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1

The National Aviation Operational Monitoring Service (NAOMS): A Documentation of the Development of a Survey Methodology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aviation Operational Monitoring Service (NAOMS) was a research project under NASA s Aviation Safety Program during the years from 2000 to 2005. The purpose of this project was to develop a methodology for gaining reliable information on changes over time in the rates-of-occurrence of safety-related events as a means of assessing the safety of the national airspace. The approach was a scientifically designed survey of the operators of the aviation system concerning their safety-related experiences. This report presents the results of the methodology developed and a demonstration of the NAOMS concept through a survey of nearly 20,000 randomly selected air-carrier pilots. Results give evidence that the NAOMS methodology can provide a statistically sound basis for evaluating trends of incidents that could compromise safety. The approach and results are summarized in the report and supporting documentation and complete analyses of results are presented in 14 appendices.

Connors, Mary M.; Mauro, Robert; Statler, Irving C.

2012-01-01

2

Aviator's night vision system (ANVIS) in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF): user acceptability survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1973, the U.S. Army adopted night vision devices for use in the aviation environment. These devices are based on the principle of image intensification (I2) and have become the mainstay for the aviator's capability to operate during periods of low illumination, i.e., at night. In the nearly four decades that have followed, a number of engineering advancements have significantly improved the performance of these devices. The current version, using 3rd generation I2 technology is known as the Aviator's Night Vision Imaging System (ANVIS). While considerable experience with performance has been gained during training and peacetime operations, no previous studies have looked at user acceptability and performance issues in a combat environment. This study was designed to compare Army Aircrew experiences in a combat environment to currently available information in the published literature (all peacetime laboratory and field training studies) and to determine if the latter is valid. The purpose of this study was to identify and assess aircrew satisfaction with the ANVIS and any visual performance issues or problems relating to its use in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). The study consisted of an anonymous survey (based on previous validated surveys used in the laboratory and training environments) of 86 Aircrew members (64% Rated and 36% Non-rated) of an Aviation Task Force approximately 6 months into their OEF deployment. This group represents an aggregate of >94,000 flight hours of which ~22,000 are ANVIS and ~16,000 during this deployment. Overall user acceptability of ANVIS in a combat environment will be discussed.

Hiatt, Keith L.; Trollman, Christopher J.; Rash, Clarence E.

2010-04-01

3

Sample Survey Activity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity stresses the importance of writing clear, unbiased survey questions. It explores the types of bias present in surveys and ways to reduce these biases. In addition, the activity covers some basics of surveys, such as: population, sample, sampling frame, and sampling method. Prior to doing this activity, students should have a strong background in the vocabulary behind surveys. Otherwise, this is a worthwhile activity for any more advanced statistics classrooms.

2009-01-28

4

HEDGEROW SURVEY, GREAT CRESTED NEWT SURVEY, DORMOUSE SURVEY AND HORSESHOE BAT ACTIVITY SURVEYS AT UNIVERSITY OF  

E-print Network

to the possible presence of a lesser horseshoe bat roost #12;________ ecosulis ltd___ PHASE 2 SURVEYS UNIBATHEDGEROW SURVEY, GREAT CRESTED NEWT SURVEY, DORMOUSE SURVEY AND HORSESHOE BAT ACTIVITY SURVEYS-UNIBAT-1624 HEDGEROW SURVEY, GREAT CRESTED NEWT SURVEY, DORMOUSE SURVEY AND HORSESHOE BAT ACTIVITY SURVEYS

Burton, Geoffrey R.

5

Epidemiological Survey of Dyslipidemia in Civil Aviators in China from 2006 to 2011  

PubMed Central

Aim. This study aimed to analyze blood lipid levels, temporal trend, and age distribution of dyslipidemia in civil aviators in China. Methods. The 305 Chinese aviators were selected randomly and followed up from 2006 to 2011. Their total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were evaluated annually. Mean values for each parameter by year were compared using a linear mixed-effects model. The temporal trend of borderline high, high, and low status for each index and of overall borderline high, hyperlipidemia, and dyslipidemia by year was tested using a generalized linear mixed model. Results. The aviators' TC (F = 4.33, P < 0.01), HDL-C (F = 23.25, P < 0.01), and LDL-C (F = 6.13, P < 0.01) values differed across years. The prevalence of dyslipidemia (F = 5.53, P < 0.01), borderline high (F = 6.52, P < 0.01), and hyperlipidemia (F = 3.90, P < 0.01) also differed across years. The prevalence rates for hyperlipidemia and dyslipidemia were the highest in the 41–50-year-old and 31–40-year-old groups. Conclusions. Civil aviators in China were in high dyslipidemia and borderline high level and presented with dyslipidemia younger than other Chinese populations. PMID:24693285

Zhao, Rongfu; Xiao, Dan; Fan, Xiaoying; Ge, Zesong; Wang, Linsheng; Yan, Tiecheng; Wang, Jianzhi; Wei, Qixin; Zhao, Yan

2014-01-01

6

Epidemiological survey of dyslipidemia in civil aviators in china from 2006 to 2011.  

PubMed

Aim. This study aimed to analyze blood lipid levels, temporal trend, and age distribution of dyslipidemia in civil aviators in China. Methods. The 305 Chinese aviators were selected randomly and followed up from 2006 to 2011. Their total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were evaluated annually. Mean values for each parameter by year were compared using a linear mixed-effects model. The temporal trend of borderline high, high, and low status for each index and of overall borderline high, hyperlipidemia, and dyslipidemia by year was tested using a generalized linear mixed model. Results. The aviators' TC (F = 4.33, P < 0.01), HDL-C (F = 23.25, P < 0.01), and LDL-C (F = 6.13, P < 0.01) values differed across years. The prevalence of dyslipidemia (F = 5.53, P < 0.01), borderline high (F = 6.52, P < 0.01), and hyperlipidemia (F = 3.90, P < 0.01) also differed across years. The prevalence rates for hyperlipidemia and dyslipidemia were the highest in the 41-50-year-old and 31-40-year-old groups. Conclusions. Civil aviators in China were in high dyslipidemia and borderline high level and presented with dyslipidemia younger than other Chinese populations. PMID:24693285

Zhao, Rongfu; Xiao, Dan; Fan, Xiaoying; Ge, Zesong; Wang, Linsheng; Yan, Tiecheng; Wang, Jianzhi; Wei, Qixin; Zhao, Yan

2014-01-01

7

Collegiate Aviation and the Community College: A Survey of Post-September 11 Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undoubtedly, the aviation industry has experienced turbulent times recently and may face significant restructuring in the next few years. Especially noteworthy has been the impact on collegiate flight programs, particularly those 2-year programs offered by community colleges that often bridge the gap in financial aid and flexible class schedules…

Bliss, Timm J.; Kutz, Mary N.

2008-01-01

8

Systems analysis of the installation, mounting, and activation of emergency locator transmitters in general aviation aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A development program was developed to design and improve the Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) transmitter and to improve the installation in the aircraft and its activation subsystem. There were 1135 general aviation fixed wing aircraft accident files reviewed. A detailed description of the damage to the aircraft was produced. The search aspects of these accidents were studied. As much information as possible about the ELT units in these cases was collected. The data should assist in establishing installation and mounting criteria, better design standards for activation subsystems, and requirements for the new ELT system design in the area of crashworthiness.

Hall, D. S.

1980-01-01

9

Aviation. Teacher Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide contains information, lesson plans, and diverse student learning activities focusing on aviation. The guide is divided into seven sections: (1) "Drawing Activities" (Airmail Art; Eyewitness; Kite Power); (2) "Geography" (U.S. Airports); (3) "Information" (Aviation Alphabet; Glossary; Four Forces of Flight; What about Wind?;…

2001

10

Biofuels as an Alternative Energy Source for Aviation-A Survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of biofuels has been gaining in popularity over the past few years because of their ability to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels. As a renewable energy source, biofuels can be a viable option for sustaining long-term energy needs if they are managed efficiently. We investigate past, present, and possible future biofuel alternatives currently being researched and applied around the world. More specifically, we investigate the use of ethanol, cellulosic ethanol, biodiesel (palm oil, algae, and halophytes), and synthetic fuel blends that can potentially be used as fuels for aviation and nonaerospace applications. We also investigate the processing of biomass via gasification, hydrolysis, and anaerobic digestion as a way to extract fuel oil from alternative biofuels sources.

McDowellBomani, Bilal M.; Bulzan, Dan L.; Centeno-Gomez, Diana I.; Hendricks, Robert C.

2009-01-01

11

Error, stress, and teamwork in medicine and aviation: cross sectional surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To survey operating theatre and intensive care unit staff about attitudes concerning error, stress, and teamwork and to compare these attitudes with those of airline cockpit crew. Design: Cross sectional surveys. Setting: Urban teaching and non›teaching hospitals in the United States, Israel, Germany, Switzerland, and Italy. Major airlines around the world. Participants: 1033 doctors, nurses, fellows, and residents working

J Bryan Sexton; Eric J Thomas; Robert L Helmreich

2000-01-01

12

Long-term follow-up of aviators after functional endoscopic sinus surgery for sinus barotrauma.  

PubMed

Prior to endonasal endoscopic advances for the treatment of sinus disease, surgical results for aviators with recurrent sinus barotrauma (RSB) were inconsistent. Between 1988 and 1992, 54 aviators, who were permanently or temporarily grounded, underwent functional endoscopic sinus (FES) surgery in an attempt to return them to active flying status. Follow-up in the immediate postoperative period revealed that 98% of these aviators returned to active flight duty. A questionnaire was mailed to each of these aviators to compare their preoperative and long-term postoperative symptoms and determine their current flying status. Long-term follow-up time ranged from 20 to 72 mo with average of 48 mo. Of the aviators who responded to the survey, 92% have continued their flying duties and do not report difficulties with RSB. We conclude that FES surgery is effective in the short- and long-term management RSB in aviators. PMID:9383504

Parsons, D S; Chambers, D W; Boyd, E M

1997-11-01

13

Agricultural aviation research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A compilation of papers, comments, and results is provided during a workshop session. The purpose of the workshop was to review and evaluate the current state of the art of agricultural aviation, to identify and rank potentially productive short and long range research and development areas, and to strengthen communications between research scientists and engineers involved in agricultural research. Approximately 71 individuals actively engaged in agricultural aviation research were invited to participate in the workshop. These were persons familiar with problems related to agricultural aviation and processing expertise which are of value for identifying and proposing beneficial research.

Chevalier, H. L. (compiler); Bouse, L. F. (compiler)

1977-01-01

14

An Active Flow Circulation Controlled Flap Concept for General Aviation Aircraft Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A recent focus on revolutionary aerodynamic concepts has highlighted the technology needs of general aviation and personal aircraft. New and stringent restrictions on these types of aircraft have placed high demands on aerodynamic performance, noise, and environmental issues. Improved high lift performance of these aircraft can lead to slower takeoff and landing speeds that can be related to reduced noise and crash survivability issues. Circulation Control technologies have been around for 65 years, yet have been avoided due to trade offs of mass flow, pitching moment, perceived noise etc. The need to improve the circulation control technology for general aviation and personal air-vehicle applications is the focus of this paper. This report will describe the development of a 2-D General Aviation Circulation Control (GACC) wing concept that utilizes a pulsed pneumatic flap.

Jones, Gregory S.; Viken, Sally A.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Cagle, C. Mark

2002-01-01

15

The relationship between aviation activities and ultrafine particulate matter concentrations near a mid-sized airport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aircraft contribute to emissions of ultrafine particulate matter (UFP) and other air pollutants, with corresponding impacts on community-level exposures near active airports. However, it is challenging to isolate the contribution of aircraft from local road traffic and other nearby combustion sources. In this study, we used high-resolution monitoring and flight activity data to quantify contributions from landing and take-off operations (LTO) to UFP concentrations. UFP concentrations were monitored with 1-min resolution at four monitoring sites surrounding T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, RI, in three one-week campaigns across different seasons in 2007 and 2008. Along with pollutant monitoring, wind data were collected and runway-specific LTO data were obtained from airport officials. We developed regression models in which wind speed and direction were included as a nonparametric smooth spatial term using thin-plate splines applied to wind velocity vectors and fitted using linear mixed models. To better pinpoint the timing in the LTO cycle most contributing to elevated concentrations, we used regression models with lag terms for flight activity (ranging from 5 min before to 5 min after the departure or arrival). Results suggest positive associations between UFP concentrations and LTO activities, especially for departures when an aircraft moves near or passes a monitoring site. Departures of jet engine aircrafts on a runway proximate to one of the monitors have a maximal impact 1 min prior to take-off, with median absolute contributions during those minutes of 7400 particles cm-3 (range: 1100-70,000 particles cm-3). Across all observations, our models indicate median (95th, 99th percentile) percent contribution for all LTO activities of 9.8% (54%, 72%) and 6.6% (39%, 55%) for the two sites proximate to the airport's principal runway, and 4.7% (24%, 36%) and 1.8% (22%, 31%) for the remaining two sites. Our analysis illustrates the complexity of aviation impacts on local air quality and allows for quantification of the marginal contribution of LTO activity relative to other nearby sources.

Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Andres Houseman, E.; Vallarino, Jose; Melly, Steven J.; Wayson, Roger L.; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

2012-04-01

16

[Aviation physiology].  

PubMed

Aviation physiology should be known at least in parts by the physicians advising air travellers. Due to reducing atmospheric pressure at altitude gas volume in body cavities expands (Boyle's law). This might not be a problem during ascend since air can disappear easily through natural ways. However, air must return to body cavities during descend and a person with a cold may suffer from painful barotitis. Hypoxia is mostly due to a reduced pO2 in high altitude (Daltons's Law). This may be prevented by an aircraft cabin or supplemented oxygen. Decompression sickness is very rare in aviation but divers should comply to a dive free interval before flying. PMID:10568247

Frank, P W

1999-10-01

17

Global thunderstorm activity research survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The published literature on the subject of the monitoring of global thunderstorm activity by instrumented satellites was reviewed. A survey of the properties of selected physical parameters of the thunderstorm is presented. The concepts used by satellites to identify and to measure terrestrial lightning pulses are described. The experimental data acquired by satellites are discussed. The scientific achievements of the satellites are evaluated against the needs of scientists and the potential requirements of user agencies. The performances of the satellites are rated according to their scientific and operational achievements.

Coroniti, S. C.

1982-01-01

18

Aviation Neuropsychiatry.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This article examines mental health factors in aviation and was written for the operational flight surgeon. It is contained as a chapter in the most recent edition of The Flight Surgeon's Guide. The major goal of this publication is to augment flight surg...

D. R. Jones, R. W. Marsh, J. C. Patterson, T. W. Sowin, F. E. Drummond

2000-01-01

19

Aviation forecasting and systems analyses  

SciTech Connect

The 9 papers in this report deal with the following areas: method of allocating airport runway slots; method for forecasting general aviation activity; air traffic control network-planning model based on second-order Markov chains; analyzing ticket-choice decisions of air travelers; assessing the safety and risk of air traffic control systems: risk estimation from rare events; forecasts of aviation fuel consumption in Virginia; estimating the market share of international air carriers; forecasts of passenger and air-cargo activity at Logan International Airport; and forecasting method for general aviation aircraft and their activity.

Geisinger, K.E.; Brander, J.R.G.; Wilson, F.R.; Kohn, H.M.; Polhemus, N.W.

1980-01-01

20

Aviation & Emissions Federal Aviation Administration  

E-print Network

vehicle engines, produce carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor (H2O), nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide, and #12;Aviation & Emissions ­ A Primer 2 Emissions from Combustion Processes CO2 ­ Carbon dioxide is the product of complete combustion of hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel. Carbon in fuel

21

Aviation safety analysis  

E-print Network

Introduction: Just as the aviation system is complex and interrelated, so is aviation safety. Aviation safety involves design of aircraft and airports, training of ground personnel and flight crew members' maintenance of ...

Ausrotas, Raymond A.

1984-01-01

22

Current Trends in the Usage of the Adaptability Rating for Military Aviation (ARMA) Among USAF Flight Surgeons.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Adaptability Rating for Military Aviation (ARMA) is that portion of the initial flight physical that assesses an aviator candidate's motivation for and potential adaptability toward an aviation career. A survey was mailed to all USAF operational fligh...

R. D. Verdone, W. Sipes, R. Miles

1993-01-01

23

Video Landing Parameter Survey - Honolulu International Airport.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center is conducting a series of video landing parameter surveys at high- activity commercial airports to acquire a better understanding of typical landing contact conditions for a wide...

T. Barnes, T. DeFiore, R. Micklos

2001-01-01

24

Collegiate Aviation Review, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue contains seven papers. "University Aviation Education: An Integrated Model" (Merrill R. Karp) addresses potential educational enhancements through the implementation of an integrated aviation learning model, the Aviation Education Reinforcement Option. "The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA): A Tombstone Agency? Putting the Nickname…

Carney, Thomas Q., Ed.

2000-01-01

25

General Aviation Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Programs exploring and demonstrating new technologies in general aviation propulsion are considered. These programs are the quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan (QCGAT) program; the general aviation turbine engine (GATE) study program; the general aviation propeller technology program; and the advanced rotary, diesel, and reciprocating engine programs.

1980-01-01

26

Physical education activity program survey  

E-print Network

the remaining responses Table 1 Descriptive data Year in college (%) Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors Graduate students Gender (%) Females Males Experience (%) 1st required activity 2nd required activity 1st elected activity 2nd elected activity More than 2nd... in college. Fresh- men (19%), sophomores (21.8%), and juniors (28%) took elected courses to improve their skills, while seniors (30.2%) did so more to participate in regular physical activity (see Table 2). A steady increase in the desire to participate...

Lumpkin, Angela; Avery, Marybell

1986-01-01

27

Aviation News  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Whether you're a fan of Airbus or Boeing, Quantas or Aer Lingus, this website provides very thorough coverage of the airline industry. The Flight Global group's motto is "serious about aviation", and it shows on their homepage, where visitors can find over thirteen sections dedicated to air transport, helicopters, training, and spaceflight. The more casual user may just wish to click on a few of the "Latest News Headlines", but dedicated aeronautics devotees may wish to sign up for their e-newsletter and their RSS feed. Moving down the site's homepage, visitors can cruise on in to the "What's Hot" area and the "Jobs" section, which might be useful for future members of a flight crew or those looking to make a more dramatic career change. Of course, any visit to this site would be woefully incomplete if visitors didn't take a look at profiles of the Airbus 380, the Boeing 747, and many other planes in the "Dynamic Aircraft Profiles" area of the site.

28

General aviation and community development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The summer program is summarized. The reports presented concern (1) general aviation components, (2) general aviation environment, (3) community perspective, and (4) transportation and general aviation in Virginia.

Sincoff, M. Z. (editor); Dajani, J. S. (editor)

1975-01-01

29

The U.S. aviation system to the year 2000  

E-print Network

Introduction: 1.1 The Future of the Aviation System. It is nothing if not presumptuous to look ahead twenty years in any phase of human activity. This seems particularly true in civil aviation where the certificated airlines ...

Ausrotas, Raymond A.

1982-01-01

30

Estimating the environmental benefits of aviation fuel and emissions reductions  

E-print Network

With commercial aviation continuing to grow and environmental policymaking activity intensifying, it is becoming increasingly necessary to assess the environmental impact of measures that result in changes in aviation fuel ...

Dorbian, Christopher S. (Christopher Salvatore)

2010-01-01

31

A survey of orphan enzyme activities  

PubMed Central

Background Using computational database searches, we have demonstrated previously that no gene sequences could be found for at least 36% of enzyme activities that have been assigned an Enzyme Commission number. Here we present a follow-up literature-based survey involving a statistically significant sample of such "orphan" activities. The survey was intended to determine whether sequences for these enzyme activities are truly unknown, or whether these sequences are absent from the public sequence databases but can be found in the literature. Results We demonstrate that for ~80% of sampled orphans, the absence of sequence data is bona fide. Our analyses further substantiate the notion that many of these enzyme activities play biologically important roles. Conclusion This survey points toward significant scientific cost of having such a large fraction of characterized enzyme activities disconnected from sequence data. It also suggests that a larger effort, beginning with a comprehensive survey of all putative orphan activities, would resolve nearly 300 artifactual orphans and reconnect a wealth of enzyme research with modern genomics. For these reasons, we propose that a systematic effort to identify the cognate genes of orphan enzymes be undertaken. PMID:17623104

Pouliot, Yannick; Karp, Peter D

2007-01-01

32

NASA aviation safety reporting system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The origins and development of the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) are briefly reviewed. The results of the first quarter's activity are summarized and discussed. Examples are given of bulletins describing potential air safety hazards, and the disposition of these bulletins. During the first quarter of operation, the ASRS received 1464 reports; 1407 provided data relevant to air safety. All reports are being processed for entry into the ASRS data base. During the reporting period, 130 alert bulletins describing possible problems in the aviation system were generated and disseminated. Responses were received from FAA and others regarding 108 of the alert bulletins. Action was being taken with respect to 70 of the 108 responses received. Further studies are planned of a number of areas, including human factors problems related to automation of the ground and airborne portions of the national aviation system.

Billings, C. E.; Lauber, J. K.; Funkhouser, H.; Lyman, E. G.; Huff, E. M.

1976-01-01

33

General aviation IFR operational problems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Operational problems of general aviation IFR operators (particularly single pilot operators) were studied. Several statistical bases were assembled and utilized to identify the more serious problems and to demonstrate their magnitude. These bases include official activity projections, historical accident data and delay data, among others. The GA operating environment and cockpit environment were analyzed in detail. Solutions proposed for each of the problem areas identified are based on direct consideration of currently planned enhancements to the ATC system, and on a realistic assessment of the present and future limitations of general aviation avionics. A coordinated set of research program is suggested which would provide the developments necessary to implement the proposed solutions.

Bolz, E. H.; Eisele, J. E.

1979-01-01

34

Transfer Learning for Activity Recognition: A Survey  

PubMed Central

Many intelligent systems that focus on the needs of a human require information about the activities being performed by the human. At the core of this capability is activity recognition, which is a challenging and well-researched problem. Activity recognition algorithms require substantial amounts of labeled training data yet need to perform well under very diverse circumstances. As a result, researchers have been designing methods to identify and utilize subtle connections between activity recognition datasets, or to perform transfer-based activity recognition. In this paper we survey the literature to highlight recent advances in transfer learning for activity recognition. We characterize existing approaches to transfer-based activity recognition by sensor modality, by differences between source and target environments, by data availability, and by type of information that is transferred. Finally, we present some grand challenges for the community to consider as this field is further developed. PMID:24039326

Cook, Diane; Feuz, Kyle D.; Krishnan, Narayanan C.

2013-01-01

35

Aviation graduates' competencies, 2000--2007: Perceptions of aviation educators and industry representatives in the United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study surveyed the perceptions of collegiate aviation educators, collegiate aviation institution representatives, and aviation industry stakeholders who were members of the University Aviation Association as of February 5, 2007. Survey forms were sent to 353 prospective participants and there was an overall response rate of 47.6%. The survey consisted of a list of 16 knowledge and skill competencies with Likert-type responses for each participant to indicate the level of importance each placed upon those competencies for collegiate aviation graduates and of the level of satisfaction each had that collegiate aviation graduates actually possessed those competencies upon graduation. Two open-ended questions pertained to the strengths and weaknesses of collegiate aviation programs or their graduates. Another allowed for general comments. The statistical analyses indicated that all three groups were most satisfied with graduates' technical skills and least satisfied with communications skills. Analyses indicated that a balance of technical skills and a liberal education was essential for program success. All knowledge and skill competencies were shown to have high to very high importance levels, but only medium to high satisfaction levels. Results indicated that graduates were perceived to possess all stated competencies, but to a lesser degree than desired. Successful collegiate aviation programs existed, but there was room for improvement. Success was program or graduate speck, with no ubiquitous definition of what constituted a successful collegiate aviation program. Aviation industry needs must be addressed by academia for any collegiate aviation program to be successful, but results indicated that the aviation industry needs to take a larger role in the development and refinement of collegiate aviation programs. Finances for institutions, programs, and students were a major concern for the foreseeable future. Administrators should consider how their actions affect the overall success of their programs.

Bridewell, John B.

36

Modelling Environmental & Economic Impacts of Aviation: Introducing the Aviation Integrated Modelling Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Aviation Integrated Modelling project is developing a policy assessment capability to enable comprehensive analyses of aviation, environment and economic interactions at local and global levels. It contains a set of inter-linked modules of the key elements relevant to this goal. These include models for aircraft\\/engine technologies, air transport demand, airport activity and airspace operations, all coupled to global climate,

Tom G. Reynolds; Steven Barrett; Lynnette M. Dray; Antony D. Evans; Marcus O. Köhler; María Vera Morales; Andreas Schäfer; Zia Wadud; Rex Britter; Henry Hallam; Richard Hunsley

2007-01-01

37

Aviation Design Software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

DARcorporation developed a General Aviation CAD package through a Small Business Innovation Research contract from Langley Research Center. This affordable, user-friendly preliminary design system for General Aviation aircraft runs on the popular 486 IBM-compatible personal computers. Individuals taking the home-built approach, small manufacturers of General Aviation airplanes, as well as students and others interested in the analysis and design of aircraft are possible users of the package. The software can cut design and development time in half.

1997-01-01

38

Aviation system capacity improvements through technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was conducted with the primary objective of determining the impact of technology on capacity improvements in the U.S. air transportation system and, consequently, to assess the areas where NASA's expertise and technical contributions would be the most beneficial. The outlook of the study is considered both near- and long-term (5 to 25 years). The approach was that of actively working with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Flight Transportation Laboratory and included interactions with 'users' outside of both agencies as well as with organizations within. This report includes an overall survey of what are believed to be the causes of the capacity problems, ongoing work with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to alleviate the problems, and identifies improvements in technology that would increase capacity and reduce delays.

Harvey, W. Don

1995-01-01

39

Collegiate Aviation Review 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains four peer-reviewed papers about university-level aviation education that were presented at the 1998 Fall Education Conference of the University Aviation Association. "Setting the Foundation for Effective Learning: Utilizing the Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor Domains to Establish Rigorous Performance Learning…

Carney, Thomas Q., Ed.; Luedtke, Jacqueline R., Ed.; Johnson, Jeffrey A., Ed.

1998-01-01

40

Aviation Instructor's Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook is designed for ground instructors, flight instructors, and aviation maintenance instructors, providing beginning instructors the foundation to understand and apply fundamentals of instruction. The handbook also provides aviation instructors with up-to-date information on learning and teaching, and how to relate this information to…

Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

41

General Aviation Pilots' Perceived Usage and Valuation of Aviation Weather Information Sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aviation suffers many accidents due to the lack of good weather information in flight. Existing aviation weather information is difficult to obtain when it is most needed and is not well formatted for in-flight use. Because it is generally presented aurally, aviation weather information is difficult to integrate with spatial flight information and retain for reference. Efforts, by NASA's Aviation Weather Information (AWIN) team and others, to improve weather information accessibility, usability and decision aiding will enhance General Aviation (GA) pilots' weather situation awareness and decision-making and therefore should improve the safety of GA flight. Consideration of pilots' economic concerns will ensure that in-flight weather information systems are financially accessible to GA pilots as well. The purpose of this survey was to describe how aviation operator communities gather and use weather information as well as how weather related decisions are made between flight crews and supporting personnel. Pilots of small GA aircraft experience the most weather-related accidents as well as the most fatal weather related accident. For this reason, the survey design and advertisement focused on encouraging participation from GA pilots. Perhaps as a result of this emphasis, most responses, 97 responses or 85% of the entire response set, were from GA pilots, This paper presents only analysis of these GA pilots' responses. The insights provided by this survey regarding GA pilots' perceived value and usage of current aviation weather information. services, and products provide a basis for technological approaches to improve GA safety. Results of this survey are discussed in the context of survey limitations and prior work, and serve as the foundation for a model of weather information value, guidance for the design of in-flight weather information systems, and definition of further research toward their development.

Latorella, Kara; Lane, Suzanne; Garland, Daniel

2002-01-01

42

Aviation Human Factors Division Institute of Aviation  

E-print Network

operators in power system monitoring and control. In this study, we examined the use of motion increased the size of the network areas controlled by individual power system operators (Overbye, Weber Systems Monitoring and Control Gavin R. Essenberg, Douglas A. Wiegmann, Aviation Human Factors Division

43

Operational Experiences of General Aviation Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation is currently under way to determine the operational practices and load experiences of general aviation aircraft performing five basic types of operations: twin-engine executive, single-engine executive, personal, instructional, and commercial survey. Limited data obtained to date from aircraft engaged in these operations indicate that aircraft are generally being operated within the limits to which they were designed.

Jewel, Joseph W., Jr.; Walker, Walter G.

1965-01-01

44

Aviation accident aetiology: catastrophe theory perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human error is often cited as a major contributing factor or cause of incidents and accidents. Incident surveys in aviation have attributed 70 per cent of incidents to crew error. Although a large proportion of the accidents can be attributed to human error, Reason proposes a view that many accidents are catalyzed by persons not present at the time of

A. J. Masys

2004-01-01

45

Aviation in the Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Makes predications concerning future aerospace technology in the areas of supersonic transportation, aircraft design, airfreight, military aviation, hypersonic aircraft and in the much distant future sub-orbital, rocket propelled transports. (BR)

Kayten, Gerald G.

1974-01-01

46

Federal Aviation Administration 1  

E-print Network

Reconciliation Act of 1990, Public Law 101-508, Title IX, Aviation Safety and Capacity Expansion Act. · What, 2012 The University of Texas Medical Branch 9 COE CST Member Universities (Primes) (Subs) #12;COE C

Waliser, Duane E.

47

Aviation Data Integration System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the analysis of flight data and safety reports done in ASAP and FOQA programs, airline personnel are not able to access relevant aviation data for a variety of reasons. We have developed the Aviation Data Integration System (ADIS), a software system that provides integrated heterogeneous data to support safety analysis. Types of data available in ADIS include weather, D-ATIS, RVR, radar data, and Jeppesen charts, and flight data. We developed three versions of ADIS to support airlines. The first version has been developed to support ASAP teams. A second version supports FOQA teams, and it integrates aviation data with flight data while keeping identification information inaccessible. Finally, we developed a prototype that demonstrates the integration of aviation data into flight data analysis programs. The initial feedback from airlines is that ADIS is very useful in FOQA and ASAP analysis.

Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao; Windrem, May; Patel, Hemil; Keller, Richard

2003-01-01

48

Initial Cognitive Performance Predicts Longitudinal Aviator Performance  

PubMed Central

Objectives. The goal of the study was to improve prediction of longitudinal flight simulator performance by studying cognitive factors that may moderate the influence of chronological age. Method. We examined age-related change in aviation performance in aircraft pilots in relation to baseline cognitive ability measures and aviation expertise. Participants were aircraft pilots (N = 276) aged 40–77.9. Flight simulator performance and cognition were tested yearly; there were an average of 4.3 (± 2.7; range 1–13) data points per participant. Each participant was classified into one of the three levels of aviation expertise based on Federal Aviation Administration pilot proficiency ratings: least, moderate, or high expertise. Results. Addition of measures of cognitive processing speed and executive function to a model of age-related change in aviation performance significantly improved the model. Processing speed and executive function performance interacted such that the slowest rate of decline in flight simulator performance was found in aviators with the highest scores on tests of these abilities. Expertise was beneficial to pilots across the age range studied; however, expertise did not show evidence of reducing the effect of age. Discussion. These data suggest that longitudinal performance on an important real-world activity can be predicted by initial assessment of relevant cognitive abilities. PMID:21586627

Jo, Booil; Adamson, Maheen M.; Kennedy, Quinn; Noda, Art; Hernandez, Beatriz; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Friedman, Leah F.; Fairchild, Kaci; Scanlon, Blake K.; Murphy, Greer M.; Taylor, Joy L.

2011-01-01

49

Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rising cost of oil coupled with the need to reduce pollution and dependence on foreign suppliers has spurred great interest and activity in developing alternative aviation fuels. Although a variety of fuels have been produced that have similar properties to standard Jet A, detailed studies are required to ascertain the exact impacts of the fuels on engine operation and exhaust composition. In response to this need, NASA acquired and burned a variety of alternative aviation fuel mixtures in the Dryden Flight Research Center DC-8 to assess changes in the aircraft s CFM-56 engine performance and emission parameters relative to operation with standard JP-8. This Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment, or AAFEX, was conducted at NASA Dryden s Aircraft Operations Facility (DAOF) in Palmdale, California, from January 19 to February 3, 2009 and specifically sought to establish fuel matrix effects on: 1) engine and exhaust gas temperatures and compressor speeds; 2) engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) gas phase and particle emissions and characteristics; and 3) volatile aerosol formation in aging exhaust plumes

Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Hudgins, C. H.; Plant, J. V.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.; Howard, R.; Corporan, E.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Timko, M.; Woods, E.; Dodds, W.; Lee, B.; Santoni, G.; Whitefield, P.; Hagen, D.; Lobo, P.; Knighton, W. B.; Bulzan, D.; Tacina, K.; Wey, C.; VanderWal, R.; Bhargava, A.

2011-01-01

50

COMMUNICATIONS-RELATED INCIDENTS IN GENERAL AVIATION DUAL FLIGHT TRAINING  

E-print Network

BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION A recent survey of the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) database of the GA instructors surveyed stated that they trained students to perform independently, as single pilots, communications equipment malfunctions, and poor radio technique. The results of this survey suggested to our

51

Active optics in Large Synoptic Survey Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) has a 3.5º field of view and F/1.2 focus that makes the performance quite sensitive to the perturbations of misalignments and mirror surface deformations. In order to maintain the image quality, LSST has an active optics system (AOS) to measure and correct those perturbations in a closed loop. The perturbed wavefront errors are measured by the wavefront sensors (WFS) located at the four corners of the focal plane. The perturbations are solved by the non-linear least square algorithm by minimizing the rms variation of the measured and baseline designed wavefront errors. Then the correction is realized by applying the inverse of the perturbations to the optical system. In this paper, we will describe the correction processing in the LSST AOS. We also will discuss the application of the algorithm, the properties of the sensitivity matrix and the stabilities of the correction. A simulation model, using ZEMAX as a ray tracing engine and MATLAB as an analysis platform, is set up to simulate the testing and correction loop of the LSST AOS. Several simulation examples and results are presented.

