Sample records for aviation activity survey

  1. 78 FR 46594 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ...Review: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger...surveying travelers to measure customer satisfaction of aviation security in an...Title: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement...

  2. Performance of Civil Aviation Receivers during Maximum Solar Activity Events

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Performance of Civil Aviation Receivers during Maximum Solar Activity Events Lina DEAMBROGIO working on the application of satellite navigation techniques to civil aviation. He received his Ph services. Mikael MABILLEAU graduated from ENAC (French Civil Aviation School) in August 2006 and has

  3. Survey: Federal Aviation Administration National Communication Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The National Communication (NATCOM) Center (commonly known as the FAA Weather Message Switching Center), is a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) facility with responsibility for providing communication switching services to the National Weather Service (NWS), the FAA, commercial and private flight organizations under the auspices of the FAA, and DoD. Data handled by NATCOM include weather data, flight plans, and Notices to Airmen (NOTAMS) on both national and international networks. The communications and data management functions are handled through four computer-controlled communication networks designated as WMSC, AFTN, A-BDIS, and NASNET. The functions of these networks are discussed with emphasis on those networks that support the different elements of the NWS. The primary network of concern to NASA, the WMSC (Weather Message Switching Center) network, performs approximately 60 percent of its work for the NWS, 20 percent for the State Department, and 20 percent for the FAA. This document discusses the current and future systems capabilities and workload of NATCOM in terms of new roles.

  4. 75 FR 29567 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ...Review: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger...surveying travelers to measure customer satisfaction of aviation security in an...1652-0013; Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement...

  5. 75 FR 47311 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ...Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Infrastructure Fee Records Retention...necessary for TSA to help set the Aviation Security Infrastructure Fee (ASIF...Collection Requirement Title: Aviation Security Infrastructure Fee Records...

  6. 78 FR 4856 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ...Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Infrastructure Fee Records Retention...necessary for TSA to help set the Aviation Security Infrastructure Fee (ASIF...Collection Requirement Title: Aviation Security Infrastructure Fee Records...

  7. In Search of Membership Satisfaction: The University Aviation Association (UAA) Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Henry R.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of members of the University Aviation Association (235 responses) revealed concerns about equity, less than positive feelings about the organizational culture, and no clear sense of members' awareness of the fiscal health and visibility of the association. (JOW)

  8. A National Opinion Survey of Aviation Maintenance Training Regulations. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William B.; Ziegler, Charles F., Jr.

    A national survey examined the opinions of aircraft maintenance training school administrators and instructors concerning the suitability of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 147 (FAR 147) to regulate effectively today's training programs. Responding to the mail survey instrument were 163 persons representing 90 schools in 37 states. Included among…

  9. The National Aviation Operational Monitoring Service (NAOMS): A Documentation of the Development of a Survey Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Mary M.; Mauro, Robert; Statler, Irving C.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aviation Operational Monitoring Service (NAOMS) was a research project under NASA s Aviation Safety Program during the years from 2000 to 2005. The purpose of this project was to develop a methodology for gaining reliable information on changes over time in the rates-of-occurrence of safety-related events as a means of assessing the safety of the national airspace. The approach was a scientifically designed survey of the operators of the aviation system concerning their safety-related experiences. This report presents the results of the methodology developed and a demonstration of the NAOMS concept through a survey of nearly 20,000 randomly selected air-carrier pilots. Results give evidence that the NAOMS methodology can provide a statistically sound basis for evaluating trends of incidents that could compromise safety. The approach and results are summarized in the report and supporting documentation and complete analyses of results are presented in 14 appendices.

  10. Sample Survey Activity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity stresses the importance of writing clear, unbiased survey questions. It explores the types of bias present in surveys and ways to reduce these biases. In addition, the activity covers some basics of surveys, such as: population, sample, sampling frame, and sampling method. Prior to doing this activity, students should have a strong background in the vocabulary behind surveys. Otherwise, this is a worthwhile activity for any more advanced statistics classrooms.

  11. HEDGEROW SURVEY, GREAT CRESTED NEWT SURVEY, DORMOUSE SURVEY AND HORSESHOE BAT ACTIVITY SURVEYS AT UNIVERSITY OF

    E-print Network

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    HEDGEROW SURVEY, GREAT CRESTED NEWT SURVEY, DORMOUSE SURVEY AND HORSESHOE BAT ACTIVITY SURVEYS-UNIBAT-1624 HEDGEROW SURVEY, GREAT CRESTED NEWT SURVEY, DORMOUSE SURVEY AND HORSESHOE BAT ACTIVITY SURVEYS to undertake a hedgerow survey, a great crested newt survey, a dormouse survey and horseshoe bat activity

  12. Guidelines for Federal Aviation Administration Regional Aviation Education Coordinators and Aviation Education Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickler, Mervin K., Jr.

    This publication is designed to provide both policy guidance and examples of how to work with various constituencies in planning and carrying out appropriate Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation education activities. Information is provided on the history of aerospace/aviation education, FAA educational materials, aerospace/aviation

  13. Applying the Principle of Active Safety to Aviation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Kirk; V. Bukov; Weavers House

    The paper describes the Principle of Active System Safety applied to the reduction of operational risks by analysing data during in real time of flight to prevent accidents. Key elements of the aircraft, flight and piloting behaviour are modelled and considered as a set of interconnected elements with dependencies in terms of their impact on each other from the safety

  14. Systems analysis of the installation, mounting, and activation of emergency locator transmitters in general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    A development program was developed to design and improve the Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) transmitter and to improve the installation in the aircraft and its activation subsystem. There were 1135 general aviation fixed wing aircraft accident files reviewed. A detailed description of the damage to the aircraft was produced. The search aspects of these accidents were studied. As much information as possible about the ELT units in these cases was collected. The data should assist in establishing installation and mounting criteria, better design standards for activation subsystems, and requirements for the new ELT system design in the area of crashworthiness.

  15. Epidemiological Survey of Dyslipidemia in Civil Aviators in China from 2006 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rongfu; Xiao, Dan; Fan, Xiaoying; Ge, Zesong; Wang, Linsheng; Yan, Tiecheng; Wang, Jianzhi; Wei, Qixin; Zhao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aim. This study aimed to analyze blood lipid levels, temporal trend, and age distribution of dyslipidemia in civil aviators in China. Methods. The 305 Chinese aviators were selected randomly and followed up from 2006 to 2011. Their total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were evaluated annually. Mean values for each parameter by year were compared using a linear mixed-effects model. The temporal trend of borderline high, high, and low status for each index and of overall borderline high, hyperlipidemia, and dyslipidemia by year was tested using a generalized linear mixed model. Results. The aviators' TC (F = 4.33, P < 0.01), HDL-C (F = 23.25, P < 0.01), and LDL-C (F = 6.13, P < 0.01) values differed across years. The prevalence of dyslipidemia (F = 5.53, P < 0.01), borderline high (F = 6.52, P < 0.01), and hyperlipidemia (F = 3.90, P < 0.01) also differed across years. The prevalence rates for hyperlipidemia and dyslipidemia were the highest in the 41–50-year-old and 31–40-year-old groups. Conclusions. Civil aviators in China were in high dyslipidemia and borderline high level and presented with dyslipidemia younger than other Chinese populations. PMID:24693285

  16. Collegiate Aviation and the Community College: A Survey of Post-September 11 Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliss, Timm J.; Kutz, Mary N.

    2008-01-01

    Undoubtedly, the aviation industry has experienced turbulent times recently and may face significant restructuring in the next few years. Especially noteworthy has been the impact on collegiate flight programs, particularly those 2-year programs offered by community colleges that often bridge the gap in financial aid and flexible class schedules…

  17. Biofuels as an Alternative Energy Source for Aviation-A Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowellBomani, Bilal M.; Bulzan, Dan L.; Centeno-Gomez, Diana I.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    The use of biofuels has been gaining in popularity over the past few years because of their ability to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels. As a renewable energy source, biofuels can be a viable option for sustaining long-term energy needs if they are managed efficiently. We investigate past, present, and possible future biofuel alternatives currently being researched and applied around the world. More specifically, we investigate the use of ethanol, cellulosic ethanol, biodiesel (palm oil, algae, and halophytes), and synthetic fuel blends that can potentially be used as fuels for aviation and nonaerospace applications. We also investigate the processing of biomass via gasification, hydrolysis, and anaerobic digestion as a way to extract fuel oil from alternative biofuels sources.

  18. Error, stress, and teamwork in medicine and aviation: cross sectional surveys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Bryan Sexton; Eric J Thomas; Robert L Helmreich

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To survey operating theatre and intensive care unit staff about attitudes concerning error, stress, and teamwork and to compare these attitudes with those of airline cockpit crew. Design: Cross sectional surveys. Setting: Urban teaching and non›teaching hospitals in the United States, Israel, Germany, Switzerland, and Italy. Major airlines around the world. Participants: 1033 doctors, nurses, fellows, and residents working

  19. Small V/STOL aircraft analysis. Volume 2: Appendices. [to determine current and future general aviation missions and performance requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, K. R., Jr.; Belina, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of general aviation activities in the United States was principally conducted through interviews with users, manufacturers, trade associations, and government organizations. A list of the organizations interviews is presented. The data became the basis for defining the current and future general aviation missions and performance. The economic characteristics of general aviation are examined. The desires of each organization regarding future aircraft characteristics are summarized.

  20. Agricultural aviation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, H. L. (compiler); Bouse, L. F. (compiler)

    1977-01-01

    A compilation of papers, comments, and results is provided during a workshop session. The purpose of the workshop was to review and evaluate the current state of the art of agricultural aviation, to identify and rank potentially productive short and long range research and development areas, and to strengthen communications between research scientists and engineers involved in agricultural research. Approximately 71 individuals actively engaged in agricultural aviation research were invited to participate in the workshop. These were persons familiar with problems related to agricultural aviation and processing expertise which are of value for identifying and proposing beneficial research.

  1. An Active Flow Circulation Controlled Flap Concept for General Aviation Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Viken, Sally A.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Cagle, C. Mark

    2002-01-01

    A recent focus on revolutionary aerodynamic concepts has highlighted the technology needs of general aviation and personal aircraft. New and stringent restrictions on these types of aircraft have placed high demands on aerodynamic performance, noise, and environmental issues. Improved high lift performance of these aircraft can lead to slower takeoff and landing speeds that can be related to reduced noise and crash survivability issues. Circulation Control technologies have been around for 65 years, yet have been avoided due to trade offs of mass flow, pitching moment, perceived noise etc. The need to improve the circulation control technology for general aviation and personal air-vehicle applications is the focus of this paper. This report will describe the development of a 2-D General Aviation Circulation Control (GACC) wing concept that utilizes a pulsed pneumatic flap.

  2. Global thunderstorm activity research survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The published literature on the subject of the monitoring of global thunderstorm activity by instrumented satellites was reviewed. A survey of the properties of selected physical parameters of the thunderstorm is presented. The concepts used by satellites to identify and to measure terrestrial lightning pulses are described. The experimental data acquired by satellites are discussed. The scientific achievements of the satellites are evaluated against the needs of scientists and the potential requirements of user agencies. The performances of the satellites are rated according to their scientific and operational achievements.

  3. GOES Aviation Products Aviation Weather Forecasting

    E-print Network

    Kuligowski, Bob

    GOES Aviation Products Aviation Weather Forecasting With Satellites Ken Pryor NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research #12;GOES Aviation Products Overview · Images from geostationary satellites (GOES) can be applied to detect and forecast aviation weather hazards including: · Icing

  4. GOES Aviation Products GOES Aviation Products

    E-print Network

    Kuligowski, Bob

    GOES Aviation Products GOES Aviation Products: Progress and Recent Developments Ken Pryor NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research #12;GOES Aviation Products Overview · Develop and evaluate potential new range forecasting of aviation hazards including: · Volcanic ash clouds · Aircraft icing · Convective

  5. Presented to: Federal Aviation

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Presented to: By: Date: Federal Aviation Administration O'Hare Modernization Program and Chicago Aviation Administration 2 Briefing Agenda · Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Overview · Chicago/Chicago Department of Aviation (CDA) and the O'Hare Modernization Program (OMP) · Federal Aviation Administration

  6. Aviation System Performance Measures

    E-print Network

    Gosling, Geoffrey D.

    1999-01-01

    general aviation sector through airport improvements and pilot education programs.Program Percent of airfield pavement at general aviation airportsProgram Percent of airfield pavement at general aviation airports

  7. XMM Survey Science Center Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.; Kaluzienski, Lou (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Elvis attended an XMM Survey Science Center meeting in Santander, Spain. This is the final meeting supported by this grant. At the meeting plans were made for a novel XMM-SSC source identification program.

  8. 75 FR 11552 - Intent To Request Renewal From OMB of One Current Public Collection of Information: Aviation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ...Information: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger...surveying travelers to measure customer satisfaction of aviation security in an...1652-0013; Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement...

  9. 78 FR 32416 - Intent To Request Renewal From OMB of One Current Public Collection of Information: Aviation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ...Information: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger...surveying travelers to measure customer satisfaction of aviation security in an...1652-0013; Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement...

  10. The New Zealand Aviation Sector Skill Shortages and Training Needs

    E-print Network

    2 The New Zealand Aviation Sector Skill Shortages and Training Needs Summary of findingS Extracts from the report for Projects International as consultant to the Aviation, Tourism and Travel Training of interviews and a web-survey covering six aviation sub-sectors: Airports (Passenger Services); Airports

  11. COMMUNICATIONS-RELATED INCIDENTS IN GENERAL AVIATION DUAL FLIGHT TRAINING

    E-print Network

    COMMUNICATIONS-RELATED INCIDENTS IN GENERAL AVIATION DUAL FLIGHT TRAINING By Kamil Etem and Marcia Patten1 Aerobase Research, Inc. The Aviation Safety Reporting System, at NASA Ames Research Center BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION A recent survey of the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) database

  12. Comparison on general aviation industry statistics between China and the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shufen Sun

    2011-01-01

    It is important of fundamental statistical information to the development of general aviation industry. Statistics of U.S. general aviation industry have such information as activities of general aviation, aircraft, airports, pilots, security and so on. In contrast, China's general aviation industry is not developed, and statistical information is not perfect. Based on U.S. statistical experience in general aviation industry and

  13. Product Overview Skytraders is a company with over 30 years experience in providing tailored aviation

    E-print Network

    Schneider, Glenn

    with over 30 years experience in providing tailored aviation solutions to meet the needs of clients. Whilst providing the broadest range of aviation activity Civil Aviation Safety Authority. The pride of Skytraders' fleet is an Airbus

  14. Collegiate Aviation Review, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Thomas Q., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This issue contains seven papers. "University Aviation Education: An Integrated Model" (Merrill R. Karp) addresses potential educational enhancements through the implementation of an integrated aviation learning model, the Aviation Education Reinforcement Option. "The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA): A Tombstone Agency? Putting the Nickname…

  15. General Aviation Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Programs exploring and demonstrating new technologies in general aviation propulsion are considered. These programs are the quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan (QCGAT) program; the general aviation turbine engine (GATE) study program; the general aviation propeller technology program; and the advanced rotary, diesel, and reciprocating engine programs.

  16. The U.S. aviation system to the year 2000

    E-print Network

    Ausrotas, Raymond A.

    1982-01-01

    Introduction: 1.1 The Future of the Aviation System. It is nothing if not presumptuous to look ahead twenty years in any phase of human activity. This seems particularly true in civil aviation where the certificated airlines ...

  17. General aviation and community development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sincoff, M. Z. (editor); Dajani, J. S. (editor)

    1975-01-01

    The summer program is summarized. The reports presented concern (1) general aviation components, (2) general aviation environment, (3) community perspective, and (4) transportation and general aviation in Virginia.

  18. A volcanic activity alert-level system for aviation: review of its development and application in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2013-01-01

    An alert-level system for communicating volcano hazard information to the aviation industry was devised by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) during the 1989–1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano. The system uses a simple, color-coded ranking that focuses on volcanic ash emissions: Green—normal background; Yellow—signs of unrest; Orange—precursory unrest or minor ash eruption; Red—major ash eruption imminent or underway. The color code has been successfully applied on a regional scale in Alaska for a sustained period. During 2002–2011, elevated color codes were assigned by AVO to 13 volcanoes, eight of which erupted; for that decade, one or more Alaskan volcanoes were at Yellow on 67 % of days and at Orange or Red on 12 % of days. As evidence of its utility, the color code system is integrated into procedures of agencies responsible for air-traffic management and aviation meteorology in Alaska. Furthermore, it is endorsed as a key part of globally coordinated protocols established by the International Civil Aviation Organization to provide warnings of ash hazards to aviation worldwide. The color code and accompanying structured message (called a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation) comprise an effective early-warning message system according to the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. The aviation color code system currently is used in the United States, Russia, New Zealand, Iceland, and partially in the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. Although there are some barriers to implementation, with continued education and outreach to Volcano Observatories worldwide, greater use of the aviation color code system is achievable.

  19. Aviation News

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Whether you're a fan of Airbus or Boeing, Quantas or Aer Lingus, this website provides very thorough coverage of the airline industry. The Flight Global group's motto is "serious about aviation", and it shows on their homepage, where visitors can find over thirteen sections dedicated to air transport, helicopters, training, and spaceflight. The more casual user may just wish to click on a few of the "Latest News Headlines", but dedicated aeronautics devotees may wish to sign up for their e-newsletter and their RSS feed. Moving down the site's homepage, visitors can cruise on in to the "What's Hot" area and the "Jobs" section, which might be useful for future members of a flight crew or those looking to make a more dramatic career change. Of course, any visit to this site would be woefully incomplete if visitors didn't take a look at profiles of the Airbus 380, the Boeing 747, and many other planes in the "Dynamic Aircraft Profiles" area of the site.

  20. Interagency Aviation Training System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Developed under the direction of the Aviation Management Council, the Interagency Aviation Training System is designed to increase awareness of �agency policy, procedures, and safe practices� in aviation among agencies of the federal government. While designed for federal agency employees, this site has a wealth of free resources available that provide valuable information about the study and practice of aviation and its management for students, instructors, and enthusiasts. Of particular educational interest are the online education modules, which allow self-paced study of topics ranging from Aviation Safety to Crash Survival to an Overview of Aviation Safety & Accident Prevention Programs.

  1. Aviation & Space Curriculum Guide K-3. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide is designed for teachers of grades K-3 who have little or no experience in the area of aviation or space. The purpose of this guide is to provide an array of aviation and space activities which may be used by teachers to enrich locally-designed programs. Units in this book include: (1) History of Aerospace; (2) Kinds and Uses of…

  2. Differences in Safety Climate between Hospital Personnel and Naval Aviators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David M. Gaba; Sara J. Singer; Anna D. Sinaiko; Jennie D. Bowen; Anthony P. Ciavarelli

    2003-01-01

    We compared results of safety climate survey questions from health care respondents with those from naval aviation, a high-reliability organization. Separate surveys containing a subset of 23 similar questions were conducted among employees from 15 hospitals and from naval aviators from 226 squadrons. For each question a “problematic response” was defined that suggested an absence of a safety climate. Overall,

  3. General Aviation Pilots' Attitudes Toward Advanced Cockpit Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen M. Casner

    A previous study of general aviation pilots using advanced cockpit systems demonstrated a link between pilots' attitudes and beliefs about advanced systems and their behavior and performance in the cockpit (Casner, 2005). To understand these attitudes and beliefs, a survey was administered to 134 general aviation pilots. The survey explored topics such as pilots' general attitudes toward advanced cockpit systems,

  4. A survey of orphan enzyme activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yannick Pouliot; Peter D. Karp

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using computational database searches, we have demonstrated previously that no gene sequences could be found for at least 36% of enzyme activities that have been assigned an Enzyme Commission number. Here we present a follow-up literature-based survey involving a statistically significant sample of such \\

  5. Active Compliant Motion: A survey. Tine Lefebvre

    E-print Network

    Xiao, Jing

    Active Compliant Motion: A survey. Tine Lefebvre , Jing Xiao , Herman Bruyninckx , Gudrun De Gersem keywords: compliant motion, contact modeling, fine-motion planning, contact identification, force control integration of those components. 1 Introduction Compliant motion allows a robot or an object held by a robot

  6. Women and Minorities in Alaskan Aviation. Alaskan Equity Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordan, Mary Lou; Nicholson, Deborah

    This resource guide tells the story of Alaskan women and minority aviators and those in aviation-related businesses, from the early 20th century to the present. Developed for secondary students but also suitable for younger students, the guide combines six accounts of Alaskan women and minority aviators with classroom activities centered around…

  7. Federal Aviation Administration

    E-print Network

    of the Industrial Research Laboratory (Menlo Park, Bell Laboratories, Sarnoff Laboratory) Rich History of Aviation/7 engineering support Operational Tower/TRACON Non-FAA tenants... (more later) #12;18Federal Aviation

  8. Transfer Learning for Activity Recognition: A Survey.

    PubMed

    Cook, Diane; Feuz, Kyle D; Krishnan, Narayanan C

    2013-09-01

    Many intelligent systems that focus on the needs of a human require information about the activities being performed by the human. At the core of this capability is activity recognition, which is a challenging and well-researched problem. Activity recognition algorithms require substantial amounts of labeled training data yet need to perform well under very diverse circumstances. As a result, researchers have been designing methods to identify and utilize subtle connections between activity recognition datasets, or to perform transfer-based activity recognition. In this paper we survey the literature to highlight recent advances in transfer learning for activity recognition. We characterize existing approaches to transfer-based activity recognition by sensor modality, by differences between source and target environments, by data availability, and by type of information that is transferred. Finally, we present some grand challenges for the community to consider as this field is further developed. PMID:24039326

  9. Transfer Learning for Activity Recognition: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Diane; Feuz, Kyle D.; Krishnan, Narayanan C.

    2013-01-01

    Many intelligent systems that focus on the needs of a human require information about the activities being performed by the human. At the core of this capability is activity recognition, which is a challenging and well-researched problem. Activity recognition algorithms require substantial amounts of labeled training data yet need to perform well under very diverse circumstances. As a result, researchers have been designing methods to identify and utilize subtle connections between activity recognition datasets, or to perform transfer-based activity recognition. In this paper we survey the literature to highlight recent advances in transfer learning for activity recognition. We characterize existing approaches to transfer-based activity recognition by sensor modality, by differences between source and target environments, by data availability, and by type of information that is transferred. Finally, we present some grand challenges for the community to consider as this field is further developed. PMID:24039326

  10. Presented to: Federal Aviation

    E-print Network

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Presented to: By: Date: Federal Aviation Administration O'Hare Modernization Program and Chicago, Chicago Modernization Program April 4, 2014 #12;OMP/CAP Overview April 4, 2014 Federal Aviation Administration 2 Briefing Agenda · Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Overview · Chicago/Chicago Department

  11. General aviation IFR operational problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolz, E. H.; Eisele, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Operational problems of general aviation IFR operators (particularly single pilot operators) were studied. Several statistical bases were assembled and utilized to identify the more serious problems and to demonstrate their magnitude. These bases include official activity projections, historical accident data and delay data, among others. The GA operating environment and cockpit environment were analyzed in detail. Solutions proposed for each of the problem areas identified are based on direct consideration of currently planned enhancements to the ATC system, and on a realistic assessment of the present and future limitations of general aviation avionics. A coordinated set of research program is suggested which would provide the developments necessary to implement the proposed solutions.

  12. NASA aviation safety reporting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.; Lauber, J. K.; Funkhouser, H.; Lyman, E. G.; Huff, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    The origins and development of the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) are briefly reviewed. The results of the first quarter's activity are summarized and discussed. Examples are given of bulletins describing potential air safety hazards, and the disposition of these bulletins. During the first quarter of operation, the ASRS received 1464 reports; 1407 provided data relevant to air safety. All reports are being processed for entry into the ASRS data base. During the reporting period, 130 alert bulletins describing possible problems in the aviation system were generated and disseminated. Responses were received from FAA and others regarding 108 of the alert bulletins. Action was being taken with respect to 70 of the 108 responses received. Further studies are planned of a number of areas, including human factors problems related to automation of the ground and airborne portions of the national aviation system.

  13. Modelling Environmental & Economic Impacts of Aviation: Introducing the Aviation Integrated Modelling Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom G. Reynolds; Steven Barrett; Lynnette M. Dray; Antony D. Evans; Marcus O. Köhler; María Vera Morales; Andreas Schäfer; Zia Wadud; Rex Britter; Henry Hallam; Richard Hunsley

    2007-01-01

    The Aviation Integrated Modelling project is developing a policy assessment capability to enable comprehensive analyses of aviation, environment and economic interactions at local and global levels. It contains a set of inter-linked modules of the key elements relevant to this goal. These include models for aircraft\\/engine technologies, air transport demand, airport activity and airspace operations, all coupled to global climate,

  14. Naval Aviation Maintenance Office Information Strategy Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, P.J.; Busbee, M.E.; Miller, L.M.; Wills, J.W.; Woods, S.D.

    1990-06-01

    Data Systems Engineering Organization (DSEO) personnel, together with members of Naval Aviation Maintenance Office (NAMO), developed an Information Strategy Plan (ISP) using a combination of Information Engineering (IE) methodologies. The purpose of the ISP was to comprehensively and objectively analyze the information requirements of NAMO. The ISP activities began with structures interviews of the NAMO top level management to identify the information needs and functions crucial to the NAMO organization. Joint Applications Design (JAD) sessions were held with functional experts to further enhance what was learned during the interview cycle. The information gathered through interviews, JAD sessions, and survey of the current systems was used to develop the Strategic Plan and the deliverables of an ISP: the Information Architecture, Business Systems Architecture, and Technical Architecture. These architectures are detailed, along with the major findings, recommendations, strategies, and plans for implementing further stages of IE. 72 figs.

  15. Aviation system capacity improvements through technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. Don

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted with the primary objective of determining the impact of technology on capacity improvements in the U.S. air transportation system and, consequently, to assess the areas where NASA's expertise and technical contributions would be the most beneficial. The outlook of the study is considered both near- and long-term (5 to 25 years). The approach was that of actively working with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Flight Transportation Laboratory and included interactions with 'users' outside of both agencies as well as with organizations within. This report includes an overall survey of what are believed to be the causes of the capacity problems, ongoing work with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to alleviate the problems, and identifies improvements in technology that would increase capacity and reduce delays.

  16. ENVIRONMENT AVIATION, ENERGY

    E-print Network

    Peraire, Jaime

    of Transportation and the NASA Administrator, PARTNER drafted the Report to the U.S. Congress on Aviation TRANSPORT ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT AND CEO, CONGRESSIONAL TESTIMONY, 200712 Aviation, environment, and energy and Emissions Reduction (PARTNER), the FAA/NASA/Transport Canada Center of Excellence with 12 universities, 50

  17. Aviation Instructor's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This handbook is designed for ground instructors, flight instructors, and aviation maintenance instructors, providing beginning instructors the foundation to understand and apply fundamentals of instruction. The handbook also provides aviation instructors with up-to-date information on learning and teaching, and how to relate this information to…

  18. FAA (federal Aviation Administration) aviation forecasts - fiscal years 1983-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    This report contains the Fiscal Years 1983-1994 Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) forecasts of aviation activity at FAA facilities. These include airports with FAA control towers, air route traffic control centers, and flight service stations. Detailed forecasts were made for the four major users of the national aviation system: air carriers, air taxi/commuters, general aviation and the military. The forecasts have been prepared to meet the budget and planning needs of the constituent units of the FAA and to provide information that can be used by state and local authorities, by the aviation industry and the general public. The overall outlook for the forecast period is for moderate economic growth, relatively stable real fuel prices, and decreasing inflation. Based upon these assumptions, aviation activity is forecast to increase by Fiscal Year 1994 by 97 percent at towered airports, 50 percent at air route traffic control centers, and 54 percent in flight services performed. Hours flown by general aviation is forecast to increase 56 percent and helicopter hours flown 80 percent. Scheduled domestic revenue passenger miles (RPM's) are forecast to increase 81 percent, with scheduled international RPM's forecast to increase by 80 percent and commuter RPM's forecast to increase by 220 percent.

  19. Initial Cognitive Performance Predicts Longitudinal Aviator Performance

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Booil; Adamson, Maheen M.; Kennedy, Quinn; Noda, Art; Hernandez, Beatriz; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Friedman, Leah F.; Fairchild, Kaci; Scanlon, Blake K.; Murphy, Greer M.; Taylor, Joy L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. The goal of the study was to improve prediction of longitudinal flight simulator performance by studying cognitive factors that may moderate the influence of chronological age. Method. We examined age-related change in aviation performance in aircraft pilots in relation to baseline cognitive ability measures and aviation expertise. Participants were aircraft pilots (N = 276) aged 40–77.9. Flight simulator performance and cognition were tested yearly; there were an average of 4.3 (± 2.7; range 1–13) data points per participant. Each participant was classified into one of the three levels of aviation expertise based on Federal Aviation Administration pilot proficiency ratings: least, moderate, or high expertise. Results. Addition of measures of cognitive processing speed and executive function to a model of age-related change in aviation performance significantly improved the model. Processing speed and executive function performance interacted such that the slowest rate of decline in flight simulator performance was found in aviators with the highest scores on tests of these abilities. Expertise was beneficial to pilots across the age range studied; however, expertise did not show evidence of reducing the effect of age. Discussion. These data suggest that longitudinal performance on an important real-world activity can be predicted by initial assessment of relevant cognitive abilities. PMID:21586627

  20. Aviation in the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayten, Gerald G.

    1974-01-01

    Makes predications concerning future aerospace technology in the areas of supersonic transportation, aircraft design, airfreight, military aviation, hypersonic aircraft and in the much distant future sub-orbital, rocket propelled transports. (BR)

  1. 32 CFR 766.6 - Approving authority for landings at Navy/Marine Corps aviation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Pacific Fleet; Chief of Naval Air Training; Commander...aircraft use of any active aviation facility under their... (c) The Chief of Naval Operations may approve...Application for use of naval aviation facilities when...

  2. 32 CFR 766.6 - Approving authority for landings at Navy/Marine Corps aviation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Pacific Fleet; Chief of Naval Air Training; Commander...aircraft use of any active aviation facility under their... (c) The Chief of Naval Operations may approve...Application for use of naval aviation facilities when...

  3. 32 CFR 766.6 - Approving authority for landings at Navy/Marine Corps aviation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Pacific Fleet; Chief of Naval Air Training; Commander...aircraft use of any active aviation facility under their... (c) The Chief of Naval Operations may approve...Application for use of naval aviation facilities when...

  4. 32 CFR 766.6 - Approving authority for landings at Navy/Marine Corps aviation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Pacific Fleet; Chief of Naval Air Training; Commander...aircraft use of any active aviation facility under their... (c) The Chief of Naval Operations may approve...Application for use of naval aviation facilities when...

