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Sample records for avian reovirus p17

  1. Retardation of cell growth by avian reovirus p17 through the activation of p53 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.-J.; Lin, P.-Y.; Lee, J.-W.; Hsu, H.-Y.; Shih, W.-L. . E-mail: shihwl@mail.tcu.edu.tw

    2005-10-21

    The second open reading frame of avian reovirus S1 gene segment encodes a 17 kDa non-structural protein, named p17. The biological role of p17 is fully unknown so far. Using trypan blue dye exclusion and MTT assay, we demonstrated that the ectopic expression of p17 results in the reduction of viable cell number and cell proliferation rate of Vero, BHK, 293, and HeLa cells. Measurement of LDH activity and DNA fragmentation analysis revealed that p17 expression did not cause cell death or apoptosis. These data indicated that the p17 possessed the growth retardation function. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed that p17-expressing cells induced the expression of CDK inhibitor p21{sup cip1/waf1} in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but the transcripts of CDK inhibitor p15{sup INK4b}, p16{sup INK4a}, or p27{sup kip} were not altered. In the presence of p17, the p53 protein level and p53-driven reporter activity were elevated significantly. Dominant negative p53 alleviated the p21 accumulation, p53 activation, and growth inhibition effect induced by p17. Taken together, these studies revealed a possible intrinsic function of p17 in growth regulation through the activation of p53 and p21{sup cip1/waf1}.

  2. Suppression of Vimentin Phosphorylation by the Avian Reovirus p17 through Inhibition of CDK1 and Plk1 Impacting the G2/M Phase of the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Chuan; Huang, Wei-Ru; Liao, Tsai-Ling; Wu, Hung-Yi; Munir, Muhammad; Shih, Wing-Ling; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The p17 protein of avian reovirus (ARV) causes cell cycle retardation in a variety of cell lines; however, the underlying mechanism(s) by which p17 regulates the cell cycle remains largely unknown. We demonstrate for the first time that p17 interacts with CDK1 and vimentin as revealed by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicated that direct interaction of p17 and CDK1/vimentin was mapped within the amino terminus (aa 1-60) of p17 and central region (aa 27-118) of CDK1/vimentin. Furthermore, p17 was found to occupy the Plk1-binding site within the vimentin, thereby blocking Plk1 recruitment to CDK1-induced vimentin phosphorylation at Ser 56. Interaction of p17 to CDK1 or vimentin interferes with CDK1-catalyzed phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser 56 and subsequently vimentin phosphorylation at Ser 82 by Plk1. Furthermore, we have identified upstream signaling pathways and cellular factor(s) targeted by p17 and found that p17 regulates inhibitory phosphorylation of CDK1 and blocks vimentin phosphorylation at Ser 56 and Ser 82. The p17-mediated inactivation of CDK1 is dependent on several mechanisms, which include direct interaction with CDK1, p17-mediated suppression of Plk1 by activating the Tpr/p53 and ATM/Chk1/PP2A pathways, and p17-mediated cdc25C degradation via an ubiquitin- proteasome pathway. Additionally, depletion of p53 with a shRNA as well as inhibition of ATM and vimentin by inhibitors diminished virus yield while Tpr and CDK1 knockdown increased virus yield. Taken together, results demonstrate that p17 suppresses both CDK1 and Plk1functions, disrupts vimentin phosphorylation, causes G2/M cell cycle arrest and thus benefits virus replication. PMID:27603133

  3. Avian Reovirus Protein p17 Functions as a Nucleoporin Tpr Suppressor Leading to Activation of p53, p21 and PTEN and Inactivation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Ru; Chiu, Hung-Chuan; Liao, Tsai-Ling; Chuang, Kuo-Pin; Shih, Wing-Ling; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Avian reovirus (ARV) protein p17 has been shown to regulate cell cycle and autophagy by activation of p53/PTEN pathway; nevertheless, it is still unclear how p53 and PTEN are activated by p17. Here, we report for the first time that p17 functions as a nucleoporin Tpr suppressor that leads to p53 nuclear accumulation and consequently activates p53, p21, and PTEN. The nuclear localization signal (119IAAKRGRQLD128) of p17 has been identified for Tpr binding. This study has shown that Tpr suppression occurs by p17 interacting with Tpr and by reducing the transcription level of Tpr, which together inhibit Tpr function. In addition to upregulation of PTEN by activation of p53 pathway, this study also suggests that ARV protein p17 acts as a positive regulator of PTEN. ARV p17 stabilizes PTEN by stimulating phosphorylation of cytoplasmic PTEN and by elevating Rak-PTEN association to prevent it from E3 ligase NEDD4-1 targeting. To activate PTEN, p17 is able to promote β-arrestin-mediated PTEN translocation from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane via a Rock-1-dependent manner. The accumulation of p53 in the nucleus induces the PTEN- and p21-mediated downregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4. Furthermore, Tpr and CDK4 knockdown increased virus production in contrast to depletion of p53, PTEN, and LC3 reducing virus yield. Taken together, our data suggest that p17-mediated Tpr suppression positively regulates p53, PTEN, and p21 and negatively regulates PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK signaling pathways, both of which are beneficial for virus replication. PMID:26244501

  4. Avian Reovirus Protein p17 Functions as a Nucleoporin Tpr Suppressor Leading to Activation of p53, p21 and PTEN and Inactivation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Ru; Chiu, Hung-Chuan; Liao, Tsai-Ling; Chuang, Kuo-Pin; Shih, Wing-Ling; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Avian reovirus (ARV) protein p17 has been shown to regulate cell cycle and autophagy by activation of p53/PTEN pathway; nevertheless, it is still unclear how p53 and PTEN are activated by p17. Here, we report for the first time that p17 functions as a nucleoporin Tpr suppressor that leads to p53 nuclear accumulation and consequently activates p53, p21, and PTEN. The nuclear localization signal (119IAAKRGRQLD128) of p17 has been identified for Tpr binding. This study has shown that Tpr suppression occurs by p17 interacting with Tpr and by reducing the transcription level of Tpr, which together inhibit Tpr function. In addition to upregulation of PTEN by activation of p53 pathway, this study also suggests that ARV protein p17 acts as a positive regulator of PTEN. ARV p17 stabilizes PTEN by stimulating phosphorylation of cytoplasmic PTEN and by elevating Rak-PTEN association to prevent it from E3 ligase NEDD4-1 targeting. To activate PTEN, p17 is able to promote β-arrestin-mediated PTEN translocation from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane via a Rock-1-dependent manner. The accumulation of p53 in the nucleus induces the PTEN- and p21-mediated downregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4. Furthermore, Tpr and CDK4 knockdown increased virus production in contrast to depletion of p53, PTEN, and LC3 reducing virus yield. Taken together, our data suggest that p17-mediated Tpr suppression positively regulates p53, PTEN, and p21 and negatively regulates PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK signaling pathways, both of which are beneficial for virus replication. PMID:26244501

  5. Optimized polypeptide for a subunit vaccine against avian reovirus.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Dana; Lublin, Avishai; Rosenbluth, Ezra; Heller, E Dan; Pitcovski, Jacob

    2016-06-01

    Avian reovirus (ARV) is a disease-causing agent. The disease is prevented by vaccination with a genotype-specific vaccine while many variants of ARV exist in the field worldwide. Production of new attenuated vaccines is a long-term process and in the case of fast-mutating viruses, an impractical one. In the era of molecular biology, vaccines may be produced by using only the relevant protein for induction of neutralizing antibodies, enabling fast adjustment to the emergence of new genetic strains. Sigma C (SC) protein of ARV is a homotrimer that facilitates host-cell attachment and induce the production and secretion of neutralizing antibodies. The aim of this study was to identify the region of SC that will elicit a protective immune response. Full-length (residues 1-326) and two partial fragments of SC (residues 122-326 and 192-326) were produced in Escherichia coli. The SC fragment of residues 122-326 include the globular head, shaft and hinge domains, while eliminating intra-capsular region. This fragment induces significantly higher levels of anti-ARV antibodies than the shorter fragment or full length SC, which neutralized embryos infection by the virulent strain to a higher extent compared with the antibodies produced in response to the whole virus vaccine. Residues 122-326 fragment is assumed to be folded correctly, exposing linear as well as conformational epitopes that are identical to those of the native protein, while possibly excluding suppressor sequences. The results of this study may serve for the development of a recombinant subunit vaccine for ARV. PMID:27155492

  6. Crystallization of the C-terminal globular domain of avian reovirus fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Raaij, Mark J. van; Hermo Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado Calvo, Pablo; Fox, Gavin C.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Costas, Celina; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier

    2005-07-01

    Partial proteolysis of the avian reovirus cell-attachment protein σC yields a major homotrimeric C-terminal fragment that presumably contains the receptor-binding domain. This fragment has been crystallized in the presence and absence of zinc sulfate and cadmium sulfate. One of the crystal forms diffracts synchrotron X-rays to 2.2–2.3 Å. Avian reovirus fibre, a homotrimer of the σC protein, is responsible for primary host-cell attachment. Using the protease trypsin, a C-terminal σC fragment containing amino acids 156–326 has been generated which was subsequently purified and crystallized. Two different crystal forms were obtained, one grown in the absence of divalent cations and belonging to space group P6{sub 3}22 (unit-cell parameters a = 75.6, c = 243.1 Å) and one grown in the presence of either zinc or cadmium sulfate and belonging to space group P321 (unit-cell parameters a = 74.7, c = 74.5 Å and a = 73.1, c = 69.9 Å for the Zn{sup II}- and Cd{sup II}-grown crystals, respectively). The first crystal form diffracted synchrotron radiation to 3.0 Å resolution and the second form to 2.2–2.3 Å. Its closest related structure, the C-terminal fragment of mammalian reovirus fibre, has only 18% sequence identity and molecular-replacement attempts were unsuccessful. Therefore, a search is under way for suitable heavy-atom derivatives and attempts are being made to grow protein crystals containing selenomethionine instead of methionine.

  7. Central nervous system signs in chickens caused by a new avian reovirus strain: a pathogenesis study.

    PubMed

    Van de Zande, Saskia; Kuhn, Eva-Maria

    2007-02-25

    The present study describes the pathogenesis of infection of chicks with a new avian reovirus strain, belonging to the so-called enteric reovirus strains (ERS) that is capable of causing central nervous system signs in SPF white leghorns. After intramuscular (IM) or oral inoculation birds were either observed for clinical signs or sacrificed for macroscopic, histological and virological examination for 21 days. Virus isolation was performed on the brain, leg muscle, hock joint, liver and spleen. For the detection of viral antigen the immunohistochemistry (IHC) technique was performed on the caudal part of the cerebrum, spinal cord including spinal ganglia and right N. Ischiadicus. High mortality (79% in 7 days) was seen in birds that were inoculated IM. Survivors were depressed and stayed small until the end of the experiment. One bird had tremor and showed torticollis at 9 days after IM inoculation. Birds that were inoculated orally were depressed from day 4 and stayed small until the end of the experiment. One bird showed a torticollis at 10 days after inoculation. After both IM and oral inoculation ERS was isolated from the brain between 3 and 10 days after inoculation. Other examined organs were positive for virus isolation from day 1 or 5 until day 21. IHC revealed viral antigen positive cells in the Plexus chorioideus (plexus epithelial cells or cells within the underlying connective tissue) and in a spinal ganglion. The results indicate that the pathogenesis of ERS infection in chickens bears some resemblance with that of the mammalian reoviruses serotype 1 in mice. PMID:17158000

  8. Evidence that avian reovirus σNS is an RNA chaperone: implications for genome segment assortment

    PubMed Central

    Borodavka, Alexander; Ault, James; Stockley, Peter G.; Tuma, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Reoviruses are important human, animal and plant pathogens having 10–12 segments of double-stranded genomic RNA. The mechanisms controlling the assortment and packaging of genomic segments in these viruses, remain poorly understood. RNA–protein and RNA–RNA interactions between viral genomic segment precursors have been implicated in the process. While non-structural viral RNA-binding proteins, such as avian reovirus σNS, are essential for virus replication, the mechanism by which they assist packaging is unclear. Here we demonstrate that σNS assembles into stable elongated hexamers in vitro, which bind single-stranded nucleic acids with high affinity, but little sequence specificity. Using ensemble and single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, we show that σNS also binds to a partially double-stranded RNA, resulting in gradual helix unwinding. The hexamer can bind multiple RNA molecules and exhibits strand-annealing activity, thus mediating conversion of metastable, intramolecular stem-loops into more stable heteroduplexes. We demonstrate that the ARV σNS acts as an RNA chaperone facilitating specific RNA–RNA interactions between genomic precursors during segment assortment and packaging. PMID:26109354

  9. In vitro antiviral activity of chestnut and quebracho woods extracts against avian reovirus and metapneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Lupini, C; Cecchinato, M; Scagliarini, A; Graziani, R; Catelli, E

    2009-12-01

    Field evidences have suggested that a natural extract, containing tannins, could be effective against poultry enteric viral infections. Moreover previous studies have shown that vegetable tannins can have antiviral activity against human viruses. Based on this knowledge three different Chestnut (Castanea spp.) wood extracts and one Quebracho (Schinopsis spp.) wood extract, all containing tannins and currently used in the animal feed industry, were tested for in vitro antiviral activity against avian reovirus (ARV) and avian metapneumovirus (AMPV). The MTT assay was used to evaluate the 50% cytotoxic compounds concentration (CC(50)) on Vero cells. The antiviral properties were tested before and after the adsorption of the viruses to Vero cells. Antiviral activities were expressed as IC(50) (concentration required to inhibit 50% of viral cytopathic effect). CC(50)s of tested compounds were > 200 microg/ml. All compounds had an extracellular antiviral effect against both ARV and AMPV with IC(50) values ranging from 25 to 66 microg/ml. Quebracho extract had also evident intracellular anti-ARV activity (IC(50) 24 microg/ml). These preliminary results suggest that the examined vegetable extracts might be good candidates in the control of some avian virus infections. Nevertheless further in vivo experiments are required to confirm these findings. PMID:19435637

  10. Different intracellular distribution of avian reovirus core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Lostale-Seijo, Irene; Martinez-Costas, Jose; Benavente, Javier

    2012-10-25

    A comparative analysis of the intracellular distribution of avian reovirus (ARV) core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin revealed that, whereas the viral protein accumulates in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of avian cells, most sigmaA concentrates in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells in tight association with the insoluble nuclear matrix fraction. Our results further showed that sigmaA becomes arrested in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells via association with mammalian cell-specific factors and that this association prevents nucleolar targeting. Inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity, but not of RNA polymerase I activity, in infected mammalian cells induces nucleus-to-cytoplasm sigmaA translocation through a CRM1- and RanGTP-dependent mechanism, yet a heterokaryon assay suggests that sigmaA does not shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The scarcity of sigmaA in cytoplasmic viral factories of infected mammalian cells could be one of the factors contributing to limited ARV replication in mammalian cells.

  11. Development and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against avian reovirus sigma C protein and their application in detection of avian reovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chien J; Wang, Chi Y; Lee, Long H; Shih, Wen L; Chang, Chi I; Cheng, Hsueh L; Chulu, Julius L C; Ji, Wen T; Liu, Hung J

    2006-08-01

    Avian reovirus (ARV) is a non-enveloped virus with a segmented double-stranded RNA genome surrounded by a double icosahedral capsid shell. ARVs are associated with viral arthritis, immunosuppression, and enteric diseases in poultry. The sigma C protein was involved in induction of apoptosis and neutralization antibody. In the present study, sigma C-His protein was expressed in Sf9 insect cells and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Eight monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against sigma C-His and three mAbs against His were screened from hybridoma cells produced by fusion of splenocytes from immunized mice with NS1 myeloma cells. Among the eight mAbs against sigma C protein, all belonged to the IgG isotype except three for IgM. It was discovered that all anti-His mAbs were mixtures of IgG and IgM isotypes. mAbs reacted with sigma C-His protein in a conformation-independent manner based on dot blot and western blotting assays. The competitive binding assay indicated that all mAbs recognized the same epitope on sigma C protein that was conserved in different isolates. Compared with the commercial anti-ARV S1133 polyclonal antibody, mAb (D15) had universal reactivity to all serotypes or genotypes of ARVs tested. This monoclonal antibody may therefore be useful for the development of an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for rapid detection of field isolates. PMID:16854646

  12. Avian reovirus triggers autophagy in primary chicken fibroblast cells and Vero cells to promote virus production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Songshu; Jiang, Ke; Zhang, Xiaorong; Zhang, Miao; Zhou, Zhizhi; Hu, Maozhi; Yang, Rui; Sun, Chenli; Wu, Yantao

    2012-04-01

    Avian reovirus (ARV) is an important cause of disease in poultry. Although ARV is known to induce apoptosis in infected cells, the interaction between ARV and its target cells requires further elucidation. In this report, we show that the ARV isolate strain GX/2010/1 induces autophagy in both Vero and primary chicken embryonic fibroblast (CEF) cells based on the appearance of an increased number of double-membrane vesicles, the presence of GFP-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) dot formation, and the elevated production of LC3II. We further demonstrate that the class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR pathway contributes to autophagic induction by ARV infection. Moreover, treatment of ARV-infected cells with the autophagy inducer rapamycin increased viral yields, while inhibition of the autophagosomal pathway using chloroquine led to a decrease in virus production. Altogether, our studies strongly suggest that autophagy may play a critical role in determining viral yield during ARV infection. PMID:22241622

  13. Avian reovirus replication in mononuclear phagocytes in chicken footpad and spleen after footpad inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu San; Shen, Pin Chun; Su, Bor Sheu; Liu, Tsung Ching; Lin, Cheng Chung; Lee, Long Huw

    2015-01-01

    Circulating monocytes and tissue macrophages were suggested to be susceptible to avian reovirus (ARV) infection. To determine if ARV infects and replicates in mononuclear phagocytes (KUL01-positive cells), we infected 3-day-old specific-pathogen-free chickens with ARV strain 2408 by inoculation of the left footpad. The left footpads and spleens were collected for analysis at 1.5 and 2.5 d after inoculation. Replication of ARV in the footpad and spleen was demonstrated by detection of the viral protein σNS using immunohistochemical testing and viral S1 RNA expression by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Furthermore, immunofluorescent double-staining assay of cytocentrifuged cells and cryosections of the footpad and spleen for the viral protein σNS and the surface marker recognized by monoclonal antibody (MAb) KUL01 indicated that KUL01-positive cells costained with MAb H1E1, which recognizes ARV protein σNS. In addition, more ARV S1 RNA was measured by qPCR in the KUL01-positive cell samples prepared from the footpad or spleen 1.5 d after inoculation compared with non-KUL01-positive cell samples. The amounts of ARV S1 RNA in the spleen were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the amounts in the footpad 1.5 d after inoculation. The results suggest that ARV infects mononuclear phagocytes and then replicates within these cells before migrating to the spleen, where it infects and replicates in KUL01-positive cells. PMID:25852223

  14. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    SciTech Connect

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier; Raaij, Mark J. van

    2007-05-01

    The avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA has been crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2°. A complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution and analyzed. The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals.

  15. Epitope mapping and functional analysis of sigma A and sigma NS proteins of avian reovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Pi H.; Li, Ying J.; Su, Yu P.; Lee, Long H.; Liu, Hung J. . E-mail: hjliu@mail.npust.edu.tw

    2005-02-20

    We have previously shown that avian reovirus (ARV) {sigma}A and {sigma}NS proteins possess dsRNA and ssRNA binding activity and suggested that there are two epitopes on {sigma}A (I and II) and three epitopes (A, B, and C) on {sigma}NS. To further define the location of epitopes on {sigma}A and {sigma}NS proteins and to further elucidate the biological functions of these epitopes by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 62, 1F9, H1E1, and 4A123 against the ARV S1133 strain, the full-length and deletion fragments of S2 and S4 genes of ARV generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were cloned into pET32 expression vectors and the fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 strain. Epitope mapping using MAbs and E. coli-expressed deletion fragments of {sigma}A and {sigma}NS of the ARV S1133 strain, synthetic peptides, and the cross reactivity of MAbs to heterologous ARV strains demonstrated that epitope II on {sigma}A was located at amino acid residues {sup 340}QWVMAGLVSAA{sup 350} and epitope B on {sigma}NS at amino acid residues {sup 180}MLDMVDGRP{sup 188}. The MAbs (62, 1F9, and H1E1) directed against epitopes II and B did not require the native conformation of {sigma}A and {sigma}NS, suggesting that their binding activities were conformation-independent. On the other hand, MAb 4A123 only reacted with complete {sigma}NS but not with truncated {sigma}NS fusion proteins in Western blot, suggesting that the binding activity of MAb to epitope A on {sigma}NS was conformation-dependent. Amino acid sequence analysis and the binding assays of MAb 62 to heterologous ARV strains suggested that epitope II on {sigma}A was highly conserved among ARV strains and that this epitope is suitable as a serological marker for the detection of ARV antibodies following natural infection in chickens. On the contrary, an amino acid substitution at position 183 (M to V) in epitope B of ARV could hinder the reactivity of the {sigma}NS with MAb 1F9. The {sigma}NS of ARV with ss

  16. Isolation and molecular characterization of newly emerging avian reovirus variants and novel strains in Pennsylvania, USA, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huaguang; Tang, Yi; Dunn, Patricia A.; Wallner-Pendleton, Eva A.; Lin, Lin; Knoll, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Avian reovirus (ARV) infections of broiler and turkey flocks have caused significant clinical disease and economic losses in Pennsylvania (PA) since 2011. Most of the ARV-infected birds suffered from severe arthritis, tenosynovitis, pericarditis and depressed growth or runting-stunting syndrome (RSS). A high morbidity (up to 20% to 40%) was observed in ARV-affected flocks, and the flock mortality was occasionally as high as 10%. ARV infections in turkeys were diagnosed for the first time in PA in 2011. From 2011 to 2014, a total of 301 ARV isolations were made from affected PA poultry. The molecular characterization of the Sigma C gene of 114 field isolates, representing most ARV outbreaks, revealed that only 21.93% of the 114 sequenced ARV isolates were in the same genotyping cluster (cluster 1) as the ARV vaccine strains (S1133, 1733, and 2048), whereas 78.07% of the sequenced isolates were in genotyping clusters 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 (which were distinct from the vaccine strains) and represented newly emerging ARV variants. In particular, genotyping cluster 6 was a new ARV genotype that was identified for the first time in 10 novel PA ARV variants of field isolates. PMID:26469681

  17. Avian reovirus σA and σNS proteins activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent Akt signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liji; Xie, Zhixun; Huang, Li; Fan, Qing; Luo, Sisi; Huang, Jiaoling; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Zhiqin; Zeng, Tingting; Zhang, Yanfang; Wang, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to identify avian reovirus (ARV) proteins that can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent Akt pathway. Based on ARV protein amino acid sequence analysis, σA, σNS, μA, μB and μNS were identified as putative proteins capable of mediating PI3K/Akt pathway activation. The recombinant plasmids σA-pcAGEN, σNS-pcAGEN, μA-pcAGEN, μB-pcAGEN and μNS-pcAGEN were constructed and used to transfect Vero cells, and the expression levels of the corresponding genes were quantified by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Phosphorylated Akt (P-Akt) levels in the transfected cells were measured by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. The results showed that the σA, σNS, μA, μB and μNS genes were expressed in Vero cells. σA-expressing and σNS-expressing cells had higher P-Akt levels than negative control cells, pcAGEN-expressing cells and cells designed to express other proteins (i.e., μA, μB and μNS). Pre-treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 inhibited Akt phosphorylation in σA- and σNS-expressing cells. These results indicate that the σA and σNS proteins can activate the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:27233800

  18. Propagation and characterization of turkey reoviruses isolated in Germany, 2004-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From 2004 to 2008, suspected avian reoviruses were isolated from turkey flocks in ten counties in Germany. The age of birds at isolation ranged from 9 to 54 days. The suspected avian reoviruses elicited characteristic cytopathic effect (CPE) in chicken embryo kidney (CEK) cell culture. In 2009, CEK ...

  19. [Reovirus infection of pheasants (Phasianus colchicus)].

    PubMed

    Mutlu, O F; Grund, C; Cöven, F

    1998-04-01

    In this case report we discribe clinic, pathology and diagnostic of an avian reovirus-infection in pheasants. The disease was observed 1993 in a flock of game-pheasants in the western part of Turkey. Of a live-stock of 100 animals, 27 were affected most of them being three to five months old. Beside a general disorder, sick pheasants showed signs of shortness of breath as well as greenish, watery diarrhoea and died within a week. The pathologic findings were dominated by an extreme hepatopathia. In addition a fibrinous tracheitis, a catarrhal inflammation of the gut and a perihepatitis fibrinosa could be observed. From organs of affected pheasants a pathogen could be isolated, which was characterized anti-genetically, by physico-chemical properties an by electronmicroscopy as avian reovirus. PMID:9587976

  20. A multiplex RT-PCR for the detection of astrovirus, rotavirus, and reovirus in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Naresh; Chander, Yogesh; Patnayak, Devi P; Mor, Sunil K; Ziegler, Andre F; Goyal, Sagar M

    2012-09-01

    This study was undertaken to develop and validate a multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) for simultaneous detection of avian rotavirus, turkey astrovirus-2 (TAstV-2), and avian reovirus. Primers targeting the conserved regions of NSP4 gene of avian rotavirus, polymerase gene of TAstV-2, and S4 gene of avian reovirus were used. The position of bands at 630, 802, and 1120 base pairs on agarose gel confirmed the presence of rotavirus, TAstV-2, and reovirus, respectively. This mRT-PCR was found to be specific as no amplification was observed with avian influenza virus, Newcastle disease virus, turkey coronavirus, avian metapneumovirus, and intestinal contents of uninfected turkey poults. Intestinal contents of poults from flocks suspected of exhibiting "poult enteritis syndrome" were pooled and tested. Of the 120 pooled samples tested, 70% were positive for TAstV-2, 45% for avian rotavirus, and 18% for avian reovirus. These three viruses were detected alone or in different combinations. Of the samples tested, 20% were negative for these three viruses, 38% were positive for a single virus (TAstV or rotavirus or reovirus), and 42% were positive for two or three viruses. This single-tube mRT-PCR assay has the potential to serve as a rapid diagnostic method for the simultaneous detection of the three enteric viruses in turkeys. PMID:23050480

  1. Reovirus infection in two species of Psittaciformes recently imported into Italy.

    PubMed

    Conzo, G; Magnino, S; Sironi, G; Lavazza, A; Vigo, P G; Fioretti, A; Kaleta, E F

    2001-02-01

    An outbreak of reovirus infection with high mortality in two groups of recently imported psittacine birds is reported. The disease in the two species involved, African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus erithacus) and Australian king parrots (Alisterus scapularis), had differences in clinical presentation and gross lesions. Reovirus particles were observed by electron microscopy and ultrastructural examination of tissues, and two viruses were isolated in cell culture, one from each bird species. Both isolates were studied by cross-neutralization with antisera against reference avian reoviruses isolated from chickens and parrots, and were found to have the greatest similarity to viruses isolated from a budgerigar and a southern screamer. PMID:19184872

  2. Phylogenetic analysis, genomic diversity and classification of M class gene segments of turkey reoviruses.

    PubMed

    Mor, Sunil K; Marthaler, Douglas; Verma, Harsha; Sharafeldin, Tamer A; Jindal, Naresh; Porter, Robert E; Goyal, Sagar M

    2015-03-23

    From 2011 to 2014, 13 turkey arthritis reoviruses (TARVs) were isolated from cases of swollen hock joints in 2-18-week-old turkeys. In addition, two isolates from similar cases of turkey arthritis were received from another laboratory. Eight turkey enteric reoviruses (TERVs) isolated from fecal samples of turkeys were also used for comparison. The aims of this study were to characterize turkey reovirus (TRV) based on complete M class genome segments and to determine genetic diversity within TARVs in comparison to TERVs and chicken reoviruses (CRVs). Nucleotide (nt) cut off values of 84%, 83% and 85% for the M1, M2 and M3 gene segments were proposed and used for genotype classification, generating 5, 7, and 3 genotypes, respectively. Using these nt cut off values, we propose M class genotype constellations (GCs) for avian reoviruses. Of the seven GCs, GC1 and GC3 were shared between the TARVs and TERVs, indicating possible reassortment between turkey and chicken reoviruses. The TARVs and TERVs were divided into three GCs, and GC2 was unique to TARVs and TERVs. The proposed new GC approach should be useful in identifying reassortant viruses, which may ultimately be used in the design of a universal vaccine against both chicken and turkey reoviruses. PMID:25655814

  3. REOVIRUSES IN WATER POLLUTION TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twelve cell lines were tested to determine their sensitivity to reoviruses of three serotypes that had been isolated from sewage. Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells were the most susceptible. Sewage-isolated, protamine-precipitated reoviruses were also used in conjunction wit...

  4. Reverse genetics for mammalian reovirus.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karl W; Ikizler, Miné; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Dermody, Terence S

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian orthoreoviruses (reoviruses) are highly tractable models for studies of viral replication and pathogenesis. The versatility of reovirus as an experimental model has been enhanced by development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system. Infectious reovirus can be recovered from cells transfected with plasmids encoding cDNAs of each reovirus gene segment using a strategy that does not require helper virus and is independent of selection. In this system, transcription of each gene segment is driven by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, which can be supplied transiently by recombinant vaccinia virus (rDIs-T7pol) or by cells that constitutively express the enzyme. Reverse genetics systems have been developed for two prototype reovirus strains, type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D). Each reovirus cDNA was encoded on an independent plasmid for the first-generation rescue system. The efficiency of virus recovery was enhanced in a second-generation system by combining the cDNAs for multiple reovirus gene segments onto single plasmids to reduce the number of plasmids from 10 to 4. The reduction in plasmid number and the use of baby hamster kidney cells that express T7 RNA polymerase increased the efficiency of viral rescue, reduced the incubation time required to recover infectious virus, and eliminated potential biosafety concerns associated with the use of recombinant vaccinia virus. Reovirus reverse genetics has been used to introduce mutations into viral capsid and nonstructural components to study viral protein-structure activity relationships and can be exploited to engineer recombinant reoviruses for vaccine and oncolytic applications. PMID:21798351

  5. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the S1 Genome segment of turkey-origin reoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on previous reports characterizing the turkey-origin avian reovirus (TRV) sigma-B (sigma-2) major outer capsid protein gene, the TRVs may represent a new group within the fusogenic orthoreoviruses. However, no sequence data from other TRV genes or genome segments has been reported. The sigma...