Liang, Ming; Krabbendam, Victor; Claver, Charles F.; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Xin, Bo

2012-09-01

52

Lessons Learned, Headquarters, 223d Aviation Battalion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report includes the Headquarters and Headquarters Company 223d Aviation Battalion (Combat), 18th Aviation Company (Utility Airplane), 163d Medical detachment, 183d Aviation Company (Utility Airplane), 185th Aviation Company (Utility Airplane), 203d Av...

1969-01-01

53

Aviation noise effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

1985-03-01

54

Alcohol fuels for aviation  

SciTech Connect

The ten-fold increase in aviation fuel prices in eight years has caused a reassessment of alcohol fuels. In a recent test, methanol fuel-flow rate was high at takeoff, and levelled off at 10,000 feet, but above 18,000 fell 30% below avgas use. Because methanol sells thirty cents below avgas per gallon it is already an attractive fuel for piston-engine aircraft. But as 95% of aviation fuel is burned as kerosene in turbines a test program has been set up to look at the performance of small shaft turbine engines with various combinations of alcohols and water, and of straight methanol, and to look at major thrust engine at optimum fuel as well. These tests should determine the overall alcohol potentials for aviation. The tests will also tell if the breakthrough will be modest or major.

Schauffler, P.

1982-06-01

55

Case for biofuels in aviation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the last 15 years, the technical and the economic feasibility of biomass based fuels for general aviation piston engines has been proven. Exhaustive ground and flight tests performed at the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) using etha...

1996-01-01

56

Worksite Health Promotion Activities. 1992 National Survey. Summary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The survey reported in this document examined worksite health promotion and disease prevention activities in 1,507 private worksites in the United States. Specificlly, the survey assessed policies, practices, services, facilities, information, and activities sponsored by employers to improve the health of their employees, and assessed health…

Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

57

Volcanic-ash hazard to aviation during the 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Within the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Anatahan is one of nine active subaerial volcanoes that pose hazards to major air-traffic routes from airborne volcanic ash. The 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano affected the region's aviation operations for 3 days in May 2003. On the first day of the eruption (10 May 2003), two international flights from Saipan to Japan were cancelled, and several flights implemented ash-avoidance procedures. On 13 May 2003, a high-altitude flight through volcanic gas was reported, with no perceptible damage to the aircraft. TOMS and MODIS analysis of satellite data strongly suggests that no significant ash and only minor amounts of SO2 were involved in the incident, consistent with crew observations. On 23 May 2003, airport operations were disrupted when tropical-cyclone winds dispersed ash to the south, dusting Saipan with light ashfall and causing flight cancellations there and at Guam 320 km south of the volcano. Operational (near-real-time) monitoring of ash clouds produced by Anatahan has been conducted since the first day of the eruption on 10 May 2003 by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The VAAC was among the first groups outside of the immediate area of the volcano to detect and report on the unexpected eruption of Anatahan. After being contacted about an unusual cloud by National Weather Service forecasters in Guam at 1235 UTC on 10 May 2003, the VAAC analyzed GOES 9 images, confirming Anatahan as the likely source of an ash cloud and estimating that the eruption began at about 0730 UTC. The VAAC issued its first Volcanic Ash Advisory for Anatahan at 1300 UTC on 10 May 2003 more than 5 h after the start of the eruption, the delay reflecting the difficulty of detecting and confirming a surprise eruption at a remote volcano with no in situ real-time geophysical monitoring. The initial eruption plume reached 10.7-13.4 km (35,000-44,000 ft), well into jet cruise altitudes; thereafter, the maximum plume height decreased and during the rest of the eruption usually did not exceed ???5 km (???17,000 ft), which lessened the potential hazard to aircraft at higher cruise altitudes. Drifting ash clouds commonly extended hundreds of kilometers from the volcano, occasionally as far west as the Philippines. Over the course of the eruptive activity in 2003-2004, the VAAC issued 323 advisories (168 with graphical depictions of ash clouds) for Anatahan, serving as a reliable source of ash-cloud information for aviation-related meteorological offices and air carriers. With a record of frequent eruptions in the CNMI, continued satellite and in situ real-time geophysical monitoring is needed at Anatahan and other Marianas volcanoes so that potential hazards to aviation from any future eruptive activity can be quickly and correctly assessed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Guffanti, M.; Ewert, J. W.; Gallina, G. M.; Bluth, G. J. S.; Swanson, G. L.

2005-01-01

58

Collegiate Aviation Review. September 1996.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains three papers on aviation education. "Academic Integrity in Higher Education: Is Collegiate Aviation Education at Risk?" (Jeffrey A. Johnson) discusses academic integrity and legal issues in higher education and argues that academic integrity needs to be an integral part of collegiate aviation education if students expect to…

Barker, Ballard M., Ed.

59

Collegiate Aviation Review, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, published annually, contains six papers devoted to aviation education. "Enhancing Global Competitiveness: Benchmarking Airline Operational Performance in Highly Regulated Environments" (Brent D. Bowen, Dean Headley, Karisa D. Kane, Rebecca K. Lutte) outlines a model to help policymakers and others evaluate the effects of airline…

Carney, Thomas Q., Ed.; Luedtke, Jacqueline R., Ed.; Johnson, Jeffrey A., Ed.

1999-01-01

60

Collegiate Aviation Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains five research papers devoted to aviation education and training. The first paper, "An Examination of the U.S. Airline Policy Regarding Child Restraint Systems" (Larry Carstenson, Donald Sluti, and Jacqueline Luedtke), examines communication of airline policy from airline management to airline personnel to the traveling…

Lehrer, Henry R., Ed.

61

The next forty years in aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A prediction of the status of various types of aviation activities which may be expected in twenty years is presented. The basic assumptions are that the population of the nation will continue to grow at more than 7 percent and that the need for air transportation of passengers and cargo will increase accordingly. Various predictions are also made for the developments in vertical takeoff aircraft, short haul airline operations, general aviation, and military aircraft. Areas of improvement are indicated for air navigation, air traffic control, night vision, quiet aircraft, and the use of hydrogen as a fuel.

Hawkins, W. M.

1975-01-01

62

Electric utility solar energy activities: 1979survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of surveys to determine the scope of solar energy projects sponsored by electric utilities in the United States are presented. It contains brief descriptions of 735 projects being conducted by 180 utility companies. Also included are an index of projects by category, a statistical summary, a list of participating utilities with information contacts and addresses, a list of

R. Furness

1979-01-01

63

Electric utility solar energy activities: 1983 survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of a survey to determine the scope of electric utility participation in solar energy projects in the United States. This ninth edition contains brief descriptions of 870 projects conducted by 184 utility companies. The report also includes an index of projects by category, a statistical summary, a list of new reports on utility-sponsored projects, a

1984-01-01

64

Electric utility solar energy activities: 1979 survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a survey to determine the scope of solar energy projects sponsored by electric utilities in the United States are presented. It contains brief descriptions of 735 projects being conducted by 180 utility companies. Also included are an index of projects by category, a statistical summary, a list of participating utilities with information contacts and addresses, a list

Furness

1979-01-01

65

Faith based aviation: An ethnographic study of missionary flights international  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of faith-based missionary aviation is a post-World War II phenomenon. The war effort demonstrated the value, utility, and global reach of aviation to remote, underdeveloped areas of the world. With the beginnings of a worldwide infrastructure for aviation, Christian aviators realized aviation could increase the range and effectiveness of their efforts to reach the world for Christ (Mellis, 2006). Although individual organizations provide statistical information and data about flight operations there is a lack of external evidence and relevant research literature confirming the scope and value of these faith based aviation organizations and operations. A qualitative, ethnographic study was conducted to document the activities of one faith-based aviation organization to gain an understanding of this little known aspect of civilian aviation. The study was conducted with Missionary Flights International (MFI) of Fort Pierce, FL which has been involved in faith-based, missionary aviation since its inception in 1964. As an aviation organization "MFI strives to offer affiliated missions the kind of efficient service and professionalism expected of an airline operation" (Missionary Flights International, 2013, p.1). MFI is a lifeline for missionaries to Haiti and the Dominican Republic, fulfilling their motto of "Standing in the Gap". MFI provides twice a week service to the island of Hispaniola and the Republic of Haiti. In this in-depth study insight and understanding was gained into the purpose of MFI, their daily routines and operations, and the challenges they face in maintaining their flight services to Haiti. This study provided documentation of the value and utility of such aviation efforts and of the individuals involved in this endeavor.

Cooper, Joseph H.

66

Aviation Particle Emissions Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aviation Particle Emissions Workshop was held on November 18 19, 2003, in Cleveland, Ohio. It was sponsored by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) under the Vehicle Systems Program (VSP) and the Ultra- Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project. The objectives were to build a sound foundation for a comprehensive particulate research roadmap and to provide a forum for discussion among U.S. stakeholders and researchers. Presentations included perspectives from the Federal Aviation Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NASA, and United States airports. There were five interactive technical sessions: sampling methodology, measurement methodology, particle modeling, database, inventory and test venue, and air quality. Each group presented technical issues which generated excellent discussion. The five session leads collaborated with their members to present summaries and conclusions to each content area.

Wey, Chowen C. (Editor)

2004-01-01

67

TRANSPORTATION CENTER--NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Aviation Symposium: The Future for Aviation  

E-print Network

TRANSPORTATION CENTER--NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Aviation Symposium: The Future for Aviation April The Transportation Center has organized a special Aviation Symposium focusing on important aviation industry topics, Professor of Transportation at Northwestern University and former Director of the Transportation Center

Bustamante, Fabián E.

68

A Brief Survey of Physical Activity Monitoring Devices1  

E-print Network

A Brief Survey of Physical Activity Monitoring Devices1 Technical Report MPCL-08 by an NIH Grant number 5R21DA024294-02. #12;ABSTRACT High caloric intake and low physical activities over the past few decades. Accurate monitoring of physical activities and energy expenditure

Helal, Abdelsalam

69

Applying lessons from commercial aviation safety and operations to resuscitation.  

PubMed

Both commercial aviation and resuscitation are complex activities in which team members must respond to unexpected emergencies in a consistent, high quality manner. Lives are at stake in both activities and the two disciplines have similar leadership structures, standard setting processes, training methods, and operational tools. Commercial aviation crews operate with remarkable consistency and safety, while resuscitation team performance and outcomes are highly variable. This commentary provides the perspective of two physician-pilots showing how commercial aviation training, operations, and safety principles can be adapted to resuscitation team training and performance. PMID:24215731

Ornato, Joseph P; Peberdy, Mary Ann

2014-02-01

70

AWE: aviation weather data visualization environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Weather is one of the major causes of aviation accidents. General aviation (GA) flights account for 92% of all the aviation accidents. In spite of all the official and unofficial sources of weather visualization tools available to pilots, there is an urgent need for visual- izing several weather related data tailored for general aviation pilots. Our system, Aviation Weather Data

Lilly Spirkovska; Suresh K. Lodha

2002-01-01

71

Space Weather Impacts on Aviation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Space Weather Impacts on Aviation examines the effects of solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and other solar phenomena on aviation operations. The module builds on background science knowledge taught in the course prerequisite, Space Weather Basics, 2nd Edition. The content gives aviation forecasters and others an overview of the information and products available from NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center and provides practice interpreting and using those products for decision support during space weather events.

Comet

2012-06-12

72

The Future of Green Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Edwards'presentation provides an overview of aviation's economic impact in the U.S. including aviation's impact on environment and energy. The presentation discusses NASA's contributions to the advancement of commercial aircraft design highlighting the technology drivers and recent technology advancements for addressing community noise, energy efficiency and emissions. The presentation concludes with a preview of some of NASA's integrated systems solutions, such as novel aircraft concepts and advancements in propulsion that will enable the future of more environmentally compatible aviation.

Edwards, Thomas

2012-01-01

73

General Aviation Task Force report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

General aviation is officially defined as all aviation except scheduled airlines and the military. It is the only air transportation to many communities throughout the world. In order to reverse the recent decline in general aviation aircraft produced in the United States, the Task Force recommends that NASA provide the expertise and facilities such as wind tunnels and computer codes for aircraft design. General aviation manufacturers are receptive to NASA's innovations and technological leadership and are expected to be effective users of NASA-generated technologies.

1993-01-01

74

General aviation avionics equipment maintenance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Maintenance of general aviation avionics equipment was investigated with emphasis on single engine and light twin engine general aviation aircraft. Factors considered include the regulatory agencies, avionics manufacturers, avionics repair stations, the statistical character of the general aviation community, and owners and operators. The maintenance, environment, and performance, repair costs, and reliability of avionics were defined. It is concluded that a significant economic stratification is reflected in the maintenance problems encountered, that careful attention to installations and use practices can have a very positive impact on maintenance problems, and that new technologies and a general growth in general aviation will impact maintenance.

Parker, C. D.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

1978-01-01

75

Lessons Learned, Headquarters, 223d Aviation Battalion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report covers the period 1 February 1970 through 30 April 1970. This report includes the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 223rd Aviation Battalion (Combat), 18th Aviation Company (Utility Airplane), 163rd Medical Detachment, 183rd Aviation Comp...

1970-01-01

76

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false 2 Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 100 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 100-2 Editorial...

2011-01-01

77

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 1  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false 1 Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 100 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...CREWMEMBERS OTHER THAN PILOTS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 100-1 Editorial...

2010-01-01

78

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 1  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false 1 Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 100 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 100-1 Editorial...

2010-01-01

79

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false 2 Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 100 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...CREWMEMBERS OTHER THAN PILOTS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 100-2 Editorial...

2011-01-01

80

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false 2 Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50-2 Editorial...

2011-01-01

81

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false 2 Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50-2 Editorial...

2011-01-01

82

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false 2 Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50-2 Editorial...

2010-01-01

83

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false 2 Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50-2 Editorial...

2010-01-01

84

A survey of active network research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: Active networks are a novel approach to network architecture in which the switches of thenetwork perform customized computations on the messages flowing through them. Thisarchitecture is motivated by both lead applications which perform user-driven computationat nodes within the network today, and the emergence of mobile code and othertechnologies that make the goal of network service innovation attainable. In this

David L. Tennenhouse; Jonathan M. Smith; W. David Sincoskie; D. J. Wetherall; G. J. Minden

1997-01-01

85

Career Games - Online Activities and surveys  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site features several workshops and games that facilitate the PIE career development method practiced by Daniel Porot, a leading European pioneer in career design and job hunting. The site features a self-assessment, job targeting, open marketing, hidden markets, interviewing, overviews, site maps, and external links. This is a fun interactive set of activities.

Porot, Daniel

2009-07-01

86

A Survey of Active Network Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Active networks are a novel approach to network architecture in which the switches of the network perform customized computations on the messages flowing through them. This approach is motivated by both lead u ser applications, which perform user-driven computation at nodes within the network today, and the e mergence of mobile c ode technologies that make dynamic network service

D. L Tennenhouse

1996-01-01

87

Aviation Safety Simulation Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aviation Safety Simulation Model is a software tool that enables users to configure a terrain, a flight path, and an aircraft and simulate the aircraft's flight along the path. The simulation monitors the aircraft's proximity to terrain obstructions, and reports when the aircraft violates accepted minimum distances from an obstruction. This model design facilitates future enhancements to address other flight safety issues, particularly air and runway traffic scenarios. This report shows the user how to build a simulation scenario and run it. It also explains the model's output.

Houser, Scott; Yackovetsky, Robert (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

88

Alternative aviation turbine fuels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The efficient utilization of fossil fuels by future jet aircraft may necessitate the broadening of current aviation turbine fuel specifications. The most significant changes in specifications would be an increased aromatics content and a higher final boiling point in order to minimize refinery energy consumption and costs. These changes would increase the freezing point and might lower the thermal stability of the fuel and could cause increased pollutant emissions, increased smoke and carbon formation, increased combustor liner temperatures, and poorer ignition characteristics. This paper discusses the effects that broadened specification fuels may have on present-day jet aircraft and engine components and the technology required to use fuels with broadened specifications.

Grobman, J.

1977-01-01

89

WRF-EMS Aviation Products  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson illustrates how numerical guidance from the Weather Research and Forecasting Model - Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS) can be added to surface observations, satellite graphics, and conceptual models of important aviation phenomena, to produce TAFs. Specifically, the lesson describes how visibility, cloud ceilings, and the flight categories variables provide values for aviation forecasts in Africa.

Comet

2013-09-25

90

Explosives Detection for Aviation Security  

Microsoft Academic Search

The threat of terrorism against commercial aviation has received much attention in the past few years. In response, new ways to detect explosives and to combine techniques based on different phenomena into integrated security systems are being developed to improve aviation security. Several leading methods for explosives and weapons detection are presented.

Anthony Fainberg

1992-01-01

91

Aviation Communications Emulation Testbed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aviation related applications that rely upon datalink for information exchange are increasingly being developed and deployed. The increase in the quantity of applications and associated data communications will expose problems and issues to resolve. NASA s Glenn Research Center has prepared to study the communications issues that will arise as datalink applications are employed within the National Airspace System (NAS) by developing an aviation communications emulation testbed. The Testbed is evolving and currently provides the hardware and software needed to study the communications impact of Air Traffic Control (ATC) and surveillance applications in a densely populated environment. The communications load associated with up to 160 aircraft transmitting and receiving ATC and surveillance data can be generated in realtime in a sequence similar to what would occur in the NAS. The ATC applications that can be studied are the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network s (ATN) Context Management (CM) and Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC). The Surveillance applications are Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) and Traffic Information Services - Broadcast (TIS-B).

Sheehe, Charles; Mulkerin, Tom

2004-01-01

92

General Aviation Data Framework  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Flight Research Services Directorate at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) provides development and operations services associated with three general aviation (GA) aircraft used for research experiments. The GA aircraft includes a Cessna 206X Stationair, a Lancair Colombia 300X, and a Cirrus SR22X. Since 2004, the GA Data Framework software was designed and implemented to gather data from a varying set of hardware and software sources as well as enable transfer of the data to other computers or devices. The key requirements for the GA Data Framework software include platform independence, the ability to reuse the framework for different projects without changing the framework code, graphics display capabilities, and the ability to vary the interfaces and their performance. Data received from the various devices is stored in shared memory. This paper concentrates on the object oriented software design patterns within the General Aviation Data Framework, and how they enable the construction of project specific software without changing the base classes. The issues of platform independence and multi-threading which enable interfaces to run at different frame rates are also discussed in this paper.

Blount, Elaine M.; Chung, Victoria I.

2006-01-01

93

Agent Architecture for Aviation Data Integration System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the proposed agent-based architecture of the Aviation Data Integration System (ADIS). ADIS is a software system that provides integrated heterogeneous data to support aviation problem-solving activities. Examples of aviation problem-solving activities include engineering troubleshooting, incident and accident investigation, routine flight operations monitoring, safety assessment, maintenance procedure debugging, and training assessment. A wide variety of information is typically referenced when engaging in these activities. Some of this information includes flight recorder data, Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) reports, Jeppesen charts, weather data, air traffic control information, safety reports, and runway visual range data. Such wide-ranging information cannot be found in any single unified information source. Therefore, this information must be actively collected, assembled, and presented in a manner that supports the users problem-solving activities. This information integration task is non-trivial and presents a variety of technical challenges. ADIS has been developed to do this task and it permits integration of weather, RVR, radar data, and Jeppesen charts with flight data. ADIS has been implemented and used by several airlines FOQA teams. The initial feedback from airlines is that such a system is very useful in FOQA analysis. Based on the feedback from the initial deployment, we are developing a new version of the system that would make further progress in achieving following goals of our project.

Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao; Windrem, May; Patel, Hemil; Wei, Mei

2004-01-01

94

Current research on aviation weather (bibliography), 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The titles, managers, supporting organizations, performing organizations, investigators and objectives of 127 current research projects in advanced meteorological instruments, forecasting, icing, lightning, visibility, low level wind shear, storm hazards/severe storms, and turbulence are tabulated and cross-referenced. A list of pertinent reference material produced through the above tabulated research activities is given. The acquired information is assembled in bibliography form to provide a readily available source of information in the area of aviation meteorology.

Turkel, B. S.; Frost, W.

1980-01-01

95

Environmentally safe aviation fuels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In response to the Air Force directive to remove Ozone Depleting Chemicals (ODC's) from military specifications and Defense Logistics Agency's Hazardous Waste Minimization Program, we are faced with how to ensure a quality aviation fuel without using such chemicals. Many of these chemicals are found throughout the fuel and fuel related military specifications and are part of test methods that help qualify the properties and quality of the fuels before they are procured. Many years ago there was a directive for military specifications to use commercially standard test methods in order to provide standard testing in private industry and government. As a result the test methods used in military specifications are governed by the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM). The Air Force has been very proactive in the removal or replacement of the ODC's and hazardous materials in these test methods. For example, ASTM D3703 (Standard Test Method for Peroxide Number of Aviation Turbine Fuels), requires the use of Freon 113, a known ODC. A new rapid, portable hydroperoxide test for jet fuels similar to ASTM D3703 that does not require the use of ODC's has been developed. This test has proved, in limited testing, to be a viable substitute method for ASTM D3703. The Air Force is currently conducting a round robin to allow the method to be accepted by ASTM and therefore replace the current method. This paper will describe the Air Force's initiatives to remove ODC's and hazardous materials from the fuel and fuel related military specifications that the Air Force Wright Laboratory.

Liberio, Patricia D.

1995-01-01

96

Marketing Universities: A Survey of Student Recruitment Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Admissions officers of 350 private colleges and universities were surveyed to ascertain their understanding of the term "marketing," current use of promotional (advertising and personal selling) activities, market segmentation approaches, and their product (i.e., academic programs) development and differentiation strategies. The mail questionnaire…

Murphy, Patrick E.; McGarrity, Richard A.

1978-01-01

97

ESO IMAGING SURVEY: Past Activities and Future Prospects  

E-print Network

36 ESO IMAGING SURVEY: Past Activities and Future Prospects L. DA COSTA1, S. ARNOUTS1, C. BENOIST1 can be found in Renzini & da Costa (1997) and in a companion article by Renzini & da Costa (4) the 80% completeness magnitude (e.g., Nonino et al. 1999); in #12;2 column (5) the 3 limiting

Zaggia, Simone

98

Survey of fall detection and daily activity monitoring techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

The risk of sustaining heavy injuries through accidental falls creates a major medical problem for elderly people. This paper conducts a survey of the various automatic techniques and methods proposed to detect falls and anomalies in movements of the elderly, through monitoring of their daily life activities. These methods can be broadly divided into three main categories: 1) Video Analysis

Farrukh Hijaz; Nabeel Afzal; Talal Ahmad; Osman Hasan

2010-01-01

99

A Hypermedia Information System for Aviation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Hypermedia Information System (HIS) is being developed under the auspices of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Office of Aviation Medicine's (AAM) Human Factors in Aviation Maintenance (HFAM) research program. The goal of the hypermedia project is to create new tools and methods for aviation-related information storage and retrieval.…

Hartzell, Karin M.

100

Aviation. Career Focus, Volume 3, No. 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This special section on aviation careers describes the programs of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, the Metro Tech Aviation Career Campus in Oklahoma City, the Aviation Technology Center at Vincennes University in Indianapolis, and the Miami-Dade Community College's Eig-Watson School of Aviation. (JOW)

Reese, Susan

2001-01-01

101

Agricultural aviation user requirement priorities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results are given of a research project pertaining to the development of agricultural aviation user requirement priorities. The raw data utilized in the project was obtained from the National Agricultural Aviation Association. A specially configured poll, developed by the Actuarial Research Corporation was used to solicit responses from NAAA members and others. The primary product of the poll is the specification of seriousness as determined by the respondents for some selected agricultural aviation problem areas identified and defined during the course of an intensive analysis by the Actuarial Research Corporation.

Kaplan, R. L.; Meeland, T.; Peterson, J. E.

1977-01-01

102

76 FR 17353 - Aviation Communications  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FCC 11-2] Aviation Communications AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final...document, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) stays...continued use of 121.5 MHz emergency locator...

2011-03-29

103

Nowcasting for Aviation in Africa  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Nowcasting for Aviation in Africa summarizes techniques and best practices for developing area-specific forecasts at very short (0-6 hour) timescales. This 1-hour lesson presents a case study focused on interpreting threats and communicating correct warning information for a weather event affecting multiple airports in Gauteng Province, South Africa. In completing the lesson, the learner will assess the state of the atmosphere, develop a nowcast, monitor conditions, and update/create appropriate nowcast products for aviation stakeholders.

Comet

2013-09-27

104

General Aviation Aircraft Reliability Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This reliability study was performed in order to provide the aviation community with an estimate of Complex General Aviation (GA) Aircraft System reliability. To successfully improve the safety and reliability for the next generation of GA aircraft, a study of current GA aircraft attributes was prudent. This was accomplished by benchmarking the reliability of operational Complex GA Aircraft Systems. Specifically, Complex GA Aircraft System reliability was estimated using data obtained from the logbooks of a random sample of the Complex GA Aircraft population.

Pettit, Duane; Turnbull, Andrew; Roelant, Henk A. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

105

Status report on the survey and alignment activities at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The surveying and alignment activities at Fermilab are the responsibility of the Alignment and Metrology Group. The Group supports and interacts with physicists and engineers working on any particular project, from the facility construction phase to the installation and final alignment of components in the beam line. One of the goals of the Alignment and Metrology Group is to upgrade the old survey networks in the tunnel using modern surveying technology, such as the Laser Tracker for tunnel networks and GPS for the surface networks. According to the job needs, all surveys are done with Laser Trackers and/or Videogrammetry (V-STARS) systems for spatial coordinates; optical and electronic levels are used for elevations, Gyro-Theodolite for azimuths, Mekometer for distances and GPS for baseline vectors. The group has recently purchased two new API Laser Trackers, one INCA3 camera for the V-Stars, and one DNA03 digital level. This report presents the projects and major activities of the Alignment and Metrology Group at Fermilab during the period of 2000 to 2004. It focuses on the most important current projects, especially those that have to be completed during the currently scheduled three-month shutdown period. Future projects, in addition to the status of the current projects, are also presented.

Oshinowo, Babatunde O'Sheg; /Fermilab

2004-10-01

106

National Survey of Children's Hospitals on Legacy-Making Activities  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective Many hospitals offer legacy-building activities for children with serious illnesses or their family members, yet legacy-making has received little empirical attention. This descriptive cross-sectional study examined healthcare provider perceptions of legacy-making activities (e.g., memory books) currently offered by hospitals to pediatric patients and their families. Methods Healthcare providers in seventy-seven (100%) teaching children's hospitals across the United States completed an electronic survey. Results Nearly all providers surveyed reported offering legacy-making activities to ill children and their families, with patients and families usually completing the activity together. Most activities were offered before a patient died and when cure is no longer being sought. Perceived outcomes included benefit to bereaved families and a tangible memento of their deceased child. Conclusion Legacy-making may enhance life and decrease suffering for dying children and their families. Healthcare professionals can facilitate opportunities for children and their families to build legacies. Additional research is needed to examine activities across different age groups and conditions, the best time to offer such activities, and associations with positive and negative outcomes for ill children, their family members, and the bereaved. PMID:22577785

Dietrich, Mary S.; Friedman, Debra L.; Gordon, Jessie E.; Gilmer, Mary J.

2012-01-01

107

76 FR 31357 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Ferrous Metals Surveys  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. Geological Survey [USGS-GX11LR000F60100] Agency Information...Activities: Comment Request for the Ferrous Metals Surveys AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of a...

2011-05-31

108

77 FR 74471 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Activities; Comment Request; State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015 AGENCY: Department...records. Title of Collection: State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015. OMB Control Number...2015 the annual, web-based State of Preschool survey, which centralizes data...

2012-12-14

109

76 FR 28801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Automated Commercial Environment Trade Survey  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Collection Activities: Automated Commercial Environment Trade Survey AGENCY: U.S. Customs...Reduction Act: Automated Commercial Environment Trade Survey. This document is published...information. Title: Automated Commercial Environment Trade Survey. OMB Number: Will...

2011-05-18

110

Friction of Aviation Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first portion of this report discusses measurements of friction made in the altitude laboratory of the Bureau of Standards between 1920 and 1926 under research authorization of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. These are discussed with reference to the influence of speed, barometric pressure, jacket-water temperature, and throttle opening upon the friction of aviation engines. The second section of the report deals with measurements of the friction of a group of pistons differing from each other in a single respect, such as length, clearance, area of thrust face, location of thrust face, etc. Results obtained with each type of piston are discussed and attention is directed particularly to the fact that the friction chargeable to piston rings depends upon piston design as well as upon ring design. This is attributed to the effect of the rings upon the thickness and distribution of the oil film which in turn affects the friction of the piston to an extent which depends upon its design.

Sparrow, S W; Thorne, M A

1928-01-01

111

PRCC Aviation Students  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne's Jeff Hansell, right, explains functions of a space shuttle main engine to Pearl River Community College Aviation Maintenance Technology Program students. Christopher Bryon, left, of Bay St. Louis, Ret Tolar of Kiln, Dan Holston of Baxterville and Billy Zugg of Long Beach took a recent tour of the SSME Processing Facility and the E-1 Test Complex at Stennis Space Center in South Mississippi. The students attend class adjacent to the Stennis International Airport tarmac in Kiln, where they get hands-on experience. PRCC's program prepares students to be responsible for the inspection, repair and maintenance of technologically advanced aircraft. A contractor to NASA, Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., manufactures the space shuttle main engine and its high-pressure turbo pumps. SSC was established in the 1960s to test the huge engines for the Saturn V moon rockets. Now 40 years later, the center tests every main engine for the space shuttle, and is America's largest rocket engine test complex. SSC will soon begin testing the rocket engines that will power spacecraft carrying Americans back to the moon and on to Mars.

2007-01-01

112

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Alternative Communications and Dispatching Procedures  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Procedures Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation 80 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...121, SFAR No. 80 Special Federal Aviation Regulation 80—Alternative...

2010-01-01

113

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Alternative Communications and Dispatching Procedures  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Procedures Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation 80 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...121, SFAR No. 80 Special Federal Aviation Regulation 80—Alternative...

2011-01-01

114

NASA Aviation Safety Program Weather Accident Prevention/weather Information Communications (WINCOMM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Weather is a contributing factor in approximately 25-30 percent of general aviation accidents. The lack of timely, accurate and usable weather information to the general aviation pilot in the cockpit to enhance pilot situational awareness and improve pilot judgment remains a major impediment to improving aviation safety. NASA Glenn Research Center commissioned this 120 day weather datalink market survey to assess the technologies, infrastructure, products, and services of commercial avionics systems being marketed to the general aviation community to address these longstanding safety concerns. A market survey of companies providing or proposing to provide graphical weather information to the general aviation cockpit was conducted. Fifteen commercial companies were surveyed. These systems are characterized and evaluated in this report by availability, end-user pricing/cost, system constraints/limits and technical specifications. An analysis of market survey results and an evaluation of product offerings were made. In addition, recommendations to NASA for additional research and technology development investment have been made as a result of this survey to accelerate deployment of cockpit weather information systems for enhancing aviation safety.

Feinberg, Arthur; Tauss, James; Chomos, Gerald (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

115

NASA Aviation Safety Program Weather Accident Prevention/Weather Information Communications (WINCOMM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Weather is a contributing factor in approximately 25-30 percent of general aviation accidents. The lack of timely, accurate and usable weather information to the general aviation pilot in the cockpit to enhance pilot situational awareness and improve pilot judgment remains a major impediment to improving aviation safety. NASA Glenn Research Center commissioned this 120 day weather datalink market survey to assess the technologies, infrastructure, products, and services of commercial avionics systems being marketed to the general aviation community to address these longstanding safety concerns. A market survey of companies providing or proposing to provide graphical weather information to the general aviation cockpit was conducted. Fifteen commercial companies were surveyed. These systems are characterized and evaluated in this report by availability, end-user pricing/cost, system constraints/limits and technical specifications. An analysis of market survey results and an evaluation of product offerings were made. In addition, recommendations to NASA for additional research and technology development investment have been made as a result of this survey to accelerate deployment of cockpit weather information systems for enhancing aviation safety.

Feinberg, Arthur; Tauss, James; Chomos, Gerald (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

116

[Aviation medicine laboratory of the North Fleet air base celebrates the 70th anniversary].  

PubMed

The article is dedicated to the history of formation and development of the oldest aviation medicine department and its role in a flight safety of the North Fleet naval aviation. The aviation medicine laboratory was created in the years of the Great Patriotic war for medical backup of flights, medical review board, delivering of combat casualty care, prophylaxis of hypothermia and exhaustion of flight and ground crew. In a post-war period the aviation medicine laboratory made a great contribution to development of medical backup of educational and combat activity of the North Fleet aviation. Participation in cosmonaut applicants selection (incl. Yu.A. Gagarin), optimization of flight services during the transmeridian flights, research of carrier-based aircraft habitability and body state of the contingent during the longstanding ship-based aviation, development of treatment methods for functional status of sea-based aviation crew are the achievements of aviation medicine laboratory. Nowadays medicine laboratory is performing a research and practice, methodic and consultative activity with the aim of improving the system of medical backup, aviation medicine, psychology, flight safety, improvement of air crew health, prolong of flying proficiency. PMID:24000629

Gavrilov, V V; Maza?kin, D N; Buldakov, I M; Pisarev, A A

2013-05-01

117

The Typical General Aviation Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The reliability of General Aviation aircraft is unknown. In order to "assist the development of future GA reliability and safety requirements", a reliability study needs to be performed. Before any studies on General Aviation aircraft reliability begins, a definition of a typical aircraft that encompasses most of the general aviation characteristics needs to be defined. In this report, not only is the typical general aviation aircraft defined for the purpose of the follow-on reliability study, but it is also separated, or "sifted" into several different categories where individual analysis can be performed on the reasonably independent systems. In this study, the typical General Aviation aircraft is a four-place, single engine piston, all aluminum fixed-wing certified aircraft with a fixed tricycle landing gear and a cable operated flight control system. The system breakdown of a GA aircraft "sifts" the aircraft systems and components into five categories: Powerplant, Airframe, Aircraft Control Systems, Cockpit Instrumentation Systems, and the Electrical Systems. This breakdown was performed along the lines of a failure of the system. Any component that caused a system to fail was considered a part of that system.