  5. 32 CFR 766.6 - Approving authority for landings at Navy/Marine Corps aviation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Pacific Fleet; Chief of Naval Air Training; Commander...aircraft use of any active aviation facility under their... (c) The Chief of Naval Operations may approve...Application for use of naval aviation facilities when...

  6. Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Hudgins, C. H.; Plant, J. V.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.; Howard, R.; Corporan, E.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Timko, M.; Woods, E.; Dodds, W.; Lee, B.; Santoni, G.; Whitefield, P.; Hagen, D.; Lobo, P.; Knighton, W. B.; Bulzan, D.; Tacina, K.; Wey, C.; VanderWal, R.; Bhargava, A.

    2011-01-01

    The rising cost of oil coupled with the need to reduce pollution and dependence on foreign suppliers has spurred great interest and activity in developing alternative aviation fuels. Although a variety of fuels have been produced that have similar properties to standard Jet A, detailed studies are required to ascertain the exact impacts of the fuels on engine operation and exhaust composition. In response to this need, NASA acquired and burned a variety of alternative aviation fuel mixtures in the Dryden Flight Research Center DC-8 to assess changes in the aircraft s CFM-56 engine performance and emission parameters relative to operation with standard JP-8. This Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment, or AAFEX, was conducted at NASA Dryden s Aircraft Operations Facility (DAOF) in Palmdale, California, from January 19 to February 3, 2009 and specifically sought to establish fuel matrix effects on: 1) engine and exhaust gas temperatures and compressor speeds; 2) engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) gas phase and particle emissions and characteristics; and 3) volatile aerosol formation in aging exhaust plumes

  7. The Potential of Turboprops to Reduce Aviation Fuel Consumption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Megan Smirti; Mark Hansen

    2009-01-01

    Aviation system planning, particularly fleet selection and adoption, is challenged by fuel price uncertainty. Fuel price uncertainty is due fuel and energy price fluctuations and a growing awareness of the environmental externalities related to transportation activities, particularly as they relate to climate change. To assist in aviation systems planning under such fuel price uncertainty and environmental regulation, this study takes

  8. 76 FR 39884 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Aviation Security Advisory Committee AGENCY...the re-establishment of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...the commerce of aviation. The Aviation Security Advisory Committee The...

  9. The actual development of European Aviation Safety Requirements in Aviation Medicine: Prospects of Future EASA Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Siedenburg, J

    2009-01-01

    Common Rules for Aviation Safety had been developed under the aegis of the Joint Aviation Authorities in the 1990ies. In 2002 the Basic Regulation 1592/2002 was the founding document of a new entity, the European Aviation Safety Agency. Areas of activity were Certification and Maintenance of aircraft. On 18 March the new Basic Regulation 216/2008, repealing the original Basic Regulation was published and applicable from 08 April on. The included Essential Requirements extended the competencies of EASA inter alia to Pilot Licensing and Flight Operations. The future aeromedical requirements will be included as Annex II in another Implementing Regulation on Personnel Licensing. The detailed provisions will be published as guidance material. The proposals for these provisions have been published on 05 June 2008 as NPA 2008- 17c. After public consultation, processing of comments and final adoption the new proposals may be applicable form the second half of 2009 on. A transition period of four year will apply. Whereas the provisions are based on Joint Awiation Requirement - Flight Crew Licensing (JAR-FCL) 3, a new Light Aircraft Pilot Licence (LAPL) project and the details of the associated medical certification regarding general practitioners will be something new in aviation medicine. This paper consists of 6 sections. The introduction outlines the idea of international aviation safety. The second section describes the development of the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA), the first step to common rules for aviation safety in Europe. The third section encompasses a major change as next step: the foundation of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the development of its rules. In the following section provides an outline of the new medical requirements. Section five emphasizes the new concept of a Leisure Pilot Licence. The last section gives an outlook on ongoing rulemaking activities and the opportunities of the public to participate in them. PMID:19561781

  10. Federal Aviation Administration Curriculum Guide for Aviation Magnet Schools Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickler, Mervin K., Jr.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and its predecessor organizations, Civil Aeronautics Agency (CAA) and the Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) have pioneered the use of aviation education in working with schools and colleges of the nation to attain their objectives. This publication includes: a brief history of the role of aviation in…

  11. National Naval Aviation Museum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Based at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, the National Naval Aviation Museum has a collection which contains over 4000 artifacts representing Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard aviation. The materials on their website are divided into five sections, including "Exhibits & Collections" and "Education". Most visitors will want to start by browsing the "Exhibits & Collections" area, which features an alphabetical listing of their aircraft collection and links to their fine online exhibits. One exhibit that's definitely worth a close look is the "Presidents and Naval Aviation" feature. The homepage also features a place where visitors can sign up to receive electronic news updates and an area with basic information about making a personal visit to the museum.

  12. Terrestrial mobile networks for Air-to-Ground communications of the General Aviation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chao Zhang

    2011-01-01

    General Aviation (GA) is destined to be an active area compared with airline scheduled civil aviation. The figures with much more aircrafts, pilots and private airports than airline aviation can be statistically obtained in a lot of countries, such as USA, UK. etc. In China, from 2011, the restriction of low attitude airspace is broken and there is a gigantic

  13. Novel near-ground navigation for General Aviation with terrestrial mobile networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chao Zhang; Keke Pang

    2011-01-01

    General Aviation (GA) is really an active area compared with airline scheduled civil aviation. The figures with much more aircrafts, pilots and private airports than airline aviation can be statistically obtained in a lot of countries, such as US, UK etc. In China, from 2011, the restriction of low level space is broken and there is a gigantic plan for

  14. Aviation Opens Antarctica

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The history of aviation and the history of Antarctic exploration and science are inextricably entwined. In 1929, naval aviation pioneer Richard E. Byrd, became the first person to fly over the South Pole, dropping a flag to mark his achievement and breaking the isolation of the skies over the Pole for the first time since the age of the dinosaurs. Today, more than 100 such flights annually cross the 900 miles between McMurdo Station (NSF's logistics hub in Antarctica) and the South Pole.

  15. Aviation Maintenance Alerts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The FAA has published monthly aviation maintenance alerts online for the past 10 years. This site is of particular interests for those studying or teaching aviation maintenance, as it will provide users with up to date maintenance alerts. The alerts contain critical reports that regard manufacturing defects or design flaws, along with any known solutions to the issues. In addition to alerts, visitors can find out how to report safety issues, as well as obtain information on aircraft safety programs funded by the FAA.

  16. Aviation--An Individualized Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeds, Fred F.

    1974-01-01

    Describes an individualized aviation course for high school seniors. The course, broken down into Learner Education Guides with students progressing at their own learning rates, consists of the history of aviation, career opportunities, the space program, basic aeronautics, navigation, meteorology, Federal Aviation Administration regulations and…

  17. aviation services 8 sept 2010

    E-print Network

    Haak, Hein

    KNMI and aviation services EASA 8 sept 2010 Geert Groen groen@knmi.nl #12;06 September 2010 KNMI2 Outline 1.KNMI and aviation services (in operational and research services) 2.Research program Knowledge for Climate for aviation (called Hotspot Schiphol) 3.Thunderstorm related issues regarding operations

  18. Aviation Education Services and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Office of General Aviation.

    A list of sources of information and material relating to aviation education is presented in this pamphlet issued in May, 1972. Following a brief description of the mission of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), reference materials mostly appropriate for school use are incorporated under the headings: Aviation Education Workshops, Careers…

  19. A survey of Chinese herbal ingredients with liver protection activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rubin Wang; John Kong; Dali Wang; Lin-min Linda Lien; Eric Jung-chi Lien

    2007-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted on herbs, their preparations and ingredients with reported liver protection activities, in which a total of 274 different species and hundreds of active ingredients have been examined. These ingredients can be roughly classified into two categories according to their activities: (1) the main ingredients, such as silybin, osthole, coumarin, glycyrrhizin, saikosaponin A, schisandrin A, flavonoids;

  20. Politics of aviation fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivent, Jacques

    1922-01-01

    In short, the "politics of aviation" lies in a few propositions: the need of having as large a number of fields as possible and of sufficient area; the utilization of the larger part of the existing military fields; the selection of uncultivated or unproductive fields, whenever technical conditions permit; ability to disregard (save in exceptional cases) objections of an agricultural nature.

  1. Collegiate Aviation Review, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Thomas Q., Ed.; Luedtke, Jacqueline R., Ed.; Johnson, Jeffrey A., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document, published annually, contains six papers devoted to aviation education. "Enhancing Global Competitiveness: Benchmarking Airline Operational Performance in Highly Regulated Environments" (Brent D. Bowen, Dean Headley, Karisa D. Kane, Rebecca K. Lutte) outlines a model to help policymakers and others evaluate the effects of airline…

  2. PNNL Aviation Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Plaza, John; Holladay, John; Hallen, Rich

    2014-10-23

    Commercial airplanes really don’t have the option to move away from liquid fuels. Because of this, biofuels present an opportunity to create new clean energy jobs by developing technologies that deliver stable, long term fuel options. The Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is working with industrial partners on processes to convert biomass to aviation fuels.

  3. Naval Aviation Maintenance Office Information Strategy Plan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. Halsey; M. E. Busbee; L. M. Miller; J. W. Wills; S. D. Woods

    1990-01-01

    Data Systems Engineering Organization (DSEO) personnel, together with members of Naval Aviation Maintenance Office (NAMO), developed an Information Strategy Plan (ISP) using a combination of Information Engineering (IE) methodologies. The purpose of the ISP was to comprehensively and objectively analyze the information requirements of NAMO. The ISP activities began with structures interviews of the NAMO top level management to identify

  4. US Geological Survey activities, fiscal year 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Activities in Alaska, Mount St. Helens, leasing and regulatory procedure, coal, royalty management, water data telemetry, acid rain, hazardous wastes, oil and gas resources, and digital cartography are reviewed. Chemical and nuclear wastes and petroleum exploration in Alaska are discussed. Management issues are addressed. Mapping activities are reported. Water resources, conservation, and earth sciences, are also reviewed.

  5. Machine Recognition of Human Activities: A Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pavan K. Turaga; Rama Chellappa; V. S. Subrahmanian; Octavian Udrea

    2008-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a rapid proliferation of video cameras in all walks of life and has resulted in a tremendous explosion of video content. Several applications such as content-based video annotation and retrieval, highlight extraction and video summarization require recognition of the activities occurring in the video. The analysis of human activities in videos is an area with

  6. Bias in Student Survey Findings from Active Parental Consent Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Thérèse; Cross, Donna; Thomas, Laura T.; Zubrick, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, researchers are required to obtain active (explicit) parental consent prior to surveying children and adolescents in schools. This study assessed the potential bias present in a sample of actively consented students, and in the estimates of associations between variables obtained from this sample. Students (n = 3496) from 36…

  7. Surveys show support for green 'activities'.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    Two independently conducted surveys on sustainability - one into the 'views and values' of NHS 'leaders', and the other questioning the public about the importance of the 'green agenda' in the NHS, and their opinions on how the service might most effectively reduce its carbon footprint, form the basis of Sustainability in the NHS: Health Check 2012, a new NHS Sustainable Development Unit (NHS SDU) publication. As HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie reports, the new document also presents updated data on the 'size' of the carbon footprint of the NHS in England, showing that, although good work by a number of Trusts in the past two years has seen healthcare-generated carbon emissions start to 'level off', the biggest contributors have been the current health service spending review, and the increased national availability of renewable energy. PMID:22515017

  8. Aviation Particle Emissions Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chowen C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The Aviation Particle Emissions Workshop was held on November 18 19, 2003, in Cleveland, Ohio. It was sponsored by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) under the Vehicle Systems Program (VSP) and the Ultra- Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project. The objectives were to build a sound foundation for a comprehensive particulate research roadmap and to provide a forum for discussion among U.S. stakeholders and researchers. Presentations included perspectives from the Federal Aviation Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NASA, and United States airports. There were five interactive technical sessions: sampling methodology, measurement methodology, particle modeling, database, inventory and test venue, and air quality. Each group presented technical issues which generated excellent discussion. The five session leads collaborated with their members to present summaries and conclusions to each content area.

  9. A survey of active network research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Tennenhouse; Jonathan M. Smith; W. David Sincoskie; D. J. Wetherall; G. J. Minden

    1997-01-01

    Abstract: Active networks are a novel approach to network architecture in which the switches of thenetwork perform customized computations on the messages flowing through them. Thisarchitecture is motivated by both lead applications which perform user-driven computationat nodes within the network today, and the emergence of mobile code and othertechnologies that make the goal of network service innovation attainable. In this

  10. Factors affecting career retention among naval aviators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald D. Gibb; Daniel L. Dolgin

    1988-01-01

    Typically, retention studies have emphasized those who separate rather than those who choose a naval career. The present study examined factors that contribute to career satisfaction and aviators' decisions to remain in naval aviation. Primary reasons for remaining in naval aviation were the enjoyment of flying, coupled with the self-esteem associated with being a naval aviator. Career satisfaction for aviators

  11. AWE: aviation weather data visualization environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lilly Spirkovska; Suresh K. Lodha

    2002-01-01

    Weather is one of the major causes of aviation accidents. General aviation (GA) flights account for 92% of all the aviation accidents. In spite of all the official and unofficial sources of weather visualization tools available to pilots, there is an urgent need for visual- izing several weather related data tailored for general aviation pilots. Our system, Aviation Weather Data

  12. A survey of active network research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Tennenhouse; J. M. Smith; W. D. Sincoskie; D. J. Wetherall; G. J. Minden

    1995-01-01

    Abstract Active networksare a novel approach to network,architecture in which the switches of the network,perform customized computations,on the,messages,flowing through them. This approach is motivated by both lead user applications, which perform user-driven computation at nodes within the network today, and the emergence of mobile code technologies that make dynamic network service innovation attainable. In this paper, we discuss two approaches

  13. NASA aviation safety reporting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    During the second quarter of the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) operation, 1,497 reports were received from pilots, controllers, and others in the national aviation system. Details of the administration and results of the program to date are presented. Examples of alert bulletins disseminated to the aviation community are presented together with responses to those bulletins. Several reports received by ASRS are also presented to illustrate the diversity of topics covered by reports to the system.

  14. General aviation avionics equipment maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, C. D.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Maintenance of general aviation avionics equipment was investigated with emphasis on single engine and light twin engine general aviation aircraft. Factors considered include the regulatory agencies, avionics manufacturers, avionics repair stations, the statistical character of the general aviation community, and owners and operators. The maintenance, environment, and performance, repair costs, and reliability of avionics were defined. It is concluded that a significant economic stratification is reflected in the maintenance problems encountered, that careful attention to installations and use practices can have a very positive impact on maintenance problems, and that new technologies and a general growth in general aviation will impact maintenance.

  15. General Aviation Task Force report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    General aviation is officially defined as all aviation except scheduled airlines and the military. It is the only air transportation to many communities throughout the world. In order to reverse the recent decline in general aviation aircraft produced in the United States, the Task Force recommends that NASA provide the expertise and facilities such as wind tunnels and computer codes for aircraft design. General aviation manufacturers are receptive to NASA's innovations and technological leadership and are expected to be effective users of NASA-generated technologies.

  16. Suggestions for Popularizing Civil Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    The public generally is taking very little interest in the progress of Civil Aviation, and the time has come to educate the public in aeronautics and to make them realize the far-reaching importance of air transport. Briefly, the whole problem resolves itself into discovering and applying means for bringing some of the many aspects and effects of civil aviation into the everyday lives of the public. The report suggests three principal groups of methods: (1) Bring aviation into daily contact with the public. (2) Bring the public into daily contact with aviation. (3) General publicity.

  17. Crosswind Landings in General Aviation: A Modified Method of Reporting Wing Information to the Pilot

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matt Ebbatson; Don Harris; Steve Jarvis

    2007-01-01

    Crosswind conditions are a contributory factor in many general aviation landing incidents and accidents. In an online survey, it was observed that 98% of respondents either failed to or could not accurately calculate the runway crosswind component from air traffic control (ATC) reports passed using the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standard phraseology; the majority of pilots also severely underestimated

  18. 1975 Status Report on Aviation and Space Related High School Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Reports results of a survey conducted on secondary school aviation courses and includes information on the aeronautical background of teacher and administrators, types of courses, field trips, student orientation flights and the major problems confronting schools operating an aviation education program. (BR)

  19. General-aviation's view of progress in the aviation weather system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Douglas J.

    1988-01-01

    For all its activity statistics, general-aviation is the most vulnerable to hazardous weather. Of concern to the general aviation industry are: (1) the slow pace of getting units of the Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS) to the field; (2) the efforts of the National Weather Service to withdraw from both the observation and dissemination roles of the aviation weather system; (3) the need for more observation points to improve the accuracy of terminal and area forecasts; (4) the need for improvements in all area forecasts, terminal forecasts, and winds aloft forecasts; (5) slow progress in cockpit weather displays; (6) the erosion of transcribed weather broadcasts (TWEB) and other deficiencies in weather information dissemination; (7) the need to push to make the Direct User Access Terminal (DUAT) a reality; and (7) the need to improve severe weather (thunderstorm) warning systems.

  20. Agent Architecture for Aviation Data Integration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao; Windrem, May; Patel, Hemil; Wei, Mei

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed agent-based architecture of the Aviation Data Integration System (ADIS). ADIS is a software system that provides integrated heterogeneous data to support aviation problem-solving activities. Examples of aviation problem-solving activities include engineering troubleshooting, incident and accident investigation, routine flight operations monitoring, safety assessment, maintenance procedure debugging, and training assessment. A wide variety of information is typically referenced when engaging in these activities. Some of this information includes flight recorder data, Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) reports, Jeppesen charts, weather data, air traffic control information, safety reports, and runway visual range data. Such wide-ranging information cannot be found in any single unified information source. Therefore, this information must be actively collected, assembled, and presented in a manner that supports the users problem-solving activities. This information integration task is non-trivial and presents a variety of technical challenges. ADIS has been developed to do this task and it permits integration of weather, RVR, radar data, and Jeppesen charts with flight data. ADIS has been implemented and used by several airlines FOQA teams. The initial feedback from airlines is that such a system is very useful in FOQA analysis. Based on the feedback from the initial deployment, we are developing a new version of the system that would make further progress in achieving following goals of our project.

  1. Survey of City/County Drug Abuse Activities 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drug Abuse Council, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This monograph is the second of a two-part report delineating state and local government activities and programs in the area of drug abuse. Presented here are the efforts of cities and counties to control drug abuse, accompanied by comparisons with state actions where appropriate. A survey instrument was developed by the Drug Abuse Council, Inc.…

  2. Alternative aviation turbine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1977-01-01

    The efficient utilization of fossil fuels by future jet aircraft may necessitate the broadening of current aviation turbine fuel specifications. The most significant changes in specifications would be an increased aromatics content and a higher final boiling point in order to minimize refinery energy consumption and costs. These changes would increase the freezing point and might lower the thermal stability of the fuel and could cause increased pollutant emissions, increased smoke and carbon formation, increased combustor liner temperatures, and poorer ignition characteristics. This paper discusses the effects that broadened specification fuels may have on present-day jet aircraft and engine components and the technology required to use fuels with broadened specifications.

  3. General aviation technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.

    1975-01-01

    The existing problem areas in general aviation were investigated in order to identify those which can benefit from technological payoffs. The emphasis was placed on acceptance by the pilot/passenger in areas such as performance, safety, handling qualities, ride quality, etc. Inputs were obtained from three sectors: industry; government; and user, although slanted toward the user group. The results should only be considered preliminary due to the small sample sizes of the data. Trends are evident however and a general methodology for allocating effort in future programs is proposed.

  4. Aviation Safety Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Scott; Yackovetsky, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Simulation Model is a software tool that enables users to configure a terrain, a flight path, and an aircraft and simulate the aircraft's flight along the path. The simulation monitors the aircraft's proximity to terrain obstructions, and reports when the aircraft violates accepted minimum distances from an obstruction. This model design facilitates future enhancements to address other flight safety issues, particularly air and runway traffic scenarios. This report shows the user how to build a simulation scenario and run it. It also explains the model's output.

  5. 77 FR 20887 - Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ...National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...information needed to measure customer satisfaction with delivered products and services...National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey, VA Form...

  6. The Outlook for European Aviation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sean Barrett

    1996-01-01

    In postwar Europe aviation markets were controlled by bilateral agreements which confined the market to one airline per country. The airlines charged the same fares and divided the markets. Economists from Adam Smith to William Baumol recommend that governments should not ban new entrants or otherwise prevent competition and the examination of the current state of European aviation in this

  7. Federal aviation administration and ada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff O'Leary

    2007-01-01

    The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) depends upon large, complex and highly available software systems to manage the vast commercial and civil aviation network and to carry out the agency's mission of ensuring high capacity, efficient and extremely safe air travel for the flying public. The FAA's Tower domain provides air traffic control services in the airport environment. There are

  8. Overcoming Stereotypes: Women in Aviation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Beth; Lea, Luanne

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes how certain traits became associated with women in aviation. Uses media of popular culture to compare prevailing cultural misconceptions to the reality of research studies and personal experiences. Offers four recommendations to dispel myths and to encourage more women to participate in rewarding nontraditional careers in aviation. (NB)

  9. Some Aviation Growth Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2002-01-01

    The growth of aviation since the first flight of a heavier-than-air powered manned vehicle in 1903 has been somewhat remarkable. Some of the events that have influenced this growth are reviewed in this paper. This review will include some events prior to World War I; the influence of the war itself; the events during the post-war years including the establishment of aeronautical research laboratories; and the influence of World War II which, among other things, introduced new technologies that included rocket and jet propulsion and supersonic aerodynamics. The subsequent era of aeronautical research and the attendant growth in aviation over the past half century will be reviewed from the view point of the author who, since 1944, has been involved in the NACA/NASA aeronautical research effort at what is now the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The review will discuss some of the research programs related to the development of some experimental aircraft, the Century series of fighter aircraft, multi-mission aircraft, advanced military aircraft and missiles, advanced civil aircraft, supersonic transports, spacecraft and others.

  10. [Heliogeophysical factors and aviation accidents].

    PubMed

    Komarov, F I; Oraevski?, V N; Sizov, Iu P; Tsirul'nik, L B; Kanonidi, Kh D; Ushakov, I B; Shalimov, P M; Kimlyk, M V; Glukhov, D V

    1998-01-01

    It was shown by two independent methods that there is a certain correlation between the number of aviation accidents and heliogeophysical factors. The statistical and spectral analyses of time series of heliogeomagnetic factors and the number of aviation accidents in 1989-1995 showed that, of 216 accidents, 58% are related to sudden geomagnetic storms. A similar relation was revealed for aviation catastrophes (64% out of 86 accidents) and emergencies (54% out of 130 accidents) that coincided in time with heliogeomagnetic storms. General periodicities of the series were revealed by the method of spectral analysis, namely, cycles of 30, 42, 46, 64, 74, 83, 99, 115, 143, 169, 339 days, which confirms the causative relation between the number of aviation accidents and heliogeomagnetic factors. It is assumed that some aviation accidents that coincided in time with geomagnetic storms, are due to changes in professional abilities of pilots that were in the zone of storms. PMID:9783079

  11. 76 FR 28801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Automated Commercial Environment Trade Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ...Collection Activities: Automated Commercial Environment Trade Survey AGENCY: U.S. Customs...Reduction Act: Automated Commercial Environment Trade Survey. This document is published...information. Title: Automated Commercial Environment Trade Survey. OMB Number: Will...

  12. 77 FR 74471 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ...Activities; Comment Request; State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015 AGENCY: Department...records. Title of Collection: State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015. OMB Control Number...2015 the annual, web-based State of Preschool survey, which centralizes data...

  13. 78 FR 4983 - Proposed Information Collection; Women Veterans Healthcare Barriers Survey Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ...Collection; Women Veterans Healthcare Barriers Survey Activity...2900-NEW, Women Veterans Healthcare Barriers Survey'' in any...other forms of information technology. Title: Women Veterans Healthcare Barriers Survey . OMB...

  14. Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors of Middle School Youth: The Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Bryant, Carol A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Hefelfinger, Jennie A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Obesity has become a national epidemic among youth. Declining physical activity and poor nutrition contribute to this epidemic. The purpose of this study was to obtain data on middle school students' physical activity and nutrition knowledge and practices. Methods: The Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey was developed and…

  15. [Space flight and the development of aviation medicine].

    PubMed

    Rudny?, N M; Giurdzhan, A A

    1981-01-01

    The paper discusses certain aspects of interaction between aviation and space medicine, contribution of aviation medicine into the development of space biology and medicine, and the role of cosmonautics in current achievements of aviation medicine. The paper describes advances in studies of space flight effects, development of life support and flight safety systems, medical and psychological support of the flight personnel, implementation of new methods and techniques, electronics, computers and automatics. Particular importance is attached to the rapid development of ergonomic approaches to the design and application of new technology, study of psychophysiology and psychology of human efficient activity in the system "man--flying vehicle--environment", i. e. psychophysiological ergonomics. Certain methodological and organizational aspects of the development of aviation and space medicine are briefly described. PMID:7022014

  16. Status report on the survey and alignment activities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O'Sheg; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The surveying and alignment activities at Fermilab are the responsibility of the Alignment and Metrology Group. The Group supports and interacts with physicists and engineers working on any particular project, from the facility construction phase to the installation and final alignment of components in the beam line. One of the goals of the Alignment and Metrology Group is to upgrade the old survey networks in the tunnel using modern surveying technology, such as the Laser Tracker for tunnel networks and GPS for the surface networks. According to the job needs, all surveys are done with Laser Trackers and/or Videogrammetry (V-STARS) systems for spatial coordinates; optical and electronic levels are used for elevations, Gyro-Theodolite for azimuths, Mekometer for distances and GPS for baseline vectors. The group has recently purchased two new API Laser Trackers, one INCA3 camera for the V-Stars, and one DNA03 digital level. This report presents the projects and major activities of the Alignment and Metrology Group at Fermilab during the period of 2000 to 2004. It focuses on the most important current projects, especially those that have to be completed during the currently scheduled three-month shutdown period. Future projects, in addition to the status of the current projects, are also presented.

  17. Ash cloud aviation advisories

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S. [EG and G, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1992-06-25

    During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

  18. Environmentally safe aviation fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liberio, Patricia D.

    1995-01-01

    In response to the Air Force directive to remove Ozone Depleting Chemicals (ODC's) from military specifications and Defense Logistics Agency's Hazardous Waste Minimization Program, we are faced with how to ensure a quality aviation fuel without using such chemicals. Many of these chemicals are found throughout the fuel and fuel related military specifications and are part of test methods that help qualify the properties and quality of the fuels before they are procured. Many years ago there was a directive for military specifications to use commercially standard test methods in order to provide standard testing in private industry and government. As a result the test methods used in military specifications are governed by the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM). The Air Force has been very proactive in the removal or replacement of the ODC's and hazardous materials in these test methods. For example, ASTM D3703 (Standard Test Method for Peroxide Number of Aviation Turbine Fuels), requires the use of Freon 113, a known ODC. A new rapid, portable hydroperoxide test for jet fuels similar to ASTM D3703 that does not require the use of ODC's has been developed. This test has proved, in limited testing, to be a viable substitute method for ASTM D3703. The Air Force is currently conducting a round robin to allow the method to be accepted by ASTM and therefore replace the current method. This paper will describe the Air Force's initiatives to remove ODC's and hazardous materials from the fuel and fuel related military specifications that the Air Force Wright Laboratory.

  19. A Hypermedia Information System for Aviation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell, Karin M.

    The Hypermedia Information System (HIS) is being developed under the auspices of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Office of Aviation Medicine's (AAM) Human Factors in Aviation Maintenance (HFAM) research program. The goal of the hypermedia project is to create new tools and methods for aviation-related information storage and retrieval.…

  20. DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION PATTERN OF ADMINISTRATION

    E-print Network

    Jones, Michelle

    DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION PATTERN OF ADMINISTRATION NAWAL K. TANEJA, CHAIR 7 August 2006 Typed;DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION PATTERN OF ADMINISTRATION TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION INTRODUCTION This document provides a brief description of the Department of Aviation

  1. ASRS Program Briefing Aviation Safety Reporting System

    E-print Network

    1 ASRS Program Briefing June 2014 #12;Aviation Safety Reporting System 2 ASRS Program Briefing;Aviation Safety Reporting System 3 ASRS Program Overview #12;Aviation Safety Reporting System 4 ASRS Program Overview Concept & Mission The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) receives, processes

  2. OVERCOMING IONOSPHERIC SCINTILLATION FOR WORLDWIDE GPS AVIATION

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    OVERCOMING IONOSPHERIC SCINTILLATION FOR WORLDWIDE GPS AVIATION A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED decades, its impact on GPS aviation has not been well understood. As a result, the current GPS aviation to mitigate the impact of scintillation. Although current aviation receivers do not protect against

  3. TRANSPORTATION CENTER--NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Aviation Symposium: The Future for Aviation

    E-print Network

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    TRANSPORTATION CENTER--NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Aviation Symposium: The Future for Aviation April The Transportation Center has organized a special Aviation Symposium focusing on important aviation industry topics, the symposium will present current perspectives across the full spectrum of aviation. Topics covered

  4. Agricultural aviation user requirement priorities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, R. L.; Meeland, T.; Peterson, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The results are given of a research project pertaining to the development of agricultural aviation user requirement priorities. The raw data utilized in the project was obtained from the National Agricultural Aviation Association. A specially configured poll, developed by the Actuarial Research Corporation was used to solicit responses from NAAA members and others. The primary product of the poll is the specification of seriousness as determined by the respondents for some selected agricultural aviation problem areas identified and defined during the course of an intensive analysis by the Actuarial Research Corporation.

  5. NASA aviation safety reporting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    During the third quarter of operation of the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), 1429 reports concerning aviation safety were received from pilots, air traffic controllers, and others in the national aviation system. Details of the administration and results of the program are discussed. The design and construction of the ASRS data base are briefly presented. Altitude deviations and potential aircraft conflicts associated with misunderstood clearances were studied and the results are discussed. Summary data regarding alert bulletins, examples of alert bulletins and responses to them, and a sample of deidentified ASRS reports are provided.

  6. Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration-sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. A tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem, including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements, as well as a comparison or the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation is provided. The flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: suppression of transient accelerations by levitation, the microgravity vibration isolation mount, and the active rack isolation system are surveyed.

  7. A Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. This paper provides a tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements as well as a comparison of the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation. This paper also surveys the flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: Suppression of Transient Accelerations By Levitation (STABLE); the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Mount (MIM); and the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS).