  6. Simultaneous detection of astrovirus, rotavirus, reovirus and adenovirus type I in broiler chicken flocks.

    PubMed

    Roussan, D A; Shaheen, I A; Khawaldeh, G Y; Totanji, W S; Al-Rifai, R H

    2012-01-01

    Enteric diseases cause substantial economic losses to the poultry industry. Astroviruses, rotaviruses, reoviruses, and adenovirus type 1 have been reported as a significant cause of intestinal symptoms in poultry. In the present study, intestinal samples from 70 commercial broiler chicken flocks were examined for the presence of astroviruses, rotavirus, and reovirus by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and for the presence of group I adenovirus by polymerase chain reaction. Astroviruses were identified in 38.6% of samples tested. Both avian nephritis virus and chicken astrovirus were identified in the astrovirus positive flocks, where 74.1% of these flocks were positive for only one type of astrovirus, whereas, 25.9% of these flocks were positive for both types of astrovirus. Reoviruses, rotaviruses, and adenoviruses were identified in 21.4, 18.6, and 14.3% of these flocks, respectively. Concomitant infection with two or more viruses in the same flock were also prominent, where 5.7, 5.7, 2.9, 2.9, 1.4, and 1.4% of these flocks were positive with both astrovirus and rotavirus; astrovirus and adenovirus; astrovirus and reovirus; rotavirus and adenovirus; rotavirus and reovirus; and reovirus and adenovirus respectively. Moreover, 4.3 and 2.7% of these flocks were positive for astrovirus, reovirus, and adenovirus; and astrovirus, reovirus, and rotavirus, respectively. Further studies will focus on identifying specific viral factors or subtypes/subgroups associated with disease through pathogenesis studies, economic losses caused by infections and co-infections of these pathogens, and the costs and benefits of countermeasures. PMID:22844713

  7. Development of reference antisera to enteric-origin avian viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent molecular surveys have revealed geographically distinct lineages of avian reovirus, rotavirus and astrovirus circulating in commercial poultry. To improve our understanding of enteric virus pathogenesis, specific immunological reagents are needed to detect viruses in histological samples. To ...

  8. Rice Reoviruses in Insect Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Taiyun; Li, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rice reoviruses, transmitted by leafhopper or planthopper vectors in a persistent propagative manner, seriously threaten the stability of rice production in Asia. Understanding the mechanisms that enable viral transmission by insect vectors is a key to controlling these viral diseases. This review describes current understanding of replication cycles of rice reoviruses in vector cell lines, transmission barriers, and molecular determinants of vector competence and persistent infection. Despite recent breakthroughs, such as the discoveries of actin-based tubule motility exploited by viruses to overcome transmission barriers and mutually beneficial relationships between viruses and bacterial symbionts, there are still many gaps in our knowledge of transmission mechanisms. Advances in genome sequencing, reverse genetics systems, and molecular technologies will help to address these problems. Investigating the multiple interaction systems among the virus, insect vector, insect symbiont, and plant during natural infection in the field is a central topic for future research on rice reoviruses. PMID:27296147

  9. Oncolytic reovirus against ovarian and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Sandra G; Norman, Kara L; Alain, Tommy; Kossakowska, Anna; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-15

    Reovirus selectively replicates in and destroys cancer cells with an activated Ras signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using reovirus (serotype 3, strain Dearing) as an antihuman colon and ovarian cancer agent. In in vitro studies, reovirus infection in human colon and ovarian cell lines was assessed by cytopathic effect as detected by light microscopy, [(35)S]Methionine labeling of infected cells for viral protein synthesis and progeny virus production by plaque assay. We observed that reovirus efficiently infected all five human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, DLD-1, HCT-116, HT-29, and SW48) and four human ovarian cancer cell lines (MDAH2774, PA-1, SKOV3, and SW626) which were tested, but not a normal colon cell line (CCD-18Co) or a normal ovarian cell line (NOV-31). We also observed that the Ras activity in the human colon and ovarian cancer cell lines was elevated compared with that in normal colon and ovarian cell lines. In animal models, intraneoplastic as well as i.v. inoculation of reovirus resulted in significant regression of established s.c. human colon and ovarian tumors implanted at the hind flank. Histological studies revealed that reovirus infection in vivo was restricted to tumor cells, whereas the surrounding normal tissue remained uninfected. Additionally, in an i.p. human ovarian cancer xenograft model, inhibition of ascites tumor formation and the survival of animals treated with live reovirus was significantly greater than of control mice treated with UV-inactivated reovirus. Reovirus infection in ex vivo primary human ovarian tumor surgical samples was also confirmed, further demonstrating the potential of reovirus therapy. These results suggest that reovirus holds promise as a novel agent for human colon and ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:11912142

  10. Myocarditis associated with reovirus in turkey poults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myocarditis associated with reovirus was diagnosed in 17 day-old male turkey poults based on virus isolation, reverse transcript – polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), demonstration of reovirus antigen in the cytoplasm of mononuclear inflammatory cells and myocytes in the heart by immunohistochemistr...

  11. Reovirus oncolysis of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kara L; Coffey, Matthew C; Hirasawa, Kensuke; Demetrick, Douglas J; Nishikawa, Sandra G; DiFrancesco, Lisa M; Strong, James E; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-20

    We have previously shown that human reovirus replication is restricted to cells with an activated Ras pathway, and that reovirus could be used as an effective oncolytic agent against human glioblastoma xenografts. This study examines in more detail the feasibility of reovirus as a therapeutic for breast cancer, a subset of cancer in which direct activating mutations in the ras proto-oncogene are rare, and yet where unregulated stimulation of Ras signaling pathways is important in the pathogenesis of the disease. We demonstrate herein the efficient lysis of breast tumor-derived cell lines by the virus, whereas normal breast cells resist infection in vitro. In vivo studies of reovirus breast cancer therapy reveal that viral administration could cause tumor regression in an MDA-MB-435S mammary fat pad model in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Reovirus could also effect regression of tumors remote from the injection site in an MDA-MB-468 bilateral tumor model, raising the possibility of systemic therapy of breast cancer by the oncolytic agent. Finally, the ability of reovirus to act against primary breast tumor samples not propagated as cell lines was evaluated; we found that reovirus could indeed replicate in ex vivo surgical specimens. Overall, reovirus shows promise as a potential breast cancer therapeutic. PMID:11916487

  12. Thermal inactivation of avian viral and bacterial pathogens in an effluent treatment system within a biosafety level 2 and 3 enhanced facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) virus, avian paramyxovirus Type 1 (APMV-1 or Newcastle disease virus [NDV]), reovirus, rotavirus, turkey astrovirus (TAstV), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), Marek’s disease virus (MDV-1), avian parvovirus (ChPV) and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis are significant biosafety...

  13. The effects of oncolytic reovirus in canine lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C C; Umeki, S; Igase, M; Coffey, M; Noguchi, S; Okuda, M; Mizuno, T

    2016-08-01

    Reovirus is a potent oncolytic virus in many human neoplasms that has reached phase II and III clinical trials. Our laboratory has previously reported the oncolytic effects of reovirus in canine mast cell tumour (MCT). In order to further explore the potential of reovirus in veterinary oncology, we tested the susceptibility of reovirus in 10 canine lymphoma cell lines. Reovirus-induced cell death, virus replication and infectivity were confirmed in four cell lines with variable levels of susceptibility. The level of Ras activation varied among the cell lines with no correlation with reovirus susceptibility. Reovirus-susceptible cell lines underwent apoptosis as proven by propidium iodide (PI) staining, Annexin V-FITC/PI assay, cleavage of PARP and inhibition of cell death by caspase inhibitor. A single intratumoral injection of reovirus suppressed the growth of canine lymphoma subcutaneous tumour in NOD/SCID mice. Unlike canine MCT, canine lymphoma is less susceptible to reovirus. PMID:25319493

  14. Picornaviruses and reoviruses of fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The number of fish viruses isolated in cell culture or observed by electron microscopy continues to increase rapidly. Until recently, most viruses that were isolated from finfish and characterized were found to be members of the Rhabdoviridae, Iridoviridae, or Herpesviridae (Wolf and Mann 1980). In a comprehensive review of fish viruses published in 1984, there were no picornaviruses and only two reoviruses listed (Wolf 1984). The expansion of aquaculture into the rearing of new species at high density in different geographic areas, and the use of improved methods of detection that include newly developed cell lines and increased sampling effort, have led to the discovery of fish viruses representing nearly all families of animal viruses. Among the newest additions, are a member of the family Picornaviridae and several new viruses that belong within the Reoviridae.

  15. A duck reovirus variant with a unique deletion in the sigma C gene exhibiting high pathogenicity in Pekin ducklings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xianjin; Wang, Dan; Ning, Kang; Liang, Te; Wang, Minghang; Jiang, Meng; Zhang, Dabing

    2016-04-01

    A novel strain of duck reovirus (DRV) associated with a high mortality in Pekin ducklings in China, 2013, was isolated and characterized. This strain (designated as HN5d) grew well in Vero cells and produced marked cytopathic effects. HN5d contains 10 dsRNA genome segments, a typical feature of avian orthoreovirus. Following cloning, sequencing, and sequence analysis of the genome segments, a unique deletion of 18 amino acids was found in the sigma C protein of HN5d when compared with that of the recent Chinese waterfowl reoviruses (e.g., DRV 091). Phylogenetic analysis of cDNA amplicons of segments encoding for the outer capsid proteins revealed that HN5d is a novel genotype 2 waterfowl reovirus isolate. Inoculation of Pekin ducklings with HN5d resulted in splenic necrosis, a typical feature of "Duck spleen necrosis disease" (DSND) discovered in China in 2006. Unlike the typical DSND, HN5d produced severer hemorrhagic and/or necrotic lesions in livers of experimentally infected ducklings. 20-30% of death was observed during the first 7 day in the experimentally exposed birds. These findings suggest that HN5d is a novel duck reovirus isolate with severer pathogenicity in Pekin ducklings. PMID:26829009

  16. Potential for Improving Potency and Specificity of Reovirus Oncolysis with Next-Generation Reovirus Variants

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Adil; Johnston, Randal N.; Shmulevitz, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Viruses that specifically replicate in tumor over normal cells offer promising cancer therapies. Oncolytic viruses (OV) not only kill the tumor cells directly; they also promote anti-tumor immunotherapeutic responses. Other major advantages of OVs are that they dose-escalate in tumors and can be genetically engineered to enhance potency and specificity. Unmodified wild type reovirus is a propitious OV currently in phase I–III clinical trials. This review summarizes modifications to reovirus that may improve potency and/or specificity during oncolysis. Classical genetics approaches have revealed reovirus variants with improved adaptation towards tumors or with enhanced ability to establish specific steps of virus replication and cell killing among transformed cells. The recent emergence of a reverse genetics system for reovirus has provided novel strategies to fine-tune reovirus proteins or introduce exogenous genes that could promote oncolytic activity. Over the next decade, these findings are likely to generate better-optimized second-generation reovirus vectors and improve the efficacy of oncolytic reotherapy. PMID:26633466

  17. Attenuated reovirus displays oncolysis with reduced host toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M; Garant, K A; zur Nieden, N I; Alain, T; Loken, S D; Urbanski, S J; Forsyth, P A; Rancourt, D E; Lee, P W K; Johnston, R N

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although the naturally occurring reovirus causes only mild symptoms in humans, it shows considerable potential as an oncolytic agent because of its innate ability to target cancer cells. In immunocompromised hosts, however, wild-type reovirus can target healthy tissues, including heart, liver, pancreas and neural structures. Methods: We characterized an attenuated form of reovirus (AV) derived from a persistently infected cell line through sequence analysis, as well as western blot and in vitro transcription and translation techniques. To examine its pathogenesis and oncolytic potential, AV reovirus was tested on healthy embryonic stem cells, various non-transformed and transformed cell lines, and in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with tumour xenografts. Results: Sequence analysis of AV reovirus revealed a premature STOP codon in its sigma 1 attachment protein. Western blot and in vitro translation confirmed the presence of a truncated σ1. In comparison to wild-type reovirus, AV reovirus did not kill healthy stem cells or induce black tail formation in SCID mice. However, it did retain its ability to target cancer cells and reduce tumour size. Conclusion: Despite containing a truncated attachment protein, AV reovirus still preferentially targets cancer cells, and compared with wild-type reovirus it shows reduced toxicity when administered to immunodeficient hosts, suggesting the potential use of AV reovirus in combination cancer therapy. PMID:21179029

  18. Novel reovirus in Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We discovered a psyllid-infecting Reovirus that we are now examining as a potential biological control agent of the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) to reduce huanglongbing disease (HLB) of citrus, a devastating bacterial disease of citrus transmitted by the psyllid. Previously, a psyllid-inf...

  19. Exploring Reovirus Plasticity for Improving Its Use as Oncolytic Virus.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Vera; Hoeben, Rob C; van den Wollenberg, Diana J M

    2016-01-01

    Reoviruses are non-enveloped viruses with a segmented double stranded RNA genome. In humans, they are not associated with serious disease. Human reoviruses exhibit an inherent preference to replicate in tumor cells, which makes them ideally suited for use in oncolytic virotherapies. Their use as anti-cancer agent has been evaluated in several clinical trials, which revealed that intra-tumoral and systemic delivery of reoviruses are well tolerated. Despite evidence of anti-tumor effects, the efficacy of reovirus in anti-cancer monotherapy needs to be further enhanced. The opportunity to treat both the primary tumor as well as metastases makes systemic delivery a preferred administration route. Several pre-clinical studies have been conducted to address the various hurdles connected to systemic delivery of reoviruses. The majority of those studies have been done in tumor-bearing immune-deficient murine models. This thwarts studies on the impact of the contribution of the immune system to the tumor cell eradication. This review focuses on key aspects of the reovirus/host-cell interactions and the methods that are available to modify the virus to alter these interactions. These aspects are discussed with a focus on improving the reovirus' antitumor efficacy. PMID:26712782

  20. Exploring Reovirus Plasticity for Improving Its Use as Oncolytic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Vera; Hoeben, Rob C.; van den Wollenberg, Diana J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Reoviruses are non-enveloped viruses with a segmented double stranded RNA genome. In humans, they are not associated with serious disease. Human reoviruses exhibit an inherent preference to replicate in tumor cells, which makes them ideally suited for use in oncolytic virotherapies. Their use as anti-cancer agent has been evaluated in several clinical trials, which revealed that intra-tumoral and systemic delivery of reoviruses are well tolerated. Despite evidence of anti-tumor effects, the efficacy of reovirus in anti-cancer monotherapy needs to be further enhanced. The opportunity to treat both the primary tumor as well as metastases makes systemic delivery a preferred administration route. Several pre-clinical studies have been conducted to address the various hurdles connected to systemic delivery of reoviruses. The majority of those studies have been done in tumor-bearing immune-deficient murine models. This thwarts studies on the impact of the contribution of the immune system to the tumor cell eradication. This review focuses on key aspects of the reovirus/host-cell interactions and the methods that are available to modify the virus to alter these interactions. These aspects are discussed with a focus on improving the reovirus’ antitumor efficacy. PMID:26712782

  1. Strategic Combinations: The Future of Oncolytic Virotherapy with Reovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xing; Chester, Cariad; Rajasekaran, Narendiran; He, ZhiXu; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2016-05-01

    The dominant cancer treatment modalities such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and even targeted kinase inhibitors and mAbs are limited by low efficacy, toxicity, and treatment-resistant tumor subclones. Oncolytic viral therapy offers a novel therapeutic strategy that has the potential to dramatically improve clinical outcomes. Reovirus, a double-stranded benign human RNA virus, is a leading candidate for therapeutic development and currently in phase III trials. Reovirus selectively targets transformed cells with activated Ras signaling pathways; Ras genes are some of the most frequently mutated oncogenes in human cancer and it is estimated that at least 30% of all human tumors exhibit aberrant Ras signaling. By targeting Ras-activated cells, reovirus can directly lyse cancer cells, disrupt tumor immunosuppressive mechanisms, reestablish multicellular immune surveillance, and generate robust antitumor responses. Reovirus therapy is currently being tested in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgery. In this review, we discuss the current successes of these combinatorial therapeutic strategies and emphasize the importance of prioritizing combination oncolytic viral therapy as reovirus-based treatments progress in clinical development. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 767-73. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197256

  2. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-03-26

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin(®)) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed. PMID:27019795

  3. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-01-01

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin®) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed. PMID:27019795

  4. NMR studies on polyphosphide Ce6Ni6P17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Yamada, H.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report the result of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on Ce6Ni6P17. The observed NMR spectra show a Lorentzian-type and an asymmetric shapes, reflecting the local symmetry around each P site in the cubic unit cell. We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to three inequivalent P sites and deduced the temperature dependence of the Knight shift for each site. The Knight shifts increase with decreasing temperature down to 1.5 K, indicating a localized spin system of Ce6Ni6P17. Antiferromagnetic correlation between 4f spins is suggested from the negative sign of the Weiss-temperature.

  5. Oncolytic reovirus synergizes with chemotherapeutic agents to promote cell death in canine mammary gland tumor.

    PubMed

    Igase, Masaya; Hwang, Chung Chew; Kambayashi, Satoshi; Kubo, Masato; Coffey, Matt; Miyama, Takako Shimokawa; Baba, Kenji; Okuda, Masaru; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Mizuno, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    The oncolytic effects of reovirus in various cancers have been proven in many clinical trials in human medicine. Oncolytic virotherapy using reovirus for canine cancers is being developed in our laboratory. The objective of this study was to examine the synergistic anti-cancer effects of a combination of reovirus and low doses of various chemotherapeutic agents on mammary gland tumors (MGTs) in dogs. The first part of this study demonstrated the efficacy of reovirus in canine MGTs in vitro and in vivo. Reovirus alone exerted significant cell death by means of caspase-dependent apoptosis in canine MGT cell lines. A single injection of reovirus impeded growth of canine MGT tumors in xenografted mice, but was insufficient to induce complete tumor regression. The second part of this study highlighted the anti-tumor effects of reovirus in combination with low doses of paclitaxel, carboplatin, gemcitabine, or toceranib. Enhanced synergistic activity was observed in the MGT cell line treated concomitantly with reovirus and in all the chemotherapeutic agents except toceranib. In addition, combining reovirus with paclitaxel or gemcitabine at half dosage of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) enhanced cytotoxicity by activating caspase 3. Our data suggest that the combination of reovirus and low dose chemotherapeutic agents provides an attractive option in canine cancer therapy. PMID:26733729

  6. Activation and characterization of the reovirus transcriptase: genetic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Drayna, D; Fields, B N

    1982-01-01

    We studied the ability of chymotrypsin to activate the transcriptases of the three serotypes of reovirus. When we used conditions that reproducibly caused the activation of type 3 transcriptase by chymotrypsin alone, type 2 transcriptase was sometimes activated, and type 1 transcriptase was never activated. Using intertypic recombinants containing various combinations of genome segments from reovirus types 3 and 1, we showed that the M2 segment determined this difference. Biochemical experiments indicated that the digestion of reovirus type 1 by chromotrypsin was blocked at an intermediate stage in uncoating. We found conditions which reproducibly activated the transcriptases of all three serotypes. This allowed us to compare the biochemical properties of the three transcriptases. Although the monovalent cation preferences, divalent cation preferences and optima, and temperature optima of type 1, 2, and 3 transcriptases were indistinguishable, the pH activity curves were reproducibly different. The largest difference was between type 2 and 3 transcriptases; the pH optimum of type 2 transcriptase was lower than the pH optimum of type 3 transcriptase. Using intertypic recombinants containing various combinations of genome segments from reovirus types 2 and 3, we demonstrated that the L1 segment specified this difference. Images PMID:7086953

  7. American woodcock (Scolopax minor) mortality associated with a reovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Converse, K.A.; Hansen, W.R.; Norman, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    A virus isolate associated with a 1989-90 die-off in American woodcock (Scolopax minor) was identified as a reovirus. Emaciation was a consistent necropsy finding in the woodcock involved in this die-off. This reovirus infection appeared to be systemic, had the potential for fecal-oral virus transmission, and was associated with deterioration of body condition. To our knowledge this is the first report of a virus isolate from wild American woodcock. A survey conducted in 1990-92 indicated that this virus was not present at detectable levels in the woodcock breeding and wintering population. /// Un virus asociado con la mortalidad de becadas o perdices americanas (Scolopax minor) en 1989-1990-fue identificado como reovirus. La emaciaci??n fue un resultado com??n a la necropsia de las aves que murieron. Esta infecci??n por reovirus pareci?? ser sist??mica, ten?-a el potencial de transmisi??n fecal-oral y estuvo asociada con el deterioro del ave. Creemos que este sea el primer reporte de aislamiento viral a partir de becadas americanas. Una encuesta hecha entre 1990 y 1992 indic?? que este virus no estaba presente en los niveles detectables en los reproductores y en las aves invernales.

  8. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470...

  13. Avian influenza

    MedlinePlus

    Bird flu; H5N1; H5N2; H5N8; H7N9; Avian influenza A (HPAI) H5 ... The first avian influenza in humans was reported in Hong Kong in 1997. It was called avian influenza (H5N1). The outbreak was linked ...

  14. Avian Astrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian astroviruses comprise a diverse group of viruses affecting many avian species and causing enteritis, hepatitis and nephritis. To date, six different astroviruses have been identified in avian species based on the species of origin and viral genome characteristics: two turkey-origin astroviru...

  15. Avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) is a viral infection of birds that varies in severity from asymptomatic infections to mild respiratory and reproductive diseases to an acute, highly fatal systemic disease of chickens, turkeys, guinea fowls, and other avian species. Avian influenza viruses are divided into two ...

  16. Virion Structure of Baboon Reovirus, a Fusogenic Orthoreovirus That Lacks an Adhesion Fiber ▿

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaodong; Parent, Kristin N.; Goodman, Russell P.; Tang, Jinghua; Shou, Jingyun; Nibert, Max L.; Duncan, Roy; Baker, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Baboon reovirus (BRV) is a member of the fusogenic subgroup of orthoreoviruses. Unlike most other members of its genus, BRV lacks S-segment coding sequences for the outer fiber protein that binds to cell surface receptors. It shares this lack with aquareoviruses, which constitute a related genus and are also fusogenic. We used electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction to determine the BRV virion structure at 9.0-Å resolution. The results show that BRV lacks a protruding fiber at its icosahedral 5-fold axes or elsewhere. The results also show that BRV is like nonfusogenic mammalian and fusogenic avian orthoreoviruses in having 150 copies of the core clamp protein, not 120 as in aquareoviruses. On the other hand, there are no hub-and-spoke complexes attributable to the outer shell protein in the P2 and P3 solvent channels of BRV, which makes BRV like fusogenic avian orthoreoviruses and aquareoviruses but unlike nonfusogenic mammalian orthoreoviruses. The outermost “flap” domains of the BRV core turret protein appear capable of conformational variability within the virion, a trait previously unseen among other ortho- and aquareoviruses. New cDNA sequence determinations for the BRV L1 and M2 genome segments, encoding the core turret and outer shell proteins, were helpful for interpreting the structural features of those proteins. Based on these findings, we conclude that the evolution of ortho- and aquareoviruses has included a series of discrete gains or losses of particular components, several of which cross taxonomic boundaries. Gain or loss of adhesion fibers is one of several common themes in double-stranded RNA virus evolution. PMID:21593159

  17. Reovirus genomes from plant-feeding insects represent a newly discovered lineage within the family Reoviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A complex set of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) was isolated from threecornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus), a plant-feeding hemipteran pest. A subset of these dsRNAs constitute the genome of a new reovirus, provisionally designated Spissistilus festinus reovirus (SpFRV). SpFRV was prese...

  18. The oncolytic effects of reovirus in canine solid tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    IGASE, Masaya; HWANG, Chung Chew; COFFEY, Matt; OKUDA, Masaru; NOGUCHI, Shunsuke; MIZUNO, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a new strategy for cancer treatment for humans and dogs. Reovirus has been proven to be a potent oncolytic virus in human medicine. Our laboratory has previously reported that canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma were susceptible to reovirus. In this study, canine solid tumor cell lines (mammary gland tumor, osteosarcoma and malignant melanoma) were tested to determine their susceptibility towards reovirus. We demonstrated that reovirus induces more than 50% cell death in three canine mammary gland tumors and one canine malignant melanoma cell line. The reovirus-induced cell death occurred via the activation of caspase 3. Ras activation has been shown to be one of the important mechanisms of reovirus-susceptibility in human cancers. However, Ras activation was not related to the reovirus-susceptibility in canine solid tumor cell lines, which was similar to reports in canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma. The results of this study highly suggest that canine mammary gland tumor and canine malignant melanoma are also potential candidates for reovirus therapy in veterinary oncology. PMID:25648933

  19. The oncolytic effects of reovirus in canine solid tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Igase, Masaya; Hwang, Chung Chew; Coffey, Matt; Okuda, Masaru; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Mizuno, Takuya

    2015-05-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a new strategy for cancer treatment for humans and dogs. Reovirus has been proven to be a potent oncolytic virus in human medicine. Our laboratory has previously reported that canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma were susceptible to reovirus. In this study, canine solid tumor cell lines (mammary gland tumor, osteosarcoma and malignant melanoma) were tested to determine their susceptibility towards reovirus. We demonstrated that reovirus induces more than 50% cell death in three canine mammary gland tumors and one canine malignant melanoma cell line. The reovirus-induced cell death occurred via the activation of caspase 3. Ras activation has been shown to be one of the important mechanisms of reovirus-susceptibility in human cancers. However, Ras activation was not related to the reovirus-susceptibility in canine solid tumor cell lines, which was similar to reports in canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma. The results of this study highly suggest that canine mammary gland tumor and canine malignant melanoma are also potential candidates for reovirus therapy in veterinary oncology. PMID:25648933

  20. Oncolytic reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cells, and synergizes with irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Radhashree; Seetharam, Raviraja; Tesfa, Lydia; Augustine, Titto A.; Klampfer, Lidija; Coffey, Matthew C.; Mariadason, John M.; Goel, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Reovirus is a double stranded RNA virus, with an intrinsic preference for replication in KRAS mutant cells. As 45% of human colorectal cancers (CRC) harbor KRAS mutations, we sought to investigate its efficacy in KRAS mutant CRC cells, and examine its impact in combination with the topoisimerase-1 inhibitor, irinotecan. Reovirus efficacy was examined in the KRAS mutant HCT116, and the isogenic KRAS WT Hke3 cell line, and in the non-malignant rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and TUNEL staining. Combination treatment with reovirus and irintoecan was investigated in 15 CRC cell lines, including the HCT116 p21 isogenic cell lines. Reovirus preferentially induced apoptosis in KRAS mutant HCT116 cells compared to its isogenic KRAS WT derivative, and in KRAS mutant IEC cells. Reovirus showed a greater degree of caspase 3 activation with PARP 1 cleavage, and preferential inhibition of p21 protein expression in KRAS mutant cells. Reovirus synergistically induced growth inhibition when combined with irinotecan. This synergy was lost upon p21 gene knock out. Reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colon cancer cells. Reovirus and irinotecan combination therapy is synergistic, p21 mediated, and represents a novel potential treatment for patients with CRC. PMID:24798549

  1. Oncolytic reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cells, and synergizes with irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Radhashree; Seetharam, Raviraja; Tesfa, Lydia; Augustine, Titto A; Klampfer, Lidija; Coffey, Matthew C; Mariadason, John M; Goel, Sanjay

    2014-05-15

    Reovirus is a double stranded RNA virus, with an intrinsic preference for replication in KRAS mutant cells. As 45% of human colorectal cancers (CRC) harbor KRAS mutations, we sought to investigate its efficacy in KRAS mutant CRC cells, and examine its impact in combination with the topoisimerase-1 inhibitor, irinotecan. Reovirus efficacy was examined in the KRAS mutant HCT116, and the isogenic KRAS WT Hke3 cell line, and in the non-malignant rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and TUNEL staining. Combination treatment with reovirus and irintoecan was investigated in 15 CRC cell lines, including the HCT116 p21 isogenic cell lines. Reovirus preferentially induced apoptosis in KRAS mutant HCT116 cells compared to its isogenic KRAS WT derivative, and in KRAS mutant IEC cells. Reovirus showed a greater degree of caspase 3 activation with PARP 1 cleavage, and preferential inhibition of p21 protein expression in KRAS mutant cells. Reovirus synergistically induced growth inhibition when combined with irinotecan. This synergy was lost upon p21 gene knock out. Reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colon cancer cells. Reovirus and irinotecan combination therapy is synergistic, p21 mediated, and represents a novel potential treatment for patients with CRC. PMID:24798549

  2. A Compact, Multifunctional Fusion Module Directs Cholesterol-Dependent Homomultimerization and Syncytiogenic Efficiency of Reovirus p10 FAST Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Key, Tim; Duncan, Roy

    2014-01-01

    The homologous p10 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) proteins of the avian (ARV) and Nelson Bay (NBV) reoviruses are the smallest known viral membrane fusion proteins, and are virulence determinants of the fusogenic reoviruses. The small size of FAST proteins is incompatible with the paradigmatic membrane fusion pathway proposed for enveloped viral fusion proteins. Understanding how these diminutive viral fusogens mediate the complex process of membrane fusion is therefore of considerable interest, from both the pathogenesis and mechanism-of-action perspectives. Using chimeric ARV/NBV p10 constructs, the 36–40-residue ectodomain was identified as the major determinant of the differing fusion efficiencies of these homologous p10 proteins. Extensive mutagenic analysis determined the ectodomain comprises two distinct, essential functional motifs. Syncytiogenesis assays, thiol-specific surface biotinylation, and liposome lipid mixing assays identified an ∼25-residue, N-terminal motif that dictates formation of a cystine loop fusion peptide in both ARV and NBV p10. Surface immunofluorescence staining, FRET analysis and cholesterol depletion/repletion studies determined the cystine loop motif is connected through a two-residue linker to a 13-residue membrane-proximal ectodomain region (MPER). The MPER constitutes a second, independent motif governing reversible, cholesterol-dependent assembly of p10 multimers in the plasma membrane. Results further indicate that: (1) ARV and NBV homomultimers segregate to distinct, cholesterol-dependent microdomains in the plasma membrane; (2) p10 homomultimerization and cholesterol-dependent microdomain localization are co-dependent; and (3) the four juxtamembrane MPER residues present in the multimerization motif dictate species-specific microdomain association and homomultimerization. The p10 ectodomain therefore constitutes a remarkably compact, multifunctional fusion module that directs syncytiogenic efficiency and

  3. Avian Metapneumoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is an economically important virus that is the primary causal agent of turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT), also known as avian rhinotracheitis (ART). The virus causes an acute highly contagious infection of the upper respiratory tract in turkeys and was first isolated from tur...

