by pumping water when necessary, impounding available rainfall, and draining fields to prevent flooding. The following soybean crop was managed as a conventional-tillage system or no-till system. Tillage system treatments were further divided into irrigated or dryland. Results indicated that there were no significant effects from either fall rice straw management or winter flooding treatments on soybean seed yields. Soybean seed yields for, the conventional tillage system were significantly greater than those for the no-till system for the first 2 yrs and not different in the third year. Irrigated soybean seed yields were significantly greater than those from dryland plots for all years. Net economic returns averaged over the 3 yrs were greatest ($390.00 ha-1) from the irrigated no-till system.

  9. Appearance-related side effects of HIV-1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Trevor

    2006-01-01

    In the early years of the AIDS epidemic, HIV infection was associated with visible signs and symptoms, adding to the stigma associated with the disease. Physical manifestations associated with HIV infection included muscle wasting, lymphadenopathy, Kaposi's sarcoma, candidiasis, molluscum contagiosum, and hairy leukoplakia. With the advent of antiretroviral therapy, particularly the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in 1996, many of these outward manifestations of the disease became rare. Ironically, however, the treatments used to control HIV infection (and its visible markers) have themselves been associated with appearance-related side effects. Patients may develop changes in fat distribution, rashes, skin hyperpigmentation, or paronychia. These effects not only have cosmetic and psychological consequences but also may decrease adherence to therapy, potentially causing regimen failure and drug resistance. Newer antiretroviral agents offer improved potency, more convenient dosing, and more treatment options with the potential for fewer side effects and drug interactions, which should foster optimal adherence by the patient. However, these newer drugs are also associated with appearance-related side effects, which must be considered in the selection of treatment regimens. This paper reviews the appearance-related side effects associated with classes of antiretroviral drugs as well as individual agents, including the newer antiretrovirals. PMID:16426151

  10. Effectiveness of steroid treatment in myasthenia gravis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Cosi, V; Citterio, A; Lombardi, M; Piccolo, G; Romani, A; Erbetta, A

    1991-07-01

    The records of 142 patients with generalized autoimmune myasthenia gravis who had been treated with steroids as the single immunosuppressive agent, collected at regular intervals, were employed for a retrospective evaluation. The effectiveness of treatment was assessed after 24 months; the data from the 6th and 12th months were also considered. After 24 months, 63.4% of the whole sample had improved (33.8% were in clinical or pharmacological remission); 13.4% were unchanged or had worsened and 22.3% had moved to a different immunosuppressive treatment. The rate of positive outcome was higher in patients over the age of 40 at disease onset. PMID:1927259

  11. Measuring and understanding treatment effectiveness in hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Voineskos, Sophocles H; Coroneos, Christopher J; Thoma, Achilleas; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-08-01

    Incorporating evidence-based medicine into practice is now an expectation for hand surgeons. Hand surgeons need to be able to assess associated benefits, risks, cost, and applicability of a treatment option when providing care to their patients. Using a clinical example, this article takes the reader through the three-step approach when using a publication from the medical literature on therapy. The focus of this article is primarily the second and third steps, which involve measuring and understanding treatment effectiveness. PMID:25066847

  12. Reformulation of Ensemble Averages via Coordinate Mapping.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Andrew J; Moustafa, Sabry G; Lin, Weisong; Weinstein, Steven J; Kofke, David A

    2016-04-12

    A general framework is established for reformulation of the ensemble averages commonly encountered in statistical mechanics. This "mapped-averaging" scheme allows approximate theoretical results that have been derived from statistical mechanics to be reintroduced into the underlying formalism, yielding new ensemble averages that represent exactly the error in the theory. The result represents a distinct alternative to perturbation theory for methodically employing tractable systems as a starting point for describing complex systems. Molecular simulation is shown to provide one appealing route to exploit this advance. Calculation of the reformulated averages by molecular simulation can proceed without contamination by noise produced by behavior that has already been captured by the approximate theory. Consequently, accurate and precise values of properties can be obtained while using less computational effort, in favorable cases, many orders of magnitude less. The treatment is demonstrated using three examples: (1) calculation of the heat capacity of an embedded-atom model of iron, (2) calculation of the dielectric constant of the Stockmayer model of dipolar molecules, and (3) calculation of the pressure of a Lennard-Jones fluid. It is observed that improvement in computational efficiency is related to the appropriateness of the underlying theory for the condition being simulated; the accuracy of the result is however not impacted by this. The framework opens many avenues for further development, both as a means to improve simulation methodology and as a new basis to develop theories for thermophysical properties. PMID:26950263

  13. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-wei; Guo, Wei-hua; Qi, Ya-fei; Wang, Jian-zhen; Ma, Xiang-xing; Yu, De-xin

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect.

  14. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Wei; Guo, Wei-Hua; Qi, Ya-Fei; Wang, Jian-Zhen; Ma, Xiang-Xing; Yu, De-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect. PMID:27255899

  15. Mean Element Propagations Using Numerical Averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term evolution characteristics (and stability) of an orbit are best characterized using a mean element propagation of the perturbed two body variational equations of motion. The averaging process eliminates short period terms leaving only secular and long period effects. In this study, a non-traditional approach is taken that averages the variational equations using adaptive numerical techniques and then numerically integrating the resulting EOMs. Doing this avoids the Fourier series expansions and truncations required by the traditional analytic methods. The resultant numerical techniques can be easily adapted to propagations at most solar system bodies.

  16. Prevalence of Side Effects Treatment with Carbamazepine and Other Antiepileptics in Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Koliqi, Rozafa; Polidori, Carlo; Islami, Hilmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This paper reveals the studies of carbamazepine monitoring in the manifestation of side effects during clinical use. It is important to realize that these ranges are derived statistically, with most patients who have high levels suffering side effects and some with poor control having low levels. Broadly, the newer agents have advantages of lower risk of side effects and less drug interaction. At the presence they are more expensive than the, than “older” agents. Current recommendations and practice are to use newer agents as second line drugs, although in some countries there are gaining favour as potential first line agents. Methods: In the study 91 patients with epilepsy were involved from which 53 or 58.2% were female and 38 or 41.8% were male with no great significant difference between two genders (X2=2.47, P=0.116). However, according to the study results female patients had slightly greater prevalence of epilepsy than man. Average age of epileptic patients was 23.2 years (SD ± 16.4 years), in the range 1–66 years. Patient distribution was present within all age-groups, but 59.4% of all patients were up to 20 years old. The highest prevalence of epilepsy was in the group age 6-15 years old: 33.0%. There were also children 1 – 5 years old with 7 or 7.7% of the patients, and the patients older than 60 years with 4 or 4.4% of the patients. Patient distribution according to the age and gender results with no female patient over 60 year old and more female patients in the age group 1-5 years. However statistically this did not produce a highly significant difference (T-test= 0.72, P=0.437) between average age according to the gender. The average age of the female gender was 22.1 year (SD ± 14.2 years), with the range 2-55 years, while the average age of the male patients was 24.6 year (SD ±19.2 years), with the range 1-66 years. Conclusion: Unwanted side effects of antiepileptic drugs analyzed in the study are frequent, but not so severe as

  17. The effects of cognitive-behavioral treatment for forensic inpatients.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Irma G H; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2005-10-01

    The effects of an intramural cognitive-behavioral treatment for forensic inpatients with personality disorders in a high-security hospital were examined. Treatment was aimed at modifying maladaptive coping and social skills, at enhancing social awareness, at reducing egoistic and oppositional behaviors, and at reducing psychological complaints. The patients, who all had committed serious crimes (violence, arson, sexual offences), participated voluntarily in the study. A total of 39 patients started the study, but during the course of the study, several patients dropped out because of several reasons. Patients as a group showed significant improvements over time on psychopathological symptoms, personality traits, and coping. A significant decrease of oppositional behaviors was reported by the staff. Though the patients improved well at the group level, only a minority of patients showed reliable change over time at the individual level. The meaning of the results in relation to treatment are discussed. PMID:16260485

  18. Effect of presowing magnetic treatment on properties of pea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M.; Haq, Z.; Jamil, Y.; Ahmad, M.

    2012-02-01

    The pea seeds were exposed to full-wave rectified sinusoidal magnetic fields. The effects of electromagnetic treatment on seedling growth and chlorophyll contents and have been investigated. Seed were sown after magnetic field treatment according to ISTA under controlled laboratory conditions. The magnetic filed treatment of seeds increased the growth significantly (P<0.05), while the increment in contents of chlorophyll have been found non significant (P<0.05). The shoot length, root length, root dry mass, shoot dry mass, fresh root mass and fresh shoot mass increased up to 140.5, 218.2, and 104, 263.6, 74.5, 91.3%, respectively. The result suggested that magnetic field could be used to enhance the growth in pea plant.

  19. Effects of oxidative treatments on human hair keratin films.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Ito, Y; Watanabe, T; Kawasoe, T

    2012-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide and commercial bleach on hair and human hair keratin films were examined by protein solubility, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Protein solubility in solutions containing urea decreased when the keratin films were treated with hydrogen peroxide or bleach. Oxidative treatments promoted the urea-dependent morphological change by turning films from opaque to transparent in appearance. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting showed that the oxidation of amino acids and proteins occurred due to the oxidative treatments, and such occurrence was more evident in the bleach-treated films than in the hydrogen peroxide-treated films. Compared with hair samples, the formation of cysteic acid was more clearly observed in the keratin films after the oxidative treatments. PMID:22487448

  20. Explicit cosmological coarse graining via spatial averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Singh, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    The present matter density of the Universe, while highly inhomogeneous on small scales, displays approximate homogeneity on large scales. We propose that whereas it is justified to use the Friedmann Lemaître Robertson Walker (FLRW) line element (which describes an exactly homogeneous and isotropic universe) as a template to construct luminosity distances in order to compare observations with theory, the evolution of the scale factor in such a construction must be governed not by the standard Einstein equations for the FLRW metric, but by the modified Friedmann equations derived by Buchert (Gen Relat Gravit 32:105, 2000; 33:1381, 2001) in the context of spatial averaging in Cosmology. Furthermore, we argue that this scale factor, defined in the spatially averaged cosmology, will correspond to the effective FLRW metric provided the size of the averaging domain coincides with the scale at which cosmological homogeneity arises. This allows us, in principle, to compare predictions of a spatially averaged cosmology with observations, in the standard manner, for instance by computing the luminosity distance versus red-shift relation. The predictions of the spatially averaged cosmology would in general differ from standard FLRW cosmology, because the scale-factor now obeys the modified FLRW equations. This could help determine, by comparing with observations, whether or not cosmological inhomogeneities are an alternative explanation for the observed cosmic acceleration.

  1. Effect of heat treatment on stainless steel orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Cuoghi, Osmar Aparecido; Kasbergen, Geraldo Francisco; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos; Mendonça, Marcos Rogério de; Tondelli, Pedro Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of heat treatment on CrNi stainless steel orthodontic archwires. Half of forty archwires of each thickness - 0.014" (0.35 mm), 0.016" (0.40 mm), 0.018" (0.45 mm) and 0.020" (0.50 mm) (totalling 160 archwires) - were subjected to heat treatment while the remainder were not. All of the archwires had their individual thickness measured in the anterior and posterior regions using AutoCad 2000 software before and after compressive and tensile strength testing. The data was statistically analysed utilising multivariance ANOVA at a 5% significance level. All archwires without heat treatment that were subjected to tensile strength testing presented with anterior opening, which was more accentuated in the 0.020" archwires. In the posterior region, the opening produced by the tensile force was more accentuated in the archwires without heat treatment. There was greater stability in the thermally treated archwires, especially those subjected to tensile strength testing, which indicates that the heat treatment of orthodontic archwires establishes a favourable and indispensable condition to preserve the intercanine width. PMID:21359492

  2. Effect of combined treatments on viscosity of whey dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camillo, A.; Sabato, S. F.

    2004-09-01

    Whey proteins, enriched protein fractions from milk, are of great interest as ingredients due to nutritional value associated with its functional properties. These proteins could have their structural properties improved when some treatments are applied, such as thermal and gamma irradiation or when some compounds are added. The current work aimed to study the viscometer behavior of whey dispersions submitted to two different combined treatments: (1) thermal plus irradiation and (2) thermal plus vacuum and N 2 plus irradiation. Dispersions of whey protein in water (5% and 8% protein (w/v) base) and containing proteins and glycerol at ratios 1:1 and 2:1 (protein:glycerol) were submitted to both combined treatments. The irradiation doses were 0, 5, 15 and 25 kGy. The viscosity of the two combined treatments and for four levels of absorbed doses is presented and the combined effects are discussed. The thermal treatment combined with gamma irradiation contributed to increase the viscosity as irradiation doses increases for both (5% and 8%) concentrations of proteins ( p<0.05). For protein and glycerol solutions, the irradiation dose seemed to result in a slightly increase. The vacuum applied before the irradiation showed a small contribution.

  3. The effect of dose calculation accuracy on inverse treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeraj, Robert; Keall, Paul J.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2002-02-01

    The effect of dose calculation accuracy during inverse treatment planning for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was studied in this work. Three dose calculation methods were compared: Monte Carlo, superposition and pencil beam. These algorithms were used to calculate beamlets, which were subsequently used by a simulated annealing algorithm to determine beamlet weights which comprised the optimal solution to the objective function. Three different cases (lung, prostate and head and neck) were investigated and several different objective functions were tested for their effect on inverse treatment planning. It is shown that the use of inaccurate dose calculation introduces two errors in a treatment plan, a systematic error and a convergence error. The systematic error is present because of the inaccuracy of the dose calculation algorithm. The convergence error appears because the optimal intensity distribution for inaccurate beamlets differs from the optimal solution for the accurate beamlets. While the systematic error for superposition was found to be ~1% of Dmax in the tumour and slightly larger outside, the error for the pencil beam method is typically ~5% of Dmax and is rather insensitive to the given objectives. On the other hand, the convergence error was found to be very sensitive to the objective function, is only slightly correlated to the systematic error and should be determined for each case individually. Our results suggest that because of the large systematic and convergence errors, inverse treatment planning systems based on pencil beam algorithms alone should be upgraded either to superposition or Monte Carlo based dose calculations.

  4. Effectiveness of three post-fire rehabilitation treatments in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, J. W.; MacDonald, L. H.; Rough, D.

    2006-09-01

    Post-fire rehabilitation treatments are commonly implemented after high-severity wildfires, but few data are available about the efficacy of these treatments. This study assessed post-fire erosion rates and the effectiveness of seeding, straw mulching, and contour felling in reducing erosion after a June 2000 wildfire northwest of Loveland, Colorado. Site characteristics and sediment yields were measured on 12 burned and untreated control plots and 22 burned and treated plots from 2000 to 2003. The size of the hillslope plots ranged from 0.015 to 0.86 ha.Sediment yields varied significantly by treatment and were most closely correlated with the amount of ground cover. On the control plots the mean sediment yield declined from 6-10 Mg ha-1 in the first two years after burning to 1.2 Mg ha-1 in 2002 and 0.7 Mg ha-1 in 2003. Natural regrowth caused the amount of ground cover on the control plots to increase progressively from 33% in fall 2000 to 88% in fall 2003. Seeding had no effect on either the amount of ground cover or sediment yields. Mulching reduced sediment yields by at least 95% relative to the control plots in 2001, 2002, and 2003, and the lower sediment yields are attributed to an immediate increase in the amount of ground cover in the mulched plots. The contour-felling treatments varied considerably in the quality of installation, and sediment storage capacities ranged from 7 to 32 m3 ha-1. The initial contour-felling treatment did not reduce sediment yields when subjected to a very large storm event, but sediment yields were significantly reduced by a contour-felling treatment installed after this large storm. The results indicate that contour felling may be able to store much of the sediment generated in an average year, but will not reduce sediment yields from larger storms.