Turnbull, Andrew

1999-01-01

118

14 CFR 183.21 - Aviation Medical Examiners.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aviation Medical Examiners. 183.21 Section...21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...Designations: Privileges § 183.21 Aviation Medical Examiners. An Aviation...

2011-01-01

119

14 CFR 183.21 - Aviation Medical Examiners.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aviation Medical Examiners. 183.21 Section...21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...Designations: Privileges § 183.21 Aviation Medical Examiners. An Aviation...

2010-01-01

120

Aviation Safety Analyst Flies with Blue Angels  

NASA Video Gallery

Abegael "Abby" Jakey has aviation in her blood, taking her first flight at six months old in a Globe Swift. Now a contractor with Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. working for NASA's Aviation Safety Report...

121

19 CFR 122.167 - Aviation smuggling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aviation smuggling. 122.167 Section 122.167 Customs Duties...TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Penalties § 122.167 Aviation smuggling. (a) Civil penalties. Any...

2011-04-01

122

An Operations Research approach to aviation security  

E-print Network

Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, aviation security policy has remained a focus of national attention. We develop mathematical models to address some prominent problems in aviation security. We explore ...

Martonosi, Susan Elizabeth

2005-01-01

123

Airborne Volcanic Ash--A Global Threat to Aviation U.S. Department of the Interior  

E-print Network

explosive eruptions. The risk to aviation from volcanic activity is significant--in the United States alone is a serious hazard to aviation and can cause jet engines to suddenly fail in flight. Explosive volcanic cockpit crews within 5 minutes of eruption detection worldwide. This image taken from space shows

Torgersen, Christian

124

Aviation Pilot Training I and Aviation Technician I: Task Analyses. Semester I. Field Review Copy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide for aviation pilot and aviation technician training begins with a course description, resource information, and a course outline. Tasks/competencies are categorized into 10 concept/duty areas: understanding aviation career opportunities; comprehending the history of aviation; understanding classes, categories, and types of aircraft;…

Upchurch, Richard

125

A Multiplicity Survey of Chromospherically Active and Inactive Stars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Surveys of the three samples of solar-type stars, segregated by chromospheric emission level, were made to determine their multiplicity fractions and to investigate the evolution of multiplicity with age. In total, 245 stars were searched for companions with DeltaV <= 3.0 and separations of 0.035" to 1.08" using optical speckle interferometry, By incorporating the visual micrometer survey for duplicity of the LamontHussey Observatory, the angular coverage was extended to 5.0" with no change in in the DeltaV limit. This magnitude difference allows mass ratios of 0.63 and larger to be detected throughout a search region of 2-127 AU for the stars observed. The 84 primaries observed in the chromospherically active sample are presumably part of a young population and are found to have a multiplicity fraction of 17.9% +/- 4.6%. The sample of 118 inactive, presumably older, primaries were selected and observed using identical methods and are found to have a multiplicity fraction of only 8.5% +/- 2.7%. Given the known link between chromospheric activity and age, these results tentatively imply a decreasing stellar multiplicity fraction from 1 to 4 Gyr, the approximate ages of the two samples. Finally, only two of the 14 very active primaries observed were found to have a companion meeting the survey detection parameters. In this case, many of the systems are either very young, or close, RS CVn type multiples that are unresolvable using techniques employed here.

Mason, Brian D.; Henry, Todd J.; Hartkopf, William I.; TenBrummelaar, Theo; Soderblom, David R.

1998-01-01

126

Federal Aviation Administration weather program to improve aviation safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of the National Airspace System (NAS) will improve safety services to aviation. These services include collision avoidance, improved landing systems and better weather data acquisition and dissemination. The program to improve the quality of weather information includes the following: Radar Remote Weather Display System; Flight Service Automation System; Automatic Weather Observation System; Center Weather Processor, and Next Generation Weather Radar Development.

Wedan, R. W.

1983-01-01

127

NASA aviation safety reporting system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aviation safety reports that relate to loss of control in flight, problems that occur as a result of similar sounding alphanumerics, and pilot incapacitation are presented. Problems related to the go around maneuver in air carrier operations, and bulletins (and FAA responses to them) that pertain to air traffic control systems and procedures are included.

1981-01-01

128

Collegiate Aviation Review. September 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains five papers on aviation education. "Training Considerations for Expert Pilot Decision Making" (Richard J. Adams, Ronald John Lofaro) is a report on research identifying the differences between expert and novice decision makers from a cognitive information processing perspective and correlating the development of expert pilot…

McCoy, C. Elaine, Ed.

129

Beginner's Guide to Aviation Efficiency  

E-print Network

to winning the air war and the key to exploring space. In the civil market, faster aircraft could fly higher around the world every year and some 23,000 aircraft in commercial service, the aviation industry today, the amount of payload it can carry and, importantly, better environmental performance. This Guide explores

130

Aviation Insights: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aviation as people know it today is a mature but very young technology as time goes. Considering that the 100th anniversary of flight was celebrated just a few years ago in 2003, millions of people fly from city to city or from nation to nation and across the oceans and around the world effortlessly and economically. Additionally, they have space…

Deal, Walter F., III

2005-01-01

131

Compton thick active galactic nuclei in Chandra surveys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results from an X-ray spectral analysis of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the Chandra Deep Field-South, All-wavelength Extended Groth-strip International Survey (AEGIS)-Deep X-ray survey (XD) and Chandra-Cosmic Evolution Surveys (COSMOS), focusing on the identification and characterization of the most heavily obscured, Compton thick (CT, NH > 1024 cm-2) sources. Our sample is comprised of 3184 X-ray selected extragalactic sources, which has a high rate of redshift completeness (96.6 per cent), and includes additional spectroscopic redshifts and improved photometric redshifts over previous studies. We use spectral models designed for heavily obscured AGN which self-consistently include all major spectral signatures of heavy absorption. We validate our spectral fitting method through simulations, identify CT sources not selected through this method using X-ray colours and take considerations for the constraints on NH given the low count nature of many of our sources. After these considerations, we identify a total of 100 CT AGN with best-fitting NH > 1024 cm-2 and NH constrained to be above 1023.5 cm-2 at 90 per cent confidence. These sources cover an intrinsic 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity range of 1042-3 × 1045 erg s-1 and a redshift range of z = 0.1-4. This sample will enable characterization of these heavily obscured AGN across cosmic time and to ascertain their cosmological significance. These survey fields are sites of extensive multiwavelength coverage, including near-infrared Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) data and far-infrared Herschel data, enabling forthcoming investigations into the host properties of CT AGN. Furthermore, by using the torus models to test different covering factor scenarios, and by investigating the inclusion of the soft scattered emission, we find evidence that the covering factor of the obscuring material decreases with LX for all redshifts, consistent with the receding torus model, and that this factor increases with redshift, consistent with an increase in the obscured fraction towards higher redshifts. The strong relationship between the parameters of obscuration and LX points towards an origin intrinsic to the AGN; however, the increase of the covering factor with redshift may point towards contributions to the obscuration by the host galaxy. We make NH, ? (with uncertainties), observed X-ray fluxes and intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosities for all sources analysed in this work publicly available in an online catalogue.

Brightman, Murray; Nandra, Kirpal; Salvato, Mara; Hsu, Li-Ting; Aird, James; Rangel, Cyprian

2014-09-01

132

NASA's Aviation Safety and Modeling Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aviation Safety Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) Project of NASA's Aviation Safety program is cultivating sources of data and developing automated computer hardware and software to facilitate efficient, comprehensive, and accurate analyses of the data collected from large, heterogeneous databases throughout the national aviation system. The ASMM addresses the need to provide means for increasing safety by enabling the identification and correcting of predisposing conditions that could lead to accidents or to incidents that pose aviation risks. A major component of the ASMM Project is the Aviation Performance Measuring System (APMS), which is developing the next generation of software tools for analyzing and interpreting flight data.

Chidester, Thomas R.; Statler, Irving C.

2006-01-01

133

A Survey of Health-Related Activities on Second Life  

PubMed Central

Background Increasingly, governments, health care agencies, companies, and private groups have chosen Second Life as part of their Web 2.0 communication strategies. Second Life offers unique design features for disseminating health information, training health professionals, and enabling patient education for both academic and commercial health behavior research. Objectives This study aimed to survey and categorize the range of health-related activities on Second Life; to examine the design attributes of the most innovative and popular sites; and to assess the potential utility of Second Life for the dissemination of health information and for health behavior change. Methods We used three separate search strategies to identify health-related sites on Second Life. The first used the application’s search engine, entering both generic and select illness-specific keywords, to seek out sites. The second identified sites through a comprehensive review of print, blog, and media sources discussing health activities on Second Life. We then visited each site and used a snowball method to identify other health sites until we reached saturation (no new health sites were identified). The content, user experience, and chief purpose of each site were tabulated as well as basic site information, including user traffic data and site size. Results We found a wide range of health-related activities on Second Life, and a diverse group of users, including organizations, groups, and individuals. For many users, Second Life activities are a part of their Web 2.0 communication strategy. The most common type of health-related site in our sample (n = 68) were those whose principle aim was patient education or to increase awareness about health issues. The second most common type of site were support sites, followed by training sites, and marketing sites. Finally, a few sites were purpose-built to conduct research in SL or to recruit participants for real-life research. Conclusions Studies show that behaviors from virtual worlds can translate to the real world. Our survey suggests that users are engaged in a range of health-related activities in Second Life which are potentially impacting real-life behaviors. Further research evaluating the impact of health-related activities on Second Life is warranted. PMID:19632971

Beard, Leslie; Wilson, Kumanan; Morra, Dante

2009-01-01

134

Pattern of malaria imported by foreign residents under active survey.  

PubMed

An active of imported malaria was carried out on 1432 foreign residents entering Czechoslovakia between 1986-1989. The survey group consisted of adult aged 18-35 years who arrived from malaria endemic regions. Of 660 people surveyed who were from regions of Africa south of the Sahara, 10% were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Whereas, those arriving from South East Asia had a relatively low prevalence of malaria (2.6%), predominantly P. vivax. Of the 10% of cases testing positive for P. falciparum, 85% had less than 10,000 asexual stages/microliters of blood and 75% were asymptomatic carriers. By contrast, 93.8% of P. vivax/ovale infections were diagnosed because of the onset of symptoms. Both the frequency of seropositivity and the geometrical mean reciprocal titre (IgG), using P. falciparum antigen, were higher in those people arriving from Africa (79% and 1,307) compared with those arriving from S.E. Asia (44.4% and 628). Malaria was confirmed, by blood smear examination, in only 23.8% of the seropositive cohort. There was a positive correlation between the percentage of P. falciparum-positive blood smears and the level of antibody titre. There was no correlation between serum reactivity and level of parasitaemia. PMID:8516636

Giboda, M; Loudová, J; Smith, J M; Gutvirth, J

1993-03-01

135

Fog: Its Processes and Impacts to Aviation and Aviation Forecasting  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module first introduces forecasters to aviation-forecast customers and their needs, and discusses how fog impacts aviation operations. The main content of the module then explains the physical processes and life cycle of radiation and advection fog, including their preconditioning environment, initiation, growth, and dissipation. The processes covered in the module include radiation (both solar and longwave), soil-atmosphere thermal interactions, turbulent mixing, the roles of condensation nuclei, and droplet settling. Each section of the module includes a set of interactive questions based on the information presented. The module concludes with a discussion of the physical processes and life-cycles of terrain-induced and pre- and post- frontal fog.

Comet

2010-10-12

136

77 FR 44670 - Information Collection Activities: National Historic Landmarks (NHL) Condition Survey  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Activities: National Historic Landmarks (NHL) Condition Survey AGENCY: National Park...1024-NEW, National Historic Landmarks (NHL) Condition Survey in the subject line...Abstract National Historic Landmarks (NHL) are nationally significant historic...

2012-07-30

137

National survey of the injury prevention activities of children's centres  

PubMed Central

Children's centres were established across England to provide a range of services including early education, social care and health to pre-school children and their families. We surveyed children's centres to ascertain the activities they were undertaking to prevent unintentional injuries in the under fives. A postal questionnaire was sent to a sample of children's centre managers (n?=?694). It included questions on current activities, knowledge and attitudes to injury prevention, health priorities and partnership working. Responses were received from 384 (56%) children's centres. Overall, 58% considered unintentional injury prevention to be one of the three main child health priorities for their centre. Over half the respondents (59%) did not know if there was an injury prevention group in their area, and 21% did not know if there was a home safety equipment scheme. Knowledge of how child injury deaths occur in the home was poor. Only 11% knew the major cause of injury deaths in children under five. Lack of both staff time and funding were seen as important barriers by children's centre staff to undertake injury prevention activities. Nearly all stated that training (97%) and assistance with planning injury prevention (94%) would be helpful to their centres. Children's centres need further support if they are to effectively tackle this important public health area. PMID:23837887

Watson, Michael C; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Kendrick, Denise; Stewart, Jane; Coupland, Carol; Hayes, Mike; Wynn, Persephone

2014-01-01

138

Compressing Aviation Data in XML Format  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design, operations and maintenance activities in aviation involve analysis of variety of aviation data. This data is typically in disparate formats making it difficult to use with different software packages. Use of a self-describing and extensible standard called XML provides a solution to this interoperability problem. XML provides a standardized language for describing the contents of an information stream, performing the same kind of definitional role for Web content as a database schema performs for relational databases. XML data can be easily customized for display using Extensible Style Sheets (XSL). While self-describing nature of XML makes it easy to reuse, it also increases the size of data significantly. Therefore, transfemng a dataset in XML form can decrease throughput and increase data transfer time significantly. It also increases storage requirements significantly. A natural solution to the problem is to compress the data using suitable algorithm and transfer it in the compressed form. We found that XML-specific compressors such as Xmill and XMLPPM generally outperform traditional compressors. However, optimal use of Xmill requires of discovery of optimal options to use while running Xmill. This, in turn, depends on the nature of data used. Manual disc0ver.y of optimal setting can require an engineer to experiment for weeks. We have devised an XML compression advisory tool that can analyze sample data files and recommend what compression tool would work the best for this data and what are the optimal settings to be used with a XML compression tool.

Patel, Hemil; Lau, Derek; Kulkarni, Deepak

2003-01-01

139

Satellite Delivery of Aviation Weather Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With aviation traffic continuing to increase worldwide, reducing the aviation accident rate and aviation schedule delays is of critical importance. In the United States, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established the Aviation Safety Program and the Aviation System Capacity Program to develop and test new technologies to increase aviation safety and system capacity. Weather is a significant contributor to aviation accidents and schedule delays. The timely dissemination of weather information to decision makers in the aviation system, particularly to pilots, is essential in reducing system delays and weather related aviation accidents. The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating improved methods of weather information dissemination through satellite broadcasting directly to aircraft. This paper describes an on-going cooperative research program with NASA, Rockwell Collins, WorldSpace, Jeppesen and American Airlines to evaluate the use of satellite digital audio radio service (SDARS) for low cost broadcast of aviation weather information, called Satellite Weather Information Service (SWIS). The description and results of the completed SWIS Phase 1 are presented, and the description of the on-going SWIS Phase 2 is given.

Kerczewski, Robert J.; Haendel, Richard

2001-01-01

140

NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Problems in briefing of relief by air traffic controllers are discussed, including problems that arise when duty positions are changed by controllers. Altimeter reading and setting errors as factors in aviation safety are discussed, including problems associated with altitude-including instruments. A sample of reports from pilots and controllers is included, covering the topics of ATIS broadcasts an clearance readback problems. A selection of Alert Bulletins, with their responses, is included.

1980-01-01

141

U. S. Army Aviation Epidemiology Data Registry: Army Aviators with Diabetes Mellitus and Impaired Glucose Tolerance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Army Aviation Epidemiology Data Register (AEDR) was queried for Army aviators with the finding of glycosuria, hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes mellitus (DM), use of oral hypoglycemic agents, or use of insulin for the peri...

K. T. Mason, S. G. Shannon

1994-01-01

142

The P-40 in Soviet Aviation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article, based on archival documents, covers the history of American Curtiss P-40 fighters in the Soviet aviation. USSR received 2134 aircraft of this type in 1941–1944. They were widely used in all branches of Soviet aviation—Air Forces, Air Defense (PVO), and naval aviation. They were considered as average fighters—better than old Soviet types and British Hurricanes but worse than

Valeriy Romanenko

2009-01-01

143

Antimicrobial stewardship activities: a survey of Queensland hospitals.  

PubMed

Objective In 2011, the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) recommended that all hospitals in Australia must have an Antimicrobial Stewardship (AMS) program by 2013. Nevertheless, little is known about current AMS activities. This study aimed to determine the AMS activities currently undertaken, and to identify gaps, barriers to implementation and opportunities for improvement in Queensland hospitals. Methods The AMS activities of 26 facilities from 15 hospital and health services in Queensland were surveyed during June 2012 to address strategies for effective AMS: implementing clinical guidelines, formulary restriction, reviewing antimicrobial prescribing, auditing antimicrobial use and selective reporting of susceptibility results. Results The response rate was 62%. Nineteen percent had an AMS team (a dedicated multidisciplinary team consisting of a medically trained staff member and a pharmacist). All facilities had access to an electronic version of Therapeutic Guidelines: Antibiotic, with a further 50% developing local guidelines for antimicrobials. One-third of facilities had additional restrictions. Eighty-eight percent had advice for restricted antimicrobials from in-house infectious disease physicians or clinical microbiologists. Antimicrobials were monitored with feedback given to prescribers at point of care by 76% of facilities. Deficiencies reported as barriers to establishing AMS programs included: pharmacy resources, financial support by hospital management, and training and education in antimicrobial use. Conclusions Several areas for improvement were identified: reviewing antimicrobial prescribing with feedback to the prescriber, auditing, and training and education in antimicrobial use. There also appears to be a lack of resources to support AMS programs in some facilities. What is known about the topic? The ACSQHC has recommended that all hospitals implement an AMS program by 2013 as a requirement of Standard 3 (Preventing and Controlling Healthcare-Associated Infections) of the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards. The intent of AMS is to ensure appropriate prescribing of antimicrobials as part of the broader systems within a health service organisation to prevent and manage healthcare-associated infections, and improve patient safety and quality of care. This criterion also aligns closely with Standard 4: Medication Safety. Despite this recommendation, little is known about what AMS activities are undertaken in these facilities and what additional resources would be required in order to meet these national standards. What does the paper add? This is the first survey that has been conducted of public hospital and health services in Queensland, a large decentralised state in Australia. This paper describes what AMS activities are currently being undertaken, identifies practice gaps, barriers to implementation and opportunities for improvement in Queensland hospitals. What are the implications for practitioners? Several areas for improvement such as reviewing antimicrobial prescribing with feedback to the prescriber, auditing, and training and education in antimicrobial use have been identified. In addition, there appears to be a lack of resources to support AMS programs in some facilities. PMID:25376911

Avent, Minyon L; Hall, Lisa; Davis, Louise; Allen, Michelle; Roberts, Jason A; Unwin, Sean; McIntosh, Kylie A; Thursky, Karin; Buising, Kirsty; Paterson, David L

2014-11-01

144

Aviation Maintenance (Aircraft Mechanics & Aircraft & Instrument Repair Personnel). Aviation Careers Series. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines career opportunities in aviation maintenance. The booklet provides the following information about aviation maintenance jobs: nature of the work, working conditions, where the jobs are, wages and benefits, opportunities for advancement, requirements to enter the job, opportunities for…

Zaharevitz, Walter

145

A Spectroscopic Survey of a Sample of Active M Dwarfs  

E-print Network

A moderate resolution spectroscopic survey of Fleming's sample of 54 X-ray selected M dwarfs with photometric distances less than 25 pc is presented. Radial and rotation velocities have been measured by fits to the H-alpha profiles. Radial velocities have been measured by cross correlation. Artificial broadening of an observed spectrum has produced a relationship between H-alpha FWHM and rotation speed, which we use to infer rotation speeds for the entire sample by measurement of the H-alpha emission line. We find 3 ultra-fast rotators (UFRs, vsini > 100km/s), and 8 stars with 30 TW Hya Association member, TWA 8A. These results show that there are a number of young (< 10^8 yr) and very young (< 10^7 yr) low mass stars in the immediate solar neighbourhood. The H-alpha activity strength does not depend on rotation speed. Our fast rotators are less luminous than similarly fast rotators in the Pleiades. They are either younger than the Pleiades, or gained angular momentum in a different way.

Stefan W. Mochnacki; Michael D. Gladders; James R. Thomson; Wenxian Lu; Paula Ehlers; Metin Guler; Asif Hussain; Quincy Kameda; Karen King; Patricia Mitchell; Jason Rowe; Peter Schindler; Heather Scott

2002-07-19

146

General Aviation in Nebraska: Nebraska SATS Project Background Paper No. 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Nebraska SATS project is a state-level component of NASA's Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS). During the next several years the project will examine several different factors affecting SATS implementation in Nebraska. These include economic and taxation issues, public policy issues, airport planning processes, information dissemination strategies, and systemic change factors. This background paper profiles the general aviation system in Nebraska. It is written to provide information about the "context" within which SATS will be pursued. The primary focus is thus on describing and providing background information about the current situation. A secondary focus is on drawing general conclusions about the ability of the current system to incorporate the types of changes implied by SATS. First, some brief information on the U.S. aviation system is provided. The next two sections profile the current general aviation aircraft and pilot base. Nebraska's system of general aviation airports is then described. Within this section of the paper, information is provided on the different types of general aviation airports in Nebraska, airport activity levels and current infrastructure. The fourth major section of the background paper looks at Nebraska's local airport authorities. These special purpose local governments oversee the majority of the general aviation airports in the state. Among the items examined are total expenditures, capital expenditures and planning activities. Next, the paper provides background information on the Nebraska Department of Aeronautics (NDA) and recent Federal funding for general aviation in Nebraska. The final section presents summary conclusions.

Smith, Russell; Wachal, Jocelyn

2000-01-01

147

Development of an autoland system for general aviation aircraft  

E-print Network

Accidents due to engine failure, pilot disorientation or pilot incapacitation occur far more frequently in general aviation than in commercial aviation, yet general aviation aircraft are equipped with less safety-enhancing ...

Siegel, Diana

2012-01-01

148

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Editorial...

2010-01-01

149

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 Editorial...

2010-01-01

150

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 106  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 106 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 106 Editorial...

2011-01-01

151

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 Editorial...

2011-01-01

152

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...121, SFAR No. 36 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 1....

2011-01-01

153

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 106  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 106 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 106 Editorial...

2010-01-01

154

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 89  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 89 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 89 Editorial...

2011-01-01

155

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...AND REPORTING POINTS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Editorial...

2011-01-01

156

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Editorial...

2010-01-01

157

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...GROUND INSTRUCTORS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108 Note: For...

2010-01-01

158

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... TRAINING CENTERS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Editorial...

2011-01-01

159

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 Editorial...

2011-01-01

160

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108 Editorial...

2011-01-01

161

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Editorial...

2010-01-01

162

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...GROUND INSTRUCTORS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108 Note: For...

2011-01-01

163

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Editorial...

2011-01-01

164

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...IN COMMON CARRIAGE Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Editorial...

2010-01-01

165

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...AND REPORTING POINTS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Editorial...

2010-01-01

166

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108 Editorial...

2010-01-01

167

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 Editorial...

2011-01-01

168

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 89  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 89 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 89 Editorial...

2010-01-01

169

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Editorial...

2011-01-01

170

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 Editorial...

2010-01-01

171

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Editorial...

2011-01-01

172

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...CREWMEMBERS OTHER THAN PILOTS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Editorial...

2010-01-01

173

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Editorial...

2011-01-01

174

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...IN COMMON CARRIAGE Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Editorial...

2011-01-01

175

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...CREWMEMBERS OTHER THAN PILOTS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Editorial...

2011-01-01

176

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 Editorial...

2011-01-01

177

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 Editorial...

2010-01-01

178

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... TRAINING CENTERS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 93 Editorial...

2010-01-01

179

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 13  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 13 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...25, SFAR No. 13 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 13 1....

2011-01-01

180

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 97 Editorial...

2010-01-01

181

14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 Editorial...

2010-01-01

182

77 FR 52203 - Airworthiness Directives; Goodyear Aviation Tires  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Airworthiness Directives; Goodyear Aviation Tires AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...airworthiness directive (AD) for Goodyear Aviation Tires, part number 299K63-1 (Brazilian made new tires only), installed on various transport...

2012-08-29

183

Workshop on the Impacts of Aviation on Climate Change  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Projections indicate that demand for aviation transportation will increase by more than two fold over the next few decades. Timely action is needed to understand and quantify the potential climate impacts of aviation emissions particularly given the sustained lapse over the last several years in U.S. research activities in this area. In response to the stated needs, a group of international experts participated in the Workshop on the Impacts of Aviation on Climate Change during June 7-9, 2006 in Boston, MA. The workshop focus was on the impacts of subsonic aircraft emissions in the UT/LS region and on the potential response of the climate system. The goals of the workshop were to assess and document the present state of scientific knowledge, to identify the key underlying uncertainties and gaps, to identify ongoing and further research needed, to explore the development of climate impact metrics, and to help focus the scientific community on the aviation-climate change research needs. The workshop concluded that the major ways that aviation can affect climate, in agreement with the 1999 assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), are the direct climate effects from CO2 and water vapor emissions, the indirect forcing on climate resulting from changes in the distributions and concentrations of ozone and methane as a primary consequence of aircraft nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, the direct effects (and indirect effects on clouds) from emitted aerosols and aerosol precursors, and the climate effects associated with contrails and cirrus cloud formation. The workshop was organized in three subgroups: (1) Effects of aircraft emissions on the UT/LS chemical composition, (2) Effects of water and particle emissions on contrails and on cirrus clouds, and (3) Impacts on climate from aircraft emissions and identification of suitable metrics to measure these impacts. The workshop participants acknowledged the need for focused research specifically to address the uncertainties and gaps in our understanding of current and projected impacts of aviation on climate and to develop metrics to better characterize these impacts. This may entail coordination and/or expansion of existing and planned climate research programs, or new activities. Such efforts should include strong and continuing interactions among the science and aviation communities as well as policymakers to develop well-informed decisions.

Wuebbles, Don; Gupta, Mohan; Ko, Malcolm

2006-01-01

184

Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal responsibility. The most frequently identified curriculum need across all aviation disciplines was that of communication skills.

Kutz, Mary N. Hill

185

The Rotary Combustion Engine: a Candidate for General Aviation. [conferences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The state of development of the rotary combustion engine is discussed. The nonturbine engine research programs for general aviation and future requirements for general aviation powerplants are emphasized.

1978-01-01

186

A Survey of the Friends of the Library Recent Activities in Ohio: Report--Description.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In October 1978 a survey was conducted of Friends of the Library (FOL) activities during the preceding 6 years in support of public, branch, academic, public school, media center, institution, and special libraries in Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to identify and provide a comprehensive summary listing of the recent activities of Friends…

McLean, Dulce DiDio

187

Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for

Mary N. Hill Kutz

1998-01-01

188

Aviation Safety Program Aircraft Aging & Durability Project  

E-print Network

of NASA to improve aircraft safety for current and future civilian and military aircraft, and to overcomeAviation Safety Program Aircraft Aging & Durability Project Technical Plan Summary Principal by NASA to define the rationale, scope and detailed content of a comprehensive Aviation Safety, Aircraft

189

Psychomotor Functions, the Body Image, and Aviation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the evaluation of aviators, and particularly student aviators, another source of anxiety -- unrelated to fears of death and mutilation, etc. -- has become evident. This is in the sphere of psychomotor adaption to the process of flying an airplane. In t...

G. J. Tucker, R. F. Reinhardt

1966-01-01

190

Explosives detection systems (EDS) for aviation security  

Microsoft Academic Search

The detection of explosives and illicit material for the purposes of aviation security is an importantarea for preventing terrorism and smuggling. A number of different methods of explosive detectionhave been developed in the past that can detect such material from a very small up to a very largequantity. For the purposes of aviation security, the checks are performed on passengers,

Sameer Singh; Maneesha Singh

2003-01-01

191

Mapping automotive like controls to a general aviation aircraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this thesis was to develop fly-by-wire control laws enabling a general aviation aircraft to be flown with automotive controls, i.e. a steering wheel and gas/brake pedals. There was a six speed shifter used to change the flight mode of the aircraft. This essentially allows the pilot to have control over different aspects of the flight profile such as climb/descend or cruise. A highway in the sky was used to aid in the navigation since it is not intuitive to people without flight experience how to navigate from the sky or when to climb and descend. Many believe that general aviation could become as widespread as the automobile. Every person could have a personal aircraft at their disposal and it would be as easy to operate as driving an automobile. The goal of this thesis is to fuse the ease of drivability of a car with flight of a small general aviation aircraft. A standard automotive control hardware setup coupled with variably autonomous control laws will allow new pilots to fly a plane as easily as driving a car. The idea is that new pilots will require very little training to become proficient with these controls. Pilots with little time to stay current can maintain their skills simply by driving a car which is typically a daily activity. A human factors study was conducted to determine the feasibility of the applied control techniques. Pilot performance metrics were developed to compare candidates with no aviation background and experienced pilots. After analyzing the relative performance between pilots and non-pilots, it has been determined that the control system is robust and easy to learn. Candidates with no aviation experience whatsoever can learn to fly an aircraft as safely and efficiently as someone with hundreds of hours of flight experience using these controls.

Carvalho, Christopher G.

192

Flight duration, airspeed practices and altitude management of airplanes involved in the NASA VGH General Aviation Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight duration, airspeed, and altitude information obtained from NASA velocity gravity height (VGH) recorders is presented for each of 95 general aviation airplanes flown in twin- and single-engine executive, personal, instructional, commercial survey, aerial application, aerobatic, commuter, and float operations. These data complement normal acceleration data obtained from the same airplanes and reported in NASA-TM-84660, and together they provide a data base for the design and analysis of general aviation airplane operations.

Jewel, Joseph W., Jr.

1987-01-01

193

Surveys  

Cancer.gov

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) The world's largest, on-going telephone health survey system, tracking health conditions and risk behaviors in the United States yearly since 1984. Currently, data are collected monthly in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam.

194

Studies in general aviation aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland has completed a research study for NASA Langley on the application of drooped leading edges to high aspect wings. The experimental study conducted for this grant was a natural extension of work previously conducted at NASA Ames, the University of Michigan, NASA Langley and the University of Maryland. Previous research had shown that wing planform modifications (commonly referred to as drooped leading edge mods) could have a significant effect on reducing or eliminating the stall/spin characteristics of General Aviation (GA) aircraft. All aircraft studied in the earlier work had relatively low aspect ratio wings (AR = 6). Since future GA aircraft will feature higher aspect ratio wings, the obvious question was: how well will the dropped leading edge work on higher aspect ratio wings? The focus of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of the drooped leading edge modifications to higher aspect ratio wings with AR = 9 to 12.

Winkelmann, Allen E.

1990-01-01

195

Studies towards assessing the effects of aviation on climate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emissions from aviation are an important component in the overall concerns about the effects of human activities on climate. Aviation emissions modify the chemical and physical properties of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) in various ways. Aircraft emit gases and particles that can either directly or indirectly affect climate and air quality, including: carbon dioxide (CO2); nitrogen oxides (NOx) that can increase ozone (O3) production and increase the destruction of methane (CH4); water vapor that under certain atmospheric conditions can lead to contrail formation; and soot and other particles that along with contrails can affect the amount and characteristics of cirrus clouds. Soot and sulfate particles can also change the cloudiness by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. Due to the high growth in air traffic that is projected to continue, it is important to understand the effects of aviation on air quality and climate. Based on then existing analyses of the emissions and their effects, the aviation contribution in changing the radiative forcing on the climate system was about 5% of the total human-related emissions (relative to 1750) in 2005 (Lee et al., 2009). This contribution is a result of various effects, especially the direct effects of CO2, NOx-induced effects, aerosol direct and indirect effects, and increased cloudiness from contrail formation and aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei. One of the main challenges of the aviation scientific community has been to increase the level of scientific understanding of these effects, especially with respect to those most uncertain (i.e. NOx effects, contrail-cirrus and aerosol effects). Another challenge has been to develop a simple climate model (SCM) that has the level of sophistication necessary to accurately assess aviation induced climate effects while being easy to use by policy makers for use in policy considerations. The main objectives in this study were: (1) to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of simple climate models for evaluating aviation policy options and tradeoffs, and (2) to increase the scientific understanding of aviation NOx-induced effects on climate. With regard to the first goal, enhancing the evaluation of SCMs, the carbon cycle and energy balance treatments in several widely used simplified climate models were evaluated. The findings from this study resulted in modifications to the carbon cycle and energy balance model components of the APMT model that is used extensively by FAA in aviation policy analyses. With regard to the second goal, 3 lines of research were pursued to increase the scientific understanding of aviation NOx-induced effects on climate. First, aviation NOx-induced effects were quantified using three-dimensional (3-D) climate-chemistry models and further, an intercomparison of NOx-induced effects in 3-D climate-chemistry models was performed. The NOx-induced forcings obtained in 3-D simulations were further used to update the parameterization of these effects in SCMs. Second, two additional NOx-induced effects (i.e., reduction in long-term O3 concentrations and lower stratospheric water vapor (SWV)) that have not been fully accounted for in previous studies were quantified based on parameterizing the results obtained in the 3-D simulations. Results indicate that the inclusion of long-term O3 and SWV RFs decreases the net aviation-induced RFs by about 21 to 31% for different range of scenarios studied. Finally, the representation of aviation NOx-induced effects in SCMs were evaluated and improved. The parameterization was improved based on the results of the 3-D simulations and by including the lifetime of the perturbed species and their emissions history into RF calculations. This resulted in 10 to 36% higher aviation NOx-induced net forcing than the net forcings that were reported in the literature, previously. Third, a set of experiments were performed to directly calculate the aviation NOx-induced changes in CH4 that were otherwise calculated through a simple parameterization, and also to

Khodayari, Arezoo

196

Electric-utility solar-energy activities: 1981 survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presented are the results of a survey to determine the scope of electric participation in solar energy projects in the United States. Brief descriptions are given of 943 projects being conducted by 236 utility companies. An index of projects by category, a statistical summary, a list of participating utilities with information contacts and addresses, a list of utilities with projects

E. Baccelli; K. Gordon

1982-01-01

197

Aviation Research and the Internet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Internet is a network of networks. It was originally funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency or DOD/DARPA and evolved in part from the connection of supercomputer sites across the United States. The National Science Foundation (NSF) made the most of their supercomputers by connecting the sites to each other. This made the supercomputers more efficient and now allows scientists, engineers and researchers to access the supercomputers from their own labs and offices. The high speed networks that connect the NSF supercomputers form the backbone of the Internet. The World Wide Web (WWW) is a menu system. It gathers Internet resources from all over the world into a series of screens that appear on your computer. The WWW is also a distributed. The distributed system stores data information on many computers (servers). These servers can go out and get data when you ask for it. Hypermedia is the base of the WWW. One can 'click' on a section and visit other hypermedia (pages). Our approach to demonstrating the importance of aviation research through the Internet began with learning how to put pages on the Internet (on-line) ourselves. We were assigned two aviation companies; Vision Micro Systems Inc. and Innovative Aerodynamic Technologies (IAT). We developed home pages for these SBIR companies. The equipment used to create the pages were the UNIX and Macintosh machines. HTML Supertext software was used to write the pages and the Sharp JX600S scanner to scan the images. As a result, with the use of the UNIX, Macintosh, Sun, PC, and AXIL machines, we were able to present our home pages to over 800,000 visitors.