  4. Gene expression in the brain during reovirus encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kenneth L; Leser, J Smith; Phang, Tzu L; Clarke, Penny

    2010-01-01

    Viral encephalitis remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. We performed microarray analysis to identify genes and pathways that are differentially regulated during reovirus encephalitis and that may provide novel therapeutic targets for virus-induced diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). An increase in the expression of 130 cellular genes was found in the brains of reovirus-infected mice at early times post infection, compared to mock-infected controls. The up-regulation of these genes was consistent with activation of innate immune responses, particularly interferon signaling. At later times post infection, when significant CNS injury is present and mice exhibit signs of severe neurologic disease, many more (1374) genes were up-regulated, indicating that increased gene expression correlates with disease pathology. Virus-induced gene expression at late times post infection was again consistent with the activation of innate immune responses. However, additional significant pathways included those associated with cytokine signaling and apoptosis, both of which can contribute to CNS injury. This is the first report comparing virus-induced cellular gene and pathway regulation at early and late times following virus infection of the brain. The shift of virus-induced gene expression from innate immune responses at early times post infection to cytokine signaling and apoptosis at later times suggests a potential therapeutic strategy that preserves early protective responses whilst inhibiting later responses that contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:20158406

  5. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  6. Molecular Interaction Studies of HIV-1 Matrix Protein p17 and Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Bugatti, Antonella; Giagulli, Cinzia; Urbinati, Chiara; Caccuri, Francesca; Chiodelli, Paola; Oreste, Pasqua; Fiorentini, Simona; Orro, Alessandro; Milanesi, Luciano; D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Caruso, Arnaldo; Rusnati, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Once released by HIV+ cells, p17 binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and CXCR1 on leukocytes causing their dysfunction. By exploiting an approach integrating computational modeling, site-directed mutagenesis of p17, chemical desulfation of heparin, and surface plasmon resonance, we characterized the interaction of p17 with heparin, a HSPG structural analog, and CXCR1. p17 binds to heparin with an affinity (Kd = 190 nm) that is similar to those of other heparin-binding viral proteins. Two stretches of basic amino acids (basic motifs) are present in p17 N and C termini. Neutralization (Arg→Ala substitution) of the N-terminal, but not of the C-terminal basic motif, causes the loss of p17 heparin-binding capacity. The N-terminal heparin-binding motif of p17 partially overlaps the CXCR1-binding domain. Accordingly, its neutralization prevents also p17 binding to the chemochine receptor. Competition experiments demonstrated that free heparin and heparan sulfate (HS), but not selectively 2-O-, 6-O-, and N-O desulfated heparins, prevent p17 binding to substrate-immobilized heparin, indicating that the sulfate groups of the glycosaminoglycan mediate p17 interaction. Evaluation of the p17 antagonist activity of a panel of biotechnological heparins derived by chemical sulfation of the Escherichia coli K5 polysaccharide revealed that the highly N,O-sulfated derivative prevents the binding of p17 to both heparin and CXCR1, thus inhibiting p17-driven chemotactic migration of human monocytes with an efficiency that is higher than those of heparin and HS. Here, we characterized at a molecular level the interaction of p17 with its cellular receptors, laying the basis for the development of heparin-mimicking p17 antagonists. PMID:23166320

  7. Avian Influenza

    MedlinePlus

    ... infectious viral disease of birds. Most avian influenza viruses do not infect humans; however some, such as ... often causing no apparent signs of illness. AI viruses can sometimes spread to domestic poultry and cause ...

  8. Avian Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Kuykendoll, K.; Rhew, R.; Jones, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the avian wing geometry (Seagull, Merganser, Teal and Owl) extracted from non-contact surface measurements using a three-dimensional laser scanner. The geometric quantities, including the camber line and thickness distribution of airfoil, wing planform, chord distribution, and twist distribution, are given in convenient analytical expressions. Thus, the avian wing surfaces can be generated and the wing kinematics can be simulated. The aerodynamic characteristics of avian airfoils in steady inviscid flows are briefly discussed. The avian wing kinematics is recovered from videos of three level-flying birds (Crane, Seagull and Goose) based on a two-jointed arm model. A flapping seagull wing in the 3D physical space is re-constructed from the extracted wing geometry and kinematics.

  9. Avian Flu

    SciTech Connect

    Eckburg, Paul

    2006-11-06

    Since 2003, a severe form of H5N1 avian influenza has rapidly spread throughout Asia and Europe, infecting over 200 humans in 10 countries. The spread of H5N1 virus from person-to-person has been rare, thus preventing the emergence of a widespread pandemic. However, this ongoing epidemic continues to pose an important public health threat. Avian flu and its pandemic potential in humans will be discussed.

  10. Avian botulism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Milton; Locke, Louis N.; Kennelly, James J.

    1985-01-01

    What is avian botulism? Avian botulism, or Western duck sickness, is one of the three most important disease problems of wild migratory birds. Each year, many birds are paralyzed or die after exposure to a toxin produced by the botulinum bacterium. Two of the seven toxin types that have been identifies cause mortality in wild birds; one of these types, type C, is most often associated with dieoffs of ducks, while type E primarily affects gulls and loons.

  11. The GM2 Glycan Serves as a Functional Coreceptor for Serotype 1 Reovirus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Blaum, Bärbel S.; Reiter, Dirk M.; Feizi, Ten; Dermody, Terence S.; Stehle, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Viral attachment to target cells is the first step in infection and also serves as a determinant of tropism. Like many viruses, mammalian reoviruses bind with low affinity to cell-surface carbohydrate receptors to initiate the infectious process. Reoviruses disseminate with serotype-specific tropism in the host, which may be explained by differential glycan utilization. Although α2,3-linked sialylated oligosaccharides serve as carbohydrate receptors for type 3 reoviruses, neither a specific glycan bound by any reovirus serotype nor the function of glycan binding in type 1 reovirus infection was known. We have identified the oligosaccharide portion of ganglioside GM2 (the GM2 glycan) as a receptor for the attachment protein σ1 of reovirus strain type 1 Lang (T1L) using glycan array screening. The interaction of T1L σ1 with GM2 in solution was confirmed using NMR spectroscopy. We established that GM2 glycan engagement is required for optimal infection of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by T1L. Preincubation with GM2 specifically inhibited type 1 but not type 3 reovirus infection of MEFs. To provide a structural basis for these observations, we defined the mode of receptor recognition by determining the crystal structure of T1L σ1 in complex with the GM2 glycan. GM2 binds in a shallow groove in the globular head domain of T1L σ1. Both terminal sugar moieties of the GM2 glycan, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-acetylgalactosamine, form contacts with the protein, providing an explanation for the observed specificity for GM2. Viruses with mutations in the glycan-binding domain display diminished hemagglutination capacity, a property dependent on glycan binding, and reduced capacity to infect MEFs. Our results define a novel mode of virus-glycan engagement and provide a mechanistic explanation for the serotype-dependent differences in glycan utilization by reovirus. PMID:23236285

  12. Synergistic cytotoxicity of oncolytic reovirus in combination with cisplatin–paclitaxel doublet chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roulstone, V; Twigger, K; Zaidi, S; Pencavel, T; Kyula, JN; White, C; McLaughlin, M; Seth, R; Karapanagiotou, EM; Mansfield, D; Coffey, M; Nuovo, G; Vile, RG; Pandha, HS; Melcher, AA; Harrington, KJ

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic reovirus is currently under active investigation in a range of tumour types. Early phase studies have shown that this agent has modest monotherapy efficacy and its future development is likely to focus on combination regimens with cytotoxic chemotherapy. Indeed, phase I/II clinical trials have confirmed that reovirus can be safely combined with cytotoxic drugs, including a platin—taxane doublet regimen, which is currently being tested in a phase III clinical trial in patients with relapsed/metastatic head and neck cancer. Therefore, we have tested this triple (reovirus, cisplatin, paclitaxel) combination therapy in a panel of four head and neck cancer cell lines. Using the combination index (CI) method, the triple therapy demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro in both malignant and non-malignant cell lines. In head and neck cancer cell lines, this was associated with enhanced caspase 3 and 7 cleavage, but no increase in viral replication. In vitro analyses confirmed colocalisation of markers of reovirus infection and caspase 3. Triple therapy was significantly more effective than reovirus or cisplatin—paclitaxel in athymic nude mice. These data suggest that the combination of reovirus plus platin—taxane doublet chemotherapy has significant activity in head and neck cancer and underpin the current phase III study in this indication. PMID:22895509

  13. All reovirus subtypes show oncolytic potential in primary cells of human high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Alloussi, S H; Alkassar, M; Urbschat, S; Graf, N; Gärtner, B

    2011-09-01

    Reoviridae are non-human pathogenic viruses. The family of reoviridae consists of 4 different subtypes. Many studies have proven that the Dearing subtype 3 has oncolytic potential. This potential is related to the RAS protein expression in tumour cells. The aim of this study, was to investigate whether all reovirus subtypes have oncolytic potential and whether there are differences in their efficacy, in particular for high-grade glioma. To evaluate the oncolytic potential, we performed an in vitro head-to-head study for all reovirus subtypes in 5 primary cell cultures of high-grade gliomas. The oncolytic activity was determined using end-point titration with observation of the cytopathogenic effect. For measurement of RAS activity, we performed an immunofluorescent detection stain on all cell cultures. For quantification of the virus, an RT-PCR measurement for all subtypes was performed. All reovirus subtypes showed oncolytic activity in the observed glioma biopsies. These observations correlated with RAS overexpression in the observed cells. All glioma biopsies overexpressed the RAS protein. The quantitative oncolytic potential differed in relation to the single observed cell culture and in relation to the chosen reovirus subtype. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing oncolytic activity for all reovirus subtypes. We show the relationship and correlation between RAS protein overexpression and vulnerability of cells to reovirus. Efficacy of the different subtypes is interindividually different and cannot be forecast. PMID:21637921

  14. REOVIRUS: A TARGETED THERAPEUTIC – PROGRESS AND POTENTIAL

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Radhashree; Ghalib, Mohammad H.; Goel, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Medical therapy of patients with malignancy requires a paradigm shift through development of new drugs with a good safety record and novel mechanisms of activity. While there is no dearth of such molecules, one particular agent, “reovirus” is promising by its ability to target cancer cells with aberrant signaling pathways. This double stranded RNA virus has been therapeutically formulated and has rapidly progressed from pre-clinical validation of anti cancer activity to a phase III registration study in platinum refractory metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. During this process, reovirus has demonstrated safety both as a single agent when administered intratumorally and intravenously, as well as in combination therapy, with multiple chemotherapeutics such as gemcitabine, carboplatin/paclitaxel, and docetaxel; and similarly with radiation. The scientific rationale for its development as an anticancer agent stems from the fact that it preferentially replicates in and induces lyses of cells with an activated Kras pathway. As documented in many previous studies, the initial observation of greater tropism in Kras compromised situation might certainly not be the sole and possibly not even the predominant reason for enhanced virulence. All the same, scientists have emphasized on Kras optimistically due to its high prevalence in various types of cancers. Incidence of Kras mutation has been found to be highest in pancreatic cancer (85–90%) followed by colorectal (35–45%) and lung (25–30%). Reovirus, in fact has the potential not only as a therapy but also as a tool to unravel the aberrant cellular pathway leading to carcinogenicity. PMID:23038811

  15. Reovirus prolongs survival and reduces the frequency of spinal and leptomeningeal metastases from medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen Qing; Senger, Donna; Muzik, Huong; Shi, Zhong Qiao; Johnson, Denise; Brasher, Penny M A; Rewcastle, N Barry; Hamilton, Mark; Rutka, Jim; Wolff, Johannes; Wetmore, Cynthia; Curran, Tom; Lee, Patrick W K; Forsyth, Peter A

    2003-06-15

    Medulloblastoma (MB), the most common pediatric brain tumor, is a highly malignant disease with a 5-year survival rate of only 60%. Tumor cells invade surrounding tissue and disseminate through cerebral spinal fluid, making treatment difficult. Human reovirus type 3 exploits an activated Ras pathway in tumor cells to support productive infection as an oncolytic virus. Here, we examined the ability of human reovirus to kill MB cells lines and surgical specimens in vitro and inhibit tumor growth/metastases in vivo. Most human MB cell lines tested (five of seven = 71.4%), two MB cell lines derived from spontaneously arising tumors in Patched-1(+/-) mice (two of two = 100%) and three MB primary cultures derived from surgical specimens, were susceptible to reovirus infection. Reovirus was internalized and transcribed in both susceptible and resistant cell lines. However, viral protein synthesis was restricted to cell lines with higher levels of activated Ras, suggesting that Ras plays a critical role in reovirus oncolysis in MB. Using an in vivo Daoy orthotopic animal model, we found that a single i.t. injection of reovirus dramatically prolonged survival compared with controls (160 versus 70 days, respectively; P = 0.0003). Repeating this experiment with GFP-labeled Daoy cells and multiple i.t. administrations of reovirus, we again found prolonged survival and a dramatic reduction in spinal and leptomeningeal metastases (66.7% in control injections versus 0.0% in the live virus group). These data suggest that this oncolytic virus may be a potentially effective novel therapy against human MB. Its ability to reduce metastases to the spinal cord could allow a reduction in the dose/field of total neuroaxis cerebral-spinal radiotherapy currently used to treat/prevent cerebral spinal fluid dissemination. PMID:12810644

  16. Avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural host for avian influenza virus (AIV) is in wild birds, including ducks, gulls, and shorebirds, where the virus causes primarily an enteric infection with little disease. However, AIV can infect a wide variety of host species, and with a certain level of adaptation for the aberrant host ...

  17. Avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses infect domestic poultry and wild birds. In domestic poultry, AI viruses are typically of low pathogenicity (LP) causing subclinical infections, respiratory disease or drops in egg production. However, a few AI viruses cause severe systemic disease with high mortality; i....

  18. AVIAN INFLUENZA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian Influenza (AI) viruses infect domestic poultry and wild birds. In domestic poultry, AI viruses are typically of low pathogenicity (LP) causing subclinical infections, respiratory disease or drops in egg production. However, a few AI viruses cause severe systemic disease with high mortality; ...

  19. AVIAN IMMUNOTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods for studying the avian immune system have matured during the past two decades, with laboratory studies predominating in earlier years and field studies being conducted only in the past decade. One application has been to determine the potential for environmental contamina...

  20. Spissistilus festinus reovirus: a novel, unassigned species of the family Reoviridae infecting the three-cornered alfalfa hopper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A complex set of double stranded RNAs (dsRNA) were isolated from threecornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus), a plant-feeding hemipteran insect pest. A subset of these dsRNAs constitute the genome of a novel, unassigned reovirus designated as Spissistilus festinus reovirus (SpFRV). Phylogen...

  1. Daxx Upregulation within the Cytoplasm of Reovirus-Infected Cells Is Mediated by Interferon and Contributes to Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Kalen R.; Zhuang, Yonghua; Leser, J. Smith; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    Reovirus infection is a well-characterized experimental system for the study of viral pathogenesis and antiviral immunity within the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously shown that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and the Fas death receptor each play a role in neuronal apoptosis occurring in reovirus-infected brains. Death-associated protein 6 (Daxx) is a cellular protein that mechanistically links Fas signaling to JNK signaling in several models of apoptosis. In the present study, we demonstrate that Daxx is upregulated in reovirus-infected brain tissue through a type I interferon-mediated mechanism. Daxx upregulation is limited to brain regions that undergo reovirus-induced apoptosis and occurs in the cytoplasm and nucleus of neurons. Cytoplasmic Daxx is present in Fas-expressing cells during reovirus encephalitis, suggesting a role for Daxx in Fas-mediated apoptosis following reovirus infection. Further, in vitro expression of a dominant negative form of Daxx (DN-Daxx), which binds to Fas but which does not transmit downstream signaling, inhibits apoptosis of reovirus-infected cells. In contrast, in vitro depletion of Daxx results in increased expression of caspase 3 and apoptosis, suggesting that Daxx plays an antiapoptotic role in the nucleus. Overall, these data imply a regulatory role for Daxx in reovirus-induced apoptosis, depending on its location in the nucleus or cytoplasm. PMID:23302889

  2. T-2 toxin impairs murine immune response to respiratory reovirus and exacerbates viral bronchiolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Maoxiang; Harkema, Jack R.; Islam, Zahidul; Cuff, Chistopher F.; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: Pestka@msu.edu

    2006-11-15

    Exposure to immunosuppressive environmental contaminants is a possible contributing factor to increased occurrence of viral respiratory diseases. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the trichothecene mycotoxin T-2 toxin (T-2), a frequent food contaminant, alters host resistance to lung infection by reovirus, a model respiratory virus. Balb/c mice (4 week old) were treated intraperitoneally with T-2 toxin (1.75 mg/kg bw) or saline vehicle and then intranasally instilled 2 h later with 10{sup 7} plaque forming unit (PFU) of reovirus, strain Lang (T1/L) or saline vehicle. At 10 days post-instillation (PI), both virus plaque-forming responses and reovirus L2 gene expression were 10-fold higher in lungs of T-2-treated mice compared to controls. No-effect and lowest-effect levels for T-2-induced suppression of reovirus clearance were 20 and 200 {mu}g/kg bw, respectively. Respiratory reovirus infection resulted in a mild bronchiolitis with minimal alveolitis, which was markedly exacerbated by T-2 pretreatment. Reovirus exposure induced marked increases in total cells, neutrophils and lymphocytes at 3 and 7 days PI in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) whereas macrophages were increased only at 7 days PI. Although prior T-2 exposure attenuated total cell and macrophage counts in BALF of control and infected mice at 3 days PI, the toxin potentiated total cell, macrophage, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in infected mice at 7 days PI. At 3 days PI, T-2 suppressed reovirus-induced IFN-{gamma} elevation in BALF, but enhanced production of IL-6 and MCP-1. T-2 pretreatment also suppressed reovirus-specific mucosal IgA responses in lung and enteric tract, but potentiated serum IgA and IgG responses. Taken together, T-2 increased lung viral burden, bronchopneumonia and pulmonary cellular infiltration in reovirus-infected mice. These effects might be attributable to reduced alveolar macrophage levels as well as modulated cytokine and mucosal Ig

  3. Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A Is Required for Hematogenous Dissemination of Reovirus

    PubMed Central

    Antar, Annukka A. R.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Campbell, Jacquelyn A.; Henry, Rachel A.; Perdigoto, Ana L.; Carter, Bruce D.; Pozzi, Ambra; Abel, Ty W.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Diverse families of viruses bind immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) proteins located in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions of epithelium and endothelium. However, little is known about the roles of these receptors in the pathogenesis of viral disease. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is an IgSF protein that localizes to TJs and serves as a receptor for mammalian reovirus. We inoculated wild-type (wt) and isogenic JAM-A−/− mice perorally with reovirus and found that JAM-A is dispensable for viral replication in the intestine but required for systemic dissemination. Reovirus replication in the brain and tropism for discrete neural regions are equivalent in wt and JAM-A−/− mice following intracranial inoculation, suggesting a function for JAM-A in reovirus spread to extra-intestinal sites. JAM-A promotes reovirus infection of endothelial cells, providing a conduit for the virus into the bloodstream. These findings indicate that a broadly expressed IgSF viral receptor specifically mediates hematogenous dissemination in the host. PMID:19154988

  4. A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Crameri, Gary; Hyatt, Alex; Yu, Meng; Tompang, Mohd Rosli; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer; Crameri, Sandra; Kumarasamy, Verasingam; Eaton, Bryan T.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory infections constitute the most widespread human infectious disease, and a substantial proportion of them are caused by unknown etiological agents. Reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were first isolated from humans in the early 1950s and so named because they were not associated with any known disease. Here, we report a previously unknown reovirus (named “Melaka virus”) isolated from a 39-year-old male patient in Melaka, Malaysia, who was suffering from high fever and acute respiratory disease at the time of virus isolation. Two of his family members developed similar symptoms ≈1 week later and had serological evidence of infection with the same virus. Epidemiological tracing revealed that the family was exposed to a bat in the house ≈1 week before the onset of the father's clinical symptoms. Genome sequence analysis indicated a close genetic relationship between Melaka virus and Pulau virus, a reovirus isolated in 1999 from fruit bats in Tioman Island, Malaysia. Screening of sera collected from human volunteers on the island revealed that 14 of 109 (13%) were positive for both Pulau and Melaka viruses. This is the first report of an orthoreovirus in association with acute human respiratory diseases. Melaka virus is serologically not related to the different types of mammalian reoviruses that were known to infect humans asymptomatically. These data indicate that bat-borne reoviruses can be transmitted to and cause clinical diseases in humans. PMID:17592121

  5. Development of an antigen-capture ELISA for the detection of avian leukosis virus p27 antigen.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bingling; Li, Delong; Zhu, Haibo; Liu, Wen; Qin, Liting; Liu, Zaisi; Wu, Guan; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2013-02-01

    An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (AC-ELISA) employing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against p27 was developed for the detection of the avian leukosis virus (ALV). The specificity of the optimized AC-ELISA was evaluated using avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), avian leukosis virus subgroup A (ALV-A), avian leukosis virus subgroup B (ALV-B), avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Marek's disease virus (MDV), avian infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Fowlpox virus (FPV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), avian reovirus (ARV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), avian influenza virus (AIV) and Escherichia coli. The only specimens that yielded a strong signal were ALV-J, ALV-A and ALV-B, indicating that this assay is suitable for the detection of ALV. The limit of detection of this assay was 1.25 ng/ml of rp27 protein and 10(1.79)TCID(50) units of HLJ09MDJ-1 (ALV-J). Moreover, this AC-ELISA can detect ALV in cloacal swabs of chickens experimentally infected as early as 12 days post-infection. The AC-ELISA detected the virus in the albumin and cloacal swabs of naturally infected chickens, and the results were confirmed by PCR, indicating that the AC-ELISA was a suitable method for the detection of ALV. This test is rapid and sensitive and could be convenient for epidemiological studies and eradication programs. PMID:23201286

  6. Avian Influenza.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Gary Adam; Maslow, Melanie Jane

    2005-05-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate more than 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantining, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent an increase in human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short-interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems, offer promise should a pandemic occur. PMID:15847721

  7. Avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Gary A; Maslow, Melanie J

    2006-03-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004 alone, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate over 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantines, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent increased human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short, interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems offer promise, should a pandemic occur. PMID:16566867

  8. Sigma 1 protein of mammalian reoviruses extends from the surfaces of viral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, D.B.; Nibert, M.L.; Fields, B.N.

    1988-01-01

    Electron microscopy revealed structures consisting of long fibers topped with knobs extending from the surfaces of virions of mammalian reoviruses. The morphology of these structures was reminiscent of the fiber protein of adenovirus. Fibers were also seen extending from the reovirus top component and intermediate subviral particles but not from cores, suggesting that the fibers consist of either the ..mu..1C or sigma1 outer capsid protein. Amino acid sequence analysis predicts that the reovirus cell attachment protein sigma1 contains an extended fiber domain. When sigma1 protein was released from viral particles with mild heat and subsequently obtained in isolation, it was found to have a morphology identical to that of the fiber structures seen extending from the viral particles. The identification of an extended form of sigma1 has important implications for its function in cell attachment. Other evidence suggest that sigma1 protein may occur in virions in both an extended and an unextended state.

  9. Oncolytic reovirus induces intracellular redistribution of Ras to promote apoptosis and progeny virus release.

    PubMed

    Garant, K A; Shmulevitz, M; Pan, L; Daigle, R M; Ahn, D-G; Gujar, S A; Lee, P W K

    2016-02-11

    Reovirus is a naturally oncolytic virus that preferentially replicates in Ras-transformed cells and is currently undergoing clinical trials as a cancer therapeutic. Ras transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by enhancing virion disassembly during entry, viral progeny production, and virus release through apoptosis; however, the mechanism behind the latter is not well understood. Here, we show that reovirus alters the intracellular location of oncogenic Ras to induce apoptosis of H-RasV12-transformed fibroblasts. Reovirus infection decreases Ras palmitoylation levels and causes accumulation of Ras in the Golgi through Golgi fragmentation. With the Golgi being the site of Ras palmitoylation, treatment of target cells with the palmitoylation inhibitor, 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), prompts a greater accumulation of H-RasV12 in the Golgi, and a dose-dependent increase in progeny virus release and subsequent spread. Conversely, tethering H-RasV12 to the plasma membrane (thereby preventing its movement to the Golgi) allows for efficient virus production, but results in basal levels of reovirus-induced cell death. Analysis of Ras downstream signaling reveals that cells expressing cycling H-RasV12 have elevated levels of phosphorylated JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase), and that Ras retained at the Golgi body by 2BP increases activation of the MEKK1/MKK4/JNK signaling pathway to promote cell death. Collectively, our data suggest that reovirus induces Golgi fragmentation of target cells, and the subsequent accumulation of oncogenic Ras in the Golgi body initiates apoptotic signaling events required for virus release and spread. PMID:25961930

  10. The pathogenicity of novel duck reovirus in Cherry Valley ducks.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Wang, Yao; Wang, Youling; Yu, Kexiang; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie

    2016-08-30

    The novel duck reovirus (NDRV) is an emerging, contagious infection. To better realize the pathogenic mechanism of NDRV in ducks, an infection experiment was conducted. The resulting data demonstrated that typical gross lesions were observed in the infected ducks. NDRV was able to replicate in various tissues, leading to these pathological lesions, especially on the liver and spleen. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that the expression of most innate immune-related genes was up-regulated and the antiviral innate immune response could be established in both the liver and spleen. This study indicates that NDRV is a pantropic virus. To resist viral infection, several pathogen recognition receptors can cooperatively recognize NDRV and initiate innate immunity, but the responses are different between different tissues. As far as we know, this is the first systematic investigation of the pathogenicity of NDRV in Cherry Valley ducks based on the host's innate immunity, and these data will provide new insights into the further study of the disease. PMID:27527781

  11. Dissolving mechanism of strain P17 on insoluble phosphorus of yellow-brown soil.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chuan-qing; Cao, Guang-xiang; Huang, Wei-yi; Luan, Xing-she; Yang, Yi-fei

    2014-01-01

    Strain P17 was a bacterial strain identified as Bacillus megaterium isolated from ground accumulating phosphate rock powder. The fermentation broth of strain P17 and the yellow-brown soil from Nanjing Agricultural University garden were collected to conduct this study. The simulation of fixed insoluble phosphorous forms after applying calcium superphosphate into yellow-brown soil was performed in pots, while available P and total P of soil were extremely positive correlative with those of groundwater. Then the dissolving effect of strain P17 on insoluble P of yellow-brown soil was studied. Results showed that Bacillus megaterium strain P17 had notable solubilizing effect on insoluble phosphates formed when too much water-soluble phosphorous fertilizer used. During 100 days after inoculation, strain P17 was dominant. Until the 120th day, compared with water addition, available P of strain P17 inoculation treated soil increased by 3 times with calcium superphosphate addition. Besides available P, pH, activity of acid and alkaline phosphatase and population of P-solubilizing microbes were detected respectively. P-solubilizing mechanism of P-solubilizing bacteria strain P17 seems to be a synergetic effect of pH decrease, organic acids, phosphatase, etc. PMID:25477929

  12. Dissolving mechanism of strain P17 on insoluble phosphorus of yellow-brown soil

    PubMed Central

    Chuan-qing, Zhong; Guang-xiang, Cao; Wei-yi, Huang; Xing-she, Luan; Yi-fei, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Strain P17 was a bacterial strain identified as Bacillus megaterium isolated from ground accumulating phosphate rock powder. The fermentation broth of strain P17 and the yellow-brown soil from Nanjing Agricultural University garden were collected to conduct this study. The simulation of fixed insoluble phosphorous forms after applying calcium superphosphate into yellow-brown soil was performed in pots, while available P and total P of soil were extremely positive correlative with those of groundwater. Then the dissolving effect of strain P17 on insoluble P of yellow-brown soil was studied. Results showed that Bacillus megaterium strain P17 had notable solubilizing effect on insoluble phosphates formed when too much water-soluble phosphorous fertilizer used. During 100 days after inoculation, strain P17 was dominant. Until the 120th day, compared with water addition, available P of strain P17 inoculation treated soil increased by 3 times with calcium superphosphate addition. Besides available P, pH, activity of acid and alkaline phosphatase and population of P-solubilizing microbes were detected respectively. P-solubilizing mechanism of P-solubilizing bacteria strain P17 seems to be a synergetic effect of pH decrease, organic acids, phosphatase, etc. PMID:25477929

  13. Magnetic properties of cubic compound Ce6Ni6P17 with geometric frustrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, N.; Izumi, K.; Ono, H.; Yodono, S.; Nakano, T.

    2012-12-01

    We report the magnetic susceptibility and the low-temperature specific heat of Ce6Ni6P17 with geometric frustrations and La6Ni6P17 as a nonmagnetic counterpart. The magnetic susceptibility of Ce6Ni6P17 decreases monotonically with decreasing temperature and the specific heat shows a broad peak around 1.4K. The evaluated magnetic entropy is about a half of Rln2 at 5.0 K. This result suggests that the frustrations persist down to very low temperatures and the residual entropy originate from frustration is present.

  14. Combination Therapy With Reovirus and Anti-PD-1 Blockade Controls Tumor Growth Through Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Rajani, Karishma; Parrish, Christopher; Kottke, Timothy; Thompson, Jill; Zaidi, Shane; Ilett, Liz; Shim, Kevin G; Diaz, Rosa-Maria; Pandha, Hardev; Harrington, Kevin; Coffey, Matt; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Oncolytic reovirus can be delivered both systemically and intratumorally, in both preclinical models and in early phase clinical trials. Reovirus has direct oncolytic activity against a variety of tumor types and antitumor activity is directly associated with immune activation by virus replication in tumors. Immune mechanisms of therapy include both innate immune activation against virally infected tumor cells, and the generation of adaptive antitumor immune responses as a result of in vivo priming against tumor-associated antigens. We tested the combination of local oncolytic reovirus therapy with systemic immune checkpoint inhibition. We show that treatment of subcutaneous B16 melanomas with a combination of intravenous (i.v.) anti-PD-1 antibody and intratumoral (i.t.) reovirus significantly enhanced survival of mice compared to i.t. reovirus (P < 0.01) or anti-PD-1 therapy alone. In vitro immune analysis demonstrated that checkpoint inhibition improved the ability of NK cells to kill reovirus-infected tumor cells, reduced T(reg) activity, and increased the adaptive CD8(+) T-cell-dependent antitumor T-cell response. PD-1 blockade also enhanced the antiviral immune response but through effector mechanisms which overlapped with but also differed from those affecting the antitumor response. Therefore, combination with checkpoint inhibition represents a readily translatable next step in the clinical development of reovirus viroimmunotherapy. PMID:26310630

  15. Avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza, which is adapted to an avian host. Although avian influenza has been isolated from numerous avian species, the primary natural hosts for the virus are dabbling ducks, shorebirds, and gulls. The virus can be found world-wide in these species and in o...