  5. Climatic effects in Central Europe on the frequency of medical treatments of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sanker, C; Lambertz, C; Gauly, M

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, the relationship between the temperature-humidity index (THI) and the incidence of medical treatments in lactating dairy cows in Lower Saxony, Germany, was investigated. Records of all veterinary-treated cases over 2 years (2003 and 2005) from eight Holstein-Friesian dairy herds raised in loose-housing systems (55 to 170 cows per herd) were evaluated. After exclusion of management-dependent and climate-independent cases, a total of 5547 treatments were analyzed. Treatments were clustered into the following groups: metabolism, fertility, udder and foot/leg. Meteorological data were compiled from the nearest weather station (average distance ± s.d. 39 ± 13 km). Hourly temperatures and relative humidity values were used to calculate the THI, which was divided into classes. Out of the total number of treatments, 37.4%, 32.9%, 21.6% and 8.1% belonged to metabolism, udder, fertility and foot/leg, respectively. Data were analyzed with a mixed model that included THI class, season and year as fixed effects and farm as random effect. In general, incidences were neither affected by the year (P > 0.05) and season (P > 0.05) nor by THI classes (P > 0.05). In tendency, incidences of metabolic treatments increased with increasing THI and incidences of udder treatments increased with decreasing THI. In conclusion, indications of moderate heat stress during summer months in Central Europe were found in the present study, although THI and season did not affect the different disease complexes significantly. PMID:23034127

  6. Effect of high-pressure treatment on hard cheese proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Luciana M; Bergamini, Carina; Vaudagna, Sergio R; Cuatrin, Alejandra L; Audero, Gabriela; Hynes, Erica

    2016-06-01

    The application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment has been proposed to reduce the ripening time of cheese via modifications in the enzymatic activities or the substrate reactivity. Investigations on the effect of HHP on cheese proteolysis have been undertaken with either encouraging results or little effect according to the treatment conditions and the type of cheese, but information concerning the effect of HHP on the ripening of hard cooked cheese is still lacking. In this report, we describe the effect of HHP treatment on Reggianito cheese proteolysis. For that purpose, 1-d-old miniature cheeses (5.5-cm diameter and 6-cm height) were treated at 100 or 400MPa and 20°C for 5 or 10min, and control cheeses in the trial were not pressurized. All cheeses were ripened at 12°C during 90d. The HHP did not affect gross composition of the cheeses, but microbial load changed, especially because the starter culture count was significantly lower at the beginning of the ripening of the cheeses treated at 400MPa than in controls and cheeses treated at 100MPa. Cheeses treated at 400MPa for 10min had significantly higher plasmin activity than did the others; the residual coagulant activity was not affected by HHP. Proteolysis assessment showed that most severe treatments (400MPa) also resulted in cheeses with increased breakdown of αS1- and β-CN. In addition, nitrogen content in soluble fractions was significantly higher in cheeses treated at 400MPa, as well as soluble peptides and free AA production. Peptide profiles and individual and total content of free AA in 60-d-old treated cheese were as high as in fully ripened control cheeses (90d). Holding time had an effect only on pH-4.6-soluble nitrogen fraction and plasmin activity; cheese treated for 10min showed higher values than those treated for 5min, at both levels of pressure assayed. We concluded that HHP treatments at 400MPa applied 1d after cheesemaking increased the rate of proteolysis, leading to an

  7. Ensemble averaging of acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanski, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    A computer program called Ensemble Averaging of Acoustic Data is documented. The program samples analog data, analyzes the data, and displays them in the time and frequency domains. Hard copies of the displays are the program's output. The documentation includes a description of the program and detailed user instructions for the program. This software was developed for use on the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel's Dynamic Analysis System consisting of a PDP-11/45 computer, two RK05 disk drives, a tektronix 611 keyboard/display terminal, and FPE-4 Fourier Processing Element, and an analog-to-digital converter.

  8. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M.

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  9. A Review of Behavioral Foundations of Effective Autism Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Amanda M; Andrade, Meca; Cividini-Motta, Catia; Conde, Kerry A; Donnelly, Maeve G; McConnell, Kelly; Moore, Keira; Peters, Lindsay; Roberts, Kylie; Stocco, Corey; Sveinbjornsdottir, Berglind; Vanselow, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Behavior analysts must base their practices on both the conceptual foundations and the validated technologies of our field. In recognition of these important facets of effective practice, Mayville and Mulick (2011) have produced an edited book aimed at “developing the conceptually sound and procedurally innovative behavior analysts that are so badly needed” (p. x) within the burgeoning field of autism treatment. We summarize the content of this book and evaluate its utility to practitioners working with people with autism spectrum disorders.

  10. Average luminosity distance in inhomogeneous universes

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, Valentin

    2010-04-01

    Using numerical ray tracing, the paper studies how the average distance modulus in an inhomogeneous universe differs from its homogeneous counterpart. The averaging is over all directions from a fixed observer not over all possible observers (cosmic), thus is more directly applicable to our observations. In contrast to previous studies, the averaging is exact, non-perturbative, and includes all non-linear effects. The inhomogeneous universes are represented by Swiss-cheese models containing random and simple cubic lattices of mass-compensated voids. The Earth observer is in the homogeneous cheese which has an Einstein-de Sitter metric. For the first time, the averaging is widened to include the supernovas inside the voids by assuming the probability for supernova emission from any comoving volume is proportional to the rest mass in it. Voids aligned along a certain direction give rise to a distance modulus correction which increases with redshift and is caused by cumulative gravitational lensing. That correction is present even for small voids and depends on their density contrast, not on their radius. Averaging over all directions destroys the cumulative lensing correction even in a non-randomized simple cubic lattice of voids. At low redshifts, the average distance modulus correction does not vanish due to the peculiar velocities, despite the photon flux conservation argument. A formula for the maximal possible average correction as a function of redshift is derived and shown to be in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The formula applies to voids of any size that: (a)have approximately constant densities in their interior and walls; and (b)are not in a deep nonlinear regime. The average correction calculated in random and simple cubic void lattices is severely damped below the predicted maximal one after a single void diameter. That is traced to cancellations between the corrections from the fronts and backs of different voids. The results obtained

  11. Averaging models for linear piezostructural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Kurdila, A. J.; Stepanyan, V.; Inman, D. J.; Vignola, J.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we consider a linear piezoelectric structure which employs a fast-switched, capacitively shunted subsystem to yield a tunable vibration absorber or energy harvester. The dynamics of the system is modeled as a hybrid system, where the switching law is considered as a control input and the ambient vibration is regarded as an external disturbance. It is shown that under mild assumptions of existence and uniqueness of the solution of this hybrid system, averaging theory can be applied, provided that the original system dynamics is periodic. The resulting averaged system is controlled by the duty cycle of a driven pulse-width modulated signal. The response of the averaged system approximates the performance of the original fast-switched linear piezoelectric system. It is analytically shown that the averaging approximation can be used to predict the electromechanically coupled system modal response as a function of the duty cycle of the input switching signal. This prediction is experimentally validated for the system consisting of a piezoelectric bimorph connected to an electromagnetic exciter. Experimental results show that the analytical predictions are observed in practice over a fixed "effective range" of switching frequencies. The same experiments show that the response of the switched system is insensitive to an increase in switching frequency above the effective frequency range.

  12. Surgical drainage of primary iliopsoas abscess--safe and cost-effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Afaq, Aamir; Jain, Bhupendra K; Dargan, Puneet; Bhattacharya, Shyamal K; Rauniyar, Raj K; Kukreti, Ranjan

    2002-07-01

    The report evaluates surgical drainage (SD) as a primary treatment of primary iliopsoas abscess (PIA). Seventy-two patients, who underwent SD for PIA at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal were studied. SD was performed through a lower abdominal, extra peritoneel, muscle splitting incision. Ultrasonography was used to diagnose the abscess in 53/54 patients (98%). Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism grown in 45/65 patients (69%). The mean duration of drainage was 3.2 +/- 1.4 days (range, 1-7 days). The treatment was successful in resolving the abscesses in all patients. The mean hospital stay was 9.0 +/- 5.4 days (range, 3-40 days). Two patients (2.8%) developed a recurrence, 10 months and 1 year after the operation, respectively. Another patient developed an incisional hernia. There were no deaths. The average cost of treatment to the patient was approximately Nepali rupees 2800 (US$ 40). Surgical drainage appears to be a cost-effective and safe treatment for PIA. PMID:12139149

  13. Assessment of psychological effects of dental treatment on children

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rakesh; Sharma, Meenakshi

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of present study is to investigate the various psychological effects on children due to dental treatment. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty school going children, age range between six and twelve years, were recruited into the study and divided into two groups (Group I included six to nine-year-olds and Group II included nine-to-twelve year olds). Only those children were included who underwent a certain dental treatment seven days prior to the investigation. Each child was asked a preformed set of questions. The child was allowed to explain and answer in his own way, rather than only in yes or no. The answers were recorded. After interviewing, the child was asked either to draw a picture or to write an essay related to his experience regarding the dentist and dental treatment. Results: A majority of the children (92.22%) had a positive perception. The number of children having negative and neutral perceptions was comparatively much less. Younger children (Group I) had a more negative experience than the older children (Group II). Only one-fourth of the children complained of some pretreatment fear (23.83%); 72.09% of the children did not have any pain during dental treatment and a majority of children (80.23%) remembered their dental treatment. Conclusion: A majority of children had a positive perception of their dental treatment and the children in the younger age group had more negative perceptions than the children in the older age group. PMID:22629059

  14. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schover, Leslie R.; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options. PMID:26217165

  15. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Schover, Leslie R; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E

    2014-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options. PMID:26217165

  16. Finasteride is effective for the treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Moisseiev, E; Holmes, A J; Moshiri, A; Morse, L S

    2016-06-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of finasteride treatment in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC).MethodsRetrospective review of 29 eyes of 23 patients who were treated with finasteride for CSC. Previous medical and ocular history, steroid use, length of finasteride treatment, additional treatments for CSC, visual acuity (VA), central macular thickness (CMT), and presence of subretinal fluid (SRF) throughout the follow-up period, and the occurrence of any complications were recorded.ResultsInitial VA was 0.29±0.31 logMAR, and a trend towards improved VA was noted after 3 months (0.25±0.36 logMAR; P=0.07). VA was significantly improved at the final follow-up (0.23±0.27 logMAR; P=0.024). Initial CMT was 354±160 μm, and was significantly reduced after 1 month of treatment (284±77 μm; P=0.002) and this was maintained to the end of follow-up (247±85 μm; P=0.001). A significant reduction in SRF presence was found at all time points, with an overall 75.9% rate of complete resolution. Following discontinuation, SRF recurrence was noted in 37.5% of cases. No adverse events were recorded.ConclusionsFinasteride is a safe and effective treatment for CSC. It may be a possible new option for the initial management of patient with CSC, and a suggested treatment approach is presented. PMID:27055675

  17. AB40. Sexual side effects of medical treatment of BPH

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jun

    2014-01-01

    The medical and surgical management of BPH/LUTS can affect erectile function (EF), cause ejaculatory dysfunction (EjD) or affect libido. Five alpha reductase inhibitors, such as finasteride and dutasteride have good efficacy for benign prostatic hyperplasia, however they have also sexual side effects including loss of libido, erectile dysfunction and decreased ejaculatory volume. Also, alpha adrenergic blockers are well known and standard medical treatment options for BPH/LUTS, and in spite of their high efficacy and low adverse effects, retrograde and diminished ejaculation are potential sexual side effects. Although the prevalence of five alpha reductase inhibitors and alpha adrenergic blockers are not high, their impact on the patients’ quality of life must be regarded as important as their efficacy for BPH/LUTS. This lecture will review the effects of these therapies on sexual function.

  18. Is immunotherapy an opportunity for effective treatment of drug addiction?

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Kaszubska, Jadwiga

    2015-11-27

    Immunotherapy has a great potential of becoming a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of addiction to psychoactive drugs. It may be used to treat addiction but also to prevent neurotoxic complications of drug overdose. In preclinical studies two immunological methods have been tested; active immunization, which relies on the administration of vaccines and passive immunization, which relies on the administration of monoclonal antibodies. Until now researchers have succeeded in developing vaccines and/or antibodies against addiction to heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, nicotine and phencyclidine. Their effectiveness has been confirmed in preclinical studies. At present, clinical studies are being conducted for vaccines against nicotine and cocaine and also anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody. These preclinical and clinical studies suggest that immunotherapy may be useful in the treatment of addiction and drug overdose. However, there are a few problems to be solved. One of them is controlling the level of antibodies due to variability between subjects. But even obtaining a suitable antibody titer does not guarantee the effectiveness of the vaccine. Additionally, there is a risk of intentional or unintentional overdose. As vaccines prevent passing of drugs through the blood/brain barrier and thereby prevent their positive reinforcement, some addicted patients may erroneously seek higher doses of psychoactive substances to get "high". Consequently, vaccination should be targeted at persons who have a strong motivation to free themselves from drug dependency. It seems that immunotherapy may be an opportunity for effective treatment of drug addiction if directed to adequate candidates for treatment. For other addicts, immunotherapy may be a very important element supporting psycho- and pharmacotherapy. PMID:26432911

  19. Clinical effectiveness of primary and secondary headache treatment by transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Dmitry; Pinchuk, Olga; Sirbiladze, Konstantin; Shugar, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of primary and secondary headache treatment by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with various locations of stimulating electrodes on the scalp was analyzed retrospectively. The results of the treatment were analyzed in 90 patients aged from 19 to 54 years (48 patients had migraine without aura, 32 - frequent episodic tension-type HAs, 10 - chronic tension-type HAs) and in 44 adolescents aged 11-16 years with chronic post-traumatic HAs after a mild head injury. Clinical effectiveness of tDCS with 70-150 μA current for 30-45 min via 6.25 cm(2) stimulating electrodes is comparable to that of modern pharmacological drugs, with no negative side effects. The obtained result has been maintained on average from 5 to 9 months. It has been demonstrated that effectiveness depends on localization of stimulating electrodes used for different types of HAs. PMID:23519166

  20. Clinical Effectiveness of Primary and Secondary Headache Treatment by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pinchuk, Dmitry; Pinchuk, Olga; Sirbiladze, Konstantin; Shugar, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of primary and secondary headache treatment by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with various locations of stimulating electrodes on the scalp was analyzed retrospectively. The results of the treatment were analyzed in 90 patients aged from 19 to 54 years (48 patients had migraine without aura, 32 – frequent episodic tension-type HAs, 10 – chronic tension-type HAs) and in 44 adolescents aged 11–16 years with chronic post-traumatic HAs after a mild head injury. Clinical effectiveness of tDCS with 70–150 μA current for 30–45 min via 6.25 cm2 stimulating electrodes is comparable to that of modern pharmacological drugs, with no negative side effects. The obtained result has been maintained on average from 5 to 9 months. It has been demonstrated that effectiveness depends on localization of stimulating electrodes used for different types of HAs. PMID:23519166

  1. [Effect of intralesional treatment with emetine hydrochloride on Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in hamsters].