  8. Future of Aviation Advisory Committee

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In April 2010, US Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood announced the creation of the Future of Aviation Advisory Committee. The focus of the Committee's work is to "provide information, advice and recommendations to the Department on ensuring the competitiveness of the U.S. aviation industry." First-time visitors should note that the homepage contains links to the Committee's charter, committee member profiles, and their final report. Published in April 2011, the 85 page final report is something of particular interest. The document contains sections on the future of the aviation workforce, outsourcing, and aviation safety. Moving on, visitors can view minutes from each of their five meetings, and two of the meetings also have archived video coverage available as well.

  9. Nowcasting for Aviation in Africa

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    Nowcasting for Aviation in Africa summarizes techniques and best practices for developing area-specific forecasts at very short (0-6 hour) timescales. This 1-hour lesson presents a case study focused on interpreting threats and communicating correct warning information for a weather event affecting multiple airports in Gauteng Province, South Africa. In completing the lesson, the learner will assess the state of the atmosphere, develop a nowcast, monitor conditions, and update/create appropriate nowcast products for aviation stakeholders.

  10. 78 FR 20685 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ...Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...SUMMARY: The Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...Pub. L. 92-463). The Aviation Security Advisory Committee...

  11. NASA Aviation Safety Program Weather Accident Prevention/weather Information Communications (WINCOMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Arthur; Tauss, James; Chomos, Gerald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Weather is a contributing factor in approximately 25-30 percent of general aviation accidents. The lack of timely, accurate and usable weather information to the general aviation pilot in the cockpit to enhance pilot situational awareness and improve pilot judgment remains a major impediment to improving aviation safety. NASA Glenn Research Center commissioned this 120 day weather datalink market survey to assess the technologies, infrastructure, products, and services of commercial avionics systems being marketed to the general aviation community to address these longstanding safety concerns. A market survey of companies providing or proposing to provide graphical weather information to the general aviation cockpit was conducted. Fifteen commercial companies were surveyed. These systems are characterized and evaluated in this report by availability, end-user pricing/cost, system constraints/limits and technical specifications. An analysis of market survey results and an evaluation of product offerings were made. In addition, recommendations to NASA for additional research and technology development investment have been made as a result of this survey to accelerate deployment of cockpit weather information systems for enhancing aviation safety.

  12. [Aviation medicine laboratory of the North Fleet air base celebrates the 70th anniversary].

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, V V; Maza?kin, D N; Buldakov, I M; Pisarev, A A

    2013-05-01

    The article is dedicated to the history of formation and development of the oldest aviation medicine department and its role in a flight safety of the North Fleet naval aviation. The aviation medicine laboratory was created in the years of the Great Patriotic war for medical backup of flights, medical review board, delivering of combat casualty care, prophylaxis of hypothermia and exhaustion of flight and ground crew. In a post-war period the aviation medicine laboratory made a great contribution to development of medical backup of educational and combat activity of the North Fleet aviation. Participation in cosmonaut applicants selection (incl. Yu.A. Gagarin), optimization of flight services during the transmeridian flights, research of carrier-based aircraft habitability and body state of the contingent during the longstanding ship-based aviation, development of treatment methods for functional status of sea-based aviation crew are the achievements of aviation medicine laboratory. Nowadays medicine laboratory is performing a research and practice, methodic and consultative activity with the aim of improving the system of medical backup, aviation medicine, psychology, flight safety, improvement of air crew health, prolong of flying proficiency. PMID:24000629

  13. A Survey of Aviation English Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderson, J. Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Lancaster Language Testing Research Group was commissioned in 2006 by the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol) to conduct a validation study of the development of a test called ELPAC (English Language Proficiency for Aeronautical Communication), intended to assess the language proficiency of air traffic…

  14. Combining Users' Activity Survey and Simulators to Evaluate Human Activity Recognition Systems

    PubMed Central

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant. PMID:25856329

  15. Coal quality activities at the new US Geological Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelman, R.B. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The recently issued Strategic Plan for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) calls for many changes including increased emphasis on the quality of natural resources, applied research, technology transfer, and issue-driven studies. To achieve these objectives the USGS will have to rely on partnerships with other Federal agencies, academia, State and local governments, nongovernmental organizations, and private industry. The coal quality activities at the USGS are briefly described and examples of the practical, team-oriented research being pursued are given.

  16. Cyber threats within civil aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitner, Kerri A.

    Existing security policies in civil aviation do not adequately protect against evolving cyber threats. Cybersecurity has been recognized as a top priority among some aviation industry leaders. Heightened concerns regarding cyber threats and vulnerabilities surround components utilized in compliance with the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Next Generation Air Transportation (NextGen) implementation. Automated Dependent Surveillance-B (ADS-B) and Electronic Flight Bags (EFB) have both been exploited through the research of experienced computer security professionals. Civil aviation is essential to international infrastructure and if its critical assets were compromised, it could pose a great risk to public safety and financial infrastructure. The purpose of this research was to raise awareness of aircraft system vulnerabilities in order to provoke change among current national and international cybersecurity policies, procedures and standards. Although the education of cyber threats is increasing in the aviation industry, there is not enough urgency when creating cybersecurity policies. This project intended to answer the following questions: What are the cyber threats to ADS-B of an aircraft in-flight? What are the cyber threats to EFB? What is the aviation industry's response to the issue of cybersecurity and in-flight safety? ADS-B remains unencrypted while the FAA's mandate to implement this system is rapidly approaching. The cyber threat of both portable and non-portable EFB's have received increased publicity, however, airlines are not responding quick enough (if at all) to create policies for the use of these devices. Collectively, the aviation industry is not being proactive enough to protect its aircraft or airport network systems. That is not to say there are not leaders in cybersecurity advancement. These proactive organizations must set the standard for the future to better protect society and it's most reliable form of transportation.

  17. Preliminary Assessment of Alternative Navigation Means for Civil Aviation

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Preliminary Assessment of Alternative Navigation Means for Civil Aviation Sherman Lo, Per Enge Leo Eldredge, Mitchell Narins, Federal Aviation Administration ABSTRACT The Federal Aviation tremendous benefits. In aviation, for example, the introduction of GPS avionics will lead to improved

  18. Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Russia: preventing the danger of volcanic eruptions to aviation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, O.; Neal, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) has been a collaborative project of scientists from the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Surveys, and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (IVS, KB GS and AVO). The purpose of KVERT is to reduce the risk of costly, damaging, and possibly deadly encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds. To reduce this risk, KVERT collects all possible volcanic information and issues eruption alerts to aviation and other emergency officials. KVERT was founded by Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry FED RAS in 1993 (in 2004, IVGG merged with the Institute of Volcanology to become IVS). KVERT analyzes volcano monitoring data (seismic, satellite, visual and video, and pilot reports), assigns the Aviation Color Code, and issues reports on eruptive activity and unrest at Kamchatkan (since 1993) and Northern Kurile (since 2003) volcanoes. KVERT receives seismic monitoring data from KB GS (the Laboratory for Seismic and Volcanic Activity). KB GS maintains telemetered seismic stations to investigate 11 of the most active volcanoes in Kamchatka. Data are received around the clock and analysts evaluate data each day for every monitored volcano. Satellite data are provided from several sources to KVERT. AVO conducts satellite analysis of the Kuriles, Kamchatka, and Alaska as part of it daily monitoring and sends the interpretation to KVERT staff. KVERT interprets MODIS and MTSAT images and processes AVHRR data to look for evidence of volcanic ash and thermal anomalies. KVERT obtains visual volcanic information from volcanologist's field trips, web-cameras that monitor Klyuchevskoy (established in 2000), Sheveluch (2002), Bezymianny (2003), Koryaksky (2009), Avachinsky (2009), Kizimen (2011), and Gorely (2011) volcanoes, and pilots. KVERT staff work closely with staff of AVO, AMC (Airport Meteorological Center) at Yelizovo Airport and the Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), the Anchorage VAAC, the Washington VAAC, the Montreal VAAC, and the Darwin VAAC to release timely eruption warnings. Urgent information is sent by email to government agencies, aviation services, and scientists (>300 users) located throughout the North Pacific region. KVERT staff also notify AMC and other emergency agencies in Kamchatka by telephone. VONA/KVERT Information Releases (VONA - Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation) are formal written notifications that are sent by email to these same users to announce Aviation Color Code changes and significant changes in activity. These statements are posted on the KVERT (http://www.kscnet.ru/ivs/kvert/) and the AVO (http://www.avo.alaska.edu) web site. During the period of 2009-2011, eruptions of 6 of Kamchatkan volcanoes were potentially dangerous for aviation: three significant events occurred at Bezymianny (2009, 2010 and 2011), one protracted eruption at Klyuchevskoy (from 2009 till 2010), three short events at Koryaksky (2009) and an ongoing explosive-effusive eruption at Kizimen (2010-2012). Eruptions of Karymsky and Sheveluch volcanoes have continued essentially uninterrupted throughout the period 2009-2011 and have also posed a hazard to aviation intermittently. Very strong explosive eruption of Sheveluch occurred on October 27-28, 2010.

  19. 77 FR 38398 - Agency Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ...National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activities Under OMB Review...National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey, VA Form 0863. OMB Control Number...Respondent: 5 minutes. Frequency of Response: On occasion. Estimated...

  20. 75 FR 9277 - Proposed Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ...Proposed Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY...information technology. Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 1465-2 through...

  1. 77 FR 64382 - Agency Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ...Agency Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 10-1465- 2 through...

  2. 77 FR 2349 - Proposed Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ...Proposed Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY...information technology. Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 10-1465- 2 through...

  3. 75 FR 25320 - Agency Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ...Agency Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 1465-2 through...

  4. 75 FR 1119 - Agency Information Collection (Supplier Perception Survey) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ...2900-New (Supplier)] Agency Information Collection (Supplier Perception Survey) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Office of Acquisition...INFORMATION: Title: Department of Veterans Affairs Supplier Perception Survey. OMB Control Number: 2900-New (Supplier)....

  5. 78 FR 11965 - Agency Information Collection (Learner's Perception (LP) Survey) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ...Information Collection (Learner's Perception (LP) Survey) Activities Under OMB...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Learner's Perception (LP) Survey, VA Form 10-0439...be use to obtain health care trainees perception of their clinical experience with...

  6. 77 FR 7244 - Agency Information Collection (Supplier Perception Survey) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ...No. 2900-0751] Agency Information Collection (Supplier Perception Survey) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Office of Acquisition...INFORMATION: Title: Department of Veterans Affairs Supplier Perception Survey. OMB Control Number: 2900-2900-0751. Type...

  7. 76 FR 70827 - Proposed Information Collection (Supplier Perception Survey) Activity; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ...2900-0751] Proposed Information Collection (Supplier Perception Survey) Activity; Comment Request AGENCY: Office of Acquisition...technology. Title: Department of Veterans Affairs Supplier Perception Survey. OMB Control Number: 2900-0751. Type of...

  8. Responsive design for household surveys: tools for actively controlling survey errors and costs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M. Groves; Steven G. Heeringa

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few years surveys have expanded to new populations, have incorporated measurement of new and more complex substantive issues and have adopted new data collection tools. At the same time there has been a growing reluctance among many household populations to participate in surveys. These factors have combined to present survey designers and survey researchers with increased uncertainty

  9. Aviation Pilot Training I and Aviation Technician I: Task Analyses. Semester I. Field Review Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Richard

    This guide for aviation pilot and aviation technician training begins with a course description, resource information, and a course outline. Tasks/competencies are categorized into 10 concept/duty areas: understanding aviation career opportunities; comprehending the history of aviation; understanding classes, categories, and types of aircraft;…

  10. Distributed Aviation Concepts and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Aviation has experienced one hundred years of evolution, resulting in the current air transportation system dominated by commercial airliners in a hub and spoke infrastructure. While the first fifty years involved disruptive technologies that required frequent vehicle adaptation, the second fifty years produced a stable evolutionary optimization of decreasing costs with increasing safety. This optimization has resulted in traits favoring a centralized service model with high vehicle productivity and cost efficiency. However, it may also have resulted in a system that is not sufficiently robust to withstand significant system disturbances. Aviation is currently facing rapid change from issues such as environmental damage, terrorism threat, congestion and capacity limitations, and cost of energy. Currently, these issues are leading to a loss of service for weaker spoke markets. These catalysts and a lack of robustness could result in a loss of service for much larger portions of the aviation market. The impact of other competing transportation services may be equally important as casual factors of change. Highway system forecasts indicate a dramatic slow down as congestion reaches a point of non-linearly increasing delay. In the next twenty-five years, there is the potential for aviation to transform itself into a more robust, scalable, adaptive, secure, safe, affordable, convenient, efficient and environmentally friendly system. To achieve these characteristics, the new system will likely be based on a distributed model that enables more direct services. Short range travel is already demonstrating itself to be inefficient with a centralized model, providing opportunities for emergent distributed services through air-taxi models. Technologies from the on-demand revolution in computers and communications are now available as major drivers for aviation on-demand adaptation. Other technologies such as electric propulsion are currently transforming the automobile industry, and will also significantly alter the functionality of future distributed aviation concepts. Many hurdles exist, including technology, regulation, and perception. Aviation has an inherent governmental role not present in other recent on-demand transformations, which may pose a risk of curtailing aviation democratization .

  11. Aviation Symposium: The Future of Aviation Northwestern University

    E-print Network

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    #12;SUSTAINABLE AIRPORT MANUAL · Guides airportspecific sustainable planning and practice throughout;SUSTAINABILITY FOR THE FUTURE · LEED certified facilities · Airport Green Roofs · Recycling and reusing DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION · O'Hare and Midway International Airports · 85 million passengers/1.1 million

  12. Aviation Sustainable Biofuels: An Asian Airline Perspective

    E-print Network

    Aviation Sustainable Biofuels: An Asian Airline Perspective Dr Mark Watson Head of Environmental Affairs, Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd, Hong Kong Aviation Biofuels Session World Biofuels Markets, Rotterdam 24 March 2011 #12;Aviation Biofuels in Asia: Current Status · Focus on "2nd generation" sustainable

  13. Civil Aviation and Facilities. Aerospace Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orser, N. A.; Glascoff, W. G., III

    This book, which is to be used only in the Air Force ROTC training program, deals with the kinds of civil aviation facilities and the intricacies and procedures of the use of flying. The first chapter traces the development of civil aviation and the formation of organizations to control aviation systems. The second chapter describes varieties of…

  14. Civil Aviation and Facilities. Aerospace Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, R. O.; Elmer, James D.

    This is a revised textbook for use in the Air Force ROTC training program. The main theme of the book is concerned with the kinds of civil aviation facilities and many intricacies involved in their use. The first chapter traces the development of civil aviation and the formation of organizations to control aviation systems. The second chapter…

  15. FM 3-04.111 Aviation Brigades

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 3-04.111 Aviation Brigades DECEMBER 2007 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release-04.111 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, D.C., 7 December 2007 Aviation Brigades Contents Page PREFACE ................................................................................ 1-4 Heavy, Medium, and Light Combat Aviation Brigades....................................... 1

  16. GOES Aviation Products Observing the Earth With

    E-print Network

    Kuligowski, Bob

    GOES Aviation Products Observing the Earth With Satellites Ken Pryor NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research #12;GOES Aviation Products Overview · Images from geostationary Aviation Products What is a geostationary satellite? · Located 36,000 km above the earth, the GOES

  17. Aviation Safety Program Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck

    E-print Network

    Aviation Safety Program Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Technical Plan Summary Principal several months by NASA to define the rationale, scope and detailed content of a comprehensive Aviation........................................................................................................ C-1 FORWARD A dichotomy exists for new safety technologies developed for civil aviation. Few

  18. Computational Modeling and Experimental Validation of Aviation

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Richard "Hao"

    Computational Modeling and Experimental Validation of Aviation Security Procedures Uwe Gl/srastkar/mvajihol}@cs.sfu.ca January 2006 Abstract Security of civil aviation has become a major concern in recent years, leading and experimental validation of aviation security combining abstract state machine (ASM) specifica- tion techniques

  19. NASA Technical Memorandum Aviation Human Factors

    E-print Network

    NASA Technical Memorandum Aviation Human Factors Research in U.S. Universities: Potential #12;1 Aviation Human Factors Research in U.S. Universities: Potential Contributions to National Needs contributions to national needs in aviation human factors. However, to guide and utilize university research

  20. Flight Cancellation Behavior and Aviation System Performance

    E-print Network

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Flight Cancellation Behavior and Aviation System Performance Analytical Support to the FAA Office;i Acknowledgments The research documented in this report was sponsored by the Federal Aviation of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR). The authors would like to thank Dan Murphy for managing

  1. National survey of the injury prevention activities of children's centres.

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael C; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Kendrick, Denise; Stewart, Jane; Coupland, Carol; Hayes, Mike; Wynn, Persephone

    2014-01-01

    Children's centres were established across England to provide a range of services including early education, social care and health to pre-school children and their families. We surveyed children's centres to ascertain the activities they were undertaking to prevent unintentional injuries in the under fives. A postal questionnaire was sent to a sample of children's centre managers (n = 694). It included questions on current activities, knowledge and attitudes to injury prevention, health priorities and partnership working. Responses were received from 384 (56%) children's centres. Overall, 58% considered unintentional injury prevention to be one of the three main child health priorities for their centre. Over half the respondents (59%) did not know if there was an injury prevention group in their area, and 21% did not know if there was a home safety equipment scheme. Knowledge of how child injury deaths occur in the home was poor. Only 11% knew the major cause of injury deaths in children under five. Lack of both staff time and funding were seen as important barriers by children's centre staff to undertake injury prevention activities. Nearly all stated that training (97%) and assistance with planning injury prevention (94%) would be helpful to their centres. Children's centres need further support if they are to effectively tackle this important public health area. PMID:23837887

  2. 1985 Lindbergh lecture. Some personal perspectives on aviation progress.

    PubMed

    Engen, D D

    1986-05-01

    Aviation has opened new opportunities for both individual achievement and public service during the past 80 years. The author discusses his experiences during the second half of the modern era of powered flight, including combat activities during World War II, work as a test pilot developing flying techniques for the first jets, challenging the world altitude record, and assessing the performance capacities of different aircraft. The lecture devotes special attention to aerobatic flying, especially the properties of the spin. The author relates these personal experiences to the responsibilities of guiding modern aviation to improved public service in the coming years. PMID:3518693

  3. Aviation Medicine: global historical perspectives and the development of Aviation Medicine alongside the growth of Singapore's aviation landscape.

    PubMed

    Gan, W H; Low, R; Singh, J

    2011-05-01

    Aviation Medicine traces its roots to high altitude physiology more than 400 years ago. Since then, great strides have been made in this medical specialty, initially catalysed by the need to reduce pilot medical attrition during the World Wars, and more recently, fuelled by the explosive growth in globalised commercial air travel. This paper traces the historical milestones in Aviation Medicine, and maps its development in Singapore since the 1960s. Advancements in military aviation platforms and technology as well as the establishment of Singapore as an international aviation hub have propelled Aviation Medicine in Singapore to the forefront of many domains. These span Aviation Physiology training, selection medical standards, performance maximisation, as well as crew and passenger protection against communicable diseases arising from air travel. The year 2011 marks the centennial milestone of the first manned flight in Singapore, paving the way for further growth of Aviation Medicine as a mature specialty in Singapore. PMID:21633764

  4. Distance Learning Aviation Course 1

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Spangler, Tim

    DLAC1, a distance learning course on forecasting fog and low stratus for aviation operations, is designed to give forecasters a comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms, synoptic patterns, and mesoscale features involved in fog/stratus generation and dissipation, as well as the latest forecast tools used to predict these challenging events.

  5. Aviation Insights: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2005-01-01

    Aviation as people know it today is a mature but very young technology as time goes. Considering that the 100th anniversary of flight was celebrated just a few years ago in 2003, millions of people fly from city to city or from nation to nation and across the oceans and around the world effortlessly and economically. Additionally, they have space…

  6. NASA aviation safety reporting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The human factors frequency considered a cause of or contributor to hazardous events onboard air carriers are examined with emphasis on distractions. Safety reports that have been analyzed, processed, and entered into the aviation safety reporting system data base are discussed. A sampling of alert bulletins and responses to them is also presented.

  7. International Civil Aviation Policy Options

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher C. Findlay

    1981-01-01

    Welfare of air transport consumers depends on the money price of travel and the quality of service. These aspects are summarised in a consumer welfare measure which, combined with measures of producer rents, is used to compare some international civil aviation policy options. These are the current regime, open skies (with subsidies where necessary), deregulation of fares and deregulation of

  8. NASA aviation safety reporting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aviation safety reports that relate to loss of control in flight, problems that occur as a result of similar sounding alphanumerics, and pilot incapacitation are presented. Problems related to the go around maneuver in air carrier operations, and bulletins (and FAA responses to them) that pertain to air traffic control systems and procedures are included.

  9. Federal Aviation Administration aging aircraft nondestructive inspection research plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seher, Chris C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper highlights the accomplishments and plans of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the development of improved nondestructive evaluation (NDE) equipment, procedures, and training. The role of NDE in aircraft safety and the need for improvement are discussed. The FAA program participants, and coordination of activities within the program and with relevant organizations outside the program are also described.

  10. Brief reactive psychosis in naval aviation.

    PubMed

    Deakins, D E; Baggett, J C; Bohnker, B K

    1991-12-01

    Five naval aviation personnel diagnosed with brief reactive psychosis (BRP) have appeared before the Special Board of Flight Surgeons (SBFS) at the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI). These cases demonstrate the challenges in diagnosis and disposition that face the clinical aeromedical specialist in evaluating the aviator who develops psychiatric symptoms. We discuss the aeromedical factors that must be considered when contemplating returning aviators with psychiatric diagnoses to flying duties. Sudden behavioral changes in aviation personnel require a systematic assessment, thorough documentation, and continuing reevaluation. The differentiation between organic and functional etiologies may be difficult. Final disposition may require consultation with experienced physicians skilled in both aviation psychiatry and neurology. PMID:1755798

  11. Cluster Report or Survey Description Date due to IEA Responsible person(s) Comments Summer Activity Report

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Cluster Report or Survey Description Date due to IEA Responsible person(s) Comments Summer Activity 10, 2014, Assignment Year 2014 made available by IEA for reporting Student Satisfaction Survey Survey Survey Survey of graduating seniors Online survey distributed to graduating seniors Summer 2013 - June 13

  12. ESO IMAGING SURVEY: Past Activities and Future Prospects

    E-print Network

    Zaggia, Simone

    . Introduction The ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) proj- ect is an ongoing effort to carry out pub- lic imaging surveys- erately deep, large-area survey (EIS- WIDE) and a deep optical/infrared sur- vey (EIS-DEEP), with the observations being conducted at the NTT. EIS has recently reached another milestone with the completion

  13. 1981 national survey of compensation paid scientists and engineers engaged in research and development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The results of a compensation survey conducted by the Columbus Laboratories of Battelle are presented. The survey was entitled A National Survey of Compensation Paid to Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development Activities. Information is included on the: sampling procedures; basic data for survey analysis; beginning salaries for recent graduates with bachelor, master, or doctorate degrees; salary trends; geographic analysis; interpretation of results; and salary tables. (LCL)

  14. Compressing Aviation Data in XML Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Hemil; Lau, Derek; Kulkarni, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    Design, operations and maintenance activities in aviation involve analysis of variety of aviation data. This data is typically in disparate formats making it difficult to use with different software packages. Use of a self-describing and extensible standard called XML provides a solution to this interoperability problem. XML provides a standardized language for describing the contents of an information stream, performing the same kind of definitional role for Web content as a database schema performs for relational databases. XML data can be easily customized for display using Extensible Style Sheets (XSL). While self-describing nature of XML makes it easy to reuse, it also increases the size of data significantly. Therefore, transfemng a dataset in XML form can decrease throughput and increase data transfer time significantly. It also increases storage requirements significantly. A natural solution to the problem is to compress the data using suitable algorithm and transfer it in the compressed form. We found that XML-specific compressors such as Xmill and XMLPPM generally outperform traditional compressors. However, optimal use of Xmill requires of discovery of optimal options to use while running Xmill. This, in turn, depends on the nature of data used. Manual disc0ver.y of optimal setting can require an engineer to experiment for weeks. We have devised an XML compression advisory tool that can analyze sample data files and recommend what compression tool would work the best for this data and what are the optimal settings to be used with a XML compression tool.

  15. Satellite Delivery of Aviation Weather Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Haendel, Richard

    2001-01-01

    With aviation traffic continuing to increase worldwide, reducing the aviation accident rate and aviation schedule delays is of critical importance. In the United States, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established the Aviation Safety Program and the Aviation System Capacity Program to develop and test new technologies to increase aviation safety and system capacity. Weather is a significant contributor to aviation accidents and schedule delays. The timely dissemination of weather information to decision makers in the aviation system, particularly to pilots, is essential in reducing system delays and weather related aviation accidents. The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating improved methods of weather information dissemination through satellite broadcasting directly to aircraft. This paper describes an on-going cooperative research program with NASA, Rockwell Collins, WorldSpace, Jeppesen and American Airlines to evaluate the use of satellite digital audio radio service (SDARS) for low cost broadcast of aviation weather information, called Satellite Weather Information Service (SWIS). The description and results of the completed SWIS Phase 1 are presented, and the description of the on-going SWIS Phase 2 is given.

  16. VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES IN FS SURVEY UNITS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 & 14 AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    M.G. JADICK

    2010-05-26

    FINAL INTERIM REPORT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES IN FINAL STATUS SURVEY UNITS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 AND 14 AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT, Niskayuna, New York 0496-SR-03-0. The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) facilities were constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium. SPRU operated between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction/oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes that were subsequently used by the Hanford and the Savannah River sites.

  17. Human error in aviation operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.; Lanber, J. K.; Cooper, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    This report is a brief description of research being undertaken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The project is designed to seek out factors in the aviation system which contribute to human error, and to search for ways of minimizing the potential threat posed by these factors. The philosophy and assumptions underlying the study are discussed, together with an outline of the research plan.

  18. Navigating towards improved surgical safety using aviation-based strategies.

    PubMed

    Kao, Lillian S; Thomas, Eric J

    2008-04-01

    Safety practices in the aviation industry are being increasingly adapted to healthcare in an effort to reduce medical errors and patient harm. However, caution should be applied in embracing these practices because of limited experience in surgical disciplines, lack of rigorous research linking these practices to outcome, and fundamental differences between the two industries. Surgeons should have an in-depth understanding of the principles and data supporting aviation-based safety strategies before routinely adopting them. This paper serves as a review of strategies adapted to improve surgical safety, including the following: implementation of crew resource management in training operative teams; incorporation of simulation in training of technical and nontechnical skills; and analysis of contributory factors to errors using surveys, behavioral marker systems, human factors analysis, and incident reporting. Avenues and challenges for future research are also discussed. PMID:17477934

  19. General Aviation in Nebraska: Nebraska SATS Project Background Paper No. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Russell; Wachal, Jocelyn

    2000-01-01

    The Nebraska SATS project is a state-level component of NASA's Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS). During the next several years the project will examine several different factors affecting SATS implementation in Nebraska. These include economic and taxation issues, public policy issues, airport planning processes, information dissemination strategies, and systemic change factors. This background paper profiles the general aviation system in Nebraska. It is written to provide information about the "context" within which SATS will be pursued. The primary focus is thus on describing and providing background information about the current situation. A secondary focus is on drawing general conclusions about the ability of the current system to incorporate the types of changes implied by SATS. First, some brief information on the U.S. aviation system is provided. The next two sections profile the current general aviation aircraft and pilot base. Nebraska's system of general aviation airports is then described. Within this section of the paper, information is provided on the different types of general aviation airports in Nebraska, airport activity levels and current infrastructure. The fourth major section of the background paper looks at Nebraska's local airport authorities. These special purpose local governments oversee the majority of the general aviation airports in the state. Among the items examined are total expenditures, capital expenditures and planning activities. Next, the paper provides background information on the Nebraska Department of Aeronautics (NDA) and recent Federal funding for general aviation in Nebraska. The final section presents summary conclusions.

  20. 75 FR 52801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Request for Comments; Clearance of a New Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ...aviation pilots, flight instructors, mechanics, and repairmen. The survey will help...aviation community, primarily pilots and mechanics. This survey is intended [[Page 52802...7,000 pilots, flight instructors, mechanics, and repairmen. Frequency: One...

  1. A Spectroscopic Survey of a Sample of Active M Dwarfs

    E-print Network

    Stefan W. Mochnacki; Michael D. Gladders; James R. Thomson; Wenxian Lu; Paula Ehlers; Metin Guler; Asif Hussain; Quincy Kameda; Karen King; Patricia Mitchell; Jason Rowe; Peter Schindler; Heather Scott

    2002-07-19

    A moderate resolution spectroscopic survey of Fleming's sample of 54 X-ray selected M dwarfs with photometric distances less than 25 pc is presented. Radial and rotation velocities have been measured by fits to the H-alpha profiles. Radial velocities have been measured by cross correlation. Artificial broadening of an observed spectrum has produced a relationship between H-alpha FWHM and rotation speed, which we use to infer rotation speeds for the entire sample by measurement of the H-alpha emission line. We find 3 ultra-fast rotators (UFRs, vsini > 100km/s), and 8 stars with 30 < vsini < 100 km/s. The UFRs have variable emission. Cross-correlation velocities measured for ultra-fast rotators (UFRs) are shown to depend on rotation speed and the filtering used. The radial velocity dispersion of the sample is 17 km/s. A new double emission line spectroscopic binary with a period of 3.55 days has been discovered, and another known one is in the sample. Three other objects are suspected spectroscopic binaries, and at least six are visual doubles. The only star in the sample observed to have significant lithium is a known TW Hya Association member, TWA 8A. These results show that there are a number of young (< 10^8 yr) and very young (< 10^7 yr) low mass stars in the immediate solar neighbourhood. The H-alpha activity strength does not depend on rotation speed. Our fast rotators are less luminous than similarly fast rotators in the Pleiades. They are either younger than the Pleiades, or gained angular momentum in a different way.

  2. A Spectroscopic Survey of a Sample of Active M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochnacki, Stefan W.; Gladders, Michael D.; Thomson, James R.; Lu, Wenxian; Ehlers, Paula; Guler, Metin; Hussain, Asif; Kameda, Quincy; King, Karen; Mitchell, Patricia; Rowe, Jason; Schindler, Peter; Scott, Heather

    2002-11-01

    A moderate-resolution spectroscopic survey of Fleming's sample of 54 X-ray-selected M dwarfs with photometric distances less than 25 pc is presented. All the objects consist of one or two dMe stars, some being doubles or spectroscopic binaries. Radial and rotation velocities have been measured by fits to the H? profiles. Radial velocities have been measured by cross correlation. Artificial broadening of an observed spectrum has produced a relationship between H? FWHM and rotation speed, which we use to infer rotation speeds for the entire sample by measurement of the H? emission line. We find three ultrafast rotators (UFRs, vsini>=100 km s-1) and eight stars with 30 km s-1<=vsini<100 km s-1. We find that the UFRs have quite variable emission and should be observed for photometric variability. Cross-correlation velocities measured for UFRs are shown to depend on rotation speed and the filtering used. The radial velocity dispersion of the sample is 17 km s-1. A new double emission line spectroscopic binary with a period of 3.55 days has been discovered, RX J1547.4+4507, and another known one is in the sample, the Hyades member RX J0442.5+2027. Three other objects are suspected spectroscopic binaries, and at least six are visual doubles. The only star in the sample observed to have significant lithium happens to be a known TW Hya association member, TWA 8A. These results all show that there are a number of young (<108 yr) and very young (<107 yr) low-mass stars in the immediate solar neighborhood. The H? activity strength does not depend on rotation speed. Our fast rotators are less luminous than similarly fast rotators in the Pleiades. They are either younger than the Pleiades or gained angular momentum in a different way. Based on data obtained at the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto.