  16. Structure-function studies of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein, p17.

    PubMed

    Cannon, P M; Matthews, S; Clark, N; Byles, E D; Iourin, O; Hockley, D J; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix protein, p17, plays important roles in both the early and late stages of the viral life cycle. Using our previously determined solution structure of p17, we have undertaken a rational mutagenesis program aimed at mapping structure-function relationships within the molecule. Amino acids hypothesized to be important for p17 function were mutated and examined for effect in an infectious proviral clone of HIV-1. In parallel, we analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy the structure of recombinant p17 protein containing such substitutions. These analyses identified three classes of mutants that were defective in viral replication: (i) proteins containing substitutions at internal residues that grossly distorted the structure of recombinant p17 and prevented viral particle formation, (ii) mutations at putative p17 trimer interfaces that allowed correct folding of recombinant protein but produced virus that was defective in particle assembly, and (iii) substitution of basic residues in helix A that caused some relocation of virus assembly to intracellular locations and produced normally budded virions that were completely noninfectious. PMID:9094619

  17. The HIV matrix protein p17 induces hepatic lipid accumulation via modulation of nuclear receptor transcriptoma

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Carino, Adriana; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; Chiara Monti, Maria; Del Sordo, Rachele; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease is the second most common cause of mortality in HIV-infected persons. Exactly how HIV infection per se affects liver disease progression is unknown. Here we have investigated mRNA expression of 49 nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and 35 transcriptional coregulators in HepG2 cells upon stimulation with the HIV matrix protein p17. This viral protein regulated mRNA expression of some NRs among which LXRα and its transcriptional co-activator MED1 were highly induced at mRNA level. Dissection of p17 downstream intracellular pathway demonstrated that p17 mediated activation of Jak/STAT signaling is responsible for the promoter dependent activation of LXR. The treatment of both HepG2 as well as primary hepatocytes with HIV p17 results in the transcriptional activation of LXR target genes (SREBP1c and FAS) and lipid accumulation. These effects are lost in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide as well as in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with the natural LXR antagonist gymnestrogenin. These results suggest that HIV p17 affects NRs and their related signal transduction thus contributing to the progression of liver disease in HIV infected patients. PMID:26469385

  18. Rethinking the Significance of Reovirus in Water and Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Walter Q; Gerba, Charles P

    2016-09-01

    The genus Orthoreovirus contains nonenveloped viruses with double-stranded gene segments encased in a double-layered icosahedral capsid shell. These features constitute major determinants of virion stability in the environment and virion resistance against physical and chemical agents. Reovirus (ReoV) is the general term most commonly used for all virus strains that infect humans and nonhuman animals. Several studies have demonstrated the frequent occurrence of ReoV in wastewaters and natural waters, including surface and ground waters from different geographical areas. Most of these studies have reported higher concentrations of ReoV than any other enteric virus analyzed. They are more commonly isolated in chlorine-disinfected wastewaters than other enteric viruses, and appear to survive longer in water. The ability of ReoV to form large aggregates, even with different types of enteric viruses (e.g., poliovirus) and their ability to undergo mechanisms of gene segment reassortment among different serotypes may also explain their greater stability. Different approaches have been applied for concentration of ReoV from water; however, the recovery efficiency of the filtration methods has not been fully evaluated. Recently, molecular methods for identification of ReoV strains and quantification of virus genome have been developed. Studies have shown that the overall detection sensitivity of ReoV RNA is enhanced through initial replication of infectious virions in cell culture. More studies are needed to specifically address unresolved issues about the fate and distribution of ReoV in the environment since this virus is not commonly included in virological investigations. PMID:27318494

  19. Astrovirus, reovirus and rotavirus concomitant infection causes decreased weight gain in broad-breasted white poults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turkey astrovirus type-2 (TAstV-2), turkey rotavirus (TRotV) and turkey reovirus (TReoV) were evaluated for pathogenesis in 3 day-old turkey poults in all possible combinations of one, two or three viruses. Body-weights were recorded at 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days post inoculation (PI) and were decreas...

  20. Transmission biology of Raspberry latent virus, a plant reovirus vectored by the aphid Amphorophora agathonica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry latent virus (RpLV) is a newly characterized reovirus found in commercial raspberry fields in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Phylogenetic analyses showed that RpLV is related most closely to Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV), the type member of the genus Oryzavirus. However, the conserved nucle...

  1. Mucosal and systemic immunity to intestinal reovirus infection in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Jonathan R; Cuff, Christopher F

    2004-09-01

    Systemic immunity is progressively impaired in aging, predisposing to morbidity and mortality from neoplasia and infectious disease. However, the effect of aging on mucosal immunity is controversial. To assess intestinal immunity in aging, young and aged mice were orally exposed to reovirus or cholera toxin (CT) and specific antibody and reovirus-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses were assessed. As previously reported, aged mice immunized orally with CT mounted diminished intestinal IgA responses to CT compared to young mice. In contrast, aged mice yielded two to three-fold more reovirus-specific IgA-producing cells in the Peyers's patches (PP) compared to young mice, and higher titers of reovirus-specific IgA in fragment culture supernatants. Cytotoxicity and CTL frequencies from aged mice were not different from those of young mice. Together, these results suggest a diminished potential for systemic and intestinal immunity to orally applied protein antigens in aging, but an intact ability to respond to intestinal virus infection. Infection with a replicating virus may induce inflammatory mediators and innate immune factors that potentiate the priming of mucosal immunity; overcoming aging related deficits otherwise observed following oral immunization with non-replicating antigens, and suggests the importance of antigen replication to antigen-specific immunotherapy strategies in the elderly. PMID:15489051

  2. Enteric reovirus infection as a probe to study immunotoxicity of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Cuff, C F; Fulton, J R; Barnett, J B; Boyce, C S

    1998-04-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract contains a complex immune system that defends the host against a wide range of pathogens and toxins. The GI tract is also exposed to many environmental toxins that could adversely affect intestinal immunity, and few systems to study immunotoxicity of the GI tract have been described. We demonstrate that intestinal reovirus infection can be used as a system to assess the effects of toxins on intestinal and systemic immunity. Mice were given various doses of cyclophosphamide (CY) for 5 days at doses ranging from 100 to 500 mg/kg by the oral route or 200 mg/kg by the intraperitoneal route. On day 3 of dosing, mice were orally infected with reovirus serotype 1, strain Lang. The effects of CY on viral clearance, intestinal and systemic immune responses, and distribution of intestinal lymphocytes were assessed. Mice treated with CY failed to clear the virus in a dose-dependent manner, and serum anti-reovirus antibody titers were suppressed. Virus-specific IgA in cultures of intestinal tissue from CY-treated mice was significantly reduced compared to controls, although total IgA production was not affected. The virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell response in spleen was also suppressed in CY-treated animals. Cyclophosphamide treatment reduced the number and percentage of B-cells in Peyer's patches. Reovirus infection did not increase cellularity of Peyer's patches in CY-treated mice. Cyclophosphamide treatment also had little effect on the phenotype of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. These data demonstrate that intestinal reovirus infection is useful in studying exposure of the GI tract to immunotoxic agents. PMID:9579022

  3. Avian rotavirus enteritis - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Saminathan, Mani; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Tiwari, Ruchi; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Kumar, Naveen; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are among the leading causes of enteritis and diarrhea in a number of mammalian and avian species, and impose colossal loss to livestock and poultry industry globally. Subsequent to detection of rotavirus in mammalian hosts in 1973, avian rotavirus (AvRV) was first reported in turkey poults in USA during 1977 and since then RVs of group A (RVA), D (RVD), F (RVF) and G (RVG) have been identified around the globe. Besides RVA, other AvRV groups (RVD, RVF and RVG) may also contribute to disease. However, their significance has yet to be unraveled. Under field conditions, co-infection of AvRVs occurs with other infectious agents such as astroviruses, enteroviruses, reoviruses, paramyxovirus, adenovirus, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, cryptosporidium and Eimeria species prospering severity of disease outcome. Birds surviving to RV disease predominantly succumb to secondary bacterial infections, mostly E. coli and Salmonella spp. Recent developments in molecular tools including state-of-the-art diagnostics and vaccine development have led to advances in our understanding towards AvRVs. Development of new generation vaccines using immunogenic antigens of AvRV has to be explored and given due importance. Till now, no effective vaccines are available. Although specific as well as sensitive approaches are available to identify and characterize AvRVs, there is still need to have point-of-care detection assays to review disease burden, contemplate new directions for adopting vaccination and follow improvements in public health measures. This review discusses AvRVs, their epidemiology, pathology and pathogenesis, immunity, recent trends in diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutics as well as appropriate prevention and control strategies. PMID:25917772

  4. Molecular identification of emergent GII.P17-GII.17 norovirus genotype, Romania, 2015.

    PubMed

    Dinu, Sorin; Nagy, Mariana; Negru, Dana Gabriela; Popovici, Emilian Damian; Zota, Lavinia; Oprișan, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The novel GII.P17-GII.17 norovirus genotype has been reported as cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks in China and Japan since the winter season 2014/15, replacing the pandemic strain GII.4 Sydney 2012. These emergent strains have also been sporadically reported on other continents than Asia. GII.P17-GII.17 isolates, similar to Kawasaki308 2015, were identified in three patients during a large outbreak of acute gastroenteritis affecting 328 people in Romania, in neighbouring localities, in 2015. PMID:26924169

  5. Other avian paramyxovirus infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian paramyxovirus infections have been reported for chickens and turkeys in association with respiratory disease or drops in egg production. This book chapter provides general information on etiology, clinical signs, lesions, diagnosis, prevention and control of avian paramyxoviruses except Newca...

  6. Other avian paramyxoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian paramyxovirus infections have been reported for chickens and turkeys in association with respiratory disease or drops in egg production. This book chapter provides general information on etiology, clinical signs, lesions, diagnosis, prevention and control of avian paramyxoviruses except Newcas...

  7. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Avian Influenza H5 Viruses in the United States Updates and Publications Information ... Humans Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza Viruses Outbreaks Health Care and Laboratorian Guidance HPAI A ...

  8. Avian respiratory system disorders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  9. Outbreak of Norovirus GII.P17-GII.17 in the Canadian Province of Nova Scotia

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Jason J.; Pettipas, Janice; Gaston, Daniel; Taylor, Robin; Hatchette, Todd F.; Booth, Tim F.; Mandes, Russell; McDermid, Andrew; Grudeski, Elsie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Norovirus is the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis, with GII.4 being the most common circulating genotype. Recently, outbreaks in China revealed that norovirus GII.17 GII.P17 had become predominant. Objective. This study aimed to characterize the distribution of norovirus genotypes circulating in Nova Scotia. Methods. Stool specimens were collected from gastrointestinal outbreaks in Nova Scotia between Jan 2014 and June 2015 and subjected to real-time RT-PCR. Norovirus-positive specimens were referred to the National Microbiology Laboratory for sequence-based genotyping. Results. The first norovirus GII.P17-GII.17 outbreak in Canada was identified, but no widespread activity was observed in Nova Scotia. Discussion. It is unknown whether GII.P17-GII.17 is more widespread in Canada since contributions to Canadian surveillance are too sparse to effectively monitor the epidemiology of emerging norovirus genotypes. Conclusions. Presence of norovirus GII.17:P17 in Canada highlights the need for more systematic surveillance to ensure that molecular targets used for laboratory detection are effective and help understand norovirus evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenesis. PMID:27366155

  10. Enteric Reovirus Infection Stimulates Peanut-Specific IgG2a Responses in a Mouse Food Allergy Model

    PubMed Central

    Fecek, Ronald J.; Rezende, Marisa Marcondes; Busch, Ryan; Hassing, Ine; Pieters, Raymond; Cuff, Christopher F.

    2010-01-01

    IgE-mediated food allergies are an important cause of life-threatening hypersensitivity reactions. Orally administered peanut antigens mixed with the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) induce a strong peanut extract (PE)-specific serum IgE response that is correlated with T-helper type 1 (Th1) and T-helper type 2 (Th2)-like T-cell responses. This study was conducted to determine if respiratory enteric orphan virus (reovirus), a non-pathogenic virus that induces robust Th1-mediated mucosal and systemic responses, could modulate induction of PE-specific allergic responses when co-administered with PE. Young mice were orally exposed to PE mixed with CT, reovirus, or both CT and reovirus. As expected, CT promoted PE-specific serum IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a and intestinal IgA production as well as splenic Th1- and Th2-associated cytokine recall responses. Reovirus did not alter PE-specific serum IgE and IgG1 levels, but substantially increased the PE-specific IgG2a response when co-administered with PE with or without CT. Additionally, reovirus significantly decreased the percentage of Peyer’s patch CD8+ T-cells and Foxp3+CD4+ T-regulatory cells when co-administered with PE. These results demonstrate that an acute mucosal reovirus infection and subsequent Th1 immune response is capable of modulating the Th1/Th2 controlled humoral response to PE. The reovirus-mediated increase in the PE-specific IgG2a antibody response may have therapeutic implications as increased levels of non-allergenic PE-specific IgG2a could block PE antigens from binding to IgE-sensitized mast cells. PMID:20356650

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid-enriched fish oil consumption modulates immunoglobulin responses to and clearance of enteric reovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Beli, Eleni; Li, Maoxiang; Cuff, Christopher; Pestka, James J

    2008-04-01

    We hypothesized that consumption of the (n-3) PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), modulates the mucosal immune response to enteric infection with respiratory enteric orphan virus (reovirus), a model intestinal pathogen. Mice were fed either AIN-93G control diet, containing 10 g/kg corn oil and 60 g/kg high oleic acid safflower oil, or AIN-93G, containing 10 g/kg corn oil and 60 g/kg DHA-enriched fish oil, for 4 wk and then orally gavaged with reovirus strain Type 1 Lang, (T1/L). Reovirus-specific IgA antibody was first detectable in the feces of mice fed a control diet at 6 d postinfection (PI) and was further elevated at 8 and 10 d PI. IgA responses in DHA-fed mice were similar at 6 and 8 d PI but greater at 10 d PI (P < 0.05). Both reovirus-specific serum IgA and IgG(2a) were comparably induced in mice fed control or DHA diets. Reovirus-specific IgA and IgG(2a) secretion by ex vivo Peyer's patch, lamina propria, and spleen cultures derived from control and DHA groups were comparable. Although both groups carried similar numbers of reovirus plaque forming units per intestine, DHA-fed mice shed nearly 10 times more viral RNA in feces than control mice at 2, 4, and 6 d PI (P < 0.05). However, viral RNA was not detectable in either group at 8 and 10 d. Taken together, these data suggest that DHA consumption did not markedly alter mucosal or systemic Ig responses to reovirus but delayed clearance of the virus from the intestinal tract. PMID:18356340

  12. Cellular integrity is required for inhibition of initiation of cellular DNA synthesis by reovirus type 3.

    PubMed Central

    Roner, M R; Cox, D C

    1985-01-01

    Synchronized HeLa cells, primed for entry into the synthesis phase by amethopterin, were prevented from initiating DNA synthesis 9 h after infection with reovirus type 3. However, nuclei isolated from synchronized cells infected with reovirus for 9 or 16 h demonstrated a restored ability to synthesize DNA. The addition of enucleated cytoplasmic extracts from infected or uninfected cells did not affect this restored capacity for synthesis. The addition of ribonucleotide triphosphates to nuclei isolated from infected cells stimulated additional DNA synthesis, suggesting that these nuclei were competent to initiate new rounds of DNA replication. Permeabilization of infected cells did not restore the ability of these cells to synthesize DNA. Nucleoids isolated from intact or permeabilized cells, infected for 9 or 16 h displayed an increased rate of sedimentation when compared with nucleoids isolated from uninfected cells. Nucleoids isolated from the nuclei of infected cells demonstrated a rate of sedimentation similar to that of nucleoids isolated from the nuclei of uninfected cells. The inhibition of initiation of cellular DNA synthesis by reovirus type 3 appears not to have been due to a permanent alteration of the replication complex, but this inhibition could be reversed by the removal of that complex from factors unique to the structural or metabolic integrity of the infected cell. Images PMID:3968718

  13. Isolation of a reovirus from coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.; Arakawa, C.N.; Lannan, C.N.; Fryer, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Reoviruses isolated from aquatic animals share certain common characteristics: (1) a typical reovirus-like morphology which shows an icosahedral particle with a double capsid that is approximately 75 nm in diameter; (2) a genome with eleven segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) distributed as three large, three medium and five small segments with a total molecular weight of approximately 15 x 106; (3) a virion composed of five major and several minor structural proteins that range in molecular weight from 32,000 to 137,000; and (4) form plaque-like syncytia in monolayer cultures of fish cells. Intact virus particles have buoyant densities in CsCl of 1.34 to 1.36 g/ml. The viruses have been isolated from fish and shellfish collected in both the marine and freshwater environments and will replicate in several fish cell lines (Plumb et al., 1979; Meyers and Hirai, 1980; Winton et al., 1981; Nagabayashi and Mori, 1983; Hedrick et al., 1984; Chen and Jiang, 1984). The original four aquatic reovirus isolates have been compared by Winton et al., 1987.

  14. Lignin as immobilization matrix for HIV p17 peptide used in immunosensing.

    PubMed

    Cerrutti, Bianca M; Moraes, Marli L; Pulcinelli, Sandra H; Santilli, Celso V

    2015-09-15

    Immunosensors based on electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are increasingly being used as a fast and potentially low cost method for clinical diagnostics. In this work we fabricated immunosensors by depositing layer-by-layer (LbL) films made with an antigenic peptide (p17-1) sequence (H2N-LSGGELDRWEKIRLRPGG-OH) and lignin on interdigitated gold electrodes, which could detect anti-p17 (HIV, human immune deficiency virus) antibodies (Ab) in phosphate buffered solutions (PBS). The molecular recognition interaction between the peptide (p17-1) and the specific Ab (anti-p17) yielded substantial changes in morphology of the with LbL films, with increased roughness according to atomic force microscopy data. This interaction is behind the high sensitivity of the immunosensor. Indeed, from the EIS results, we noted that the capacitance increased significantly with the specific Ab concentration, before getting close to saturation of available peptide sites at high concentrations. Concentrations of specific antibodies as low as 0.1 ng/mL could be detected and the immunosensors had their activity preserved for two months at least. The selectivity of the immunosensor was confirmed with two types of control experiments. First, no changes in impedance were observed when the lignin/peptide LbL immunosensor was immersed into a PBS solution containing the non-specific Ab (anti-HCV for Hepatitis C) antibodies. Furthermore, for sensing units made LbL films of lignin only, the electrical response was not affected by adding specific antibodies into the PBS buffer. The successful immunosensing for HIV with antigenic peptides in a lignin matrix is also relevant for valorization of lignin, which is an important biomass component in the sugar and ethanol industry, and brings the prospect for all-organic, biocompatible sensors if implantation is ever required. PMID:25950938

  15. Simultaneous typing of nine avian respiratory pathogens using a novel GeXP analyzer-based multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixun; Luo, Sisi; Xie, Liji; Liu, Jiabo; Pang, Yaoshan; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Zhiqin; Fan, Qing; Khan, Mazhar I

    2014-10-01

    A new, rapid, and high-throughput GenomeLab Gene Expression Profiler (GeXP) analyzer-based multiplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of nine avian respiratory pathogens. The respiratory pathogens included in this study were avian influenza subtypes H5, H7, and H9, infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) and Haemophilus paragallinarum (HPG). Ten pairs of primers were designed using conserved and specific sequence genes of AIV subtypes and respiratory pathogens from GenBank. Single and mixed pathogen cDNA/DNA templates were used to evaluate the specificity of the GeXP-multiplex assay. The corresponding specific DNA products were amplified for each pathogen. The specific DNA product amplification peaks of nine respiratory pathogens were observed on the GeXP analyzer. Non-respiratory avian pathogens, including chicken infectious anemia virus, fowl adenovirus, avian reovirus and infectious bursal disease virus, did not produce DNA products. The detection limit for the GeXP-multiplex assay was determined to be 100 copies/μl using various pre-mixed plasmids/ssRNAs containing known target genes of the respiratory pathogens. Further, GeXP-multiplex PCR assay was 100% specific when 24 clinical samples with respiratory infections were tested in comparison with conventional PCR method. The GeXP-multiplex PCR assay provides a novel tool for simultaneous detection and differentiation of nine avian respiratory pathogens. PMID:25025815

  16. Emergence of Enteric Viruses in Production Chickens Is a Concern for Avian Health

    PubMed Central

    Mettifogo, Elena; Nuñez, Luis F. N.; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S.; Jerez, José A.; Jones, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Several viruses have been identified in recent years in the intestinal contents of chickens and turkeys with enteric problems, which have been observed in commercial farms worldwide, including Brazil. Molecular detection of these viruses in Brazil can transform to a big threat for poultry production due to risk for intestinal integrity. This disease is characterized by severely delayed growth, low uniformity, lethargy, watery diarrhea, delayed feed consumption, and a decreased conversion rate. Chicken astrovirus (CAstV), rotavirus, reovirus, chicken parvovirus (ChPV), fowl adenovirus of subgroup I (FAdV-1), and avian nephritis virus (ANV) were investigated using the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), which may play a role in enteric disease, was included. The viruses most frequently detected, either alone or in concomitance with other viruses, were IBV, ANV, rotavirus, and CAstV followed by parvovirus, reovirus, and adenovirus. This study demonstrates the diversity of viruses in Brazilian chicken flocks presenting enteric problems characterized by diarrhea, growth retard, loss weight, and mortality, which reflects the multicausal etiology of this disease. PMID:24578633

  17. Role of HIV-1 matrix protein p17 variants in lymphoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giagulli, Cinzia; He, Wangxiao; Selleri, Marina; Caccuri, Francesca; Eyzaguirre, Lindsay M.; Mazzuca, Pietro; Corbellini, Silvia; Campilongo, Federica; Marsico, Stefania; Giombini, Emanuela; Muraro, Elena; Rozera, Gabriella; De Paoli, Paolo; Carbone, Antonino; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Fiorentini, Simona; Blattner, William A.; Lu, Wuyuan; Gallo, Robert C.; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    Although in decline after successful anti-HIV therapy, B-cell lymphomas are still elevated in HIV-1-seropositive (HIV+) persons, and the mechanisms are obscure. The HIV-1 matrix protein p17 persists in germinal centers long after HIV-1 drug suppression, and some p17 variants (vp17s) activate Akt signaling and promote growth of transformed B cells. Here we show that vp17s derived from four of five non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) tissues from HIV+ subjects display potent B-cell growth-promoting activity. They are characterized by amino acid insertions at position 117–118 (Ala–Ala) or 125–126 (Gly–Asn or Gly–Gln–Ala–Asn–Gln–Asn) among some other mutations throughout the sequence. Identical dominant vp17s are found in both tumor and plasma. Three of seven plasma samples from an independent set of NHL cases manifested multiple Ala insertions at position 117–118, and one with the Ala–Ala profile also promoted B-cell growth and activated Akt signaling. Ultradeep pyrosequencing showed that vp17s with C-terminal insertions are more frequently detected in plasma of HIV+ subjects with than without NHL. Insertion of Ala–Ala at position 117–118 into reference p17 (refp17) was sufficient to confer B-cell growth-promoting activity. In contrast, refp17 bearing the Gly–Asn insertion at position 125–126 did not, suggesting that mutations not restricted to the C terminus can also account for this activity. Biophysical analysis revealed that the Ala–Ala insertion mutant is destabilized compared with refp17, whereas the Gly–Asn form is stabilized. This finding provides an avenue for further exploration of structure function relationships and new treatment strategies in combating HIV-1–related NHL. PMID:26578780

  18. A natural reassortant and mutant serotype 3 reovirus from mink in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Wu; Liu, Ye; Lian, Hai; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Shou-Feng; Hu, Rong-Liang

    2016-02-01

    Mammalian orthoreoviruses (MRVs) are widespread and infect virtually all mammals. We report here the first case of a natural mutant and reassortant serotype 3 reovirus from mink in China, known as MRV3 SD-14. Whole-genome sequence analysis showed that the MRV3 SD-14 may have resulted from a reassortment involving MRVs that infected swine, humans and mink. Interestingly, the S1 segment, which encodes the viral attachment protein σ1, which influences viral virulence and cell tropism in the host, had a stop codon mutation at amino acid 246. Surveillance of the virulence and evolution of MRVs in humans and other animals deserves more attention. PMID:26573525

  19. Engineering Recombinant Reoviruses To Display gp41 Membrane-Proximal External-Region Epitopes from HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Karl W.; Ikizler, Mine'; Iskarpatyoti, Jason A.; Wetzel, J. Denise; Willis, Jordan; Crowe, James E.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) is a target for broadly neutralizing antibody responses against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, replication-defective virus vaccines currently under evaluation in clinical trials do not efficiently elicit MPER-specific antibodies. Structural modeling suggests that the MPER forms an α-helical coiled coil that is required for function and immunogenicity. To maintain the native MPER conformation, we used reverse genetics to engineer replication-competent reovirus vectors that displayed MPER sequences in the α-helical coiled-coil tail domain of viral attachment protein σ1. Sequences in reovirus strain type 1 Lang (T1L) σ1 were exchanged with sequences encoding HIV-1 strain Ba-L MPER epitope 2F5 or the entire MPER. Individual 2F5 or MPER substitutions were introduced at virion-proximal or virion-distal sites in the σ1 tail. Recombinant reoviruses containing heterologous HIV-1 sequences were viable and produced progeny yields comparable to those with wild-type virus. HIV-1 sequences were retained following 10 serial passages in cell culture, indicating that the substitutions were genetically stable. Recombinant viruses engineered to display the 2F5 epitope or full-length MPER in σ1 were recognized by purified 2F5 antibody. Inoculation of mice with 2F5-containing vectors or rabbits with 2F5- or MPER-containing vectors elicited anti-reovirus antibodies, but HIV-1-specific antibodies were not detected. Together, these findings indicate that heterologous sequences that form α-helices can functionally replace native sequences in the α-helical tail domain of reovirus attachment protein σ1. However, although these vectors retain native antigenicity, they were not immunogenic, illustrating the difficulty of experimentally inducing immune responses to this essential region of HIV-1. IMPORTANCE Vaccines to protect against HIV-1, the causative agent of AIDS, are not approved for use

  20. Engineering Recombinant Reoviruses To Display gp41 Membrane-Proximal External-Region Epitopes from HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karl W; Ikizler, Mine'; Iskarpatyoti, Jason A; Wetzel, J Denise; Willis, Jordan; Crowe, James E; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Wilson, Gregory J; Dermody, Terence S

    2016-01-01

    The gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) is a target for broadly neutralizing antibody responses against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, replication-defective virus vaccines currently under evaluation in clinical trials do not efficiently elicit MPER-specific antibodies. Structural modeling suggests that the MPER forms an α-helical coiled coil that is required for function and immunogenicity. To maintain the native MPER conformation, we used reverse genetics to engineer replication-competent reovirus vectors that displayed MPER sequences in the α-helical coiled-coil tail domain of viral attachment protein σ1. Sequences in reovirus strain type 1 Lang (T1L) σ1 were exchanged with sequences encoding HIV-1 strain Ba-L MPER epitope 2F5 or the entire MPER. Individual 2F5 or MPER substitutions were introduced at virion-proximal or virion-distal sites in the σ1 tail. Recombinant reoviruses containing heterologous HIV-1 sequences were viable and produced progeny yields comparable to those with wild-type virus. HIV-1 sequences were retained following 10 serial passages in cell culture, indicating that the substitutions were genetically stable. Recombinant viruses engineered to display the 2F5 epitope or full-length MPER in σ1 were recognized by purified 2F5 antibody. Inoculation of mice with 2F5-containing vectors or rabbits with 2F5- or MPER-containing vectors elicited anti-reovirus antibodies, but HIV-1-specific antibodies were not detected. Together, these findings indicate that heterologous sequences that form α-helices can functionally replace native sequences in the α-helical tail domain of reovirus attachment protein σ1. However, although these vectors retain native antigenicity, they were not immunogenic, illustrating the difficulty of experimentally inducing immune responses to this essential region of HIV-1. IMPORTANCE Vaccines to protect against HIV-1, the causative agent of AIDS, are not approved for use. Antibodies that

  1. T-2 toxin impairment of enteric reovirus clearance in the mouse associated with suppressed immunoglobulin and IFN-{gamma} responses

    SciTech Connect

    Li Maoxiang; Cuff, Christopher F.; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-08-01

    Trichothecenes are exquisitely toxic to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and leukocytes and thus are likely to impair gut immunity. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that the Type A trichothecene T-2 toxin interferes with the gut mucosal immune response to enteric reovirus infection. Mice were exposed i.p. first to 1.75 mg/kg bw T-2 and then 2 h later with 3 x 10{sup 7} plaque-forming units of reovirus serotype 1, strain Lang (T1/L). As compared to vehicle-treated control, T-2-treated mice had dramatically elevated intestinal plaque-forming viral titers after 5 days and failed to completely clear the virus from intestine by 10 days. Levels of reovirus {lambda}2 core spike (L2 gene) RNA in feces in T-2-treated mice were significantly higher at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days than controls. T-2 potentiated L2 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner with as little as 50 {mu}g/kg of the toxin having a potentiative effect. T-2 exposure transiently suppressed induction of reovirus-specific IgA in feces (6 and 8 days) as well as specific IgA and IgG{sub 2a} in serum (5 days). This suppression corresponded to decreased secretion of reovirus-specific IgA and IgG{sub 2a} in Peyer's patch (PP) and lamina propria fragment cultures prepared 5 days after infection. T-2 suppressed IFN-{gamma} responses in PP to reovirus at 3 and 7 days as compared to infected controls whereas IL-2 mRNA concentrations were unaffected. PP IL-6 mRNA levels were increased 2-fold 2 h after T-2 treatment, but no differences between infected T-2-exposed and infected vehicle-treated mice were detectable over the next 7 days. Overall, the results suggest that T-2 toxin increased both the extent of GI tract reovirus infection and fecal shedding which corresponded to both suppressed immunoglobulin and IFN-{gamma} responses.

  2. Avian Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    NWCC Wildlife Work Group

    2004-12-01

    OAK-B135 After conducting four national research meetings, producing a document guiding research: Metrics and Methods for Determining or Monitoring Potential Impacts on Birds at Existing and Proposed Wind Energy Sites, 1999, and another paper, Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States, 2001, the subcommittee recognized a need to summarize in a short fact sheet what is known about avian-wind interaction and what questions remain. This fact sheet attempts to summarize in lay terms the result of extensive discussion about avian-wind interaction on land. This fact sheet does not address research conducted on offshore development. This fact sheet is not intended as a conclusion on the subject; rather, it is a summary as of Fall/Winter 2002.

  3. Avian Influenza in Birds

    MedlinePlus

    ... and even kill certain domesticated bird species including chickens, ducks, and turkeys. Infected birds can shed avian ... virus’ ability to cause disease and mortality in chickens in a laboratory setting [2.5 MB, 64 ...