    PubMed

    Cazorla, D; Yépez, J; Añez, N; Sánchez de Mirt, A

    2001-03-01

    The therapeutic effect of the emetine hydrochloride alkaloid administered intralesionally was compared with that of standard parenteral treatment with Glucantime in outbred male hamsters experimentally infected with 4 x 10(3) amastigotes of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. Both chemotherapeutic agents reduced significantly (P < 0.01) the average lesion sizes in experimental animals in comparison with those untreated. The alkaloid infiltration was found to be as effective as the antimonial injection for clinical resolution. The ultrastructural effects on the Leishmania parasites exposed to emetine were observed mainly in the inner cytoplasm, which appeared disorganized, pycnotic and with loss of morphological definition; however, any known emetine hydrochloride action mechanism factor could not be directly related with ultrastructure effects detected on leishmanial parasites. Smears, conventional histopathology, culture in NNN medium and indirect immunoperoxidase method showed viable amastigotes in nodules and/or scars of all the evaluated hamsters 75 to 230 days after the end of treatment. These findings suggest that measurement of the size of cutaneous leishmania lesions does not appear to be a valid criterion for evaluating the efficiency of chemotherapy in experimental LT. Detection of leishmania parasites in the lesion scars, supports the hypothesis that man could be considered as an domestic reservoir. PMID:11294031

  2. Cardiac effects of current treatments of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lahousse, Lies; Verhamme, Katia M; Stricker, Bruno H; Brusselle, Guy G

    2016-02-01

    We review the cardiac safety of the drugs available at present for the maintenance treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in stable disease, focusing on inhaled long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMA) and long-acting β2 agonists (LABA), used either as a monotherapy or as a fixed-dose combination. We report the difficulties of, and pitfalls in, the investigation of the safety of drug treatments in COPD, which is hampered by the so-called COPD trial paradox: on the one hand, COPD is defined as a systemic disease and is frequently associated with comorbidities (especially cardiovascular comorbidities), which have an important effect on the prognosis of individual patients; on the other hand, patients with COPD and cardiovascular or other coexisting illnesses are often excluded from participation in randomised controlled clinical trials. In these trials, inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, both LAMA or LABA, or both, seem to be safe when used in the appropriate dose in adherent patients with COPD without uncontrolled cardiovascular disease or other notable comorbidities. However, the cardiac safety of LAMA and LABA is less evident when used inappropriately (eg, overdosing) or in patients with COPD and substantial cardiovascular disease, prolonged QTc interval, or polypharmacy. Potential warnings about rare cardiac events caused by COPD treatment from meta-analyses and observational studies need to be confirmed in high quality large randomised controlled trials. Finally, we briefly cover the cardiac safety issues of chronic oral drug treatments for COPD, encompassing theophylline, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and macrolides. PMID:26794033

  3. Lasso adjustments of treatment effect estimates in randomized experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bloniarz, Adam; Liu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Sekhon, Jasjeet S.; Yu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    We provide a principled way for investigators to analyze randomized experiments when the number of covariates is large. Investigators often use linear multivariate regression to analyze randomized experiments instead of simply reporting the difference of means between treatment and control groups. Their aim is to reduce the variance of the estimated treatment effect by adjusting for covariates. If there are a large number of covariates relative to the number of observations, regression may perform poorly because of overfitting. In such cases, the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) may be helpful. We study the resulting Lasso-based treatment effect estimator under the Neyman–Rubin model of randomized experiments. We present theoretical conditions that guarantee that the estimator is more efficient than the simple difference-of-means estimator, and we provide a conservative estimator of the asymptotic variance, which can yield tighter confidence intervals than the difference-of-means estimator. Simulation and data examples show that Lasso-based adjustment can be advantageous even when the number of covariates is less than the number of observations. Specifically, a variant using Lasso for selection and ordinary least squares (OLS) for estimation performs particularly well, and it chooses a smoothing parameter based on combined performance of Lasso and OLS. PMID:27382153

  4. Effects of long-term atorvastatin treatment on cardiac aging

    PubMed Central

    HAN, LEI; LI, MINGGAO; LIU, XIN

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have reported that atorvastatin (AVT) may have an important role in the delay of cardiac aging. However, the mechanism by which AVT affects cardiac aging has not been established. In this study, a series of experiments were performed to investigate the effects of AVT treatment on the cardiovascular system and the associated mechanism. Wistar rats were administered AVT or saline for 4 months. Age-related changes in the hearts were measured at the end of the experiment. The results showed that compared with young rats, the aged rats had significant changes indicative of myocardial aging, including increased blood lipid 1evelss, increased body weight, cardiac hypertrophy, larger myocardial cells, irregular muscle fibers, fewer deeply stained nuclei, smaller intercellular spaces, a larger number of apoptotic cells and increased levels of lipofuscin in myocardial tissue. However, long-term AVT treatment was able to significantly delay or even reverse these aging-related changes. In addition, these effects showed a certain dose-dependence. In general, long-term AVT treatment reduces blood lipids, inhibits cardiac hypertrophy, suppresses cardiomyocyte apoptosis and lowers the level of oxidative stress to protect the heart from aging. PMID:24137254

  5. The Effective Treatment of Juveniles Who Sexually Offend

    PubMed Central

    Letourneau, Elizabeth J.; Borduin, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    This article raises serious concerns regarding the widespread use of unproven interventions with juveniles who sexually offend and suggests innovative methods for addressing these concerns. Dominant interventions (i.e., cognitive-behavioral group treatments with an emphasis on relapse prevention) typically fail to address the multiple determinants of juvenile sexual offending and could result in iatrogenic outcomes. Methodologically sophisticated research studies (i.e., randomized clinical trials) are needed to examine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group interventions, especially those delivered in residential settings. The moral and ethical mandate for such research is evident when considering the alternative, in which clinicians and society are willing to live in ignorance regarding the etiology and treatment of juvenile sexual offending and to consign offending youths to the potential harm of untested interventions. Encouraging signs of a changing ethical climate include recent federal funding of a randomized clinical trial examining treatment effectiveness with sexually offending youths and the introduction of separate (i.e., developmentally informed) clinical and legal interventions for juvenile vs. adult sexual offenders. PMID:20721303

  6. Effective Treatment of Respiratory Alphaherpesvirus Infection Using RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Amy; Peters, Sarah T.; Perkins, Gillian A.; Jarosinski, Keith W.; Damiani, Armando; Brosnahan, Margaret; Buckles, Elizabeth L.; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1), a member of the Alphaherpesvirinae, is spread via nasal secretions and causes respiratory disease, neurological disorders and abortions. The virus is a significant equine pathogen, but current EHV-1 vaccines are only partially protective and effective metaphylactic and therapeutic agents are not available. Small interfering RNAs (siRNA's), delivered intranasally, could prove a valuable alternative for infection control. siRNA's against two essential EHV-1 genes, encoding the viral helicase (Ori) and glycoprotein B, were evaluated for their potential to decrease EHV-1 infection in a mouse model. Methodology/Principal Fndings siRNA therapy in vitro significantly reduced virus production and plaque size. Viral titers were reduced 80-fold with 37.5 pmol of a single siRNA or with as little as 6.25 pmol of each siRNA when used in combination. siRNA therapy in vivo significantly reduced viral replication and clinical signs. Intranasal treatment did not require a transport vehicle and proved effective when given up to 12 h before or after infection. Conclusions/Significance siRNA treatment has potential for both prevention and early treatment of EHV-1 infections. PMID:19122813

  7. Lasso adjustments of treatment effect estimates in randomized experiments.

    PubMed

    Bloniarz, Adam; Liu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Sekhon, Jasjeet S; Yu, Bin

    2016-07-01

    We provide a principled way for investigators to analyze randomized experiments when the number of covariates is large. Investigators often use linear multivariate regression to analyze randomized experiments instead of simply reporting the difference of means between treatment and control groups. Their aim is to reduce the variance of the estimated treatment effect by adjusting for covariates. If there are a large number of covariates relative to the number of observations, regression may perform poorly because of overfitting. In such cases, the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) may be helpful. We study the resulting Lasso-based treatment effect estimator under the Neyman-Rubin model of randomized experiments. We present theoretical conditions that guarantee that the estimator is more efficient than the simple difference-of-means estimator, and we provide a conservative estimator of the asymptotic variance, which can yield tighter confidence intervals than the difference-of-means estimator. Simulation and data examples show that Lasso-based adjustment can be advantageous even when the number of covariates is less than the number of observations. Specifically, a variant using Lasso for selection and ordinary least squares (OLS) for estimation performs particularly well, and it chooses a smoothing parameter based on combined performance of Lasso and OLS. PMID:27382153

  8. Effect Size for Single-Subject Design in Phonological Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Morrisette, Michele L.; Dickinson, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to document, validate, and corroborate effect size (ES) for single-subject design in treatment of children with functional phonological disorders; to evaluate potential child-specific contributing variables relative to ES; and to establish benchmarks for interpretation of ES for the population. Method Data were extracted from the Developmental Phonologies Archive for 135 preschool children with phonological disorders who previously participated in single-subject experimental treatment studies. Standard mean differenceall with correction for continuity was computed to gauge the magnitude of generalization gain that accrued longitudinally from treatment for each child with the data aggregated for purposes of statistical analyses. Results ES ranged from 0.09 to 27.83 for the study population. ES was positively correlated with conventional measures of phonological learning and visual inspection of learning data on the basis of procedures standard to single-subject design. ES was linked to children's performance on diagnostic assessments of phonology but not other demographic characteristics or related linguistic skills and nonlinguistic skills. Benchmarks for interpretation of ES were estimated as 1.4, 3.6, and 10.1 for small, medium, and large learning effects, respectively. Conclusion Findings have utility for single-subject research and translation of research to evidence-based practice for children with phonological disorders. PMID:26184118

  9. The effect of surface treatment on nickel leaching from nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madamba, Daniel

    Nitinol is widely used as a biomaterial for implantable medical devices but can be susceptible to nickel leaching. Our research was aimed at determining nickel leaching from surface treated Nitinol samples, treated as follows: mechanical polishing (untreated), oxidation, and nitriding+oxidation (5 different nitriding temperatures). Five specimens from each category were immersed in 40 mL PBS solution and incubated at 37°C over 91 days. Nickel concentration readings were taken at regular intervals. After 91 days, the average nickel concentration in the PBS solution was (a) 0.223 mg/L, SD 0.017, untreated, (b) 7.68 mg/L, SD 6.405, 1000°C nitriding+oxidation, and (c) 3.914 mg/L, SD 1.78, oxidation-only. The concentration readings had large standard deviations implying differences in surface characteristics after treatment. The increased nickel leaching from treated samples was thought to be due to atomic diffusion and exposure of the nickel-rich sublayers to PBS after oxide layer delamination. These sublayers formed after formation of thick (>1 microm) TiO2 layers during oxidation.

  10. [Effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine in the treatment of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Miyake, Nobumi; Miyamoto, Seiya

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation have recently been focused on the pathological hypotheses of schizophrenia. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a precursor of endogenous antioxidant glutathione and has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties. NAC is widely available as an over-the-counter nutritional supplement. Increasing lines of evidence suggest that NAC is effective for various mental disorders. In randomized controlled trials, treatment with NAC as an add-on to antipsychotics showed beneficial effects and safety profiles in patients with chronic schizophrenia. The results of a recent preclinical study using a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia suggest that NAC may have promising effects in an early stage of schizophrenia and an at-risk mental state. However, there is little clinical evidence for the efficacy and safety of NAC at these stages of schizophrenia. In this review, we summarize the evidence regarding the effectiveness of NAC for the treatment of schizophrenia and its prodromal stage. We also introduce the preliminary results of our research on NAC. PMID:27333656

  11. Oral tissues and orthodontic treatment: common side effects.

    PubMed

    Farronato, G; Giannini, L; Galbiati, G; Cannalire, P; Martinelli, G; Tubertini, I; Maspero, C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide a literature review about the problems that can occur during orthodontic treatment. Using the PubMed database we collected items that would provide information regarding the direct consequences of the placement of an orthodontic appliance: coming to the discussion of the following topics: candida infections, the effects on the soft tissues, the effects on periodontal tissues and effects on hard tissues. The presence of appliances in the oral cavity increases the prevalence of people with candida, specifically the species Candida Albicans is the most frequently isolated. The balance between the clearance of the microorganism, the colonization and the state of candidiasis depends both on the virulence of the fungus, and the competence of the host immune system. On soft tissues, cases of ulceration of the upper jaw by a rapid palatal expander and pyogenic granuloma due to quad helix appliance have been reported. The second one is mostly observed on vestibular gingiva. The first one was found, however, in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus type 1 because of the tissue modifications induced by this pathological condition. The more severe periodontic effects are those caused by incorrect use of orthodontic elastic separators. Finally, the White Spot Lesions are the direct consequences of a wrong conditioning of enamel when attaching the bracket. They represent a first stage of caries in the positioning area of the bracket. The orthodontist is required to intercept these issues not to affect the success of the treatment. PMID:24270203

  12. Sample Size Bias in Judgments of Perceptual Averages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Paul C.; Kimura, Nicole M.; Smith, Andrew R.; Marshall, Lindsay D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that people exhibit a sample size bias when judging the average of a set of stimuli on a single dimension. The more stimuli there are in the set, the greater people judge the average to be. This effect has been demonstrated reliably for judgments of the average likelihood that groups of people will experience negative,…

  13. Effects of alkalinity on membrane bioreactors for reject water treatment: Performance improvement, fouling mitigation and microbial structures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dalong; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Xuelian; Wei, Haijuan; Jiang, Lu-Man; Lv, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Two submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for reject water treatment were operated to investigate effects of sodium bicarbonate (SB) addition on enhancing process performance and mitigating membrane fouling. Results showed that SB addition enhanced average removal efficiencies of COD and NH4-N by 14.6% and 38.3%, respectively. With SB addition, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content in activated sludge increased, but those in membrane foulants greatly decreased. Gel permeation chromatography analysis demonstrated that EPS in MBRs for reject water treatment had much larger molecular weight (MW) and broader MW distribution than those in MBRs for municipal wastewater treatment. The fouling mitigation by SB was attributed to a deprotonation mechanism reduced EPS adsorption on negatively charged membrane surfaces, and improvement of degradation efficiency of macromolecular organic matters. SB addition into MBRs for reject water treatment increased microbial abundance, enriched nitrifying bacteria, and converted predominant AOB genus from Nitrosomonas to Nitrosospira. PMID:26340030

  14. Effects of Treatment Duration and Cooling Rate on Pure Aluminum Solidification Upon Pulse Magneto-Oscillation Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edry, Itzhak; Mordechai, Tomer; Frage, Nachum; Hayun, Shmuel

    2016-03-01

    The effect of pulse magneto-oscillation (PMO) treatment on casting grain size has been widely investigated. Nevertheless, its mechanism remains unclear, especially when PMO is applied at different periods during solidification, namely when only applied above the melting point. In the present work, the effect of PMO treatment applied at different segments during solidification was investigated. It was found that the dendrite fragmentation model may well explain the effect of PMO applied during the dendrite growth stage. However, only the cavities activation model may account for the effect when PMO is conducted above the melting point. In current study, the effect of PMO treatment on grain size was also investigated at various cooling rates. It was established that the cooling rate had only a slight effect on grain size when PMO treatment was applied. Thus, PMO treatment may provide homogeneous grain size distribution in castings with different wall thicknesses that solidified with various cooling rates.