Scott, Antoinette M.

1995-01-01

198

Patterns of physical activity among Russian youth The Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This paper describes physical activity the patterns of 2,101 Russian youth enrolled in the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS). The RLMS is a nationally representative household sample survey. Methods: Youth 14-18 years and parents of youth 6-13 years responded to survey questions about hours per week of light (cooking and laundry), moderate (walking, bicycling and sports), and vigorous physical

SARAH LEVIN; BARBARA E. AINSWORTH; CYNTHIA W. KWOK; CHERYL L ADDY; BARRY M. POPKIN

199

Principles and Guidelines for Duty and Rest Scheduling in Commercial Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aviation industry requires 24-hour activities to meet operational demands. Growth in global long-haul, regional, overnight cargo, and short-haul domestic operations will continue to increase these round-the-clock requirements. Flight crews must be available to support 24-hour-a-day operations to meet these industry demands. Both domestic and international aviation can also require crossing multiple time zones. Therefore, shift work, night work, irregular work schedules, unpredictable work schedules, and dm zone changes will continue to be commonplace components of the aviation industry. These factors pose known challenges to human physiology, and because they result in performance-impairing fatigue, they pose a risk to safety. It is critical to acknowledge and, whenever possible, incorporate scientific information on fatigue, human sleep, and circadian physiology into 24-hour aviation operations. Utilization of such scientific information can help promote crew performance and alertness during flight operations and thereby maintain and improve the safety margin.

Dinges, David F.; Graeber, R. Curtis; Rosekind, Mark R.; Samel, Alexander

1996-01-01

200

MAINTENANCE The Aviation Maintenance Technology Program offers an associate of  

E-print Network

AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY The Aviation Maintenance Technology Program offers an associate of applied science in aviation maintenance and certificates in airframe, powerplant, or airframe and powerplant maintenance. It is one of the few twelve month Federal Aviation Administration Part-147 certified

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

201

Retaining Women in Collegiate Aviation by Implementing Learning Style Considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women are clearly underrepresented in aviation. Research must be accomplished to determine which factors influence women, once they have indicated a serious interest in an aviation career, to stay in collegiate aviation programs or to leave. Addressing the issue of women's retention in aviation is one way to help address the growing commercial pilot shortage, while moving toward gender equity

Merrill R Karp; Mary Ann Turney; Mary Niemczyk; Mavis F Green; Ruth L Sitler; James C. Bishop

2001-01-01

202

A SURVEY OF THE PRACTICES AND ACTIVITIES OF CANADIAN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

To document the nature of clinical psychology in Canada, a national survey was conducted to collect data on clinical psychologists' demographic characteristics, professional affiliations, professional identities, therapeutic orientations and activities, and publications. Eightyeight members of the Canadian Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology returned questionnaires designed to assess these areas. Survey results are presented in detail, including the findings

JOHN HUNSLEY; MONIQUE LEFEBVRE

1990-01-01

203

Anuran Calling Survey Optimization: Developing and Testing Predictive Models of Anuran Calling Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amphibian populations, particularly anurans, are declining worldwide, and programs that use calling surveys have been established to monitor anuran populations. Models that describe the environment's influence on calling may be useful to increase detection allowing optimization of surveys. Using an automated recording system, we evaluated the calling activity of Pseudacris crucifer, Pseudacris feriarum, and Rana sphenocephala at an ephemeral wetland

Charlotte K. Steelman; Michael E. Dorcas

2010-01-01

204

An Activity-Based Learning Third-Level Course on Survey Sampling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a novel method for the delivery of an introductory module on survey sampling at a third-level institution. As part of the module, students undertake a practical survey that is of interest not only to themselves but also to university administrators and other module coordinators. Unlike many data collection activities used in…

Kelly, Gabrielle E.

2010-01-01

205

78 FR 42537 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Online Survey of Web Services Employers; New...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Collection Activities: Online Survey of Web Services Employers; New Information Collection...the Form/Collection: Online Survey of Web Services Employers. (3) Agency form number...USCIS obtains data on the E-Verify Program Web Services. Gaining an understanding of...

2013-07-16

206

Activities and services of the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver area, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This booklet is a summary of the activities and services of the United States Geological Survey, written for people who have visited or plan to visit one or more of its offices in the Denver area as well as to provide general information about the Geological Survey and its work. Sources of additional information are listed on pages 42-43.

U.S. Geological Survey

1969-01-01

207

Minimum detectable activities of contamination control survey equipment  

SciTech Connect

The Instrumentation External Dosimetry (I ED) Section of the Health Physics Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has performed a series of tests to determine the ability of portable survey instruments used at Hanford to detect radioactive contamination at levels required by DOE 5480.11. This semi-empirical study combines instrumental, statistical, and human factors as necessary to derive operational detection limits. These threshold detection values have been compared to existing contamination control requirements, and detection deficiencies have been identified when present. Portable survey instruments used on the Hanford Site identify the presence of radioactive surface contamination based on the detection of {alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}-, and/or x-radiation. However, except in some unique circumstances, most contamination monitors in use at Hanford are configured to detect either {alpha}-radiation alone or {beta}- and {gamma}-radiation together. Testing was therefore conducted on only these two categories of radiation detection devices. Nevertheless, many of the results obtained are generally applicable to all survey instruments, allowing performance evaluations to be extended to monitoring devices which are exclusively {gamma}- and/or x-ray- sensitive. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Goles, R.W.; Baumann, B.L.; Johnson, M.L.

1991-08-01

208

Study to determine the IFR operational profile and problems of the general aviation single pilot  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

General aviation single pilot operating under instrument flight rules (GA SPIFR) was studied. The objectives of the study were to (1) develop a GA SPIFR operational profile, (2) identify problems experienced by the GA SPIFR pilot, and (3) identify research tasks which have the potential for eliminating or reducing the severity of the problems. To obtain the information necessary to accomplish these objectives, a mail questionnaire survey of instrument rated pilots was conducted. The general aviation IFR single pilot operational profile and selected data analysis examples are presented.

Weislogel, G. S.

1983-01-01

209

Aviation Safety Program Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck  

E-print Network

Aviation Safety Program Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Technical Plan Summary Principal Safety, Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck research project. It contains reference to past work that these two capabilities, safer aircraft and higher capacity airspace systems, fight against each other

210

Improved Usability of Aviation Automation Through Direct  

E-print Network

of THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AVIATION PSYCHOLOGY, 12(2), 153­178 Copyright © 2002, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc- fessionals. After this, general human­computer interaction design guidelines and recommendations on aspects

Kaber, David B.

211

Changing the Landscape of Civil Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is undertaking several bold new initiatives to develop revolutionary technologies for civil aviation. These technologies span the civil aviation fleet from general aviation to large subsonic and supersonic aircraft and promise to bring a new era of new aircraft, lower operation costs, faster more direct flight capabilities, more environmentally friendly aircraft, and safer airline operations. These initiatives have specific quantified goals that require technologies well beyond those currently being developed creating a bold new vision for aeronautics. Revolutionary propulsion systems are enabling for these advancements. This paper gives an overview of the new national aeronautics goals and explores for a selected subset of goals some of the revolutionary technologies will be required to meet some of these goals. The focus of the paper is on the pivotal role propulsion and icing technologies will play in changing the landscape of civil aviation.

Russo, Carol J.

1997-01-01

212

Aviation Safety Reporting System Meteorological and  

E-print Network

Aviation Safety Reporting System Meteorological and Aeronautical Information Services (AIS) Data Comments 12 Preliminary Conclusions 13 b | Meteorological & Aeronautical Information Services (AIS) Data Meteorological (MET) and Aeronautical Information Services (AIS) information is provided to the cockpit via data

213

Evaluation of Aviation Maintenance Fatigue Countermeasures Training.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A major airline volunteered to help the Federal Aviation Administration Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) test a fatigue countermeasures training adapted for maintenance employees by providing employee participants and a training facility. The thre...

B. M. Wenzel, E. L. Hauck, J. O. Banks, K. E. Avers

2013-01-01

214

Enabling America's Next Generation of Aviation Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs o America's Next Generation of Aviation Vehicles are presented. The topics include: 1) UAV's- Unlimited Applications; 2) Global Challenges; 3) UAV/CNS Overview; 4) Communications; 5) Navigation; and 6) Surveillance.

2004-01-01

215

78 FR 3403 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Financial Education Content Needs Survey  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection Activities: Financial Education Content Needs Survey AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission...inquire as to how often the respondents would like to receive content from CFTC, the format in which the respondents would...

2013-01-16

216

Anuran Calling Survey Optimization: Developing and Testing Predictive Models of Anuran Calling Activity  

E-print Network

of surveys. Using an automated recording system, we evaluated the calling activity of Pseudacris crucifer, Pseudacris feriarum, and Rana sphenocephala at an ephemeral wetland in the Piedmont of North Carolina. We

Dorcas, Michael E.

217

78 FR 4983 - Proposed Information Collection; Women Veterans Healthcare Barriers Survey Activity: Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2900-New] Proposed Information Collection; Women Veterans Healthcare Barriers Survey Activity...provision of comprehensive health care for women Veterans. DATES: Written comments and...refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW, Women Veterans Healthcare Barriers...

2013-01-23

218

Student Participation in Community Service Activity. 1996 National Household Education Survey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report examines data from the 1996 National Household Education Survey, Youth Civic Involvement component, in which students in grades 6 through 12 were asked about their participation in community service activities. Additionally, youth were asked a...

B. Chaney, C. Chapman, K. Chandler, M. J. Nolin

1997-01-01

219

General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of turbine engines for the smaller general aviation aircraft was investigated and a technology program for developing the necessary technology was identified. Major results included the definition of the 1988 general aviation market, the identification of turboprop and turboshaft engines that meet the requirements of the aircraft studies, a benefit analysis showing the superiority of gas turbine engines for portions of the market studied, and detailed plans for the development of the necessary technology.

Baerst, C. F.; Furst, D. G.

1979-01-01

220

Adult Learning and University Aviation Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current aviation arena involves highly complex, technically sophisticated aircraft operating in an increasingly dynamic\\u000a flight and navigation environment. In order for commercial aviation students to be prepared for careers as pilots, they must\\u000a undergo very comprehensive theoretical academic education. This study examines appropriate adult learning principles, learning\\u000a style theory, and cooperative and collaborative learning techniques, and then suggests an

Merrill Ron Karp

1998-01-01

221

How Does Active Parental Consent Influence the Findings of Drug-Use Surveys in Schools?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the impact of passive and active parental consent procedures on the type of adolescents participating in a school-based survey examining substance use. Schools recruited from a random sample of metropolitan schools were assigned to passive or active parental consent condition. Results showed that participation rates in active

White, Victoria M.; Hill, David J.; Effendi, Yuksel

2004-01-01

222

Orientation and disorientation in aviation  

PubMed Central

On the ground, the essential requirement to remain orientated is a largely unconscious activity. In flight, orientation requires a conscious effort by the pilot particularly when the visual environment becomes degraded and a deceptive force environment becomes the frame of reference. Furthermore, an unusual force environment can determine the apparent location of objects within a limited visual scene, sometimes with disastrous consequences. This review outlines the sources of pilot disorientation that arise from the visual and force environment of flight and their interaction. It challenges the value of the traditional illusion-based approach to the subject both to aircrew and to surveys of disorientation. Also, it questions the emphasis on the shortcomings of vestibular function as the physiological basis for disorientation. While military accidents from all causes have shown a decline, there has been no corresponding reduction in accidents involving disorientation, 85% of which are the results of unrecognised disorientation. This finding has implications for the way in which pilots are taught about disorientation in the interest of enhanced flight safety. It argues for a greater use of conventional fixed base simulators to create disorientating scenarios rather than complex motion devices to create unusual sensations. PMID:23849216

2013-01-01

223

Aviation Frontiers: On-Demand Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Throughout the 20th Century, NASA has defined the forefront of aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry owes much of its prosperity to this knowledge and technology. In recent decades, centralized aeronautics has become a mature discipline, which raises questions concerning the future aviation innovation frontiers. Three transformational aviation capabilities, bounded together by the development of a Free Flight airspace management system, have the potential to transform 21st Century society as profoundly as civil aviation transformed the 20th Century. These mobility breakthroughs will re-establish environmental sustainable centralized aviation, while opening up latent markets for civil distributed sensing and on-demand rural and regional transportation. Of these three transformations, on-demand aviation has the potential to have the largest market and productivity improvement to society. The information system revolution over the past 20 years shows that vehicles lead, and the interconnecting infrastructure to make them more effective follows; that is, unless on-demand aircraft are pioneered, a distributed Air Traffic Control system will likely never be established. There is no single technology long-pole that will enable on-demand vehicle solutions. However, fully digital aircraft that include electric propulsion has the potential to be a multi-disciplinary initiator of solid state technologies that can provide order of magnitude improvements in the ease of use, safety/reliability, community and environmental friendliness, and affordability.

Moore, Mark D.

2010-01-01

224

Aviation human factors research in US universities: Potential contributions to national needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Universities can and should make vital contributions to national needs in aviation human factors. However, to guide and utilize university research effectively we must understand what types of expertise and facilities universities can bring to bear on aviation problems. We should be aware of where relevant research is already underway and where untapped potential exists. How does the character of research in universities differ from and complement research in government and industry laboratories? What conditions would encourage universities to focus on national priorities and would promote high quality, relevant research? This paper attempts to address these issues. It is based on a survey conducted by the author, which included site visits to several universities, telephone interviews with faculty members at other universities, and a search of the aviation human factors research literature.

Dismukes, R. Key

1994-01-01

225

Report of the workshop on Aviation Safety/Automation Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of NASA's responsibility to encourage and facilitate active exchange of information and ideas among members of the aviation community, an Aviation Safety/Automation workshop was organized and sponsored by the Flight Management Division of NASA Langley Research Center. The one-day workshop was held on October 10, 1989, at the Sheraton Beach Inn and Conference Center in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Participants were invited from industry, government, and universities to discuss critical questions and issues concerning the rapid introduction and utilization of advanced computer-based technology into the flight deck and air traffic controller workstation environments. The workshop was attended by approximately 30 discipline experts, automation and human factors researchers, and research and development managers. The goal of the workshop was to address major issues identified by the NASA Aviation Safety/Automation Program. Here, the results of the workshop are documented. The ideas, thoughts, and concepts were developed by the workshop participants. The findings, however, have been synthesized into a final report primarily by the NASA researchers.

Morello, Samuel A. (editor)

1990-01-01

226

47 CFR 22.873 - Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground systems...Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems... Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground...

2010-10-01

227

47 CFR 22.873 - Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground systems...Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems... Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground...

2011-10-01

228

47 CFR 22.873 - Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground systems...Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems... Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground...

2013-10-01

229

47 CFR 22.873 - Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground systems...Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems... Construction requirements for commercial aviation air-ground...

2012-10-01

230

77 FR 27538 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee-Continuing a Task  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee--Continuing a Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of continuing a...

2012-05-10

231

78 FR 16756 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting...Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel's (DGP's) Spring...Civil Aviation Organization's Dangerous Goods Panel's (ICAO DGP's)...

2013-03-18

232

78 FR 59413 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting...Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel's (DGP's) meeting...Civil Aviation Organization's Dangerous Goods Panel's (ICAO DGP's)...

2013-09-26

233

Survey on Adult Student Opinions of English Classroom Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explored the adult student opinions on four types of English classroom activities (language learning; language acquisition; information convey; role play) and the relationship between the fondness degrees and their personality, test performance and motivation. It turned out that the majority of students ranked all classroom activities a…

Lin-shuang, Yao; Zi-jiang, Que

2007-01-01

234

[Risk and risk management in aviation].  

PubMed

RISK MANAGEMENT: The large proportion of human errors in aviation accidents suggested the solution--at first sight brilliant--to replace the fallible human being by an "infallible" digitally-operating computer. However, even after the introduction of the so-called HITEC-airplanes, the factor human error still accounts for 75% of all accidents. Thus, if the computer is ruled out as the ultimate safety system, how else can complex operations involving quick and difficult decisions be controlled? OPTIMIZED TEAM INTERACTION/PARALLEL CONNECTION OF THOUGHT MACHINES: Since a single person is always "highly error-prone", support and control have to be guaranteed by a second person. The independent work of mind results in a safety network that more efficiently cushions human errors. NON-PUNITIVE ERROR MANAGEMENT: To be able to tackle the actual problems, the open discussion of intervened errors must not be endangered by the threat of punishment. It has been shown in the past that progress is primarily achieved by investigating and following up mistakes, failures and catastrophes shortly after they happened. HUMAN FACTOR RESEARCH PROJECT: A comprehensive survey showed the following result: By far the most frequent safety-critical situation (37.8% of all events) consists of the following combination of risk factors: 1. A complication develops. 2. In this situation of increased stress a human error occurs. 3. The negative effects of the error cannot be corrected or eased because there are deficiencies in team interaction on the flight deck. This means, for example, that a negative social climate has the effect of a "turbocharger" when a human error occurs. It needs to be pointed out that a negative social climate is not identical with a dispute. In many cases the working climate is burdened without the responsible person even noticing it: A first negative impression, too much or too little respect, contempt, misunderstandings, not expressing unclear concern, etc. can considerably reduce the efficiency of a team. PMID:15595595

Müller, Manfred

2004-10-01

235

Understanding Aviation English as a Lingua Franca: Perceptions of Korean Aviation Personnel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers exploring the use of language use in radiotelephony communication have tended to focus on the limitations of the non-native English user and the threats which their limited control of English may pose for aviation safety (e.g. Atsushi, 2003, 2004). Hence the recent International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) policy places the onus…

Kim, Hyejeong; Elder, Catherine

2009-01-01

236

A survey of peptidase activity in rumen bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-nine strains of 14 species of rumen bacteria were screened for their ability to hydrolyse Ma,, Alas, GlyArg-4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide (GlyArg-MNA) and Leu-MNA. Several species, notably Megasphaera elsdenii, were active against Ala, , and a smaller number, including Bacteroides ruminicola, Butyrivibrio jibrisolvens, Ruminococcus pavefaciens, Lachnospira multiFa and Ruminobacter amylophilus, broke down Alas. Streptococcus bovis had an exceptionally high leucine arylamidase activity. However,

R. JOHN WALLACE; NEST MCKAIN

1991-01-01

237

ALLStars: Overcoming Multi-Survey Selection Bias using Crowd-Sourced Active Learning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Developing a multi-survey time-series classifier presents several challenges. One problem is overcoming the sample selection bias which arises when the instruments or observing cadences differ between the training and testing datasets. In this case, the probabilistic distributions characterizing the sources in the training survey dataset differ from the source distributions in the other survey, resulting in poor results when a classifier is naively applied. To resolve this, we have developed the ALLStars active learning framework which allows us to bootstrap a classifier onto a new survey using a small set of optimally chosen sources which are then presented to users for manual classification. Several iterations of this crowd-sourcing process results in a significantly improved classifier. Using this procedure, we have built a variable star light-curve classifier using OGLE, Hipparcos, and ASAS survey data.

Starr, D. L.; Richards, J. W.; Brink, H.; Miller, A. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Butler, N. R.; James, J. B.; Long, J. P.

2012-09-01

238

Dose-response relationship between physical activity and mental health: the Scottish Health Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives:Regular physical activity is thought to be associated with better mental health, although there is a lack of consensus regarding the optimal amount and type of activity to achieve these benefits. The association between mental health and physical activity behaviours was examined among a representative sample of men and women from the Scottish Health Surveys.Methods:Self-reported physical activity was measured and

M Hamer; E Stamatakis; A Steptoe

2009-01-01

239

GASP- GENERAL AVIATION SYNTHESIS PROGRAM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The General Aviation Synthesis Program, GASP, was developed to perform tasks generally associated with the preliminary phase of aircraft design. GASP gives the analyst the capability of performing parametric studies in a rapid manner during preliminary design efforts. During the development of GASP, emphasis was placed on small fixed-wing aircraft employing propulsion systems varying from a single piston engine with a fixed pitch propeller through twin turboprop/turbofan systems as employed in business or transport type aircraft. The program is comprised of modules representing the various technical disciplines of design, integrated into a computational flow which ensures that the interacting effects of design variables are continuously accounted for in the aircraft sizing procedures. GASP provides a useful tool for comparing configurations, assessing aircraft performance and economics, and performing tradeoff and sensitivity studies. By utilizing GASP, the impact of various aircraft requirements and design factors may be studied in a systematic manner, with benefits being measured in terms of overall aircraft performance and economics. The GASP program consists of a control module and six "technology" submodules which perform the various independent studies required in the design of general aviation or small transport type aircraft. The six technology modules include geometry, aerodynamics, propulsion, weight and balance, mission analysis, and economics. The geometry module calculates the dimensions of the synthesized aircraft components based on such input parameters as number of passengers, aspect ratio, taper ratio, sweep angles, and thickness of wing and tail surfaces. The aerodynamics module calculates the various lift and drag coefficients of the synthesized aircraft based on inputs concerning configuration geometry, flight conditions, and type of high lift device. The propulsion module determines the engine size and performance for the synthesized aircraft. Both cruise and take-off requirements for the aircraft may be specified. This module can currently simulate turbojet, turbofan, turboprop, and reciprocating or rotating combustion engines. The weight and balance module accepts as input gross weight, payload, aircraft geometry, and weight trend coefficients for use in calculating the size of tip tanks and wing location required such that the synthesized aircraft is in balance for center of gravity travel. In the mission analysis module, the taxi, take-off, climb, cruise, and landing segments of a specified mission are analyzed to compute the total range, and the aircraft size required to provide this range is determined. In the economic module both the flyaway and operating costs are determined from estimated resources and services cost. The six technology modules are integrated into a single synthesis system by the control module. This integrated approach ensures that the results from each module contain the effect of design interactions among all the modules. Starting from a set of simple input quantities concerning aircraft type, size, and performance, the synthesis is extended to the point where all of the important aircraft characteristics have been analyzed quantitatively. Together, the synthesis model and procedure develops aircraft configurations in a manner useful in parametric analysis and provides a useful step toward more detailed analytical and experimental studies. The GASP program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC CYBER 170 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 200K(octal) of 60 bit words. The GASP program was developed in 1978.

Galloway, T. L.

1994-01-01

240

Cosmic radiation in commercial aviation.  

PubMed

This paper reviews the current knowledge of cosmic radiation and its applicability to commercial aviation. Galactic cosmic radiation emanates from outside the solar system, while occasionally a disturbance in the suns' atmosphere leads to a surge in radiation particles. Protection is provided by the suns' magnetic field, the earths' magnetic field, and the earths' atmosphere. Dose rates are dependent on the altitude, the geomagnetic latitude and the solar cycle. For occupational exposure to ionising radiation, which includes aircrew, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends maximum mean body effective dose limits of 20mSv/yr (averaged over 5 years, with a maximum in any 1 year of 50mSv). Radiation doses can be measured during flight or may be calculated using a computer-modelling program such as CARI, EPCARD, SIEVERT or PCAIRE. Mean ambient equivalent dose rates are consistently reported in the region of 4-5microSv/h for long-haul pilots and 1-3microSv/h for short-haul, giving an annual mean effective exposure of the order 2-3mSv for long-haul and 1-2mSv for short-haul pilots. Epidemiological studies of flight crew have not shown conclusive evidence for any increase in cancer mortality or cancer incidence directly attributable to ionising radiation exposure. Whilst there is no level of radiation exposure below which effects do not occur, current evidence indicates that the probability of airline crew or passengers suffering adverse health effects as a result of exposure to cosmic radiation is very low. PMID:18486066

Bagshaw, Michael

2008-05-01

241

A SURVEY OF BLASTING ACTIVITY IN THE UNITED STATES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Statistical information on chemical explosions is needed in seismology, to evaluate the practical difficulties in identifying this very common type of seismic source from other seismic sources such as small earthquakes and small nuclear explosions. We have obtained data on blasting activity from three different sources: (1) overview information from the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) on the total amount

PAUL G. RICHARDS; DOUGLAS A. ANDERSON; DAVID W. SIMPSON

1992-01-01

242

Transport impacts on atmosphere and climate: Aviation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion. The last major international assessment of these impacts was made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 1999. Here, a comprehensive updated assessment of aviation is provided. Scientific advances since the 1999 assessment have reduced key uncertainties, sharpening the quantitative evaluation, yet the basic conclusions remain the same. The climate impact of aviation is driven by long-term impacts from CO 2 emissions and shorter-term impacts from non-CO 2 emissions and effects, which include the emissions of water vapour, particles and nitrogen oxides (NO x). The present-day radiative forcing from aviation (2005) is estimated to be 55 mW m -2 (excluding cirrus cloud enhancement), which represents some 3.5% (range 1.3-10%, 90% likelihood range) of current anthropogenic forcing, or 78 mW m -2 including cirrus cloud enhancement, representing 4.9% of current forcing (range 2-14%, 90% likelihood range). According to two SRES-compatible scenarios, future forcings may increase by factors of 3-4 over 2000 levels, in 2050. The effects of aviation emissions of CO 2 on global mean surface temperature last for many hundreds of years (in common with other sources), whilst its non-CO 2 effects on temperature last for decades. Much progress has been made in the last ten years on characterizing emissions, although major uncertainties remain over the nature of particles. Emissions of NO x result in production of ozone, a climate warming gas, and the reduction of ambient methane (a cooling effect) although the overall balance is warming, based upon current understanding. These NO x emissions from current subsonic aviation do not appear to deplete stratospheric ozone. Despite the progress made on modelling aviation's impacts on tropospheric chemistry, there remains a significant spread in model results. The knowledge of aviation's impacts on cloudiness has also improved: a limited number of studies have demonstrated an increase in cirrus cloud attributable to aviation although the magnitude varies: however, these trend analyses may be impacted by satellite artefacts. The effect of aviation particles on clouds (with and without contrails) may give rise to either a positive forcing or a negative forcing: the modelling and the underlying processes are highly uncertain, although the overall effect of contrails and enhanced cloudiness is considered to be a positive forcing and could be substantial, compared with other effects. The debate over quantification of aviation impacts has also progressed towards studying potential mitigation and the technological and atmospheric tradeoffs. Current studies are still relatively immature and more work is required to determine optimal technological development paths, which is an aspect that atmospheric science has much to contribute. In terms of alternative fuels, liquid hydrogen represents a possibility and may reduce some of aviation's impacts on climate if the fuel is produced in a carbon-neutral way: such fuel is unlikely to be utilized until a 'hydrogen economy' develops. The introduction of biofuels as a means of reducing CO 2 impacts represents a future possibility. However, even over and above land-use concerns and greenhouse gas budget issues, aviation fuels require strict adherence to safety standards and thus require extra processing compared with biofuels destined for other sectors, where the uptake of such fuel may be more beneficial in the first instance.

Lee, D. S.; Pitari, G.; Grewe, V.; Gierens, K.; Penner, J. E.; Petzold, A.; Prather, M. J.; Schumann, U.; Bais, A.; Berntsen, T.; Iachetti, D.; Lim, L. L.; Sausen, R.

2010-12-01

243

Smart phones are useful for food intake and physical activity surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current self-report methods of recording food intake and Physical Activity (PA) are cumbersome and inaccurate. Food and activity surveys implemented on a smart phone will allow for immediate entry, data transfer to a researcher, and feedback to the user. Ten subjects followed a script, representative of one day, to enter food intake and PA on a smart phone. In the

E. M. Wohlers; J. R. Sirard; C. M. Barden; J. K. Moon

2009-01-01

244

"Activities of Older Adults" Survey: Tapping into Student Views of the Elderly  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes an exercise used in a life span developmental psychology course to tap into undergraduates' perceptions of activities of the elderly. Students were asked to generate items to be included in a hypothetical Activities of Older Adults survey (to be administered to people 65 years and older). Responses from 1,340 students over a…

Wurtele, Sandy K.

2009-01-01

245

Finding Autonomy in Activity: Development and Validation of a Democratic Classroom Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper developed a Democratic Classroom Survey to measure students' perceived democratic environment of the classroom. Perceived democratic environment is one of the most important variables for understanding classroom activity and indeed any type of group activity, but actually measuring perceptions in an objective manner has been…

Hur, Eun Hye; Glassman, Michael; Kim, Yunhwan

2013-01-01

246

Measuring physical activity in children and adolescents for dietary surveys: practicalities, problems and pitfalls.  

PubMed

Physical inactivity is an important risk factor for many chronic diseases and contributes to obesity and poor mental well-being. The present paper describes the main advantages and disadvantages, practical problems, suggested uses, and future developments regarding self-reported and objective data collection in the context of dietary surveys. In dietary surveys, physical activity is measured primarily to estimate energy expenditure. Energy expenditure surveillance is important for tracking changes over time, particularly given the debates over the role of the relative importance of energy intake and expenditure changes in the aetiology of obesity. It is also important to assess the extent of underreporting of dietary intake in these surveys. Physical activity data collected should include details on the frequency, duration and relative intensity of activity for each activity type that contributes considerably to overall activity and energy expenditure. Problems of validity and reliability, associated with inaccurate assessment, recall bias, and social desirability bias, are well-known; children under 10 years cannot report their activities accurately. However, despite such limitations, questionnaires are still the dominant method of physical activity assessment in dietary surveys due to their low cost and relatively low participant burden. Objective, time-stamped measures that monitor heart rate and/or movement can provide more comprehensive, quantitative assessment of physical activity but at greater cost and participant burden. Although overcoming many limitations of questionnaires, objective measures also have drawbacks, including technical, practical and interpretational issues. PMID:24423128

Mindell, Jennifer S; Coombs, Ngaire; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

2014-05-01

247

Swift\\/BAT Hard X-Ray Survey: A Complete Sample of Local, Active, Black Holes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Swift\\/BAT hard X-ray survey is a nearly uniform, all-sky survey in the 14-195 keV energy band, which is not effected by absorption for Compton-thin sources. At a sensitivity of 1.5X10-11 ergs cm-2s-1, we will detect 450 AGN in 36 months. The survey is continuing and the sensitivity increases like t1\\/2. Swift is creating a complete census of active black

Jack Tueller; C. B. Markwardt; R. Mushotzky; G. K. Skinner; W. H. Baumgardner

2008-01-01

248

A National Survey of College Health Education\\/Health Promotion Evaluation Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A national survey of college and university health education\\/health promotion evaluation activities was sent to American College Health Association (ACHA) member institutions and members of the ACHA Health Education Section. One hundred and fifty-eight (158) colleges and universities responded to the survey, indicating the kind of evaluation (e.g., program monitoring, outcome studies) conducted within specific content areas (e.g., nutrition, stress).

Doryn Davis Chervin; Beverlie Conant Sloane

1985-01-01

249

A survey of activity-based costing in the U.K.'s largest companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper contains the results of a 1994 survey of activity-based costing (ABC) in the U.K.'s largest 1000 companies. The survey was designed to ascertain the adoption rate of ABC in these companies, the specific application of ABC, the views of users on the success and importance of ABC, the views of non-ABC users on ABC and the possibilities for

John Innes; Falconer Mitchell

1995-01-01

250

Current and historical trends in general aviation in the United States  

E-print Network

General aviation (GA) is an important component of aviation in the United States. In 2011, general aviation and air taxi operations represented 63% of all towered operations in the United States, while commercial aviation ...

Shetty, Kamala Irene

2012-01-01

251

Alternative fuels : how can aviation cross the "Valley of Death"  

E-print Network

Aviation has used petroleum-derived fuels for over 100 years. With the rapidly rising price of oil and concerns about supply, the military and the commercial airlines are fostering the development of an alternative aviation ...

Harrison, William E. (William Elton)

2008-01-01

252

An assessment of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations  

E-print Network

An exploration of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations is made by assessing the results of a study of aviation's effects on United States air quality mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The ...

Sequeira, Christopher J

2008-01-01

253

78 FR 20685 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Homeland Security, via the...civil aviation security measures...on threat intelligence related to...classified (SECRET) briefing...on threat intelligence related to...aviation security and how...

2013-04-05

254

32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58...Beneficiaries of Other Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a)...

2010-07-01

255

47 CFR 17.23 - Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved] 17.23 Section 17...20, 1999, as amended at 69 FR 18803, Apr. 9, 2004] Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting...

2011-10-01

256

32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58...Beneficiaries of Other Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a)...

2011-07-01

257

The air quality and health impacts of aviation in Asia  

E-print Network

Aviation in Asia is growing more rapidly than other regions around the world. Adverse health impacts of aviation are linked to an increase in the concentration of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 [mu]m in diameter ...