  4. Apoptosis Induced by Mammalian Reovirus Is Beta Interferon (IFN) Independent and Enhanced by IFN Regulatory Factor 3- and NF-κB-Dependent Expression of Noxa

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Jonathan J.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of signal transduction pathways are activated in response to viral infection, which dampen viral replication and transmission. These mechanisms involve both the induction of type I interferons (IFNs), which evoke an antiviral state, and the triggering of apoptosis. Mammalian orthoreoviruses are double-stranded RNA viruses that elicit apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. The transcription factors interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) are required for the expression of IFN-β and the efficient induction of apoptosis in reovirus-infected cells. However, it is not known whether IFN-β induction is required for apoptosis, nor have the genes induced by IRF-3 and NF-κB that are responsible for apoptosis been identified. To determine whether IFN-β is required for reovirus-induced apoptosis, we used type I IFN receptor-deficient cells, IFN-specific antibodies, and recombinant IFN-β. We found that IFN synthesis and signaling are dispensable for the apoptosis of reovirus-infected cells. These results indicate that the apoptotic response following reovirus infection is mediated directly by genes responsive to IRF-3 and NF-κB. Noxa is a proapoptotic BH3-domain-only protein of the Bcl-2 family that requires IRF-3 and NF-κB for efficient expression. We found that Noxa is strongly induced at late times (36 to 48 h) following reovirus infection in a manner dependent on IRF-3 and NF-κB. The level of apoptosis induced by reovirus is significantly diminished in cells lacking Noxa, indicating a key prodeath function for this molecule during reovirus infection. These results suggest that prolonged innate immune response signaling induces apoptosis by eliciting Noxa expression in reovirus-infected cells. PMID:22090144

  5. Differential Reovirus-Specific and Herpesvirus-Specific Activator Protein 1 Activation of Secretogranin II Leads to Altered Virus Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Alicia R.; Severini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses utilize host cell machinery for propagation and manage to evade cellular host defense mechanisms in the process. Much remains unknown regarding how the host responds to viral infection. We recently performed global proteomic screens of mammalian reovirus TIL- and T3D-infected and herpesvirus (herpes simplex virus 1 [HSV-1])-infected HEK293 cells. The nonenveloped RNA reoviruses caused an upregulation, whereas the enveloped DNA HSV-1 caused a downregulation, of cellular secretogranin II (SCG2). SCG2, a member of the granin family that functions in hormonal peptide sorting into secretory vesicles, has not been linked to virus infections previously. We confirmed SCG2 upregulation and found SCG2 phosphorylation by 18 h postinfection (hpi) in reovirus-infected cells. We also found a decrease in the amount of reovirus secretion from SCG2 knockdown cells. Similar analyses of cells infected with HSV-1 showed an increase in the amount of secreted virus. Analysis of the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway indicated that each virus activates different pathways leading to activator protein 1 (AP-1) activation, which is the known SCG2 transcription activator. We conclude from these experiments that the negative correlation between SCG2 quantity and virus secretion for both viruses indicates a virus-specific role for SCG2 during infection. IMPORTANCE Mammalian reoviruses affect the gastrointestinal system or cause respiratory infections in humans. Recent work has shown that all mammalian reovirus strains (most specifically T3D) may be useful oncolytic agents. The ubiquitous herpes simplex viruses cause common sores in mucosal areas of their host and have coevolved with hosts over many years. Both of these virus species are prototypical representatives of their viral families, and investigation of these viruses can lead to further knowledge of how they and the other more pathogenic members of their respective

  6. Specific Destruction of HIV Proviral p17 Gene in T Lymphoid Cells Achieved by the Genome Editing Technology.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Tsunao; Ejima, Akika; Mazda, Osam

    2016-01-01

    Recent development in genome editing technologies has enabled site-directed deprivation of a nucleotide sequence in the chromosome in mammalian cells. Human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection causes integration of proviral DNA into the chromosome, which potentially leads to re-emergence of the virus, but conventional treatment cannot delete the proviral DNA sequence from the cells infected with HIV. In the present study, the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) specific for the HIV p17 gene were constructed, and their activities to destroy the target sequence were evaluated. SSA assay showed a high activity of a pair of p17-specific TALENs. A human T lymphoid cell line, Jurkat, was infected with a lentivirus vector followed by transfection with the TALEN-HIV by electroporation. The target sequence was destructed in approximately 10-95% of the p17 polymerase chain reaction clones, and the efficiencies depended on the Jurkat-HIV clones. Because p17 plays essential roles for assembly and budding of HIV, and this gene has relatively low nucleotide sequence diversity, genome editing procedures targeting p17 may provide a therapeutic benefit for HIV infection. PMID:27446041

  7. Specific Destruction of HIV Proviral p17 Gene in T Lymphoid Cells Achieved by the Genome Editing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kishida, Tsunao; Ejima, Akika; Mazda, Osam

    2016-01-01

    Recent development in genome editing technologies has enabled site-directed deprivation of a nucleotide sequence in the chromosome in mammalian cells. Human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection causes integration of proviral DNA into the chromosome, which potentially leads to re-emergence of the virus, but conventional treatment cannot delete the proviral DNA sequence from the cells infected with HIV. In the present study, the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) specific for the HIV p17 gene were constructed, and their activities to destroy the target sequence were evaluated. SSA assay showed a high activity of a pair of p17-specific TALENs. A human T lymphoid cell line, Jurkat, was infected with a lentivirus vector followed by transfection with the TALEN–HIV by electroporation. The target sequence was destructed in approximately 10–95% of the p17 polymerase chain reaction clones, and the efficiencies depended on the Jurkat–HIV clones. Because p17 plays essential roles for assembly and budding of HIV, and this gene has relatively low nucleotide sequence diversity, genome editing procedures targeting p17 may provide a therapeutic benefit for HIV infection. PMID:27446041

  8. Identification and RNA segment assignment of six structural proteins of Scylla serrata reovirus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yangyang; Fan, Dongyang; Zhang, Zhao; Yang, Jifang; Liu, Jingwen; Chen, Jigang

    2016-08-01

    Scylla serrata reovirus (SsRV) is one of the most prevalent viral pathogens of the mud crab (S. serrata). The virus represents an unassigned novel genus in the Reoviridae family, and contains 12 double-stranded RNA genomic segments. Previous analysis of virion proteins concluded that SsRV contains at least eight structural proteins, ranging from 25 to 160 kDa. Here, tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Western blotting were used to re-identify the structural proteins. The results indicate that proteins encoded by SsRV segments S1, S3, S6, S9, S11, and S12 are structural proteins. PMID:27023722

  9. Perturbation of the switch-on of transcriptase activity in intermediate subviral particles from reovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Borsa, J.; Sargent, M.D.; Ewing, D.D.; Einspenner, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intermediate subviral particles (ISVP) derived from reovirus represent a simple model system for the switch-on of transcriptase function. In such particles the endogenous transcriptase is present in a switched-off form, one step removed from the switched-on state. Switch-on of transcriptase function is an active process in this system and can be triggered by K+ ions. A variety of agents which affect gene expression in cells were tested for an effect on switch-on in ISVP. Marked effects on switch-on in ISVP were observed with a diverse group of test agents, including DMSO and other solvents, BUdR, TdR, caffeine, theophylline, and temperature. The correlation in response between ISVP and cells suggests that the ISVP system may be useful as a model for studying the biochemical mechanisms underlying the perturbative effects of such agents on gene expression in cells.

  10. Transcription In Vitro by Reovirus-Associated Ribonucleic Acid-Dependent Polymerase 1

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, A. K.; Shatkin, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Digestion of purified reovirus type 3 with chymotrypsin degrades 70% of the viral protein and converts the virions to subviral particles (SVP). The SVP contain 3 of the 6 viral structural proteins and all 10 double-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) genome segments but not adenine-rich, single-stranded RNA. An RNA polymerase which is structurally associated with SVP transcribes one strand of each genome segment by a conservative mechanism in vitro. The single-stranded products include large (1.2 × 106 daltons), medium (0.7 × 106 daltons), and small (0.4 × 106 daltons) molecules which hybridize exclusively with the corresponding genome segments. The enzyme obtained by heating virions at 60 C synthesizes similar products. Kinetic and pulse-chase studies indicate that the different-sized products are synthesized simultaneously but at rates which are in the order: small > medium > large. Images PMID:5529847

  11. The p14 FAST Protein of Reptilian Reovirus Increases Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Neuropathogenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher W.; Stephenson, Kyle B.; Hanson, Stephen; Kucharczyk, Michael; Duncan, Roy; Bell, John C.; Lichty, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    The fusogenic orthoreoviruses express nonstructural fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) proteins that induce cell-cell fusion and syncytium formation. It has been speculated that the FAST proteins may serve as virulence factors by promoting virus dissemination and increased or altered cytopathology. To directly test this hypothesis, the gene encoding the p14 FAST protein of reptilian reovirus was inserted into the genome of a heterologous virus that does not naturally form syncytia, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Expression of the p14 FAST protein by the VSV/FAST recombinant gave the virus a highly fusogenic phenotype in cell culture. The growth of this recombinant fusogenic VSV strain was unaltered in vitro but was significantly enhanced in vivo. The VSV/FAST recombinant consistently generated higher titers of virus in the brains of BALB/c mice after intranasal or intravenous infection compared to the parental VSV/green fluorescent protein (GFP) strain that expresses GFP in place of p14. The VSV/FAST recombinant also resulted in an increased incidence of hind-limb paralysis, it infected a larger volume of brain tissue, and it induced more extensive neuropathology, thus leading to a lower maximum tolerable dose than that for the VSV/GFP parental virus. In contrast, an interferon-inducing mutant of VSV expressing p14 was still attenuated, indicating that this interferon-inducing phenotype is dominant to the fusogenic properties conveyed by the FAST protein. Based on this evidence, we conclude that the reovirus p14 FAST protein can function as a bona fide virulence factor. PMID:18971262

  12. HeLa cell response proteome alterations induced by mammalian reovirus T3D infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cells are exposed to multiple stressors that induce significant alterations in signaling pathways and in the cellular state. As obligate parasites, all viruses require host cell material and machinery for replication. Virus infection is a major stressor leading to numerous induced modifications. Previous gene array studies have measured infected cellular transcriptomes. More recently, mass spectrometry-based quantitative and comparative assays have been used to complement such studies by examining virus-induced alterations in the cellular proteome. Methods We used SILAC (stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture), a non-biased quantitative proteomic labeling technique, combined with 2-D HPLC/mass spectrometry and reciprocal labeling to identify and measure relative quantitative differences in HeLa cell proteins in purified cytosolic and nuclear fractions after reovirus serotype 3 Dearing infection. Protein regulation was determined by z-score analysis of each protein’s label distribution. Results A total of 2856 cellular proteins were identified in cytosolic fractions by 2 or more peptides at >99% confidence and 884 proteins were identified in nuclear fractions. Gene ontology analyses indicated up-regulated host proteins were associated with defense responses, immune responses, macromolecular binding, regulation of immune effector processes, and responses to virus, whereas down-regulated proteins were involved in cell death, macromolecular catabolic processes, and tissue development. Conclusions These analyses identified numerous host proteins significantly affected by reovirus T3D infection. These proteins map to numerous inflammatory and innate immune pathways, and provide the starting point for more detailed kinetic studies and delineation of virus-modulated host signaling pathways. PMID:23799967

  13. HAT-P-17b,c: A TRANSITING, ECCENTRIC, HOT SATURN AND A LONG-PERIOD, COLD JUPITER

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Beky, B.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Perumpilly, G.; Shporer, A.; Mazeh, T.; Kovacs, Geza; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Butler, R. P.; Lazar, J.; Papp, I. E-mail: gbakos@cfa.harvard.edu; and others

    2012-04-20

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-17b,c, a multi-planet system with an inner transiting planet in a short-period, eccentric orbit and an outer planet in a 4.4 yr, nearly circular orbit. The inner planet, HAT-P-17b, transits the bright V = 10.54 early K dwarf star GSC 2717-00417, with an orbital period P = 10.338523 {+-} 0.000009 days, orbital eccentricity e = 0.342 {+-} 0.006, transit epoch T{sub c} = 2454801.16943 {+-} 0.00020 (BJD: barycentric Julian dates throughout the paper are calculated from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)), and transit duration 0.1690 {+-} 0.0009 days. HAT-P-17b has a mass of 0.534 {+-} 0.018 M{sub J} and radius of 1.010 {+-} 0.029 R{sub J} yielding a mean density of 0.64 {+-} 0.05 g cm{sup -3}. This planet has a relatively low equilibrium temperature in the range 780-927 K, making it an attractive target for follow-up spectroscopic studies. The outer planet, HAT-P-17c, has a significantly longer orbital period P{sub 2} = 1610 {+-} 20 days and a minimum mass m{sub 2}sin i{sub 2} = 1.31{sup +0.18}{sub -0.15} M{sub J}. The orbital inclination of HAT-P-17c is unknown as transits have not been observed and may not be present. The host star has a mass of 0.86 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }, radius of 0.84 {+-} 0.02 R{sub Sun }, effective temperature 5246 {+-} 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = 0.00 {+-} 0.08. HAT-P-17 is the second multi-planet system detected from ground-based transit surveys.

  14. Complete genome sequence and comparative analysis of grass carp reovirus strain 109 (GCReV-109) with other grass carp reovirus strains reveals no significant correlation with regional distribution.

    PubMed

    Pei, Chao; Ke, Fei; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2014-09-01

    A new grass carp reovirus strain, tentatively named GCReV-109, was isolated in Hubei, China, and its complete genome sequence was determined. The genome contained 11 double-stranded RNA segments (S1-S11) covering 24,620 base pairs. All of the segments had conserved terminal nucleotides, with GUAA(U)/CU at the 5' end and UCAUC at the 3' end. Protein sequence comparison showed that GCReV-109 was most closely related to GCRV-GD108 and shared 96.6-99.5 % protein sequence identity but only shared 16.7-46.1 and 15.1-45.4 % identity with GCRV-873 and HGDRV, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that grass carp reovirus strains in China can be divided into three genotypes. Further analysis revealed homology between the GCRV-109 VP56 and HGDRV VP55 proteins, as well as GCReV-109 NS38, GCRV-873 NS38, and HGDRV VP39. The results of these comparisons also indicated that the homology between viruses was not necessarily linked to their geographical distribution. Our study will help in recognizing and understanding the genome structure and genetic diversity of grass carp reovirus. PMID:24687858

  15. The HIV Matrix Protein p17 Subverts Nuclear Receptors Expression and Induces a STAT1-Dependent Proinflammatory Phenotype in Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; D'Amore, Claudio; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term remission of HIV-1 disease can be readily achieved by combinations of highly effective antiretroviral therapy (HAART). However, a residual persistent immune activation caused by circulating non infectious particles or viral proteins is observed under HAART and might contribute to an higher risk of non-AIDS pathologies and death in HIV infected persons. A sustained immune activation supports lipid dysmetabolism and increased risk for development of accelerated atehrosclerosis and ischemic complication in virologically suppressed HIV-infected persons receiving HAART. Aim While several HIV proteins have been identified and characterized for their ability to maintain immune activation, the role of HIV-p17, a matrix protein involved in the viral replication, is still undefined. Results Here, we report that exposure of macrophages to recombinant human p17 induces the expression of proinflammatory and proatherogenic genes (MCP-1, ICAM-1, CD40, CD86 and CD36) while downregulating the expression of nuclear receptors (FXR and PPARγ) that counter-regulate the proinflammatory response and modulate lipid metabolism in these cells. Exposure of macrophage cell lines to p17 activates a signaling pathway mediated by Rack-1/Jak-1/STAT-1 and causes a promoter-dependent regulation of STAT-1 target genes. These effects are abrogated by sera obtained from HIV-infected persons vaccinated with a p17 peptide. Ligands for FXR and PPARγ counteract the effects of p17. Conclusions The results of this study show that HIV p17 highjacks a Rack-1/Jak-1/STAT-1 pathway in macrophages, and that the activation of this pathway leads to a simultaneous dysregulation of immune and metabolic functions. The binding of STAT-1 to specific responsive elements in the promoter of PPARγ and FXR and MCP-1 shifts macrophages toward a pro-atherogenetic phenotype characterized by high levels of expression of the scavenger receptor CD36. The present work identifies p17 as a novel target in HIV

  16. A detailed viscoelastic characterization of the P17 and adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Benjamin S; Ilankovan, Ashok I; Morrison, Barclay

    2011-11-01

    Brain is a morphologically and mechanically heterogeneous organ. Although rat brain is commonly used as an experimental neurophysiological model for various in vivo biomechanical studies, little is known about its regional viscoelastic properties. To address this issue, we have generated viscoelastic mechanical property data for specific anatomical regions of the P17 and adult rat brain. These ages are commonly used in rat experimental models. We measured mechanical properties of both white and gray matter regions in coronal slices with a custom-designed microindentation device performing stress-relaxation indentations to 10% effective strain. Shear moduli calculated for short (100?ms), intermediate (1?sec), and long (20?sec) time points, ranged from ?1?kPa for short term moduli to ?0.4?kPa for long term moduli. Both age and anatomic region were significant factors affecting the time-dependent shear modulus. White matter regions and regions of the cerebellum were much more compliant than those of the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus. Linear viscoelastic models (Prony series, continuous phase lag, and a power law model) were fit to the time-dependent shear modulus data. All models fit the data equally with no significant differences between them (F-test; p>0.05). The F-test was also used to statistically determine that a Prony series with three time-dependent parameters accurately fit the data with no added benefit from additional terms. The age- and region-dependent rat brain viscoelastic properties presented here will help inform future biomechanical models of the rat brain with specific and accurate regional mechanical property data. PMID:21341982

  17. Differential expression of two C-type lectins in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella and their response to grass carp reovirus.

    PubMed

    Ju, C S; He, L B; Pei, Y Y; Jiang, Y; Huang, R; Li, Y M; Liao, L J; Jang, S H; Wang, Y P

    2016-02-01

    The cDNAs of two C-type lectins in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella, galactose-binding lectin (galbl) and mannose-binding lectin (mbl), were cloned and analysed in this study. Both of them exhibited the highest expression level in liver, whereas their expression pattern differed in early phase of embryonic development. Following exposure to grass carp reovirus (GCRV), the mRNA expression level of galbl and mbl was significantly up-regulated in liver and intestine. PMID:26643267

  18. Adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals: effects of cation-exchange capacity, cation saturation, and surface area.

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, S M; Stotzky, G

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals has been reported by several investigators, but the mechanisms defining this association have been studied only minimally. The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the mechanisms involved with this interaction. More reovirus type 3 was adsorbed, in both distilled and synthetic estuarine water, by low concentrations of montmorillonite than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite containing a mixed complement of cations on the exchange complex. Adsorption to the clays was essentially immediate and was correlated with the cation-exchange capacity of the clays, indicating that adsorption was primarily to negatively charged sites on the clays. Adsorption was greater with low concentrations of clays in estuarine water than in distilled water, as the higher ionic strength of the estuarine water reduced the electrokinetic potential of both clay and virus particles. The addition of cations (as chloride salts) to distilled water enhanced adsorption, with divalent cations being more effective than monovalent cations and 10(-2) M resulting in more adsorption than 10(-3) M. Potassium ions suppressed reovirus adsorption to montmorillonite, probably by collapsing the clay lattices and preventing the expression of the interlayer-derived cation-exchange capacity. More virus was adsorbed by montmorillonite made homoionic to various mono-, di-, and trivalent cations (except by montmorillonite homoionic to potassium) than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite homoionic to the same cations. The sequence of the amount of adsorption to homoionic montmorillonite was Al greater than Ca greater than Mg greater than Na greater than K; the sequence of adsorption to kaolinite was Na greater than Al greater than Ca greater than Mg greater than K. The constant partition-type adsorption isotherms obtained when the clay concentration was maintained constant and the virus concentration was varied indicated that a fixed proportion of the

  19. Blocking the PI3K/AKT pathway enhances mammalian reovirus replication by repressing IFN-stimulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jin; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Wu, Hongxia; Liu, Chunguo; Li, Zhijie; Hu, Xiaoliang; Su, Shuo; Wang, Lin-Fa; Qu, Liandong

    2015-01-01

    Many host cellular signaling pathways were activated and exploited by virus infection for more efficient replication. The PI3K/Akt pathway has recently attracted considerable interest due to its role in regulating virus replication. This study demonstrated for the first time that the mammalian reovirus strains Masked Palm Civet/China/2004 (MPC/04) and Bat/China/2003 (B/03) can induce transient activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway early in infection in vitro. When UV-treated, both viruses activated PI3K/Akt signaling, indicating that the virus/receptor interaction was sufficient to activate PI3K/Akt. Reovirus virions can use both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, but only chlorpromazine, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, or siRNA targeting clathrin suppressed Akt phosphorylation. We also identified the upstream molecules of the PI3K pathway. Virus infection induced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) but not Gab1, and blockage of FAK phosphorylation suppressed Akt phosphorylation. Blockage of PI3K/Akt activation increased virus RNA synthesis and viral yield. We also found that reovirus infection activated the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) in an interferon-independent manner and up-regulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) via the PI3K/Akt/EMSY pathway. Suppression of PI3K/Akt activation impaired the induction of ISRE and down-regulated the expression of ISGs. Overexpression of ISG15 and Viperin inhibited virus replication, and knockdown of either enhanced virus replication. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PI3K/Akt activated by mammalian reovirus serves as a pathway for sensing and then inhibiting virus replication/infection. PMID:26388843

  20. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr, October 1992--April 1993)

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, S.; Goddard, J.G.; Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, S.C.; Reid, J.L.; Swift, J.H.; Talley, L.D.

    1998-06-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide concentration (TCO{sub 2}) and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) in discrete water samples collected during three expeditions of the Research Vessel (R/V) Knorr in the South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the first cruise (WOCE Section P16A/P17A) began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on October 6, 1992, and returned to Papeete on November 25, 1992. The second cruise (WOCE Section P17E/P19S) began in Papeete on December 4, 1992, and finished in Punta Arenas, Chile, on January 22, 1993. The third expedition (WOCE Section P19C) started in Punta Arenas, on February 22 and finished in Panama City, Panama, on April 13, 1993. During the three expeditions, 422 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen [measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensor], as well as discrete measurements of salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12), TCO{sub 2}, and pCO{sub 2} measured at 4 and 20 C. In addition, potential temperatures were calculated from the measured variables.

  1. Application of a serum-free medium for the growth of Vero cells and the production of reovirus.

    PubMed

    Butler, M; Burgener, A; Patrick, M; Berry, M; Moffatt, D; Huzel, N; Barnabé, N; Coombs, K

    2000-01-01

    Two strains of reovirus (serotype 1 Lang/TIL and serotype 3 Dearing/T3D) were propagated in Vero cells grown in stationary or agitated cultures in a serum-free medium, M-VSFM. Solid microcarriers (Cytodex-1) were used to support cell growth in agitated cultures with a normal doubling time of 25 h. Cell yields of 1 x 10(6) cells/mL were obtained from an inoculum of 2 x 10(5) cells/mL in 4 days in microcarrier cultures. The growth profile and cell yield was not significantly different from serum-supplemented cultures. The virus titer increased by 3-4 orders of magnitude over a culture period of 150 h. The maximum virus titer in stationary cultures reached >1 x 10(9) pfu/mL for both strains of reovirus in M-VSFM. M-VSFM also supported high viral yields in microcarrier cultures. Both the specific productivity and final viral yield was higher in M-VSFM than serum-supplemented cultures. The high viral productivity suggests that this is a suitable system for the production of reovirus as an oncolytic agent for human therapeutic use. PMID:11027181

  2. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Intratumoral Reovirus Infusion for the Treatment of Recurrent Malignant Gliomas in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kicielinski, Kimberly P; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, John S; Gill, George M; Coffey, Matt; Markert, James M

    2014-01-01

    Reovirus, an oncolytic RNA virus exhibiting antiglioma activity, was shown in a previous single institution phase 1 study found that the inoculation of the virus to be well tolerated in patients with recurrent malignant glioma (MG). The goals of multicenter study reported herein were to determine the dose-limiting toxicity, maximum tolerated dose, and target lesion response rate when reovirus was administered in a novel fashion via intratumoral infusion for 72 hours in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Fifteen adult patients were treated in a dose escalation study ranging from 1 × 108 to 1 × 1010 tissue culture infectious dose 50, tentimes the dose achieved in the previous trial. Neurological, functional examinations, and imaging studies were completed pre- and postinfusion. There was one grade 3 adverse event (convulsions) felt to be possibly related to treatment, but no grade 4 adverse events considered probably or definitely related to treatment. Dose-limiting toxicity were not identified and a maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Evidence of antiglioma activity was seen in some patients. This first report of intratumoral infusion of reovirus in patients with recurrent malignant glioma demonstrated the approach to be safe and well tolerated, warranting further studies. PMID:24553100

  3. The avian heterophil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterophils play an indispensable role in the immune defense of the avian host. To accomplish this defense, heterophils use sophisticated mechanisms to both detect and destroy pathogenic microbes. Detection of pathogens through toll-like receptors (TLR), FC and complement receptors, and other path...

  4. Avian influenza (fowl plague)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses infect domestic poultry and wild birds. In domestic poultry, AI viruses are typically of low pathogenicity (LP) causing subclinical infections, respiratory disease or drops in egg production. However, a few AI viruses cause severe systemic disease with high mortality; ...

  5. Avian influenza: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Capua, Ilaria; Alexander, Dennis J

    2004-08-01

    This paper reviews the worldwide situation regarding avian influenza infections in poultry from 1997 to March 2004. The increase in the number of primary introductions and the scientific data available on the molecular basis of pathogenicity have generated concerns particularly for legislative purposes and for international trade. This has led to a new proposed definition of 'avian influenza' to extend all infections caused by H5 and H7 viruses regardless of their virulence as notifiable diseases, although this has encountered some difficulties in being approved. The paper also reviews the major outbreaks caused by viruses of the H5 or H7 subtype and the control measures applied. The zoonotic aspects of avian influenza, which until 1997 were considered to be of limited relevance in human medicine, are also discussed. The human health implications have now gained importance, both for illness and fatalities that have occurred following natural infection with avian viruses, and for the potential of generating a reassortant virus that could give rise to the next human influenza pandemic. PMID:15370036

  6. Avian dark cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, J.; Plymale, D. R.; Shepard, D. L.; Hara, H.; Garry, Robert F.; Yoshihara, T.; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Bolton, M.; Kalkeri, R.; Fermin, Cesar D.

    2002-01-01

    Dark cells (DCs) of mammalian and non-mammalian species help to maintain the homeostasis of the inner ear fluids in vivo. Although the avian cochlea is straight and the mammalian cochlea is coiled, no significant difference in the morphology and/or function of mammalian and avian DCs has been reported. The mammalian equivalent of avian DCs are marginal cells and are located in the stria vascularis along a bony sheet. Avian DCs hang free from the tegmentum vasculosum (TV) of the avian lagena between the perilymph and endolymph. Frame averaging was used to image the fluorescence emitted by several fluorochromes applied to freshly isolated dark cells (iDCs) from chickens (Gallus domesticus) inner ears. The viability of iDCs was monitored via trypan blue exclusion at each isolation step. Sodium Green, BCECF-AM, Rhodamine 123 and 9-anthroyl ouabain molecules were used to test iDC function. These fluorochromes label iDCs ionic transmembrane trafficking function, membrane electrogenic potentials and Na+/K+ ATPase pump's activity. Na+/K+ ATPase pump sites, were also evaluated by the p-nitrophenyl phosphatase reaction. These results suggest that iDCs remain viable for several hours after isolation without special culturing requirements and that the number and functional activity of Na+/K+ ATPase pumps in the iDCs were indistinguishable from in vivo DCs. Primary cultures of freshly iDCs were successfully maintained for 28 days in plastic dishes with RPMI 1640 culture medium. The preparation of iDCs overcomes the difficulty of DCs accessability in vivo and the unavoidable contamination that rupturing the inner ear microenvironments induces.