  15. Assessing treatment effects through changes in perceptions and cognitive organization.

    PubMed

    Szalay, L; Bovasso, G; Vilov, S; Williams, R E

    1992-01-01

    This investigation tested the Associative Group Analysis (AGA) for its analytic sensitivity in assessing perceptions and attitudes and in mapping changes in cognitive organization indicative of substance abuse. Based on inferences drawn from the distributions of thousands of spontaneous, free associations elicited by strategically selected stimulus themes, AGA offers an unstructured approach to assess images and meanings, and to map systems of mental representation evasive to the more direct methods of using questions or scales. This article compares pretreatment and posttreatment samples, tracing the psychosocial effects of treatment. The investigations focus on variables related to substance abuse such as self-image, social nexus, and perceptions of illicit substances. The results indicate a sensitive approach, useful in treatment evaluation. PMID:1449123

  16. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells. PMID:27517913

  17. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells. PMID:27517913

  18. Passive mine drainage treatment: an effective low-cost alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    Two prototype Passive Mine Drainage Treatment Systems have been designed and constructed in Colorado. These projects have addressed acid mine drainage from inactive coal mines. Metal removal for both systems is accomplished using simulated peat bogs composed of sphagnum moss and hypnum moss retained by loose rock check dams. Acid neutralization is accomplished using crushed limestone filled channels. Neutralization and aeration are enhanced with drop structures and waterfalls placed in the drainage channel. Preliminary water quality results show dramatic treatment effects with the PMDT system. This investigation presents cost data for design and construction of the two PMDT systems. Cost projections for periodic maintenance requirements are provided along with a suggested method for financing maintenance costs. Performance data for the first system installed are presented. 14 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  19. Is hot water immersion an effective treatment for marine envenomation?

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, P R T; Boyle, A; Hartin, D; McAuley, D

    2006-01-01

    Envenomation by marine creatures is common. As more people dive and snorkel for leisure, the incidence of envenomation injuries presenting to emergency departments has increased. Although most serious envenomations occur in the temperate or tropical waters of the Indo‐Pacific region, North American and European waters also provide a habitat for many stinging creatures. Marine envenomations can be classified as either surface stings or puncture wounds. Antivenom is available for a limited number of specific marine creatures. Various other treatments such as vinegar, fig juice, boiled cactus, heated stones, hot urine, hot water, and ice have been proposed, although many have little scientific basis. The use of heat therapies, previously reserved for penetrating fish spine injuries, has been suggested as treatment for an increasing variety of marine envenomation. This paper reviews the evidence for the effectiveness of hot water immersion (HWI) and other heat therapies in the management of patients presenting with pain due to marine envenomation. PMID:16794088

  20. Neurotoxic effects of solvent exposure on sewage treatment workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kraut, A.; Lilis, R.; Marcus, M.; Valciukas, J.A.; Wolff, M.S.; Landrigan, P.J.

    1988-07-01

    Nineteen Sewage Treatment Workers (STWs) exposed to industrial sewage that contained benzene, toluene, and other organic solvents at a primary sewage treatment plant in New York City (Plant A) were examined for evidence of solvent toxicity. Fourteen (74%) complained of central nervous system (CNS) symptoms consistent with solvent exposure, including lightheadedness, fatigue, increased sleep requirement, and headache. The majority of these symptoms resolved with transfer from the plant. Men working less than 1 yr at Plant A were more likely to complain of two or more CNS symptoms than men who were working there longer than 1 yr (p = .055). Objective abnormalities in neurobehavioral testing were found in all 4 men working longer than 9 yr at this plant, but in only 5 of 15 employed there for a shorter period (p = .03). These results are consistent with the known effects of solvent exposure. Occupational health personnel must be aware that STWs can be exposed to solvents and other industrial wastes.

  1. Effect of BPSH post treatment on DMFC performance and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kickner, M.; Yuseung, K.; McGrath, James E.; Zelenay, P.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2002-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are being investigated for applications ranging from milliwatt (cell phones) to kilowatt (MUS) size scales. A common pitfall for DMFCs has been the inability of the electrolyte, typically Nafion, to act as an effective methanol barrier. Methanol crossover adversely affects the cell by lowering the cell voltage due to a mixed potential at the cathode and lower fuel utilization. Improved DMFC performance was demonstrated with sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymer membranes (1). Another study has shown the dependence of polymer properties and morphology on the post treatment of such membranes (2). In agreement with measurements on free-standing films, the fuel cell characteristics of these membranes have been found to have a strong dependence on acidification treatment. Methanol permeability, proton conductivity, and electro-osmotic drag coefficient all were found to increase when the membranes were acidified under boiling conditions versus a low-temperature process.

  2. Effective Treatment of Paroxysmal Nonkinesigenic Dyskinesia With Oxcarbazepine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aditya; Szekely, Anna; Jabbari, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) is a rare chronic disorder characterized by intermittent, non-movement-related involuntary movements. The response to currently available therapies is inconsistent and temporary. We describe here a patient with infantile-onset PNKD who failed a number of pharmaceutical agents used alone or in combination. Treatment with oxcarbazepine resulted in a substantial reduction in the frequency and severity of episodes. The patient has been followed for 4 years now, and the outcome of treatment is consistently favorable. Oxcarbazepine has been effective in managing the kinesigenic form of this disorder; however, its use has never been reported in PNKD to our knowledge. Oxcarbazepine is safer and better tolerated than most of the drugs currently used for treating PNKD, but blinded clinical trials are needed to verify its efficacy in the management of this debilitating, often difficult-to-treat disease. PMID:27046658

  3. The enduring effects of psychodynamic treatments vis-a-vis alternative treatments: A multilevel longitudinal meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivlighan, D. Martin, III

    Although evidence suggests that the benefits of psychodynamic treatments are sustained over time, presently it is unclear whether these sustained benefits are superior to non-psychodynamic treatments. Additionally, the extant literature comparing the sustained benefits of psychodynamic treatments compared to alternative treatments is limited with methodological shortcomings. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a rigorous test of the growth of the benefits of psychodynamic treatments relative to alternative treatments across distinct domains of change (i.e., all outcome measures, targeted outcome measures, non-targeted outcome measures, and personality outcome measures). To do so, the study employed strict inclusion criteria to identify randomized clinical trials that directly compared at least one bona fide psychodynamic treatment and one bona fide non-psychodynamic treatment. Hierarchical linear modeling (Raudenbush, Bryk, Cheong & Congdon, du Toit, 2011) was used to longitudinally model the impact of psychodynamic treatments compared to non-psychodynamic treatments at post-treatment and to compare the growth (i.e., slope) of effects beyond treatment completion. Findings from the present meta-analysis indicated that psychodynamic treatments and non-psychodynamic treatments were equally efficacious at post-treatment and at follow-up for combined outcomes ( k = 20), targeted outcomes (k =19), non-targeted outcomes (k =17), and personality outcomes (k =6). Clinical implications, directions for future research, and limitations are discussed.

  4. Effects of hook plate on shoulder function after treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Hong; Dong, Qi-Rong; Zhou, Rong-Kui; Zhen, Hua-Qing; Jiao, Ya-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Internal fixation with hook plate has been used to treat acromioclavicular joint dislocation. This study aims to evaluate the effect of its use on shoulder function, to further analyze the contributing factors, and provide a basis for selection and design of improved internal fixation treatment of the acromioclavicular joint dislocation in the future. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on patients treated with a hook plate for acromioclavicular joint dislocation in our hospital from January 2010 to February 2013. There were 33 cases in total, including 25 males and 8 females, with mean age of 48.27 ± 8.7 years. There were 29 cases of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular dislocation, 4 cases of type V. The Constant-Murley shoulder function scoring system was used to evaluate the shoulder function recovery status after surgery. Anteroposterior shoulder X-ray was used to assess the position of the hook plate, status of acromioclavicular joint reduction and the occurrence of postoperative complications. Results: According to the Constant-Murley shoulder function scoring system, the average scores were 78 ± 6 points 8 to 12 months after the surgery and before the removal of the hook plate, the average scores were 89 ± 5 minutes two months after the removal of hook plate. Postoperative X-ray imaging showed osteolysis in 10 cases (30.3%), osteoarthritis in six cases (18.1%), osteolysis associated with osteoarthritis in four cases(12.1%), and steel hook broken in one case (3%). Conclusion: The use of hook plate on open reduction and internal fixation of the acromioclavicular joint dislocation had little adverse effect on shoulder function and is an effective method for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Osteoarthritis and osteolysis are the two common complications after hook plate use, which are associated with the impairment of shoulder function. Shoulder function will be improved after removal of the hook plate. PMID

  5. Effect of yeast antagonist in combination with heat treatment on postharvest blue mold decay and Rhizopus decay of peaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyin; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Dong, Ying

    2007-04-01

    The potential of using heat treatment alone or in combination with an antagonistic yeast for the control of blue mold decay and Rhizopus decay of peaches caused by Penicillium expansum and Rhizopus stolonifer respectively, and in reducing natural decay development of peach fruits, as well as its effects on postharvest quality of fruit was investigated. In vitro tests, spore germination of pathogens in PDB was greatly controlled by the heat treatment of 37 degrees C for 2 d. In vivo test to control blue mold decay of peaches, heat treatment and antagonist yeast, as stand-alone treatments, were capable of reducing the percentage of infected wounds from 92.5% to 52.5% and 62.5%, respectively, when peach fruits stored at 25 degrees C for 6 d. However, in fruit treated with combination of heat treatment and Cryptococcus laurentii, the percentage of infected wounds of blue mold decay was only 22.5%. The test of using heat treatment alone or in combination with C. laurentii to control Rhizopus decay of peaches gave a similar result. The application of heat treatment and C. laurentii resulted in low average natural decay incidences on peaches after storage at 4 degrees C for 30 days and 20 degrees C for 7 days ranging from 40% to 30%, compared with 20% in the control fruit. The combination of heat treatment and C. laurentii was the most effective treatment, and the percentage of decayed fruits was 20%. Heat treatment in combination with C. laurentii had no significant effect on firmness, TSS, ascorbic acid or titratable acidity compared to control fruit. Thus, the combination of heat treatment and C. laurentii could be an alternative to chemicals for the control of postharvest decay on peach fruits. PMID:17140691

  6. Ultraviolet and pulsed electric field treatments have additive effect on inactivation of E. coli in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Gachovska, T K; Kumar, S; Thippareddi, H; Subbiah, J; Williams, F

    2008-11-01

    Apple juice inoculated with Escherichia coli ATCC 23472 was processed continuously using either ultraviolet (UV), high-voltage pulsed electric field (PEF), or a combination of the PEF and UV treatment systems. Apple juice was pumped through either of the systems at 3 flow rates (8, 14, and 20 mL/min). E. coli was reduced by 3.46 log CFU/mL when exposed in a 50 cm length of UV treatment chamber at 8 mL/min (2.94 s treatment time with a product temperature increase of 13 degrees C). E. coli inactivation of 4.87 log CFU/mL was achieved with a peak electric field strength of 60 kV/cm and 11.3 pulses (average pulse width of 3.5 mus, product temperature increased to 52 degrees C). E. coli reductions resulting from a combination treatment of UV and PEF applied sequentially were evaluated. A maximum E. coli reduction of 5.35 log CFU/mL was achieved using PEF (electrical field strength of 60 kV/cm, specific energy of 162 J/mL, and 11.3 pulses) and UV treatments (length of 50 cm, treatment time of 2.94 s, and flow rate of 8 mL/min). An additive effect was observed for the combination treatments (PEF and UV), regardless of the order of treatment (P > 0.05). E. coli reductions of 5.35 and 5.30 log CFU/mL with PEF treatment (electrical field strength of 60 kV/cm, specific energy of 162 J/mL, and 11.3 pulses) followed by UV (length of 30 cm, treatment time of 1.8 s, and flow rate of 8 mL/min) and UV treatment followed by PEF (same treatment conditions), respectively. No synergistic effect was observed. PMID:19021811

  7. Evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment with prednisone and azathioprine of autoimmune hepatitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewska-Pilarczyk, Małgorzata; Pawłowska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Autoimmune hepatitis is rarely diagnosed in children, but the course of the disease is often aggresive. Combination therapy with prednisone and azathioprine improves the prognosis of patients. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of combination therapy with prednisone and azathioprine of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in children. Material and methods There was a retrospective analysis of the medical records of 15 patients with AIH, diagnosed before18 years of age, treated in the Provincial Infectious Diseases Hospital in Bydgoszcz in the years 2002 to 2013. We analysed the results of laboratory tests, ultrasound examination, endoscopy, and morphological liver pictures, as well as periods of exacerbation of inflammation and side effects of therapy. Results Biochemical remission of the disease was achieved on average after 36 days of treatment. Histopathological regression in the control liver biopsy was found in 7/15 patients and progression in 2/15 patients. In the study group 10/15 patients experienced exacerbation of the disease from 1 to 3 times during observation, with an increase of ALT activity to greater than 3 norm, and the remaining 5/15 patients had no increase of ALT activity. In total, 10 patients in the study group experienced 17 exacerbations. In 13/17 cases of exacerbations they were associated with a reduction in the dose of immunosuppressive drugs. There was no correlation between the biochemical exacerbation and changes in the histopathological image. Steroidside effects occurred in 14/15 patients. Conclusions The treatment allows for biochemical remission of the disease and significantly improves the prognosis of most patients. However, significant side effects of treatment indicate the need for further exploration of effective and safe therapy, especially in the paediatric population. PMID:27110306

  8. Intratumoral Immunocytokine Treatment Results in Enhanced Antitumor Effects

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erik E.; Lum, Hillary D.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L.; Schmidt, Brian E.; Furlong, Meghan; Buhtoiarov, Ilia N.; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; Raubitschek, Andrew; Colcher, David; Reisfeld, Ralph A.; Gillies, Stephen D.; Sondel, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Immunocytokines (IC), consisting of tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies fused to the immunostimulatory cytokine interleukin 2 (IL2), exert significant antitumor effects in several murine tumor models. We investigated whether intratumoral (IT) administration of IC provided enhanced antitumor effects against subcutaneous tumors. Three unique ICs (huKS-IL2, hu14.18-IL2, and GcT84.66-IL2) were administered systemically or IT to evaluate their antitumor effects against tumors expressing the appropriate IC-targeted tumor antigens. The effect of IT injection of the primary tumor on a distant tumor was also evaluated. Here, we show that IT injection of IC resulted in enhanced antitumor effects against B16-KSA melanoma, NXS2 neuroblastoma, and human M21 melanoma xenografts when compared to intravenous (IV) IC injection. Resolution of both primary and distant subcutaneous tumors, and a tumor-specific memory response were demonstrated following IT treatment in immunocompetent mice bearing NXS2 tumors. The IT effect of huKS-IL2 IC was antigen-specific, enhanced compared to IL2 alone, and dose-dependent. Hu14.18-IL2 also showed greater IT effects than IL2 alone. The antitumor effect of IT IC did not always require T cells since IT IC induced antitumor effects against tumors in both SCID and nude mice. Localization studies using radiolabeled 111In-GcT84.66-IL2 IC confirmed that IT injection resulted in a higher concentration of IC at the tumor site than IV administration. In conclusion, we suggest that IT IC is more effective than IV administration against palpable tumors. Further testing is required to determine how to potentially incorporate IT administration of IC into an antitumor regimen that optimizes local and systemic anticancer therapy. PMID:18438664

  9. The effect of coal desulfurization on flotation through ultrasonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Jun; Chen Jianqi

    1997-12-31

    This paper carries out a study on the influence of ultrasonic treatment upon the changes of these aspects: pulp particle granularity, dissolving oxygen, pulp pH, surface potential (x), pulp potential (Eh) and conductivity rate, through the introduction of primary application and functional mechanism of ultrasonic wave such as ultrasonic comminution, ultrasonic cleaning and ultrasonic atomization. The effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on the size composition of the feeds and the floatability of coal and pyrite is examined. The tests affected the size composition of raw coal distinctively and caused the removal of sulfur from coals. It has been found that ultrasonic pretreatment of slurry enhances the differences in physico-chemical surface properties of coal and pyrite. In this case it is possible to obtain low-sulfur coals from high-sulfur coals. This may be explained by the different effects of ultrasonic vibrations on coal and pyrite which cause some improvement of the selectivity of their flotation separation. According to the authors` research, it explores the feasibility of flotation desulfurization by means of ultrasonic reinforcement, and puts forward that ultrasonic treatment of a slurry under the appropriate period of time, sonic frequency and energy density, along with appropriate flotation process and coal pyrite depression method, can achieve the best effect of flotation desulfurization. It offers a new method or means to gain abstraction of the clean coal.