  3. Post stapedotomy aviation: A changing scenario.

    PubMed

    Rajguru, Renu

    2014-01-01

    Aeromedical implications of stapedotomy like rapid barometric changes and G forces are generally thought to put an end to the aviation career of an aviator. Aviation industry has grown tremendously in the last few decades, and aviation now is not only occupational but also recreational. The Indian Military Aviation rules state that, "Stapedectomy cases will be assessed permanently unfit for flying duties. These cases will be cautioned against flying in an unpressurised aircraft." The basis of this is the aeromedical concerns associated with stapedotomy as clinical conditions which are of minor significance on the ground may become aggravated in the air. With an ever expanding civil and military aviation industry, the number of aviators who have undergone stapedotomy has also increased. Though grounding the aircrew is the safest option, but if medical certification is denied to all, then the majority who can fly safely will also be excluded, thus denying the organization of its trained resources. This paper discusses post otosclerosis and post stapedotomy aeromedical concerns, reviews existing literature concerning post stapedotomy aviation and various post stapedotomy aviation policies. PMID:25598613

  4. Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues. UNO Aviation Monograph Series. UNOAI Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Brent, Ed.

    This document contains four papers concerning collegiate aviation research and education solutions to critical safety issues. "Panel Proposal Titled Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues for the Tim Forte Collegiate Aviation Safety Symposium" (Brent Bowen) presents proposals for panels on the following…

  5. Aviation Maintenance (Aircraft Mechanics & Aircraft & Instrument Repair Personnel). Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines career opportunities in aviation maintenance. The booklet provides the following information about aviation maintenance jobs: nature of the work, working conditions, where the jobs are, wages and benefits, opportunities for advancement, requirements to enter the job, opportunities for…

  6. NASA research on general aviation power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. L.; Weber, R. J.; Willis, E. A.; Sievers, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Research activities within NASA to support general aviation industry in improving propulsion engines are described. Near-term objectives include improvements of gasoline piston engines to achieve fuel savings and reduce emissions well below EPA levels. To meet the longer term goals, advanced combustion research has been considered as essential in obtaining further improvements in BSFC (break specific fuel consumption). Modifications of an aircraft rotary engine were tested and it was found that by increasing the compression ratio and other refinements the BSFC was improved by 15%. The applicability of available large turbofan engine technology to small engines in order to obtain significant reductions in noise and pollutant emissions is being tested. Studies have been conducted at exploring the possibility of achieving high improvements in cost and performance for turboprop engines of less than 1000 horsepower.

  7. Feasibility of using web surveys to collect time-activity data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangmei May; Bennett, Deborah H; Lee, Kiyoung; Cassady, Diana L; Ritz, Beate; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2012-01-01

    Time-activity data are traditionally collected by telephone interviews or through paper diaries, which are time consuming and costly. As a potential alternative that may greatly save staff time, a web survey to collect time-activity data was developed and tested in this study. We collected 24-h recall web diaries from 151 parents of young children mostly under 55 years of age (who also answered for their children) and 55 older adults (? 55 years of age) both on a weekday and a weekend day every 3 months during an 18-month period. The performance and reliability of the web surveys collected were evaluated, including the survey-completion rate, and the percentage of surveys with unreasonable time being reported as spent sleeping and with missing reports of being in transit between locations. We also compared the web-survey data with time-activity information we collected from the same subjects in telephone interviews and found that these data sources were fairly consistent with each other. However, we observed slightly more compliance issues for the web than the telephone survey, but most of these issues could be addressed and minimized by refining some questions or the survey interface. Our study suggests that it is critical to reduce participants' burden and improve survey interface design for optimal compliance and data quality. In conclusion, web surveys are a promising method to consider for time-activity data collection. PMID:21792233

  8. 77 FR 53902 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ...Docket No. TSA-2011-0008] Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...will hold a meeting of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...TSA on matters affecting civil aviation security. This meeting is open to...

  9. 78 FR 3908 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ...Docket No. TSA-2011-0008] Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...will hold a meeting of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...TSA on matters affecting civil aviation security. This meeting is open to...

  10. 76 FR 72967 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ...Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...will hold a meeting of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...TSA on matters affecting civil aviation security. This meeting is open to...

  11. 78 FR 41413 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ...Docket No. TSA-2011-0008] Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...will hold a meeting of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC...recommendations for improving aviation security measures to the...

  12. NEXTOR: The National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    NEXTOR: The National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research Co-directors: M. Ball Mathematics, Economics, Civil Engineering and Electrical Engineering. BACKGROUND The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) established The National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR

  13. Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutz, Mary N. Hill

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal responsibility. The most frequently identified curriculum need across all aviation disciplines was that of communication skills.

  14. The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of The Assistant Administrator for Aviation Safety,

    E-print Network

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of The Assistant Administrator for Aviation Safety, and administered by the National. Background for TCAS II Since 1955, the aviation community has strug-gled to conceive and implement

  15. The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of The Assistant Administrator for Aviation Safety,

    E-print Network

    Directline ASRS The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of The Assistant Administrator for Aviation SafetyASRS Summer1992 Summer 1992 Several recent ground accidents have made members of the aviation community

  16. Patterns of physical activity among Russian youth The Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SARAH LEVIN; BARBARA E. AINSWORTH; CYNTHIA W. KWOK; CHERYL L ADDY; BARRY M. POPKIN

    Background: This paper describes physical activity the patterns of 2,101 Russian youth enrolled in the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS). The RLMS is a nationally representative household sample survey. Methods: Youth 14-18 years and parents of youth 6-13 years responded to survey questions about hours per week of light (cooking and laundry), moderate (walking, bicycling and sports), and vigorous physical

  17. Mapping automotive like controls to a general aviation aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Christopher G.

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop fly-by-wire control laws enabling a general aviation aircraft to be flown with automotive controls, i.e. a steering wheel and gas/brake pedals. There was a six speed shifter used to change the flight mode of the aircraft. This essentially allows the pilot to have control over different aspects of the flight profile such as climb/descend or cruise. A highway in the sky was used to aid in the navigation since it is not intuitive to people without flight experience how to navigate from the sky or when to climb and descend. Many believe that general aviation could become as widespread as the automobile. Every person could have a personal aircraft at their disposal and it would be as easy to operate as driving an automobile. The goal of this thesis is to fuse the ease of drivability of a car with flight of a small general aviation aircraft. A standard automotive control hardware setup coupled with variably autonomous control laws will allow new pilots to fly a plane as easily as driving a car. The idea is that new pilots will require very little training to become proficient with these controls. Pilots with little time to stay current can maintain their skills simply by driving a car which is typically a daily activity. A human factors study was conducted to determine the feasibility of the applied control techniques. Pilot performance metrics were developed to compare candidates with no aviation background and experienced pilots. After analyzing the relative performance between pilots and non-pilots, it has been determined that the control system is robust and easy to learn. Candidates with no aviation experience whatsoever can learn to fly an aircraft as safely and efficiently as someone with hundreds of hours of flight experience using these controls.

  18. 77 FR 56909 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC); Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ...Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC); Renewal AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Renewal...SUMMARY: The FAA announces the charter renewal of the Aviation Rulemaking...

  19. The Rotary Combustion Engine: a Candidate for General Aviation. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The state of development of the rotary combustion engine is discussed. The nonturbine engine research programs for general aviation and future requirements for general aviation powerplants are emphasized.

  20. An Activity-Based Learning Third-Level Course on Survey Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Gabrielle E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the delivery of an introductory module on survey sampling at a third-level institution. As part of the module, students undertake a practical survey that is of interest not only to themselves but also to university administrators and other module coordinators. Unlike many data collection activities used in…

  1. A survey of Martian dust devil activity using Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jenny A. Fisher; Mark I. Richardson; Claire E. Newman; Mark A. Szwast; Chelsea Graf; Shabari Basu; Shawn P. Ewald; Anthony D. Toigo; R. John Wilson

    2005-01-01

    A survey of dust devils using the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide- and narrow-angle (WA and NA) images has been undertaken. The survey comprises two parts: (1) sampling of nine broad regions from September 1997 to July 2001 and (2) a focused seasonal monitoring of variability in the Amazonis region, an active dust devil site, from

  2. Creating Aviation Safety Dictionary through Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wang Hongwei; Feng Xia; Huan Xiuxia

    2008-01-01

    Since the aviation safety information contains both structured and textual data, this paper proposed a strategy for creating aviation safety dictionary. It used the maximum match algorithm based on segmentation unit to obtain the candidate word set and adopted the mutually information to improve the word extraction accuracy in cooperation with domain specialists. Experiments showed that the created dictionary could

  3. The Politics of Aviation English Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderson, J. Charles

    2011-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Association has developed a set of Language Proficiency Requirements (LPRs) and a Language Proficiency Rating Scale, which seeks to define proficiency in the language needed for aviation purposes at six different levels. Pilots, air traffic controllers and aeronautical station operators are required to achieve at…

  4. Machinist's Mate J 1 and C: Aviation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Training Publications Center, Memphis, TN.

    The rate training manual is one of a series of training manuals prepared for enlisted personnel of the Navy and Naval Reserve studying for advancement from the Aviation Machinist's Mate ADJ2 rating to ADJ1 to ADJC. Aviation Machinist's Mates J maintain aircraft jet engines and their related systems. Chpater 1 discusses the enlisted rating…

  5. Aviation Safety Reporting System Meteorological and

    E-print Network

    Aviation Safety Reporting System Meteorological and Aeronautical Information Services (AIS) Data Collection 4 Findings 5 Event Information 5 Discussion 11 Qualified Incident Reporting 11 Pre-flight Link Services & Applications #12;Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) | c List of Figures Figure 1

  6. Emergency Guidebook for General Aviation Airports

    E-print Network

    Janssen, Michel

    Emergency Guidebook for General Aviation Airports A Guidebook for Municipal Airport Managers #12;Emergency Guidebook for General Aviation Airports Published by: Minnesota Airport Technical Assistance Program (AirTAP) Center for Transportation Studies (CTS) University of Minnesota 511 Washington Ave. S

  7. Aviation Career Awareness Program [and Related Materials].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrie, Edwin T.

    The learning packet focuses on general aviation and is to be used in career awareness programs at the elementary level. It includes a document which presents a group of units on general aviation and its related careers. The units include the following: (1) aircraft manufacturing, (2) instruments and controls, (3) how airplanes fly, (4) flight…

  8. Systems Engineering of Coast Guard Aviator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Eugene R.; Caro, Paul W.

    This paper describes a total-program application of the systems engineering concept of the U.S. Coast Guard aviation training programs. The systems approach used treats all aspects of the training to produce the most cost-effective integration of academic, synthetic, and flight training for the production of graduate Coast Guard aviators. The…

  9. Relationships between naval aviation safety and pilot flight experience.

    PubMed

    Borowsky, M S

    1981-10-01

    Flight activity of all aviators flying naval aircraft and aircraft accident data were analyzed to determine if statistical relationships among lifetime and recent experience variables and accident liability exist. The results demonstrate that accident potential, though not statistically related to flight hours in 30-d periods, is correlated with lifetime flight experience with the higher liability associated with minimal amounts of flight hours and with transitioning into new aircraft. PMID:7295248

  10. How Does Active Parental Consent Influence the Findings of Drug-Use Surveys in Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Victoria M.; Hill, David J.; Effendi, Yuksel

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the impact of passive and active parental consent procedures on the type of adolescents participating in a school-based survey examining substance use. Schools recruited from a random sample of metropolitan schools were assigned to passive or active parental consent condition. Results showed that participation rates in active

  11. A Survey of Leisure Time Activities of Working Owmen in Jaipur

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixit, Asha

    1976-01-01

    A survey of the leisure time activities of 278 working women (teachers, nurses, telephone operators, and clerks) indicated that occupation does not significantly influence the type of leisure activities. Comparisons were made within and between occupational groups and between home and office time activities. (MS)

  12. Aviation 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    spot ranges too frequently may lead to the uneconomical use of these engines for operators (LaFleur, R.H.C. 2013). ................................................................... 18 Figure 10: FlexGen ultracapacitor system...). .................................................................... 25 Table 4: Pricing estimates per drilling rig includes the use of 2-3 engines per rig (Hill et al. 2011; Kulkarni 2013). For hybrid power, only one ultracapacitor would be needed with the use of 2-3 engines generating power (Juergens 2013...

  13. Environmentally Responsible Aviation - Real Solutions for Environmental Challenges Facing Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Fayette; Thomas, Russell; Burley, Casey; Nickol, Craig; Lee, Chi-Ming; Tong, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The combined reality of persistently strong growth in air traffic and the vital economic role of the air transport system result in continued demand for the progress of technology for the reduction of aircraft noise, emissions of oxides of nitrogen, and fuel burn. NASA s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project has set aggressive goals in these three areas including a noise goal of 42 dB cumulative below the Stage 4 certification level. The goal for the reduction of oxides of nitrogen is 75% below the current standard. The fuel burn reduction goal is 50% below that of a current state-of-the-art aircraft. Furthermore, the overall goal of ERA is to mature technologies that will meet these goals simultaneously and with a timeframe of 2020 for technical readiness. This paper outlines the key technologies and the progress achieved to date toward the goals.

  14. Studies towards assessing the effects of aviation on climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayari, Arezoo

    Emissions from aviation are an important component in the overall concerns about the effects of human activities on climate. Aviation emissions modify the chemical and physical properties of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) in various ways. Aircraft emit gases and particles that can either directly or indirectly affect climate and air quality, including: carbon dioxide (CO2); nitrogen oxides (NOx) that can increase ozone (O3) production and increase the destruction of methane (CH4); water vapor that under certain atmospheric conditions can lead to contrail formation; and soot and other particles that along with contrails can affect the amount and characteristics of cirrus clouds. Soot and sulfate particles can also change the cloudiness by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. Due to the high growth in air traffic that is projected to continue, it is important to understand the effects of aviation on air quality and climate. Based on then existing analyses of the emissions and their effects, the aviation contribution in changing the radiative forcing on the climate system was about 5% of the total human-related emissions (relative to 1750) in 2005 (Lee et al., 2009). This contribution is a result of various effects, especially the direct effects of CO2, NOx-induced effects, aerosol direct and indirect effects, and increased cloudiness from contrail formation and aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei. One of the main challenges of the aviation scientific community has been to increase the level of scientific understanding of these effects, especially with respect to those most uncertain (i.e. NOx effects, contrail-cirrus and aerosol effects). Another challenge has been to develop a simple climate model (SCM) that has the level of sophistication necessary to accurately assess aviation induced climate effects while being easy to use by policy makers for use in policy considerations. The main objectives in this study were: (1) to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of simple climate models for evaluating aviation policy options and tradeoffs, and (2) to increase the scientific understanding of aviation NOx-induced effects on climate. With regard to the first goal, enhancing the evaluation of SCMs, the carbon cycle and energy balance treatments in several widely used simplified climate models were evaluated. The findings from this study resulted in modifications to the carbon cycle and energy balance model components of the APMT model that is used extensively by FAA in aviation policy analyses. With regard to the second goal, 3 lines of research were pursued to increase the scientific understanding of aviation NOx-induced effects on climate. First, aviation NOx-induced effects were quantified using three-dimensional (3-D) climate-chemistry models and further, an intercomparison of NOx-induced effects in 3-D climate-chemistry models was performed. The NOx-induced forcings obtained in 3-D simulations were further used to update the parameterization of these effects in SCMs. Second, two additional NOx-induced effects (i.e., reduction in long-term O3 concentrations and lower stratospheric water vapor (SWV)) that have not been fully accounted for in previous studies were quantified based on parameterizing the results obtained in the 3-D simulations. Results indicate that the inclusion of long-term O3 and SWV RFs decreases the net aviation-induced RFs by about 21 to 31% for different range of scenarios studied. Finally, the representation of aviation NOx-induced effects in SCMs were evaluated and improved. The parameterization was improved based on the results of the 3-D simulations and by including the lifetime of the perturbed species and their emissions history into RF calculations. This resulted in 10 to 36% higher aviation NOx-induced net forcing than the net forcings that were reported in the literature, previously. Third, a set of experiments were performed to directly calculate the aviation NOx-induced changes in CH4 that were otherwise calculated through a simple parameterization, and also to

  15. Professional Development Activities of Public Library Administrators: An Opinion Survey of the Relative Value of Such Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrossan, John A.

    A survey of 104 Florida public library administrators resulted in a 70% response rate to a questionnaire investigating the value of a variety of types of activities associated with professional development. Presented as a poster session, this report indicates that the following professional and continuing education activities were considered the…

  16. Minimum detectable activities of contamination control survey equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Goles, R.W.; Baumann, B.L.; Johnson, M.L.

    1991-08-01

    The Instrumentation External Dosimetry (I ED) Section of the Health Physics Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has performed a series of tests to determine the ability of portable survey instruments used at Hanford to detect radioactive contamination at levels required by DOE 5480.11. This semi-empirical study combines instrumental, statistical, and human factors as necessary to derive operational detection limits. These threshold detection values have been compared to existing contamination control requirements, and detection deficiencies have been identified when present. Portable survey instruments used on the Hanford Site identify the presence of radioactive surface contamination based on the detection of {alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}-, and/or x-radiation. However, except in some unique circumstances, most contamination monitors in use at Hanford are configured to detect either {alpha}-radiation alone or {beta}- and {gamma}-radiation together. Testing was therefore conducted on only these two categories of radiation detection devices. Nevertheless, many of the results obtained are generally applicable to all survey instruments, allowing performance evaluations to be extended to monitoring devices which are exclusively {gamma}- and/or x-ray- sensitive. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Studies in general aviation aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelmann, Allen E.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland has completed a research study for NASA Langley on the application of drooped leading edges to high aspect wings. The experimental study conducted for this grant was a natural extension of work previously conducted at NASA Ames, the University of Michigan, NASA Langley and the University of Maryland. Previous research had shown that wing planform modifications (commonly referred to as drooped leading edge mods) could have a significant effect on reducing or eliminating the stall/spin characteristics of General Aviation (GA) aircraft. All aircraft studied in the earlier work had relatively low aspect ratio wings (AR = 6). Since future GA aircraft will feature higher aspect ratio wings, the obvious question was: how well will the dropped leading edge work on higher aspect ratio wings? The focus of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of the drooped leading edge modifications to higher aspect ratio wings with AR = 9 to 12.

  18. NASA general aviation technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winblade, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the current NASA programs that are aimed at providing new technology for aircraft designs that will improve both safety and utility while reducing the environmental impact of general aviation to acceptable levels. Safety related areas that are discussed include the full scale crash test program and the stall/spin research effort. Among the programs addressing increased utility and performance, advanced airfoil developments and engine cooling drag reduction are discussed. Noise and emission reduction is a subject that is receiving significant emphasis within the NASA programs. Also included is a description of the current status of the hydrogen injection concept as a means of both lowering emissions and increasing fuel economy.

  19. NASA aviation safety reporting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The study deals with 165 inadvertent operations on or into inappropriate portions of the aircraft areas at controlled airports. Pilot-initiated and controller-initiated incursions are described and discussed. It was found that a majority of the pilot-initiated occurrences involved operation without a clearance; controller-initiated occurrences usually involved failure to maintain assured separation. The factors associated with these occurrences are analyzed. It appears that a major problem in these occurrences is inadequate coordination among the various system participants. Reasons for this, and some possible solutions to various aspects of the problem, are discussed. A sample of reports from pilots and controllers is presented. These relate to undesired occurrences in air transport, general aviation, and air traffic control operations; to ATC coordination problems; and to a recurrent problem in ASRS reports, parachuting operations. A sample of alert bulletins and responses to them is presented.

  20. Aviation Research and the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Antoinette M.

    1995-01-01

    The Internet is a network of networks. It was originally funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency or DOD/DARPA and evolved in part from the connection of supercomputer sites across the United States. The National Science Foundation (NSF) made the most of their supercomputers by connecting the sites to each other. This made the supercomputers more efficient and now allows scientists, engineers and researchers to access the supercomputers from their own labs and offices. The high speed networks that connect the NSF supercomputers form the backbone of the Internet. The World Wide Web (WWW) is a menu system. It gathers Internet resources from all over the world into a series of screens that appear on your computer. The WWW is also a distributed. The distributed system stores data information on many computers (servers). These servers can go out and get data when you ask for it. Hypermedia is the base of the WWW. One can 'click' on a section and visit other hypermedia (pages). Our approach to demonstrating the importance of aviation research through the Internet began with learning how to put pages on the Internet (on-line) ourselves. We were assigned two aviation companies; Vision Micro Systems Inc. and Innovative Aerodynamic Technologies (IAT). We developed home pages for these SBIR companies. The equipment used to create the pages were the UNIX and Macintosh machines. HTML Supertext software was used to write the pages and the Sharp JX600S scanner to scan the images. As a result, with the use of the UNIX, Macintosh, Sun, PC, and AXIL machines, we were able to present our home pages to over 800,000 visitors.

  1. Issue Brief -AVIATION I. Introduction and Overall County Grade

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    AVIATION #12;DRAFT Issue Brief - AVIATION I. Introduction and Overall County Grade Facilities for commercial, general and military aviation have been a part of Orange County since before World War II. Since commercial and general aviation facilities. The regional need to satisfy the demand for air transportation

  2. Anthropogenic Effects on Observing Conditions at Paranal. I: Aviation

    E-print Network

    Anthropogenic Effects on Observing Conditions at Paranal. I: Aviation H.Pedersen May 7, 1997 From aviation, and artificial Earth satellites. In this report, the effects of aviation will be discussed report may deal with artificial Earth satellites. 2 Possible Effects of Aviation The passage of aircraft

  3. National Transportation Safety Board Office of Aviation Safety

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    1 National Transportation Safety Board Office of Aviation Safety Washington, D.C. 20594 Electronics Engineer Federal Aviation Administration 1 UTC ­ is an abbreviation for Coordinated Universal Time NWS and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Advisory Circular "Aviation Weather Services", AC 00

  4. A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Chris

    A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson C. M. Holloway*, Dept in aviation. The N.A.C.A. committee published an initial report in August 1928 [1]. This was "undertaken be compared to the International Civil Aviation Organisation's (ICAO) definition of an aviation accident

  5. Introduction Fossil fuel combustion by aviation, shipping and road

    E-print Network

    Haak, Hein

    96 Introduction Fossil fuel combustion by aviation, shipping and road traffic contributes about one. The total climate impact of aviation emissions (excluding the uncertain impact on natural clouds of the aviation sector has already been assessed quite extensively, e.g. in the IPCC special Report on Aviation

  6. MAINTENANCE The Aviation Maintenance Technology Program offers an associate of

    E-print Network

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY The Aviation Maintenance Technology Program offers an associate of applied science in aviation maintenance and certificates in airframe, powerplant, or airframe and powerplant maintenance. It is one of the few twelve month Federal Aviation Administration Part-147 certified

  7. Understanding industry-government-university technology development partnership needs in the aviation\\/aerospace industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kotnour

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. The contribution of this paper is a description of the partnership needs among industry, government, and the educational system for technology development. A three-part research study involving an industry survey, industry\\/government interviews, and a faculty survey was conducted. Industry, government, and faculty associated with aviation\\/aerospace in the state of Florida were the sample population. The results

  8. Active Transportation to School: Findings from a National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Janet E.; Shisler, Jessica L.; Yore, Michelle M.; Caspersen, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    In the past, active transportation to school offered an important source of daily physical activity for youth; more recently, however, factors related to distance, safety, or physical or social environments may have contributed to the proportion of children who travel to school by motorized vehicle. The authors examine the characteristics of…

  9. A Fractal Dimension Survey of Active Region Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Gallagher, Peter; Ireland, Jack

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to quantifying the magnetic complexity of active regions using a fractal dimension measure is presented. This fully-automated approach uses full disc MDI magnetograms of active regions from a large data set (2742 days of the SoHO mission; 9342 active regions) to compare the calculated fractal dimension to both Mount Wilson classification and flare rate. The main Mount Wilson classes exhibit no distinct fractal dimension distribution, suggesting a self-similar nature of all active regions. Solar flare productivity exhibits an increase in both the frequency and GOES X-ray magnitude of flares from regions with higher fractal dimensions. Specifically a lower threshold fractal dimension of 1.2 and 1.25 exists as a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for an active region to produce M- and X-class flares respectively .

  10. Come Fly with Me! Exploring Science 7-9 through Aviation/Aerospace Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Housel, David C.; Housel, Doreen K. M.

    This guide contains 67 activities dealing with various aerospace/aviation education concepts. The activities are presented in units related to physical science, earth science, and life science. In addition, there is a section related to student involvement in the space shuttle programs. The physical science unit (activities 1-23) focuses on the…

  11. M.S. in Aviation and Space The Master's in Aviation and Space emphasizes management, regulation, finance,

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    M.S. in Aviation and Space The Master's in Aviation and Space emphasizes management, regulation, finance, current issues, aerospace logistics, aerospace security, and content regarding the aviation be admitted to both the Oklahoma State University graduate college and the Aviation Education (AVED) program

  12. UNSW School of Aviation 2013 Colloquium Series Location: School of Aviation, Old Main Building, Level 2, Room 221

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    UNSW School of Aviation 2013 Colloquium Series Location: School of Aviation, Old Main Building presentation Date Presenter Affiliation Topic Title Chair 31 July Xiaowen Fu USYD Aviation Economics China David Tan 14 August Brett Molesworth UNSW Aviation Safety Using the effect of alcohol

  13. ISSUE NO. 8 The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation

    E-print Network

    ISSUE NO. 8 The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of the Assistant Administrator for System Safety in the national aviation system. Under his leadership, the ASRS became a model for aviation incident reporting

  14. Measuring physical activity in children and adolescents for dietary surveys: practicalities, problems and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Mindell, Jennifer S; Coombs, Ngaire; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    Physical inactivity is an important risk factor for many chronic diseases and contributes to obesity and poor mental well-being. The present paper describes the main advantages and disadvantages, practical problems, suggested uses, and future developments regarding self-reported and objective data collection in the context of dietary surveys. In dietary surveys, physical activity is measured primarily to estimate energy expenditure. Energy expenditure surveillance is important for tracking changes over time, particularly given the debates over the role of the relative importance of energy intake and expenditure changes in the aetiology of obesity. It is also important to assess the extent of underreporting of dietary intake in these surveys. Physical activity data collected should include details on the frequency, duration and relative intensity of activity for each activity type that contributes considerably to overall activity and energy expenditure. Problems of validity and reliability, associated with inaccurate assessment, recall bias, and social desirability bias, are well-known; children under 10 years cannot report their activities accurately. However, despite such limitations, questionnaires are still the dominant method of physical activity assessment in dietary surveys due to their low cost and relatively low participant burden. Objective, time-stamped measures that monitor heart rate and/or movement can provide more comprehensive, quantitative assessment of physical activity but at greater cost and participant burden. Although overcoming many limitations of questionnaires, objective measures also have drawbacks, including technical, practical and interpretational issues. PMID:24423128

  15. Activities of the Alaska District, Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, E. F., (compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Hydrologic data collection activities by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska are described. Seventeen projects were active in 1987. Each description includes information on period of project, project chief, funding sources, location, purpose, current status, and published or planned reports. The compilation also contains a bibliography of reports published by the Alaska District from 1984 through 1986. (USGS)

  16. "Activities of Older Adults" Survey: Tapping into Student Views of the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtele, Sandy K.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an exercise used in a life span developmental psychology course to tap into undergraduates' perceptions of activities of the elderly. Students were asked to generate items to be included in a hypothetical Activities of Older Adults survey (to be administered to people 65 years and older). Responses from 1,340 students over a…

  17. Reliability and Convergent Validity of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey Physical Activity Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinger, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS) vigorous physical activity (VPA), moderate physical activity (MPA), flexibility (FLEX), and muscular strength and/or endurance (MSE) questions. Twenty college students completed the four items twice during the same day. During the next 7…

  18. Smart phones are useful for food intake and physical activity surveys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. Wohlers; J. R. Sirard; C. M. Barden; J. K. Moon

    2009-01-01

    Current self-report methods of recording food intake and Physical Activity (PA) are cumbersome and inaccurate. Food and activity surveys implemented on a smart phone will allow for immediate entry, data transfer to a researcher, and feedback to the user. Ten subjects followed a script, representative of one day, to enter food intake and PA on a smart phone. In the

  19. Orientation and disorientation in aviation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    On the ground, the essential requirement to remain orientated is a largely unconscious activity. In flight, orientation requires a conscious effort by the pilot particularly when the visual environment becomes degraded and a deceptive force environment becomes the frame of reference. Furthermore, an unusual force environment can determine the apparent location of objects within a limited visual scene, sometimes with disastrous consequences. This review outlines the sources of pilot disorientation that arise from the visual and force environment of flight and their interaction. It challenges the value of the traditional illusion-based approach to the subject both to aircrew and to surveys of disorientation. Also, it questions the emphasis on the shortcomings of vestibular function as the physiological basis for disorientation. While military accidents from all causes have shown a decline, there has been no corresponding reduction in accidents involving disorientation, 85% of which are the results of unrecognised disorientation. This finding has implications for the way in which pilots are taught about disorientation in the interest of enhanced flight safety. It argues for a greater use of conventional fixed base simulators to create disorientating scenarios rather than complex motion devices to create unusual sensations. PMID:23849216

  20. (To appear. ACM Computing Surveys.) Human Activity Analysis: A Review

    E-print Network

    Aggarwal, J. K.

    in the paper. Space-time volume approaches and sequential approaches that represent and recognize activities. Automated surveillance systems in pub- lic places like airports and subway stations require detection of

  1. Survey of French activities concerning structural airworthiness and aging aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labourdette, Roger

    1992-01-01

    French activities concerning structural airworthiness and aging aircraft are presented. Basic applied research, full-scale testing, teardown inspections, crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, fretting fatigue, non-destructive inspection, and damage tolerance are among the topics covered.