  7. Probing the transcription mechanisms of reovirus cores with molecules that alter RNA duplex stability.

    PubMed

    Demidenko, Alexander A; Nibert, Max L

    2009-06-01

    The mammalian reovirus (MRV) genome comprises 10 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments, packaged along with transcriptase complexes inside each core particle. Effects of four small molecules on transcription by MRV cores were studied for this report, chosen for their known capacities to alter RNA duplex stability. Spermidine and spermine, which enhance duplex stability, inhibited transcription, whereas dimethyl sulfoxide and trimethylglycine, which attenuate duplex stability, stimulated transcription. Different mechanisms were identified for inhibition or activation by these molecules. With spermidine, one round of transcription occurred normally, but subsequent rounds were inhibited. Thus, inhibition occurred at the transition between the end of elongation in one round and initiation in the next round of transcription. Dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylglycine, on the other hand, had no effect on transcription by a constitutively active fraction of cores in each preparation but activated transcription in another fraction that was otherwise silent for the production of elongated transcripts. Activation of this other fraction occurred at the transition between transcript initiation and elongation, i.e., at promoter escape. These results suggest that the relative stability of RNA duplexes is most important for certain steps in the particle-associated transcription cycles of dsRNA viruses and that small molecules are useful tools for probing these and probably other steps. PMID:19297468

  8. Moroxydine hydrochloride inhibits grass carp reovirus replication and suppresses apoptosis in Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Ling, Fei; Hao, Kai; Wang, Gao-Xue; Zhu, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Moroxydine hydrochloride (Mor) is known to have multi-antiviral activities against DNA and RNA viruses but very little information exists on its pharmacology. The paper was undertaken to explore the antiviral response and antiapoptotic mechanism of Mor against grass carp reovirus (GCRV) in Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney (CIK) cells. The results showed that exposing GCRV-infected cell to 6.3 μg mL(-1) of Mor for 96 h avoid ca. 50% apoptosis. Meanwhile, Mor had lower cytotoxicity than ribavirin (Rib) as the value of safe concentration was threefold higher than effective concentration and the compound could ensure sufficient into and out of cells within 4 h when tested at the maximal safe concentration. Mor blocked the GCRV-induced cytopathic effects and eliminated nucleocapsids in CIK cells to keep the normal morphological structure. Moreover, the expressions of viral protein genes were significantly inhibited especially the guanylyl transferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase related expression. Furthermore, GCRV caused Bcl-2 down-regulation and Bax mitochondrial translocation was prevented by treatment of CIK cells with Mor. The downstream effector, caspase activity was also significantly inhibited in Mor treated cells. The potential mechanism might be that mitochondrial apoptotic signals were not activated by the intervention of Mor for targeting viral gene expression. Taken together, Mor showed high anti-GCRV activity and had been proved as a secure and promising agent in viral controlling in aquaculture industry. PMID:27188236

  9. Piscine reovirus in wild and farmed salmonids in British Columbia, Canada: 1974-2013.

    PubMed

    Marty, G D; Morrison, D B; Bidulka, J; Joseph, T; Siah, A

    2015-08-01

    Piscine reovirus (PRV) was common among wild and farmed salmonids in British Columbia, western Canada, from 1987 to 2013. Salmonid tissues tested for PRV by real-time rRT-PCR included sections from archived paraffin blocks from 1974 to 2008 (n = 363) and fresh-frozen hearts from 2013 (n = 916). The earliest PRV-positive sample was from a wild-source steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), from 1977. By histopathology (n = 404), no fish had lesions diagnostic for heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI). In some groups, lymphohistiocytic endocarditis affected a greater proportion of fish with PRV than fish without PRV, but the range of Ct values among affected fish was within the range of Ct values among unaffected fish. Also, fish with the lowest PRV Ct values (18.4-21.7) lacked endocarditis or any other consistent lesion. From 1987 to 1994, the proportion of PRV positives was not significantly different between farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L. (44% of 48), and wild-source salmonids (31% of 45). In 2013, the proportion of PRV positives was not significantly different between wild coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum), sampled from British Columbia (5.0% of 60) or the reference region, Alaska, USA (10% of 58). PMID:25048977

  10. Rapid immunochromatographic test strip to detect swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus reovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, LiPing; Li, DengFeng; Liu, LianGuo; Zhang, Ge

    2015-11-17

    Swimming crab reovirus (SCRV) is the causative agent of a serious disease with high mortality in cultured Portunus trituberculatus. A rapid immunochromatographic assay (ICA) was developed in a competitive assay format and optimized for the detection of SCRV. The gold probe-based ICA test comprised SCRV antigen and goat anti-chicken egg yolk antibody (IgY) sprayed onto a nitrocellulose membrane as the test line and control line, respectively. IgY-gold complexes were deposited onto the conjugate pad as detector reagents. The method showed high specificity with no cross-reactivity with other related aquatic pathogens. The detection limit of the ICA strip was 50 µg ml⁻¹. To evaluate the performance of the ICA test, the strip and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were applied to the same samples (n = 90 crabs). The strip successfully detected SCRV in all of the artificially infected samples. Furthermore, the ICA strip and ELISA tests had high consistency (98.28%). The strip assay requires no instruments and has a detection time of less than 10 min. It is portable and easy to perform in the field. These results indicated that the developed strip could be a promising on-site tool for screening pooled crabs to confirm SCRV infection or disease outbreaks. PMID:26575153

  11. Identification of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate as a potential agent for blocking infection by grass carp reovirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Weisha; Yu, Fei; Lu, Liqun

    2016-04-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV), the representative strain of the species Aquareovirus C, serves as a model for studying the pathogenesis of aquareoviruses. Previously, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) was shown to inhibit orthoreovirus infection. The aim of this study was to test its potential in blocking infection by GCRV. We show that adhesion to the CIK (Ctenopharyngodon idellus kidney) cell surface by GCRV particles is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by EGCG, as well as by a crude extract of green tea. We also evaluated the safety of EGCG and green tea extract using CIK cells, and the results suggest that EGCG is a promising compound that may be developed as a plant-derived small molecular therapeutic agent against grass carp hemorrhagic disease caused by GCRV infection. As the ligand for the 37/67-kDa laminin receptor (LamR), EGCG's blocking effect on GCRV attachment was associated with the binding potential of GCRV particles to LamR, which was inferred from a VOPBA assay. PMID:26758731

  12. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance the Therapeutic Potential of Reovirus in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Stiff, Andrew; Caserta, Enrico; Sborov, Douglas W; Nuovo, Gerard J; Mo, Xiaokui; Schlotter, Sarah Y; Canella, Alessandro; Smith, Emily; Badway, Joseph; Old, Matthew; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena Cristina; Yan, Pearlly; Benson, Don M; Byrd, John C; Baiocchi, Robert; Kaur, Balveen; Hofmeister, Craig C; Pichiorri, Flavia

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma remains incurable and the majority of patients die within 5 years of diagnosis. Reolysin, the infusible form of human reovirus (RV), is a novel viral oncolytic therapy associated with antitumor activity likely resulting from direct oncolysis and a virus-mediated antitumor immune response. Results from our phase I clinical trial investigating single agent Reolysin in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma confirmed tolerability, but no objective responses were evident, likely because the virus selectively entered the multiple myeloma cells but did not actively replicate. To date, the precise mechanisms underlying the RV infectious life cycle and its ability to induce oncolysis in patients with multiple myeloma remain unknown. Here, we report that junctional adhesion molecule 1 (JAM-1), the cellular receptor for RV, is epigenetically regulated in multiple myeloma cells. Treatment of multiple myeloma cells with clinically relevant histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) results in increased JAM-1 expression as well as increased histone acetylation and RNA polymerase II recruitment to its promoter. Furthermore, our data indicate that the combination of Reolysin with HDACi, potentiates RV killing activity of multiple myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo This study provides the molecular basis to use these agents as therapeutic tools to increase the efficacy of RV therapy in multiple myeloma. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 830-41. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26809490

  13. A novel totivirus and piscine reovirus (PRV) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) with cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) is a severe disease affecting large farmed Atlantic salmon. Mortality often appears without prior clinical signs, typically shortly prior to slaughter. We recently reported the finding and the complete genomic sequence of a novel piscine reovirus (PRV), which is associated with another cardiac disease in Atlantic salmon; heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI). In the present work we have studied whether PRV or other infectious agents may be involved in the etiology of CMS. Results Using high throughput sequencing on heart samples from natural outbreaks of CMS and from fish experimentally challenged with material from fish diagnosed with CMS a high number of sequence reads identical to the PRV genome were identified. In addition, a sequence contig from a novel totivirus could also be constructed. Using RT-qPCR, levels of PRV in tissue samples were quantified and the totivirus was detected in all samples tested from CMS fish but not in controls. In situ hybridization supported this pattern indicating a possible association between CMS and the novel piscine totivirus. Conclusions Although causality for CMS in Atlantic salmon could not be proven for either of the two viruses, our results are compatible with a hypothesis where, in the experimental challenge studied, PRV behaves as an opportunist whereas the totivirus might be more directly linked with the development of CMS. PMID:21067578

  14. Quantification of the Host Response Proteome after Mammalian Reovirus T1L Infection

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Alicia R.; Cortens, John P.; Krokhin, Oleg; Wilkins, John A.; Severini, Alberto; Coombs, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    All viruses are dependent upon host cells for replication. Infection can induce profound changes within cells, including apoptosis, morphological changes, and activation of signaling pathways. Many of these alterations have been analyzed by gene arrays to measure the cellular “transcriptome.” We used SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture), combined with high-throughput 2-D HPLC/mass spectrometry, to determine relative quantitative differences in host proteins at 6 and 24 hours after infecting HEK293 cells with reovirus serotype 1 Lang (T1L). 3,076 host proteins were detected at 6hpi, of which 132 and 68 proteins were significantly up or down regulated, respectively. 2,992 cellular proteins, of which 104 and 49 were up or down regulated, respectively, were identified at 24hpi. IPA and DAVID analyses indicated proteins involved in cell death, cell growth factors, oxygen transport, cell structure organization and inflammatory defense response to virus were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in apoptosis, isomerase activity, and metabolism were down-regulated. These proteins and pathways may be suitable targets for intervention to either attenuate virus infection or enhance oncolytic potential. PMID:23240068

  15. Insights into the Antiviral Immunity against Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) Reovirus (GCRV) in Grass Carp

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Global fish production from aquaculture has rapidly grown over the past decades, and grass carp shares the largest portion. However, hemorrhagic disease caused by grass carp reovirus (GCRV) results in tremendous loss of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) industry. During the past years, development of molecular biology and cellular biology technologies has promoted significant advances in the understanding of the pathogen and the immune system. Immunoprophylaxis based on stimulation of the immune system of fish has also got some achievements. In this review, authors summarize the recent progresses in basic researches on GCRV; viral nucleic acid sensors, high-mobility group box proteins (HMGBs); pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid inducible gene I- (RIG-I-) like receptors (RLRs); antiviral immune responses induced by PRRs-mediated signaling cascades of type I interferon (IFN-I) and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) activation. The present review also notices the potential applications of molecule genetic markers. Additionally, authors discuss the current preventive and therapeutic strategies (vaccines, RNAi, and prevention medicine) and highlight the importance of innate immunity in long term control for grass carp hemorrhagic disease. PMID:25759845

  16. Avian flu: pandemic preparedness.

    PubMed

    Jan, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Pandemic influenza is unpredictable, and the risk of an avian flu outbreak is unclear. It is critical that home health providers, who may become overburdened quickly in the event of a pandemic outbreak, be prepared to ensure a sustainable healthcare response. This article offers information on strategies that may be used by home health providers to prepare for, prevent, and manage pandemic influenza. PMID:17984642

  17. Junctional adhesion molecule-A is overexpressed in advanced multiple myeloma and determines response to oncolytic reovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kevin R.; Espitia, Claudia M.; Zhao, Weiguo; Wendlandt, Erik; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang; Carew, Jennifer S.; Nawrocki, Steffan T.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the development of several new agents for multiple myeloma (MM) therapy over the last decade, drug resistance continues to be a significant problem. Patients with relapsed/refractory disease have high mortality rates and desperately need new precision approaches that directly target specific molecular features that are prevalent in the refractory setting. Reolysin is a proprietary formulation of reovirus for cancer therapy that has demonstrated efficacy in multiple clinical trials. Its selective effects against solid tumors have been largely attributed to RAS-mediated control of reovirus replication. However, the mechanisms regulating its preferential anti-neoplastic effects in MM and other hematological malignancies have not been rigorously studied. Here we report that the reovirus receptor, junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is highly expressed in primary cells from patients with MM and the majority of MM cell lines compared to normal controls. A series of experiments demonstrated that JAM-A expression, rather than RAS, was required for Reolysin-induced cell death in MM models. Notably, analysis of paired primary MM specimens revealed that JAM-A expression was significantly increased at relapse compared to diagnosis. Two different models of acquired resistance to bortezomib also displayed both higher JAM-A expression and elevated sensitivity to Reolysin compared to parental cells, suggesting that Reolysin may be an effective agent for patients with relapsed/refractory disease due to their high JAM-A levels. Taken together, these findings support further investigation of Reolysin for the treatment of patients with relapsed/refractory MM and of JAM-A as a predictive biomarker for sensitivity to Reolysin-induced cell death. PMID:26513296

  18. Pathobiology of avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus causes serious disease in a wide variety of birds and mammals. Its natural hosts are wild aquatic birds, in which most infections are unapparent. Avian Influenza (AI) viruses are classified into 16 hemagglutinin (H1-16) and nine neuraminidase (N1-9) subtypes. Each virus has on...

  19. Avian influenza prevention and control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza is one of the most important diseases affecting the poultry industry around the world. Avian Influenza virus (AIV) has a broad host range in birds and mammals, although the natural reservoir is considered to be in wild birds where it typically causes an asymptomatic to mild infectio...

  20. Avian influenza: Vaccination and control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) is a viral disease of poultry that remains an economic threat to commercial poultry throughout the world by negatively impacting animal health and trade. Strategies to control avian influenza (AI) virus are developed to prevent, manage or eradicate the virus from the country, re...

  1. Avian influenza vaccination and control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) remains an economic threat to commercial poultry throughout the world by negatively impacting animal health and trade. Vaccination with high quality efficacious vaccines that are properly delivered can contribute to the control of avian AI outbreaks when used as part of a compr...

  2. New intermediate subviral particles in the in vitro uncoating of reovirus virions by chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Borsa, J; Copps, T P; Sargent, M D; Long, D G; Chapman, J D

    1973-04-01

    Reovirus virions, grown in suspension cultures of L cells and extensively purified by density gradient and velocity gradient centrifugation after their release from cell debris by fluorocarbon extraction, are characterized by a mean particle diameter of 73 nm and a density in CsCl of 1.36 to 1.37 g/cm(3). Treatment of intact virions by chymotrypsin (CHT) digestion in vitro converts them to subviral particles (SVP) having characteristics which are determined by the species of monovalent cation present during the digestion. In the presence of Cs(+) ions, CHT converts the virions to SVP of mean diameter 51 nm and density 1.43 to 1.44 g/cm(3). In the presence of K(+) ions, the conversion is to SVP of diameter 51 nm and density 1.39 to 1.40 g/cm(3). The SVP made in the presence of either Cs(+) or K(+) possess an extremely active RNA polymerase and nucleoside triphosphate phosphohydrolase (NTPase) activity in vitro and are resistant to further digestion by CHT. Treatment of intact virions with CHT in the presence of Na(+) or Li(+) ions results in their conversion to SVP of mean diameter 64 nm and density 1.37 to 1.38 g/cm(3). Such SVP are not active in in vitro RNA synthesis or NTP hydrolysis and are resistant to further digestion by CHT even during prolonged exposure to high concentrations of enzyme. Addition of Cs(+) or K(+) ions to the digestion mixture allows conversion of the 64-nm diameter SVP to 51-nm diameter SVP in which the RNA polymerase and NTPase are active in vitro. Analysis of the proteins present in intact virions and in the different SVP reveals clear differences which indicate that the conversions are accomplished by removal or cleavage of particular species of polypeptides. PMID:4349495

  3. Inactivation of adenovirus, reovirus and bacteriophages in fecal sludge by pH and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Magri, Maria Elisa; Fidjeland, Jørgen; Jönsson, Håkan; Albihn, Ann; Vinnerås, Björn

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the inactivation of adenovirus, reovirus and bacteriophages (MS2, ΦX174, 28B) in a fecal sludge. We conducted two experiments. In the first, we tested different compositions of the fecal sludge by mixing different amounts of water, feces and urine, totaling nine combinations which were kept at temperatures between 10 and 28°C. In the second study, urea was added to the mixtures, which were kept at temperatures from 5 to 33°C. The inactivation was based on a combination of temperature, pH and uncharged ammonia concentration. The increase in pH and ammonia was provided mainly by urine content (Experiment 1) and by urine and added urea (Experiment 2). The inactivation of bacteriophages was slower than the AdV and ReV. At 23°C and 28°, reasonable treatment times were obtained when pH was higher than 8.9 and NH3 concentrations were higher than 35 and 55 mM respectively. With those conditions, the maximum time for a 3 log reduction in viruses, according to this study, would be 35 days (23°C) and 21 days (28°C). However, in most applications where helminth eggs are present, the treatment time and NH3 for sanitization will be the scaling criteria, as they are more persistent. Concerning the sanitization of effluents from latrines, vacuum toilets or dry toilets in developing countries with tropical and sub-tropical climates, the use of intrinsic ammonia combined with high pH can be effective in producing a safe and highly valuable liquid that can be used as a fertilizer. In the case of the fecal sludge with very intrinsic ammonia concentration (<20 mM), sanitization could still be achieved by the addition of urea. PMID:25817758

  4. Isolation and characterization of a reovirus from common eiders (Somateria mollissima) from Finland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmen, T.; Franson, J. Christian; Kilpi, Mikael; Docherty, D.E.; Hansen, W.R.; Hario, Martti

    2002-01-01

    Samples of brain, intestine, liver, lung, spleen, and bursa of Fabricius were collected from five common eider (Somateria mollissima) duckling carcasses during a die-off in the western Gulf of Finland (59??50???N, 23??15???E) in June 1996. No viral activity was observed in specific-pathogen-free chicken embryos inoculated with tissue suspensions, but samples of bursa of Fabricius from three birds were positive when inoculated into Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) embryo fibroblasts. The isolates were characterized as nonenveloped RNA viruses and possessed several characteristics of the genus Orthoreovirus. Virus particles were icosahedral with a mean diameter of 72 nm and were stable at pH 3.0; their genome was separated into 10 segments by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings experimentally infected with the eider reovirus showed elevated serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase enzymes and focal hemorrhages in the liver, spleen, and bursa of Fabricius. During 1997-99, the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to the isolated virus ranged from 0 to 86% in 302 serum samples collected from incubating eider hens at three nesting areas along coastal Finland. The highest seroprevalence was found in Hanko in 1999, just weeks before reports of an uninvestigated mortality event resulting in the death of an estimated 98% of ducklings at that location. These findings raise the question of potential involvement of the virus in poor duckling survival and eider population declines observed in several breeding areas along coastal Finland since the mid-1980s.

  5. Avian influenza in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, C

    2009-04-01

    The outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N2 in Mexico in 1994 led to a clear increase in biosecurity measures and improvement of intensive poultry production systems. The control and eradication measures implemented were based on active surveillance, disease detection, depopulation of infected farms and prevention of possible contacts (identified by epidemiological investigations), improvement of biosecurity measures, and restriction of the movement of live birds, poultry products, by-products and infected material. In addition, Mexico introduced a massive vaccination programme, which resulted in the eradication of HPAI in a relatively short time in two affected areas that had a high density of commercial poultry. PMID:19618630

  6. Avian Soft Tissue Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2016-01-01

    Basic surgical instrumentation for avian soft tissue surgery includes soft tissue retractors, microsurgical instrumentation, surgical loupes, and head-mounted lights. Hemostasis is fundamental during the surgical procedures. The indications, approach, and complications associated with soft tissue surgeries of the integumentary (digit constriction repair, feather cyst excision, cranial wound repair, sternal wound repair, uropygial gland excision), gastrointestinal (ingluviotomy, crop biopsy, crop burn repair, celiotomy, coelomic hernia and pseudohernia repair, proventriculotomy, ventriculotomy, enterotomy, intestinal resection and anastomosis, cloacoplasty, cloacopexy), respiratory (rhinolith removal, sinusotomy, tracheotomy, tracheal resection and anastomosis, tracheostomy, pneumonectomy) and reproductive (ovocentesis, ovariectomy, salpingohysterectomy, cesarean section, orchidectomy, vasectomy, phallectomy) systems are reviewed. PMID:26611927

  7. A one-step molecular biology method for simple and rapid detection of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella reovirus (GCRV) HZ08 strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) primers designed against conserved regions of segment 6 (s6) gene were used for the detection of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella reovirus (GCRV) HZ08 subtype. The entire amplification could be completed within 40 min at 62...

  8. Genome sequence analysis of CsRV1, a pathogenic reovirus that infects the blue crab Callinectes sapidus across its trans-hemispheric range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun 1896), which is a commercially important trophic link in coastal ecosystems of the western Atlantic, is infected in both North and South America by C. sapidus Reovirus 1 (CsRV1), a double stranded RNA virus. The 12 genome segments of a North American strai...

  9. Genome sequence analysis of CsRV1: a pathogenic reovirus that infects the blue crab Callinectes sapidus across its trans-hemispheric range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun 1896), which is a commercially important trophic link in coastal ecosystems of the western Atlantic, is infected in both North and South America by C. sapidus Reovirus 1 (CsRV1), a double stranded RNA virus. The 12 genome segments of a North American strai...

  10. Upregulation of ICOS on CD43+ CD4+ murine small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes during acute reovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Montufar-Solis, Dina; Garza, Tomas; Teng, B.-B.; Klein, John R. . E-mail: john.r.klein@uth.tmc.edu

    2006-04-14

    Murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) can be classified according to expression of a CD43 glycoform recognized by the S7 monoclonal antibody. In this study, we examined the response of S7+ and S7- IELs in mice during acute reovirus serotype 3 (Dearing strain) infection, which was confirmed by virus-specific real-time PCR. In vivo proliferation increased significantly for both S7- and S7+ IELs on day 4 post-infection as determined by BrdU incorporation; however, expression of the inducible costimulatory (ICOS) molecule, which peaked on day 7 post-infection, was upregulated on S7+ CD4+ T cells, most of which were CD4+8- IELs. In vitro ICOS stimulation by syngeneic peritoneal macrophages induced IFN-{gamma} secretion from IELs from day 7 infected mice, and was suppressed by treatment with anti-ICOS mAb. Additionally, IFN-{gamma} mRNA increased in CD4+ IELs on day 6 post-infection. These findings indicate that S7- and S7+ IELs are differentially mobilized during the immune response to reovirus infection; that the regulated expression of ICOS is associated with S7+ IELs; and that stimulation of IELs through ICOS enhances IFN-{gamma} synthesis during infection.

  11. Reovirus-mediated induction of ADAR1 (p150) minimally alters RNA editing patterns in discrete brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Jennifer L.; Morabito, Michael V.; Martinez, Charles R.; Gilbert, James A.; Ferrick, Elizabeth A.; Ayers, Gregory D.; Chappell, James D.; Dermody, Terence S.; Emeson, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Transcripts encoding ADAR1, a double-stranded, RNA-specific adenosine deaminase involved in the adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing of mammalian RNAs, can be alternatively spliced to produce an interferon-inducible protein isoform (p150) that is up-regulated in both cell culture and in vivo model systems in response to pathogen or interferon stimulation. In contrast to other tissues, p150 is expressed at extremely low levels in the brain and it is unclear what role, if any, this isoform may play in the innate immune response of the central nervous system (CNS) or whether the extent of editing for RNA substrates critical for CNS function is affected by its induction. To investigate the expression of ADAR1 isoforms in response to viral infection and subsequent alterations in A-to-I editing profiles for endogenous ADAR targets, we used a neuro-tropic strain of reovirus to infect neonatal mice and quantify A-to-I editing in discrete brain regions using a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing strategy. While intracranial injection of reovirus resulted in a widespread increase in the expression of ADAR1 (p150) in multiple brain regions and peripheral organs, significant changes in site-specific A-to-I conversion were quite limited, suggesting that steady-state levels of p150 expression are not a primary determinant for modulating the extent of editing for numerous ADAR targets in vivo. PMID:24906008

  12. Distinct binding sites for zinc and double-stranded RNA in the reovirus outer capsid protein sigma3

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, L.A.; Nibert, M.L.; Co, M.S.; Brown, E.G.; Fields, B.N.

    1988-01-01

    By atomic absorption analysis, the authors determined that the reovirus outer capsid protein sigma3, which binds double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), is a zinc metalloprotein. Using Northwestern blots and a novel zinc blotting technique, the authors localized the zinc- and dsRNA-binding activities of sigma3 to distinct V8 protease-generated fragments. Zinc-binding activity was contained within an amino-terminal fragment that contained a transcription factor IIIA-like zinc-binding sequence, and dsRNA-binding activity was associated with a carboxy-terminal fragment. By these techniques, new zinc- and dsRNA-binding activities were also detected in reovirus core proteins. A sequence similarity was observed between the catalytic site of the picornavirus proteases and the transcription factor IIIA-like zinc-binding site within sigma3. The authors suggest that the zinc- and dsRNA-binding activities of sigma3 may be important for its proposed regulatory effects on viral and host cell transcription and translation.

  13. Genome Sequence Analysis of CsRV1: A Pathogenic Reovirus that Infects the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus Across Its Trans-Hemispheric Range

    PubMed Central

    Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R.; Warg, Janet V.; Neill, John D.; Killian, Mary L.; Vinagre, Anapaula S.; Brown, Shanai; Almeida, Andréa Santos e; Schott, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, 1896, which is a commercially important trophic link in coastal ecosystems of the western Atlantic, is infected in both North and South America by C. sapidus Reovirus 1 (CsRV1), a double stranded RNA virus. The 12 genome segments of a North American strain of CsRV1 were sequenced using Ion Torrent technology. Putative functions could be assigned for 3 of the 13 proteins encoded in the genome, based on their similarity to proteins encoded in other reovirus genomes. Comparison of the CsRV1 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) sequence to genomes of other crab-infecting reoviruses shows that it is similar to the mud crab reovirus found in Scylla serrata and WX-2012 in Eriocheir sinensis, Chinese mitten crab, and supports the idea that there is a distinct “Crabreo” genus, different from Seadornavirus and Cardoreovirus, the two closest genera in the Reoviridae. A region of 98% nucleotide sequence identity between CsRV1 and the only available sequence of the P virus of Macropipus depurator suggests that these two viruses may be closely related. An 860 nucleotide region of the CsRV1 RdRP gene was amplified and sequenced from 15 infected crabs collected from across the geographic range of C. sapidus. Pairwise analysis of predicted protein sequences shows that CsRV1 strains in Brazil can be distinguished from those in North America based on conserved residues in this gene. The sequencing, annotation, and preliminary population metrics of the genome of CsRV1 should facilitate additional studies in diverse disciplines, including structure-function relationships of reovirus proteins, investigations into the evolution of the Reoviridae, and biogeographic research on the connectivity of C. sapidus populations across the Northern and Southern hemispheres. PMID:26904003

  14. Genome Sequence Analysis of CsRV1: A Pathogenic Reovirus that Infects the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus Across Its Trans-Hemispheric Range.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Emily M; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Warg, Janet V; Neill, John D; Killian, Mary L; Vinagre, Anapaula S; Brown, Shanai; Almeida, Andréa Santos E; Schott, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, 1896, which is a commercially important trophic link in coastal ecosystems of the western Atlantic, is infected in both North and South America by C. sapidus Reovirus 1 (CsRV1), a double stranded RNA virus. The 12 genome segments of a North American strain of CsRV1 were sequenced using Ion Torrent technology. Putative functions could be assigned for 3 of the 13 proteins encoded in the genome, based on their similarity to proteins encoded in other reovirus genomes. Comparison of the CsRV1 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) sequence to genomes of other crab-infecting reoviruses shows that it is similar to the mud crab reovirus found in Scylla serrata and WX-2012 in Eriocheir sinensis, Chinese mitten crab, and supports the idea that there is a distinct "Crabreo" genus, different from Seadornavirus and Cardoreovirus, the two closest genera in the Reoviridae. A region of 98% nucleotide sequence identity between CsRV1 and the only available sequence of the P virus of Macropipus depurator suggests that these two viruses may be closely related. An 860 nucleotide region of the CsRV1 RdRP gene was amplified and sequenced from 15 infected crabs collected from across the geographic range of C. sapidus. Pairwise analysis of predicted protein sequences shows that CsRV1 strains in Brazil can be distinguished from those in North America based on conserved residues in this gene. The sequencing, annotation, and preliminary population metrics of the genome of CsRV1 should facilitate additional studies in diverse disciplines, including structure-function relationships of reovirus proteins, investigations into the evolution of the Reoviridae, and biogeographic research on the connectivity of C. sapidus populations across the Northern and Southern hemispheres. PMID:26904003

  15. The HIV Matrix Protein p17 Promotes the Activation of Human Hepatic Stellate Cells through Interactions with CXCR2 and Syndecan-2

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Carino, Adriana; Cipriani, Sabrina; D'Amore, Claudio; Sidoni, Angelo; Sordo, Rachele Del; Ferri, Ivana; Lucattelli, Monica; Lunghi, Benedetta; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p17 is a matrix protein involved in virus life's cycle. CXCR2 and Syndecan-2, the two major coreceptors for the p17 protein, are expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a key cell type involved in matrix deposition in liver fibrotic disorders. Aim In this report we have investigated the in vitro impact of p17 on HSCs transdifferentiation and function and underlying signaling pathways involved in these processes. Methods LX-2 cells, a human HSC line, and primary HSC were challenged with p17 and expressions of fibrogenic markers and of p17 receptors were assessed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Downstream intracellular signaling pathways were evaluated with qRT-PCR and Western blot as well as after pre-treatment with specific pathway inhibitors. Results Exposure of LX2 cells to p17 increases their contractile force, reshapes the cytoskeleton fibers and upregulates the expression of transdifferentiation markers including αSMA, COL1α1 and endothelin-1 through the activation of Jak/STAT and Rho signaling pathways. These effects are lost in HSCs pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide. Confocal laser microscopy studies demonstrates that CXCR2 and syndecan-2 co-associate at the plasma membrane after exposure to p17. Immunostaining of HIV/HCV liver biopsies from co-infected patients reveals that the progression of liver fibrosis correlates with a reduced expression of CXCR2. Conclusions The HIV matrix protein p17 is pro-fibrogenic through its interactions both with CXCR2 and syndecan-2 on activated HSCs. PMID:24736615

  16. SARS/avian coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Monceyron Jonassen, C

    2006-01-01

    In the hunt for the aetiology of the SARS outbreak in 2003, a newly developed virus DNA micro-array was successfully used to hybridise PCR products obtained by random amplification of nucleic acids extracted from a cell culture infected with material from a SARS patient. The SARS agent was found to hybridise with micro-array probes from both coronaviruses and astroviruses, but one of the coronavirus probes and the four astrovirus probes contained redundant sequences, spanning a highly conserved motif, named s2m, found at the 3' end of the genomes of almost all astroviruses, one picornavirus, and the poultry coronaviruses. The three other coronavirus probes, that hybridised with the SARS agent, were located in the replicase gene, and it could be concluded that the SARS agent was a novel coronavirus, harbouring s2m. The presence of this motif in different virus families is probably the result of recombinations between unrelated viruses, but its presence in both poultry and SARS coronaviruses could suggest a bird involvement in the history of the SARS coronavirus. A recent screening of wild birds for the presence of coronaviruses, using a pan-coronavirus RT-PCR, led to the identification of novel coronaviruses in the three species studied. Phylogenetic analyses performed on both replicase gene and nucleocapsid protein could not add support to a close relationship between avian and SARS coronaviruses, but all the novel avian coronaviruses were found to harbour s2m. The motif is inserted at a homologous place in avian and SARS coronavirus genomes, but in a somewhat different context for the SARS coronavirus. If the presence of s2m in these viruses is a result of two separate recombination events, this suggests that its particular position in these genomes is the only one that would not be deleterious for coronaviral replication, or that it is the result of a copy-choice recombination between coronaviruses, following an ancestral introduction in the coronavirus family by

  17. The Avian Development Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Avian Development Facility (ADF) supports 36 eggs in two carousels, one of which rotates to provide a 1-g control for comparing to eggs grown in microgravity. The ADF was designed to incubate up to 36 Japanese quail eggs, 18 in microgravity and 18 in artificial gravity. The two sets of eggs were exposed to otherwise identical conditions, the first time this is been accomplished in space. Eggs are preserved at intervals to provide snapshots of their development for later analysis. Quails incubate in just 15 days, so they are an ideal species to be studied within the duration of space shuttle missions. Further, several investigators can use the same specimens to address different questions. The ADF originated in NASA's Shuttle Student Involvement program in the 1980s and was developed under the NASA Small Business Irnovation Research program. In late 2001, the ADF made its first flight and carried eggs used in two investigations.