Lee, In Hwan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01

258

Benefit-cost assessment of aviation environmental policies  

E-print Network

This thesis aids in the development of a framework in which to conduct global benefit-cost assessments of aviation policies. Current policy analysis tools, such as the aviation environmental portfolio management tool (APMT), ...

Gilmore, Christopher K. (Christopher Kenneth)

2012-01-01

259

Future trends in local air quality impacts of aviation  

E-print Network

The International Civil Aviation Organization is considering the use of cost-benefit analyses to estimate interdependencies between the industry costs and the major environmental impacts in policy-making for aviation. To ...

Rojo, Julien Joseph

2007-01-01

260

78 FR 41882 - Airworthiness Directives; Dassault Aviation Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...applies to all Dassault Aviation Model Falcon 2000 series airplanes. That AD currently...in this proposed AD, contact Dassault Falcon Jet, P.O. Box 2000, South Hackensack...2002), for all Dassault Aviation Model Falcon 2000 airplanes. (That AD...

2013-07-12

261

ICAO Assistance to Civil Aviation in the Developing World.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the cost advantages of air transportation over road, rail, and river transportation in many circumstances which prevail today in developing countries. Presents accounts of International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO's) efforts supporting civil aviation programs in these countries. (DS)

Vivian, Jack

1981-01-01

262

Federal Aviation Administration's Airport Capital Improvement Program Development Process  

E-print Network

The Airport Capital Improvement Program (ACIP) serves as the primary tool for project planning and formulation by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The FAA relies on the ACIP to serve as the basis for the distribution of Aviation Trust...

Tener, Scott D.

2009-12-18

263

Application of DNA Profiling in Resolving Aviation Forensic Toxicology Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Biological samples from the victims of aviation accidents are submitted to the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) for toxicological evaluation. Body components of aviation accident fatalities are often scattered, disintegrated, commingled, contamina...

A. K. Chaturvedi, D. Burian, D. M. Kupfer, D. V. Canfield, K. J. Craft

2009-01-01

264

Publishing Aviation Research: An Interdisciplinary Review of Scholarly Journals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An ERIC search and key informant interviews were used to identify 26 journals that regularly publish aviation-related articles. The journals are in four categories: transportation management and economics, travel and tourism, aviation law, and interdisciplinary. (SK)

Truitt, Lawrence J.; Kaps, Robert W.

1995-01-01

265

Rating hydrogen as a potential aviation fuel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The viability of liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and synthetic aviation kerosene as future alternate fuels for transport aircraft is analyzed, and the results of a comparative assessment are given in terms of cost, energy resource utilization, areas of fuel production, transmission airport facilities, and ultimate use in the aircraft. Important safety (fires) and some environmental aspects (CO2 balance) are also described. It is concluded that fuel price estimates indicate the price of synthetic aviation kerosene (synjet) would be approximately half of the price calculated for liquid hydrogen and somewhat less than that of liquid methane, with synjet from oil shale reported to be the least expensive.

Witcofski, R. D.

1980-01-01

266

Contrails: Visible Aviation Induced Climate Impact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contrails are aircraft induced linear ice particle clouds. In ice-supersaturated air masses, contrails persist and develop into contrail cirrus. Aviation changes cloudiness also by soot emissions and other aerosols. In the global mean, contrail cirrus warms the atmosphere. The local warming induced by a contrail varies strongly relative to the global mean, and may be positive or negative, depending on aircraft, route, solar and Earth-atmosphere parameters. Here we summarize present knowledge on contrails with respect to aviation and atmospheric research.

Schumann, Ulrich; Graf, Kaspar; Mannstein, Hermann; Mayer, Bernhard

267

Meteorological and Environmental Inputs to Aviation Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reports on aviation meteorology, most of them informal, are presented by representatives of the National Weather Service, the Bracknell (England) Meteorological Office, the NOAA Wave Propagation Lab., the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center, and the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. Additional presentations are included on aircraft/lidar turbulence comparison, lightning detection and locating systems, objective detection and forecasting of clear air turbulence, comparative verification between the Generalized Exponential Markov (GEM) Model and official aviation terminal forecasts, the evaluation of the Prototype Regional Observation and Forecast System (PROFS) mesoscale weather products, and the FAA/MIT Lincoln Lab. Doppler Weather Radar Program.

Camp, Dennis W. (editor); Frost, Walter (editor)

1988-01-01

268

Application of propfan propulsion to general aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent studies of advanced propfan propulsion systems have shown significant reductions in fuel consumption of 15-30 percent for transport class aircraft. This paper presents the results of a study which examined applying propfan propulsion to General Aviation class aircraft to determine if similar improvements could be achieved for business aircraft. In addition to the potential performance gains, this paper also addresses the cost aspects of propfan propulsion on General Aviation aircraft emphasizing the significant impact that the cost of capital and tax aspects have on determining the total cost of operation for business aircraft.

Awker, R. W.

1986-01-01

269

Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration funded project, Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities has been in operation since July, 1995. This project operated as a collaboration with Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications, the Federal Aviation Administration, Bridgewater State College and four targeted "core sites" in the greater Boston area. In its first and second years, a video series on aeronautics and aviation science was developed and broadcast via "live, interactive" satellite feed. Accompanying teacher and student supplementary instructional materials for grades 6-9 were produced and disseminated by the Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (MCET). In the MCET grant application it states that project Take Off! in its initial phase would recruit and train teachers at "core" sites in the greater Boston area, as well as opening participation to other on-line users of MCET's satellite feeds. "Core site" classrooms would become equipped so that teachers and students might become engaged in an interactive format which aimed at not only involving the students during the "live" broadcast of the instructional video series, but which would encourage participation in electronic information gathering and sharing among participants. As a Take Off! project goal, four schools with a higher than average proportion of minority and underrepresented youth were invited to become involved with the project to give these students the opportunity to consider career exploration and development in the field of science aviation and aeronautics. The four sites chosen to participate in this project were: East Boston High School, Dorchester High School, Randolph Junior-Senior High School and Malden High School. In year 3 Dorchester was unable to continue to fully participate and exited out. Danvers was added to the "core site" list in year 3. In consideration of Goals 2000, the National Science Foundation standards for quality of teaching, and an educational agenda that promotes high standards for all students, Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities had as its aim to deliver products to schools, both in and outside the project sites, which attempt to incorporate multi-disciplined approaches in the presentation of a curriculum which would be appropriate in any classroom, while also aiming to appeal to young women and minorities. The curriculum was developed to provide students with fundamentals of aeronautics and aviation science. The curriculum also encouraged involving students and teachers in research projects, and further information gathering via electronic bulletin boards and internet capabilities. Though not entirely prescriptive, the curriculum was designed to guide teachers through recommended activities to supplement MCET's live telecast video presentations. Classroom teachers were encouraged to invite local pilots, meteorologists, and others from the field of aviation and aeronautics, particularly women and minorities to visit schools and to field questions from the students.

Texter, P. Cardie

1998-01-01

270

Seismic Surveys Negatively Affect Humpback Whale Singing Activity off Northern Angola  

PubMed Central

Passive acoustic monitoring was used to document the presence of singing humpback whales off the coast of Northern Angola, and opportunistically test for the effect of seismic survey activity in the vicinity on the number of singing whales. Two Marine Autonomous Recording Units (MARUs) were deployed between March and December 2008 in the offshore environment. Song was first heard in mid June and continued through the remaining duration of the study. Seismic survey activity was heard regularly during two separate periods, consistently throughout July and intermittently in mid-October/November. Numbers of singers were counted during the first ten minutes of every hour for the period from 24 May to 1 December, and Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs) were used to assess the effect of survey day (seasonality), hour (diel variation), moon phase and received levels of seismic survey pulses (measured from a single pulse during each ten-minute sampled period) on singer number. Application of GAMMs indicated significant seasonal variation, which was the most pronounced effect when assessing the full dataset across the entire season (p<0.001); however seasonality almost entirely dropped out of top-ranked models when applied to a reduced dataset during the July period of seismic survey activity. Diel variation was significant in both the full and reduced datasets (from p<0.01 to p<0.05) and often included in the top-ranked models. The number of singers significantly decreased with increasing received level of seismic survey pulses (from p<0.01 to p<0.05); this explanatory variable was included among the top ranked models for one MARU in the full dataset and both MARUs in the reduced dataset. This suggests that the breeding display of humpback whales is disrupted by seismic survey activity, and thus merits further attention and study, and potentially conservation action in the case of sensitive breeding populations. PMID:24618836

Cerchio, Salvatore; Strindberg, Samantha; Collins, Tim; Bennett, Chanda; Rosenbaum, Howard

2014-01-01

271

An acoustic sensitivity study of general aviation propellers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the results of a study in which a systematic approach has been taken in studying the effect of selected propeller parameters on the character and magnitude of propeller noise. Four general aviation aircraft were chosen, i.e., a Cessna 172, Cessna 210, Cessna 441, and a 19 passenger commuter concept, to provide a range in flight velocity, engine horsepower, and gross weight. The propeller parameters selected for examination consisted of number of blades, rpm reduction, thickness/chord reduction, activity factor reduction, proplets, airfoil improvement, sweep, position of maximum blade loading, and diameter reduction.

Korkan, K. D.; Gregorek, G. M.; Keiter, I.

1980-01-01

272

Technical documentation for the 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey Public Use File  

SciTech Connect

The Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey (NTACS) provides detailed activity data for a sample of trucks covered in the 1987 Truck Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS) for days selected at random over a 12-month period ending in 1990. The NTACS was conducted by the US Bureau of the Census for the US Department of Transportation (DOT). A Public Use File for the NTACS was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under a reimbursable agreement with the DOT. The content of the Public Use File and the design of the NTACS are described in this document.

Not Available

1992-09-01

273

Triennial Central Bank Survey of Foreign Exchange and Derivatives Market Activity 1998  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Central Bank Survey of Foreign Exchange and Derivatives Market Activity 1998 is a triennial statistical publication by the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) (reviewed in the March 7, 1997 Scout Report). The survey reports on foreign exchange and OTC derivative activities in 43 countries, and an 83-page statistical annex provides spot, outright forward, foreign exchange swap, and total turnover figures by country for the month of April 1998. Links to central bank and monetary authority data home pages as well as a discussion of main findings are also available on-site.

274

Survey of Activated FLT3 Signaling in Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Activating mutations of FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) are found in approximately 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). FLT3 is therefore an attractive drug target. However, the molecular mechanisms by which FLT3 mutations lead to cell transformation in AML remain unclear. To develop a better understanding of FLT3 signaling as well as its downstream effectors, we performed detailed phosphoproteomic analysis of FLT3 signaling in human leukemia cells. We identified over 1000 tyrosine phosphorylation sites from about 750 proteins in both AML (wild type and mutant FLT3) and B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (normal and amplification of FLT3) cell lines. Furthermore, using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), we were able to quantified over 400 phosphorylation sites (pTyr, pSer, and pThr) that were responsive to FLT3 inhibition in FLT3 driven human leukemia cell lines. We also extended this phosphoproteomic analysis on bone marrow from primary AML patient samples, and identify over 200 tyrosine and 800 serine/threonine phosphorylation sites in vivo. This study showed that oncogenic FLT3 regulates proteins involving diverse cellular processes and affects multiple signaling pathways in human leukemia that we previously appreciated, such as Fc epsilon RI-mediated signaling, BCR, and CD40 signaling pathways. It provides a valuable resource for investigation of oncogenic FLT3 signaling in human leukemia. PMID:21552520

Gu, Ting-lei; Nardone, Julie; Wang, Yi; Loriaux, Marc; Villen, Judit; Beausoleil, Sean; Tucker, Meghan; Kornhauser, Jon; Ren, Jianmin; MacNeill, Joan; Gygi, Steven P.; Druker, Brian J.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Rush, John; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.

2011-01-01

275

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Process for Requesting Waiver of Mandatory Separation Age for a Federal Aviation Administration...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Control Specialist In Flight Service...and the David J. Hurley Air Traffic Control System Command Center Federal...Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Control Specialist In Flight...

2013-01-01

276

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Process for Requesting Waiver of Mandatory Separation Age for a Federal Aviation Administration...  

...Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Control Specialist In Flight Service...and the David J. Hurley Air Traffic Control System Command Center Federal...Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Control Specialist In Flight...

2014-01-01

277

Aviation Safety + Security Program GLOBAL EXPERTS IN SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS  

E-print Network

Organization (ICAO) has recognized the critical nature of implementing the Safety Management Systems (SMS2011- 2012 Aviation Safety + Security Program GLOBAL EXPERTS IN SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Systems, is so necessary in ensuring the safety of aviation operations. The International Civil Aviation

Wang, Hai

278

University of Southern California Aviation Safety and Security Program  

E-print Network

IN AVIATION SAFETY AND SYSTEM SAFETY Cert no. XXX-XXX-XXXX #12;1 Message froM the dean The year 2012 Management Systems, is so necessary in ensuring the safety of aviation operations. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has recognized the critical nature of implementing the Safety Management

Wang, Hai

279

Meeting the challenge of aviation emissions: an aircraft industry perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1999 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) produced a report on aviation and the atmosphere that highlighted the role that aviation plays in climate change. As the report showed aviation impacts the atmosphere in a number of ways, including emissions of CO2 and NOx, water vapour and creation of cirrus plus contrails. Of these the significant climate impact

Philip Lawrence

2009-01-01

280

CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 289 October 2003  

E-print Network

CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 289 October 2003 A Monthly Safety Bulletin from The Office of the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System, P.O. Box 189, Moffett Field 2114 General Aviation Pilots 781 Controllers 51 Cabin/Mechanics/Military/Other 136 TOTAL 3082 ASRS

281

Clearing the Air: Applied Linguistic Perspectives on Aviation Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a result of investigations showing that communication problems can be a significant contributing factor to major aviation accidents, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has established a set of Language Proficiency Requirements. All pilots and air traffic controllers engaged in international aviation must be certified by their…

Read, John; Knoch, Ute

2009-01-01

282

Federal Aviation Administration and National Weather Service Aviation Research and Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is given of the developmental status of aviation weather services. Particular attention is given to justifying the need for better, more reliable service. The accomplishments of several automatic weather stations are discussed.

Connolly, J. W.

1980-01-01

283

The UNO Aviation Monograph Series: Aviation Security: An Annotated Bibliography of Responses to the Gore Commission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This monograph is a companion to UNOAI Monograph 96-2, "The Image of Airport Security: An Annotated Bibliography," compiled in June 1996. The White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security, headed by Vice President Al Gore, was formed as a result of the TWA Flight 800 crash in August 1996. The Commission's final report included 31 recommendations addressed toward aviation security. The recommendations were cause for security issues to be revisited in the media and by the aviation industry. These developments necessitated the need for an updated bibliography to review the resulting literature. Many of the articles were written in response to the recommendations made by the Gore Commission. "Aviation Security: An Annotated Bibliography of Responses to the Gore Commission" is the result of this need.

Carrico, John S.; Schaaf, Michaela M.

1998-01-01

284

Light transport and general aviation aircraft icing research requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A short term and a long term icing research and technology program plan was drafted for NASA LeRC based on 33 separate research items. The specific items listed resulted from a comprehensive literature search, organized and assisted by a computer management file and an industry/Government agency survey. Assessment of the current facilities and icing technology was accomplished by presenting summaries of ice sensitive components and protection methods; and assessments of penalty evaluation, the experimental data base, ice accretion prediction methods, research facilities, new protection methods, ice protection requirements, and icing instrumentation. The intent of the research plan was to determine what icing research NASA LeRC must do or sponsor to ultimately provide for increased utilization and safety of light transport and general aviation aircraft.

Breeze, R. K.; Clark, G. M.

1981-01-01

285

NASA and General Aviation. NASA SP-485.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A detailed examination of the nature and function of general aviation and a discussion of how the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) helps keep it on the cutting edge of technology are offered in this publication. The intricacies of aerodynamics, energy, and safety as well as the achievements in aeronautical experimentation are…

Ethell, Jeffrey L.

286

Flight Attendants. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the career opportunities of airline flight attendants. General information about airline hiring policies for flight attendants are discussed, and the following information about the flight attendant job classification is provided: nature of the work, working conditions, where the jobs…

Zaharevitz, Walter

287

Airline Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airlines. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the airline industry, including salaries, working conditions, job requirements, and projected job opportunities. In the main part of the booklet, the following 22 job…

Zaharevitz, Walter

288

The Federal Aviation Administration's Second Career Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) retraining program is for air traffic controllers who have been removed from their jobs due to either operational or medical disqualifications. The FAA's New England region second career program deals mainly with older adults who have completed their child rearing and related family responsibilities by…

Ferrini, Paul

289

Simulation training for Aviation-meteorologist  

E-print Network

Simulation training for Aviation-meteorologist CALMet X Toulouse Thursday August 29 th Rob for improvement 2 #12;Construction of a simulation training Intro Briefing Simulation case Debriefing Judgement versie 3: 6 februari 2012 Inhoudsopgave Inleiding Testmethodes Simulator Case study Theoretische toets

Haak, Hein

290

Aviation-Produced Aerosols and Contrails  

Microsoft Academic Search

Liquid and solid particles in the plumes of jet aircraft cruising in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere lead to the formation of ice clouds (contrails), modify the microphysical properties of existing cirrus clouds, and provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions. Characterization of aviation-produced particles in terms of physico-chemical properties is an important step in assessing the global impact of

B. Kärcher

1999-01-01

291

NASA & FAA Committed to Advancing Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA and the FAA are committed to advancing aviation safety. Their work includes improving the integrety of airframe design and performance, and the quality, quantity and accessability of timely information available to pilots. This video outlines some of the goals of the collaboration, and the technologies they hope will achieve them.

1998-01-01

292

NASA & FAA: Committed to Advancing Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA and the FAA are committed to advancing aviation safety. Their work includes improving the integrety of airframe design and performance, and the quality, quantity and accessability of timely information available to pilots. This video outlines some of the goals of the collaboration, and the technologies they hope will achieve them.

1974-01-01

293

Aviation Structural Mechanic E 1 & C.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The rate training manual is one of a series of training handbooks prepared for enlisted personnel of the Navy and Naval Reserve who are studying for advancement in the Aviation Structural Mechanic E (AME) rating. The manual is based on the professional qualifications for the rates AME1 and AMEC. Chapters are organized according to specific job…

Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

294

Proposed English Standards Promote Aviation Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Air Navigation's Commission approval of a task to develop minimum skill level requirements in English for air traffic control. The ICAO collaborated with the Defense Language Institute English Language Center to propose a minimum standard for English proficiency for international…

Chatham, Robert L.; Thomas, Shelley

2000-01-01

295

Carbonaceous aerosols of aviation and shipping emissions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a study of the physical and chemical properties of carbonaceous aerosols emitted by transport systems (namely, by aircraft gas turbine engines and large ship diesel engines) into the atmosphere. A comparative analysis of the morphology, size, elemental composition, and surface chemistry between aviation and diesel soot particles reveals the general and characteristic features of emissions from each source.

O. B. Popovicheva; E. D. Kireeva; M. A. Timofeev; N. K. Shonija; V. P. Mogil'Nikov

2010-01-01

296

Aviation weather service requirements, 1980 - 1990  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future aviation weather needs are discussed. Priority weather requirements and deficiencies existing for weather observations and forecast services in terminal areas are presented. Needs in en route operations up to 30 km are addressed with emphasis on turbulence, presence of suspended ice and water particles, SST to supersonic speeds, solar radiation, ozone, and sonic booms. Some conclusions are drawn and recommendations are presented.

Lieurance, N. A.

1977-01-01

297

Aviation technology applicable to developing regions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper is an analysis of aviation technologies useful for formulation of development plans to the year 2000 for emerging nations. The Caribbean Basin was used as a specific application. This development promises to be so explosive over the next 15 years as to be virtually unpredictable.

Zuk, John; Alton, Larry R.

1988-01-01

298

AN AVIATION COURSE FOR JUNIOR COLLEGES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE COURSE IS IN TWO PARTS. IN PART 1, A PROGRAM OF 60 HOURS COVERS SUCH TOPICS AS FLIGHT PRINCIPLES, AIRCRAFT OPERATION AND PERFORMANCE, NAVIGATION, THE FLIGHT COMPUTER, RADIO GUIDANCE AND COMMUNICATION, WEATHER, FLIGHT INFORMATION PUBLICATIONS, FEDERAL AVIATION REGULATIONS, THE AIRWAY SYSTEM, FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS, AND FLIGHT PLANNING. THE TOPICS…

Cessna Aircraft Co., Wichita, KS.

299

FALL DETECTION AND ACTIVITY RECOGNITION METHODS FOR THE CONFIDENCE PROJECT: A SURVEY  

E-print Network

tags obtained by motion capture system. 3 FALL DETECTION Falls among the elderly are the leading cause of injury, even death, and the loss of independent living. Detection and prevention of falls is consequentlyFALL DETECTION AND ACTIVITY RECOGNITION METHODS FOR THE CONFIDENCE PROJECT: A SURVEY Bostjan Kaluza

LuÂ?trek, Mitja

300

Revision of certification standards for aviation maintenance personnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Part 65, Subparts D and E, of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) identify the certification requirements for aviation mechanics and aviation repairmen. The training, experience, privileges, ratings, recordkeeping, and currency requirements for aviation maintenance personnel are also addressed by those parts of the FAR. The recent emergence of the aging fleet problem and the introduction of new technologies, aircraft, engines, and aeronautical products has caused certain portions of these rules to become obsolete. Further, international political arrangements, such as bilateral airworthiness and maintenance agreements, International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards, certain international agreements for maintenance personnel training, and mechanic certificate reciprocity, have all impacted on the current regulatory policy.

Vipond, Leslie K.

1992-01-01

301

First NASA Aviation Safety Program Weather Accident Prevention Project Annual Review  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of this Annual Review was to present NASA plans and accomplishments that will impact the national aviation safety goal. NASA's WxAP Project focuses on developing the following products: (1) Aviation Weather Information (AWIN) technologies (displays, sensors, pilot decision tools, communication links, etc.); (2) Electronic Pilot Reporting (E-PIREPS) technologies; (3) Enhanced weather products with associated hazard metrics; (4) Forward looking turbulence sensor technologies (radar, lidar, etc.); (5) Turbulence mitigation control system designs; Attendees included personnel from various NASA Centers, FAA, National Weather Service, DoD, airlines, aircraft and pilot associations, industry, aircraft manufacturers and academia. Attendees participated in discussion sessions aimed at collecting aviation user community feedback on NASA plans and R&D activities. This CD is a compilation of most of the presentations presented at this Review.

Colantonio, Ron

2000-01-01

302

EU Accession and Civil Aviation Regimes: Malta and Cyprus as a Case Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aviation deregulation is usually a challenging and demanding task and accession to the European Union requires that all candidate states should harmonize their legislation in the context of the European Common Aviation Area. Malta and Cyprus, the small Mediterranean island-states to join the EU in 2004, will have to abandon any protectionist policies in favour of their flag-carriers and let them survive in a liberal framework. The paper discusses the implications of this regime change for civil aviation in Malta and Cyprus and in addition to the airline industry, it examines the impacts on the complementary tourism sector. Unless carrying capacity limits are understood, the islands may become victims of successful airline liberalisation. The paper concludes by stressing the need for sustainable development and active policy making. Keywords: carrying capacity, Cyprus, air transport deregulation, Malta, tourism

Papatheodorou, Andreas; Busuttil, Louis

2003-01-01

303

[Improvement of protective and survival means as a current ecological-ergonomic problem in aviation].  

PubMed

Science and application aspects of the ergonomic enhancement of protective and survival means for aviation personnel under the present-day operational environment have been studied. Substantiated and presented is a concept of ergonomic enhancement of these means and possibly marked improvement of professional readiness, and maintenance of work capacity and occupational health of aviation personnel affected by a combination of adverse factors by way of a more thorough consideration of human operator's characteristics in the process of design and evaluation of protective means. Methods proposed for evaluation of environmental effects on and assessment of the ergonomic stimulation of the quality and intensity of flying activity have been analyzed. PMID:9190254

Ushakov, I B; Turzin, P S

1997-01-01

304

Physical Activity, TV Viewing, and Weight in U.S. Youth: 1999 Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the relationship between physical activity, TV watching, and weight in U.S. youth ages 14 to 18 years.Research Methods and Procedures: Data from a nationally representative sample of 15,143 U.S. high-school students participating in the 1999 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Survey were examined. Prevalence rates of participation in moderate physical activity (MPA),

Joey C. Eisenmann; R. Todd Bartee; Min Qi Wang

2002-01-01

305

26 CFR 48.4091-3 - Aviation fuel; conditions to allowance of refunds of aviation fuel tax under section 4091(d).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Aviation fuel; conditions to allowance of refunds of aviation fuel tax under section 4091(d). 48...Fuel Taxable Fuel § 48.4091-3 Aviation fuel; conditions to allowance of...

2010-04-01

306

26 CFR 48.4091-3 - Aviation fuel; conditions to allowance of refunds of aviation fuel tax under section 4091(d).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aviation fuel; conditions to allowance of refunds of aviation fuel tax under section 4091(d). 48...Fuel Taxable Fuel § 48.4091-3 Aviation fuel; conditions to allowance of...

2011-04-01

307

77 FR 18099 - Special Conditions: Dassault Aviation, Model Falcon 7X Airplanes; Seats With Inflatable Shoulder...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...delivery of the affected aircraft. In addition, the...passengers in a severe crash. Because Sec. Sec...activation. Because a crash requiring use of the...Subjects in 14 CFR Part 25 Aircraft, Aviation safety, Reporting...provide protection under crash conditions where it...

2012-03-27

308

The effect of cosmic ray intensity variations and geomagnetic disturbances on the physiological state of aviators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last few years various researches have reached the conclusion that cosmic ray variations and geomagnetic disturbances are related to the condition of the human physiological state. In this study medical data regarding 4018 Slovak aviators were analyzed in relation to daily variations of cosmic ray and geomagnetic activity. Specifically daily data concerning mean values of heart rate which

M. Papailiou; H. Mavromichalaki; K. Kudela; J. Stetiarova; S. Dimitrova; E. Giannaropoulou

2011-01-01

309

Mitigating Aviation Communication and Satellite Orbit Operations Surprises from Adverse Space Weather  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Adverse space weather affects operational activities in aviation and satellite systems. For example, large solar flares create highly variable enhanced neutral atmosphere and ionosphere electron density regions. These regions impact aviation communication frequencies as well as precision orbit determination. The natural space environment, with its dynamic space weather variability, is additionally changed by human activity. The increase in orbital debris in low Earth orbit (LEO), combined with lower atmosphere CO2 that rises into the lower thermosphere and causes increased cooling that results in increased debris lifetime, adds to the environmental hazards of navigating in near-Earth space. This is at a time when commercial space endeavors are posed to begin more missions to LEO during the rise of the solar activity cycle toward the next maximum (2012). For satellite and aviation operators, adverse space weather results in greater expenses for orbit management, more communication outages or aviation and ground-based high frequency radio used, and an inability to effectively plan missions or service customers with space-based communication, imagery, and data transferal during time-critical activities. Examples of some revenue-impacting conditions and solutions for mitigating adverse space weather are offered.

Tobiska, W. Kent

2008-01-01

310

Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

While transportation fueling can accommodate a broad range of alternate fuels, aviation fueling needs are specific, such as the fuel not freezing at altitude or become too viscous to flow properly or of low bulk energy density that shortens range. The fuel must also be compatible with legacy aircraft, some of which are more than 50 years old. Worldwide, the aviation industry alone uses some 85-95 billion gallons of hydrocarbon-based fossil fuel each year, which is about 10% of the transportation industry. US civil aviation alone consumes nearly 14 billion gallons. The enormity of the problem becomes overwhelming, and the aviation industry is taking alternate fueling issues very seriously. Biofuels (algae, cyanobacteria, halophytes, weeds that use wastelands, wastewater and seatwater), when properly sourced, have the capacity to be drop-in fuel replacements for petroleum fuels. As such, biojet from such sources solves the aviation CO2 emissions issue without the downsides of 'conventional' biofuels, such as competing with food and fresh water resources. Of the many current fundamental problems, the major biofuel problem is cost. Both research and development and creative engineering are required to reduce these biofuels costs. Research is also ongoing in several 'improvement' areas including refining/processing and biologics with greater disease resistance, greater bio-oil productivity, reduced water/nutrient requirements, etc. The authors' current research is aimed at aiding industry efforts in several areas. They are considering different modeling approaches, growth media and refining approaches, different biologic feedstocks, methods of sequestering carbon in the processes, fuel certification for aviation use and, overall, ensuring that biofuels are feasible from all aspects - operability, capacity, carbon cycle and financial. The authors are also providing common discussion grounds/opportunities for the various parties, disciplines and concerned organization to share both issues and potential ways for moving forward, and overall, trying to educate those concerned about the innate limitations of 'conventional' biofuels and the solutions provided by non-traditional feedstocks that used waste lands/water or saline/salt water have an immense capacity potential.

Hendricks, R. C.; Bushnell, D. M.

2009-01-01

311

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Department of Energy (DOE) activities at Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Ventura County, California  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories Site (DOE/SSFL), conducted May 16 through 26, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by an private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with DOE activities at SSFL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at SSFL, and interviews with site personnel. 90 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01

312

Ultralean combustion in general aviation piston engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The role of ultralean combustion in achieving fuel economy in general aviation piston engines was investigated. The aircraft internal combustion engine was reviewed with regard to general aviation requirements, engine thermodynamics and systems. Factors affecting fuel economy such as those connected with an ideal leanout to near the gasoline lean flammability limit (ultralean operation) were analyzed. A Lycoming T10-541E engine was tested in that program (both in the test cell and in flight). Test results indicate that hydrogen addition is not necessary to operate the engine ultralean. A 17 percent improvement in fuel economy was demonstrated in flight with the Beechcraft Duke B60 by simply leaning the engine at constant cruiser power and adjusting the ignition for best timing. No detonation was encountered, and a 25,000 ft ceiling was available. Engine roughness was shown to be the limiting factor in the leanout.

Chirivella, J. E.

1979-01-01

313

The National Institute for Aviation Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Institute for Aviation Research (NIAR) at Wichita State University houses numerous laboratories conducting research and development, education, testing, certification, and technology transfer for the aviation industry. Current research includes Crashworthiness, Dynamic Seat Certification, Airframe Design and Analysis, Composites Material Testing, Aerodynamics Design and Testing, Human Factors, CAD/CAM Education, 3D Prototyping, and Aeroacoustics. The links from the main page list contact information for the different labs, but the sidebar link to Research Labs will take you to individual websites where some general information on the facilities, projects, and workshops are provided. The laboratory with the most information available online is the Aging Aircraft website. Also, the Wind Tunnel website includes a history and rich description of the tunnels used for research.

314

Carbonaceous aerosols of aviation and shipping emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is a study of the physical and chemical properties of carbonaceous aerosols emitted by transport systems (namely, by aircraft gas turbine engines and large ship diesel engines) into the atmosphere. A comparative analysis of the morphology, size, elemental composition, and surface chemistry between aviation and diesel soot particles reveals the general and characteristic features of emissions from each source. The high pollution rate of diesel soot particles, considerable fraction of metal admixtures, and availability of char particles characterize the specific features of the formation of particles of this type. The main characteristics characterizing the interaction between aviation and shipping emission aerosols in the moist atmosphere (the composition of organic and water-soluble fractions at the surface) have been obtained. Due to high hygroscopicity, the microparticles can generate cloud condensation nuclei and initiate contrails and additional tropospheric cloudiness.

Popovicheva, O. B.; Kireeva, E. D.; Timofeev, M. A.; Shonija, N. K.; Mogil'Nikov, V. P.

2010-06-01

315

Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Worldwide, aviation alone uses 85 to 95 billion gallons of nonrenewable fossil fuel per year (2008). General transportation fueling can accommodate several different fuels; however, aviation fuels have very specific requirements. Biofuels have been flight demonstrated, are considered renewable, have the capacity to become "drop-in" replacements for Jet-A fuel, and solve the CO2 climate change problem. The major issue is cost; current biomass biofuels are not economically competitive. Biofuel feedstock sources being researched are halophytes, algae, cyanobacteria, weeds-to-crops, wastes with contingent restraints on use of crop land, freshwater, and climate change. There are five major renewable energy sources: solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, drilled geothermal and biomass, each of which have an order of magnitude greater capacity to meet all energy needs. All five address aspects of climate change; biomass has massive potential as an energy fuel feedstock.

Hendricks, R.C.; Bushnell, D.M.

2009-01-01

316

Multi-Fuel Rotary Engine for General Aviation Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design studies, conducted for NASA, of Advanced Multi-fuel General Aviation and Commuter Aircraft Rotary Stratified Charge Engines are summarized. Conceptual design studies of an advanced engine sized to provide 186/250 shaft KW/HP under cruise conditions at 7620/25,000 m/ft. altitude were performed. Relevant engine development background covering both prior and recent engine test results of the direct injected unthrottled rotary engine technology, including the capability to interchangeably operate on gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, or aviation jet fuel, are presented and related to growth predictions. Aircraft studies, using these resultant growth engines, define anticipated system effects of the performance and power density improvements for both single engine and twin engine airplanes. The calculated results indicate superior system performance and 30 to 35% fuel economy improvement for the Rotary-engine airplanes as compared to equivalent airframe concept designs with current baseline engines. The research and technology activities required to attain the projected engine performance levels are also discussed.

Jones, C.; Ellis, D. R.; Meng, P. R.

1983-01-01

317

Helicopter Flight Training Through Serious Aviation Gaming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The notion of Serious Games dates to at least 1970. More recently leaders also identified gaming technology as a possible disruptive technology. If off-the-shelf PC-based aviation games and the vast library of related civilian developed databases and models can be leveraged for serious training use, then existing flight training paradigms from familiarization training to mission rehearsal might be disrupted and

Michael D. Proctor; Maria Bauer; Thomas Lucario

2007-01-01

318

Carbonaceous aerosols of aviation and shipping emissions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a study of the physical and chemical properties of carbonaceous aerosols emitted by transport systems (namely, by\\u000a aircraft gas turbine engines and large ship diesel engines) into the atmosphere. A comparative analysis of the morphology,\\u000a size, elemental composition, and surface chemistry between aviation and diesel soot particles reveals the general and characteristic\\u000a features of emissions from each source.