  10. Targeting therapy to minimize antimicrobial use in preweaned calves: effects on health, growth, and treatment costs.

    PubMed

    Berge, A C B; Moore, D A; Besser, T E; Sischo, W M

    2009-09-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic antimicrobial use in food animals is questioned because of the potential for development of resistant bacteria and future inability to use some antimicrobials for human or animal disease. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of raising preweaned dairy calves without antimicrobials in the milk and minimizing therapeutic antimicrobial treatment on morbidity, mortality, weight gain, and treatment costs. Newborn calves (n = 358) were allocated to 1 of 4 groups, housed outdoors in individual hutches, and monitored for 28 d. Calves in the conventional therapy (CT) group were treated as per dairy protocol with sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, spectinomycin, penicillin, and bismuth-pectin for diarrhea. The targeted therapy (TT) group included bismuth-pectin for diarrhea and antimicrobial treatment only in cases of fever or depressed attitude. Within CT and TT groups, calves were equally assigned to receive neomycin and tetracycline in their milk for the first 2 wk of life (AB-milk) or no antimicrobials (NoAB-milk). Daily health evaluations included fecal consistency, respiratory disease, attitude, and hydration status as well as milk and grain consumption. A negative binomial model evaluated the total number of days with diarrhea days in each group. General linear models were used to assess average daily weight gain and grain consumption. Conventionally treated calves had 70% more days with diarrhea than TT calves, and AB-milk calves had 31% more days with diarrhea compared with NoAB-milk calves. The TT calves tended to have a higher average daily gain by 28 d and consumed more grain compared with CT calves. If antimicrobials were used only for diarrhea cases with fever, inappetence, or depression and no in-milk antimicrobials were used, a $10 per calf savings could be realized. Targeting antimicrobial therapy of calf diarrhea cases is prudent not only to save the drugs for future use but also to prevent the potential for

  11. The partially averaged field approach to cosmic ray diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, F. C.; Birmingham, T. J.; Kaiser, T. B.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetic equation for particles interacting with turbulent fluctuations is derived by a new nonlinear technique which successfully corrects the difficulties associated with quasilinear theory. In this new method the effects of the fluctuations are evaluated along particle orbits which themselves include the effects of a statistically averaged subset of the possible configurations of the turbulence. The new method is illustrated by calculating the pitch angle diffusion coefficient D sub Mu Mu for particles interacting with slab model magnetic turbulence, i.e., magnetic fluctuations linearly polarized transverse to a mean magnetic field. Results are compared with those of quasilinear theory and also with those of Monte Carlo calculations. The major effect of the nonlinear treatment in this illustration is the determination of D sub Mu Mu in the vicinity of 90 deg pitch angles where quasilinear theory breaks down. The spatial diffusion coefficient parallel to a mean magnetic field is evaluated using D sub Mu Mu as calculated by this technique. It is argued that the partially averaged field method is not limited to small amplitude fluctuating fields and is hence not a perturbation theory.

  12. Effective treatment of bipolar depression: monotherapy and combination strategies.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-11-01

    Managing patients with bipolar disorder remains a challenge due to its chronic nature. In addition, bipolar depression remains understudied even though patients spend more time in depressive episodes than in manic ones. Effective treatment requires an accurate and timely diagnosis, psychoeducation, psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and implementation of elements of the chronic care model. Pharmacologic strategies for treating bipolar depression differ from those for bipolar mania as well as those for unipolar depression and require knowledge of the efficacy and safety of agents including mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, and antidepressants both as monotherapy and in combination. PMID:26646048

  13. The Effect of Tuberculosis Treatment at Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation on Subsequent Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Soeters, Heidi M.; Poole, Charles; Patel, Monita R.; Van Rie, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the impact of TB treatment at the time of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation on subsequent mortality. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and selected conference proceedings for studies that report adult mortality on cART, stratified by TB treatment status at cART initiation. Stratified random-effects and meta-regression analyses were used to examine the influence of study and population characteristics. Results 22 eligible cohort studies reported data on 98,350 (range 74-15,225) adults, of whom 14,779 (15%) were receiving TB treatment at cART initiation. Studies of those receiving vs. not receiving TB treatment had an average mortality relative risk of 1.10 (95% confidence interval 0.87-1.40) at 1-3 months (based upon 8 estimates), 1.15 (0.94-1.41) at 6-12 months (11 estimates), and 1.33 (1.02-1.75) at 18-98 months (10 estimates) following cART initiation. However, there was a wide range of estimates and those at later time points were markedly heterogeneous. Meta-regression identified factors associated with elevated average risk estimates: lower median baseline CD4 counts and adjustment for baseline hemoglobin at 1-3 months; longer length of follow-up and women-only studies at 6-12 months; and not adjusting for BMI/weight at 18-98 months. Conclusions Patients receiving TB treatment at cART initiation did not have a statistically significant estimated increase in short-term risk of all-cause mortality as compared to those not receiving TB treatment. TB treatment was significantly associated with increased mortality after about a year of cART, suggesting that patients with concurrent TB treatment at cART initiation may benefit from continued support after TB treatment completion. PMID:24143260

  14. Is rituximab an effective treatment of refractory calcinosis?

    PubMed

    Dubos, Maria; Ly, Kim; Martel, Clothilde; Fauchais, Anne Laure

    2016-01-01

    Calcinosis, the deposition of calcified material in soft tissues, is frequently seen in systemic sclerosis and dermatomyositis. Treatment options are limited, with disappointing results. Some recent case reports suggest that rituximab may be an attractive therapeutic option. In case 1, a 54-year-old woman who presented with rheumatoid arthritis in association with scleromyositis was treated with rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis. Despite this, she developed multiple progressive calcinosis, necessitating extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to limit calcinosis extension and pain. In case 2, a 38-year-old man, previously treated for an anti-Pm/Scl-positive polymyositis/scleroderma overlap syndrome, presented with multiple tumoural periarticular calcinosis, which progressed despite bisphosphonates, sodium thiosulfate and thalidomide. We decided to start rituximab. Progression of calcinosis was still evident 6 and 12 months after anti-CD20 treatment. Many treatments have been tried to treat calcinosis without demonstrated effectiveness. Presently, rituximab cannot be recommended for this indication in the absence of successful controlled trials. PMID:27247203

  15. Thermal treatment effects on laser surface remelting duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Alex M.; Ierardi, Maria Clara F.; Aparecida Pinto, M.; Tavares, Sérgio S. M.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the microstructural changes and effects on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels UNS S32304 and UNS S32205, commonly used by the petroleum industry, were studied, following the execution of laser surface remelting (LSM) and post-thermal treatments (TT). In this way, data was obtained, which could then be compared with the starting condition of the alloys. In order to analyze the corrosion behaviour of the alloys in the as-received conditions, treated with laser and after post-thermal treatments, cyclic polarization tests were carried out. A solution of 3.5% NaCl (artificial sea water) was used, as duplex stainless steels are regularly used by the petroleum industry in offshore locations. The results obtained showed that when laser surface treated, due to rapid resolidification, the alloys became almost ferritic, and since the level of nitrogen in the composition of both alloys is superior to their solubility limit in ferrite, a precipitation of Cr2N (chromium nitrides) occurred in the ferritic matrix, causing loss of corrosion resistance, thus resulting in an increase in surface hardness. However, after the post-thermal treatment the alloys corrosion resistance was restored to values close to those of the as-received condition.

  16. Effect of high pressure treatment on liquid whole egg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Csaba; Dalmadi, István; Mráz, Balázs; Friedrich, László; Zeke, Ildikó; Juhász, Réka; Suhajda, Ágnes; Balla, Csaba

    2012-06-01

    In our tests, we artificially infected liquid whole egg samples with Salmonella enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, and then treated the samples in "Food Lab900" high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) instrument for 3-17 min at 200-400 MPa. Subsequently, the change of the viable cell count of the specific bacteria has been tested. In addition to the samples infected with various bacteria, non-infected samples were also treated in each test and the change in viable cell count, colour and viscosity of the samples upon the effect of the treatment. In summary, it can be concluded that in each test of our investigations, the viable cell count of S. enteritidis critical for egg products is reduced significantly, while the reduction of the total viable cell count was around two magnitudes. Additionally, based on our results, microbial destruction, reduction of enthalpy (denaturation of egg white) caused by the treatment at HPP, and colour change are primarily affected by the pressure level, while the changes in rheological properties are also significantly affected by the duration of high pressure treatment (p<0.05).

  17. Plasmapheresis in Acute Fatty Liver of Pregnancy: An Effective Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seyyed Majidi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is an idiopathic disorder with an unknown cause occurring in late pregnancy. The treatment in these patients is often immediate termination of pregnancy, and plasmapheresis provides an effective treatment option. In this paper, we introduce three pregnant women treated with plasmapheresis. The first case was a 22-year-old primigravida woman treated with 22 sessions of plasmapheresis due to AFLP, hepatic and renal failure, coagulopathy, and ventilator-dependent respiratory failure. The second case was a 23-year-old woman in her second pregnancy treated with 4 plasmapheresis sessions due to AFLP, hepatic and renal failure, coagulopathy, and hypoglycemia. The third patient was a 23-year-old primigravida woman treated with 3 plasmapheresis sessions due to AFLP, renal failure, and coagulopathy. Plasmapheresis can be a life-saving treatment in patients with AFLP and is strongly recommended for patients with severity of their disease accompanied by other organ disorders. In addition, shortening the time interval between the termination of pregnancy and initializing plasmapheresis improves the outcome and reduces the duration of hospital stay and sessions of plasmapheresis. PMID:23424692

  18. Effectiveness of foam sclerotherapy for the treatment of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Nael, Raha; Rathbun, Suman

    2010-02-01

    Varicose veins (VVs) are associated with lifestyle-limiting symptoms and complications. Patients who fail compression therapy are candidates for more invasive treatments. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of endovenous foam sclerotherapy (EFS) for the treatment of VVs in a US academic center. We reviewed medical records of a consecutive cohort of patients who underwent EFS over a 2-year period. The primary outcome measure was obliteration of VVs. The secondary outcome measures were symptomatic improvement, ulcer healing, recurrence, and adverse events. A total of 166 patients (217 legs) underwent EFS for pain (81%), pruritus (41%), swelling (17%), ulcerations (17%), thrombophlebitis (14%), and varix rupture (3%). Complete (65%) or near-complete (34%) obliteration was achieved in 215 (99%) legs after one injection. Additional injections achieved complete obliteration in 39 of 53 legs. Ninety-three percent (27/29) of active ulcers healed or were decreasing in size. Five ulcers and 11 VVs recurred. Common adverse events included pain and hyperpigmentation. Thrombosis, hematoma, skin necrosis, and neurologic events were rare. In conclusion, EFS appears to be a safe and effective outpatient therapy for the treatment of symptomatic and complicated VVs. PMID:19797263

  19. Treatment of neuroblastoma with metaiodobenzylguanidine: results and side effects

    SciTech Connect

    Treuner, J.; Klingebiel, T.; Bruchelt, G.; Feine, U.; Niethammer, D.

    1987-01-01

    Between April 1984 and December 1985 we treated ten children suffering from neuroblastoma in a total of 25 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) courses. Five had had a relapse of neuroblastoma stage III or IV, three had never achieved a remission in spite of intensive chemotherapy, and two were treated with an unstable remission. The children were each administered from 1 to 5 courses with a dosage per course of between 1295 and 9065 MBq. The sum of the single doses during the whole course of therapy ranged between 3145 and 21,904 MBq per child. Five of five children suffering from bone pain and fever became free of complaints during the first three treatment days. Six of eight children with manifest tumor at onset of therapy responded well to the treatment: response extended from transitory decrease in elevated catecholamine levels in serum and urine to complete disappearance of large abdominal tumor masses. We also observed a decrease in bone marrow involvement and a stabilization of osteolytic lesions. Seven of these eight children died in spite of a good response from 55 to 350 days after the first MIBG treatment course. The only side effect we witnessed was a reversible bone marrow depression. In three children we combined the MIBG therapy with bone marrow transplantation.

  20. Physicochemical treatments of anionic surfactants wastewater: Effect on aerobic biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Fathi; Kchaou, Sonia; Sayadi, Sami

    2009-05-15

    The effect of different physicochemical treatments on the aerobic biodegradability of an industrial wastewater resulting from a cosmetic industry has been investigated. This industrial wastewater contains 11423 and 3148mgL(-1) of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and anionic surfactants, respectively. The concentration of COD and anionic surfactants were followed throughout the diverse physicochemical treatments and biodegradation experiments. Different pretreatments of this industrial wastewater using chemical flocculation process with lime and aluminium sulphate (alum), and also advanced oxidation process (electro-coagulation (Fe and Al) and electro-Fenton) led to important COD and anionic surfactants removals. The best results were obtained using electro-Fenton process, exceeding 98 and 80% of anionic surfactants and COD removals, respectively. The biological treatment by an isolated strain Citrobacter braakii of the surfactant wastewater, as well as the pretreated wastewater by the various physicochemical processes used in this study showed that the best results were obtained with electro-Fenton pretreated wastewater. The characterization of the treated surfactant wastewater by the integrated process (electro-coagulation or electro-Fenton)-biological showed that it respects Tunisian discharge standards. PMID:18799262

  1. Fiber Treatment Effects on Bioreactor Bulk Fluid Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Ronald II

    2013-01-01

    In order to facilitate the exploration of worlds beyond the borders of our planet, it is necessary to maintain sustainable levels of clean water. The remediation of water via Membrane Aerated Bioreactors (MABRs) is one such method, and the focus of this study. MARRs rely on healthy biofilms grown on hollow fiber membranes to clean non-potable water. These biofilms can take weeks to months to establish. Therefore, various fiber treatments and two inoculums were evaluated for their effect on rapid biofilm formation. Fiber treatments are as follows: sanding of the fibers with 1500 and 8000 grit sandpaper, immersion of the fibers in a 1% hydrofluoric acid solution for 12 seconds and 15 minutes, and the immersion of the fibers in a Fluoroetch® solution for 18 seconds and 5 minutes. The two inoculums utilized were sourced from healthy, established MARRs; Texas Tech University (TTU) MABR "TRL5" and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) MABR "R3". Data attained from direct bacterial cell counts of the reactor bulk fluids via fluorescent microscopy, suggests that the fluoroetching treatment combined with the TTU inoculum show the greatest biofilm creation.