  18. Avian psychology and communication.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Candy; Skelhorn, John

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of animal communication is a complex issue and one that attracts much research and debate. 'Receiver psychology' has been highlighted as a potential selective force, and we review how avian psychological processes and biases can influence the evolution and design of signals as well as the progress that has been made in testing these ideas in behavioural studies. Interestingly, although birds are a focal group for experimental psychologists and behavioural ecologists alike, the integration of theoretical ideas from psychology into studies of communication has been relatively slow. However, recent operant experiments are starting to address how birds perceive and respond to complex natural signals in an attempt to answer evolutionary problems in communication. This review outlines how a psychological approach to understanding communication is useful, and we hope that it stimulates further research addressing the role of psychological mechanisms in signal evolution. PMID:15306314

  19. Thromboelastography in Selected Avian Species.

    PubMed

    Strindberg, Sophie; Nielsen, Tenna W; Ribeiro, Ângela M; Wiinberg, Bo; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Bertelsen, Mads F

    2015-12-01

    Currently available assay methods and reagents are not optimized for evaluating avian hemostasis; therefore, assessing avian coagulopathies is challenging. Recently, thromboelastography (TEG), which measures the viscoelastic properties of blood, has been used clinically in mammalian species to diagnose and characterize hemostatic disorders. To evaluate TEG in healthy individuals of 6 avian species, we modified existing mammalian TEG protocols to allow analysis of citrated, avian whole-blood samples collected from scarlet ibis (Eudocimus ruber) (n = 13), American flamingos ( Phoenicopterus ruber ) (n = 13), helmeted Guinea fowl ( Numida meleagris ) (n = 12), Amazon parrots (Amazona species) (n = 9), Humboldt penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ) (n = 6), and domestic chickens (n = 16). Activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and fibrinogen were measured as a means of comparison. Regardless of the mode of activation, clot formation in the species studied was markedly delayed compared with mammals. Because of prolonged reaction time (14.7-52.7 minutes) with kaolin and diluted tissue factor, undiluted human tissue factor was used in all avian samples because it provided the shortest reaction time. Species differed significantly in reaction time (P = .007), clotting rate (P < .001), rate of clot formation (α angle; P < .001), and maximum amplitude (P < .001) values, indicating that species-specific reference intervals are necessary. Based on these results, TEG with specific reference intervals could prove useful in evaluating avian hemostatic disorders. PMID:26771317

  20. Evaluating the cell mediated immune response of avian species to avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The measurement of avian cellular immunity is critical to understanding the role and regulation of avian lymphocytes following avian influenza virus infection. Although the ability to measure avian T cell responses has steadily increased over the last few years, few studies have examined the role o...

  1. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Making a Candidate Vaccine Virus Related Links Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Language: English Españ ...

  2. Translation of reovirus RNA species m1 can initiate at either of the first two in-frame initiation codons.

    PubMed Central

    Roner, M R; Roner, L A; Joklik, W K

    1993-01-01

    The m1 species of reovirus RNA, which encodes the minor protein component mu 2, possesses two initiation codons, one "strong" according to Kozak rules and preceded by 13 residues (IC1), the other "weak" and located 49 codons downstream of the first (IC2). In reovirus-infected cells only IC2 is used, but initiation from IC1 can be activated, and efficiency of initiation from either initiation codon modulated over a wide range, by coupling unrelated sequences to either or both ends of m1 RNA. For example, when the M1 genome segment is cloned into the thymidine kinase gene of vaccinia virus in such a way that various "irrelevant" stretches of nucleotides comprising restriction endonuclease cleavage sites or promoter remnants are coupled to the 5' end of m1 RNA, translation of the resultant transcripts is also initiated at IC2, with frequencies controlled by the nature of the attached sequences. However, in rabbit reticulocyte lysates these same transcripts are translated from IC1 as well as from IC2, and transcripts in which m1 RNA is preceded by long sequences of encephalomyocarditis virus RNA (from the T7 polymerase-controlled pTM1 vector) are translated exclusively from IC1. By contrast, m1 RNA itself is translated only from IC2. It appears that the most important factor that controls the extent to which translation is initiated from IC1 and IC2 is their "availability," which is likely to be a function of the extent to which the regions on either side of them interact with each other (and also, to a lesser extent, with the 3' untranslated region) either directly or via interaction with host cell proteins. The effects described here are of considerable potential significance when genetic material is rearranged as a result of translocations, insertions, deletions, and amplifications--that is, when sequences that are normally separated are brought into apposition. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8415636

  3. Reovirus μ2 Protein Inhibits Interferon Signaling through a Novel Mechanism Involving Nuclear Accumulation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 9▿

    PubMed Central

    Zurney, Jennifer; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Holm, Geoffrey H.; Dermody, Terence S.; Sherry, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The secreted cytokine alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) binds its receptor to activate the Jak-STAT signal transduction pathway, leading to formation of the heterotrimeric IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcription complex for induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) and establishment of an antiviral state. Many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit the IFN pathway, thereby subverting the innate antiviral response. Here, we demonstrate that the mildly myocarditic reovirus type 1 Lang (T1L), but not the nonmyocarditic reovirus type 3 Dearing, represses IFN induction of a subset of ISGs and that this repressor function segregates with the T1L M1 gene. Concordantly, the T1L M1 gene product, μ2, dramatically inhibits IFN-β-induced reporter gene expression. Surprisingly, T1L infection does not degrade components of the ISGF3 complex or interfere with STAT1 or STAT2 nuclear translocation as has been observed for other viruses. Instead, infection with T1L or reassortant or recombinant viruses containing the T1L M1 gene results in accumulation of interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) in the nucleus. This effect has not been previously described for any virus and suggests that μ2 modulates IRF9 interactions with STATs for both ISGF3 function and nuclear export. The M1 gene is a determinant of virus strain-specific differences in the IFN response, which are linked to virus strain-specific differences in induction of murine myocarditis. We find that virus-induced myocarditis is associated with repression of IFN function, providing new insights into the pathophysiology of this disease. Together, these data provide the first report of an increase in IRF9 nuclear accumulation associated with viral subversion of the IFN response and couple virus strain-specific differences in IFN antagonism to the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis. PMID:19109390

  4. A brief introduction to avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by a type A influenza virus isolated from and adapted to an avian host. This chapter covers the basic physicochemical aspects of AIV including; virus family and properties, subtype classification; basic molecular biology and genetics. The avian host range and ecology...

  5. 77 FR 34783 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... avian influenza (HPAI). On January 24, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 4046-4056... Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule... importation of bird and poultry products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian...

  6. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal... products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The... vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype...

  7. Markov Chain Estimation of Avian Seasonal Fecundity

    EPA Science Inventory

    To explore the consequences of modeling decisions on inference about avian seasonal fecundity we generalize previous Markov chain (MC) models of avian nest success to formulate two different MC models of avian seasonal fecundity that represent two different ways to model renestin...

  8. Identification and characterization of a double-stranded RNA- reovirus temperature-sensitive mutant defective in minor core protein mu2.

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, K M

    1996-01-01

    A newly identified temperature-sensitive mutant whose defect was mapped to the reovirus M1 gene (minor core protein mu2) was studied to better understand the functions of this virion protein. Sequence determination of the Ml gene of this mutant (tsH11.2) revealed a predicted methionine-to-threonine alteration at amino acid 399 and a change from proline to histidine at amino acid 414. The mutant made normal amounts of single-stranded RNA, both in in vitro transcriptase assays and in infected cells, and normal amounts of progeny viral protein at early times in a restrictive infection. However, tsH11.2 produced neither detectable progeny protein nor double-stranded RNA at late times in a restrictive infection. These studies indicate that mu2 plays a role in the conversion of reovirus mRNA to progeny double-stranded RNA. PMID:8676444

  9. Avian infectious laryngotracheitis.

    PubMed

    Bagust, T J; Jones, R C; Guy, J S

    2000-08-01

    Avian infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) herpesvirus continues to cause sporadic cases of respiratory disease in chickens world-wide. Sources of transmission of ILT infection are three-fold, namely: chickens with acute upper respiratory tract disease, latently infected 'carrier' fowls which excrete infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) when stressed, and all fomites (inanimate articles as well as the personnel in contact with infected chickens). Infectious laryngotracheitis virus infectivity can persist for weeks to months in tracheal mucus or carcasses. Rigorous site biosecurity is therefore critical in ILT disease control. Furthermore, while current (modified live) ILT vaccines can offer good protection, the strains of ILTV used in vaccines can also produce latent infections, as well as ILT disease following bird-to-bird spread. The regional nature of reservoirs of ILTV-infected flocks will tend to interact unfavourably with widely varying ILT control practices in the poultry industry, so as to periodically result in sporadic and unexpected outbreaks of ILT in intensive poultry industry populations. Precautions for trade-related movements of chickens of all ages must therefore include an accurate knowledge of the ILT infection status, both of the donor and recipient flocks. PMID:10935275

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus contains an epitope immunoreactive with thymosin. cap alpha. /sub 1/ and the 30-amino acid synthetic p17 group-specific antigen peptide HGP-30

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, P.H.; Naylor, C.W.; Badamchian, M.; Wada, S.; Goldstein, A.L.; Wang, S.S.; Sun, D.K.; Thornton, A.H.; Sarin, P.S.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have reported that an antiserum prepared against thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ (which shares a region of homology with the p17 protein of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated human immunodeficiency virus) effectively neutralized the AIDs virus and prevented its replication in H9 cells. Using HPLC and immunoblot analysis, they have identified from a clone B, type III human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-IIIB) extracts a protein with a molecular weight of 17,000 that is immunoreactive with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was found in retroviral extracts from a number of nonhuman species including feline, bovine, simian, gibbon, and murine retroviruses. Heterologous antiserum prepared against a 30-amino acid synthetic peptide analogue (HGP-30) does not cross-react with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ but does react specifically with the p17 protein of the AIDS virus in a manner identical to that seen with an HTLV-IIIB p17-specific monoclonal antibody. The demonstration that this synthetic analogue is immunogenic and that antibodies to HGP-30 cross-react not only with synthetic peptide but also with the HTLV-IIIB p17 viral protein provides an additional, and potentially more specific, candidate for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine for AIDS. In addition, the p17 synthetic peptide (HGP-3) may prove to be useful in a diagnostic assay for the detection of AIDS virus infection in seronegative individuals.

  11. Non-structural proteins P17 and P33 are involved in the assembly of the internal membrane-containing virus PRD1

    SciTech Connect

    Karttunen, Jenni; Mäntynen, Sari; Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Bamford, Jaana K.H.; Oksanen, Hanna M.

    2015-08-15

    Bacteriophage PRD1, which has been studied intensively at the structural and functional levels, still has some gene products with unknown functions and certain aspects of the PRD1 assembly process have remained unsolved. In this study, we demonstrate that the phage-encoded non-structural proteins P17 and P33, either individually or together, complement the defect in a temperature-sensitive GroES mutant of Escherichia coli for host growth and PRD1 propagation. Confocal microscopy of fluorescent fusion proteins revealed co-localisation between P33 and P17 as well as between P33 and the host chaperonin GroEL. A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay demonstrated that the diffusion of the P33 fluorescent fusion protein was substantially slower in E. coli than theoretically calculated, presumably resulting from intermolecular interactions. Our results indicate that P33 and P17 function in procapsid assembly, possibly in association with the host chaperonin complex GroEL/GroES. - Highlights: • Two non-structural proteins of PRD1 are involved in the virus assembly. • P17 and P33 complement the defect in GroES of Escherichia coli. • P33 co-localises with GroEL and P17 in the bacterium. • Slow motion of P33 in the bacterium suggests association with cellular components.

  12. Reovirus-associated reduction of microRNA-let-7d is related to the increased apoptotic death of cancer cells in clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Nuovo, Gerard J; Garofalo, Michela; Valeri, Nicola; Roulstone, Vicki; Volinia, Stefano; Cohn, David E; Phelps, Mitch; Harrington, Kevin J; Vile, Richard; Melcher, Alan; Galanis, Evanthia; Sehl, Sarah; Adair, Rob; Scott, Karen; Rose, Ailsa; Toogood, Giles; Coffey, Matthew C

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the in situ molecular correlates of infection from cancer patients treated with reovirus. Melanoma, colorectal, and ovarian cancer samples from such patients showed variable infection of the cancer cells but not the intermingled benign cells. RT in situ PCR showed most cancer cells contained the viral genome with threefold less having productive viral infection as documented by either tubulin or reoviral protein co-expression. Productive infection in the cancer cells was strongly correlated with co-expression of p38 and caspase-3 as well as apoptosis-related death (P<0.001). The cancer cell apoptotic death was due to a marked viral-induced inhibition of microRNA-let-7d that, in turn, upregulated caspase-3 activity. In summary, reovirus shows a striking tropism to cancer cells in clinical samples. A rate-limiting factor of reovirus-induced cancer cell death is productive viral infection that operates via the marked reduction of microRNA-let-7d and concomitant elevated caspase-3 expression. PMID:22699519

  13. Comparative proteomic analyses demonstrate enhanced interferon and STAT-1 activation in reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati, Peyman; Komher, Krysten; Severini, Giulia; Coombs, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses are exclusively and intimately dependent upon their host cells for replication. During replication viruses induce profound changes within cells, including: induction of signaling pathways, morphological changes, and cell death. Many such cellular perturbations have been analyzed at the transcriptomic level by gene arrays and recent efforts have begun to analyze cellular proteomic responses. We recently described comparative stable isotopic (SILAC) analyses of reovirus, strain type 3 Dearing (T3D)-infected HeLa cells. For the present study we employed the complementary labeling strategy of iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) to examine HeLa cell changes induced by T3D, another reovirus strain, type 1 Lang, and UV-inactivated T3D (UV-T3D). Triplicate replicates of cytosolic and nuclear fractions identified a total of 2375 proteins, of which 50, 57, and 46 were significantly up-regulated, and 37, 26, and 44 were significantly down-regulated by T1L, T3D, and UV-T3D, respectively. Several pathways, most notably the Interferon signaling pathway and the EIF2 and ILK signaling pathways, were induced by virus infection. Western blots confirmed that cells were more strongly activated by live T3D as demonstrated by elevated levels of key proteins like STAT-1, ISG-15, IFIT-1, IFIT-3, and Mx1. This study expands our understanding of reovirus-induced host responses. PMID:25905045

  14. Avian influenza virus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shelan; Sha, Jianping; Yu, Zhao; Hu, Yan; Chan, Ta-Chien; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Pan, Hao; Cheng, Wei; Mao, Shenghua; Zhang, Run Ju; Chen, Enfu

    2016-07-01

    The unprecedented epizootic of avian influenza viruses, such as H5N1, H5N6, H7N1 and H10N8, has continued to cause disease in humans in recent years. In 2013, another novel influenza A (H7N9) virus emerged in China, and 30% of those patients died. Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to avian influenza and are more likely to develop severe complications and to die, especially when infection occurs in the middle and late trimesters. Viremia is believed to occur infrequently, and thus vertical transmission induced by avian influenza appears to be rare. However, avian influenza increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including spontaneous abortion, preterm birth and fatal distress. This review summarises 39 cases of pregnant women and their fetuses from different countries dating back to 1997, including 11, 15 and 13 infections with H7N9, H5N1 and the 2009 pandemic influenza (H1N1), respectively. We analysed the epidemic features, following the geographical, population and pregnancy trimester distributions; underlying diseases; exposure history; medical timelines; human-to-human transmission; pathogenicity and vertical transmission; antivirus treatments; maternal severity and mortality and pregnancy outcome. The common experiences reported in different countries and areas suggest that early identification and treatment are imperative. In the future, vigilant virologic and epidemiologic surveillance systems should be developed to monitor avian influenza viruses during pregnancy. Furthermore, extensive study on the immune mechanisms should be conducted, as this will guide safe, rational immunomodulatory treatment among this high-risk population. Most importantly, we should develop a universal avian influenza virus vaccine to prevent outbreaks of the different subtypes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27187752

  15. Avian reproductive physiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  16. THE STELLAR OBLIQUITY AND THE LONG-PERIOD PLANET IN THE HAT-P-17 EXOPLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Crepp, Justin R.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.; Johnson, John Asher; Knutson, Heather A.; Zhao Ming

    2013-08-01

    We present the measured projected obliquity-the sky-projected angle between the stellar spin axis and orbital angular momentum-of the inner planet of the HAT-P-17 multi-planet system. We measure the sky-projected obliquity of the star to be {lambda}=19{sup +14}{sub -16} deg by modeling the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect in Keck/HIRES radial velocities (RVs). The anomalous RV time series shows an asymmetry relative to the midtransit time, ordinarily suggesting a nonzero obliquity-but in this case at least part of the asymmetry may be due to the convective blueshift, increasing the uncertainty in the determination of {lambda}. We employ the semi-analytical approach of Hirano et al. that includes the effects of macroturbulence, instrumental broadening, and convective blueshift to accurately model the anomaly in the net RV caused by the planet eclipsing part of the rotating star. Obliquity measurements are an important tool for testing theories of planet formation and migration. To date, the measured obliquities of {approx}50 Jovian planets span the full range, from prograde to retrograde, with planets orbiting cool stars preferentially showing alignment of stellar spins and planetary orbits. Our results are consistent with this pattern emerging from tidal interactions in the convective envelopes of cool stars and close-in planets. In addition, our 1.8 yr of new RVs for this system show that the orbit of the outer planet is more poorly constrained than previously thought, with an orbital period now in the range of 10-36 yr.

  17. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from expe...

  18. Laser Cleaning of Avian Eggshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, L.; Ball, A.; Russell, D.

    A low vacuum SEM was used to evaluate the effect of using an Nd:YAG laser as a non-contact technique for cleaning avian eggshells. The technique shows potential, since there are no obvious deleterious effects from cleaning, but further study is required to understand how the laser is interacting with the sample surface.

  19. Molecular characterization of avian astroviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Astroviruses are frequently associated with enteric diseases in poultry, being isolated from cases of runting-stunting syndrome (RSS) of broiler chickens, poult enteritis complex (PEC) and poult enteritis mortality syndrome (PEMS) of turkeys. Currently, five types of avian astrovirus have been ident...

  20. Avian Influenza: Our current understanding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) has become one of the most important diseases of the poultry industry around the world. The virus has a broad host range in birds and mammals, although the natural reservoir is considered to be in wild birds where it typically causes an asymptomatic to mild infection. T...

  1. Reverse genetics of avian metapneumoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infection in turkeys and development of a reverse genetics system for aMPV subgroup C (aMPV-C) virus will be presented. By using reverse genetics technology, we generated recombinant aMPV-C viruses containing a different length of glycoprotein (G) gene or...

  2. Avian metapneumovirus in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States of America (USA), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) causes an upper respiratory tract infection in turkeys; no outbreaks have been reported in commercial chicken flocks. Typical clinical signs of the disease in turkey poults include coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, tracheal rale...

  3. Influenza vaccines for avian species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beginning in Southeast Asia, in 2003, a multi-national epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity an...

  4. Avian disease at the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, M.

    2002-01-01

    A review of existing records and the scientific literature was conducted for occurrences of avian diseases affecting free-ranging avifauna within the Salton Sea ecosystem. The period for evaluation was 1907 through 1999. Records of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Biological Survey and the scientific literature were the data sources for the period of 1907a??1939. The narrative reports of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Sonny Bono National Wildlife Refuge Complex and the epizootic database of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center were the primary data sources for the remainder of the evaluation. The pattern of avian disease at the Salton Sea has changed greatly over time. Relative to past decades, there was a greater frequency of major outbreaks of avian disease at the Salton Sea during the 1990s than in previous decades, a greater variety of disease agents causing epizootics, and apparent chronic increases in the attrition of birds from disease. Avian mortality was high for about a decade beginning during the mid-1920s, diminished substantially by the 1940s and was at low to moderate levels until the 1990s when it reached the highest levels reported. Avian botulism (Clostridium botulinum type C) was the only major cause of avian disease until 1979 when the first major epizootic of avian cholera (Pasteurella multocidia) was documented. Waterfowl and shorebirds were the primary species affected by avian botulism. A broader spectrum of species have been killed by avian cholera but waterfowl have suffered the greatest losses. Avian cholera reappeared in 1983 and has joined avian botulism as a recurring cause of avian mortality. In 1989, avian salmonellosis (Salmonella typhimurium) was first diagnosed as a major cause of avian disease within the Salton Sea ecosystem and has since reappeared several times, primarily among cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis). The largest loss from a single epizootic occurred in 1992, when an estimated

  5. Pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production by reovirus treated melanoma cells is PKR/NF-κB mediated and supports innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune priming

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As well as inducing direct oncolysis, reovirus treatment of melanoma is associated with activation of innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune responses. Results Here we characterise the effects of conditioned media from reovirus-infected, dying human melanoma cells (reoTCM), in the absence of live virus, to address the immune bystander potential of reovirus therapy. In addition to RANTES, IL-8, MIP-1α and MIP-1β, reovirus-infected melanoma cells secreted eotaxin, IP-10 and the type 1 interferon IFN-β. To address the mechanisms responsible for the inflammatory composition of reoTCM, we show that IL-8 and IFN-β secretion by reovirus-infected melanoma cells was associated with activation of NF-κB and decreased by pre-treatment with small molecule inhibitors of NF-κB and PKR; specific siRNA-mediated knockdown further confirmed a role for PKR. This pro-inflammatory milieu induced a chemotactic response in isolated natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DC) and anti-melanoma cytotoxic T cells (CTL). Following culture in reoTCM, NK cells upregulated CD69 expression and acquired greater lytic potential against tumour targets. Furthermore, melanoma cell-loaded DC cultured in reoTCM were more effective at priming adaptive anti-tumour immunity. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the PKR- and NF-κB-dependent induction of pro-inflammatory molecules that accompanies reovirus-mediated killing can recruit and activate innate and adaptive effector cells, thus potentially altering the tumour microenvironment to support bystander immune-mediated therapy as well as direct viral oncolysis. PMID:21338484

  6. Piscine Reovirus: Genomic and Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis from Farmed and Wild Salmonids Collected on the Canada/US Pacific Coast

    PubMed Central

    Siah, Ahmed; Morrison, Diane B.; Fringuelli, Elena; Savage, Paul; Richmond, Zina; Johns, Robert; Purcell, Maureen K.; Johnson, Stewart C.; Saksida, Sonja M.

    2015-01-01

    Piscine reovirus (PRV) is a double stranded non-enveloped RNA virus detected in farmed and wild salmonids. This study examined the phylogenetic relationships among different PRV sequence types present in samples from salmonids in Western Canada and the US, including Alaska (US), British Columbia (Canada) and Washington State (US). Tissues testing positive for PRV were partially sequenced for segment S1, producing 71 sequences that grouped into 10 unique sequence types. Sequence analysis revealed no identifiable geographical or temporal variation among the sequence types. Identical sequence types were found in fish sampled in 2001, 2005 and 2014. In addition, PRV positive samples from fish derived from Alaska, British Columbia and Washington State share identical sequence types. Comparative analysis of the phylogenetic tree indicated that Canada/US Pacific Northwest sequences formed a subgroup with some Norwegian sequence types (group II), distinct from other Norwegian and Chilean sequences (groups I, III and IV). Representative PRV positive samples from farmed and wild fish in British Columbia and Washington State were subjected to genome sequencing using next generation sequencing methods. Individual analysis of each of the 10 partial segments indicated that the Canadian and US PRV sequence types clustered separately from available whole genome sequences of some Norwegian and Chilean sequences for all segments except the segment S4. In summary, PRV was genetically homogenous over a large geographic distance (Alaska to Washington State), and the sequence types were relatively stable over a 13 year period. PMID:26536673

  7. Laminin receptor is an interacting partner for viral outer capsid protein VP5 in grass carp reovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Yu, Fei; Li, Jiale; Lu, Liqun

    2016-03-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV) is responsible for viral hemorrhagic disease in cultured grass carp Ctenopharyngon idellus. Through yeast two-hybrid screen, laminin receptor (LamR) was identified as a potential interacting partner for the outer capsid protein VP5 of GCRV. We cloned and sequenced the gene encoding grass carp LamR. Viral attachment assay demonstrated the involvement of membrane-associated LamR in GCRV infection. Solid-phase overlay assays demonstrated that GCRV interacted with GST-tagged LamR in vitro. In contrast to VP7, GST-tagged VP5 was shown to associate with LamR in both pull-down and solid-phase blot overlay assays. With the reduction of LamR expression in CIK cells achieved by RNAi, remarkably reduced infection efficiency of GCRV was observed. CIK cells pretreated with polyclonal antibody against LamR resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of GCRV infection. These results collectively indicated that grass carp LamR was involved in GCRV infection by interacting with viral outer capsid protein VP5. PMID:26848829

  8. Plate tectonics of virus shell assembly and reorganization in phage φ8, a distant relative of mammalian reoviruses.

    PubMed

    El Omari, Kamel; Sutton, Geoff; Ravantti, Janne J; Zhang, Hanwen; Walter, Thomas S; Grimes, Jonathan M; Bamford, Dennis H; Stuart, David I; Mancini, Erika J

    2013-08-01

    The hallmark of a virus is its capsid, which harbors the viral genome and is formed from protein subunits, which assemble following precise geometric rules. dsRNA viruses use an unusual protein multiplicity (120 copies) to form their closed capsids. We have determined the atomic structure of the capsid protein (P1) from the dsRNA cystovirus Φ8. In the crystal P1 forms pentamers, very similar in shape to facets of empty procapsids, suggesting an unexpected assembly pathway that proceeds via a pentameric intermediate. Unlike the elongated proteins used by dsRNA mammalian reoviruses, P1 has a compact trapezoid-like shape and a distinct arrangement in the shell, with two near-identical conformers in nonequivalent structural environments. Nevertheless, structural similarity with the analogous protein from the mammalian viruses suggests a common ancestor. The unusual shape of the molecule may facilitate dramatic capsid expansion during phage maturation, allowing P1 to switch interaction interfaces to provide capsid plasticity. PMID:23891291

  9. Piscine reovirus: Genomic and molecular phylogenetic analysis from farmed and wild salmonids collected on the Canada/US Pacific Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siah, Ahmed; Morrison, Diane B.; Fringuelli, Elena; Savage, Paul S.; Richmond, Zina; Purcell, Maureen K.; Johns, Robert; Johnson, Stewart C.; Sakasida, Sonja M.

    2015-01-01

    Piscine reovirus (PRV) is a double stranded non-enveloped RNA virus detected in farmed and wild salmonids. This study examined the phylogenetic relationships among different PRV sequence types present in samples from salmonids in Western Canada and the US, including Alaska (US), British Columbia (Canada) and Washington State (US). Tissues testing positive for PRV were partially sequenced for segment S1, producing 71 sequences that grouped into 10 unique sequence types. Sequence analysis revealed no identifiable geographical or temporal variation among the sequence types. Identical sequence types were found in fish sampled in 2001, 2005 and 2014. In addition, PRV positive samples from fish derived from Alaska, British Columbia and Washington State share identical sequence types. Comparative analysis of the phylogenetic tree indicated that Canada/US Pacific Northwest sequences formed a subgroup with some Norwegian sequence types (group II), distinct from other Norwegian and Chilean sequences (groups I, III and IV). Representative PRV positive samples from farmed and wild fish in British Columbia and Washington State were subjected to genome sequencing using next generation sequencing methods. Individual analysis of each of the 10 partial segments indicated that the Canadian and US PRV sequence types clustered separately from available whole genome sequences of some Norwegian and Chilean sequences for all segments except the segment S4. In summary, PRV was genetically homogenous over a large geographic distance (Alaska to Washington State), and the sequence types were relatively stable over a 13 year period.

  10. Associations between piscine reovirus infection and life history traits in wild-caught Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. in Norway.

    PubMed

    Garseth, Ase Helen; Biering, Eirik; Aunsmo, Arnfinn

    2013-10-01

    Piscine Reovirus (PRV), the putative causative agent of heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), is widely distributed in both farmed and wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) in Norway. While HSMI is a common and commercially important disease in farmed Atlantic salmon, the presence of PRV has so far not been associated with HSMI related lesions in wild salmon. Factors associated with PRV-infection were investigated in returning Atlantic salmon captured in Norwegian rivers. A multilevel mixed-effect logistic regression model confirmed clustering within rivers and demonstrated that PRV-infection is associated with life-history, sex, catch-year and body length as a proxy for sea-age. Escaped farmed salmon (odds ratio/OR: 7.32, p<0.001) and hatchery-reared salmon (OR: 1.69 p=0.073) have higher odds of being PRV-infected than wild Atlantic salmon. Male salmon have double odds of being PRV infected compared to female salmon (OR: 2.11, p<0.001). Odds of being PRV-infected increased with body-length measured as decimetres (OR: 1.20, p=0.004). Since body length and sea-age are correlated (r=0.85 p<0.001), body length serves as a proxy for sea-age, meaning that spending more years in sea increases the odds of being PRV-infected. PMID:23906390

  11. Avian influenza: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed

    Pasick, J; Berhane, Y; Hooper-McGrevy, K

    2009-04-01

    Reports of sporadic avian influenza outbreaks involving domestic poultry date back to the 1960s. With the exception of A/turkey/Ontario/7732/1966 (H5N9), which was isolated from a turkey breeding establishment, all viruses characterised prior to 2004 fit the criteria of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI). Only in retrospect was A/turkey/Ontario/7732/1966 shown to meet the criteria of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). In 2004, Canada reported its first case of HPAI to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). The outbreak, which began in a broiler breeder farm in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, involved an H7N3 LPAI virus which underwent a sudden virulence shift to HPAI. More than 17 million birds were culled and CAN$380 million in gross economic costs incurred before the outbreak was eventually brought under control. In its aftermath a number of changes were implemented to mitigate the impact of any future HPAI outbreaks. These changes involved various aspects of avian influenza detection and control, including self-quarantine, biosecurity, surveillance, and laboratory testing. In 2005, a national surveillance programme for influenza A viruses in wild birds was initiated. Results of this survey provided evidence for wild birds as the likely source of an H5N2 LPAI outbreak that occurred in domestic ducks in the Fraser Valley in the autumn of 2005. Wild birds were once again implicated in an H7N3 HPAI outbreak involving a broiler breeder operation in Saskatchewan in 2007. Fortunately, both of these outbreaks were limited in extent, a consequence of some of the changes implemented in response to the 2004 British Columbia outbreak. PMID:19618638

  12. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Keith A.; Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  13. Avian malaria in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Schoener, E R; Banda, M; Howe, L; Castro, I C; Alley, M R

    2014-07-01

    Avian malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium have the ability to cause morbidity and mortality in naïve hosts, and their impact on the native biodiversity is potentially serious. Over the last decade, avian malaria has aroused increasing interest as an emerging disease in New Zealand with some endemic avian species, such as the endangered mohua (Mohua ochrocephala), thought to be particularly susceptible. To date, avian malaria parasites have been found in 35 different bird species in New Zealand and have been diagnosed as causing death in threatened species such as dotterel (Charadrius obscurus), South Island saddleback (Philesturnus carunculatus carunculatus), mohua, hihi (Notiomystis cincta) and two species of kiwi (Apteryx spp.). Introduced blackbirds (Turdus merula) have been found to be carriers of at least three strains of Plasmodium spp. and because they are very commonly infected, they are likely sources of infection for many of New Zealand's endemic birds. The spread and abundance of introduced and endemic mosquitoes as the result of climate change is also likely to be an important factor in the high prevalence of infection in some regions and at certain times of the year. Although still limited, there is a growing understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of Plasmodium spp. in New Zealand. Molecular biology has played an important part in this process and has markedly improved our understanding of the taxonomy of the genus Plasmodium. This review presents our current state of knowledge, discusses the possible infection and disease outcomes, the implications for host behaviour and reproduction, methods of diagnosis of infection, and the possible vectors for transmission of the disease in New Zealand. PMID:24313228

  14. Avian embryos in hypoxic environments.

    PubMed

    León-Velarde, F; Monge-C, C

    2004-08-12

    Avian embryos at high altitude do not benefit of the maternal protection against hypoxia as in mammals. Nevertheless, avian embryos are known to hatch successfully at altitudes between 4,000 and 6,500 m. This review considers some of the processes that bring about the outstanding modifications in the pressure differences between the environment and mitochondria of avian embryos in hypoxic environments. Among species, some maintain normal levels of oxygen consumption ( VO2) have a high oxygen carrying capacity, lower the air cell-arterial pressure difference ( PAO2 - PaO2 ) with a constant pH. Other species decrease VO2, increase only slightly the oxygen carrying capacity, have a higher PAO2 - PaO2 difference than sea-level embryos and lower the PCO2 and pH. High altitude embryos, and those exposed to hypoxia have an accelerated decline of erythrocyte ATP levels during development and an earlier stimulation of 2,3-BPG synthesis. A higher Bohr effect may ensure high tissue PO2 in the presence of the high-affinity hemoglobin. Independently of the strategy used, they serve together to promote suitable rates of development and successful hatching of high altitude birds in hypoxic environments. PMID:15288603

  15. Avian utilization of subsidence wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrot, J.R.; Conley, P.S.; Smout, C.L.