O. B. Popovicheva; E. D. Kireeva; M. A. Timofeev; N. K. Shonija; V. P. Mogil’nikov

2010-01-01

319

BoM Aviation Fog Case Exercise  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This case exercise focuses on a potential fog event in Melbourne, Australia, on 6-7 April 2008. The key aim of this module is to step through the forecast process during a potential fog event from the perspective of an aviation forecaster with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. This involves consideration of model guidance and observations, identification of potential areas of fog, forecasting and nowcasting fog formation and clearance, and considering and providing TAF updates throughout.

Comet

2009-02-26

320

Engine test of alcohol as aviation fuel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of using ethyl alcohol as an aviation fuel is considered. Tests were made in a single-cylinder air-cooled engine at incremental manifold boost pressures of 100 mm Hg, from -100 mm to \\/sup +\\/600 mm pressure. At each increment, air-to-fuel ratios were varied and corresponding horsepower (HP) measurements were taken. From these tests, ethyl alcohol proved to have very

Tsunoda

2008-01-01

321

Rheumatoid arthritis in a military aviator.  

PubMed

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition whose pathogenesis is determined partially by genetic and environmental factors. Without treatment, 20 to 30% of individuals with this condition will become permanently disabled in a few years. Rheumatoid arthritis and its potential complications can cause significant disability and could seriously affect the performance of an aviator. Traditionally, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and biologics have not been used until disease progression occurs, but they recently have been added earlier in the course of disease for a more aggressive approach to treatment. It has been shown to significantly reduce the number of affected joints, pain, and disability. This newer treatment regimen has helped a military pilot continue his aviation career. We present the case of an experienced designated military pilot who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. He was initially treated early with a DMARD and biologic medication. He has remained in remission and currently only uses etanercept (biologic medication) and a non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drug to control his disease. He has responded favorably to therapy and has few limitations. Due to his positive response to treatment, the aviator was granted military aeromedical waivers for rheumatoid arthritis and chronic medication use. PMID:17225486

Moszyk, Danielle J; Sulit, Daryl J

2007-01-01

322

Aviation Fueling: A Cleaner, Greener Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Projected growth of aviation depends on fueling where specific needs must be met. Safety is paramount, and along with political, social, environmental and legacy transport systems requirements, alternate aviation fueling becomes an opportunity of enormous proportions. Biofuels sourced from halophytes, algae, cyanobacteria, and weeds using wastelands, waste water, and seawater have the capacity to be drop-in fuel replacements for petroleum fuels. Biojet fuels from such sources solves the aviation CO2 emissions issue and do not compete with food or freshwater needs. They are not detrimental to the social or environmental fabric and use the existing fuels infrastructure. Cost and sustainable supply remains the major impediments to alternate fuels. Halophytes are the near-term solution to biomass/biofuels capacity at reasonable costs; they simply involve more farming, at usual farming costs. Biofuels represent a win-win approach, proffering as they do at least the ones we are studying massive capacity, climate neutral-to-some sequestration, and ultimately, reasonable costs.

Hendricks, Robert C.; Bushnell, Dennis M.; Shouse, Dale T.

2010-01-01

323

Human Factors Directions for Civil Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Despite considerable progress in understanding human capabilities and limitations, incorporating human factors into aircraft design, operation, and certification, and the emergence of new technologies designed to reduce workload and enhance human performance in the system, most aviation accidents still involve human errors. Such errors occur as a direct or indirect result of untimely, inappropriate, or erroneous actions (or inactions) by apparently well-trained and experienced pilots, controllers, and maintainers. The field of human factors has solved many of the more tractable problems related to simple ergonomics, cockpit layout, symbology, and so on. We have learned much about the relationships between people and machines, but know less about how to form successful partnerships between humans and the information technologies that are beginning to play a central role in aviation. Significant changes envisioned in the structure of the airspace, pilots and controllers' roles and responsibilities, and air/ground technologies will require a similarly significant investment in human factors during the next few decades to ensure the effective integration of pilots, controllers, dispatchers, and maintainers into the new system. Many of the topics that will be addressed are not new because progress in crucial areas, such as eliminating human error, has been slow. A multidisciplinary approach that capitalizes upon human studies and new classes of information, computational models, intelligent analytical tools, and close collaborations with organizations that build, operate, and regulate aviation technology will ensure that the field of human factors meets the challenge.

Hart, Sandra G.

2002-01-01

324

The Impact of Child Obesity on Active Parental Consent in School-Based Survey Research on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous studies have shown that active consent procedures result in sampling bias in surveys dealing with adolescent risk behaviors such as cigarette smoking and illicit drug use. To examine sampling bias from active consent procedures when the survey topic pertains to childhood obesity and associated health behaviors, the authors pair data…

Mellor, Jennifer M.; Rapoport, Ronald B.; Maliniak, Daniel

2008-01-01

325

Aircraft noise annoyance at three joint air carrier and general aviation airports  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of social surveys conducted near three airports that support both general aviation and scheduled air carrier operations are presented and discussed. Inferences supported by these data include: (1) the nature of noise exposure and community reaction at smaller airports may differ from that at larger airports; (2) survey techniques are capable of identifying changes in annoyance associated with numerically small changes in noise exposure; (3) changes in the prevalence of annoyance are causally produced by changes in noise exposure; and (4) changes in annoyance associated with changes in exposure vary with time.

Fidell, S.; Horonjeff, R.; Mills, J.; Baldwin, E.; Teffeteller, S.; Pearsons, K.

1985-01-01

326

On the applicability of integrated circuit technology to general aviation orientation estimation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The criteria of the significant value of the panel instruments used in general aviation were examined and kinematic equations were added for comparison. An instrument survey was performed to establish the present state of the art in linear and angular accelerometers, pressure transducers, and magnetometers. A very preliminary evaluation was done of the computers available for data evaluation and estimator mechanization. The mathematical model of a light twin aircraft employed in the evaluation was documented, the results of the sensor survey and the results of the design studies were presented.

Debra, D. B.; Tashker, M. G.

1976-01-01

327

Reconnaissance surveys of near-event seismic activity in the volcanoes of the Cascade Range, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveys of near-event seismic activity were made at two principal locations in the Cascade Range in Oregon during the summers of 1969 and 1970. A tripartite array of ultrasensitive high frequency seismometers was deployed about 7.5 km north of the Mt. Hood summit with one of the 1-km legs oriented broadside to the dormant volcano. Seismometers were emplaced over olivine

J. K. Westhusing

1973-01-01

328

Reconnaissance surveys of near-event seismic activity in the volcanoes of the Cascade Range, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveys of near-event seismic activity were made at two principal locations in the Cascade Range in Oregon during the summers\\u000a of 1969 and 1970.\\u000a \\u000a A tripartite array of ultrasensitive high frequency seismometers was deployed about 7.5 km north of the Mt. Hood summit with\\u000a one of the 1-km legs oriented broadside to the dormant volcano. Seismometers were emplaced over olivine

J. K. Westhusing

1973-01-01

329

The use of non-destructive high energy gamma photon activation for trace element survey analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An empirical study has been made of the potential of high energy ? photon activation and high resolution ?-ray spectrometry\\u000a for the survey analysis of trace elements in a variety of materials. Human blood, urine, bone ash, standard glass (NBS, SRM\\u000a 612) and air particulates, along with synthetic multi-element standards, have been studied following irradiation with ? photons\\u000a of maximum

J. S. Hislop; D. R. Williams

1973-01-01

330

Surveying proteolytic processes in human cancer microenvironments by microdialysis and activity-based mass spectrometry  

PubMed Central

We present a strategy to survey proteolytic processes in human cancer microenvironments. By combining in situ microdialysis during cancer surgery and mass spectrometry we were able to identify proteolytic enzymes, protease inhibitors and cleavage products in the interstitial fluid surrounding tumors and anatomically matched normal sites. Protease activity-based 18O-profiling revealed peptides processed by co-collected proteases ex vivo. This approach provides unique views of proteolytic networks in human cancers that could aid biomarker discovery efforts. PMID:22262628

Hardt, Markus; Lam, David K.; Dolan, John C.; Schmidt, Brian L.

2012-01-01

331

Survey of trace elements in coals and coal-related materials by neutron activation analysis  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Utilizing primarily instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and other analytical methods as many as 61 elements were quantitatively surveyed in 170 U.S. whole coals, 70 washed coals, and 40 bench samples. Data on areal and vertical distributions in various regions were obtained along with extensive information on the mode of occurrence of various elements in the coal matrix itself. ?? 1977 Akade??miai Kiado??.

Ruch, R.R.; Cahill, R.A.; Frost, J.K.; Camp, L.R.; Gluskoter, H.J.

1977-01-01

332

Cooperative activities of the U.S. Geological Survey with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, fiscal years 1983-90  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, has been involved in numerous cooperative activities with Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Assistance agreements, which include both grants and cooperative agreements, have fostered many educational research and development activities. These activities have included site visits, employment opportunities, curriculum development, seminars, and research projects. The activities are consistent with the Geological Survey's mission of conducting earth-science research and dissemination of the results. The cooperative have benefitted the Historically Black Colleges and Universities, their students, and the Geological Survey.

edited by Hall, A. E.; Scott, J. C.

1991-01-01

333

The Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) Project: A Documentation of its History and Accomplishments: 1999-2005  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) Project was one of the projects within NASA s Aviation Safety Program from 1999 through 2005. The objective of the ASMM Project was to develop the technologies to enable the aviation industry to undertake a proactive approach to the management of its system-wide safety risks. The ASMM Project entailed four interdependent elements: (1) Data Analysis Tools Development - develop tools to convert numerical and textual data into information; (2) Intramural Monitoring - test and evaluate the data analysis tools in operational environments; (3) Extramural Monitoring - gain insight into the aviation system performance by surveying its front-line operators; and (4) Modeling and Simulations - provide reliable predictions of the system-wide hazards, their causal factors, and their operational risks that may result from the introduction of new technologies, new procedures, or new operational concepts. This report is a documentation of the history of this highly successful project and of its many accomplishments and contributions to improved safety of the aviation system.

Statler, Irving C. (Editor)

2007-01-01

334

American Time Use Survey: Sleep Time and Its Relationship to Waking Activities  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: To gain some insight into how various behavioral (lifestyle) factors influence sleep duration, by investigation of the relationship of sleep time to waking activities using the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). Design: Cross-sectional data from ATUS, an annual telephone survey of a population sample of US citizens who are interviewed regarding how they spent their time during a 24-hour period between 04:00 on the previous day and 04:00 on the interview day. Participants: Data were pooled from the 2003, 2004, and 2005 ATUS databases involving N=47,731 respondents older than 14 years of age. Interventions: N/A Results: Adjusted multiple linear regression models showed that the largest reciprocal relationship to sleep was found for work time, followed by travel time, which included commute time. Only shorter than average sleepers (<7.5 h) spent more time socializing, relaxing, and engaging in leisure activities, while both short (<5.5 h) and long sleepers (?8.5 h) watched more TV than the average sleeper. The extent to which sleep time was exchanged for waking activities was also shown to depend on age and gender. Sleep time was minimal while work time was maximal in the age group 45–54 yr, and sleep time increased both with lower and higher age. Conclusions: Work time, travel time, and time for socializing, relaxing, and leisure are the primary activities reciprocally related to sleep time among Americans. These activities may be confounding the frequently observed association between short and long sleep on one hand and morbidity and mortality on the other hand and should be controlled for in future studies. Citation: Basner M; Fomberstein KM; Razavi FM; Banks S; William JH; Rosa RR; Dinges DF. American time use survey: sleep time and its relationship to waking activities. SLEEP 2007;30(9):1085-1095. PMID:17910380

Basner, Mathias; Fomberstein, Kenneth M.; Razavi, Farid M.; Banks, Siobhan; William, Jeffrey H.; Rosa, Roger R.; Dinges, David F.

2007-01-01

335

ASMET 7: Forecasting Fog for Aviation: Kenya Case Study  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson aims to improve aviation forecasts of fog in the African airspace by teaching forecasters to make more accurate forecasts using satellite imagery, numerical weather prediction, and other available data. A process for diagnosing and forecasting fog is presented and applied to a case over the Nairobi, Kenya region. Learners assume the role of aviation forecaster, analysing various products to determine whether the current Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) is valid or needs to be amended. The lesson is intended for aviation forecasters, general weather forecasters interested in aviation meteorology, and meteorological forecasting instructors and students. This lesson is one of three aviation weather case studies developed by the ASMET project to improve aviation forecasting in Africa. They also support COMET's Review of Aeronautical Meteorology â Africa online learning curriculum, which provides training that supports the WMO/ICAO competencies for Aeronautical Meteorological Forecasters.

Comet

2013-11-05

336

System for Secure Integration of Aviation Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aviation Data Integration System (ADIS) of Ames Research Center has been established to promote analysis of aviation data by airlines and other interested users for purposes of enhancing the quality (especially safety) of flight operations. The ADIS is a system of computer hardware and software for collecting, integrating, and disseminating aviation data pertaining to flights and specified flight events that involve one or more airline(s). The ADIS is secure in the sense that care is taken to ensure the integrity of sources of collected data and to verify the authorizations of requesters to receive data. Most importantly, the ADIS removes a disincentive to collection and exchange of useful data by providing for automatic removal of information that could be used to identify specific flights and crewmembers. Such information, denoted sensitive information, includes flight data (here signifying data collected by sensors aboard an aircraft during flight), weather data for a specified route on a specified date, date and time, and any other information traceable to a specific flight. The removal of information that could be used to perform such tracing is called "deidentification." Airlines are often reluctant to keep flight data in identifiable form because of concerns about loss of anonymity. Hence, one of the things needed to promote retention and analysis of aviation data is an automated means of de-identification of archived flight data to enable integration of flight data with non-flight aviation data while preserving anonymity. Preferably, such an automated means would enable end users of the data to continue to use pre-existing data-analysis software to identify anomalies in flight data without identifying a specific anomalous flight. It would then also be possible to perform statistical analyses of integrated data. These needs are satisfied by the ADIS, which enables an end user to request aviation data associated with de-identified flight data. The ADIS includes client software integrated with other software running on flight-operations quality-assurance (FOQA) computers for purposes of analyzing data to study specified types of events or exceedences (departures of flight parameters from normal ranges). In addition to ADIS client software, ADIS includes server hardware and software that provide services to the ADIS clients via the Internet (see figure). The ADIS server receives and integrates flight and non-flight data pertaining to flights from multiple sources. The server accepts data updates from authorized sources only and responds to requests from authorized users only. In order to satisfy security requirements established by the airlines, (1) an ADIS client must not be accessible from the Internet by an unauthorized user and (2) non-flight data as airport terminal information system (ATIS) and weather data must be displayed without any identifying flight information. ADIS hardware and software architecture as well as encryption and data display scheme are designed to meet these requirements. When a user requests one or more selected aviation data characteristics associated with an event (e.g., a collision, near miss, equipment malfunction, or exceedence), the ADIS client augments the request with date and time information from encrypted files and submits the augmented request to the server. Once the user s authorization has been verified, the server returns the requested information in de-identified form.

Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao; Keller, Rich; Chidester, Tom; Statler, Irving; Lynch, Bob; Patel, Hemil; Windrem, May; Lawrence, Bob

2007-01-01

337

Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Conference Proceedings is a collection of 6 abstracts and 3 papers presented April 19-20, 2001 in Denver, CO. The conference focus was "Best Practices and Benchmarking in Collegiate and Industry Programs". Topics covered include: satellite-based aviation navigation; weather safety training; human-behavior and aircraft maintenance issues; disaster preparedness; the collegiate aviation emergency response checklist; aviation safety research; and regulatory status of maintenance resource management.

Bowen, Brent (Editor)

2002-01-01

338

Crop duster aviation mechanics: high risk for pesticide poisoning.  

PubMed Central

A cross-sectional medical survey was conducted among 63 Nicaraguan aviation mechanics exposed to organophosphate and other toxic pesticides. Thirty-one (49 percent) reported having been acutely poisoned on the job. Also, seven of 14 novice mechanics, with less than one year on the job, reported that they had been poisoned. Thirty-eight (61 percent) had cholinesterase levels below the lower limit of normal, including three workers with levels less than 20 percent of the lower limit of normal. Risk factors for low cholinesterase included recent hire and recent poisoning. Workers did not use protective equipment, nor were there facilities for bathing on site. As a result of this survey, the government has prohibited the mixing and loading of pesticides at this airport and requires the washing of planes prior to maintenance work; coveralls and thin, pesticide impermeable gloves are to be issued to mechanics handling pesticide-contaminated parts. Closed system mixing and loading systems have been installed at satellite airstrips. PMID:2400036

McConnell, R; Pacheco Anton, A F; Magnotti, R

1990-01-01

339

Research on aviation fuel instability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current aircraft turbine fuels do not present a significant problem with fuel thermal stability. However, turbine fuels with broadened properties or nonpetroleum derived fuels may have reduced thermal stability because of their higher content of olefins, heteroatoms, and trace metals. Moreover, advanced turbine engines will increase the thermal stress on fuels because of their higher pressure ratios and combustion temperature. In recognition of the importance of this problem, NASA Lewis is currently engaged in a broadly based research effort to better understand the underlying causes of fuel thermal degradation. The progress and status of our various activities in this area are discussed. Topics covered include: nature of fuel instability and its temperature dependence, methods of measuring the instability, chemical mechanisms involved in deposit formation, and instrumental methods for characterizing fuel deposits. Finally, some preliminary thoughts on design approaches for minimizing the effects of lowered thermal stability are briefly discussed.

Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

1984-01-01

340

[Progress in synthesis technologies and application of aviation biofuels].  

PubMed

Development of aviation biofuels has attracted great attention worldwide because that the shortage of fossil resources has become more and more serious. In the present paper, the development background, synthesis technologies, current application status and existing problems of aviation biofuels were reviewed. Several preparation routes of aviation biofuels were described, including Fischer-Tropsch process, catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic cracking of bio-oil. The status of flight tests and commercial operation were also introduced. Finally the problems for development and application of aviation biofuels were stated, and some accommodation were proposed. PMID:23789270

Sun, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Xuebing; Yang, Ming; Liu, Dehua

2013-03-01

341

Assessing the Relationship between Airlines' Maintenance Outsourcing and Aviation Professionals' Job Satisfaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current economic and security challenges placed an additional burden on U.S. airlines to provide optimum service at reasonable costs to the flying public. In efforts to stay competitive, U.S. airlines increased foreign-based outsourcing of aircraft major repair and overhaul (MRO) mainly to reduce labor costs and conserve capital. This concentrated focus on outsourcing and restructuring, ignored job dissatisfaction among remaining employees which could reduce and or eliminate an airline's competitiveness. The purpose of this quantitative study was (a) to assess the relationship between increased levels of foreign-based MRO outsourcing and aviation professionals' job satisfaction (Y1); (b) to assess the influence of increased levels of foreign-based outsourcing on MRO control (Y2), MRO error rate (Y3), and MRO technical punctuality (Y4) as perceived by aviation professionals; and (c) to assess the influence of increased levels of foreign-based MRO outsourcing on technical skills (Y5) and morale ( Y6) as perceived by aviation professionals. The survey instrument was utilized based on Paul Spector's Job Satisfaction Questionnaire and MRO specific questions. A random sample of 300 U.S. airline participants was requested via MarketTools to meet required sample size of 110 as determined through a priori power analysis. Study data rendered 198 useable surveys of 213 total responses, and correlation, multiple regression, and ANOVA methods were used to test study hypotheses. The Spearman's rho for (Y 1) was statistically significant, p = .010 and multiple regression was statistically significant, p < .001. A one-way ANOVA indicated participants differed in their opinions of (Y2) through (Y6), Recommendations for future research include contrasting domestic and global MRO providers, and examining global aircraft parts suppliers and aviation technical training.

McCamey, Rotorua

342

A survey of the antibacterial activity of some New Zealand honeys.  

PubMed

To assess the variation in antibacterial activity of honey a survey was carried out on 345 samples of unpasteurized honey obtained from commercial apiarists throughout New Zealand. Most of the honeys were considered to be monofloral, from 26 different floral sources. The honeys were tested against Staphylococcus aureus in an agar well diffusion assay, with reference to phenol as a standard. Antibacterial activity was found to range from the equivalent of less than 2% (w/v) phenol to 58% (w/v) phenol, with a median of 13.6 and a standard deviation of 12.5. Neither the age of the honey samples nor whether they had been processed by the apiarist was associated with lower activity. However, the difference between floral sources in the antibacterial activity was very highly significant. Kanuka (Kunzea ericoides (A. Rich.) J. Thompson. Family: Myrtaceae), manuka (Leptospermum scoparium J. R. et G. Forst. Family: Myrtaceae), ling heather (Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Family: Ericaceae) and kamahi (Weinmannia racemosa Linn. f. Family: Cunoniaceae) were shown to be sources likely to give honey with high antibacterial activity. When antibacterial activity was assayed with catalase added to remove hydrogen peroxide, most of the honeys showed no detectable antibacterial activity. Only manuka and vipers bugloss (Echium vulgare L. Family: Boraginaceae) honeys showed this type of activity in a significant proportion of the samples. The high antibacterial activity of manuka honey was in many cases due entirely to this non-peroxide component. PMID:1687577

Allen, K L; Molan, P C; Reid, G M

1991-12-01

343

2013 aircrew, avionics, and operations survey, part 1.  

PubMed

Air medical transport services (AMTS) depend on the teamwork of aviation professionals, medical caregivers, communications specialists, maintenance staff, and administrative personnel to facilitate the safe medical transportation and care to critically ill and injured patients across the world. Consisting of respondents based in the United States, this 2013 survey revisits contemporary AMTS aircrew (pilot, aviator) experience, compensation, benefits, training, and safety in the industry compared to a survey conducted in 2000. PMID:24182879

Greene, Michael J

2013-01-01

344

Development and testing of the BONES physical activity survey for young children  

PubMed Central

Background Weight-bearing and high intensity physical activities are particularly beneficial for stimulating bone growth in children given that bone responds favorably to mechanical load. While it is important to assess the contribution and impact of weight-bearing physical activity on health outcomes, measurement tools that quantify and provide information on these activities separately from overall physical activity are limited. This study describes the development and evaluation of a pictorial physical activity survey (PAS) that measures children's participation and knowledge of high-intensity, weight-bearing ("bone smart") physical activity. Methods To test reliability, two identical sets of the PAS were administered on the same day to 41 children (mean age 7.1 ± 0.8 years; 63% female) and compared. To test validity, accelerometry data from 40 children (mean age 7.7 ± 0.8 years; 50% female) were compared to data provided by the PAS. Agreements between categorical and ordinal items were assessed with Kappa statistics; agreements between continuous indices were assessed with Spearman's correlation tests. Results The subjects produced reliable results in all 10 physical activity participation items (? range: 0.36-0.73, all p < 0.05), but less reliable in answering if the physical activities were "bone smart" (? range: -0.04-0.66). Physical activity indices, including metabolic equivalent time and weight-bearing factors, were significant in test-retest analyses (Spearman's r range: 0.57-0.74, all p < 0.001). Minutes of very vigorous activity from the accelerometer were associated with the self-reported weight-bearing activity, moderate-high, and high activity scores from the PAS (Spearman's r range: 0.47-0.48, all p < 0.01). However, accelerometer counts, counts per minute, and minutes of moderate-vigorous and vigorous activity were not associated with the PAS scores. Conclusions Together, the results of these studies suggest that the PAS has acceptable test-retest reliability, but limited validity for early elementary school children. This survey demonstrates a first step towards developing a questionnaire that measures high intensity, weight-bearing activity in schoolchildren. PMID:20807435

2010-01-01

345

Prevalence of Drugs and Alcohol in Fatal Civil Aviation Accidents Between 1994 and 1998.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The use of drugs and alcohol in aviation is closely monitored by the FAA Office of Aviation Medicine's (OAM's) Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) through the toxicological analysis of specimens from pilots who have died in aviation accidents. This informa...

D. V. Canfield, J. Hordinsky, D. P. Millett, B. Endecott, D. Smith

2000-01-01

346

77 FR 14856 - Public Meeting With Interested Persons To Discuss the Proposed Federal Aviation Administration...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Public Meeting With Interested Persons...LPSE) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (DOT). ACTION: Notice of public meetings...SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will be holding a...

2012-03-13

347

77 FR 16135 - Airworthiness Directives; Mooney Aviation Company, Inc. (Mooney) Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...We reviewed Mooney Aviation Company, Inc. Service Bulletin...effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government...2012-05-09 Mooney Aviation Company, Inc. (Mooney): Amendment...applies to Mooney Aviation Company, Inc. (Mooney)...

2012-03-20

348

47 CFR 22.859 - Incumbent commercial aviation air-ground systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Incumbent commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.859 Section...Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.859 Incumbent commercial aviation air-ground systems. This...

2011-10-01

349

78 FR 11978 - Airworthiness Directives; Reims Aviation S.A. Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No...2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Reims Aviation S.A. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of...

2013-02-21

350

49 CFR 1511.7 - Remittance of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Remittance of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees. 1511...ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES AVIATION SECURITY INFRASTRUCTURE FEE § 1511.7 Remittance of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees....

2011-10-01

351

32 CFR 766.7 - How to request use of naval aviation facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false How to request use of naval aviation facilities. 766.7 Section...RULES USE OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.7 How to request use of naval aviation facilities. (a) Forms...

2011-07-01

352

49 CFR 1511.5 - Imposition of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Imposition of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees. 1511...ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES AVIATION SECURITY INFRASTRUCTURE FEE § 1511.5 Imposition of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees....

2011-10-01

353

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 5-Flightcrew Compartment Access and Door Designs  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Door Designs Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation 92 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...121, SFAR No. 92-5 Special Federal Aviation Regulation 92-5—Flightcrew...

2011-01-01

354

14 CFR 243.11 - Transmission of information after an aviation disaster.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Transmission of information after an aviation disaster. 243.11 Section 243...SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS... Transmission of information after an aviation disaster. (a) Each covered...

2011-01-01

355

76 FR 8892 - Removal of Expired Federal Aviation Administration Regulations and References  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 21, 61...183-14] Removal of Expired Federal Aviation Administration Regulations and References AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION:...

2011-02-16

356

14 CFR 243.11 - Transmission of information after an aviation disaster.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Transmission of information after an aviation disaster. 243.11 Section 243...SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS... Transmission of information after an aviation disaster. (a) Each covered...

2010-01-01

357

32 CFR 766.7 - How to request use of naval aviation facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false How to request use of naval aviation facilities. 766.7 Section...RULES USE OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.7 How to request use of naval aviation facilities. (a) Forms...

2010-07-01

358

14 CFR 121.548 - Aviation safety inspector's credentials: Admission to pilot's compartment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector's credentials: Admission...548 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.548 Aviation safety inspector's credentials:...

2010-01-01

359

47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.857...Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems....

2011-10-01

360

14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 5-Flightcrew Compartment Access and Door Designs  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Door Designs Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation 92 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...121, SFAR No. 92-5 Special Federal Aviation Regulation 92-5—Flightcrew...

2010-01-01

361

32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies...RULES USE OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.13 Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and...

2010-07-01

362

49 CFR 1511.5 - Imposition of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Imposition of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees. 1511...ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES AVIATION SECURITY INFRASTRUCTURE FEE § 1511.5 Imposition of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees....

2010-10-01

363

41 CFR 102-33.15 - How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? 102-33.15 Section...How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? This part does not supersede...regulations in 14 CFR chapter I (Federal Aviation...

2010-07-01

364

14 CFR 121.548 - Aviation safety inspector's credentials: Admission to pilot's compartment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector's credentials: Admission...548 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.548 Aviation safety inspector's credentials:...

2011-01-01

365

49 CFR 1511.7 - Remittance of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Remittance of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees. 1511...ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES AVIATION SECURITY INFRASTRUCTURE FEE § 1511.7 Remittance of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees....

2010-10-01

366

14 CFR 385.12 - Authority of the Director, Office of Aviation Analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Authority of the Director, Office of Aviation Analysis. 385.12 Section 385...SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ORGANIZATION STAFF...Authority of the Director, Office of Aviation Analysis. The Director, Office...

2011-01-01

367

14 CFR 385.13 - Authority of the Director, Office of International Aviation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...the Director, Office of International Aviation. 385.13 Section 385.13 Aeronautics...SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ORGANIZATION STAFF...the Director, Office of International Aviation. The Director, Office of...

2011-01-01

368

41 CFR 102-33.15 - How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? 102-33.15 Section...How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? This part does not supersede...regulations in 14 CFR chapter I (Federal Aviation...

2011-01-01

369

77 FR 72252 - Airworthiness Directives; Reims Aviation S.A. Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No...2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Reims Aviation S.A. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of...

2012-12-05

370

47 CFR 22.859 - Incumbent commercial aviation air-ground systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Incumbent commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.859 Section...Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.859 Incumbent commercial aviation air-ground systems. This...

2010-10-01

371

14 CFR 385.13 - Authority of the Director, Office of International Aviation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the Director, Office of International Aviation. 385.13 Section 385.13 Aeronautics...SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ORGANIZATION STAFF...the Director, Office of International Aviation. The Director, Office of...

2010-01-01

372

76 FR 47423 - Aviation Fuel and Oil Operating Limitations; Policy Memorandum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each week...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 33 [ANE-2010-33.7-5A] Aviation Fuel and Oil Operating Limitations...Memorandum AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

2011-08-05

373

76 FR 68368 - Airworthiness Directives; DASSAULT AVIATION Model MYSTERE-FALCON 900 Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Directives; DASSAULT AVIATION Model MYSTERE-FALCON 900 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation...all DASSAULT AVIATION Model MYSTERE-FALCON 900 airplanes. This proposed AD results...unsafe condition as: Several Mystere-Falcon 900 aeroplanes experienced fuel...

2011-11-04

374

75 FR 51931 - Airworthiness Directives; Dassault-Aviation Model FALCON 7X Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Dassault-Aviation Model FALCON 7X Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Applicability (c) This AD applies to Dassault-Aviation Model FALCON 7X airplanes, certificated in any category, all serial...

2010-08-24

375

76 FR 46351 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting...Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel (DGP) to be held October...Civil Aviation Organization's Dangerous Goods Panel (ICAO DGP)...

2011-08-02

376

77 FR 53250 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting...Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel's (DGP's) Fall Working...Civil Aviation Organization's Dangerous Goods Panel's (ICAO DGP's)...

2012-08-31

377

Aviation Safety Program The Aviation Safety Program (AvSP), part of  

E-print Network

accidents. But as air traffic volume increases, the vigilance of the aviation community must continue. That particles inside engines, leading to power loss. Human-Friendly Flight Decks: NASA uses. A substantial portion of research within the project focuses on how icing affects both airframes and propulsion

378

Physical activity in subjects with multiple sclerosis with focus on gender differences: a survey  

PubMed Central

Background There is increasing research that examines gender-issues in multiple sclerosis (MS), but little focus has been placed on gender-issues regarding physical activity. The aim of the present study was to describe levels of physical activity, self-efficacy for physical activity, fall-related self-efficacy, social support for physical activity, fatigue levels and the impact of MS on daily life, in addition to investigating gender differences. Methods The sample for this cross-sectional cohort study consisted of 287 (84 men; 29.3%) adults with MS recruited from the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. A questionnaire was sent to the subjects consisting of the self-administrated measurements: Physical Activity Disability Survey – Revised, Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, Falls- Efficacy Scale (Swedish version), Social Influences on Physical Activity, Fatigue Severity Scale and Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale. Response rate was 58.2%. Results Men were less physically active, had lower self-efficacy for physical activity and lower fall-related self-efficacy than women. This was explained by men being more physically affected by the disease. Men also received less social support for physical activity from family members. The level of fatigue and psychological consequences of the disease were similar between the genders in the total sample, but subgroups of women with moderate MS and relapsing remitting MS experienced more fatigue than men. Conclusions Men were less physically active, probably a result of being more physically affected by the disease. Men being more physically affected explained most of the gender differences found in this study. However, the number of men in the subgroup analyses was small and more research is needed. A gender perspective should be considered in strategies for promoting physical activity in subjects with MS, e.g. men may need more support to be physically active. PMID:24612446

2014-01-01

379

A psychologist's view of validating aviation systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

All systems, no matter what they are designed to do, have shortcomings that may make them less productive than was hoped during the initial development. Such shortcomings can arise at any stage of development: from conception to the end of the implementation life cycle. While systems failure and errors of a lesser magnitude can occur as a function of mechanical or software breakdown, the majority of such problems, in aviation are usually laid on the shoulders of the human operator and, to a lesser extent, on human factors. The operator bears the responsibility and blame even though, from a human factors perspective, error may have been designed into the system. Human factors is not a new concept in aviation. The name may be new, but the issues related to operators in the loop date back to the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century and certainly to the aviation build-up for World War I. During this first global confrontation, military services from all sides discovered rather quickly that poor selection and training led to drastically increased personnel losses. While hardware design became an issue later, the early efforts were primarily focused on increased care in pilot selection and on their training. This actually involved early labor-intensive simulation, using such devices as sticks and chairs mounted on rope networks which could be manually moved in response to control input. The use of selection criteria and improved training led to more viable person-machine systems. More pilots survived training and their first ten missions in the air, a rule of thumb arrived at by experience which predicted ultimate survival better than any other. This rule was to hold through World War II. At that time, personnel selection and training became very sophisticated based on previous standards. Also, many psychologists were drafted into Army Air Corps programs which were geared towards refining the human factor. However, despite the talent involved in these programs and the tremendous build-up of aviation during the war, there were still aircraft designs that were man killers (no sexism implied since all combat pilots were men). One classic design error that was identified fifty years ago was the multipointer altimeter, which could easily be misread especially by a pilot under considerable task load. It has led to flying fully operational aircraft into the terrain. The authors of the research which formally identified this problem put 'Human Errors' in quotes to express their dissatisfaction with the traditional approach to accident investigation. It traditionally places the burden of guilt on the operator. Some of these altimeters still exist in older aircraft to this day.