  2. Gatifloxacin for short, effective treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, C-Y; Van Deun, A; Rieder, H L

    2016-09-01

    The 9-month regimen for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) piloted in Bangladesh and used, with modifications, in Cameroon and Niger, has achieved treatment success in a very large proportion of patients; gatifloxacin (GFX) is likely to have played a critical role in this success. Two months after the publication of a study reporting that GFX and not moxifloxacin (MFX) was associated with dysglycaemia, the manufacturer announced the withdrawal of GFX from the market. The findings of that study may have less significance for the majority of MDR-TB patients living in high-incidence countries who are much younger, have a lower risk of dysglycaemia and suffer from a highly fatal condition. The problem of dysglycaemia is not limited to GFX use and may occur with other fluoroquinolones; furthermore, GFX-associated dysglycemia was manageable among those MDR-TB patients in Bangladesh and Niger in whom it occurred. GFX has now become unavailable in Bangladesh, Cameroon, Niger and other countries piloting the shorter MDR-TB regimens, depriving resource-poor countries of an efficacious, effective and inexpensive drug with a demonstrated good safety profile for the given indication. There is little reason not to make GFX available for MDR-TB treatment as long as the superiority of non-GFX-based MDR-TB regimens is not demonstrated. PMID:27510237

  3. Effect of microalgal treatments on pesticides in water.

    PubMed

    Hultberg, Malin; Bodin, Hristina; Ardal, Embla; Asp, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris on a wide range of different pesticides in water was studied. Treatments included short-term exposure (1 h) to living and dead microalgal biomass and long-term exposure (4 days) to actively growing microalgae. The initial pesticide concentration was 63.5 ± 3.9 µg L(-1). There was no significant overall reduction of pesticides after short-term exposure. A significant reduction of the total amount of pesticides was achieved after the long-term exposure to growing microalgae (final concentration 29.7 ± 1.0 µg L(-1)) compared with the long-term control (37.0 ± 1.2 µg L(-1)). The concentrations of 10 pesticides out of 38 tested were significantly lowered in the long-term algal treatment. A high impact of abiotic factors such as sunlight and aeration for pesticide reduction was observed when the initial control (63.5 ± 3.9 µg L(-1)) and the long-term control (37.0 ± 1.2 µg L(-1)) were compared. The results suggest that water treatment using microalgae, natural inhabitants of polluted surface waters, could be further explored not only for removal of inorganic nutrients but also for removal of organic pollutants in water. PMID:26370171

  4. Effect of ionic liquid treatment on the structures of lignins in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Kent, Michael S; He, Lilin; Varanasi, Patanjali; Dibble, Dean; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema

    2012-01-01

    The solution structures of three types of isolated lignin - organosolv (OS), Kraft (K), and low sulfonate (LS) - before and after treatment with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate were studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) over a concentration range of 0.3-2.4 wt %. The results indicate that each of these lignins is comprised of aggregates of well-defined basal subunits, the shapes and sizes of which, in D{sub 2}O and DMSO-d{sub 6}, are revealed using these techniques. LS lignin contains a substantial amount of nanometer-scale individual subunits. In aqueous solution these subunits have a well-defined elongated shape described well by ellipsoidal and cylindrical models. At low concentration the subunits are highly expanded in alkaline solution, and the effect is screened with increasing concentration. OS lignin dissolved in DMSO was found to consist of a narrow distribution of aggregates with average radius 200 {+-} 30 nm. K lignin in DMSO consists of aggregates with a very broad size distribution. After ionic liquid (IL) treatment, LS lignin subunits in alkaline solution maintained the elongated shape but were reduced in size. IL treatment of OS and K lignins led to the release of nanometer-scale subunits with well-defined size and shape.

  5. Bioinjection Treatment: Effects of Post-Injection Residual Stress on Left Ventricular Wall Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Wall, Samuel T.; Genet, Martin; Hinson, Andy; Guccione, Julius M.

    2014-01-01

    Injection of biomaterials into diseased myocardium has been associated with decreased myofiber stress, restored left ventricular (LV) geometry and improved LV function. However, its exact mechanism(s) of action remained unclear. In this work, we present the first patient-specific computational model of biomaterial injection that accounts for the possibility of residual strain and stress introduced by this treatment. We show that the presence of residual stress can create more heterogeneous regional myofiber stress and strain fields. Our simulation results show that the treatment generates low stress and stretch areas between injection sites, and high stress and stretch areas between the injections and both the endocardium and epicardium. Globally, these local changes are translated into an increase in average myofiber stress and its standard deviation (from 6.9 ± 4.6 to 11.2 ± 48.8 kPa and 30 ± 15 to 35.1 ± 50.9 kPa at end-diastole and end-systole, respectively). We also show that the myofiber stress field is sensitive to the void-to-injection size ratio – for a constant void size, the myofiber stress field became less heterogeneous with decreasing injection volume. These results suggest that the residual stress and strain possibly generated by biomaterial injection treatment can have large effects on the regional myocardial stress and strain fields, which may be important in the remodeling process. PMID:25065728

  6. Low Level Laser Effect in Treatment of Patients with Intractable Tinnitus Due To Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mirvakili, Abbas; Mehrparvar, Amirhoushang; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mirvakili, Masud; Baradaranfar, Mohammadhosein; Davari, Mohammadhosein

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tinnitus is defined as a perception of sound without an external acoustic stimulus. Due to large number of causes and limited knowledge of its pathophysiology, tinnitus still remains an obscure symptom. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study on 120 patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss who were randomly divided into two groups; one group received low-level laser and the second group used the same instrument but off, for 20 sessions of 20 minutes. A tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used to evaluate the severity of patients’ symptoms. Severity and frequency of tinnitus were also determined using Audiometric tests. Results: The average age of the 120 patients in the two groups of study were not statistically significantly different. The mean difference of severity of tinnitus between the two groups was statistically significant at the end of the study and 3 month after completion of treatment. The VAS and THI mean differences after the treatment were statistically significant between the two groups but not statistically significant after 3 months of completion the study. Conclusion: Low level laser radiation is effective for short-term treatment of Tinnitus caused by sensorineural hearing loss and its impact may be reduced over the time. PMID:25653802

  7. Factors Associated with Effectiveness of Treatment and Reproductive Outcomes in Patients with Thin Endometrium Undergoing Estrogen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-Miao; Zhou, Yuan-Zheng; Wang, Han-Bi; Sun, Zheng-Yi; Zhen, Jing-Ran; Shen, Keng; Deng, Cheng-Yan; Lang, Jing-He

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thin endometrium is associated with poor reproductive outcomes; estrogen treatment can increase endometrial thickness (EMT). The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate the factors influencing the effectiveness of estrogen treatment and reproductive outcomes after the treatment in patients with thin endometrium. Methods: Relevant clinical data of 101 patients with thin endometrium who had undergone estrogen treatment were collected. Possible factors influencing the effectiveness of treatment were analyzed retrospectively by logistic regression analysis. Eighty-seven infertile women without thin endometrium who had undergone assisted reproduction served as controls. The cases and controls were matched for age, assisted reproduction method, and number of embryos transferred. Reproductive outcomes of study and control groups were compared using Student's t-test and the Chi-square test. Results: At the end of estrogen treatment, EMT was ≥8 mm in 93/101 patients (92.1%). Effectiveness of treatment was significantly associated with maximal pretreatment EMT (P = 0.017) and treatment duration (P = 0.004). The outcomes of assisted reproduction were similar in patients whose treatment was successful in increasing EMT to ≥8 mm and the control group. The rate of clinical pregnancy in patients was associated with the number of good-quality embryos transferred in both fresh (P = 0.005) and frozen-thawed (P = 0.000) embryo transfer cycles. Conclusions: Thinner EMT before estrogen treatment requires longer treatment duration and predicts poorer treatment outcomes. The effectiveness of treatment depends on the duration of estrogen administration. Assisted reproductive outcomes of patients whose treatment is successful (i.e., achieves an EMT ≥8 mm) are similar to those of controls. The quality of embryos transferred is an important predictor of assisted reproductive outcomes in patients treated successfully with exogenous estrogen. PMID:26612292

  8. Proton Radiotherapy: The Biological Effect of Treating Alternating Subsets of Fields for Different Treatment Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Engelsman, Martijn; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Common practice in proton radiotherapy is to deliver a subset of all fields in the treatment plan on any given treatment day. We investigate using biological modeling if the resulting variation in daily dose to normal tissues has a relevant detrimental biological effect. Methods and Materials: For four patient groups, the cumulative normalized total dose (NTD) was determined for normal tissues (OARs) of each patient using the clinically delivered fractionation schedule (FS{sub clin}), and for hypothetical fractionation schedules delivering all fields every day (FS{sub all}) or only a single field each day (FS{sub single}). Cumulative three-dimensional NTD distributions were summarized using the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) model. Results: For the skull base/cervical spine chordoma group, the largest effect is a 4-Gy increase in gEUD of the chiasm when treating only a subset of fields on any day. For lung cancer and pancreatic cancer patients, the variation in the gEUD of normal tissues is <0.2 Gy. For the prostate group, FS{sub clin} increases the gEUD of the femoral heads by 9 Gy compared with FS{sub all}. Use of FS{sub single} resulted in the highest NTD to normal tissues for any patient. FS{sub all} resulted in an integral NTD to the patient that is on average 5% lower than FS{sub clin} and 10% lower than FS{sub single}. Conclusion: The effects of field set of the day treatment delivery depend on the tumor site and number of fields treated each day. Modeling these effects may be important for accurate risk assessment.

  9. Effects of hydroxyurea treatment for patients with hemoglobin SC disease.

    PubMed

    Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Pressel, Sara; Hilliard, Lee; Brown, R Clark; Smith, Mary G; Thompson, Alexis A; Lee, Margaret T; Rothman, Jennifer; Rogers, Zora R; Owen, William; Imran, Hamayun; Thornburg, Courtney; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Aygun, Banu; Nelson, Stephen; Roberts, Carla; Gauger, Cynthia; Piccone, Connie; Kalfa, Theodosia; Alvarez, Ofelia; Hassell, Kathryn; Davis, Barry R; Ware, Russell E

    2016-02-01

    Although hemoglobin SC (HbSC) disease is usually considered less severe than sickle cell anemia (SCA), which includes HbSS and HbS/β(0) -thalassemia genotypes, many patients with HbSC experience severe disease complications, including vaso-occlusive pain, acute chest syndrome, avascular necrosis, retinopathy, and poor quality of life. Fully 20 years after the clinical and laboratory efficacy of hydroxyurea was proven in adult SCA patients, the safety and utility of hydroxyurea treatment for HbSC patients remain unclear. Recent NHLBI evidence-based guidelines highlight this as a critical knowledge gap, noting HbSC accounts for ∼30% of sickle cell patients within the United States. To date, only 5 publications have reported short-term, incomplete, or conflicting laboratory and clinical outcomes of hydroxyurea treatment in a total of 71 adults and children with HbSC. We now report on a cohort of 133 adult and pediatric HbSC patients who received hydroxyurea, typically for recurrent vaso-occlusive pain. Hydroxyurea treatment was associated with a stable hemoglobin concentration; increased fetal hemoglobin (HbF) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV); and reduced white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), and absolute reticulocyte count (ARC). Reversible cytopenias occurred in 22% of patients, primarily neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Painful events were reduced with hydroxyurea, more in patients >15 years old. These multicenter data support the safety and potentially salutary effects of hydroxyurea treatment for HbSC disease; however, a multicenter, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 clinical trial is needed to determine if hydroxyurea therapy has efficacy for patients with HbSC disease. PMID:26615793

  10. Effect of cryogenic treatment on nickel-titanium endodontic instruments

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J. W.; Griggs, J. A.; Regan, J. D.; Ellis, R. A.; Cai, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effects of cryogenic treatment on nickel-titanium endodontic instruments. The null hypothesis was that cryogenic treatment would result in no changes in composition, microhardness or cutting efficiency of nickel-titanium instruments. Methodology Microhardness was measured on 30 nickel-titanium K-files (ISO size 25) using a Vicker’s indenter. Elemental composition was measured on two instruments using X-ray spectroscopy. A nickel-titanium bulk specimen was analysed for crystalline phase composition using X-ray diffraction. Half of the specimens to be used for each analysis were subjected to a cryogenic treatment in liquid nitrogen (−196 °C) for either 3 s (microhardness specimens) or 10 min (other specimens). Cutting efficiency was assessed by recording operator choice using 80 nickel-titanium rotary instruments (ProFile® 20, .06) half of which had been cryogenically treated and had been distributed amongst 14 clinicians. After conditioning by preparing four corresponding canals, each pair of instruments were evaluated for cutting efficiency by a clinician during preparation of one canal system in vitro. A Student’s t-test was used to analyse the microhardness data, and a binomial test was used to analyse the observer choice data. Composition data were analysed qualitatively. Results Cryogenically treated specimens had a significantly higher microhardness than the controls (P < 0.001; β > 0.999). Observers showed a preference for cryogenically treated instruments (61%), but this was not significant (P = 0.21). Both treated and control specimens were composed of 56% Ni, 44% Ti, 0% N (by weight) with a majority in the austenite phase. Conclusions Cryogenic treatment resulted in increased microhardness, but this increase was not detected clinically. There was no measurable change in elemental or crystalline phase composition. PMID:15910471

  11. Effectiveness of Endoscopic Treatment for Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weili; Wu, Siyuan; Han, Xiao; Yang, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several recent studies have explored efficacy and safety of different endoscopic treatments for gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). However, there is no definitive consensus regarding the best endoscopic approach for GI-NETs treatment. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate the application of various endoscopic techniques for the treatment of GI-NETs according to the previous conclusions and to summarize the optimal endoscopic modalities for GI-NETs. Ninety-eight patients with 100 GI-NETs removed by endoscopic therapies were reviewed. The pathological complete resection rate (PCRR), complication, local recurrence, and factors possibly associated with the pathological complete resection were analyzed. Twenty-two patients were treated by conventional polypectomy (including 6 cold biopsy forceps polypectomy and 16 snare polypectomy with electrocauterization), 41 by endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), and 35 by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The PCRRs of conventional polypectomy, EMR, and ESD were 86.4%, 75.6%, and 85.7%, respectively. Sixteen GI-NETs that had a polypoid appearance, with a mean tumor size of 5.2 mm, were removed by snare polypectomy (PCRR 93.8%). The complication rates of conventional polypectomy, EMR, and ESD were 0.0% (0/22), 2.4% (1/41), and 2.9% (1/35), respectively. There were 2 local recurrences after cold biopsy forceps polypectomy treatment and no local recurrences in the EMR and ESD groups (P = 0.049). The results showed that PCRR was only associated with the depth of invasion (P = 0.038). Endoscopic resection of GI-NETs is safe and effective in properly selected patients. For submucosal GI-NETs, ESD was a feasible modality, with a higher PCRR compared with EMR. For ≤5 mm polypoid-like NETs, snare polypectomy with electrocauterization was a simple procedure with a high PCRR. PMID:27082572

  12. Apparent and average accelerations of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Andersson, Lars E-mail: larsa@math.miami.edu

    2008-10-15

    In this paper we consider the relation between the volume deceleration parameter obtained within the Buchert averaging scheme and the deceleration parameter derived from supernova observation. This work was motivated by recent findings that showed that there are models which despite having {Lambda} = 0 have volume deceleration parameter q{sup vol}<0. This opens the possibility that back-reaction and averaging effects may be used as an interesting alternative explanation to the dark energy phenomenon. We have calculated q{sup vol} in some Lemaitre-Tolman models. For those models which are chosen to be realistic and which fit the supernova data, we find that q{sup vol}>0, while those models which we have been able to find which exhibit q{sup vol}<0 turn out to be unrealistic. This indicates that care must be exercised in relating the deceleration parameter to observations.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporosis in Chinese postmenopausal women: impact of medication persistence and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Si, Lei; Winzenberg, Tania M; Gu, Jieruo; Jiang, Qicheng; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Aims Raloxifene treatment of osteoporotic fractures is clinically effective, but economic evidence in support of raloxifene reimbursement is lacking in the People’s Republic of China. We aimed at evaluating the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporotic fractures using an osteoporosis health economic model. We also assessed the impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of raloxifene. Methods We used a previously developed and validated osteoporosis state-transition microsimulation model to compare treatment with raloxifene with current practices of osteoporotic fracture treatment (conventional treatment) from the health care payer’s perspective. A Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis with microsimulations was conducted. The impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene was addressed in sensitivity analyses. The simulated patients used in the model’s initial state were 65-year-old postmenopausal Chinese women with osteoporosis (but without previous fractures), simulated using a 1-year cycle length until all patients had died. Costs were presented in 2015 US dollars (USD), and costs and effectiveness were discounted at 3% annually. The willingness-to-pay threshold was set at USD 20,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results Treatment with raloxifene improved clinical effectiveness by 0.006 QALY, with additional costs of USD 221 compared with conventional treatment. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 36,891 per QALY gained. The cost-effectiveness decision did not change in most of the one-way sensitivity analyses. With full raloxifene persistence and adherence, average effectiveness improved compared with the real-world scenario, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 40,948 per QALY gained compared with conventional treatment. Conclusion Given the willingness-to-pay threshold

  14. Methods for Modeling and Decomposing Treatment Effect Variation in Large-Scale Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Peng; Feller, Avi; Miratrix, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature has underscored the critical role of treatment effect variation in estimating and understanding causal effects. This approach, however, is in contrast to much of the foundational research on causal inference. Linear models, for example, classically rely on constant treatment effect assumptions, or treatment effects defined by…

  15. Fluoride glass starting materials - Characterization and effects of thermal treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, William; Dunn, Bruce; Shlichta, Paul; Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The production of heavy metal fluoride (HMF) glasses, and the effects of thermal treatments on the HMF glasses are investigated. ZrF4, BaF2, AlF3, LaF3, and NaF were utilized in the synthesis of zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum-sodium fluoride glass. The purity of these starting materials, in particular ZrF4, is evaluated using XRD analysis. The data reveal that low temperature heating of ZrF4-H2O is effective in removing the water of hydration, but causes the production of ZrF4 and oxyfluorides; however, dehydration followed by sublimation results in the production of monoclinic ZrFe without water or oxyfluoride contaminants.