    1995-09-01

    Diverse and productive wetlands have resulted from coal mining in the midwest. The trend from surface to underground mining has increased the potential for subsidence. Planned subsidence of longwall mining areas provides increased opportunities for wetland habitat establishment. Planned subsidence over a 180 meter (590 foot) deep longwall mine in southern Illinois during 1984 to 1986 produced three subsidence wetlands totaling 15 hectares (38 acres). The resulting palustrine emergent wetlands enhanced habitat diversity within the surrounding palustrine forested unsubsided area. Habitat assessments and evaluations of avian utilization of the subsidence wetlands were conducted during February 1990 through October 1991. Avian utilization was greatest within the subsided wetlands. Fifty-three bird species representing seven foraging guilds utilized the subsidence wetlands. Wading/fishing, dabbling waterfowl, and insectivorous avian guilds dominated the subsidence wetlands. The subsidence wetlands represented ideal habitat for wood ducks and great blue herons which utilized snags adjacent to and within the wetlands for nesting (19 great blue heron nests produced 25 young). Dense cover and a rich supply of macroinvertebrates provide excellent brood habitat for wood ducks, while herpetofauna and ichthyofauna provided abundant forage in shallow water zones for great blue herons and other wetland wading birds. The diversity of game and non-game avifauna utilizing the subsidence areas demonstrated the unique value of these wetlands. Preplanned subsidence wetlands can help mitigate loss of wetland habitats in the midwest.

  16. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotypes leading to liver metastasis are abrogated by the novel TGFβ1-targeting peptides P17 and P144.

    PubMed

    Zubeldia, Idoia G; Bleau, Anne-Marie; Redrado, Miriam; Serrano, Diego; Agliano, Alice; Gil-Puig, Carmen; Vidal-Vanaclocha, Fernando; Lecanda, Jon; Calvo, Alfonso

    2013-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) frequently metastasizes to the liver, a phenomenon that involves the participation of transforming-growth-factor-β(1) (TGFβ(1)). Blockade of the protumorigenic effects elicited by TGFβ(1) in advanced CRC could attenuate liver metastasis. We aimed in the present study to assess the antimetastatic effect of TGFβ(1)-blocking peptides P17 and P144, and to study mechanisms responsible for this activity in a mouse model. Colon adenocarcinoma cells expressing luciferase were pretreated with TGFβ(1) (Mc38-luc(TGFβ1) cells), injected into the spleen of mice and monitored for tumor development. TGFβ(1) increased primary tumor growth and liver metastasis, whereas systemic treatment of mice with either P17 or P144 significantly reduced tumor burden (p<0.01). In metastatic nodules, mitotic/apoptotic ratio, mesenchymal traits and angiogenesis (evaluated by CD-31, as well as circulating endothelial and progenitor cells) induced by TGFβ(1) were consistently reduced following injection of peptides. In vitro experiments revealed a direct effect of TGFβ(1) in Mc38 cells, which resulted in activation of Smad2, Smad3 and Smad1/5/8, and increased invasion and transendothelial migration, whereas blockade of TGFβ(1)-signaling reverted these features. Because TGFβ(1)-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been suggested to induce a cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype, we analyzed the ability of this cytokine to induce tumorsphere formation and the expression of CSC markers. In TGFβ(1)-treated cells, tumorspheres were enriched in CD44 and SOX2, which were diminished in the presence of P17. Our data provide a preclinical rationale to evaluate P17 and P144 as potential therapeutic options for the treatment of metastatic CRC. PMID:23153552

  17. Biology and transmission of avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural host and reservoir for avian influenza is in wild birds where the viral infection is typically asymptomatic. The virus primarily replicates in the enteric tract and transmission is thought to be primarily by fecal-oral transmission. Avian influenza can infect a broad host range, but fo...

  18. Avian influenza diagnostics and surveillance methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clinical presentation of avian influenza (AI) varies by virus strain and host species. The clinical disease and lesions the virus produces in poultry are not pathognomonic for avian influenza; therefore, diagnosis of AI virus (AIV) infection requires a laboratory test. Detection of AIV infecti...

  19. Avian influenza biology and disease transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural host and reservoir for avian influenza is in wild birds where the viral infection is typically asymptomatic. The virus primarily replicates in the enteric tract and transmission is thought to be primarily by fecal oral transmission. Avian influenza can infect a broad host range, but fo...

  20. Avian influenza: preparedness and response strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus is naturally found in wild birds, primarily waterfowl, but the virus may also be found in poultry. In the United States we have a strong passive and active surveillance program for avian influenza in poultry. This includes serologic testing on most flocks that go through the ...

  1. 76 FR 4046 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ...We are amending the regulations concerning the importation of animals and animal products to prohibit or restrict the importation of bird and poultry products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. We are also adding restrictions concerning importation of live poultry and birds that have been vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza,......

  2. The global nature of avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus is a global virus which knows no geographic boundaries, has no political agenda, and can infect poultry irrespective of their agricultural or anthropocentric production systems. Avian influenza viruses or evidence of their infection have been detected in poultry and wild birds...

  3. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination for both low pathogenic and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used for countries that have been endemic for avian influenza influenza virus, but stamping out policies are common for countries that are normally free of the disease. Stamping out policies of euthanizing infecte...

  4. MANAGING AVIAN FLU, CARCASS MANAGEMENT & BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The avian influenza virus is discussed with emphasis on the impact to poultry and possible movement of the highly pathogenic H5N 1 virus to humans. A review is made of the worldwide effects to date of the avian influenza viruses; methods for the viruses to enter recreational wate...

  5. A brief introduction to avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) causes a disease of high economic importance for poultry production worldwide. The earliest recorded cases of probable high pathogenicity AIV in poultry were reported in Italy in the 1870’s and avian influenza been recognized in domestic poultry through the modern era of ...

  6. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Thomas Washington TUNES-1 in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P17C)

    SciTech Connect

    Goyet, C.; Key, R.M.; Sullivan, K.F.; Tsuchiya, M.; Kozyr, A. |

    1997-06-01

    This report discusses the procedures and methods used to obtain measurements of total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), total alkalinity (TALK), and radiocarbon ({Delta} {sup 14}C), as well as hydrographic and chemical data, during the Research Vessel Thomas Washington Expedition TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (Section P17C). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in San Diego, California, on May 31, 1991, and ended in Papeete, Tahiti, on July 11, 1991. WOCE Meridional Section P17C, along 135{degree}W and between {approximately}5{degree}S and 36{degree}N, was completed during the 42-day expedition. All 123 hydrographic stations (including 9 large-volume stations) were completed to the full water-column depth. Spacing between stations was 30 nautical miles, except between 3{degree}N and 3{degree}S, where it was 10 nautical miles. At 30 stations, CO{sub 2} measurements were provided for the US Department of Energy`s Carbon Dioxide Program. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Section P17C included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen (measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth sensor), as well as bottle measurements of salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-11, CFC-12, {Delta} {sup 14}C, TCO{sub 2}, and TALK. In addition, potential temperatures were calculated from the measured variables.

  7. Cryoconservation of avian gonads in Canada.

    PubMed

    Silversides, F G; Robertson, M C; Liu, J

    2013-10-01

    Avian genetic resources have declined dramatically over the past half century as the cost of maintaining populations has exceeded the perceived benefit of keeping them. Despite the early importance of poultry in the development of cryopreservation techniques, very little avian germplasm has been conserved. Cryopreservation and recovery of avian gonads preserve the W chromosome and overcome problems of freezing and recovering semen or conserving and manipulating embryonic cells, and the use of vitrification procedures for preserving gonads minimizes cellular damage. On the basis of research demonstrating the biological possibility of cryopreserving and transplanting avian gonads, 5,125 testicles and 2,667 ovaries from 10 populations of Japanese quail, 9 populations of chickens, and 1 population of Chilean tinamou were cryopreserved and sent to the Canadian Animal Genetic Resources program for long-term storage. These gonads represent 20 of the 33 distinct avian populations currently maintained at Canadian public institutions of agricultural research. PMID:24046407

  8. RNA-seq profiles from grass carp tissues after reovirus (GCRV) infection based on singular and modular enrichment analyses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mijuan; Huang, Rong; Du, Fukuan; Pei, Yongyan; Liao, Lanjie; Zhu, Zuoyan; Wang, Yaping

    2014-09-01

    Hemorrhagic disease of the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella, is a fatal disease in fingerlings and yearlings caused by a reovirus, GCRV. RNA-seq data from four diseased grass carp tissues (gill, intestine, liver and spleen) were obtained at 2h before and six times after (2h, 24h, 48h, 72h, 96h and 120h) GCRV challenge. A total of 7.25±0.18 million (M) clean reads and 3.53±0.37M unique reads were obtained per RNA-seq analysis. Compared with controls, there were 9060 unique differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the four tissues at the six time points post-GCRV challenge. Hierarchical clustering analysis of the DEGs showed that the data from the six time points fell into three branches: 2h, 24h/48h, and 72h/96h/120h. Singular (SEA) and modular enrichment analyses of DEGs per RNA-seq dataset were performed based on gene ontology. The results showed that immune responses occurred in all four tissues, indicating that GCRV probably does not target any tissue specifically. Moreover, during the course of disease, disturbances were observed in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in each of the organs. SEA of DEGs based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database was also performed, and this indicated that the complement system and cellular immunity played an important role during the course of hemorrhagic disease. The qPCR of pooled samples of duplicate challenge experiment were used to confirm our RNA-seq approach. PMID:24865419

  9. Grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella Fibulin-4 as a potential interacting partner for grass carp reovirus outer capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Wang, Hao; Liu, Weisha; Lu, Liqun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 2 (Fibulin-4/EFEMP2), an extracellular matrix(ECM) protein and a member of the fibulin family, is involved in elastic fiber formation, connective tissue development and some human diseases. In a yeast-two hybrid screening of host proteins interacting with outer capsid protein of grass carp reovirus (GCRV), a grass carp homologue of Fibulin-4 (designated as GcFibulin-4) is suggested to hold the potential to bind VP7, VP56 and VP55, the outer capsid protein encoded by type I, II, III GCRV, respectively. GcFibulin-4 gene of grass carp was cloned and sequenced from the cDNA library constructed for the yeast two-hybrid screening. Full-length cDNA of GcFibulin-4 contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1323 bp encoding a putative protein of 440 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of GcFibulin-4 indicated that it shared a high homology with zebra fish Fibulin-4 protein. Transcriptional distribution analysis of GcFibulin-4 in various tissues of healthy grass carp showed that GcFibulin-4 was highly expressed in muscle, moderately expressed in the intestine and brain, and slightly expressed in other examined tissues; the expression pattern is consistent with tissue tropism of GCRV resulting in hemorrhage symptom in the corresponding tissues. Our results suggested that Fibulin-4 might enable free GCRV particles, the pathogen for grass carp hemorrhagic disease, to target fish tissues more efficiently by interacting with viral outer capsid proteins. PMID:26626583

  10. Immunogenicity of a cell culture-derived inactivated vaccine against a common virulent isolate of grass carp reovirus.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Weiwei; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yingying; Zhao, Changchen; Li, Yingying; Shi, Chunbin; Wu, Shuqin; Song, Xinjian; Huang, Qiwen; Li, Shoujun

    2016-07-01

    Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) hemorrhagic disease, caused by grass carp reovirus (GCRV), is emerging as a serious problem in grass carp aquaculture. There is no available antiviral therapy and vaccination is the primary method of disease control. In the present study, the immunological effects and protective efficacy of an inactivated HuNan1307 vaccine in grass carp were evaluated. The GCRV isolate HuNan1307 was produced by replication onto the grass carp PSF cell line, and inactivated with 1% β-propiolactone for 60 h at 4 °C. Grass carp were injected with inactivated GCRV vaccine, followed by challenge with the isolate HuNan1307. The results showed that the minimum dosage of the inactivated vaccine was 10(5.5) TCID50/0.2 mL to induce immune protection. All grass carp immunized with the inactivated vaccine produced a high titer of serum antibodies and GCRV-specific neutralizing antibody. Moreover, the inactivated vaccine injection increased the expression of 6 immune-related genes in the spleen and head kidney, which indicated that a immune response was induced by the HuNan1307 vaccine. In addition, grass carp immunized with the inactivated vaccine showed a survival rate above 80% after the viral challenge, equal to that of grass carp immunized with a commercial attenuated vaccine, and the protection lasted at least for one year. The data in this study suggested that the inactivated HuNan1307 vaccine may represent an efficient method to induce immunity against GCRV infection and the induced disease in grass carp. PMID:27142935

  11. Influenza vaccines for avian species.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in Southeast Asia in 2003, a multinational epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity and mortality in many bird species, was responsible for considerable economic losses via trade restrictions, and crossed species barriers (including its recovery from human cases). To date, these H5N1 HPAI viruses have been isolated in European, Middle Eastern, and African countries, and are considered endemic in many areas where regulatory control and different production sectors face substantial hurdles in controlling the spread of this disease. While control of avian influenza (AI) virus infections in wild bird populations may not be feasible at this point, control and eradiation of AI from commercial, semicommercial, zoo, pet, and village/backyard birds will be critical to preventing events that could lead to the emergence of epizootic influenza virus. Efficacious vaccines can help reduce disease, viral shedding, and transmission to susceptible cohorts. However, only when vaccines are used in a comprehensive program including biosecurity, education, culling, diagnostics and surveillance can control and eradication be considered achievable goals. In humans, protection against influenza is provided by vaccines that are chosen based on molecular, epidemiologic, and antigenic data. In poultry and other birds, AI vaccines are produced against a specific hemagglutinin subtype of AI, and use is decided by government and state agricultural authorities based on risk and economic considerations, including the potential for trade restrictions. In the current H5N1 HPAI epizootic, vaccines have been used in a variety of avian species as a part of an overall control program to aid in disease management and control. PMID:19768403

  12. Genomic Avenue to Avian Colisepticemia

    PubMed Central

    Huja, Sagi; Oren, Yaara; Trost, Eva; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Biran, Dvora; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Hacker, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here we present an extensive genomic and genetic analysis of Escherichia coli strains of serotype O78 that represent the major cause of avian colisepticemia, an invasive infection caused by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains. It is associated with high mortality and morbidity, resulting in significant economic consequences for the poultry industry. To understand the genetic basis of the virulence of avian septicemic E. coli, we sequenced the entire genome of a clinical isolate of serotype O78—O78:H19 ST88 isolate 789 (O78-9)—and compared it with three publicly available APEC O78 sequences and one complete genome of APEC serotype O1 strain. Although there was a large variability in genome content between the APEC strains, several genes were conserved, which are potentially critical for colisepticemia. Some of these genes are present in multiple copies per genome or code for gene products with overlapping function, signifying their importance. A systematic deletion of each of these virulence-related genes identified three systems that are conserved in all septicemic strains examined and are critical for serum survival, a prerequisite for septicemia. These are the plasmid-encoded protein, the defective ETT2 (E. coli type 3 secretion system 2) type 3 secretion system ETT2sepsis, and iron uptake systems. Strain O78-9 is the only APEC O78 strain that also carried the regulon coding for yersiniabactin, the iron binding system of the Yersinia high-pathogenicity island. Interestingly, this system is the only one that cannot be complemented by other iron uptake systems under iron limitation and in serum. PMID:25587010

  13. Avian Risk and Fatality Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, M. L.

    1998-11-12

    The protocol is designed to assist with the placement of wind power developments, and to document bird behavior and fatalities resulting from existing wind power developments. A standardized protocol will assist with comparing data among potential and existing development locations. Furthermore, this protocol is based on standard methods being used in other studies of bird behavior. The data collected will only be useful if observers follow each method carefully. In addition, the data collected using this protocol will likely be used by a permitting or other regulatory agency in evaluating the avian impacts at the site.

  14. Physiologically driven avian vocal synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitt, Jacobo D.; Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Goller, Franz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we build an electronic syrinx, i.e., a programmable electronic device capable of integrating biomechanical model equations for the avian vocal organ in order to synthesize song. This vocal prosthesis is controlled by the bird’s neural instructions to respiratory and the syringeal motor systems, thus opening great potential for studying motor control and its modification by sensory feedback mechanisms. Furthermore, a well-functioning subject-controlled vocal prosthesis can lay the foundation for similar devices in humans and thus provide directly health-related data and procedures.

  15. Purification and some properties of reovirus-like particles from leafhoppers and their possible involvement in wallaby ear disease of maize.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, G; Hatta, T; Francki, R I; Grivell, C J

    1980-01-30

    Reovirus-like particles, occurring in association with viroplasms, crystalline arrays and tubules, in the cytoplasm of Cicadulina bimaculata capable of inducing wallaby ear disease in maize, were purified from the insects by differential centrifugation, treatment with the nonionic detergent, Nonidet P-40, and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The purified particles have a double-shelled icosahedral structure about 70 nm in diameter with external projections (A spikes) about 10 nm long located at the 12 vertices. These intact particles (IPs) are morphologically similar to those of Fiji disease virus (FDV), but are more stable. Cores were produced by enzymatic digestion of IPs with alpha-chymotrypsin. The cores are icosahedra about 57 nm in diameter with projections (B spikes) located at the 12 vertices, resembling those of FDV and cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus. Immunization of a rabbit with purified IPs resulted in the production of antibodies specific to IPs, cores, and dsRNA. Immunoelectron microscopic investigations revealed that there is no relationship between this virus and FDV, maize rough dwarf, oat sterile dwarf, pangola stunt, and rice ragged stunt viruses, all members of the genus Fijivirus in the family Reoviridae. The nucleic acid extracted from partially purified virus was resolved into 10 segments by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Reovirus-like particles or viroplasms could not be detected in thin sections of maize seedlings colonized by C. bimaculata showing wallaby ear symptoms. In the light of these data the possible etiology of wallaby ear disease is discussed. PMID:18631635

  16. Complete nucleotide sequence of the M2 gene segment of reovirus type 3 dearing and analysis of its protein product mu 1.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, A K; Nibert, M L; Fields, B N

    1988-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the M2 gene segment of the mammalian reovirus prototype strain, type 3 Dearing, was determined from a cloned full-length cDNA copy of the viral double-stranded RNA segment. The gene comprises 2203 nucleotides and has a single long open reading frame that spans bases 30 through 2154 and encodes the 708 amino acid outer capsid protein mu 1. Aminoterminal sequence analysis of mu 1C, the proteolytically cleaved form of mu 1 that is found in purified reovirions, has identified the site of mu 1 to mu 1C cleavage between residues 42 and 43 in the mu 1 sequence. Aminoterminal sequence analysis of delta, the proteolytically cleaved product of mu 1C that is found in chymotrypsin-generated intermediate subviral particles, has indicated that the mu 1C to delta cleavage occurs near the carboxyterminus of mu 1C. Lastly, stoichiometric determinations using new sequence information have suggested that approximately equimolar amounts of mu 1C and the other major outer capsid component sigma 3 are present in virions. The data presented in this study should be useful for understanding the molecular basis of the functions of the mu 1 protein in reovirus entry into cells and in pathogenesis in the host animal. PMID:3354207

  17. Epizootiological survey of parainfluenza-3, reovirus-3, respiratory syncytial and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis viral antibodies in sheep and goat flocks in Quebec.

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, L; Descôteaux, J P; Roy, R

    1985-01-01

    A serological survey was conducted in an attempt to detect antibodies against bovine respiratory viruses in sheep and goats from seven geographical areas of Quebec. Sera from 10% of the animals in 182 sheep flocks and 40 goat flocks were collected and specific antibodies against parainfluenza-3, reovirus type 3, respiratory syncytial and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis viruses were detected by hemagglutination-inhibition tests for the former viruses and complement fixation and seroneutralization assays for the latter viruses. Results showed prevalence rates of serological reaction to parainfluenza-3, reovirus type 3 and respiratory syncytial viruses of 28, 72 and 35% in sheep and 26, 64 and 36% in goats, respectively. No antibodies in infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus were detected in sheep or goats tested. Prevalence rates varied according to the geographical area. No relationships were detected between age, sex, breed, size of flock and prevalence rates of different antibodies except that parainfluenza-3 antibodies were more common in large goat flocks and in sheep flocks with total confinement housing. A relationship between presence of clinical signs in the flocks and prevalence rates of antibodies was only demonstrated for parainfluenza-3 infection in goat flocks. PMID:3000551

  18. Epizootiological survey of parainfluenza-3, reovirus-3, respiratory syncytial and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis viral antibodies in sheep and goat flocks in Quebec.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, L; Descôteaux, J P; Roy, R

    1985-10-01

    A serological survey was conducted in an attempt to detect antibodies against bovine respiratory viruses in sheep and goats from seven geographical areas of Quebec. Sera from 10% of the animals in 182 sheep flocks and 40 goat flocks were collected and specific antibodies against parainfluenza-3, reovirus type 3, respiratory syncytial and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis viruses were detected by hemagglutination-inhibition tests for the former viruses and complement fixation and seroneutralization assays for the latter viruses. Results showed prevalence rates of serological reaction to parainfluenza-3, reovirus type 3 and respiratory syncytial viruses of 28, 72 and 35% in sheep and 26, 64 and 36% in goats, respectively. No antibodies in infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus were detected in sheep or goats tested. Prevalence rates varied according to the geographical area. No relationships were detected between age, sex, breed, size of flock and prevalence rates of different antibodies except that parainfluenza-3 antibodies were more common in large goat flocks and in sheep flocks with total confinement housing. A relationship between presence of clinical signs in the flocks and prevalence rates of antibodies was only demonstrated for parainfluenza-3 infection in goat flocks. PMID:3000551

  19. Comparative proteomic analyses of two reovirus T3D subtypes and comparison to T1L identifies multiple novel proteins in key cellular pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Berard, Alicia R; Severini, Alberto; Coombs, Kevin M

    2015-06-01

    Viruses induce changes in the host to facilitate replication and evade the immune response. These changes are reflected by the host's proteome, including differences in protein abundance. Focusing on up and down regulated proteins after a virus infects the cell will lead to a characterization of the host response to infection, and may give insight into how viruses modulate proteins to evade host defense responses. We previously used SILAC to examine host proteomic changes in protein abundance in HEK293 cells infected with reovirus type 1, strain Lang (T1L). For the present study, we extended this analysis by determining cell protein alterations induced by two different reovirus subtypes, a less pathogenic type 3 Dearing (T3D(F)) isolate, and a more pathogenic isolate named T3D(C) that is presently in clinical trials as an anti-cancer oncolytic agent. This comparison of host proteome regulation showed that T3D(C) had a more marked effect on DNA replication proteins, recombination and repair, as well as immunological, apoptotic, and survival cell functions. We also identified several proteins not previously identified in any virus infection; branched chain amino-acid transaminase 2 (BCAT), paternally expressed 10 (PEG10), target of myb1 (TOM1), histone cluster 2 H4b (HIST2H4B) and tubulin beta 4B (TUBB4B). PMID:25900405

  20. Avian botulism and avian chlamydiosis in wild water birds, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, Douglas E.; Franson, J. Christian; Brannian, Roger E.; Long, Renee R.; Radi, Craig A.; Krueger, David; Johnson, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center, Madison, Wisconsin, conducted a diagnostic investigation into a water bird mortality event involving intoxication with avian botulism type C and infection with avian chlamydiosis at the Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Montana, USA. Of 24 carcasses necropsied, 11 had lesions consistent with avian chlamydiosis, including two that tested positive for infectious Chlamydophila psittaci, and 12 were positive for avian botulism type C. One bird tested positive for both avian botulism type C and C. psittaci. Of 61 apparently healthy water birds sampled and released, 13 had serologic evidence of C. psittaci infection and 7 were, at the time of capture, shedding infectious C. psittaci via the cloacal or oropharyngeal route. Since more routinely diagnosed disease conditions may mask avian chlamydiosis, these findings support the need for a comprehensive diagnostic investigation when determining the cause of a wildlife mortality event.

  1. Genetic Applications in Avian Conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.; Bronaugh, Whitcomb M.; Crowhurst, Rachel S.; D'Elia, Jesse; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Epps, Clinton W.; Knaus, Brian; Miller, Mark P.; Moses, Michael L.; Oyler-McCance, Sara; Robinson, W. Douglas; Sidlauskas, Brian

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental need in conserving species and their habitats is defining distinct entities that range from individuals to species to ecosystems and beyond (Table 1; Ryder 1986, Moritz 1994, Mayden and Wood 1995, Haig and Avise 1996, Hazevoet 1996, Palumbi and Cipriano 1998, Hebert et al. 2004, Mace 2004, Wheeler et al. 2004, Armstrong and Ball 2005, Baker 2008, Ellis et al. 2010, Winker and Haig 2010). Rapid progression in this interdisciplinary field continues at an exponential rate; thus, periodic updates on theory, techniques, and applications are important for informing practitioners and consumers of genetic information. Here, we outline conservation topics for which genetic information can be helpful, provide examples of where genetic techniques have been used best in avian conservation, and point to current technical bottlenecks that prevent better use of genomics to resolve conservation issues related to birds. We hope this review will provide geneticists and avian ecologists with a mutually beneficial dialogue on how this integrated field can solve current and future problems.

  2. Presence of avian bornavirus RNA and anti-avian bornavirus antibodies in apparently healthy macaws.

    PubMed

    De Kloet, Siwo R; Dorrestein, Gerry M

    2009-12-01

    Recently a novel avian bornavirus has been described that has been suggested to be the possible etiological agent for proventricular dilatation disease or macaw wasting disease. This article describes two macaws that shed avian bornaviral RNA sequences and demonstrated anti-avian bornavirus antibodies as revealed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and Western blot, yet are free of outward clinical signs of the disease. PMID:20095158

  3. Emerging and reemerging diseases of avian wildlife.

    PubMed

    Pello, Susan J; Olsen, Glenn H

    2013-05-01

    Of the many important avian wildlife diseases, aspergillosis, West Nile virus, avipoxvirus, Wellfleet Bay virus, avian influenza, and inclusion body disease of cranes are covered in this article. Wellfleet Bay virus, first identified in 2010, is considered an emerging disease. Avian influenza and West Nile virus have recently been in the public eye because of their zoonotic potential and links to wildlife. Several diseases labeled as reemerging are included because of recent outbreaks or, more importantly, recent research in areas such as genomics, which shed light on the mechanisms whereby these adaptable, persistent pathogens continue to spread and thrive. PMID:23642867

  4. An update on avian influenza in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Chávez, C; Rivera-Cruz, E

    2003-01-01

    The avian influenza high-pathogenicity virus was eradicated in poultry of Mexico in a relatively short period by the use of inactivated emulsified vaccine, enforcing biosecurity, and controlling movement of poultry and poultry products. Mexico maintains a permanent and reliable monitoring program for AI. H5N2 is the only avian influenza subtype identified. It is possible to control and eradicate the avian influenza low-pathogenicity virus mainly by controlled depopulation of positive poultry, reinforcing biosecurity, and the use of vaccines. PMID:14575101

  5. Emerging and reemerging diseases of avian wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pello, Susan J.; Olsen, Glenn H.

    2013-01-01

    Of the many important avian wildlife diseases, aspergillosis, West Nile virus, avipoxvirus, Wellfleet Bay virus, avian influenza, and inclusion body disease of cranes are covered in this article. Wellfleet Bay virus, first identified in 2010, is considered an emerging disease. Avian influenza and West Nile virus have recently been in the public eye because of their zoonotic potential and links to wildlife. Several diseases labeled as reemerging are included because of recent outbreaks or, more importantly, recent research in areas such as genomics, which shed light on the mechanisms whereby these adaptable, persistent pathogens continue to spread and thrive.

  6. Publisher's Note: Level structure 18Ne and its importance in the 14O(α,p)17F reaction rate [Phys. Rev. C 86, 025801(2012)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Tan, W. P.; Aprahamian, A.; Bucher, B.; Roberts, A.; Wiescher, M.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Ozkan, N.; Guray, R. T.; et al

    2012-08-10

    The level structure of 18Ne above the α-decay threshold has been studied using the 16O(3He,n) reaction. A coincidence measurement of neutrons and charged particles decaying from populated states in 18Ne has been made. Decay branching ratios were measured for six resonances and used to calculate the 14O(α,p)17F reaction rate which is a measure of one of two breakout paths from the Hot CNO cycle. As a result, the new experimental information combined with previous experimental and theoretical information, provides a more accurate calculation of the reaction rate.

  7. Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-09-01

    Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies. PMID:26333275

  8. Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Jo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies. PMID:26333275

  9. OBSERVATIONS ON THE AVIAN PARATYPHOID BACILLI.

    PubMed

    Mulsow, F W

    1919-07-01

    This investigator presents a detailed discussion of certain types of avian bacteria, which will be of interest to specialists. He notes some reactions not observed before and the agglutinative relations. PMID:18010130

  10. Are wetlands the reservoir for avian cholera?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands have long been suspected to be an important reservoir for Pasteurella multocida and therefore the likely source of avian cholera outbreaks. During the fall of 1995a??98 we collected sediment and water samples from 44 wetlands where avian cholera epizootics occurred the previous winter or spring. We attempted to isolate P. multocida in sediment and surface water samples from 10 locations distributed throughout each wetland. We were not able to isolate P. multocida from any of the 440 water and 440 sediment samples collected from these wetlands. In contrast, during other investigations of avian cholera we isolated P. multocida from 20 of 44 wetlands, including 7% of the water and 4.5% of the sediment samples collected during or shortly following epizootic events. Our results indicate that wetlands are an unlikely reservoir for the bacteria that causes avian cholera.