  2. The NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of reports based on safety-related incidents submitted to the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System by pilots, controllers, and, occasionally, other participants in the National Aviation System (refs. 1-13). ASRS operates under a memorandum of agreement between the National Aviation and Space Administration and the Federal Aviation Administration. The report contains, first, a special study prepared by the ASRS Office Staff, of pilot- and controller-submitted reports related to the perceived operation of the ATC system since the 1981 walkout of the controllers' labor organization. Next is a research paper analyzing incidents occurring while single-pilot crews were conducting IFR flights. A third section presents a selection of Alert Bulletins issued by ASRS, with the responses they have elicited from FAA and others concerned. Finally, the report contains a list of publications produced by ASRS with instructions for obtaining them.

  3. Considering Object Oriented Technology in Aviation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Holloway, C. Michael

    2003-01-01

    Few developers of commercial aviation software products are using object-oriented technology (OOT), despite its popularity in some other industries. Safety concerns about using OOT in critical applications, uncertainty about how to comply with regulatory requirements, and basic conservatism within the aviation community have been factors behind this caution. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have sponsored research to investigate and workshops to discuss safety and certification concerns about OOT and to develop recommendations for safe use. Two Object Oriented Technology in Aviation (OOTiA) workshops have been held and numerous issues and comments about the effect of OOT features and languages have been collected. This paper gives a high level overview of the OOTiA project, and discusses selected specific results from the March 2003 workshop. In particular, results in the form of questions to consider before making the decision to use OOT are presented.

  4. The climate impact of aviation aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettelman, A.; Chen, C.

    2013-06-01

    A comprehensive general circulation model (GCM) is used to estimate the climate impact of aviation emissions of black carbon (BC) and sulfate (SO4) aerosols. Aviation BC is found not to exert significant radiative forcing impacts, when BC nucleating efficiencies in line with observations are used. Sulfate emissions from aircraft are found to alter liquid clouds at altitudes below emission (˜200 hPa); contributing to shortwave cloud brightening through enhanced liquid water path and drop number concentration in major flight corridors, particularly in the N. Atlantic. Global averaged sulfate direct and indirect effects on liquid clouds of 46 mWm-2are larger than the warming effect of aviation induced cloudiness of 16 mWm-2. The net result of including contrail cirrus and aerosol effects is a global averaged cooling of -21±11 mWm-2. These aerosol forcings should be considered with contrails in evaluating the total global impact of aviation on climate.

  5. 78 FR 13395 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...kodiakairporteis.com 2. Email: Leslie.Grey@faa.govmailto:izembek_eis@fws...of the message. 3. Fax: Attn: Leslie Grey, AAL-614, (907) 271-2851 4. U.S. Mail: Leslie Grey--AAL-614, Federal Aviation...

  6. 78 FR 25524 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...at The Eastern Iowa Airport (CID) being changed...conditions of the Airport Improvement Program Grant Agreement Grant...and (iii), the airport will receive fair...improvement project for general aviation facilities at...

  7. Aviation human factors research in US universities: Potential contributions to national needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismukes, R. Key

    1994-01-01

    Universities can and should make vital contributions to national needs in aviation human factors. However, to guide and utilize university research effectively we must understand what types of expertise and facilities universities can bring to bear on aviation problems. We should be aware of where relevant research is already underway and where untapped potential exists. How does the character of research in universities differ from and complement research in government and industry laboratories? What conditions would encourage universities to focus on national priorities and would promote high quality, relevant research? This paper attempts to address these issues. It is based on a survey conducted by the author, which included site visits to several universities, telephone interviews with faculty members at other universities, and a search of the aviation human factors research literature.

  8. Directions in civil aviation 1980-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1977-01-01

    The following future directions in civil aviation are considered: (1) greater economy and efficiency in passenger and cargo air service at subsonic speeds, and improved utility and safety for general aviation, (2) greatly improved short haul air transportation using turbofan or turboprop aircraft, and subsequently, rotorcraft and V/STOL aircraft, and (3) supersonic, and ultimately hypersonic, air transportation for transoceanic long range flight. Attention is also given to new directions in research and technology.

  9. NASA Research on General Aviation Power Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. L.; Weber, R. J.; Willis, E. A.; Sievers, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    Propulsion systems are key factors in the design and performance of general aviation airplanes. NASA research programs that are intended to support improvements in these engines are described. Reciprocating engines are by far the most numerous powerplants in the aviation fleet; near-term efforts are being made to lower their fuel consumption and emissions. Longer-term work includes advanced alternatives, such as rotary and lightweight diesel engines. Work is underway on improved turbofans and turboprops.

  10. General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerst, C. F.; Furst, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of turbine engines for the smaller general aviation aircraft was investigated and a technology program for developing the necessary technology was identified. Major results included the definition of the 1988 general aviation market, the identification of turboprop and turboshaft engines that meet the requirements of the aircraft studies, a benefit analysis showing the superiority of gas turbine engines for portions of the market studied, and detailed plans for the development of the necessary technology.

  11. Modeling and Validation of Aviation Security

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uwe Glässer; Sarah Rastkar; Mona Vajihollahi

    2008-01-01

    Security of civil aviation has become a major concern in recent years, especially due to the increasing number of potential\\u000a and real threats imposing dynamically changing risks on airport and aircraft security. We propose here a novel computational\\u000a approach to checking consistency, coherence and completeness of aviation security requirements and provide a framework for\\u000a systematic analysis of the efficiency and

  12. Survey research on activity-based costing: a reply to Dugdale and Jones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Innes; F. Mitchell

    1997-01-01

    In January 1996 we responded positively to a request by David Dugdale for assistance in accessing 14 respondents to our postal questionnaire survey of activity-based costing (ABC) in the U.K.'s largest companies (Innes and Mitchell, 1995). While the survey covered a broad range of ABC applications these respondents were the only ones who had stated that their firms had used

  13. Aviation Frontiers: On-Demand Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the 20th Century, NASA has defined the forefront of aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry owes much of its prosperity to this knowledge and technology. In recent decades, centralized aeronautics has become a mature discipline, which raises questions concerning the future aviation innovation frontiers. Three transformational aviation capabilities, bounded together by the development of a Free Flight airspace management system, have the potential to transform 21st Century society as profoundly as civil aviation transformed the 20th Century. These mobility breakthroughs will re-establish environmental sustainable centralized aviation, while opening up latent markets for civil distributed sensing and on-demand rural and regional transportation. Of these three transformations, on-demand aviation has the potential to have the largest market and productivity improvement to society. The information system revolution over the past 20 years shows that vehicles lead, and the interconnecting infrastructure to make them more effective follows; that is, unless on-demand aircraft are pioneered, a distributed Air Traffic Control system will likely never be established. There is no single technology long-pole that will enable on-demand vehicle solutions. However, fully digital aircraft that include electric propulsion has the potential to be a multi-disciplinary initiator of solid state technologies that can provide order of magnitude improvements in the ease of use, safety/reliability, community and environmental friendliness, and affordability.

  14. AWE: Aviation Weather Data Visualization Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Lodha, Suresh K.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Weather is one of the major causes of aviation accidents. General aviation (GA) flights account for 92% of all the aviation accidents, In spite of all the official and unofficial sources of weather visualization tools available to pilots, there is an urgent need for visualizing several weather related data tailored for general aviation pilots. Our system, Aviation Weather Data Visualization Environment AWE), presents graphical displays of meteorological observations, terminal area forecasts, and winds aloft forecasts onto a cartographic grid specific to the pilot's area of interest. Decisions regarding the graphical display and design are made based on careful consideration of user needs. Integral visual display of these elements of weather reports is designed for the use of GA pilots as a weather briefing and route selection tool. AWE provides linking of the weather information to the flight's path and schedule. The pilot can interact with the system to obtain aviation-specific weather for the entire area or for his specific route to explore what-if scenarios and make "go/no-go" decisions. The system, as evaluated by some pilots at NASA Ames Research Center, was found to be useful.

  15. Recreational activities of lower extremity amputees: a survey.

    PubMed

    Kegel, B; Webster, J C; Burgess, E M

    1980-06-01

    This study summarizes a detailed questionnaire evaluation of recreational activities participated in by 100 persons with lower extremity amputations. Additional information was obtained from prosthetists and physical therapists. Approximately 60% of the respondents are active in sports. Younger persons of either sex, who have had amputations for congenital deformities or trauma, are most active. Level of amputation does not appear to be a determining factor as to whether amputees participated or not. The most common recreational activities are fishing and swimming. Sports causing the amputee most discomfort are hunting and jogging. The ability to run and jump is the most difficult to achieve. Reasons for non-participation are pain, embarrassment, insufficient training and lack of organized sports programs for the disabled. Fear of further injury or an overprotective family are not inhibiting factors, nor is cost of the prosthesis. Only a few people wear specifically designed recreational prostheses, and only one-third of the amputees believe that their prosthetist is knowledgeable about recreational prostheses, while 40% feel the prosthetist discouraged their own ideas about prosthetic innovations. Therapists also proved inadequate in their knowledge and efforts at preparing the amputee for recreation. The amputees indicate a need for improved prosthetic design, and believe that insufficient information, both verbal and written, was given to them. PMID:7377953

  16. Active memory chips: A brief survey and case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Elliot Shaw; Theodore M. Sabety

    1987-01-01

    Conventional random access memories are capable only of writing data into and reading data from the storage location corresponding to a given address. The availability of VLSI circuits containing hundreds of thousands of switching devices, however, has recently made practical the implementation of “active” memory chips capable of performing a range of complex operations on their stored data. Such designs

  17. Document Skimming Support Environment for Surveying Documents in Creative Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayama, Tessai; Kanai, Takashi; Kunifuji, Susumu

    This paper proposes a document skimming environment for surveying documents in our research. Although there are a lot of on-line documents on our surroundings, people, generally, prefer printing out on-line research papers from computer screen. For this reason, although skimming is used for reading documents in our daily life, it is difficult for us to skim documents from computer screens. Therefore, we developed a document skimming environment. The environment has a skimming support system and a recommendation system. The skimming support system supports skimming documents from computer screens by the interface, which is applied the Fisheye effect and the Overview+detail effect. Focus points of the Fisheye effect are the sentences selected by the original sentence extraction algorithm based on the value of standard distribution, and the Overview interface is displayed automatically the generated table of contents. The recommendation system generates personalized summaries by the collaborate filtering, which use users' log of the skimming support system. Furthermore, evaluation results show as follows; The value of F-measure of our sentence extraction algorithm is higher than it of the sentence extraction algorithm based on TF or Japanese lexical chaining method, the skimming support system is more effective method to skim documents from computer screen than paper, and the skimming support environment is more effective method to product research proposal documents than paper.

  18. NASA aviation safety reporting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A sample of reports relating to operations during winter weather is presented. Several reports involving problems of judgment and decisionmaking have been selected from the numerous reports representative of this area. Problems related to aeronautical charts are discussed in a number of reports. An analytic study of reports involving potential conflicts in the immediate vicinity of uncontrolled airports was performed; the results are discussed in this report. It was found that in three-fourths of 127 such conflicts, neither pilot, or only one of the pilots, was communicating position and intentions on the appropriate frequency. The importance of providing aural transfer of information, as a backup to the visual see and avoid mode of information transfer is discussed. It was also found that a large fraction of pilots involved in potential conflicts on final approach had executed straight-in approaches, rather than the recommended traffic pattern entries, prior to the conflicts. A selection of alert bulletins and responses to them by various segments of the aviation community is presented.

  19. Activated sludge modelling in practice: an international survey.

    PubMed

    Hauduc, H; Gillot, S; Rieger, L; Ohtsuki, T; Shaw, A; Takács, I; Winkler, S

    2009-01-01

    The Good Modelling Practice Task Group (GMP-TG) of the International Water Association (IWA) is developing guidelines for the use of Activated Sludge Models (ASM). As part of this work the group created and sent out a questionnaire to current and potential activated sludge model users in 2007. The objectives of the questionnaire were (i) to better define the profile of ASM users, (ii) to identify the tools and procedures that are actually used and (iii) to highlight the main limitations while building and using ASM-type models. Ninety-six answers were received from all over the world, from several types of organisation. The results were analysed to identify the modellers' perceptions of models depending on their profile. The results also highlighted the main topics of interest for improving modelling procedures which are standardisation of the available modelling guidelines and better experience and knowledge transfer. PMID:19844041

  20. Active Recognition through Next View Planning: A Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sumantra Dutta; Roy Santanu; Chaudhury Subhashis Banerjee

    D object recognition involves using image-computable features to identify 3-D object. A single view of a 3-D object may not contain sufficient features to recognize it unambigu- ously. One needs to plan different views around the given object in order to recognize it. Such a task involves an active sensor - one whose parameters (external and\\/or internal) can be changed

  1. Understanding Aviation English as a Lingua Franca: Perceptions of Korean Aviation Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyejeong; Elder, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Researchers exploring the use of language use in radiotelephony communication have tended to focus on the limitations of the non-native English user and the threats which their limited control of English may pose for aviation safety (e.g. Atsushi, 2003, 2004). Hence the recent International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) policy places the onus…

  2. Aviation Weather Observations for Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS) and Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS). Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Transportation, Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides instructions for observing, identifying, and recording aviation weather at Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS) and Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS). Official technical definitions, meteorological and administrative procedures are outlined. Although this publication is intended for use…

  3. The Impact of Child Obesity on Active Parental Consent in School-Based Survey Research on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer M. Mellor; Ronald B. Rapoport; Daniel Maliniak

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that active consent procedures result in sampling bias in surveys dealing with adolescent risk behaviors such as cigarette smoking and illicit drug use. To examine sampling bias from active consent procedures when the survey topic pertains to childhood obesity and associated health behaviors, the authors pair data obtained from both active and passive consent procedures. The

  4. Come Fly with Me! Exploring Science K-6 through Aviation/Aerospace Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Housel, David C.; Housel, Doreen K. M.

    This guide contains 95 activities dealing with various aerospace/aviation education concepts. The activities are presented in units for kindergarten through sixth grade organized around a central theme at each grade level. The themes follow a sequence from grade to grade. Beginning with the introduction of basic inquiry process skills in…

  5. Comparison of aerial and ground surveying of subsidence over an active longwall

    SciTech Connect

    LaScola, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines repeatedly surveyed a grid of monuments over an active longwall mine panel in southwestern Pennsylvania during a 1-yr period. Both conventional ground surveying techniques and photogrammetry were used. The objective of this investigation was to compare elevation measurements of subsidence obtained from aerial and ground survey methods under dynamic ground conditions. The results of a statistical analysis of the survey data show that the mean of the differences between 372 matched pairs of elevation measurements was 0.20 ft (61 mm) with a 95-pct-confidence interval of 0.05 ft (15 mm). The mean of the absolute values of the differences was 0.38 ft (116 mm) with a 95-pct-confidence interval of 0.04 ft (12 mm). Ninety-five percent of the absolute values of the differences were less than 1.11 ft (338 mm).

  6. Transport impacts on atmosphere and climate: Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. S.; Pitari, G.; Grewe, V.; Gierens, K.; Penner, J. E.; Petzold, A.; Prather, M. J.; Schumann, U.; Bais, A.; Berntsen, T.; Iachetti, D.; Lim, L. L.; Sausen, R.

    2010-12-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion. The last major international assessment of these impacts was made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 1999. Here, a comprehensive updated assessment of aviation is provided. Scientific advances since the 1999 assessment have reduced key uncertainties, sharpening the quantitative evaluation, yet the basic conclusions remain the same. The climate impact of aviation is driven by long-term impacts from CO 2 emissions and shorter-term impacts from non-CO 2 emissions and effects, which include the emissions of water vapour, particles and nitrogen oxides (NO x). The present-day radiative forcing from aviation (2005) is estimated to be 55 mW m -2 (excluding cirrus cloud enhancement), which represents some 3.5% (range 1.3-10%, 90% likelihood range) of current anthropogenic forcing, or 78 mW m -2 including cirrus cloud enhancement, representing 4.9% of current forcing (range 2-14%, 90% likelihood range). According to two SRES-compatible scenarios, future forcings may increase by factors of 3-4 over 2000 levels, in 2050. The effects of aviation emissions of CO 2 on global mean surface temperature last for many hundreds of years (in common with other sources), whilst its non-CO 2 effects on temperature last for decades. Much progress has been made in the last ten years on characterizing emissions, although major uncertainties remain over the nature of particles. Emissions of NO x result in production of ozone, a climate warming gas, and the reduction of ambient methane (a cooling effect) although the overall balance is warming, based upon current understanding. These NO x emissions from current subsonic aviation do not appear to deplete stratospheric ozone. Despite the progress made on modelling aviation's impacts on tropospheric chemistry, there remains a significant spread in model results. The knowledge of aviation's impacts on cloudiness has also improved: a limited number of studies have demonstrated an increase in cirrus cloud attributable to aviation although the magnitude varies: however, these trend analyses may be impacted by satellite artefacts. The effect of aviation particles on clouds (with and without contrails) may give rise to either a positive forcing or a negative forcing: the modelling and the underlying processes are highly uncertain, although the overall effect of contrails and enhanced cloudiness is considered to be a positive forcing and could be substantial, compared with other effects. The debate over quantification of aviation impacts has also progressed towards studying potential mitigation and the technological and atmospheric tradeoffs. Current studies are still relatively immature and more work is required to determine optimal technological development paths, which is an aspect that atmospheric science has much to contribute. In terms of alternative fuels, liquid hydrogen represents a possibility and may reduce some of aviation's impacts on climate if the fuel is produced in a carbon-neutral way: such fuel is unlikely to be utilized until a 'hydrogen economy' develops. The introduction of biofuels as a means of reducing CO 2 impacts represents a future possibility. However, even over and above land-use concerns and greenhouse gas budget issues, aviation fuels require strict adherence to safety standards and thus require extra processing compared with biofuels destined for other sectors, where the uptake of such fuel may be more beneficial in the first instance.

  7. A MID-INFRARED CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Miranda K. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Robitaille, Thomas P.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, Texas 78712-0259 (United States); Schlingman, Wayne M. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Cyganowski, Claudia J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Urquhart, James, E-mail: miranda.dunham@yale.edu [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2011-04-20

    We present the results of a search for mid-infrared signs of star formation activity in the 1.1 mm sources in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). We have correlated the BGPS catalog with available mid-IR Galactic plane catalogs based on the Spitzer Space Telescope GLIMPSE legacy survey and the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Galactic plane survey. We find that 44% (3712 of 8358) of the BGPS sources contain at least one mid-IR source, including 2457 of 5067 (49%) within the area where all surveys overlap (10 deg. < l < 65 deg.). Accounting for chance alignments between the BGPS and mid-IR sources, we conservatively estimate that 20% of the BPGS sources within the area where all surveys overlap show signs of active star formation. We separate the BGPS sources into four groups based on their probability of star formation activity. Extended Green Objects and Red MSX Sources make up the highest probability group, while the lowest probability group is comprised of 'starless' BGPS sources which were not matched to any mid-IR sources. The mean 1.1 mm flux of each group increases with increasing probability of active star formation. We also find that the 'starless' BGPS sources are the most compact, while the sources with the highest probability of star formation activity are on average more extended with large skirts of emission. A subsample of 280 BGPS sources with known distances demonstrates that mass and mean H{sub 2} column density also increase with probability of star formation activity.

  8. National General Aviation Design Competition Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the management of the National General Aviation Design Competition on behalf of NASA, the FAA and the Air Force by the Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC) for the time period October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2000. This was the VSGC's sixth year of managing the Competition, which the Consortium originally designed, developed and implemented for NASA and the FAA. The seventh year of the Competition was announced in July 2000. Awards to winning university teams were presented at a ceremony held at AirVenture 2000, the Experimental Aircraft Association's Annual Convention and Fly-In at Oshkosh, WIS. NASA, FAA and AOPA administrators presented the awards. The competition calls for individuals or teams of undergraduate and graduate students from U.S. engineering schools to participate in a major national effort to rebuild the U.S. general aviation sector. For the purpose of the contest, General aviation aircraft are defined as fixed wing, single or dual engine (turbine or piston), single-pilot aircraft for 2-6 passengers. In addressing design challenges for a small aircraft transportation system, the competition seeks to raise student awareness of the importance of general aviation and to stimulate breakthroughs in technology and their application in the general aviation market. The Competition has two categories: Innovative Design, and Design It, Build It, Fly It. Awards were given in both categories for this reporting year.

  9. NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) collects, analyzes, and distributes de-identified safety information provided through confidentially submitted reports from frontline aviation personnel. Since its inception in 1976, the ASRS has collected over 900,000 reports and has never breached the identity of the people sharing their information about events or safety issues. From this volume of data, the ASRS has released over 5,500 aviation safety alerts concerning potential hazards and safety concerns. The ASRS processes these reports, evaluates the information, and provides de-identified report information through the online ASRS Database at http://asrs.arc.nasa.gov. The NASA ASRS is also a founding member of the International Confidential Aviation Safety Systems (ICASS) group which is a collection of other national aviation reporting systems throughout the world. The ASRS model has also been replicated for application to improving safety in railroad, medical, fire fighting, and other domains. This presentation \\vill discuss confidential, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting systems and their advantages in providing information for safety improvements.

  10. Aviation Safety Reporting System: Process and Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda J.

    1997-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) was established in 1976 under an agreement between the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cooperative safety program invites pilots, air traffic controllers, flight attendants, maintenance personnel, and others to voluntarily report to NASA any aviation incident or safety hazard. The FAA provides most of the program funding. NASA administers the program, sets its policies in consultation with the FAA and aviation community, and receives the reports submitted to the program. The FAA offers those who use the ASRS program two important reporting guarantees: confidentiality and limited immunity. Reports sent to ASRS are held in strict confidence. More than 350,000 reports have been submitted since the program's beginning without a single reporter's identity being revealed. ASRS removes all personal names and other potentially identifying information before entering reports into its database. This system is a very successful, proof-of-concept for gathering safety data in order to provide timely information about safety issues. The ASRS information is crucial to aviation safety efforts both nationally and internationally. It can be utilized as the first step in safety by providing the direction and content to informed policies, procedures, and research, especially human factors. The ASRS process and procedures will be presented as one model of safety reporting feedback systems.

  11. AWE: Aviation Weather Data Visualization Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Lodha, Suresh K.

    2000-01-01

    The two official sources for aviation weather reports both provide weather information to a pilot in a textual format. A number of systems have recently become available to help pilots with the visualization task by providing much of the data graphically. However, two types of aviation weather data are still not being presented graphically. These are airport-specific current weather reports (known as meteorological observations, or METARs) and forecast weather reports (known as terminal area forecasts, or TAFs). Our system, Aviation Weather Environment (AWE), presents intuitive graphical displays for both METARs and TAFs, as well as winds aloft forecasts. We start with a computer-generated textual aviation weather briefing. We map this briefing onto a cartographic grid specific to the pilot's area of interest. The pilot is able to obtain aviation-specific weather for the entire area or for his specific route. The route, altitude, true airspeed, and proposed departure time can each be modified in AWE. Integral visual display of these three elements of weather reports makes AWE a useful planning tool, as well as a weather briefing tool.

  12. Lambda = 3 mm line survey of nearby active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladro, R.; Martín, S.; Riquelme, D.; Henkel, C.; Mauersberger, R.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Weiß, A.; Lefevre, C.; Kramer, C.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Armijos-Abendaño, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We aim to better understand the imprints that the nuclear activity in galaxies leaves in the molecular gas. Methods: We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to observe the frequency range ~[86-116] GHz towards the central regions of the starburst galaxies M 83, M 82, and NGC 253, the galaxies hosting an active galactic nucleus (AGN) M 51, NGC 1068, and NGC 7469, and the ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) Arp 220 and Mrk 231. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), we calculated the column densities of 27 molecules and 10 isotopologues (or their upper limits in case of non-detections). Results: Among others, we report the first tentative detections of CH3CHO, HNCO, and NS in M 82 and, for the first time in the extragalactic medium, HC5N in NGC 253. H? recombination lines were only found in M 82 and NGC 253. Vibrationally excited lines of HC3N were only detected in Arp 220. CH3CCH emission is only seen in the starburst-dominated galaxies. By comparison of the fractional abundances among the galaxies, we looked for the molecules that are best suited to characterise the chemistry of each group of galaxies (starbursts, AGNs and ULIRGs), as well as the differences among galaxies within the same group. Conclusions: Suitable species for characterising and comparing starburst galaxies are CH3OH and HNCO as tracers of large-scale shocks, which dominate early to intermediate starburst stages, and CH3CCH, c-C3H2, and HCO as tracers of UV fields, which control the intermediate-to-old or post starburst phases. M 83 shows signs of a shock-dominated environment. NGC 253 is characterised by both strong shocks and some UV fields. M 82 stands out for its bright photo-dissociated region tracers, which indicate an UV field-dominated environment. Regarding AGNs, the abundances of HCN and CN (previously claimed as enhanced in AGNs) in M 51 are similar to those in starburst galaxies, while the HCN/HCO+ ratio is high in M 51 and NGC 1068, but not in NGC 7469. We did not find a correlation between the HCN/CS ratio (recently claimed as a possible starburst/AGN discriminator) and the AGN activity. However, a high enough spatial resolution to separate their circumnuclear disks from the surrounding star-forming regions is needed to find molecular abundance trends in AGNs. High abundances of H13CN and HC3N, as well as a similarity between the column densities of 13CO and C18O, are representative of the molecular interstellar medium in the ULIRGs. Furthermore, the chemistry of Arp 220 points towards a more starburst-dominated environment, while that of Mrk 231 more resembles the AGNs of our sample. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFITS files of the reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/579/A101

  13. AERA Annual Meeting Participant Activities and Satisfaction: Results of the 1993 Market Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnette, J. Jackson

    The American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting attracts several thousand participants. With several hundred sessions combined with opportunities for other professional, social, and personal activities, the meeting provides a widely varied set of experiences. The market survey conducted at the 1993 Annual Meeting sought to…

  14. Things Are Happening: A Survey Report of North American Family History Activity. Series 340.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennion, Roy B.; Nichols, Elizabeth L.

    To find out about grass roots activities and projects in family history, a survey form was distributed through periodicals and newsletters of genealogical and historical organizations and through general periodicals; telephone calls were made to all state boards of education; and data were gathered from projects already in the researchers'…

  15. Activities of the Alaska District, Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Elisabeth F.

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen projects of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resource Division active in Alaska in 1990 are described. Each description includes information on period of project, chief, funding sources, location, purpose, current status, and published or planned reports. The compilation also contains a bibliography of reports published by the Alaska District from 1987 through January 1990. (USGS)

  16. Survey of Attitudes Toward a Student Activities Program for Johnson County Community College, Shawnee Mission, Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolbert, Patsie S.

    To incorporate many of the suggestions of the authors of community college student activities studies, it is necessary to investigate and determine the characteristics, needs, and desires of community college students. A 15 per cent sample of the student population at Johnson County Community College (Kansas) was surveyed by an instrument…

  17. Test-Retest Reliability of a Survey to Measure Transport-Related Physical Activity in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badland, Hannah; Schofield, Grant

    2006-01-01

    The present research details test-retest reliability of a newly developed, telephone-administered TPA survey for adults. This instrument examines barriers, perceptions, and current travel behaviors to place of work/study and local convenience shops. Demonstrated test-retest reliability of the Active Friendly Environments-Transport-Related Physical…

  18. Microbial Survey of a Full-Scale, Biologically Active Filter for Treatment of Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    DeBry, Ronald W.; Lytle, Darren A.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial community of a full-scale, biologically active drinking water filter was surveyed using molecular techniques. Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira, Sphingomonadales, and Rhizobiales dominated the clone libraries. The results elucidate the microbial ecology of biological filters and demonstrate that biological treatment of drinking water should be considered a viable alternative to physicochemical methods. PMID:22752177

  19. AH-64 IHADSS aviator vision experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Keith L.; Rash, Clarence E.; Harris, Eric S.; McGilberry, William H.

    2004-09-01

    Forty AH-64 Apache aviators representing a total of 8564 flight hours and 2260 combat hours during Operation Iraqi Freedom and its aftermath were surveyed for their visual experiences with the AH-64's monocular Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS) helmet-mounted display in a combat environment. A major objective of this study was to determine if the frequencies of reports of visual complaints and illusions reported in the previous studies, addressing mostly benign training environments, differ in the more stressful combat environments. The most frequently reported visual complaints, both while and after flying, were visual discomfort and headache, which is consistent with previous studies. Frequencies of complaints after flying in the current study were numerically lower for all complaint types, but differences from previous studies are statistically significant only for visual discomfort and disorientation (vertigo). With the exception of "brownout/whiteout," reports of degraded visual cues in the current study were numerically lower for all types, but statistically significant only for impaired depth perception, decreased field of view, and inadvertent instrumental meteorological conditions. This study also found statistically lower reports of all static and dynamic illusions (with one exception, disorientation). This important finding is attributed to the generally flat and featureless geography present in a large portion of the Iraqi theater and to the shift in the way that the aviators use the two disparate visual inputs presented by the IHADSS monocular design (i.e., greater use of both eyes as opposed to concentrating primarily on display imagery).

  20. NASA's aviation safety research and technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1977-01-01

    Aviation safety is challenged by the practical necessity of compromising inherent factors of design, environment, and operation. If accidents are to be avoided these factors must be controlled to a degree not often required by other transport modes. The operational problems which challenge safety seem to occur most often in the interfaces within and between the design, the environment, and operations where mismatches occur due to ignorance or lack of sufficient understanding of these interactions. Under this report the following topics are summarized: (1) The nature of operating problems, (2) NASA aviation safety research, (3) clear air turbulence characterization and prediction, (4) CAT detection, (5) Measurement of Atmospheric Turbulence (MAT) Program, (6) Lightning, (7) Thunderstorm gust fronts, (8) Aircraft ground operating problems, (9) Aircraft fire technology, (10) Crashworthiness research, (11) Aircraft wake vortex hazard research, and (12) Aviation safety reporting system.

  1. Benefit-cost assessment of aviation environmental policies

    E-print Network

    Gilmore, Christopher K. (Christopher Kenneth)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aids in the development of a framework in which to conduct global benefit-cost assessments of aviation policies. Current policy analysis tools, such as the aviation environmental portfolio management tool (APMT), ...

  2. A proposed system for aviation noise measurement and control

    E-print Network

    Simpson, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    This report reviews previous work on various measures for aviation noise, and proposes a completely new system for aviation noise measurement and control compatible with real time, operational noise monitoring hardware. ...

  3. Naval aviation psychology. IV. The central research groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald W. Fiske

    1947-01-01

    The development of the naval aviation psychology program is traced from the establishment of the Aviation Psychology Section at the Pensacola Naval Air Station. (See also ^W20:^n 887, 2044; ^W21:^n 854.)

  4. The air quality and health impacts of aviation in Asia

    E-print Network

    Lee, In Hwan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Aviation in Asia is growing more rapidly than other regions around the world. Adverse health impacts of aviation are linked to an increase in the concentration of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 [mu]m in diameter ...