Stein, Earl S.; Wagner, Dan

1994-01-01

380

Lightning hazards overview: Aviation requirements and interests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A ten-year history of USAF lightning incidents is presented along with a discussion of the problems posed by lightning to current aircraft, and the hazards it constitutes to the electrical and electronic subsystems of new technology aircraft. Lightning technical protection technical needs, both engineering and operational, include: (1) in-flight data on lightning electrical parameters; (2) tech base and guidelines for protection of advanced systems and structures; (3) improved laboratory test techniques; (4) analysis techniques for predicting induced effects; (5) lightning strike incident data from general aviation; (6) lightning detection systems; (7) pilot reports on lightning strikes; and (8) better training in lightning awareness.

Corn, P. B.

1979-01-01

381

Advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The small engine technology requirements suitable for general aviation service in the 1987 to 1988 time frame were defined. The market analysis showed potential United States engines sales of 31,500 per year providing that the turbine engine sales price approaches current reciprocating engine prices. An optimum engine design was prepared for four categories of fixed wing aircraft and for rotary wing applications. A common core approach was derived from the optimum engines that maximizes engine commonality over the power spectrum with a projected price competitive with reciprocating piston engines. The advanced technology features reduced engine cost, approximately 50 percent compared with current technology.

Smith, R.; Benstein, E. H.

1979-01-01

382

Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this technical document, we describe the development of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC) and Beta version. We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models in the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC and Beta system development. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has seven chapters, a bibliography, and two appendices.

Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Anderson, Kevin; Book, Paul

1999-01-01

383

Regulation, Competition and Network Evolution in Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Our focus is the evolution of business strategies and network structure decisions in the commercial passenger aviation industry. The paper reviews the growth of hub-and-spoke networks as the dominant business model following deregulation in the latter part of the 20 century, followed by the emergence of value-based airlines as a global phenomenon at the end of the century. The paper highlights the link between airline business strategies and network structures, and examines the resulting competition between divergent network structure business models. In this context we discuss issues of market structure stability and the role played by competition policy.

Gillen, David; Morrison, William

2003-01-01

384

Toxicology and drug testing in aviation.  

PubMed

The occupational physician working in the aviation industry must have some toxicological expertise. Airline production and maintenance operations, while similar to other large manufacturing facilities, use some exotic metals and composites with unique toxicity. Airport operations involve exposure of the ground crew to de-icing chemicals and jet fuels. Moreover, evaluation of drug test results requires a background in pharmacology, physiology, and laboratory methods. Frank response to employees and coordination of plans with industrial hygienists, managers, and employees are necessary when toxicological questions arise. This article also offers a Controversy (Substituted Urine: Offer a Retest or Not?). PMID:11872436

Green, Kendall B

2002-01-01

385

Recent trends in aviation turbine fuel properties  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plots and tables, compiled from Department of Energy (and predecessor agency) inspection reports from 1969 to 1980, present ranges, averages, extremes, and trends for most of the 22 properties of Jet A aviation turbine fuel. In recent years, average values of aromatics content, mercaptan sulfur content, distillation temperature of 10 percent recovered, smoke point, and freezing point show small but recognizable trends toward their specification limits. About 80 percent of the fuel samples had at least one property near specification, defined as within a standard band about the specification limit. By far the most common near-specification properties were aromatics content, smoke point, and freezing point.

Friedman, R.

1982-01-01

386

NASA general aviation crashworthiness seat development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three load limiting seat concepts for general aviation aircraft designed to lower the deceleration of the occupant in the event of a crash were sled tested and evaluated with reference to a standard seat. Dummy pelvis accelerations were reduced up to 50 percent with one of the concepts. Computer program MSOMLA (Modified Seat Occupant Model for Light Aircraft) was used to simulate the behavior of a dummy passenger in a NASA full-scale crash test of a twin engine light aircraft. A computer graphics package MANPLOT was developed to pictorially represent the occupant and seat motion.

Fasanella, E. L.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

1979-01-01

387

Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this technical document, we describe the design developed for the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC). We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models within the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC system design. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has six chapters, a bibliography, three appendices and one attachment.

Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Osman, Mohammed; Godso, David; King, Brent; Ricciardi, Michael

1998-01-01

388

BoM Aviation Fog Case Exercise  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This case study focuses on a potential fog event in Melbourne, Australia on the sixth and seventh of April, 2008. The key aim of this module is to step through the forecast process during a potential fog event as an aviation forecaster with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. This involves consideration of model guidance and consideration, identification of potential areas of fog, forecasting and "now"-casting both formation and clearance, and providing TAF updates throughout. It is presented in video format with audio commentary.

389

ROSAT x ray survey observations of active chromospheric binary systems and other selected sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The connection between processes that produce optical chromospheric activity indicators and those that produce x-rays in RS CVn binary systems by taking advantage of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) results and our unique ground-based data set was investigated. In RS CVn systems, excess emission in the Ca 2 resonance (K & H) and infrared triplet (IRT) lines and in the Balmer lines of hydrogen is generally cited as evidence for chromospheric activity, which is usually modeled as scaled up solar-type activity. X-ray emission in RS CVn systems is believed to arise from coronal loop structures. Results from spectra data obtained from RASS observations are discussed and presented.

Ramsey, Lawrence W.

1993-01-01

390

Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data  

PubMed Central

Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km2 of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10–120 cameras) and occasions (20–120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ?) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with low detection (i.e., bobcat and coyote) the most efficient sampling approach was to increase the number of occasions (survey days). However, for common species that are moderately detectable (i.e., cottontail rabbit and mule deer), occupancy could reliably be estimated with comparatively low numbers of cameras over a short sampling period. We provide general guidelines for reliably estimating occupancy across a range of terrestrial species (rare to common: ? = 0.175–0.970, and low to moderate detectability: p = 0.003–0.200) using motion-activated cameras. Wildlife researchers/managers with limited knowledge of the relative abundance and likelihood of detection of a particular species can apply these guidelines regardless of location. We emphasize the importance of prior biological knowledge, defined objectives and detailed planning (e.g., simulating different study-design scenarios) for designing effective monitoring programs and research studies. PMID:25210658

Lewis, Jesse S.; Gerber, Brian D.

2014-01-01

391

76 FR 45518 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...to the proposed survey area, 32 days alternating between acquiring magnetic and seismic...species, state of maturity, experience, current activity, reproductive state, time...echosounder and a 150 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler were transmitting during...

2011-07-29

392

Sampling and analysis plan for the preoperational environmental survey for the immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) project W-465  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a detailed description of the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Preoperational Survey to be conducted at the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Project Site in the 200 East Area.

Mitchell, R.M.

1998-09-28

393

Relationship Between Accelerometer-based Measures of Physical Activity and the Yale Physical Activity Survey in Adults with Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the correlation between the Yale Physical Activity Survey (YPAS) scores and objective accelerometer measures of time spent in light, moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activities (MVPA), and moderate-to-vigorous activities in bouts lasting at least 10 minutes. Methods This study analyzed baseline data from 171 persons with RA and 139 persons with OA in a randomized clinical trial (IMPAACT). Persons fulfilling the 1988 ACR criteria for RA and persons with symptomatic, radiologic knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence Class ? 2) wore an accelerometer for 7 days, then responded to the YPAS questionnaire, and questions regarding demographics (age, gender, and race) and health factors [BMI, disease status (HAQ/WOMAC), comorbidities, pain and function]. Spearman Correlation coefficients were estimated between each YPAS summary measure and accelerometer measures. Results In the RA participants the strongest correlation was between the YPAS Activity Dimensions Summary Index (Y-ADSI) and Average Daily Minutes of Bouted Moderate/Vigorous Activity (r = 0.51). Additionally, the Y-ADSI correlated significantly with both objectively measured average daily accelerometer counts (r= 0.45) and average daily minutes of Moderate/Vigorous Activity (r = 0.43). For OA participants, a similar pattern emerged: the Y-ADSI had significant correlations with average daily minutes of Bouted Moderate/Vigorous Activity (r = 0.36), average daily minutes of Moderate/Vigorous Activity (r = 0.31), and average daily counts (r = 0.24). Conclusions For both RA and OA groups, the summary index Y-ADSI had the strongest significant correlations with objectively measured physical activity, which supports Y-ADSI use as a tool for clinical applications and in rheumatology research. PMID:21954166

Semanik, Pamela; Lee, Jungwha; Manheim, Larry; DiPietro, Loretta; Dunlop, Dorothy; Chang, Rowland W.

2013-01-01

394

14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

2012-01-01

395

14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.  

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

2014-01-01

396

14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

2010-01-01

397

14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

2011-01-01

398

14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

2013-01-01

399

Radio-Selected Binary Active Galactic Nuclei from the Very Large Array Stripe 82 Survey  

E-print Network

Galaxy mergers play an important role in the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes. Simulations suggest that tidal interactions could enhance black hole accretion, which can be tested by the fraction of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) among galaxy mergers. But determining the fraction requires a statistical sample of binaries. We have identified kpc-scale binary AGNs directly from high-resolution radio imaging. Inside the 92 square deg covered by the high-resolution Very Large Array survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, we identified 22 grade A and 30 grade B candidates of binary radio AGNs with angular separations less than 5" (10 kpc at z = 0.1). Eight of the candidates have optical spectra for both components from the SDSS spectroscopic surveys and our Keck program. Two grade B candidates are projected pairs, but the remaining six candidates are all compelling cases of binary AGNs based on either emission line ratios or the excess in radio power compared to the...

Fu, Hai; Djorgovski, S G; Yan, Lin; Wrobel, J M; Stockton, A

2014-01-01

400

A Survey of Studies of Brain Activities Associated with Music Perception  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Music, to many of us, is an indispensable ingredient of life for some unknown reason. Recently, it has become a quite popular research target for a number of reasons. Like language, it is learned from childhood either passively or actively. Unlike language, it cannot convey any precisely defined meaning but nevertheless can move us and make us happy. Unlike language only a small percentage of people can become truely proficient even in listening. In this survey paper, we look at how music has attracted many researchers who are endeavoring to find out how music attracts so many people from professionals to laymen.

Nemoto, Iku

401

75 FR 29803 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-05-27

402

75 FR 882 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-01-06

403

75 FR 29804 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-05-27

404

75 FR 36465 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-06-25

405

75 FR 5844 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-02-04

406

75 FR 5845 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-02-04

407

75 FR 7304 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-02-18

408

75 FR 36464 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-06-25

409

75 FR 32236 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-06-07

410

75 FR 8426 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-02-24

411

75 FR 5843 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-02-04

412

75 FR 5843 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-02-04

413

75 FR 13806 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the attention of the Desk Officer, Department of...

2010-03-23

414

Aviation Maintenance Technology. Course Content Guides. FAA Approved Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Course content guides are provided for the 30 courses in this aviation maintenance technology curriculum approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. Course titles are physics for technicians; aircraft information, regulations, and procedures; aircraft assembly; fundamentals of aircraft electronics; aircraft electrical components; aircraft…

Shrawder, Jack; And Others

415

Aviation Centers Take Off as Airlines Face Pilot Shortfall.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses aviation training requirements for pilots planning to fly for commercial airlines within or outside the United States. Describes two aviation training programs at Western Michigan University, a fast-track 13-month program and the traditional four-year program required for U.S. pilots. Notes that decreasing numbers of pilots trained in…

Mangan, Katherine S.

2000-01-01

416

Aviation and global climate change in the 21st century  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aviation emissions contribute to the radiative forcing (RF) of climate. Of importance are emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxides (NO.), aerosols and their precursors (soot and sulphate), and increased cloudiness in the form of persistent linear contrails and induced-cirrus cloudiness. The recent Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) quantified aviation's RF contribution for

David S. Lee; David W. Fahey; Piers M. Forster; Peter J. Newton; Ron C. N. Wit; Ling L. Lim; Bethan Owen; Robert Sausen

2009-01-01

417

INTELLIGENT ILLICIT OBJECT DETECTION SYSTEM FOR ENHANCED AVIATION SECURITY  

E-print Network

INTELLIGENT ILLICIT OBJECT DETECTION SYSTEM FOR ENHANCED AVIATION SECURITY Vallipuram.green}@griffith.edu.au ABSTRACT Although aviation security is not a new phenomenon to the world, current threats are much more hindering passenger life style. In order to provide adequate security, a much more sophisticated, reliable

Blumenstein, Michael

418

Security of international civil aviation: The role of ICAO  

Microsoft Academic Search

The International Civil Aviation Organization in the last twenty years has marshaled support of the overwhelming majority of its 150 member states in developing security programs and establishing a legal framework of international cooperation against terrorism in international aviation. The Tokyo Convention of 1963 establishes jurisdiction over offenses while an aircraft is in flight and grants a wide spectrum of

Seymour Maxwell Finger

1983-01-01

419

CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System A Monthly Safety Bulletin  

E-print Network

CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System A Monthly Safety Bulletin from The Office of the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System, P.O. Box 189, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0189 http Cabin/Mechanics/Military/Other 182 TOTAL 3583 Number 312 September/October 2005 ASRS Alerts Issued

420

Technology and geographical imaginations: representing aviation in 1930s Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the geographical imaginations associated with aviation in fascist Italy, focusing on the representation of flight on the one hand, and on the other hand the role of propaganda flights organized by the regime in the 1930s. The representation and use of aviation in interwar Italy is explored in light of the concept of technological legitimation, based on

Federico Caprotti

2008-01-01

421

78 FR 29669 - Airworthiness Directives; DASSAULT AVIATION Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Dassault Aviation Fan Jet Falcon and Myst[egrave...dormant failure that might impact the capability to extinguish...2012 (for Model FAN JET FALCON, FAN JET FALCON...a significant economic impact, positive or negative...DASSAULT AVIATION Model FAN JET FALCON, FAN JET...

2013-05-21

422

78 FR 68355 - Airworthiness Directives; Dassault Aviation Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aviation Model Fan Jet Falcon; Model Mystere-Falcon...cartridges, which could impact the capability to...Dassault Aviation Fan Jet Falcon and Myst...failure that might impact the capability to...1) Model Fan Jet Falcon airplanes...cartridges, which could impact the capability...

2013-11-14

423

Language and Communication-Related Problems of Aviation Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the problems posed by the use of natural language in various aspects of aviation is presented. The study, part of a larger investigation of the feasibility of voice input/output interfaces for communication in aviation, looks at representative real examples of accidents and near misses resulting from language confusions and omissions.…

Cushing, Steven

424

Toward a Naval Aviation Training Quality Feedback System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Naval aviation needs a unified standard for job-task analyses and data collection. Such a standard would facilitate consolidation of data across aviation platforms and permit evaluation of training content across phases of the training continuum. It would also make possible the construction of a training transfer evaluation system. The Navy cannot…

Phillips, Henry L., IV; Foster, T. Chris

2008-01-01

425

32 CFR 855.18 - Aviation fuel and oil purchases.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aviation fuel and oil purchases. 855.18 Section 855.18 National...FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.18 Aviation fuel and oil purchases. When a user qualifies...

2011-07-01

426

32 CFR 855.18 - Aviation fuel and oil purchases.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aviation fuel and oil purchases. 855.18 Section 855.18 National...FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.18 Aviation fuel and oil purchases. When a user qualifies...

2010-07-01

427

EKG Findings in Female Aviators in the US Air Force.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The initial EKGs from 309 female aviators and 309 age-matched male aviators were read to compare the prevalence of findings. Abnormal readings were unusual, as would be expected in this selected group. About 1.3 percent of the males and none of the female...

R. A. Munson

1990-01-01

428

General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) Program, Turbine Engine System Element  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of the General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) Program Turbine Engine System Elements is to conduct a shared resource project to develop an affordable gas turbine engine for use on 4 to 6 place, light aircraft that will lead to revitalization of the general aviation industry in the United States, creating many new, high-quality jobs.

1997-01-01

429

CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 09 (PERIODS 1-4 AND FOOD, FRUIT & VEG): CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

This data collection form is divided into two parts: Child Activity Diary and Food Survey. The Child Activity Diary collects information on the child's activities at home over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into four time periods over the 48-hr monitoring inter...

430

CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 08 (PERIODS 1-5 AND FOOD, FRUIT & VEG): CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

This data collection form is divided into two parts: Child Activity Diary and Food Survey. The Child Activity Diary collects information on the child's activities at home over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into five time periods over the 48-hr monitoring inter...

431

77 FR 10544 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Nonferrous Metals Surveys (30...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Geological Survey [USGS-GX12LR000F60100] Agency Information...Comment Request for the Nonferrous Metals Surveys (30 Forms) AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

2012-02-22

432

77 FR 6580 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals Surveys (40...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. Geological Survey [USGS-GX12LR000F60100] Agency Information...Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals Surveys (40 Forms) AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

2012-02-08

433

77 FR 37704 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals Surveys (40...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Geological Survey [USGS-GX12LR000F60100] Agency Information...Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals Surveys (40 Forms) AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

2012-06-22

434

Will climate change increase transatlantic aviation turbulence?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric turbulence causes most weather-related aircraft incidents. Commercial aircraft encounter moderate-or-greater turbulence tens of thousands of times each year world-wide, injuring probably hundreds of passengers (occasionally fatally), costing airlines tens of millions of dollars, and causing structural damage to planes. Clear-air turbulence is especially difficult to avoid, because it cannot be seen by pilots or detected by satellites or on-board radar. Clear-air turbulence is linked to atmospheric jet streams, which are projected to be strengthened by anthropogenic climate change. However, the response of clear-air turbulence to climate change has not previously been studied. Here we show using computer simulations that clear-air turbulence changes significantly within the transatlantic flight corridor when the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is doubled. At cruise altitudes within 50-75°N and 10-60°W in winter, most clear-air turbulence measures show a 10-40% increase in the median strength of turbulence and a 40-170% increase in the frequency of occurrence of moderate-or-greater turbulence. Our results suggest that climate change will lead to bumpier transatlantic flights by the middle of this century. Journey times may lengthen and fuel consumption and emissions may increase. Aviation is partly responsible for changing the climate, but our findings show for the first time how climate change could affect aviation.

Williams, Paul; Joshi, Manoj

2013-04-01

435

Will Climate Change Increase Transatlantic Aviation Turbulence?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric turbulence causes most weather-related aircraft incidents. Commercial aircraft encounter moderate-or-greater turbulence tens of thousands of times each year world-wide, injuring probably hundreds of passengers (occasionally fatally), costing airlines tens of millions of dollars, and causing structural damage to planes. Clear-air turbulence is especially difficult to avoid, because it cannot be seen by pilots or detected by satellites or on-board radar. Clear-air turbulence is linked to atmospheric storm tracks and jet streams, which are projected to be strengthened by anthropogenic climate change. However, the response of clear-air turbulence to climate change has not previously been studied. Here we show using computer simulations that clear-air turbulence changes significantly within the transatlantic flight corridor when the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is doubled. At cruise altitudes within 50-75°N and 10-60°W in winter, most clear-air turbulence measures show a 10-40% increase in the median strength of turbulence and a 40-170% increase in the frequency of occurrence of moderate-or-greater turbulence. Our results suggest that climate change will lead to bumpier transatlantic flights by the middle of this century. Journey times may lengthen and fuel consumption and emissions may increase. Aviation is partly responsible for changing the climate, but our findings show for the first time how climate change could affect aviation.

Williams, P. D.; Joshi, M. M.

2013-12-01

436

Agricultural aviation medicine in the Soviet Union.  

PubMed

The Soviet Union has developed one of the world's most sophisticated civil aviation medicine programs. The program gives specific attention to aerial application operations and includes special preflight pilot medical examinations, aircraft with specialized protective airflow systems for the pilots, minimum flight altitude spraying limit of 5 m, and the use of a "chemical log book" by each pilot in addition to the flight log book. These and additional steps--i.e. limiting a pilot's daily agricultural flights to 4-6 h--have led to a reported USSR agricultural aviation annual accident rate near zero. The Soviet workhorse aircraft, the Antonov AN-2, can serve multipurpose roles since, when not used for application flights, it can be rapidly converted to executive, courier, cargo, or air taxi, or air ambulance use. A new, single-engine turbojet biplane, the Polish M-15, is undergoing evaluation in the Soviet Union as a replacement for the AN-2. Countries with very high agricultural aircraft accident rates may wish to study the Soviet approach, especially the use by the pilot of a chemical log book. PMID:6248014

Mohler, S R

1980-05-01

437

Aviation and global climate change in the 21st century  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aviation emissions contribute to the radiative forcing (RF) of climate. Of importance are emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2), nitrogen oxides (NO x), aerosols and their precursors (soot and sulphate), and increased cloudiness in the form of persistent linear contrails and induced-cirrus cloudiness. The recent Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) quantified aviation's RF contribution for 2005 based upon 2000 operations data. Aviation has grown strongly over the past years, despite world-changing events in the early 2000s; the average annual passenger traffic growth rate was 5.3% yr -1 between 2000 and 2007, resulting in an increase of passenger traffic of 38%. Presented here are updated values of aviation RF for 2005 based upon new operations data that show an increase in traffic of 22.5%, fuel use of 8.4% and total aviation RF of 14% (excluding induced-cirrus enhancement) over the period 2000-2005. The lack of physical process models and adequate observational data for aviation-induced cirrus effects limit confidence in quantifying their RF contribution. Total aviation RF (excluding induced cirrus) in 2005 was ˜55 mW m -2 (23-87 mW m -2, 90% likelihood range), which was 3.5% (range 1.3-10%, 90% likelihood range) of total anthropogenic forcing. Including estimates for aviation-induced cirrus RF increases the total aviation RF in 2005-78 mW m -2 (38-139 mW m -2, 90% likelihood range), which represents 4.9% of total anthropogenic forcing (2-14%, 90% likelihood range). Future scenarios of aviation emissions for 2050 that are consistent with IPCC SRES A1 and B2 scenario assumptions have been presented that show an increase of fuel usage by factors of 2.7-3.9 over 2000. Simplified calculations of total aviation RF in 2050 indicate increases by factors of 3.0-4.0 over the 2000 value, representing 4-4.7% of total RF (excluding induced cirrus). An examination of a range of future technological options shows that substantive reductions in aviation fuel usage are possible only with the introduction of radical technologies. Incorporation of aviation into an emissions trading system offers the potential for overall (i.e., beyond the aviation sector) CO 2 emissions reductions. Proposals exist for introduction of such a system at a European level, but no agreement has been reached at a global level.

Lee, David S.; Fahey, David W.; Forster, Piers M.; Newton, Peter J.; Wit, Ron C. N.; Lim, Ling L.; Owen, Bethan; Sausen, Robert

438

Aviation induced diurnal North Atlantic cirrus cover cycle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aviation induced cirrus (AIC) cover is identified from mean diurnal cycles of cirrus cover and air traffic density in the North Atlantic flight corridor. Traffic data for this region show an aviation “fingerprint” with two maxima during morning eastbound and afternoon westbound traffic. The same aviation fingerprint is found in cirrus cover. Cycle differences between west and east domain parts allow separating between aviation and natural diurnal changes. Cirrus cover is derived from 8 years of Meteosat infrared data. Linear contrail cover is estimated from the same data. Background cirrus without aviation impact is estimated from cirrus observations over the South Atlantic and from numerical weather prediction forecast. The cirrus cover cycle is well approximated by linear response to traffic density with fitted delay times of 2.3-4.1 h, implying AIC cover of 1-2%, more than expected from recent models.

Graf, Kaspar; Schumann, Ulrich; Mannstein, Hermann; Mayer, Bernhard

2012-08-01

439

Active and Passive Hydrologic Tomographic Surveys:A Revolution in Hydrology (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mathematical forward or inverse problems of flow through geological media always have unique solutions if necessary conditions are givens. Unique mathematical solutions to forward or inverse modeling of field problems are however always uncertain (an infinite number of possibilities) due to many reasons. They include non-representativeness of the governing equations, inaccurate necessary conditions, multi-scale heterogeneity, scale discrepancies between observation and model, noise and others. Conditional stochastic approaches, which derives the unbiased solution and quantifies the solution uncertainty, are therefore most appropriate for forward and inverse modeling of hydrological processes. Conditioning using non-redundant data sets reduces uncertainty. In this presentation, we explain non-redundant data sets in cross-hole aquifer tests, and demonstrate that active hydraulic tomographic survey (using man-made excitations) is a cost-effective approach to collect the same type but non-redundant data sets for reducing uncertainty in the inverse modeling. We subsequently show that including flux measurements (a piece of non-redundant data set) collected in the same well setup as in hydraulic tomography improves the estimated hydraulic conductivity field. We finally conclude with examples and propositions regarding how to collect and analyze data intelligently by exploiting natural recurrent events (river stage fluctuations, earthquakes, lightning, etc.) as energy sources for basin-scale passive tomographic surveys. The development of information fusion technologies that integrate traditional point measurements and active/passive hydrogeophysical tomographic surveys, as well as advances in sensor, computing, and information technologies may ultimately advance our capability of characterizing groundwater basins to achieve resolution far beyond the feat of current science and technology.

Yeh, T. J.

2013-12-01

440

Collegiate Aviation Maintenance Training Programs Certified under 14CFR Part 147 that Are Members of the Aviation Technician Education Council  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and method of study: The purpose of this study was to construct a descriptive analysis of aviation maintenance training programs that confer the Bachelor of Science degree and who are members of the Aviation Technician Education Council. The sample was comprised of the 11 educational programs within the population that met these criteria.…

Hunt, Terry Lile

2010-01-01

441

State of the Art on Alternative Fuels in Aviation. SWAFEA. Sustainable Way for Alternative Fuels and Energy in Aviation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Currently, the aviation sector uses petroleum derived liquid fuels as the energy carrier of choice for flight. In light the present environmental, economical and political concerns as to the sustainability of this energy source, the question of which alternatives the aviation sector should pursue in the future has emerged. Among these concerns, the environmental impact of fossil fuel use on

S. Blakey; P. Novelli; P. Costes; S. Bringtown; D. Christensen; B. Sakintuna; C. Peineke; R. E. E. Jongschaap; J. G. Conijn; B. Rutgers; L. Valot; E. Joubert; J. F. Perelgritz; A. Filogonio; T. Roetger; A. Prieur; L. Starck; N. Jeuland; P. Bogers; R. Midgley; J. Bauldreay; G. Rollin; L. Rye; C. Wilson

2010-01-01

442

ISSUE NO. 10 DECEMBER 1998 The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation  

E-print Network

ISSUE NO. 10 DECEMBER 1998 The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of the Assistant Administrator for System Safety and Marcia Patten ASRS Services on the Internet 10 23 16 #12;#12;Issue Number 10 3 An Introduction to Issue

443

CHROMOSPHERICALLY ACTIVE STARS IN THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE) SURVEY. I. THE CATALOG  

SciTech Connect

RAVE, the unbiased magnitude limited survey of southern sky stars, contained 456,676 medium-resolution spectra at the time of our analysis. Spectra cover the Ca II infrared triplet (IRT) range, which is a known indicator of chromospheric activity. Our previous work classified all spectra using locally linear embedding. It identified 53,347 cases with a suggested emission component in calcium lines. Here, we use a spectral subtraction technique to measure the properties of this emission. Synthetic templates are replaced by the observed spectra of non-active stars to bypass the difficult computations of non-local thermal equilibrium profiles of the line cores and stellar parameter dependence. We derive both the equivalent width of the excess emission for each calcium line on a 5 Å wide interval and their sum EW{sub IRT} for ?44,000 candidate active dwarf stars with signal-to-noise ratio >20, with no cuts on the basis of the source of their emission flux. From these, ?14,000 show a detectable chromospheric flux with at least a 2? confidence level. Our set of active stars vastly enlarges previously known samples. Atmospheric parameters and, in some cases, radial velocities of active stars derived from automatic pipelines suffer from systematic shifts due to their shallower calcium lines. We re-estimate the effective temperature, metallicity, and radial velocities for candidate active stars. The overall distribution of activity levels shows a bimodal shape, with the first peak coinciding with non-active stars and the second with the pre-main-sequence cases. The catalog will be made publicly available with the next RAVE public data releases.

Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Matijevi?, G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 E Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Strassmeier, K. G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Bienaymé, O. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 11 rue de l'Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australia National University, Weston Creek, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Kordopatis, G. [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Munari, U. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, I-36012 Asiago (Italy); Navarro, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Seabroke, G. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Wyse, R. F. G., E-mail: marusa.zerjal@fmf.uni-lj.si [Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2013-10-20

444

Aviation human factors research in U.S. universities: Potential contributions to national needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Univesity research can make vital contributions to national needs in aviation human factors (AHF). This article examines the types of expertise and facilities available in universities and explores how university capabilities complement the work of government laboratories. The AHF infrastructure is discussed and compared to other fields of applied research. Policy and funding issues are also examined. This study is based on a survey conducted by the author, which included site visits to several universities, telephone interviews with faculty members at other universities, and a search of the AHF research literature.

Key Dismukes, R.

1994-01-01

445

77 FR 71472 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; Clearance of Renewed Approval of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Information Collection: Aeronautical Chart Point of Sale Survey AGENCY: Federal Aviation...an information collection. Aeronautical Chart Point of Sale Survey data will be used...Number: 2120-0741. Title: Aeronautical Chart Point of Sale Survey. Form Numbers:...

2012-11-30

446

Quality-assurance plan for groundwater activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Water Science Center  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report documents the standard procedures, policies, and field methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Washington Water Science Center staff for activities related to the collection, processing, analysis, storage, and publication of groundwater data. This groundwater quality-assurance plan changes through time to accommodate new methods and requirements developed by the Washington Water Science Center and the USGS Office of Groundwater. The plan is based largely on requirements and guidelines provided by the USGS Office of Groundwater, or the USGS Water Mission Area. Regular updates to this plan represent an integral part of the quality-assurance process. Because numerous policy memoranda have been issued by the Office of Groundwater since the previous groundwater quality assurance plan was written, this report is a substantial revision of the previous report, supplants it, and contains significant additional policies not covered in the previous report. This updated plan includes information related to the organization and responsibilities of USGS Washington Water Science Center staff, training, safety, project proposal development, project review procedures, data collection activities, data processing activities, report review procedures, and archiving of field data and interpretative information pertaining to groundwater flow models, borehole aquifer tests, and aquifer tests. Important updates from the previous groundwater quality assurance plan include: (1) procedures for documenting and archiving of groundwater flow models; (2) revisions to procedures and policies for the creation of sites in the Groundwater Site Inventory database; (3) adoption of new water-level forms to be used within the USGS Washington Water Science Center; (4) procedures for future creation of borehole geophysics, surface geophysics, and aquifer-test archives; and (5) use of the USGS Multi Optional Network Key Entry System software for entry of routine water-level data collected as part of long-term water-level monitoring networks.

Kozar, Mark D.; Kahle, Sue C.

2013-01-01

447

Potential global jamming transition in aviation networks.  

PubMed

In this paper, we propose a nonlinear transport model for an aviation network. The takeoff rate from an airport is characterized by the degree of ground congestion. Due to the effect of surface congestion, the performance of an airport deteriorates because of inefficient configurations of waiting aircraft on the ground. Using a simple transport model, we performed simulations on a United States airport network and found a global jamming transition induced by local surface congestion. From a physical perspective, the mechanism of the transition is studied analytically and the resulting aircraft distribution is discussed considering system dynamics. This study shows that the knowledge of the relationship between a takeoff rate and a congestion level on the ground is vital for efficient air traffic operations. PMID:25215781

Ezaki, Takahiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

2014-08-01

448

A geophysical survey of active volcanism in the Central and Southern Andes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South American plate results in great earthquakes and active volcanism along the Andean margin. The Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) between 15°S and 28°S and the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) between 33°S and 46°S are separated by a zone of flat slab subduction and differ significantly in the manifestation of current volcanic activity. The CVZ has been considered less hazardous due to the few number of historical volcanic eruptions compared to the SVZ, yet it contains the largest mid-crustal magma body on Earth and erupted at least 10,000 km 3 of ignimbrite in the Late Miocene (10-1 Ma). In this dissertation, I use InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar), thermal remote sensing, and seismology to investigate active volcanism in the Central and Southern Andes. InSAR and thermal remote sensing provide synoptic coverage along the volcanic arc, and seismic experiments allow further examination of selected volcanoes. I establish the first catalog of seismicity at Uturuncu volcano in Bolivia, where InSAR has observed continuous uplift since 1992, and find an unusually high seismicity rate for a Pleistocene volcano as well as swarm activity and triggered earthquakes. I then conduct a survey using satellite thermal infrared data to detect thermal hotspots related to volcanic activity throughout the CVZ and SVZ. I find hotspots at many volcanoes that had not previously been documented, with the CVZ containing more volcanoes with hotspots than the SVZ. One of the most thermally active volcanoes in the SVZ, Cordon Caulle volcano, experienced a large rhyodacitic eruption from 2011-2012. I use InSAR and petrology to model the pre-eruptive conditions at depth and co-eruptive processes and find that a large, long-lived crustal magma reservoir must be present beneath Cordon Caulle. Finally, I carry out an InSAR survey of volcanoes in southern Peru, completing a regional study of volcano deformation in the CVZ and allowing for a comprehensive comparative analysis between the CVZ and SVZ.

Jay, Jennifer Ann

449

Electric, Magnetic and Ionospheric Survey of Seismically Active Regions with SWARM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a project devoted to the scientific exploitation of SWARM multi-point measurements of the magnetic and electric field, of the electron temperature and density in the ionosphere. These data provide unique opportunities to study in-situ and remotely the electromagnetic and plasma variability due to ionospheric forcing from above and below. The project "Electric, Magnetic and Ionospheric Survey of Seismically Active Regions with SWARM (EMISSARS)" focus on coordinated studies between SWARM and ground based observatories to survey electromagnetic and ionospheric variability at medium latitudes and look for possible correlations with the seismic activity in central Europe. The project is coordinated by the Institute for Space Sciences (INFLPR-ISS) and the National Institute for Earth Physics (INFP) in Bucharest, Romania. In addition to SWARM data the project benefits from support of dedicated ground based measurements provided by the MEMFIS network coordinated by INFP, the MM100 network of magnetic observatories coordinated by the Geological and Geophysical Institute of Hungary (MFGI) in Budapest. Seismic data are provided by INFP and the European Mediterranean Seismological Center. The mission of the project is to monitor from space and from ground the ionospheric and electromagnetic variability during time intervals prior, during and after seismic activity in (i) the seismic active regions of the central Europe and (ii) in regions unaffected by the seismic activity. The latter will provide reference measurements, free from possible seismogenic signals. The scientific objectives of the project are: (1) Observation of electric, magnetic and ionospheric (electron temperature, density) variability in the ionosphere above or in the close vicinity of seismic active regions, in conjunction with ground based observations from dedicated networks; (2) Investigation of the coupling between the litosphere - atmosphere - ionosphere, during Earthquakes; (3) Quantitative nonlinear analysis of anomalous magnetic events detected on ground and in space before, during and after Earthquakes. The methodology includes methods of analysis like : (i) the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of electric, magnetic, lithospheric signal, (ii) the Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) at various scales from multi-spacecraft statistical ensembles, (iii) the auto and cross-correlation analysis of magnetic field and ionospheric variables for search of coherent structures, (iv) numerical modelling of the litosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling based on the current continuity.