  16. Operative treatment of aneurysms and Coanda effect: a working hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J L; Roberts, A

    1972-12-01

    The Coanda effect has been known to mechanical engineers for many decades. Consideration of this effect both by a neurosurgeon and a mechanical engineer revealed that it might be of importance during the operative treatment of intracranial aneurysms. If a jet effect were produced in the stream of blood after clipping an aneurysm, most of the flow of blood might be directed down only one limb of a bifurcation occurring in a vessel near to a clipped aneurysm. Blood might also be entrained from the other limb of the bifurcation. This boundary wall effect, which can occur without the rate of flow through the vessel being altered appreciably, could explain some of the unfortunate sequelae of aneurysm surgery which occur in the absence of any obvious cause such as postoperative thrombosis, etc. A possible mechanism for some of the complications after gradual occlusion of the common carotid artery in the neck is also proposed on this basis. Other details of how this data might be of clinical significance, together with suggestions for how to avoid fluidic effects during aneurysm surgery, are presented. PMID:4647852

  17. Characterizing individual painDETECT symptoms by average pain severity

    PubMed Central

    Sadosky, Alesia; Koduru, Vijaya; Bienen, E Jay; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    Background painDETECT is a screening measure for neuropathic pain. The nine-item version consists of seven sensory items (burning, tingling/prickling, light touching, sudden pain attacks/electric shock-type pain, cold/heat, numbness, and slight pressure), a pain course pattern item, and a pain radiation item. The seven-item version consists only of the sensory items. Total scores of both versions discriminate average pain-severity levels (mild, moderate, and severe), but their ability to discriminate individual item severity has not been evaluated. Methods Data were from a cross-sectional, observational study of six neuropathic pain conditions (N=624). Average pain severity was evaluated using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, with severity levels defined using established cut points for distinguishing mild, moderate, and severe pain. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was followed by ridit analysis to represent the probability that a randomly selected subject from one average pain-severity level had a more favorable outcome on the specific painDETECT item relative to a randomly selected subject from a comparator severity level. Results A probability >50% for a better outcome (less severe pain) was significantly observed for each pain symptom item. The lowest probability was 56.3% (on numbness for mild vs moderate pain) and highest probability was 76.4% (on cold/heat for mild vs severe pain). The pain radiation item was significant (P<0.05) and consistent with pain symptoms, as well as with total scores for both painDETECT versions; only the pain course item did not differ. Conclusion painDETECT differentiates severity such that the ability to discriminate average pain also distinguishes individual pain item severity in an interpretable manner. Pain-severity levels can serve as proxies to determine treatment effects, thus indicating probabilities for more favorable outcomes on pain symptoms. PMID:27555789

  18. Catha edulis chewing effects on treatment of paranoid schizophrenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Kotb El-Sayed, Mohamed-I; Amin, Hatem-K

    2015-01-01

    Background The current study’s aim is to evaluate the possible interaction effects of khat chewing on treatment of paranoid schizophrenic patients. Patients and methods In the study group, 42 male subjects suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and were classified according to their khat chewing habits into two subgroups: either khat-chewer subgroup (SKc; n=21; r=11, h=10) or non-khat-chewer subgroup (SNKc; n=21, r=11, h=10). Each subgroup was further subdivided according to type of treatment into r (risperidone) and h (haloperidol). Healthy male subjects (37) were subdivided into healthy khat-chewer as positive controls (HKc, n=17) and healthy non-khat-chewer as negative controls (HNKc, n=20). Plasma dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were estimated. Results ANOVA and post hoc analysis showed that dopamine was illustrating significant elevation in all khat chewing groups. DOPAC was illustrating significant decrease in all khat chewing groups with an interesting outcome showing significant increase in DOPAC in SNKcr group due to risperidone effect. Homovanillic acid, serotonin, hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and norepinephrine were illustrating significant elevations in all khat chewing groups. Epinephrine was illustrating significant elevation in all chewers than non-chewers groups. Unexpected significant decrease in epinephrine in the SNKcr group indicated that risperidone drug is decreasing epinephrine through indirect mechanism involving calcium. Conclusion Khat chewing in schizophrenic patients is contraindicated because it aggravates the disease symptoms, attenuates all used treatment medications, and deteriorates all biochemical markers of the patients. PMID:25926735

  19. Nanoparticle-Assisted Combinatorial Therapy for Effective Treatment of Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhay Kumar; Chakravarty, Baidyanath; Chaudhury, Koel

    2015-05-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. Conventional treatment modalities for endometriosis are unsatisfactory; therefore, there is a need to treat the underlying causes and mechanism. Oxidative stress, extracellular matrix degradation, and angiogenesis are associated with the pathogenesis of endometriosis. The anti-angiogenic and antioxidant properties of epigallocatechin gallate and the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory activity of the antibiotic doxycycline are well established. However, epigallocatechin gallate and doxycycline have several limitations when used in their native forms. This motivated us to synthesize dual drug-loaded (epigallocatechin gallate and doxycycline) nanoparticles and check their therapeutic efficacy in mice with induced endometriosis. The synthesized nanoparticles displayed features of a promising drug-delivery system, such as small size, high encapsulation efficiency, controlled drug release, and low toxicity. The serum of endometriosis-induced mice and controls was assessed for various oxidative stress markers, matrix-degrading enzymes, and angiogenic markers before and after nanoparticle administration. Endometrial glands, stroma, and new microvessels were determined using histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Treatment with dual drug-loaded nanoparticles markedly decreased oxidative stress, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and angiogenesis, as well as endometrial gland presence and microvessel density. Mitigation of endometriosis-related adverse effects further produced an improvement in the quality of oocytes, which is critical for successful pregnancy outcomes. Our observations suggest that owing to their combinatorial effect, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles loaded with epigallocatechin gallate and doxycycline in a single vehicle appear to be promising for the treatment of endometriosis. PMID:26349392

  20. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-06-30

    Mathematically modelling changes in HCV RNA levels measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of the effectiveness of an antiviral agent at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of the initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV-infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. The original understanding of HCV RNA decline under interferon-based therapies obtained by modelling needed to be revised in order to interpret the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In addition, there also exist unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as the presence of detectable HCV RNA at the end of therapy in patients who nonetheless have a sustained virologic response.

  1. Dosimetric Effects of Setup Uncertainties on Breast Treatment Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Harron, Elizabeth Christine McCallum, Hazel Mhairi; Lambert, Elizabeth Lyn; Lee, Daniela; Lambert, Geoffrey David

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the dosimetric impact of setup errors during the delivery of radiotherapy to the breast, and use this information to make recommendations on intervention tolerances for portal imaging of breast treatments. Translational and rotational setup errors were simulated for 10 recent breast patients using an Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system. The effect of these errors on the breast and tumor bed target volumes receiving 95% and 107% of the prescribed dose were assessed. For the majority of patients, shifts of up to 10 mm or a 4 deg. patient rotation about the cranio-caudal axis had no significant effect on the dose distribution. Changes in dosimetry were more likely if the reference plan contained large hot or cold spots. For a typical patient, it is estimated that a shift of 5 mm in any one direction, or a 2 deg. patient rotation would not cause more than a 5% change in the target volume receiving between 95% and 107% of the prescribed dose. If combinations of errors occur, greater dosimetric changes would be expected. It is concluded that individual patient shifts of up to 5 mm or rotations about the cranio-caudal axis of 2 deg. or less are unlikely to affect dose-volume histogram parameters by an amount judged as clinically significant. Setup errors exceeding these values may cause large dosimetric changes for some patients, particularly those with larger hot or cold regions in the dose distribution, and intervention is therefore recommended.

  2. Effect of ultrasonic treatment on swine wastewater solubilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Kim, S-M; Na, S; So, K-H; Nam, J-J

    2009-01-01

    In order to accelerate hydrolysis known to be the rate-limiting step of the overall digestion process for swine wastewater, an ultrasonic treatment process was tested for the solubilization of the swine wastewater. The effectiveness of ultrasonic solubilization of the swine wastewater under various operational conditions was compared by means of an increment of soluble organics in the treated swine wastewater and the hydrolysis rate constant. Ultrasonic treatment resulted in the high degree of solubilization of particulate organics in the swine wastewater and the degree of solubilization increased with increasing supplied energy. The highest extent of an increment of SCOD concentration and SCOD/TCOD ratio at the end of the operation time of 60 min was 109.7 and 117.5%, respectively, under 120 W power output and 20(o)C operating temperature conditions. The observed highest hydrolysis rate constant described by pseudo-first order rate constant was 2.94 h(-1) under the same conditions. Based on the estimated activation energy from modeling using the Arrhenius equation, ultrasonic solubilization of the swine wastewater under higher supplied energy conditions was more dependent on the operating temperature, which was consistent with the experimentally obtained results. Based on the investigation into the effect of gas type and gas delivery methods for ultrasonic solubilization of the swine wastewater, oxygen gas bubbling through the liquid showed the highest degree of an increment of soluble organics possibly attributed to the influent of oxygen in an increase of radicals during the sonolysis. PMID:19214016

  3. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-06-30

    Mathematically modelling changes in HCV RNA levels measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of the effectiveness of an antiviral agent at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of themore » initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV-infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. The original understanding of HCV RNA decline under interferon-based therapies obtained by modelling needed to be revised in order to interpret the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In addition, there also exist unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as the presence of detectable HCV RNA at the end of therapy in patients who nonetheless have a sustained virologic response.« less

  4. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-01-01

    Mathematically modelling HCV RNA changes measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of antiviral agent effectiveness at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of the initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and, determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. Our understanding of HCV RNA decline under IFN-based therapies needs to be revised in order to understand the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In this Review, we also discuss the unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as whether a sustained virological response necessarily involves elimination of all infected cells PMID:26122475

  5. Effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. J. Wahab, M. A. A. Mahmod, S. Idris, M. I. Abdullah, H. Z.

    2015-07-22

    Alkali and heat treatments were first introduced by Kim et al. to prepare a bioactive surface on titanium. This method has been proven very effective and widely used in other studies to promote titanium osteointegration. This study aims to investigate further the effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of high purity titanium. High purity titanium foils were immersed in NaOH aqueous solutions of 0.5 M, 5 M and 15 M at 60°C and 80 °C for 1, 3 and 7 days. The surface morphology was examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The obtained phases were analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in the spectra range of 4000-600 cm{sup −1} at 4 cm{sup −1} resolution and 50 scans. At the same soaking temperature and soaking time, a thicker porous network was observed with increasing concentration of NaOH. At the same soaking temperature, a much porous structure was observed with increasing soaking time. At constant alkali concentration, more homogenously distributed porous surface structure was observed with increasing soaking temperature.

  6. A Comparative Dosimetric Analysis of the Effect of Heterogeneity Corrections Used in Three Treatment Planning Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, Andrea Celeste

    Successful treatment in radiation oncology relies on the evaluation of a plan for each individual patient based on delivering the maximum dose to the tumor while sparing the surrounding normal tissue (organs at risk) in the patient. Organs at risk (OAR) typically considered include the heart, the spinal cord, healthy lung tissue, and any other organ in the vicinity of the target that is not affected by the disease being treated. Depending on the location of the tumor and its proximity to these OARs, several plans may be created and evaluated in order to assess which "solution" most closely meets all of the specified criteria. In order to successfully review a treatment plan and take the correct course of action, a physician needs to rely on the computer model (treatment planning algorithm) of dose distribution to reconstruct CT scan data to proceed with the plan that best achieves all of the goals. There are many available treatment planning systems from which a Radiation Oncology center can choose from. While the radiation interactions considered are identical among clinics, the way the chosen algorithm handles these interactions can vary immensely. The goal of this study was to provide a comparison between two commonly used treatment planning systems (Pinnacle and Eclipse) and their associated dose calculation algorithms. In order to this, heterogeneity correction models were evaluated via test plans, and the effects of going from heterogeneity uncorrected patient representation to a heterogeneity correction representation were studied. The results of this study indicate that the actual dose delivered to the patient varies greatly between treatment planning algorithms in areas of low density tissue such as in the lungs. Although treatment planning algorithms are attempting to come to the same result with heterogeneity corrections, the reality is that the results depend strongly on the algorithm used in the situations studied. While the Anisotropic Analytic Method

  7. Effect of coconut oil and defaunation treatment on methanogenesis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Machmüller, Andrea; Soliva, Carla R; Kreuzer, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate in vivo the role of rumen ciliate protozoa with respect to the methane-suppressing effect of coconut oil. Three sheep were subjected to a 2 x 2 factorial design comprising two types of dietary lipids (50 g x kg(-1) coconut oil vs. 50 g x kg(-1) rumen-protected fat) and defaunation treatment (with vs. without). Due to the defaunation treatment, which reduced the rumen ciliate protozoa population by 94% on average, total tract fibre degradation was reduced but not the methane production. Feeding coconut oil significantly reduced daily methane release without negatively affecting the total tract nutrient digestion. Compared with the rumen-protected fat diet, coconut oil did not alter the energy retention of the animals. There was no interaction between coconut oil feeding and defaunation treatment in methane production. An interaction occurred in the concentration of methanogens in the rumen fluid, with the significantly highest values occurring when the animals received the coconut oil diet and were subjected to the defaunation treatment. Possible explanations for the apparent inconsistency between the amount of methane produced and the concentration of methane-producing microbes are discussed. Generally, the present data illustrate that a depression of the concentration of ciliate protozoa or methanogens in rumen fluid cannot be used as a reliable indicator for the success of a strategy to mitigate methane emission in vivo. The methane-suppressing effect of coconut oil seems to be mediated through a changed metabolic activity and/or composition of the rumen methanogenic population. PMID:12785449

  8. An Evaluation of the Observer Effect on Treatment Integrity in a Day Treatment Center for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Monica R.; Burke, Raymond V.; Allen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity is an important concern in treatment centers but is often overlooked. Performance feedback is a well-established approach to improving treatment integrity, but is underused and undervalued. One way to increase its value to treatment centers may be to expose unrealized benefits on the observer who collects the performance…

  9. Emissions of ammonia, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide from swine wastewater during and after acidification treatment: effect of pH, mixing and aeration.