  5. Aviation Safety Analyst Flies with Blue Angels - Duration: 52 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Abegael "Abby" Jakey has aviation in her blood, taking her first flight at six months old in a Globe Swift. Now a contractor with Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. working for NASA's Aviation Safety Report...

  6. An assessment of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations

    E-print Network

    Sequeira, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    An exploration of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations is made by assessing the results of a study of aviation's effects on United States air quality mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The ...

  7. The California Aviation System: Current Status and Recent Trends

    E-print Network

    Hansen, Mark M.; Gosling, Geoffrey D.; Kettunen, Tarja; Wilkins, Erik

    2002-01-01

    Improvement Program. General aviation airports are furtherGeneral Aviation or Reliever, depending on whether the airport is eligible to receive funding as a reliever airport under the FAA Airport Improvement Program.

  8. 47 CFR 17.23 - Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved] 17.23 Section 17.23...1999, as amended at 69 FR 18803, Apr. 9, 2004] Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting...

  9. 47 CFR 17.23 - Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved] 17.23 Section 17.23...1999, as amended at 69 FR 18803, Apr. 9, 2004] Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting...

  10. 47 CFR 17.23 - Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved] 17.23 Section 17.23...1999, as amended at 69 FR 18803, Apr. 9, 2004] Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting...

  11. 47 CFR 17.23 - Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved] 17.23 Section 17.23...other specifications provided by the Commission. Aviation Red Obstruction Lighting [Reserved] Effective Date Note:...

  12. Future trends in local air quality impacts of aviation

    E-print Network

    Rojo, Julien Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization is considering the use of cost-benefit analyses to estimate interdependencies between the industry costs and the major environmental impacts in policy-making for aviation. To ...

  13. Meteorological and Environmental Inputs to Aviation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, Dennis W. (editor); Frost, Walter (editor)

    1988-01-01

    Reports on aviation meteorology, most of them informal, are presented by representatives of the National Weather Service, the Bracknell (England) Meteorological Office, the NOAA Wave Propagation Lab., the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center, and the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. Additional presentations are included on aircraft/lidar turbulence comparison, lightning detection and locating systems, objective detection and forecasting of clear air turbulence, comparative verification between the Generalized Exponential Markov (GEM) Model and official aviation terminal forecasts, the evaluation of the Prototype Regional Observation and Forecast System (PROFS) mesoscale weather products, and the FAA/MIT Lincoln Lab. Doppler Weather Radar Program.

  14. Runway Incursion Prevention for General Aviation Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2006-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) and additional incursion detection algorithm were adapted for general aviation operations and evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the fall of 2005. RIPS has been designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential runway conflicts in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the airborne incursion detection algorithms and associated alerting and airport surface display concepts for general aviation operations. This paper gives an overview of the system, simulation study, and test results.

  15. Computer technology forecast study for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, C. L.; Vaughn, D.

    1976-01-01

    A multi-year, multi-faceted program is underway to investigate and develop potential improvements in airframes, engines, and avionics for general aviation aircraft. The objective of this study was to assemble information that will allow the government to assess the trends in computer and computer/operator interface technology that may have application to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. The current state of the art of computer hardware is assessed, technical developments in computer hardware are predicted, and nonaviation large volume users of computer hardware are identified.

  16. General aviation air traffic pattern safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    A concept is described for evaluating the general aviation mid-air collision hazard in uncontrolled terminal airspace. Three-dimensional traffic pattern measurements were conducted at uncontrolled and controlled airports. Computer programs for data reduction, storage retrieval and statistical analysis have been developed. Initial general aviation air traffic pattern characteristics are presented. These preliminary results indicate that patterns are highly divergent from the expected standard pattern, and that pattern procedures observed can affect the ability of pilots to see and avoid each other.

  17. Active and passive spatial learning in human navigation: acquisition of survey knowledge.

    PubMed

    Chrastil, Elizabeth R; Warren, William H

    2013-09-01

    It seems intuitively obvious that active exploration of a new environment would lead to better spatial learning than would passive visual exposure. It is unclear, however, which components of active learning contribute to spatial knowledge, and previous literature is decidedly mixed. This experiment tests the contributions of 4 components to metric survey knowledge: visual, vestibular, and podokinetic information and cognitive decision making. In the learning phase, 6 groups of participants learned the locations of 8 objects in a virtual hedge maze by (a) walking, (b) being pushed in a wheelchair, or (c) watching a video, crossed with (1) making decisions about their path or (2) being guided through the maze. In the test phase, survey knowledge was assessed by having participants walk a novel shortcut from a starting object to the remembered location of a test object, with the maze removed. Performance was slightly better than chance in the passive video condition. The addition of vestibular information did not improve performance in the wheelchair condition, but the addition of podokinetic information significantly improved angular accuracy in the walking condition. In contrast, there was no effect of decision making in any condition. The results indicate that visual and podokinetic information significantly contribute to survey knowledge, whereas vestibular information and decision making do not. We conclude that podokinetic information is the primary component of active learning for the acquisition of metric survey knowledge. PMID:23565781

  18. Seismic Vulnerability Evaluations Within The Structural And Functional Survey Activities Of The COM Bases In Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Zuccaro, G.; Cacace, F. [Studies Center Plinivs--Lupt, Univ. of Naples 'Federico II', Via Toledo 402--80134 Naples (Italy); Albanese, V.; Mercuri, C.; Papa, F.; Pizza, A. G.; Sergio, S.; Severino, M. [Italian Department of Civil Protection, Via Vitorchiano 2, 00189, Rome (Italy)

    2008-07-08

    The paper describes technical and functional surveys on COM buildings (Mixed Operative Centre). This activity started since 2005, with the contribution of both Italian Civil Protection Department and the Regions involved. The project aims to evaluate the efficiency of COM buildings, checking not only structural, architectonic and functional characteristics but also paying attention to surrounding real estate vulnerability, road network, railways, harbours, airports, area morphological and hydro-geological characteristics, hazardous activities, etc. The first survey was performed in eastern Sicily, before the European Civil Protection Exercise 'EUROSOT 2005'. Then, since 2006, a new survey campaign started in Abruzzo, Molise, Calabria and Puglia Regions. The more important issue of the activity was the vulnerability assessment. So this paper deals with a more refined vulnerability evaluation technique by means of the SAVE methodology, developed in the 1st task of SAVE project within the GNDT-DPC programme 2000-2002 (Zuccaro, 2005); the SAVE methodology has been already successfully employed in previous studies (i.e. school buildings intervention programme at national scale; list of strategic public buildings in Campania, Sicilia and Basilicata). In this paper, data elaborated by SAVE methodology are compared with expert evaluations derived from the direct inspections on COM buildings. This represents a useful exercise for the improvement either of the survey forms or of the methodology for the quick assessment of the vulnerability.

  19. The Impact of Child Obesity on Active Parental Consent in School-Based Survey Research on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellor, Jennifer M.; Rapoport, Ronald B.; Maliniak, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that active consent procedures result in sampling bias in surveys dealing with adolescent risk behaviors such as cigarette smoking and illicit drug use. To examine sampling bias from active consent procedures when the survey topic pertains to childhood obesity and associated health behaviors, the authors pair data…

  20. ASRS Database Report Set General Aviation Flight Training Incidents

    E-print Network

    ASRS Database Report Set General Aviation Flight Training Incidents Report Set Description.........................................A sampling of reports referencing General Aviation flight training. Update Number, CA 94035-1000 TH: 262-7 MEMORANDUM FOR: Recipients of Aviation Safety Reporting System Data SUBJECT

  1. SAAS: Simulation Analysis of Aviation Security Year One Report

    E-print Network

    Wang, Hai

    SAAS: Simulation Analysis of Aviation Security Year One Report Yao, K. & Kadam, S. CREATE REPORT of the United States Department of Homeland Security. DRAFT #12;SAAS: Simulation Analysis of Aviation Security to rapidly respond to terrorists or to other emergencies on a regional or nation-wide basis. Using aviation

  2. AVIATION UTILIZATION OF GEOSTATIONARY SATELLITES FOR THE AUGMENTATION TO

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    AVIATION UTILIZATION OF GEOSTATIONARY SATELLITES FOR THE AUGMENTATION TO GPS: RANGING AND DATA LINK currently under development by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). WAAS will provide corrections to aviation users for the GPS clock, its ephemeris, and for the delay in its signal as it passes through

  3. CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 307 April 2005

    E-print Network

    CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 307 April 2005 A Monthly Safety Bulletin from The Office of the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System, P.O. Box 189, Moffett Field, CA Carrier / Air Taxi Pilots 2993 General Aviation Pilots 725 Controllers 34 Cabin

  4. Applicability of Usability Evaluation Techniques to Aviation Systems

    E-print Network

    Kaber, David B.

    Applicability of Usability Evaluation Techniques to Aviation Systems Michael Clamann Booz Allen in developing highly complex computer systems. Given the importance of the human in the loop in aviation systems of the aviation domain that will affect a usability evaluation and the char- acteristics of evaluation methods

  5. Authenticating Aviation Augmentation System Sherman C. Lo, Stanford University

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Authenticating Aviation Augmentation System Broadcasts Sherman C. Lo, Stanford University Per K and GBAS, respectively. These systems are designed to serve aviation navigation and landing by providing. As a result, aviation seeks data authentication that is 1) fast, 2) robust to message loss, 3) not resource

  6. Aviation Safety + Security Program GLOBAL EXPERTS IN SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Wang, Hai

    2010- 2011 Aviation Safety + Security Program GLOBAL EXPERTS IN SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Relevance and currency -- that is what drives the Aviation Safety and Security Program of the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. We constantly strive to improve our program and make it as useful to the aviation

  7. Aeronautical Ad Hoc Network for Civil Aviation Quentin Vey1

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aeronautical Ad Hoc Network for Civil Aviation Quentin Vey1 , Alain Pirovano1 , Jos´e Radzik2 by civil aviation. In this article we first present communication systems cur- rently used for en://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-06644-8_8 1 Introduction Since the beginning of civil aviation, communications have

  8. CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 293 February 2004

    E-print Network

    CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 293 February 2004 A Monthly Safety Bulletin from The Office of the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System, P.O. Box 189, Moffett Field of the reports submitted to the Aviation Safety Reporting System deal with inadvertent mistakes. While

  9. A General Equilibrium Analysis of Climate Policy for Aviation

    E-print Network

    A General Equilibrium Analysis of Climate Policy for Aviation by Christopher Whittlesey Gillespie B, Technology and Policy Program #12;2 #12;A General Equilibrium Analysis of Climate Policy for Aviation Regulation of aviation's contribution to the global problem of climate change is in- creasingly likely

  10. Report to the United States Congress AVIATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-print Network

    Waitz, Ian A.

    Report to the United States Congress AVIATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT A National Vision Statement, Framework for Goals and Recommended Actions #12;Report to the United States Congress AVIATION States Congress AVIATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT A National Vision Statement, Framework for Goals

  11. Oklahoma State University Master of Science in Aviation and Space

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma State University Master of Science in Aviation and Space The Master of Science in Aviation and Space emphasizes management, leadership, legal, and regulatory issues, finance, current participating in this program come from a variety of backgrounds including aviation, military, and government

  12. Following volcanic ash as a hazard to aviation

    E-print Network

    Following volcanic ash as a hazard to aviation and as a factor in climate John Merrill University plumes as hazards to aviation · The silicate ash particles in volcanic plumes cause several types, 2003 Expanding Horizons Workshop 3 Further on hazards to aviation · The ash particles also damage

  13. Formal Analysis of Aviation Incidents Tibor Bosse1

    E-print Network

    Bosse, Tibor

    Formal Analysis of Aviation Incidents Tibor Bosse1 and Nataliya M. Mogles1,2 1 Vrije Universiteit of accidents and incidents in aviation. The approach comprises a number of steps, which include development, and a number of advantages with respect to the current state-of-the-art are discussed. Keywords: aviation

  14. Meeting the challenge of aviation emissions: an aircraft industry perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    In 1999 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) produced a report on aviation and the atmosphere that highlighted the role that aviation plays in climate change. As the report showed aviation impacts the atmosphere in a number of ways, including emissions of CO2 and NOx, water vapour and creation of cirrus plus contrails. Of these the significant climate impact

  15. A sequential stochastic passenger screening problem for aviation security

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura A. McLay; Sheldon H. Jacobson; Alexander G. Nikolaev

    2009-01-01

    Designing effective aviation security systems has become a problem of national concern. Since September 11th, 2001 passenger screening systems have become an important component in the design and operation of aviation security systems. This paper introduces the Sequential Stochastic Passenger Screening Problem (SSPSP), which allows passengers to be optimally assigned (in real-time) to aviation security resources. Passengers are classified as

  16. U.S. Geological Survey's Alert Notification System for Volcanic Activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Cynthia A.; Guffanti, Marianne C.

    2006-01-01

    The United States and its territories have about 170 volcanoes that have been active during the past 10,000 years, and most could erupt again in the future. In the past 500 years, 80 U.S. volcanoes have erupted one or more times. About 50 of these recently active volcanoes are monitored, although not all to the same degree. Through its five volcano observatories, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) issues information and warnings to the public about volcanic activity. For clarity of warnings during volcanic crises, the USGS has now standardized the alert-notification system used at its observatories.

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Department of Energy (DOE) activities at Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories Site (DOE/SSFL), conducted May 16 through 26, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by an private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with DOE activities at SSFL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at SSFL, and interviews with site personnel. 90 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

  18. Reaction to aircraft noise near general aviation airfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-06-01

    The results of a social survey and noise measurement program around five United Kingdom General Aviation (GA) airfields at Coventry, Kidlington, Leavesden, Shoreham, and Staverton are presented. The fieldwork was carried out during the Summer and early Autumn of 1981. The aims of the study were as follows: to establish the nature and scale of disturbance through noise from GA operations at a number of representative GA airfields; to determine how adequate existing noise indices, in particular NNI (Noise and Number Index) and Leq, (measure of sound energy experienced during a specified period), are in describing disturbance due to GA operations, and what modification, if any, might be necessary to make them appropriate. The NNI is found to show a reasonable correlation with disturbance around the airfields. Reaction above 35 NNI appears stronger than for public transport operations at major airports.

  19. UNSW School of Aviation S2-2014 Colloquium Series Location: School of Aviation, Old Main Building, Level 2, Room 221

    E-print Network

    Blennerhassett, Peter

    UNSW School of Aviation S2-2014 Colloquium Series Location: School of Aviation, Old Main Building presentation Date Presenter Affiliation Topic Title Chair 6 August David Tan UNSW Aviation Aviation Economics A portfolio approach to assessing aviation- exposed risk for tourism destinations Brett Molesworth 13 August

  20. First NASA Aviation Safety Program Weather Accident Prevention Project Annual Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Ron

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this Annual Review was to present NASA plans and accomplishments that will impact the national aviation safety goal. NASA's WxAP Project focuses on developing the following products: (1) Aviation Weather Information (AWIN) technologies (displays, sensors, pilot decision tools, communication links, etc.); (2) Electronic Pilot Reporting (E-PIREPS) technologies; (3) Enhanced weather products with associated hazard metrics; (4) Forward looking turbulence sensor technologies (radar, lidar, etc.); (5) Turbulence mitigation control system designs; Attendees included personnel from various NASA Centers, FAA, National Weather Service, DoD, airlines, aircraft and pilot associations, industry, aircraft manufacturers and academia. Attendees participated in discussion sessions aimed at collecting aviation user community feedback on NASA plans and R&D activities. This CD is a compilation of most of the presentations presented at this Review.

  1. EU Accession and Civil Aviation Regimes: Malta and Cyprus as a Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papatheodorou, Andreas; Busuttil, Louis

    2003-01-01

    Aviation deregulation is usually a challenging and demanding task and accession to the European Union requires that all candidate states should harmonize their legislation in the context of the European Common Aviation Area. Malta and Cyprus, the small Mediterranean island-states to join the EU in 2004, will have to abandon any protectionist policies in favour of their flag-carriers and let them survive in a liberal framework. The paper discusses the implications of this regime change for civil aviation in Malta and Cyprus and in addition to the airline industry, it examines the impacts on the complementary tourism sector. Unless carrying capacity limits are understood, the islands may become victims of successful airline liberalisation. The paper concludes by stressing the need for sustainable development and active policy making. Keywords: carrying capacity, Cyprus, air transport deregulation, Malta, tourism

  2. Understanding Aviation Meteorology and Weather Hazards with Ground-Based Observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Pagé

    \\u000a Meteorology is no doubt important for aviation, as weather hazards have a significant negative impact on aircraft safety and\\u000a traffic delay. Based on recent surveys, 20–30% of worldwide air accidents and as much as 22% of air traffic delays are due\\u000a to to adverse weather conditions. Information on thunderstorms, ceiling and visibility, wind shear, turbulence, and aircraft\\u000a icing conditions are

  3. ISSUE NO. 10 DECEMBER 1998 The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation

    E-print Network

    ISSUE NO. 10 DECEMBER 1998 The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of the Assistant Administrator for System Safety, and Charles Drew Communications-related Incidents in General Aviation Dual Flight Training by Kamil Etem

  4. Cooperative activities of the U.S. Geological Survey with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, fiscal years 1983-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, A. E., (Edited By); Scott, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, has been involved in numerous cooperative activities with Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Assistance agreements, which include both grants and cooperative agreements, have fostered many educational research and development activities. These activities have included site visits, employment opportunities, curriculum development, seminars, and research projects. The activities are consistent with the Geological Survey's mission of conducting earth-science research and dissemination of the results. The cooperative have benefitted the Historically Black Colleges and Universities, their students, and the Geological Survey.

  5. Federal Aviation Administration Human Factors Team

    E-print Network

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    Federal Aviation Administration Human Factors Team Report on: The Interfaces Between Flightcrews-600 operated by China Airlines crashed at Nagoya, Japan, killing 264 passengers and flightcrew members category airplanes. This report is the culmination of that study. #12;Report of the FAA Human Factors Team

  6. [Occupationally mediated morbidity in aviation specialists].

    PubMed

    Soldatov, S K; Bukhtiiarov, I V; Zinkin, V N; Swidowy?, V I; Palishkina, E E

    2010-01-01

    General hygienic evaluation covered workplaces of aviation engineers and technicians and showed that work conditions of these occupations are characterized mainly by exposure to noise and infrasound, that are assigned to hazardous (3.4) and jeopardized (4) classes. Analysis of periodic medical examinations results helped to justify evidence based occupational and occupationally mediated diseases. PMID:21089440

  7. Experiences in mining aviation safety data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zohreh Nazeri; Eric Bloedorn; Paul Ostwald

    2001-01-01

    The goal of data analysis in aviation safety is simple: improve safety. However, the path to this goal is hard to identify. What data mining methods are most applicable to this task? What data are available and how should they be analyzed? How do we focus on the most interesting results? Our answers to these questions are based on a

  8. Topographical orientation in Naval Aviation Cadets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brant Clark; R. Daniel Malone

    1954-01-01

    A test of topographical orientation, two tests of general intelligence and five tests of special abilities were given to 242 Naval Aviation Cadets. Large errors in orientation to individual geographical points were found to be the rule. Topographical orientation appears to be a unique characteristic, since a comparison of the various scores shows it to be independent of spatial orientation,

  9. Military Essentiality of Naval Aviation Repair Parts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marvin Denicoff; Sheldon E. Haber; Thomas C. Varley

    1967-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of ranking items according to their worth, where each item has associated with it a vector of attributes. In particular, a ranking system is developed and tested for aviation repair parts. The objective of the study is to determine whether some items are more important than others for the accomplishment of aircraft missions. If

  10. Chinese-English Aviation and Space Dictionary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Systems Command, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH. Foreign Technology Div.

    The Aviation and Space Dictionary is the second of a series of Chinese-English technical dictionaries under preparation by the Foreign Technology Division, United States Air Force Systems Command. The purpose of the series is to provide rapid reference tools for translators, abstracters, and research analysts concerned with scientific and…

  11. NASA and General Aviation. NASA SP-485.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethell, Jeffrey L.

    A detailed examination of the nature and function of general aviation and a discussion of how the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) helps keep it on the cutting edge of technology are offered in this publication. The intricacies of aerodynamics, energy, and safety as well as the achievements in aeronautical experimentation are…

  12. Proposed English Standards Promote Aviation Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatham, Robert L.; Thomas, Shelley

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Air Navigation's Commission approval of a task to develop minimum skill level requirements in English for air traffic control. The ICAO collaborated with the Defense Language Institute English Language Center to propose a minimum standard for English proficiency for international…

  13. Collegiate Aviation and FAA Air Traffic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Jose R.; Ruiz, Lorelei E.

    2003-01-01

    Based on a literature review this article describes the Air Traffic-Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) program, including objectives, the process by which postsecondary institutes become affiliated, advantages of affiliation, and the recruitment and employment of air traffic control graduates by the Federal Aviation Administration. (Contains…

  14. Fiber optics in aviation and rocket technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iu. V. Rozhdestvenskii; V. B. Veinberg; D. K. Sattarov

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of fiber optics and production of fiber optics elements are reviewed, and the characteristics and design of a number of instruments based on fiber optics for application in aviation and space research are described. The discussion covers navigation equipment and devices, communications and data processing equipment, onboard monitoring and scientific instruments, illumination systems and light signaling systems, information

  15. Aircraft Manufacturing Occupations. Aviation Careers Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in the aircraft manufacturing industry. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the aerospace industry (of which aircraft manufacturing is one part), including the numbers of various types of workers employed in those…

  16. Aspects of General Aviation flight safety research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. B. Gratton; M. A. Bromfield

    The largest cause of General Aviation Accidents is shown through an analysis of the 283 UK fatal accidents between 1980 and 2006 to be loss of control, most usually at low level. Evaluating the reasons behind this, it is shown to be due to a combination of aircraft characteristics and pilot situational awareness and response. The statistical analysis also shows

  17. Integrated decision support for aviation safety inspectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James T. Luxhøj; Trefor P. Williams

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a systems viewpoint for developing an advanced decision support system for aircraft safety inspectors. Research results from a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored project to use neural network and expert systems technology to analyze aircraft maintenance databases are summarized. One of the main objectives of this research is to define more refined “alert” indicators for national comparison

  18. Crew Schedules, Sleep Deprivation, and Aviation Performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John A. Caldwell

    2012-01-01

    Recent events have highlighted the importance of pilot fatigue in aviation operations. Because of demanding flight schedules, crew members often suffer disrupted sleep and desynchronized circadian rhythms, the combination of which threatens alertness and performance. Unfortunately, market requirements for transcontinental and transoceanic routes, as well as for nighttime departures and early-morning arrivals, continue to pose challenges to human vigilance in

  19. Simulation training for Aviation-meteorologist

    E-print Network

    Haak, Hein

    Simulation training for Aviation-meteorologist CALMet X Toulouse Thursday August 29 th Rob for improvement 2 #12;Construction of a simulation training Intro Briefing Simulation case Debriefing Judgement versie 3: 6 februari 2012 Inhoudsopgave Inleiding Testmethodes Simulator Case study Theoretische toets

  20. Demand Estimation for Collegiate Aviation Academic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodell, Phillips W.

    This paper addresses the issue of how one might go about providing a reasonable answer to the question of how many students will enroll in a new academic program at a university and applies the principles to the process of estimating demand for a new collegiate aviation program. A combination of approaches is suggested, including the following:…

  1. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  2. Operational energy conservation strategies in commercial aviation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. R. Covey; G. J. Mascetti; W. U. Roessler; R. L. Bowles

    1979-01-01

    During the past few years, the air transportation industry and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have identified a number of optional operational strategies intended to save jet fuel. Currently, a number of these options are either fully or partially implemented. However, the implementation is generally based on relatively simple open-loop control approaches, and the application of more sophisticated real-time decision

  3. Economic and emissions impacts of renewable fuel goals for aviation in the US*

    E-print Network

    and predictions of the risks of climate change and the challenges of limiting human influence on the environment--essential renewable oils. Our approach employs an economy-wide model of economic activity and energy systems and a detailed partial equilibrium model of the aviation industry. If soybean oil is used as a feedstock, we find

  4. Aviation Trends Related to Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies Project Technical Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Barr, Lawrence C.; Evans, Joni K.; Leone, Karen M.; Jones, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    Current and future aviation safety trends related to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies Project's three technical challenges (engine icing characterization and simulation capability; airframe icing simulation and engineering tool capability; and atmospheric hazard sensing and mitigation technology capability) were assessed by examining the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) accident database (1989 to 2008), incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accident/incident database (1989 to 2006), and literature from various industry and government sources. The accident and incident data were examined for events involving fixed-wing airplanes operating under Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Parts 121, 135, and 91 for atmospheric conditions related to airframe icing, ice-crystal engine icing, turbulence, clear air turbulence, wake vortex, lightning, and low visibility (fog, low ceiling, clouds, precipitation, and low lighting). Five future aviation safety risk areas associated with the three AEST technical challenges were identified after an exhaustive survey of a variety of sources and include: approach and landing accident reduction, icing/ice detection, loss of control in flight, super density operations, and runway safety.

  5. Kamchatkan Volcanoes Explosive Eruptions in 2014 and Danger to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, Olga; Manevich, Alexander; Melnikov, Dmitry; Demyanchuk, Yury; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Petrova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    There are 30 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka, and several of them are continuously active. In 2014, three of the Kamchatkan volcanoes - Sheveluch, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky - had strong and moderate explosive eruptions. Moderate gas-steam activity was observing of Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Avachinsky, Koryaksky, Gorely, Mutnovsky and other volcanoes. Strong explosive eruption of volcanoes is the most dangerous for aircraft because in a few hours or days in the atmosphere and the stratosphere can produce about several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch Volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2014: on January 08 and 12, May 12, September 24, October 02 and 28, November 16, 22 and 26, and December 05, 17, 26 and 29: ash plumes rose up to 9-12 km a.s.l. and extended more 900 km to the eastern and western directions of the volcano. Ashfalls occurred at Klyuchi Village (on January 12, June 11, and November 16). Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation. Karymsky volcano has been in a state of explosive eruption since 1996. The moderate ash explosions of this volcano were noting during 2014: from March 24 till April 02; and from September 03 till December 10. Ash plumes rose up to 5 km a.s.l. and extended more 300 km mainly to the eastern directions of the volcano. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to local aviation. Explosive eruption of Zhupanovsky volcano began on June 06, 2014 and continues in January 2015 too. Ash explosions rose up to 8-10 km a.s.l. on June 19, September 05 and 07, October 11, November 07 and 22; in the other days - up to 5-6 km a.s.l. Ash plumes extended for about 1000 km mainly to the eastern directions of the volcano. Ashfalls occurred at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky on September 07. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation.

  6. Revision of certification standards for aviation maintenance personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vipond, Leslie K.

    1992-01-01

    Part 65, Subparts D and E, of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) identify the certification requirements for aviation mechanics and aviation repairmen. The training, experience, privileges, ratings, recordkeeping, and currency requirements for aviation maintenance personnel are also addressed by those parts of the FAR. The recent emergence of the aging fleet problem and the introduction of new technologies, aircraft, engines, and aeronautical products has caused certain portions of these rules to become obsolete. Further, international political arrangements, such as bilateral airworthiness and maintenance agreements, International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards, certain international agreements for maintenance personnel training, and mechanic certificate reciprocity, have all impacted on the current regulatory policy.

  7. Local ordinances that promote physical activity: a survey of municipal policies.

    PubMed

    Librett, John J; Yore, Michelle M; Schmid, Thomas L

    2003-09-01

    In this Utah-based study, we sought to identify the types of municipal employees responsible for physical activity policies, identify municipal ordinances that may influence physical activity, and determine local governments' intentions to implement policies. In 2001, we mailed a survey to all of the state's municipalities with the goal of measuring 6 physical activity domains: sidewalks, bicycle lanes, shared-use paths, work sites, greenways, and recreational facilities. Data from 74 municipalities revealed that planners made up a small proportion of municipal staff. Relative to cities experiencing slow or medium growth, high growth cities reported more ordinances encouraging physical activity. Physical activity policies can be monitored across municipalities. Moreover, evidence-based public health practice provides direction for limited staff and funding resources. PMID:12948951

  8. Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Division in North Carolina, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, J. F., (compiler); Deckard, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Water resources programs conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the state of North Carolina during 1985 and proposed programs for 1986 are described. This is the first in a series of biennial progress reports on Survey activities in the state. Activities such as gathering, interpreting and publishing hydrologic data and scientific information in support of state and local water resources planning, management, and regulatory programs are presented. The water resources programs described are funded through cooperative agreements with state and local agencies and through special agreements with other federal agencies. Cooperative programs are reviewed annually to insure that state, local and national priorities are being met. Groundwater withdrawals are estimated to have produced water level declines of 150 ft and more for large areas of the northeast and central Coastal Plain. Future demands for water quality and quantity are discussed.

  9. Understanding Sexual Activity and Chlamydia Testing Rate Based on Linked National Survey and Medicaid Claims Data

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Guoyu; Hua, Jennifer; Chen, Jessica L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Monitoring adherence to national recommendations for annual chlamydia screening of female adolescents and young adult women is important for targeting quality improvement interventions to improve low screening rates. However, accurate measurement of rates may vary depending on the data source used to determine eligible sexually-active women. Methods The 2001–2004 NHANES data linked with Medicaid administrative data by respondent’s unique identifier, the 2011–2012 NHANES data, and the 2004 and 2010 Medicaid data were used in this cross-sectional analysis. We defined self-reported sexual activity by self-reported sexual behaviors, claim-identified sexual activity by reproductive-related claims among women who had ? one healthcare claim, HEDIS-defined sexual activity by reproductive-related claims among women who were enrolled in Medicaid for ?330 days and had ? one healthcare claim, and chlamydia tests by claims submitted in the 12 months prior to the survey interview. Results Of Medicaid women aged 18–25 years, 91.5% self-reported to be sexually-active. Of self-reported sexually-active women aged 18–25 years, 92.0% had ? one healthcare claim in the 12 months prior to the survey interview; of this subpopulation, only 58.8% were enrolled in Medicaid for ? 330 days in the 12 months prior to the survey interview; of this further subpopulation, 74.1% had healthcare claims identifying them as sexually-active in the 12 months prior to the survey interview. Of HEDIS-defined sexually-active women, 42.4% had chlamydia testing. Conclusion Our study suggests that the number of sexually-active women aged 18–25 years used as the denominator in the chlamydia testing measure could be significantly different, depending upon the definition applied and the data used. Our data highlight the limited representativeness of Medicaid population in the current HEDIS measure on chlamydia testing when a high proportion of women who were enrolled in Medicaid for <330 days had been excluded from the measure. The interventions that can improve the proportion of women who were enrolled in Medicaid for ? 330 days among all young Medicaid women are needed not only for improving health care services, but also for measuring quality of healthcare. PMID:25875858

  10. A Lyalpha-only Active Galactic Nucleus from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik A. Hoversten; Christy A. Tremonti; Daniel E. Vanden Berk; Donald P. Schneider; Michael A. Strauss; Gillian R. Knapp; Donald G. York; Damien Hutsemékers; P. R. Newman; J. Brinkmann; Brenda Frye; Masataka Fukugita; Karl Glazebrook; Michael Harvanek; Timothy M. Heckman; Zeljko Ivezic; S. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Daniel C. Long; Eric Neilsen; Martin Niederste-Ostholt; Atsuko Nitta; David J. Schlegel; S. Snedden

    2004-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has discovered a z=2.4917 radio-loud active galactic nucleus (AGN) with a luminous, variable, low-polarization UV continuum, H I two-photon emission, and a moderately broad Lyalpha line (FWHM~=1430 km s-1) but without obvious metal-line emission. SDSS J113658.36+024220.1 does have associated metal-line absorption in three distinct, narrow systems spanning a velocity range of 2710 km s-1. Despite

  11. Survey of trace elements in coals and coal-related materials by neutron activation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.; Cahill, R.A.; Frost, J.K.; Camp, L.R.; Gluskoter, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    Utilizing primarily instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and other analytical methods as many as 61 elements were quantitatively surveyed in 170 U.S. whole coals, 70 washed coals, and 40 bench samples. Data on areal and vertical distributions in various regions were obtained along with extensive information on the mode of occurrence of various elements in the coal matrix itself. ?? 1977 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  12. Smart phones are useful for food intake and physical activity surveys.