Echim, Marius M.; Moldovan, Iren; Voiculescu, Mirela; Balasis, George; Lichtenberger, Janos; Heilig, Balazs; Kovacs, Peter

2014-05-01

450

National Household Education Surveys Program of 2005 After-School Programs and Activities: 2005. E.D. TAB. NCES 2006-076  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents data on participation in after-school activities and programs in the United States. The data are from the After-School Programs and Activities Survey (ASPA), a nationally representative survey of the 2005 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES:2005). The data presented in the report are based on a sample of 11,684…

Carver, Priscilla R.; Iruka, Iheoma U.

2006-01-01

451

Comparison of global 3-D aviation emissions datasets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aviation emissions are unique from other transportation emissions, e.g., from road transportation and shipping, in that they occur at higher altitudes as well as at the surface. Aviation emissions of carbon dioxide, soot, and water vapor have direct radiative impacts on the Earth's climate system while emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrocarbons (HC) impact air quality and climate through their effects on ozone, methane, and clouds. The most accurate estimates of the impact of aviation on air quality and climate utilize three-dimensional chemistry-climate models and gridded four dimensional (space and time) aviation emissions datasets. We compare five available aviation emissions datasets currently and historically used to evaluate the impact of aviation on climate and air quality: NASA-Boeing 1992, NASA-Boeing 1999, QUANTIFY 2000, Aero2k 2002, and AEDT 2006 and aviation fuel usage estimates from the International Energy Agency. Roughly 90% of all aviation emissions are in the Northern Hemisphere and nearly 60% of all fuelburn and NOx emissions occur at cruise altitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. While these datasets were created by independent methods and are thus not strictly suitable for analyzing trends they suggest that commercial aviation fuelburn and NOx emissions increased over the last two decades while HC emissions likely decreased and CO emissions did not change significantly. The bottom-up estimates compared here are consistently lower than International Energy Agency fuelburn statistics although the gap is significantly smaller in the more recent datasets. Overall the emissions distributions are quite similar for fuelburn and NOx with regional peaks over the populated land masses of North America, Europe, and East Asia. For CO and HC there are relatively larger differences. There are however some distinct differences in the altitude distribution of emissions in certain regions for the Aero2k dataset.

Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Owen, B.

2013-01-01

452

The Impact of Active Consent Procedures on Nonresponse and Nonresponse Error in Youth Survey Data: Evidence from a New Experiment  

PubMed Central

This paper reports results from a student survey fielded using an experimental design with 14 Kentucky school districts. Seven of the fourteen districts were randomly assigned to implement the survey with active consent procedures; the other seven districts implemented the survey with passive consent procedures. We utilized our experimental design to investigate the impact of consent procedures on (a) participation rates, (b) demographic characteristic of the survey samples, and (c) estimates of ATOD use. We found that the use of active consent procedures resulted in reduced response rates, under-representation of male students and older students, and lower lifetime and past 30 day prevalence rates for most drugs and for most antisocial behaviors. Methodological implications of these findings are discussed, along with directions for further research. PMID:19506295

Courser, Matthew W.; Shamblen, Stephen R.; Lavrakas, Paul J.; Collins, David; Ditterline, Paul

2009-01-01

453

A Helioseismic Survey of Emerging Active Regions Using HMI-SDO Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A survey of the subsurface properties of approximately 100 emerging active regions, determined from the application of helioseismic holography to Dopplergrams obtained with the HMI instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, is being carried out. The goal of this research is to use helioseismology and numerical simulations to identify and understand possible signatures, in the form of acoustic travel time shifts, due to rising magnetic flux concentrations prior to their emergence at the solar photosphere. The status of the project and current results will be discussed. We make use of ensemble averages of travel-time shift measurements as proxies for near-surface depth-integrated wave-speed changes and flows. The latter include horizontal components of the flows as well as their horizontal divergence and the vertical component of the flow vorticity. A control sample of a similar number of quiet-Sun regions is used for comparison and for identifying potential systematic effects. Preliminary results confirm previous suggestions (obtained from a prior survey using GONG data) that emergence sites are associated with converging photospheric flows, such as the boundaries of supergranulation.This work is supported by the NASA Heliophysics Supporting Research program through contract NNH12CF23C.

Braun, Douglas; Schunker, Hannah; Birch, Aaron

2014-06-01

454

Measuring safety climate in aviation: A review and recommendations for the future  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews 23 studies that have examined safety climate within commercial and military aviation. The safety climate factors identified in the aviation safety climate questionnaires were found to be consistent with the literature examining safety climate in non-aviation high reliability organizations. Therefore, it was concluded that the aviation safety climate tools had some construct validity (the extent to which

Paul O’Connor; Angela O’Dea; Quinn Kennedy; Samuel E. Buttrey

2011-01-01

455

Family Health Education and Its Place in the Training of Student Aviators: A Method.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The real mission of a flight surgeon is often misunderstood by military aviation students and their families. Because of his prominent position in student aviator selection and retention, a flight surgeon may represent a threat to an aviator's career. While the Army aviation training program is rapidly expanding, formal contacts between students…

Knapp, Stanley C.

456

Curvature wavefront sensing performance evaluation for active correction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).  

PubMed

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, modified Paul-Baker design, with an 8.4-meter primary mirror, a 3.4-m secondary, and a 5.0-m tertiary, along with three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat focal plane with a field of view of 9.6 square degrees. In order to maintain image quality during operation, the deformations and rigid body motions of the three large mirrors must be actively controlled to minimize optical aberrations, which arise primarily from forces due to gravity and thermal expansion. We describe the methodology for measuring the telescope aberrations using a set of curvature wavefront sensors located in the four corners of the LSST camera focal plane. We present a comprehensive analysis of the wavefront sensing system, including the availability of reference stars, demonstrating that this system will perform to the specifications required to meet the LSST performance goals. PMID:20173981

Manuel, Anastacia M; Phillion, Donald W; Olivier, Scot S; Baker, Kevin L; Cannon, Brice

2010-01-18

457

Patterns of research activity related to government policy: a UK web based survey  

PubMed Central

Aims: To describe the patterns of child and family health and wellbeing research activity in the fiscal year (FY) 2002/2003 in relation to UK government policies. Methods: Projects investigating the health and wellbeing of children and families were located through a web based survey of major research funders, including UK government departments and non-departmental public bodies, research councils, and medical charities. A budget was estimated for each project for the FY 2002/2003, and each project coded according to a framework which reflected government priorities and research methodologies. Results: There was a substantial amount of project information posted on the websites of the funding organisations, but the level of detail varied. For the FY 2002/2003, 31 organisations were identified that commissioned 567 projects investigating the health and wellbeing of children and families. Based on information from organisations' websites, this represented approximately 3% of their research budgets. Within this funding area, low proportions of research activity related to health inequalities (9% of total expenditure on child and family health research), health economic analysis (8%), primary and secondary prevention (12%), and children and adolescents at high risk of ill health (14%). Conclusions: A limited amount of research activity on children and families health funded in the FY 2002/2003 is addressing UK government policy priorities. This suggests the need to commission further research to fill gaps in the evidence. PMID:16243861

Hawkins, S; Law, C

2005-01-01

458

Demonstration and implementation of ethanol as an aviation fuel. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the viability of ethanol as an aviation fuel at appropriate locations and audiences in the participating Biomass Energy Program Regions, and to promote implementation projects in the area. Seven demonstrations were to be performed during the Summer 1995 through December 1996 period. To maximize the cost effectiveness of the program, additional corporate co-sponsorships were sought at each demonstration site and the travel schedule was arranged to take advantage of appropriate events taking place in the vicinity of the schedule events or enroute. This way, the original funded amount was stretched to cover another year of activities increasing the number of demonstrations from seven to thirty-nine. While the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) contract focused on ethanol as an aviation fuel, RAFDC also promoted the broader use of ethanol as a transportation fuel. The paper summarizes locations and occasions, and gives a brief description of each demonstration/exhibit/presentation held during the term of the project. Most of the demonstrations took place at regularly scheduled air shows, such as the Oshkosh, Wisconsin Air Show. The paper also reviews current and future activities in the areas of certification, emission testing, the international Clean Airports Program, air pollution monitoring with instrumented aircraft powered by renewable fuels, training operation and pilot project on ethanol, turbine fuel research, and educational programs.

NONE

1998-01-01

459

Impact of aviation emissions on the Arctic environment - GEM-AC model simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The continuing decrease of ice cover over the Artic allows for the increase in shipping and industrial activities in the region. These activities lead to the increase of anthropogenic emissions from shipping, prospecting, exploration, and smelting. Emissions from shipping are dominant and their magnitude and impact on the Arctic environment have been addressed in recent publications. The objective of this study is investigate the impact of the increased demand for commercial aviation transport to the Arctic on the air quality near the ground as well as the impact of aviation emissions injected at cruise altitudes (9-11 km ) which in many cases will be above the tropopause. We will present results from the GEM-AC model simulations for several aviation emissions scenarios. GEM-AC (Global Environmental Multiscale model for Atmospheric Chemistry) is a chemical weather model based on the GEM model developed by the Meteorological Service of Canada for operational weather forecasting where air quality, free tropospheric, and stratospheric chemistry process are on-line and interactive. In vertical, the model domain is defined on hybrid levels from the surface to ~60km. The gas-phase chemistry includes detailed reactions of Ox, NOx, HOx, CO, CH4, NMVOCs, halocarbons, ClOx and BrO. Also, the model can address aerosol microphysics and gas-aerosol partitioning. The model will be run on a global variable grid with ~30 km uniform horizontal resolution over the Arctic.

Kaminski, J. W.; Porebska, M.; Semeniuk, K.; Lupu, A.

2013-12-01

460

76 FR 9810 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Ferrous Metals Surveys (17 Forms)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Request for the Ferrous Metals Surveys (17 Forms) AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey...described below. This collection consists of 17 forms. As required by the Paperwork Reduction...1028-0068. Form Number: Various (17 forms). Title: Ferrous Metals...

2011-02-22

461

76 FR 67459 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Survey of “Health...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Comment Request; Survey of ``Health Care Providers' Responses to Medical...proposed information collection ``Health Care Providers' Responses to Medical...information technology. Survey of ``Health Care Providers' Responses to...

2011-11-01

462

76 FR 49737 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...seismic survey in the central-western Bering Sea. Acoustic stimuli...survey lines in the central-western Bering Sea. USGS assumes that...offshore waters of the central-western Bering Sea. The closest survey...sightings northwest of the Pribilof Islands using correction values...

2011-08-11

463

General aviation Omega navigation in the national airspace system  

E-print Network

Introduction: Omega navigation has great potential as a navigation sensor for general aviation aircraft. Advantages of Omega navigation include signal availability at all altitudes, and no need for overflying of various ...

Wischmeyer, Carl Edward

1976-01-01

464

Flight test and evaluation of Omega navigation for general aviation  

E-print Network

A seventy hour flight test program was accomplished to determine the suitability and accuracy of a low cost Omega navigation receiver in a general aviation aircraft. An analysis was made of signal availability in two widely ...

Hwoschinsky, Peter V.

1975-01-01

465

76 FR 11308 - Aviation Noise Impacts Roadmap Annual Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...collective scientific knowledge of the impact of aircraft noise on society in order to improve...identify current knowledge gaps and future...pooled to advance the knowledge on how best to address...aviation noise on society. Issued in...

2011-03-01

466

A General Equilibrium Analysis of Climate Policy for Aviation  

E-print Network

- dependent aviation-sector goals for carbon mitigation and technology adoption. This thesis asks the question in Technology and Policy at the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY June 2011 c Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2011. All rights reserved. Author

467

Vehicle Technology for Civil Aviation: The Seventies and Beyond  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The panel discussion on aviation technology for the seventies and beyond is reported. Topics discussed include: Government role in developing and applying new aeronautical technologies, noise and environmental problems, and congestion in the vicinity of major air terminals.

1972-01-01

468

Noise Susceptibility: A Comparison of Two Naval Aviator Populations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The identification of characteristics of noise susceptible or noise resistant individuals is necessary for the development of noise susceptibility risk profiles. Fifty six naval aviators, categorized as having either incurred a hearing loss (i.e., hearing...

G. B. Thomas, C. E. Williams

1986-01-01

469

77 FR 3 - Airworthiness Directives; Dassault Aviation Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...equipped with any ram air turbine (RAT) transformer rectifier...part of the ram air turbine (RAT) system. The Federal Aviation...to essential airplane systems while the RAT is deployed...December 1, 2010. (h) Parts...

2012-01-03

470

78 FR 14912 - International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) Program Change  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...safety of its airlines. It does not assess the safety compliance of any particular air carrier (nor does it address aviation security, airports, or air traffic management). Although the FAA assessment team typically visits one or more air...

2013-03-08

471

14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...inspector airport access. Airports, aircraft operators, aircraft owners, airport tenants, and air agencies must grant Aviation Safety Inspectors bearing FAA Form 110A free and uninterrupted access to public-use airports and facilities,...

2010-01-01

472

NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 4: General aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A substantially improved flow of new technology is imperative if the general aviation industry is to maintain a strong world position. Although NASA is the most eminently suited entity available to carry out the necessary research and technology development effort because of its facilities, expertise, and endorsement by the aircraft industry, less than 3% of its aeronautical R&T budget is devoted to general aviation aeronautics. It is recommended that (1) a technology program, particularly one that focuses on improving fuel efficienty and safety, be aggressively pursued by NASA; (2) NASA be assigned the role of leading basic research technology effort in general aviation up through technology demonstration; (3) a strategic plan be developed by NASA, in cooperation with the industry, and implemented in time for the 1982 budget cycle; and (4) a NASA R&T budget be allocated for general aviation adequate to support the proposed plan.

1981-01-01

473

It's time to reinvent the general aviation airplane  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current designs for general aviation airplanes have become obsolete, and avenues for major redesign must be considered. New designs should incorporate recent advances in electronics, aerodynamics, structures, materials, and propulsion. Future airplanes should be optimized to operate satisfactorily in a positive air traffic control environment, to afford safety and comfort for point-to-point transportation, and to take advantage of automated manufacturing techniques and high production rates. These requirements have broad implications for airplane design and flying qualities, leading to a concept for the Modern Equipment General Aviation (MEGA) airplane. Synergistic improvements in design, production, and operation can provide a much needed fresh start for the general aviation industry and the traveling public. In this investigation a small four place airplane is taken as the reference, although the proposed philosophy applies across the entire spectrum of general aviation.

Stengel, Robert F.

1988-01-01

474

78 FR 69785 - Airworthiness Directives; Slingsby Aviation Ltd. Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Slingsby Aviation...a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Slingsby...AD, contact Slingsby Advanced Composites, Ings...39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 0 1. The authority...instructions in Slingsby Advanced Composites Ltd....

2013-11-21

475

Transcription of the Workshop on General Aviation Advanced Avionics Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Papers are presented dealing with the design of reliable, low cost, advanced avionics systems applicable to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. Sensors, displays, integrated circuits, microprocessors, and minicomputers are among the topics discussed.

Tashker, M. (editor)

1975-01-01

476

77 FR 61539 - Airworthiness Directives; DASSAULT AVIATION Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain DASSAULT AVIATION Model FALCON 2000, FALCON 2000EX, MYSTERE- FALCON 900 and FALCON 900EX airplanes; and all Model MYSTERE-FALCON 50 airplanes. This proposed AD...

2012-10-10

477

An estimate of the global impact of commercial aviation noise  

E-print Network

This study estimates the impacts of commercial aviation noise at 181 airports around the world. These airports are located in 38 countries plus Taiwan, with 95 of the airports located in the United States. They are part ...

Kish, Christopher (Christopher John)

2008-01-01

478

Service network design optimization for Army Aviation lift planning  

E-print Network

The need for optimized aviation lift planning is becoming increasingly important as the United States and her allies participate in the Global War on Terror (GWOT). As part of a comprehensive effort, our nation's fighting ...

Mogensen, Matthew D. (Matthew David)

2014-01-01

479

Comparative analysis of aviation safety information feedback systems  

E-print Network

In the aviation system, there are several feedback systems to prevent an accident. First of all, the accident and serious incident reporting and investigation system is established by the Chicago Convention. In general, ...

Funahashi, Yoshifuru

2010-01-01

480

Use of Loran-C for general aviation aircraft navigation  

E-print Network

This report describes an extensive evaluation of Loran-C for use by general aviation. Flight, ground, and antenna tests were done. Flight tests measured the accuracy and the ability to make approaches. Receiver reliability ...

Natarajan, Krishnan

1981-01-01

481

Prospective Safety Analysis and the Complex Aviation System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fatal accident rates in commercial passenger aviation are at historic lows yet have plateaued and are not showing evidence of further safety advances. Modern aircraft accidents reflect both historic causal factors and new unexpected "Black Swan" events. The ever-increasing complexity of the aviation system, along with its associated technology and organizational relationships, provides fertile ground for fresh problems. It is important to take a proactive approach to aviation safety by working to identify novel causation mechanisms for future aviation accidents before they happen. Progress has been made in using of historic data to identify the telltale signals preceding aviation accidents and incidents, using the large repositories of discrete and continuous data on aircraft and air traffic control performance and information reported by front-line personnel. Nevertheless, the aviation community is increasingly embracing predictive approaches to aviation safety. The "prospective workshop" early assessment tool described in this paper represents an approach toward this prospective mindset-one that attempts to identify the future vectors of aviation and asks the question: "What haven't we considered in our current safety assessments?" New causation mechanisms threatening aviation safety will arise in the future because new (or revised) systems and procedures will have to be used under future contextual conditions that have not been properly anticipated. Many simulation models exist for demonstrating the safety cases of new operational concepts and technologies. However the results from such models can only be as valid as the accuracy and completeness of assumptions made about the future context in which the new operational concepts and/or technologies will be immersed. Of course that future has not happened yet. What is needed is a reasonably high-confidence description of the future operational context, capturing critical contextual characteristics that modulate both the likelihood of occurrence of hazards, and the likelihood that those hazards will lead to negative safety events. Heuristics extracted from scenarios, questionnaires, and observed trends from scanning the aviation horizon may be helpful in capturing those future changes in a way conducive to safety assessment. What is also needed is a checklist of potential sources of emerging risk that arise from organizational features that are frequently overlooked. The ultimate goal is to develop a pragmatic, workable method for using descriptions of the future aviation context, to generate valid predictions of safety risks.

Smith, Brian E.

2013-01-01

482

Recommendations for Injury Prevention in Transport Aviation Accidents  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1996, a national objective was established to reduce the rate of fatal accidents in aviation. To assist in determining the best methods for improving aircraft crash survivability, a combined approach was used involving database research and the examination of case studies of transport aviation accidents. The results of the study include recommendations for maintaining occupiable space, enhancing occupant restraint, managing energy transferred to the occupant, improving egress, and increasing post-crash survival.

Grierson, Anita E.; Jones, Lisa E.

2001-01-01

483

AVIATION NOISE AND ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE: THE BARRIO BARRIER &ast  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT.?Aviation noise is a harmful pollutant, which has yet to be studied in the environmental justice literature. This paper uses Tobit and logit multivariate regression analyses to analyze noise pollution exposure from a major commercial-service airport. It addresses the issue of whether people moved to the aviation noise-impacted areas or the noise encroached on the people, and controls for economic

Robin R. Sobotta; Heather E. Campbell; Beverly J. Owens

2007-01-01

484

Flight test and evaluation of Omega navigation for general aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A seventy hour flight test program was performed to determine the suitability and accuracy of a low cost Omega navigation receiver in a general aviation aircraft. An analysis was made of signal availability in two widely separated geographic areas. Comparison is made of the results of these flights with other navigation systems. Conclusions drawn from the test experience indicate that developmental system improvement is necessary before a competent fail safe or fail soft area navigation system is offered to general aviation.

Hwoschinsky, P. V.

1975-01-01

485

Development of an Airport Choice Model for General Aviation Operations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The General Aviation Airport Choice model developed estimates General Aviation (GA) person-trips and number of aircraft operations given trip demand in the form of GA person trips from counties. A pseudo-gravity model is embedded in the model to distribute the inter-county person-trips to a prescribed set of airports in the US. The airport-to-airport person-trips are split into person-trips by three

Hojong Baik; Senanu Ashiabor; Antonio Trani

2003-01-01

486

Future Ability Requirements for Human Operators in Aviation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study addresses the optimal fit between technical innovations in aviation and aircraft operators. Because of the\\u000a increase in computerization, an accurate and efficient monitoring of the automation poses a key challenge to future operators.\\u000a As the German Aerospace Center’s Department of Aviation and Space Psychology is responsible for personnel selection of pilots\\u000a and air traffic controllers, our objective

Catrin Hasse; Carmen Bruder; Dietrich Grasshoff; Hinnerk Eißfeldt

2009-01-01

487

Effects of age, season, gender and urban-rural status on time-activity: CanadianHuman Activity Pattern Survey 2 (CHAPS 2).  

PubMed

Estimation of population exposure is a main component of human health risk assessment for environmental contaminants. Population-level exposure assessments require time-activity pattern distributions in relation to microenvironments where people spend their time. Societal trends may have influenced time-activity patterns since previous Canadian data were collected 15 years ago. The Canadian Human Activity Pattern Survey 2 (CHAPS 2) was a national survey conducted in 2010-2011 to collect time-activity information from Canadians of all ages. Five urban and two rural locations were sampled using telephone surveys. Infants and children, key groups in risk assessment activities, were over-sampled. Survey participants (n = 5,011) provided time-activity information in 24-hour recall diaries and responded to supplemental questionnaires concerning potential exposures to specific pollutants, dwelling characteristics, and socio-economic factors. Results indicated that a majority of the time was spent indoors (88.9%), most of which was indoors at home, with limited time spent outdoors (5.8%) or in a vehicle (5.3%). Season, age, gender and rurality were significant predictors of time activity patterns. Compared to earlier data, adults reported spending more time indoors at home and adolescents reported spending less time outdoors, which could be indicative of broader societal trends. These findings have potentially important implications for assessment of exposure and risk. The CHAPS 2 data also provide much larger sample sizes to allow for improved precision and are more representative of infants, children and rural residents. PMID:24557523

Matz, Carlyn J; Stieb, David M; Davis, Karelyn; Egyed, Marika; Rose, Andreas; Chou, Benedito; Brion, Orly

2014-02-01

488

Effects of Age, Season, Gender and Urban-Rural Status on Time-Activity: Canadian Human Activity Pattern Survey 2 (CHAPS 2)  

PubMed Central

Estimation of population exposure is a main component of human health risk assessment for environmental contaminants. Population-level exposure assessments require time-activity pattern distributions in relation to microenvironments where people spend their time. Societal trends may have influenced time-activity patterns since previous Canadian data were collected 15 years ago. The Canadian Human Activity Pattern Survey 2 (CHAPS 2) was a national survey conducted in 2010–2011 to collect time-activity information from Canadians of all ages. Five urban and two rural locations were sampled using telephone surveys. Infants and children, key groups in risk assessment activities, were over-sampled. Survey participants (n = 5,011) provided time-activity information in 24-hour recall diaries and responded to supplemental questionnaires concerning potential exposures to specific pollutants, dwelling characteristics, and socio-economic factors. Results indicated that a majority of the time was spent indoors (88.9%), most of which was indoors at home, with limited time spent outdoors (5.8%) or in a vehicle (5.3%). Season, age, gender and rurality were significant predictors of time activity patterns. Compared to earlier data, adults reported spending more time indoors at home and adolescents reported spending less time outdoors, which could be indicative of broader societal trends. These findings have potentially important implications for assessment of exposure and risk. The CHAPS 2 data also provide much larger sample sizes to allow for improved precision and are more representative of infants, children and rural residents. PMID:24557523

Matz, Carlyn J.; Stieb, David M.; Davis, Karelyn; Egyed, Marika; Rose, Andreas; Chou, Benedito; Brion, Orly

2014-01-01

489

An automated survey of three and five minute oscillations in active regions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of an survey of the automatically detected three and five minute oscillation content of 44 active regions automatically detected by the SDO Feature Finding Team SPoCA (Spatial Possibilistic Clustering Algorithm; Barra et al., A&A, 2009, 505, 361). Analysis is restricted to one hour, full cadence, cut-outs of automatically detected active regions found in 171Å and 193Å from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The oscillations were found using an improved version of the automated oscillation detection algorithm of Ireland et al. 2010, Sol. Phys. 264, 403, that also estimates the coherence and the local phase speed of any detected oscillating region. It is shown that most active regions only support very few oscillating regions of either three or five minute periods. Further, very few of these oscillating regions have a substantial coherence (greater than 0.6) and a relative phase speed error of less than 50%, our criteria for the detection of an identifiable and coherent wave. These results suggest that oscillating regions in active regions are rare. Finally, a large proportion of the regions that do oscillate with 5 minute periods do not do so coherently and with a well-defined phase speed. These results are discussed in the context of the recent suggestion that most five-minute oscillations are not due to slow-mode magnetohydrodynamic waves (De Moortel et al. 2000, A&A 355, L23) but are due to quasi-periodic flows (De Pontieu and McIntosh, 2010, Ap. J. 722, 1013). The advantages of using automated detection and classification methods are also briefly discussed.

Ireland, J.; Young, C.

2011-12-01

490

Aviation Management Perception of Biofuel as an Alternative Fuel Source  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore lived experiences and perceptions from a population of 75 aviation managers in various locations in Pennsylvania about the use of aviation biofuel and how it will impact the aviation industry. The primary research question for this study focused on the impact of biofuel on the airline industry and how management believes biofuel can contribute to the reduction of fossil fuel. Grounded in the conceptual framework of sustainability, interview data collected from 27 airline and fueling leaders were analyzed for like terms, coded, and reduced to 3 themes. Data were organized and prioritized based on frequency of mention. The findings represented themes of (a) flight planning tools, (b) production, and (c) costs that are associated with aviation fuel. The results confirmed findings addressed in the literature review, specifically that aviation biofuel will transform the airline industry through lower cost and production. These findings have broad applicability for all management personnel in the aviation industry. Implications for social change and improved business environments could be realized with a cleaner environment, reduced fuel emissions, and improved air quality.

Marticek, Michael

491

A Helioseismic Survey to Investigate Relationships between Subsurface Flows beneath Large Active Regions and Solar Flares  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A survey of the subsurface flow properties of about 120 of the largest active regions, determined from the application of helioseismic holography to Dopplergrams obtained with the HMI instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, is being carried out. The overriding goal is to characterize differences in the subsurface flows between active regions associated with eruptive flares and the flows observed in relatively quiescent regions. Applications to flare forecasting comprise only one part of this investigation, since the potential response of the subsurface environment to eruptive events during and after their occurrence is also of scientific interest. Other priorities include understanding the limitations of the helioseismic methods, identifying and correcting systematic effects, and validating the reliability of the measurements using artificial data. While inversions to determine the variation with depth of subsurface flows are planned, preliminary results will be discussed which make use of proxies for near-surface depth-integrated properties, including the horizontal component of the flow divergence and the vertical component of the flow vorticity.This work is supported by the Solar Terrestrial Program of the National Science Foundation, through grant AGS-1127327, and by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration SBIR program.

Braun, Douglas; Leka, K D.; Barnes, Graham

2014-06-01

492

Outreach as seen by the Spanish professional astronomers: a survey of beliefs, attitudes, and activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A survey of outreach related beliefs, attitudes, and activities of the Spanish professional astronomers is presented. More than one hundred scientists answered an ad-hoc drawn up questionnaire, whose results have been analysed statistically. This feedback form is an improved version of that used in a previous research carried out by the authors with a sample of members of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Díaz Vilela & Rodríguez Hidalgo 2005). Some of the studied items are the actual time and effort devoted to outreach by a researcher, the role of outreach within his work, the valuation of outreach activities in his curriculum, socially, or economically, the opinion about who should have the responsibility of organising and performing popularisation tasks, etc. Three kinds of studies have been performed: the descriptive one is based on the frequencies and means of variables; a Principal Component Analysis was applied to get a shorter number of belief-attitude dimensions; and an inferential one, derived from a Multiple Regression Analysis which provides a reliable description of the beliefs-attitudes scale grouping outreach related beliefs into 6 components, 3 of them more significant. A simple regression allows us to predict about a 50% of the variance of the outreach practices.

Rodríguez Hidalgo, I.; Díaz Vilela, L. F.

493

THE POPULATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE CHANDRA-COSMOS SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present the high-redshift (3 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected in the Chandra Cosmic Evolution Survey. The sample comprises 81 X-ray-detected sources with available spectroscopic (31) and photometric (50) redshifts plus 20 sources with a formal z{sub phot} < 3 but with a broad photometric redshift probability distribution, such that z{sub phot} + 1{sigma} > 3. Eighty-one sources are selected in the 0.5-2 keV band, fourteen are selected in the 2-10 keV and six in the 0.5-10 keV bands. We sample the high-luminosity (log L{sub (2-10keV)} > 44.15 erg s{sup -1}) space density up to z {approx} 5 and a fainter luminosity range (43.5 erg s{sup -1} < log L{sub (2-10keV)} < 44.15 erg s{sup -1}) than previous studies, up to z = 3.5. We weighted the contribution to the number counts and the space density of the sources with photometric redshift by using their probability of being at z > 3. We find that the space density of high-luminosity AGNs declines exponentially at all the redshifts, confirming the trend observed for optically selected quasars. At lower luminosity, the measured space density is not conclusive, and a larger sample of faint sources is needed. Comparisons with optical luminosity functions and black hole formation models are presented together with prospects for future surveys.

Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Hao, H. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brusa, M. [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik Giessenbach strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Comastri, A.; Zamorani, G.; Gilli, R.; Mignoli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Salvato, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstrass 2, Garching D-85748 (Germany); Capak, P.; Kakazu, Y.; Masters, D. [California Institute of Technology, 1201 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fiore, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, Monteporzio-Catone (Roma) I-00040 (Italy); Ikeda, H. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kartaltepe, J. S. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Miyaji, T. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico-Ensenada, Km. 103 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, 22860 Ensenada (Mexico); Puccetti, S. [ASI Science Data Center, via Galileo Galilei, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Shankar, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Silverman, J. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Vignali, C. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

2011-11-10

494

Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to document risk factors for any injury and sports- and exercise-related injuries, including personal and occupational stress among active duty service members (SMs) in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. A total of 10,692 SMs completed the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members. The survey asked about demographics, personal stress and occupational stress, injuries from any cause, and participation in sports- and exercise- related activities in the past year. The survey used a complex sampling procedure to create a representative sample of SMs. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations of injury outcomes with potential risk factors. 49% of SMs sought medical care for an injury in the past year and 25% sustained a sports- and exercise-related activities injury. Odds of injury were higher for the Army and Marine Corps than for the Air Force or Navy. This survey showed that higher personal and occupational stress was associated with higher risks of injury. SMs who experienced higher levels of personal or occupational stress reported higher risks of injuries. The effects of stress reduction programs on injury risks should be evaluated in military and other young physically active populations. PMID:25373060

Bedno, Sheryl; Hauret, Keith; Loringer, Kelly; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Mallon, Timothy; Jones, Bruce

2014-11-01

495

Aviation and programmatic analyses; Volume 1, Task 1: Aviation data base development and application. [for NASA OAST programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method was developed for using the NASA aviation data base and computer programs in conjunction with the GE management analysis and projection service to perform simple and complex economic analysis for planning, forecasting, and evaluating OAST programs. Capabilities of the system are discussed along with procedures for making basic data tabulations, updates and entries. The system is applied in an agricultural aviation study in order to assess its value for actual utility in the OAST working environment.

1977-01-01

496

Current status of visibility sensors for aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a new increased range higher visibility was investigated. The visibility sensor that is currently is the Transmissometer. Current transmissometer technology provides only a factor of 10 dynamic range with a single base line. The FAA is preparing to install automated weather observing systems (AWOS) at many locations. These systems require visibilities up to approximately 5 miles. To use a transmissometer for this type of measurement, the base line must be about 1,000 feet; where alignment becomes very difficult to maintain. New technologies were developd for measuring visibility. Improved transmissometers, forward-scatter meters and back-scatter meters have become available. A current practical issue for visibility sensors is how to specify one that is good enough to meet the needs of aviation. The first question is what performance is required; how accurately must the sensor measure? Visibility sensors do not actually measure the visibility directly. The purpose of measuring the visibility is to predict what the pilot will see a considerable distance away from the sensor location. The atmosphere introduces considerable variation in the measurement and the basic sensor accuracy needed is difficult to define. The second question for high visibilities is what to use as the standard reference sensor. The third question pertains to the competitive procurement of visibility sensors, which is mandated at present. Two acceptance test procedures to be used to insure satisfactory sensor performance is examined.

Burnham, D. C.

1983-01-01

497

Fast Multivariate Search on Large Aviation Datasets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multivariate Time-Series (MTS) are ubiquitous, and are generated in areas as disparate as sensor recordings in aerospace systems, music and video streams, medical monitoring, and financial systems. Domain experts are often interested in searching for interesting multivariate patterns from these MTS databases which can contain up to several gigabytes of data. Surprisingly, research on MTS search is very limited. Most existing work only supports queries with the same length o