    PubMed

    Dai, X R; Blanes-Vidal, V

    2013-01-30

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of swine slurry acidification and acidification-aeration treatments on ammonia (NH(3)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) emissions during slurry treatment and subsequent undisturbed storage. The study was conducted in an experimental setup consisting of nine dynamic flux chambers. Three pH levels (pH = 6.0, pH = 5.8 and pH = 5.5), combined with short-term aeration and venting (with an inert gas) treatments were studied. Acidification reduced average NH(3) emissions from swine slurry stored after acidification treatment compared to emissions during storage of non-acidified slurry. The reduction were 50%, 62% and 77% when pH was reduce to 6.0, 5.8 and 5.5, respectively. However, it had no significant effect on average CO(2) and H(2)S emissions during storage of slurry after acidification. Aeration of the slurry for 30 min had no effect on average NH(3), CO(2) and H(2)S emissions both during the process and from stored slurry after venting treatments. During aeration treatment, the NH(3), CO(2) and H(2)S release pattern observed was related to the liquid turbulence caused by the gas bubbles rather than to biological oxidation processes in this study. PMID:23246907

  10. Effectiveness of a Self-Guided Web-Based Cannabis Treatment Program: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Jan; Norberg, Melissa; Hine, Donald; McCambridge, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-help strategies offer a promising way to address problems with access to and stigma associated with face-to-face drug and alcohol treatment, and the Internet provides an excellent delivery mode for such strategies. To date, no study has tested the effectiveness of a fully self-guided web-based treatment for cannabis use and related problems. Objectives The current study was a two-armed randomized controlled trial aimed at testing the effectiveness of Reduce Your Use, a fully self-guided web-based treatment program for cannabis use disorder consisting of 6 modules based on cognitive, motivational, and behavioral principles. Methods 225 individuals who wanted to cease or reduce their cannabis use were recruited using both online and offline advertising methods and were randomly assigned to receive: (1) the web-based intervention, or (2) a control condition consisting of 6 modules of web-based educational information on cannabis. Assessments of cannabis use, dependence symptoms, and abuse symptoms were conducted through online questionnaires at baseline, and at 6-week and 3-month follow-ups. Two sets of data analyses were undertaken—complier average causal effect (CACE) modeling and intention to treat (ITT). Results Two thirds (149) of the participants completed the 6-week postintervention assessment, while 122 (54%) completed the 3-month follow-up assessment. Participants in the intervention group completed an average of 3.5 of the 6 modules. The CACE analysis revealed that at 6 weeks, the experimental group reported significantly fewer days of cannabis use during the past month (P=.02), significantly lower past-month quantity of cannabis use (P=.01), and significantly fewer symptoms of cannabis abuse (P=.047) relative to controls. Cannabis dependence symptoms (number and severity) and past-month abstinence did not differ significantly between groups (Ps>.05). Findings at 3 months were similar, except that the experimental group reported

  11. Fenton's treatment as an effective treatment for elderberry effluents: economical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Silva, Nuno; Martins, Rui C; Castro-Silva, Sérgio; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2016-05-01

    The utilization of Fenton's oxidation for the depuration of elderberry juice wastewater was studied. The aim was to select the adequate cost-effective operating conditions suitable to lead to an effluent within the legal thresholds to be discharged into the natural water courses. The treatment efficacy was assessed by chemical oxygen demand (COD), colour, phenolic content and total solids removal besides its ability to improve biodegradability (biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5)/COD). Moreover, the costs of the applied reactants were also considered. Fenton's reaction was able to abate at least 70% of COD (corresponding to a final value below 150 mg O2 L(-1)). Besides, total phenolic content degradation was always achieved. Within these conditions, the resulting effluent is able to be directly discharged into the natural hydric channels. Fenton oxidation could be successfully applied as a single treatment method with a reactant cost of 4.38 € m(-3) ([Fe(2+)] = 20 mmol L(-1), [H2O2] = 100 mmol L(-1), pH = 3 and 4 h of oxidation procedure). PMID:26507382

  12. Effects of Antioxidant Treatment on Blast-Induced Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoping; Ewert, Donald L.; Cheng, Weihua; West, Matthew B.; Lu, Jianzhong; Li, Wei; Floyd, Robert A.; Kopke, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has dramatically increased in combat troops in today’s military operations. We previously reported that antioxidant treatment can provide protection to the peripheral auditory end organ, the cochlea. In the present study, we examined biomarker expression in the brains of rats at different time points (3 hours to 21 days) after three successive 14 psi blast overpressure exposures to evaluate antioxidant treatment effects on blast-induced brain injury. Rats in the treatment groups received a combination of antioxidants (2,4-disulfonyl α-phenyl tertiary butyl nitrone and N-acetylcysteine) one hour after blast exposure and then twice a day for the following two days. The biomarkers examined included an oxidative stress marker (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, 4-HNE), an immediate early gene (c-fos), a neural injury marker (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP) and two axonal injury markers [amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein, APP, and 68 kDa neurofilament, NF-68]. The results demonstrate that blast exposure induced or up-regulated the following: 4-HNE production in the dorsal hippocampus commissure and the forceps major corpus callosum near the lateral ventricle; c-fos and GFAP expression in most regions of the brain, including the retrosplenial cortex, the hippocampus, the cochlear nucleus, and the inferior colliculus; and NF-68 and APP expression in the hippocampus, the auditory cortex, and the medial geniculate nucleus (MGN). Antioxidant treatment reduced the following: 4-HNE in the hippocampus and the forceps major corpus callosum, c-fos expression in the retrosplenial cortex, GFAP expression in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), and APP and NF-68 expression in the hippocampus, auditory cortex, and MGN. This preliminary study indicates that antioxidant treatment may provide therapeutic protection to the central auditory pathway (the DCN and MGN) and the non-auditory central nervous system (hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex

  13. [Effect of sanatorium treatment on endothelial function in children with primary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ianina, T Iu

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of sanatorium treatment (ST) using sodium chloride baths and metabolic drug mildronat on the dynamics of the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), markers of endothelial function in children with primary arterial hypertension (PAH). ABPM and held defined level of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) in the serum of 114 children with PAH aged 12-17. The positive dynamics of ABPM in all groups, but significantly (P < 0.05) decrease in mean BP was noted in the group with combined ST using sodium chloride baths. When analyzing the level of NO a positive trend (P < 0.01) in the group was using metabolic therapy, but significantly (P < 0.001) pronounced effect was observed when it is combined balneotherapy and metabolic therapy. Analysis of ET-1 and ADMA at ST in conjunction with therapy and metabolic rate of sodium chloride baths there was a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in these parameters in comparison with those before treatment. In children with PAH have been identified violations of the functional activity of the endothelium, which is reflected in increased levels of ET-1, ADMA and reducing NO. Conducting rehabilitation inclusion complex balneotherapy and metabolic therapy helps to reduce average daily blood pressure, normalization of functional activity of the endothelium as a normalization of the synthesis of NO (P < 0.,001), a significant decrease of ET-1 (P < 0.01) and ADMA (P < 0.01). PMID:24908958

  14. SOCIAL COSTS OF ROBBERY AND THE COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anirban; Paltiel, A. David; Pollack, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Reduced crime provides a key benefit associated with substance abuse treatment (SAT). Armed robbery is an especially costly and frequent crime committed by some drug-involved offenders. Many studies employ valuation methods that understate the true costs of robbery, and thus the true social benefits of SAT-related robbery reduction. At the same time, regression to the mean and self-report bias may lead pre–post comparisons to overstate crime reductions associated with SAT. Using 1992–1997 data from the National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study (NTIES), we examined pre–post differences in self-reported robbery among clients in five residential and outpatient SAT modalities. Fixed-effect negative binomial regression was used to examine incidence rate reductions (IRR) in armed robbery. Published data on willingness to pay to avoid robbery were used to determine the social valuation of these effects. Differences in IRR across SAT modalities were explored to bound potential biases. All SAT modalities were associated with large and statistically significant reductions in robbery. The average number of self-reported robberies declined from 0.83/client/year pre-entry to 0.12/client/year following SAT (p < 0.001). Under worst-case assumptions, monetized valuations of reductions in armed robbery associated with outpatient methadone and residential SAT exceeded economic costs of these interventions. Conventional wisdom posits the economic benefits of SAT. We find that SAT is even more beneficial than is commonly assumed. PMID:17992708

  15. Effects of vegetation management in constructed wetland treatment cells on water quality and mosquito production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thullen, J.S.; Sartoris, J.J.; Walton, W.E.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of three vegetation management strategies on wetland treatment function and mosquito production was assessed in eight free water surface wetland test cells in southern California during 1998-1999. The effectiveness of the strategies to limit bulrush Schoenoplectus californicus culm density within the cells was also investigated. Removing accumulated emergent biomass and physically limiting the area in which vegetation could reestablish, significantly improved the ammonia - nitrogen removal efficiency of the wetland cells, which received an ammonia-dominated municipal wastewater effluent (average loading rate = 9.88 kg/ha per day NH4-N). We determined that interspersing open water with emergent vegetation is critical for maintaining the wetland's treatment capability, particularly for systems high in NH4-N. Burning aboveground plant parts and thinning rhizomes only temporarily curtailed vegetation proliferation in shallow zones, whereas creating hummocks surrounded by deeper water successfully restricted the emergent vegetation to the shallower hummock areas. Since the hummock configuration kept open water areas interspersed throughout the stands of emergent vegetation, the strategy was also effective in reducing mosquito production. Decreasing vegetation biomass reduced mosquito refuge areas while increasing mosquito predator habitat. Therefore, the combined goals of water quality improvement and mosquito management were achieved by managing the spatial pattern of emergent vegetation to mimic an early successional growth stage, i.e. actively growing plants interspersed with open water. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Long Term Sertraline Treatment and Depression on Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Premenopausal Female Primates

    PubMed Central

    Shively, Carol A.; Register, Thomas C.; Appt, Susan E.; Clarkson, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Major depressive disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) often co-occur in the same individuals. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed for depression and other disorders, but their effects on CHD risk remain unclear. We determined the effects of a SSRI on coronary artery atherosclerosis (CAA) in an established nonhuman primate model used to clarify the association between depression and CAA. Methods 42 adult female cynomolgus macaques consuming a Western diet were characterized during an 18-month pretreatment phase, and assigned to SSRI (sertraline HCl 20 mg/kg, po, once/day) or Placebo balanced on pretreatment depression, body weight (BW), and iliac artery atherosclerosis extent measured via biopsy. After 18 months CAA extent was measured using histomorphometry. Results Before and during treatment depressed monkeys had lower BW, body mass index (BMI), and plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and higher heart rates during the pretreatment (p<0.01) but not the treatment phase (p=0.17). There were no pretreatment differences between the sertraline and placebo groups. Sertraline reduced anxious behavior but had no effect on BW, BMI, heart rate, plasma lipids, or depression. CAA, analyzed by a 2 (Depressed, Nondepressed) × 2 (Placebo, Sertraline) × 3 (coronary arteries) analysis of covariance adjusted for pretreatment iliac atherosclerosis, was greater in depressed than nondepressed monkeys (p<0.036), and in sertraline than placebo-treated monkeys (p=0.040). The observed CAA extent in depressed monkeys treated with sertraline was 4.9 times higher than in untreated depressed monkeys, and 6.5 times higher than in non-depressed monkeys, on average. Conclusions Depressed animals develop more CAA, and that longterm treatment with sertraline promotes CAA. PMID:25829239

  17. Effect of Length of Treatment on Weight Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, Michael G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Tested efficacy of behavior therapy for obesity and duration of treatment. Assigned obese clients (N=48) to either 20 or 40 weekly sessions with identical program content; treatment procedures were introduced more gradually in extended treatment. Both groups showed equivalent weight loss at week 20; extended treatment produced significantly…

  18. Complete treatment of galaxy two-point statistics: Gravitational lensing effects and redshift-space distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jaiyul

    2009-01-15

    We present a coherent theoretical framework for computing gravitational lensing effects and redshift-space distortions in an inhomogeneous universe and investigate their impacts on galaxy two-point statistics. Adopting the linearized Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric, we derive the gravitational lensing and the generalized Sachs-Wolfe effects that include the weak lensing distortion, magnification, and time delay effects, and the redshift-space distortion, Sachs-Wolfe, and integrated Sachs-Wolfe effects, respectively. Based on this framework, we first compute their effects on observed source fluctuations, separating them as two physically distinct origins: the volume effect that involves the change of volume and is always present in galaxy two-point statistics, and the source effect that depends on the intrinsic properties of source populations. Then we identify several terms that are ignored in the standard method, and we compute the observed galaxy two-point statistics, an ensemble average of all the combinations of the intrinsic source fluctuations and the additional contributions from the gravitational lensing and the generalized Sachs-Wolfe effects. This unified treatment of galaxy two-point statistics clarifies the relation of the gravitational lensing and the generalized Sachs-Wolfe effects to the metric perturbations and the underlying matter fluctuations. For near-future dark energy surveys, we compute additional contributions to the observed galaxy two-point statistics and analyze their impact on the anisotropic structure. Thorough theoretical modeling of galaxy two-point statistics would be not only necessary to analyze precision measurements from upcoming dark energy surveys, but also provide further discriminatory power in understanding the underlying physical mechanisms.

  19. Effect of Polyherbal Mixtures on the Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Aparajeya; Jena, Somanatha; Sahu, Pramod Kumar; Nayak, Sanghamitra; Padhi, Payodhar

    2013-01-01

    The study focuses on polyherbal antidiabetic formulations of different plants used in the treatment of diabetes mixed in different concentrations. In the present study eleven medicinal plants with proven antidiabetic and related beneficial effects were selected for the preparation of five mixtures. The efficacy of prepared mixtures has been tested on streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats and compared with a commercially available drug glibenclamide. The mixtures at the dose levels of 400 mg/kg b.w. produced a significant decrease in blood glucose level by 69.6%, 70.97%, 64.45%, 71.82%, and 64.44% after 21 days of treatment. The elevated level of SGPT, SGOT, and ALP in the diabetic controlled group reflected the significant alteration of liver function by STZ induction and was found to be equipotent to glibenclamide in restoration of the elevated enzyme levels to normal. The elevated lipid levels (triglyceride and total cholesterol) were restored to near normal by these mixtures for all the estimated parameters. The results of the mixtures on treated group were found to restore the glycemic level to the near normal level thereby indicating antihyperglycemic activity of the formulated mixtures. PMID:23691349

  20. New medications for treatment of obesity: metabolic and cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Andrea; Finer, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    The management of obesity remains a major challenge. Dietary therapy often fails, whereas bariatric surgery, although successful, is demanding and applicable to a limited number of patients. Drug therapy has had many setbacks over the past 20 years because of serious adverse effects; however, several new drugs for the treatment of obesity are either licensed in some parts of the world, submitted for registration, or completing phase III trials. These include combinations (at low dose) of existing drugs, e.g., bupropion + naltrexone (Contrave), phentermine + topiramate (Qsymia), higher doses of existing drugs licensed for other indications (liraglutide, 3 mg), and new entities (lorcaserin). We discuss the challenges and opportunities for obesity pharmacotherapy and review in detail the efficacy of the new drugs regarding weight loss and both desirable and potential undesirable cardiovascular (CV) and metabolic risk factors. Substantial barriers remain, even if the drugs are approved, in successfully integrating these agents into weight management practice, largely related to cost, patient acceptability, and clinician willingness to be engaged in obesity treatment. Although hard clinical outcome benefit (at least for CV outcomes) has yet to be established, obesity pharmacotherapy may soon address many of the challenges in the clinical management of obesity, although newer and better drug combinations and more evidence of benefit from appropriately designed outcome trials is needed. PMID:25661549