    PubMed

    Wohlers, Erica M; Sirard, John R; Barden, Charles M; Moon, Jon K

    2009-01-01

    Current self-report methods of recording food intake and Physical Activity (PA) are cumbersome and inaccurate. Food and activity surveys implemented on a smart phone will allow for immediate entry, data transfer to a researcher, and feedback to the user. Ten subjects followed a script, representative of one day, to enter food intake and PA on a smart phone. In the follow-up report, all subjects were interested in using the tested program to compare food intake with PA to predict weight gain and loss. PMID:19964382

  13. Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Bushnell, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    While transportation fueling can accommodate a broad range of alternate fuels, aviation fueling needs are specific, such as the fuel not freezing at altitude or become too viscous to flow properly or of low bulk energy density that shortens range. The fuel must also be compatible with legacy aircraft, some of which are more than 50 years old. Worldwide, the aviation industry alone uses some 85-95 billion gallons of hydrocarbon-based fossil fuel each year, which is about 10% of the transportation industry. US civil aviation alone consumes nearly 14 billion gallons. The enormity of the problem becomes overwhelming, and the aviation industry is taking alternate fueling issues very seriously. Biofuels (algae, cyanobacteria, halophytes, weeds that use wastelands, wastewater and seatwater), when properly sourced, have the capacity to be drop-in fuel replacements for petroleum fuels. As such, biojet from such sources solves the aviation CO2 emissions issue without the downsides of 'conventional' biofuels, such as competing with food and fresh water resources. Of the many current fundamental problems, the major biofuel problem is cost. Both research and development and creative engineering are required to reduce these biofuels costs. Research is also ongoing in several 'improvement' areas including refining/processing and biologics with greater disease resistance, greater bio-oil productivity, reduced water/nutrient requirements, etc. The authors' current research is aimed at aiding industry efforts in several areas. They are considering different modeling approaches, growth media and refining approaches, different biologic feedstocks, methods of sequestering carbon in the processes, fuel certification for aviation use and, overall, ensuring that biofuels are feasible from all aspects - operability, capacity, carbon cycle and financial. The authors are also providing common discussion grounds/opportunities for the various parties, disciplines and concerned organization to share both issues and potential ways for moving forward, and overall, trying to educate those concerned about the innate limitations of 'conventional' biofuels and the solutions provided by non-traditional feedstocks that used waste lands/water or saline/salt water have an immense capacity potential.

  14. Active galaxies observed during the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, H. L.; Fruscione, A.; Carone, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) during the all-sky survey. A total of 13 sources were detected at a significance of 2.5 sigma or better: seven Seyfert galaxies, five BL Lac objects, and one quasar. The fraction of BL Lac objects is higher in our sample than in hard X-ray surveys but is consistent with the soft X-ray Einstein Slew Survey, indicating that the main reason for the large number of BL Lac objects in the extreme ulktraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray bands is their steeper X-ray spectra. We show that the number of AGNs observed in both the EUVE and ROSAT Wide Field Camera surveys can readily be explained by modelling the EUV spectra with a simple power law in the case of BL Lac objects and with an additional EUV excess in the case of Seyferts and quasars. Allowing for cold matter absorption in Seyfert galaxy hosts drive up the inferred average continuum slope to 2.0 +/- 0.5 (at 90% confidence), compared to a slope of 1.0 usually found from soft X-ray data. If Seyfert galaxies without EUV excesses form a significant fraction of the population, then the average spectrum of those with bumps should be even steeper. We place a conservative limit on neutral gas in BL Lac objects: N(sub H) less than 10(exp 20)/sq cm.

  15. Multi-fuel rotary engine for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C.; Ellis, D. R.; Meng, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Design studies of advanced multifuel general aviation and commuter aircraft rotary stratified charge engines are summarized. Conceptual design studies were performed at two levels of technology, on advanced general aviation engines sized to provide 186/250 shaft kW/hp under cruise conditions at 7620 (25000 m/ft) altitude. A follow on study extended the results to larger (2500 hp max.) engine sizes suitable for applications such as commuter transports and helicopters. The study engine designs were derived from relevant engine development background including both prior and recent engine test results using direct injected unthrottled rotary engine technology. Aircraft studies, using these resultant growth engines, define anticipated system effects of the performance and power density improvements for both single engine and twin engine airplanes. The calculated results indicate superior system performance and 27 to 33 percent fuel economy improvement for the rotary engine airplanes as compared to equivalent airframe concept designs with current baseline engines. The research and technology activities required to attain the projected engine performance levels are also discussed.

  16. Multi-fuel rotary engine for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C.; Ellis, D. R.; Meng, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Design studies of advanced multifuel general aviation and commuter aircraft rotary stratified charge engines are summarized. Conceptual design studies were performed at two levels of technology, an advanced general aviation engines sized to provide 186/250 shaft kW/hp under cruise conditions at 7620 (25,000 m/ft) altitude. A follow on study extended the results to larger (2500 hp max.) engine sizes suitable for applications such as commuter transports and helicopters. The study engine designs were derived from relevant engine development background including both prior and recent engine test results using direct injected unthrottled rotary engine technology. Aircraft studies, using these resultant growth engines, define anticipated system effects of the performance and power density improvements for both single engine and twin engine airplanes. The calculated results indicate superior system performance and 27 to 33 percent fuel economy improvement for the rotary engine airplanes as compared to equivalent airframe concept designs with current baseline engines. The research and technology activities required to attain the projected engine performance levels are also discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N83-18910

  17. Aircraft noise annoyance at three joint air carrier and general aviation airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, S.; Horonjeff, R.; Mills, J.; Baldwin, E.; Teffeteller, S.; Pearsons, K.

    1985-01-01

    The results of social surveys conducted near three airports that support both general aviation and scheduled air carrier operations are presented and discussed. Inferences supported by these data include: (1) the nature of noise exposure and community reaction at smaller airports may differ from that at larger airports; (2) survey techniques are capable of identifying changes in annoyance associated with numerically small changes in noise exposure; (3) changes in the prevalence of annoyance are causally produced by changes in noise exposure; and (4) changes in annoyance associated with changes in exposure vary with time.

  18. Ultralean combustion in general aviation piston engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirivella, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The role of ultralean combustion in achieving fuel economy in general aviation piston engines was investigated. The aircraft internal combustion engine was reviewed with regard to general aviation requirements, engine thermodynamics and systems. Factors affecting fuel economy such as those connected with an ideal leanout to near the gasoline lean flammability limit (ultralean operation) were analyzed. A Lycoming T10-541E engine was tested in that program (both in the test cell and in flight). Test results indicate that hydrogen addition is not necessary to operate the engine ultralean. A 17 percent improvement in fuel economy was demonstrated in flight with the Beechcraft Duke B60 by simply leaning the engine at constant cruiser power and adjusting the ignition for best timing. No detonation was encountered, and a 25,000 ft ceiling was available. Engine roughness was shown to be the limiting factor in the leanout.

  19. Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R.C.; Bushnell, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, aviation alone uses 85 to 95 billion gallons of nonrenewable fossil fuel per year (2008). General transportation fueling can accommodate several different fuels; however, aviation fuels have very specific requirements. Biofuels have been flight demonstrated, are considered renewable, have the capacity to become "drop-in" replacements for Jet-A fuel, and solve the CO2 climate change problem. The major issue is cost; current biomass biofuels are not economically competitive. Biofuel feedstock sources being researched are halophytes, algae, cyanobacteria, weeds-to-crops, wastes with contingent restraints on use of crop land, freshwater, and climate change. There are five major renewable energy sources: solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, drilled geothermal and biomass, each of which have an order of magnitude greater capacity to meet all energy needs. All five address aspects of climate change; biomass has massive potential as an energy fuel feedstock.

  20. Descriptive statistics tables from a detailed analysis of the National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS) data

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, A.M.; Klepeis, N.E.

    1996-07-01

    Detailed results tables are presented from an unweighted statistical analysis of selected portions of the 1992--1994 National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS) data base. This survey collected data on the potential exposure of Americans to important household pollutants. Randomly selected individuals (9,386) supplied minute-by-minute diaries spanning a 24-hour day as well as follow-up questions on specific exposure types. Selected 24-hour diary locations and activities, selected regroupings of the 24-hour diary locations, activities, and smoker-present categories, and most of the follow-up question variables in the NHAPS data base were statistically analyzed across 12 subgroups (gender, age, Hispanic, education, employment, census region, day-of-week, season, asthma, angina and bronchitis/emphysema). Overall statistics were also generated for the 9,386 total respondents. Tables show descriptive statistics (including frequency distributions) of time spent and frequency of occurrence in each of 39 locations and for 22 activities (that were experienced by more than 50 respondents), along with equivalent tables for 10 regrouped locations (Residence-Indoors, Residence-Outdoors, Inside Vehicle, Near Vehicle, Other Outdoor, Office/Factory, Mall/Store, Public Building, Bar/Restaurant, Other Indoor), seven regrouped activities and smoker present. Tables of frequency distributions of time spent in exposure activities, or the frequency of occurrence of exposure activities, as determined from the follow up questions that were analyzed are also presented. Detailed indices provide page numbers for each table. An Appendix contains a condensed listing of the questionnaires (Versions A and B for adults, child-direct and child-proxy interview types), including the question number, the NHAPS data base variable name, and the verbatim question text.

  1. The Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) Project: A Documentation of its History and Accomplishments: 1999-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    The Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) Project was one of the projects within NASA s Aviation Safety Program from 1999 through 2005. The objective of the ASMM Project was to develop the technologies to enable the aviation industry to undertake a proactive approach to the management of its system-wide safety risks. The ASMM Project entailed four interdependent elements: (1) Data Analysis Tools Development - develop tools to convert numerical and textual data into information; (2) Intramural Monitoring - test and evaluate the data analysis tools in operational environments; (3) Extramural Monitoring - gain insight into the aviation system performance by surveying its front-line operators; and (4) Modeling and Simulations - provide reliable predictions of the system-wide hazards, their causal factors, and their operational risks that may result from the introduction of new technologies, new procedures, or new operational concepts. This report is a documentation of the history of this highly successful project and of its many accomplishments and contributions to improved safety of the aviation system.

  2. Psoriatic arthritis in a military aviator.

    PubMed

    Sulit, Daryl J; Clarke, Jonathan E

    2005-07-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic spondyloarthropathy whose pathogenesis is unknown. We present a case of a naval flight officer who presented with chronic psoriatic arthritis, which ultimately became well controlled with etanercept treatment. The naval flight officer was granted military aeromedical waivers for psoriatic arthritis, cutaneous psoriasis, and chronic medication use. We also review the medical literature on psoriatic arthritis disease and etanercept and discuss their aeromedical implications in military aviation. PMID:16018354

  3. BoM Aviation Fog Case Exercise

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2009-02-26

    This case exercise focuses on a potential fog event in Melbourne, Australia, on 6-7 April 2008. The key aim of this module is to step through the forecast process during a potential fog event from the perspective of an aviation forecaster with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. This involves consideration of model guidance and observations, identification of potential areas of fog, forecasting and nowcasting fog formation and clearance, and considering and providing TAF updates throughout.

  4. Aviation turbine fuel properties and their trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel property values and their trends were studied through a review of a recognized, wide ranging sample population from actual fuel inspection data. A total of 676 fuel samples of Jet A aviation turbine fuel were compiled over an eleven year period. Results indicate that most fuel samples have one to three near-specification properties, the most common being aromatics, smoke point, and freezing point.

  5. Sampling and analysis plan for the preoperational environmental survey for the immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) project W-465

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.M.

    1998-09-28

    This document provides a detailed description of the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Preoperational Survey to be conducted at the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Project Site in the 200 East Area.

  6. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 08 (PERIODS 1-5 AND FOOD, FRUIT & VEG): CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is divided into two parts: Child Activity Diary and Food Survey. The Child Activity Diary collects information on the child's activities at home over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into five time periods over the 48-hr monitoring inter...

  7. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 09 (PERIODS 1-4 AND FOOD, FRUIT & VEG): CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is divided into two parts: Child Activity Diary and Food Survey. The Child Activity Diary collects information on the child's activities at home over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into four time periods over the 48-hr monitoring inter...

  8. Insights on Volcanic Activity - Self-Potential and Gravity surveys of Masaya volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Jones, G.; Mauri, G.; Saracco, G.

    2006-12-01

    For more than ten years, the activity of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, has been surveyed annually in order to characterize the long term mass/density variations within the shallow magma chamber. However, the injection of new magma is a rapid process, requiring only several hours or days. Other cyclical short period phenomena may be present (e.g., hydrothermal systems) and responsible for noise in the measured signal during a typical dynamic gravity survey. In order to determine the origin and importance of this noise and fully characterize any short period variations, a continuous gravity survey was made from February 16, 2006 to March 12, 2006 in the summit crater of Masaya. During this period, a short term of gravity variation of 60 ?Gal was measured with a wavelength of 20 hours. Hydrothermal systems, which may or may not be well developed, are directly related to heat, gas and fluids coming from the shallow magma chamber and plumbing system. Others sources of fluids are rainfall and the local aquifer, notably at the caldera lake, Laguna Masaya. Movement of hydrothermal fluids, which will generate self-potential (SP) signals, are directly influenced by superficial dyke injection and fluctuations of magma in the shallow plumbing system. The depth and movement of large fluid cells can be localized by self- potential data when processed by continuous wavelet transform. To characterize the shape and position of the hydrothermal system on the Masaya volcano, several SP profiles were made in conjunction with the continuous gravity survey. The SP data from around the summit pit craters were processed by continuous wavelet transform to localize the main large cell of hydrothermal fluid and determine the effects of the hydrothermal fluids on the continuous gravity measurements. The combination of SP and continuous gravity can give insight into short and medium term variations in magmatic activity.

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis in a military aviator.

    PubMed

    Moszyk, Danielle J; Sulit, Daryl J

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition whose pathogenesis is determined partially by genetic and environmental factors. Without treatment, 20 to 30% of individuals with this condition will become permanently disabled in a few years. Rheumatoid arthritis and its potential complications can cause significant disability and could seriously affect the performance of an aviator. Traditionally, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and biologics have not been used until disease progression occurs, but they recently have been added earlier in the course of disease for a more aggressive approach to treatment. It has been shown to significantly reduce the number of affected joints, pain, and disability. This newer treatment regimen has helped a military pilot continue his aviation career. We present the case of an experienced designated military pilot who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. He was initially treated early with a DMARD and biologic medication. He has remained in remission and currently only uses etanercept (biologic medication) and a non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drug to control his disease. He has responded favorably to therapy and has few limitations. Due to his positive response to treatment, the aviator was granted military aeromedical waivers for rheumatoid arthritis and chronic medication use. PMID:17225486

  10. Human Factors Directions for Civil Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    2002-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in understanding human capabilities and limitations, incorporating human factors into aircraft design, operation, and certification, and the emergence of new technologies designed to reduce workload and enhance human performance in the system, most aviation accidents still involve human errors. Such errors occur as a direct or indirect result of untimely, inappropriate, or erroneous actions (or inactions) by apparently well-trained and experienced pilots, controllers, and maintainers. The field of human factors has solved many of the more tractable problems related to simple ergonomics, cockpit layout, symbology, and so on. We have learned much about the relationships between people and machines, but know less about how to form successful partnerships between humans and the information technologies that are beginning to play a central role in aviation. Significant changes envisioned in the structure of the airspace, pilots and controllers' roles and responsibilities, and air/ground technologies will require a similarly significant investment in human factors during the next few decades to ensure the effective integration of pilots, controllers, dispatchers, and maintainers into the new system. Many of the topics that will be addressed are not new because progress in crucial areas, such as eliminating human error, has been slow. A multidisciplinary approach that capitalizes upon human studies and new classes of information, computational models, intelligent analytical tools, and close collaborations with organizations that build, operate, and regulate aviation technology will ensure that the field of human factors meets the challenge.

  11. Aviation Fueling: A Cleaner, Greener Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Bushnell, Dennis M.; Shouse, Dale T.

    2010-01-01

    Projected growth of aviation depends on fueling where specific needs must be met. Safety is paramount, and along with political, social, environmental and legacy transport systems requirements, alternate aviation fueling becomes an opportunity of enormous proportions. Biofuels sourced from halophytes, algae, cyanobacteria, and weeds using wastelands, waste water, and seawater have the capacity to be drop-in fuel replacements for petroleum fuels. Biojet fuels from such sources solves the aviation CO2 emissions issue and do not compete with food or freshwater needs. They are not detrimental to the social or environmental fabric and use the existing fuels infrastructure. Cost and sustainable supply remains the major impediments to alternate fuels. Halophytes are the near-term solution to biomass/biofuels capacity at reasonable costs; they simply involve more farming, at usual farming costs. Biofuels represent a win-win approach, proffering as they do at least the ones we are studying massive capacity, climate neutral-to-some sequestration, and ultimately, reasonable costs.

  12. A lifetime prognostics method for aviation generator based on grey theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cui Jianguo; Zhao Yunlongl; Yu Fenz; Liu Liqiu; Li Zhonghai; Qiu Nanl

    2010-01-01

    For the problem that aviation generator lifetime prognostics is difficult, this paper proposes a prognostics method for aviation generator lifetime based on grey theory. A real military aviation generator is tested to obtain a large number of lifetime data. After the analysis about the military aviation generator lifetime data, the paper uses grey theory to design two models of aviation

  13. swinburne.edu.au `I chose to study aviation management, as not everyone can fly

    E-print Network

    Liley, David

    swinburne.edu.au Aviation }2014 Degrees #12;`I chose to study aviation management, as not everyone. What I like most is that the course provides students with a sound understanding of the aviation in the industry.' Brayden Bachelor of Aviation (Management) #12;}}Prepare your career for take-off Aviation

  14. swinburne.edu.au `I chose to study aviation management as not everyone can fly

    E-print Network

    Liley, David

    swinburne.edu.au Aviation }2015 Degrees #12;`I chose to study aviation management as not everyone. What I like most is that the course provides students with a sound understanding of the aviation in the industry.' Brayden Bachelor of Aviation (Management) #12;}}Prepare your career for take-off Aviation

  15. Legacy: General Aviation Highlights from 8 Decades of NACA/NASA Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, Susan L.; Strain, Natale A.; Robinson, Stephen K.

    1995-01-01

    Legacy includes the bibliographic citations and full text images of 179 NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) and NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) reports of interest to the general aviation (GA) community. The majority of titles included in this collection were recommended by the GA community in response to an Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) survey conducted in January 1995. Searching and browsing of the collection is supported using all elements of the bibliographic record. A complete scanned image of each report is provided for viewing and printing. This 'first volume' of Legacy is a prototype product that will serve as a proof-of-concept trial for distributing information via CD-ROM to members of AGATE and others. The CD-ROM may be operated on Mac (6.0.5 or higher), Windows (3.1 or higher), or DOS (3.0 or higher) platforms.

  16. The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of The Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety, and administered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

    E-print Network

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of The Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety, and administered by the National University (OSU) 7th International Symposium on Aviation Psychology. This issue contains two more: "Emergency

  17. The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of The Assistant Administrator for Aviation Safety, and administered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

    E-print Network

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System is a cooperative program established by the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of The Assistant Administrator for Aviation Safety, and administered by the National presented at the Ohio State University (OSU) 7th International Symposium on Aviation Psychology. Future

  18. Field Manual (FM) 1100 is Army aviation's capstone manual. It embodies the doctrinal tenets for the employment of aviation and establishes the basis for understanding aviation as an essential

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    (FM) 1­100 is Army aviation's capstone manual. It embodies the doctrinal tenets for the employment of aviation and establishes the basis for understanding aviation as an essential element of combat power. Doctrinally describing Army aviation, the manual serves as the foundation that captures the essence of Army

  19. ASMET 7: Forecasting Fog for Aviation: Kenya Case Study

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2013-11-05

    This lesson aims to improve aviation forecasts of fog in the African airspace by teaching forecasters to make more accurate forecasts using satellite imagery, numerical weather prediction, and other available data. A process for diagnosing and forecasting fog is presented and applied to a case over the Nairobi, Kenya region. Learners assume the role of aviation forecaster, analysing various products to determine whether the current Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) is valid or needs to be amended. The lesson is intended for aviation forecasters, general weather forecasters interested in aviation meteorology, and meteorological forecasting instructors and students. This lesson is one of three aviation weather case studies developed by the ASMET project to improve aviation forecasting in Africa. They also support COMET's Review of Aeronautical Meteorology – Africa online learning curriculum, which provides training that supports the WMO/ICAO competencies for Aeronautical Meteorological Forecasters.

  20. Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jesse S.; Gerber, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km2 of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10–120 cameras) and occasions (20–120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ?) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with low detection (i.e., bobcat and coyote) the most efficient sampling approach was to increase the number of occasions (survey days). However, for common species that are moderately detectable (i.e., cottontail rabbit and mule deer), occupancy could reliably be estimated with comparatively low numbers of cameras over a short sampling period. We provide general guidelines for reliably estimating occupancy across a range of terrestrial species (rare to common: ? = 0.175–0.970, and low to moderate detectability: p = 0.003–0.200) using motion-activated cameras. Wildlife researchers/managers with limited knowledge of the relative abundance and likelihood of detection of a particular species can apply these guidelines regardless of location. We emphasize the importance of prior biological knowledge, defined objectives and detailed planning (e.g., simulating different study-design scenarios) for designing effective monitoring programs and research studies. PMID:25210658

  1. Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This Conference Proceedings is a collection of 6 abstracts and 3 papers presented April 19-20, 2001 in Denver, CO. The conference focus was "Best Practices and Benchmarking in Collegiate and Industry Programs". Topics covered include: satellite-based aviation navigation; weather safety training; human-behavior and aircraft maintenance issues; disaster preparedness; the collegiate aviation emergency response checklist; aviation safety research; and regulatory status of maintenance resource management.

  2. Progress in aviation through aircraft engineering and modification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. J. Bottino

    2005-01-01

    Commercial and General Aviation has benefited over the years through the efforts of Research and Development (R&D). Some of these efforts are pursued by the aerospace industry, partnerships with academic institutions, and most frequently by aviation-related government agencies. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has participated and contributed significantly to R&D efforts at the William J. Hughes Technical Center in Egg

  3. The United States national volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Albersheim; Marianne Guffanti

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic-ash clouds are a known hazard to aviation, requiring that aircraft be warned away from ash-contaminated airspace.\\u000a The exposure of aviation to potential hazards from volcanoes in the United States is significant. In support of existing interagency\\u000a operations to detect and track volcanic-ash clouds, the United States has prepared a National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan\\u000a for Aviation to strengthen the

  4. 2013 aircrew, avionics, and operations survey, part 1.

    PubMed

    Greene, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Air medical transport services (AMTS) depend on the teamwork of aviation professionals, medical caregivers, communications specialists, maintenance staff, and administrative personnel to facilitate the safe medical transportation and care to critically ill and injured patients across the world. Consisting of respondents based in the United States, this 2013 survey revisits contemporary AMTS aircrew (pilot, aviator) experience, compensation, benefits, training, and safety in the industry compared to a survey conducted in 2000. PMID:24182879

  5. [Progress in synthesis technologies and application of aviation biofuels].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Xuebing; Yang, Ming; Liu, Dehua

    2013-03-01

    Development of aviation biofuels has attracted great attention worldwide because that the shortage of fossil resources has become more and more serious. In the present paper, the development background, synthesis technologies, current application status and existing problems of aviation biofuels were reviewed. Several preparation routes of aviation biofuels were described, including Fischer-Tropsch process, catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic cracking of bio-oil. The status of flight tests and commercial operation were also introduced. Finally the problems for development and application of aviation biofuels were stated, and some accommodation were proposed. PMID:23789270

  6. THE COSMOS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY. I. XMM-NEWTON COUNTERPARTS

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, Chris D.; Gabor, Jared; Kelly, Brandon C. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Elvis, Martin; Huchra, John P.; Civano, Francesca; Hao, Heng [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); McCarthy, Patrick J.; Scoville, Nick Z.; Smolcic, Vernesa [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Brusa, Marcella; Cappelluti, Nico; Hasinger, Gunther [Max Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter [California Institute of Technology, MC 105-24, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Comastri, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Jahnke, Knud; Schinnerer, Eva [Max Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lilly, Simon J. [Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-05-10

    We present optical spectroscopy for an X-ray and optical flux-limited sample of 677 XMM-Newton selected targets covering the 2 deg{sup 2} Cosmic Evolution Survey field, with a yield of 485 high-confidence redshifts. The majority of the spectra were obtained over three seasons (2005-2007) with the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph instrument on the Magellan (Baade) telescope. We also include in the sample previously published Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and supplemental observations with MMT/Hectospec. We detail the observations and classification analyses. The survey is 90% complete to flux limits of f {sub 0.5-10keV} > 8 x 10{sup -16} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and i {sup +} {sub AB} < 22, where over 90% of targets have high-confidence redshifts. Making simple corrections for incompleteness due to redshift and spectral type allows for a description of the complete population to i {sup +} {sub AB} < 23. The corrected sample includes a 57% broad emission line (Type 1, unobscured) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at 0.13 < z < 4.26, 25% narrow emission line (Type 2, obscured) AGN at 0.07 < z < 1.29, and 18% absorption line (host-dominated, obscured) AGN at 0 < z < 1.22 (excluding the stars that made up 4% of the X-ray targets). We show that the survey's limits in X-ray and optical fluxes include nearly all X-ray AGNs (defined by L {sub 0.5-10keV} > 3 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}) to z < 1, of both optically obscured and unobscured types. We find statistically significant evidence that the obscured-to-unobscured AGN ratio at z < 1 increases with redshift and decreases with luminosity.

  7. The Southern 2MASS Active Galactic Nuclei Survey: Spectroscopic Follow-up with Six Degree Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masci, Frank J.; Cutri, Roc M.; Francis, Paul J.; Nelson, Brant O.; Huchra, John P.; Heath Jones, D.; Colless, Matthew; Saunders, Will

    2010-09-01

    The Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) has provided a uniform photometric catalog to search for previously unknown red active galactic nuclei (AGN) and Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs). We have extended the search to the southern equatorial sky by obtaining spectra for 1182 AGN candidates using the six degree field (6dF) multifibre spectrograph on the UK Schmidt Telescope. These were scheduled as auxiliary targets for the 6dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. The candidates were selected using a single color cut of J-Ks>2 to Ks<~15.5 and a galactic latitude of |b|>30°. 432 spectra were of sufficient quality to enable a reliable classification. 116 sources (~27%) were securely classified as type I AGN, 20 as probable type I AGN, and 57 as probable type II AGN. Most of them span the redshift range 0.0520%) than in any previous (mostly blue-selected) galaxy survey. A small fraction of the type I AGN could have their optical colors reddened by optically thin dust with AV<2mag relative to optically selected QSOs. A handful show evidence of excess far-infrared (IR) emission. The equivalent width (EW) and color distributions of the type I and II AGN are consistent with AGN unified models. In particular, the EW of the [Oiii] emission line weakly correlates with optical-near-IR color in each class of AGN, suggesting anisotropic obscuration of the AGN continuum. Overall, the optical properties of the 2MASS red AGN are not dramatically different from those of optically-selected QSOs. Our near-IR selection appears to detect the most near-IR luminous QSOs in the local universe to z~=0.6 and provides incentive to extend the search to deeper near-IR surveys.

  8. Radio-selected Binary Active Galactic Nuclei from the Very Large Array Stripe 82 Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hai; Myers, A. D.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Yan, Lin; Wrobel, J. M.; Stockton, A.

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers play an important role in the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes. Simulations suggest that tidal interactions could enhance black hole accretion, which can be tested by the fraction of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) among galaxy mergers. However, determining the fraction requires a statistical sample of binaries. We have identified kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs directly from high-resolution radio imaging. Inside the 92 deg2 covered by the high-resolution Very Large Array survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, we identified 22 grade A and 30 grade B candidates of binary radio AGNs with angular separations less than 5'' (10 kpc at z = 0.1). Eight of the candidates have optical spectra for both components from the SDSS spectroscopic surveys and our Keck program. Two grade B candidates are projected pairs, but the remaining six candidates are all compelling cases of binary AGNs based on either emission line ratios or the excess in radio power compared to the H?-traced star formation rate. Only two of the six binaries were previously discovered by an optical spectroscopic search. Based on these results, we estimate that ~60% of our binary candidates would be confirmed once we obtain complete spectroscopic information. We conclude that wide-area high-resolution radio surveys offer an efficient method to identify large samples of binary AGNs. These radio-selected binary AGNs complement binaries identified at other wavelengths and are useful for understanding the triggering mechanisms of black hole accretion. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. 77 FR 6580 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals Surveys (40...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. Geological Survey [USGS-GX12LR000F60100] Agency Information...Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals Surveys (40 Forms) AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  10. 77 FR 37704 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals Surveys (40...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Geological Survey [USGS-GX12LR000F60100] Agency Information...Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals Surveys (40 Forms) AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  11. 75 FR 3539 - Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ...Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker...Clearance for NCA, and IG Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Control Number...a. Next of Kin National Customer Satisfaction Survey (Mail to...

  12. 78 FR 38809 - Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ...Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone...for NCA, and IG Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Control...identify and survey its customers to determine the...and their level of satisfaction with existing...

  13. 78 FR 21008 - Proposed Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ...Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker...burden estimates relating to customer satisfaction surveys involving the National...Clearance for NCA, and IG Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Control...

  14. UNSW School of Aviation S1-2014 Colloquium Series Location: School of Aviation, Old Main Building, Level 2, Room 221

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    UNSW School of Aviation S1-2014 Colloquium Series Location: School of Aviation, Old Main Building presentation Date Presenter Affiliation Topic Title Chair 19 March Jim Mitchell UWS Aviation Management University) Road Safety Social context of driving Brett Molesworth 16 April Simon Darcy UTS Aviation

  15. Factor Structure, Reliability and Convergent Validity of the Engagement in Meaningful Activities Survey for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Eakman, Aaron M.; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Engagement in Meaningful Activities Survey (EMAS) (Goldberg, Brintnell, & Goldberg, 2002) in a sample of older adults living in the greater Los Angeles area. The EMAS evidenced moderate test-retest reliability (r = .56) and good internal consistency (? = .89). Exploratory factor analysis (principal components) discerned a two-component structure within the EMAS, indicative of Personal-Competence and Social-Experiential meaning. The EMAS demonstrated theoretically predicted zero-order correlations with measures of meaning and purpose in life, depressive symptomology, life satisfaction, and health-related quality of life. Regression analyses discerned that purpose and meaning in life consistently predicted the EMAS and its components. Furthermore, persons reporting greater levels of Social-Experiential relative to Personal-Competence meaning had the lowest levels of physical health-related quality of life. This study offers initial evidence in support of the EMAS as a valid measure of meaningful activity in older adults. PMID:21927592

  16. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Sections 1107 and 1108 of Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (72 Stat. 798...Contract aircraft. The sale of aviation fuel, oil, supplies, etc...charter. Sales are not authorized at naval aviation facilities where commercial...

  17. 76 FR 1386 - Safety Zone; Centennial of Naval Aviation Kickoff, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Centennial of Naval Aviation Kickoff, San Diego Bay, San...in support of the Centennial of Naval Aviation Kickoff. This temporary safety...12, 2010, the Centennial of Naval Aviation Kickoff will take place in...

  18. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Sections 1107 and 1108 of Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (72 Stat. 798...Contract aircraft. The sale of aviation fuel, oil, supplies, etc...charter. Sales are not authorized at naval aviation facilities where commercial...

  19. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Sections 1107 and 1108 of Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (72 Stat. 798...Contract aircraft. The sale of aviation fuel, oil, supplies, etc...charter. Sales are not authorized at naval aviation facilities where commercial...

  20. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Sections 1107 and 1108 of Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (72 Stat. 798...Contract aircraft. The sale of aviation fuel, oil, supplies, etc...charter. Sales are not authorized at naval aviation facilities where commercial...

  1. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Sections 1107 and 1108 of Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (72 Stat. 798...Contract aircraft. The sale of aviation fuel, oil, supplies, etc...charter. Sales are not authorized at naval aviation facilities where commercial...

  2. 32 CFR 766.5 - Conditions governing use of aviation facilities by civil aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...use of aviation facilities by civil aircraft. 766.5 Section 766.5 National...NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.5 Conditions governing use of aviation facilities by civil aircraft. (a) Risk. The use of...

  3. 32 CFR 766.5 - Conditions governing use of aviation facilities by civil aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...use of aviation facilities by civil aircraft. 766.5 Section 766.5 National...NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.5 Conditions governing use of aviation facilities by civil aircraft. (a) Risk. The use of...

  4. 32 CFR 766.5 - Conditions governing use of aviation facilities by civil aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...use of aviation facilities by civil aircraft. 766.5 Section 766.5 National...NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.5 Conditions governing use of aviation facilities by civil aircraft. (a) Risk. The use of...

  5. 77 FR 12179 - Airworthiness Directives; Mooney Aviation Company, Inc. (Mooney) Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ...Airworthiness Directives; Mooney Aviation Company, Inc. (Mooney) Airplanes AGENCY: Federal...for certain Mooney Aviation Company, Inc. (Mooney) Models M20R and M20TN airplanes...this AD, contact Mooney Aviation Company, Inc., 165 Al Mooney Road North,...

  6. 76 FR 57635 - Restrictions on Operators Employing Former Flight Standards Service Aviation Safety Inspectors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ...Employing Former Flight Standards Service Aviation Safety Inspectors; Correction...Employing Former Flight Standards Service Aviation Safety Inspectors...oversight of, a Flight Standards Service Aviation Safety Inspector, and...

  7. General aviation and commercial airports are continually faced with the challenge

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    General aviation and commercial airports are continually faced with the challenge of doing more, and for aviation- and non-aviation-related operations such as manufacturing, ware- housing, freight forwarding

  8. European Aviation Safety Agency announces acceptance of NCAMP material certification process

    E-print Network

    European Aviation Safety Agency announces acceptance of NCAMP material certification process Wichita, KS, January 30, 2014 ­ The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) recently released Certification University's National Institute for Aviation Research (NIAR). The EASA memo states that EASA accepts data

  9. Active and Passive Hydrologic Tomographic Surveys:A Revolution in Hydrology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Mathematical forward or inverse problems of flow through geological media always have unique solutions if necessary conditions are givens. Unique mathematical solutions to forward or inverse modeling of field problems are however always uncertain (an infinite number of possibilities) due to many reasons. They include non-representativeness of the governing equations, inaccurate necessary conditions, multi-scale heterogeneity, scale discrepancies between observation and model, noise and others. Conditional stochastic approaches, which derives the unbiased solution and quantifies the solution uncertainty, are therefore most appropriate for forward and inverse modeling of hydrological processes. Conditioning using non-redundant data sets reduces uncertainty. In this presentation, we explain non-redundant data sets in cross-hole aquifer tests, and demonstrate that active hydraulic tomographic survey (using man-made excitations) is a cost-effective approach to collect the same type but non-redundant data sets for reducing uncertainty in the inverse modeling. We subsequently show that including flux measurements (a piece of non-redundant data set) collected in the same well setup as in hydraulic tomography improves the estimated hydraulic conductivity field. We finally conclude with examples and propositions regarding how to collect and analyze data intelligently by exploiting natural recurrent events (river stage fluctuations, earthquakes, lightning, etc.) as energy sources for basin-scale passive tomographic surveys. The development of information fusion technologies that integrate traditional point measurements and active/passive hydrogeophysical tomographic surveys, as well as advances in sensor, computing, and information technologies may ultimately advance our capability of characterizing groundwater basins to achieve resolution far beyond the feat of current science and technology.

  10. GPS Surveys to Detect Rift-Related Active Faulting in the Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konfal, S. A.; Wilson, T. J.; Willis, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains Deformation (TAMDEF) network is a relatively dense GPS array deployed on bedrock throughout the Victoria Land region of Antarctica. The network covers nearly a quarter million square kilometers, extending approximately 675 km N-S and 350 km E-W. It spans the uplifted Transantarctic Mountains rift-flank block, the bounding border fault zone, and the offshore Terror Rift, where there is evidence of neotectonic activity. Embedded within this network are three local arrays of GPS sites established around known or suspected Quaternary faults to test for modern displacements. Two of these fault arrays, located in Hidden Valley and on Doorly Ridge, surround mapped faults within the Transantarctic Mountains Front, the border fault zone separating the uplifted Transantarctic Mountains rift flank from the offshore rift basin. The first of these arrays consists of five monuments surrounding a NE-SW trending fault showing left-lateral strike separation and cutting a hanging valley moraine, indicating Quaternary age faulting. The second fault array is located on Doorly ridge, and consists of two monuments placed on either side of a series of NE-SW trending faults showing normal sense displacements of Jurassic and older crystalline rocks. Finally, six monuments surrounding a NE-SW trending fault with normal displacement of bedrock units in Beacon Valley, located in the interior of the Transantarctic Mountain range, comprise the third fault array. These local fault arrays were first surveyed during the 1996-1997 austral summer field season, and all arrays have been surveyed a minimum of three times, including the most recent survey of all networks during the 2005-2006 field season. Analysis of GPS velocities indicates how strain is being accommodated within the interior of the mountain range, helping to resolve questions regarding the degree of modern tectonic activity in the West Antarctic Rift System.

  11. CHROMOSPHERICALLY ACTIVE STARS IN THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE) SURVEY. I. THE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Matijevi?, G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 E Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Strassmeier, K. G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Bienaymé, O. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 11 rue de l'Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australia National University, Weston Creek, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Kordopatis, G. [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Munari, U. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, I-36012 Asiago (Italy); Navarro, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Seabroke, G. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Wyse, R. F. G., E-mail: marusa.zerjal@fmf.uni-lj.si [Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    RAVE, the unbiased magnitude limited survey of southern sky stars, contained 456,676 medium-resolution spectra at the time of our analysis. Spectra cover the Ca II infrared triplet (IRT) range, which is a known indicator of chromospheric activity. Our previous work classified all spectra using locally linear embedding. It identified 53,347 cases with a suggested emission component in calcium lines. Here, we use a spectral subtraction technique to measure the properties of this emission. Synthetic templates are replaced by the observed spectra of non-active stars to bypass the difficult computations of non-local thermal equilibrium profiles of the line cores and stellar parameter dependence. We derive both the equivalent width of the excess emission for each calcium line on a 5 Å wide interval and their sum EW{sub IRT} for ?44,000 candidate active dwarf stars with signal-to-noise ratio >20, with no cuts on the basis of the source of their emission flux. From these, ?14,000 show a detectable chromospheric flux with at least a 2? confidence level. Our set of active stars vastly enlarges previously known samples. Atmospheric parameters and, in some cases, radial velocities of active stars derived from automatic pipelines suffer from systematic shifts due to their shallower calcium lines. We re-estimate the effective temperature, metallicity, and radial velocities for candidate active stars. The overall distribution of activity levels shows a bimodal shape, with the first peak coinciding with non-active stars and the second with the pre-main-sequence cases. The catalog will be made publicly available with the next RAVE public data releases.

  12. Variation in harbour porpoise activity in response to seismic survey noise.

    PubMed

    Pirotta, Enrico; Brookes, Kate L; Graham, Isla M; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    Animals exposed to anthropogenic disturbance make trade-offs between perceived risk and the cost of leaving disturbed areas. Impact assessments tend to focus on overt behavioural responses leading to displacement, but trade-offs may also impact individual energy budgets through reduced foraging performance. Previous studies found no evidence for broad-scale displacement of harbour porpoises exposed to impulse noise from a 10 day two-dimensional seismic survey. Here, we used an array of passive acoustic loggers coupled with calibrated noise measurements to test whether the seismic survey influenced the activity patterns of porpoises remaining in the area. We showed that the probability of recording a buzz declined by 15% in the ensonified area and was positively related to distance from the source vessel. We also estimated received levels at the hydrophones and characterized the noise response curve. Our results demonstrate how environmental impact assessments can be developed to assess more subtle effects of noise disturbance on activity patterns and foraging efficiency. PMID:24850891

  13. 75 FR 45007 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; Clearance of Renewed Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ...Collection(s): Flight Standards Customer Satisfaction Survey AGENCY: Federal Aviation...Title: Flight Standards Customer Satisfaction Survey. Form Numbers: There...Background: The FAA has initiated customer service surveys...

  14. A post-carbon aviation future: Airports and the transition to a cleaner aviation sector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robbert Kivits; Michael B. Charles; Neal Francis Ryan

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing global interest in sustainable aviation technologies as a result of concerns associated with the carbon-intensive nature of the industry and the imminence of reaching peak oil. Available options such as biofuels, liquid hydrogen and electric propulsion will not only impact on the design and functionality of commercial airplanes, but also will affect the entire industry from

  15. Military Aviation and the Environment: Historical Trends and Comparison to Civil Aviation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian A. Waitz; Stephen P. Lukachko; Joosung J. Lee

    2005-01-01

    This paper articulates trends in the environmental im- pact of military aviation between 1960 and 2000. The fo- cus is on community noise, local air quality, and global climate impacts and the discussion is restricted to fixed- wing aircraft. Comparisons are made to trends within the commercial air transport industry. The unique features of military aircraft technology and operations responsible

  16. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Osman, Mohammed; Godso, David; King, Brent; Ricciardi, Michael

    1998-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the design developed for the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC). We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models within the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC system design. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has six chapters, a bibliography, three appendices and one attachment.

  17. Recent trends in aviation turbine fuel properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1982-01-01

    Plots and tables, compiled from Department of Energy (and predecessor agency) inspection reports from 1969 to 1980, present ranges, averages, extremes, and trends for most of the 22 properties of Jet A aviation turbine fuel. In recent years, average values of aromatics content, mercaptan sulfur content, distillation temperature of 10 percent recovered, smoke point, and freezing point show small but recognizable trends toward their specification limits. About 80 percent of the fuel samples had at least one property near specification, defined as within a standard band about the specification limit. By far the most common near-specification properties were aromatics content, smoke point, and freezing point.

  18. BoM Aviation Fog Case Exercise

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This case study focuses on a potential fog event in Melbourne, Australia on the sixth and seventh of April, 2008. The key aim of this module is to step through the forecast process during a potential fog event as an aviation forecaster with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. This involves consideration of model guidance and consideration, identification of potential areas of fog, forecasting and "now"-casting both formation and clearance, and providing TAF updates throughout. It is presented in video format with audio commentary.

  19. Advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.; Benstein, E. H.

    1979-01-01

    The small engine technology requirements suitable for general aviation service in the 1987 to 1988 time frame were defined. The market analysis showed potential United States engines sales of 31,500 per year providing that the turbine engine sales price approaches current reciprocating engine prices. An optimum engine design was prepared for four categories of fixed wing aircraft and for rotary wing applications. A common core approach was derived from the optimum engines that maximizes engine commonality over the power spectrum with a projected price competitive with reciprocating piston engines. The advanced technology features reduced engine cost, approximately 50 percent compared with current technology.

  20. A psychologist's view of validating aviation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Earl S.; Wagner, Dan

    1994-01-01

    All systems, no matter what they are designed to do, have shortcomings that may make them less productive than was hoped during the initial development. Such shortcomings can arise at any stage of development: from conception to the end of the implementation life cycle. While systems failure and errors of a lesser magnitude can occur as a function of mechanical or software breakdown, the majority of such problems, in aviation are usually laid on the shoulders of the human operator and, to a lesser extent, on human factors. The operator bears the responsibility and blame even though, from a human factors perspective, error may have been designed into the system. Human factors is not a new concept in aviation. The name may be new, but the issues related to operators in the loop date back to the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century and certainly to the aviation build-up for World War I. During this first global confrontation, military services from all sides discovered rather quickly that poor selection and training led to drastically increased personnel losses. While hardware design became an issue later, the early efforts were primarily focused on increased care in pilot selection and on their training. This actually involved early labor-intensive simulation, using such devices as sticks and chairs mounted on rope networks which could be manually moved in response to control input. The use of selection criteria and improved training led to more viable person-machine systems. More pilots survived training and their first ten missions in the air, a rule of thumb arrived at by experience which predicted ultimate survival better than any other. This rule was to hold through World War II. At that time, personnel selection and training became very sophisticated based on previous standards. Also, many psychologists were drafted into Army Air Corps programs which were geared towards refining the human factor. However, despite the talent involved in these programs and the tremendous build-up of aviation during the war, there were still aircraft designs that were man killers (no sexism implied since all combat pilots were men). One classic design error that was identified fifty years ago was the multipointer altimeter, which could easily be misread especially by a pilot under considerable task load. It has led to flying fully operational aircraft into the terrain. The authors of the research which formally identified this problem put 'Human Errors' in quotes to express their dissatisfaction with the traditional approach to accident investigation. It traditionally places the burden of guilt on the operator. Some of these altimeters still exist in older aircraft to this day.

  1. Carleton University and Ottawa Aviation Services enhance their partnership in research and engineer/pilot training

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    Carleton University and Ottawa Aviation Services enhance their partnership in research and engineer/pilot training Carleton University and Ottawa Aviation Services (OAS) have engaged in collaborative research

  2. 14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

  3. 14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

  4. 14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

  5. 14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

  6. 14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

  7. Can retired galaxies mimic active galaxies? Clues from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasi?ska, G.; Vale Asari, N.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Gomes, J. M.; Schlickmann, M.; Mateus, A.; Schoenell, W.; Sodré, L., Jr.; Seagal Collaboration

    2008-11-01

    The classification of galaxies as star forming or active is generally done in the ([OIII]/H?, [NII]/H?) plane. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has revealed that, in this plane, the distribution of galaxies looks like the two wings of a seagull. Galaxies in the right wing are referred to as Seyfert/LINERs, leading to the idea that non-stellar activity in galaxies is a very common phenomenon. Here, we argue that a large fraction of the systems in the right wing could actually be galaxies which stopped forming stars. The ionization in these `retired' galaxies would be produced by hot post-asymptotic giant branch stars and white dwarfs. Our argumentation is based on a stellar population analysis of the galaxies via our STARLIGHT code and on photoionization models using the Lyman continuum radiation predicted for this population. The proportion of LINER galaxies that can be explained in such a way is, however, uncertain. We further show how observational selection effects account for the shape of the right wing. Our study suggests that nuclear activity may not be as common as thought. If retired galaxies do explain a large part of the seagull's right wing, some of the work concerning nuclear activity in galaxies, as inferred from SDSS data, will have to be revised.

  8. Electric, Magnetic and Ionospheric Survey of Seismically Active Regions with SWARM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, Marius M.; Moldovan, Iren; Voiculescu, Mirela; Balasis, George; Lichtenberger, Janos; Heilig, Balazs; Kovacs, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We present a project devoted to the scientific exploitation of SWARM multi-point measurements of the magnetic and electric field, of the electron temperature and density in the ionosphere. These data provide unique opportunities to study in-situ and remotely the electromagnetic and plasma variability due to ionospheric forcing from above and below. The project "Electric, Magnetic and Ionospheric Survey of Seismically Active Regions with SWARM (EMISSARS)" focus on coordinated studies between SWARM and ground based observatories to survey electromagnetic and ionospheric variability at medium latitudes and look for possible correlations with the seismic activity in central Europe. The project is coordinated by the Institute for Space Sciences (INFLPR-ISS) and the National Institute for Earth Physics (INFP) in Bucharest, Romania. In addition to SWARM data the project benefits from support of dedicated ground based measurements provided by the MEMFIS network coordinated by INFP, the MM100 network of magnetic observatories coordinated by the Geological and Geophysical Institute of Hungary (MFGI) in Budapest. Seismic data are provided by INFP and the European Mediterranean Seismological Center. The mission of the project is to monitor from space and from ground the ionospheric and electromagnetic variability during time intervals prior, during and after seismic activity in (i) the seismic active regions of the central Europe and (ii) in regions unaffected by the seismic activity. The latter will provide reference measurements, free from possible seismogenic signals. The scientific objectives of the project are: (1) Observation of electric, magnetic and ionospheric (electron temperature, density) variability in the ionosphere above or in the close vicinity of seismic active regions, in conjunction with ground based observations from dedicated networks; (2) Investigation of the coupling between the litosphere - atmosphere - ionosphere, during Earthquakes; (3) Quantitative nonlinear analysis of anomalous magnetic events detected on ground and in space before, during and after Earthquakes. The methodology includes methods of analysis like : (i) the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of electric, magnetic, lithospheric signal, (ii) the Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) at various scales from multi-spacecraft statistical ensembles, (iii) the auto and cross-correlation analysis of magnetic field and ionospheric variables for search of coherent structures, (iv) numerical modelling of the litosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling based on the current continuity.

  9. GPS-Based Attitude and Guidance Displays for General Aviation

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    -Heading Reference System (AHRS) for use by small General Aviation aircraft. The gyros enabled a high bandwidth by the system. I. INTRODUCTION Attitude information for small General Aviation (GA) aircraft is currently obtained by gyros with spinning rotors. A vertical gyro is used for pitch and roll while a separate

  10. Aviation Safety + Security Program GLOBAL EXPERTS IN SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Wang, Hai

    in commercial space travel and unmanned aviation systems. Such is the nature of aviation and such is the nature The year 2011 will be the year of the Space Shuttle's last flights. It will also see increased initiatives School of Engineering stems from a vision where effective research and education addresses real

  11. CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 303 December 2004

    E-print Network

    CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 303 December 2004 A Monthly Safety Bulletin from The Office of the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System, P.O. Box 189, Moffett Field and at the instrument panel. I was looking outside to maintain clearance from the terrain and to try and navigate, but I

  12. [The domestic aviation and space medicine reflected in phaleristics].

    PubMed

    Zhdan'ko, I M; Ryzhenko, S P; Khomenko, M N; Golosov, S Iu; Sobolenko, D A

    2013-04-01

    The article is devoted to the connection between the badges of medical institutions that are material evidence of formation and development of domestic aviation and space medicine and the history of Armed forces. The authors describe development of aviation and space medicine phaleristics, which is an important factor for patriotic education of modem scientific and military medical personnel. PMID:24000615

  13. Aviation Electronics Technician 3 and 2. Rate Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    The manual is designed as a self-study text for use by personnel of the Navy and Naval Reserve who are preparing to meet professional requirements for advancement in the rating of Aviation Electronics Technician. The document opens with a review of leadership and qualifications for the Aviation Electronics Technician rating. Other chapters cover…

  14. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Course Content Guides. FAA Approved Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrawder, Jack; And Others

    Course content guides are provided for the 30 courses in this aviation maintenance technology curriculum approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. Course titles are physics for technicians; aircraft information, regulations, and procedures; aircraft assembly; fundamentals of aircraft electronics; aircraft electrical components; aircraft…

  15. Language and Communication-Related Problems of Aviation Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushing, Steven

    A study of the problems posed by the use of natural language in various aspects of aviation is presented. The study, part of a larger investigation of the feasibility of voice input/output interfaces for communication in aviation, looks at representative real examples of accidents and near misses resulting from language confusions and omissions.…

  16. General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) Program, Turbine Engine System Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) Program Turbine Engine System Elements is to conduct a shared resource project to develop an affordable gas turbine engine for use on 4 to 6 place, light aircraft that will lead to revitalization of the general aviation industry in the United States, creating many new, high-quality jobs.

  17. Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Elgowainy; J. Han; M. Wang; N. Carter; R. Stratton; J. Hileman; A. Malwitz; S. Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed

  18. Psychological aspects of ensuring flight safety in civil aviation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. V. Luzik; A. N. Akmaldinova

    2006-01-01

    The article considers issues relating to the system of continuous professional training of aviation specialists and formulates fundamental prerequisites of psychological endurance reliability of aircrews in terms of flight safety problems. Analysis is given of factors affecting the efficiency of the “pilot – airplane” interactive system. Results of forecasting the measure of significance of the human factor in aviation for

  19. CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 288 September 2003

    E-print Network

    CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 288 September 2003 A Monthly Safety Bulletin from The Office of the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System, P.O. Box 189, Moffett Field Southern airport runway surface condition SA227 nose wheel steering loss on takeoff CL65 uncommanded flight

  20. CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System A Monthly Safety Bulletin

    E-print Network

    procedure or equipment 1 Chart, Publication, or Nav Database 1 Company policy or maintenance procedure 9CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System A Monthly Safety Bulletin from The Office of the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System, P.O. Box 189, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0189 http

  1. AVIATION AND THE BELGIAN CLIMATE POLICY: INTEGRATION OPTIONS AND IMPACTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tim Festraets; Cathy Macharis; Sandrine Meyer

    integrated analysis of issues related to the inclusion of national and international air transport into European and international climate policy. Since the publication of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change special report on aviation (1999), the international scientific community has become aware of the importance of the impacts of emissions from the aviation sector on global warming. The possibility of

  2. Low cost runway incursion detection system for general aviation airports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. K. Dabipi; J. Bryan Burrows-McElwain; Chris Hartman

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to a freshman engineering design project where students were required to design a novel low cost runway incursion detection system that might have future application for small general aviation airport operations by applying sound engineering problem solving criterion. Given the direction of Aviation towards autonomous navigation, this project provides a

  3. The California Aviation System: Current Status and Recent Trends

    E-print Network

    Hansen, Mark M.; Gosling, Geoffrey D.; Rice, Colin

    1998-01-01

    General Aviation or Reliever, depending on whether the airport is eligible to receive funding as a reliever airport under the FAA Airport Improvement Program. -General Aviation or Reliever, depending on whether the airport is eligible to receive funding as a reliever airport under the FAA Airport Improvement Program.

  4. Capacity utilization study for aviation security cargo inspection queuing system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glenn O. Allgood; Mohammed M. Olama; Joe E. Lake; Daryl L Brumback

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct performance evaluation study for an aviation security cargo inspection queuing system for material flow and accountability. The queuing model employed in our study is based on discrete-event simulation and processes various types of cargo simultaneously. Onsite measurements are collected in an airport facility to validate the queuing model. The overall performance of the aviation security

  5. Q-FANSTM for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worobel, R.; Mayo, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Continued growth of general aviation over the next 10 to 15 years is dependent on continuing improvement in aircraft safety, utility, performance and cost. Moreover, these advanced aircraft will need to conform to expected government regulations controlling propulsion system emissions and noise levels. An attractive compact low noise propulsor concept, the Q-FANTM when matched to piston, rotary combustion, or gas turbine engines opens up the exciting prospect of new, cleaner airframe designs for the next generation of general aviation aircraft which will provide these improvements and meet the expected noise and pollution restriction of the 1980 time period. New Q-FAN methodology which was derived to predict Q-FAN noise, weight and cost is presented. Based on this methodology Q-FAN propulsion system performance, weight, noise, and cost trends are discussed. Then the impact of this propulsion system type on the complete aircraft is investigated for several representative aircraft size categories. Finally, example conceptual designs for Q-FAN/engine integration and aircraft installations are presented.

  6. Aviation induced diurnal North Atlantic cirrus cover cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Kaspar; Schumann, Ulrich; Mannstein, Hermann; Mayer, Bernhard

    2012-08-01

    Aviation induced cirrus (AIC) cover is identified from mean diurnal cycles of cirrus cover and air traffic density in the North Atlantic flight corridor. Traffic data for this region show an aviation “fingerprint” with two maxima during morning eastbound and afternoon westbound traffic. The same aviation fingerprint is found in cirrus cover. Cycle differences between west and east domain parts allow separating between aviation and natural diurnal changes. Cirrus cover is derived from 8 years of Meteosat infrared data. Linear contrail cover is estimated from the same data. Background cirrus without aviation impact is estimated from cirrus observations over the South Atlantic and from numerical weather prediction forecast. The cirrus cover cycle is well approximated by linear response to traffic density with fitted delay times of 2.3-4.1 h, implying AIC cover of 1-2%, more than expected from recent models.

  7. Effects of Age, Season, Gender and Urban-Rural Status on Time-Activity: Canadian Human Activity Pattern Survey 2 (CHAPS 2)

    PubMed Central

    Matz, Carlyn J.; Stieb, David M.; Davis, Karelyn; Egyed, Marika; Rose, Andreas; Chou, Benedito; Brion, Orly

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of population exposure is a main component of human health risk assessment for environmental contaminants. Population-level exposure assessments require time-activity pattern distributions in relation to microenvironments where people spend their time. Societal trends may have influenced time-activity patterns since previous Canadian data were collected 15 years ago. The Canadian Human Activity Pattern Survey 2 (CHAPS 2) was a national survey conducted in 2010–2011 to collect time-activity information from Canadians of all ages. Five urban and two rural locations were sampled using telephone surveys. Infants and children, key groups in risk assessment activities, were over-sampled. Survey participants (n = 5,011) provided time-activity information in 24-hour recall diaries and responded to supplemental questionnaires concerning potential exposures to specific pollutants, dwelling characteristics, and socio-economic factors. Results indicated that a majority of the time was spent indoors (88.9%), most of which was indoors at home, with limited time spent outdoors (5.8%) or in a vehicle (5.3%). Season, age, gender and rurality were significant predictors of time activity patterns. Compared to earlier data, adults reported spending more time indoors at home and adolescents reported spending less time outdoors, which could be indicative of broader societal trends. These findings have potentially important implications for assessment of exposure and risk. The CHAPS 2 data also provide much larger sample sizes to allow for improved precision and are more representative of infants, children and rural residents. PMID:24557523

  8. Speciation of Zinc and Copper in Stormwater Pavement Runoff from Airside and Landside Aviation Land Uses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Gnecco; J. J. Sansalone; L. G. Lanza

    2008-01-01

    The transport, bioavailability and fate of aqueous metals in rainfall-runoff are determined, in part, by speciation. In the\\u000a framework of a monitoring program to investigate the predominant species of zinc, copper, and water chemistry in runoff subject\\u000a to aviation land use and activities, two rainfall-runoff monitoring stations were installed at the international airport of\\u000a Genoa (Italy). One catchment was a

  9. Results From NICLAKES Survey of Active Faulting Beneath Lake Nicaragua, Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, J.; Mann, P.; McIntosh, K.; Wulf, S.; Dull, R.; Perez, P.; Strauch, W.

    2006-12-01

    In May of 2006 we used a chartered ferry boat to collect 520 km of seismic data, 886 km of 3.5 kHz subbottom profiler data, and 35 cores from Lake Nicaragua. The lake covers an area of 7700 km2 within the active Central American volcanic arc, forms the largest lake in Central America, ranks as the twentieth largest freshwater lake in the world, and has never been previously surveyed or cored in a systematic manner. Two large stratovolcanoes occupy the central part of the lake: Concepcion is presently active, Maderas was last active less than 2000 years ago. Four zones of active faulting and doming of the lake floor were mapped with seismic and 3.5 kHz subbottom profiling. Two of the zones consist of 3-5-km-wide, 20-30-km-long asymmetric rift structures that trend towards the inactive cone of Maderas Volcano in a radial manner. The northeastern rift forms a 20-27-m deep depression on the lake bottom that is controlled by a north-dipping normal fault. The southwestern rift forms a 25-35-m deep depression controlled by a northeast-dipping normal fault. Both depressions contain mound-like features inferred to be hydrothermal deposits. Two zones of active faulting are associated with the active Concepcion stratovolcano. A 600-m-wide and 6-km-long fault bounded horst block extends westward beneath the lake from a promontory on the west side of the volcano. Like the two radial rift features of Maderas, the horst points roughly towards the active caldera of Concepcion. A second north-south zone of active faulting, which also forms a high, extends off the north coast of Concepcion and corresponds to a localized zone of folding and faulting mapped by previous workers and inferred by them to have formed by gravitational spreading of the flank of the volcano. The close spatial relation of these faults to the two volcanic cones in the lake suggests that the mechanism for faulting is a result of either crustal movements related to magma intrusion or gravitational sliding and is not related to more regional tectonic forces. We did not find evidence for a regional fault parallel to the active volcanic axis or faults in the 10-30 km long offsets between the major stratovolcanoes. Core data is currently being analyzed and will improve constraints on the age of faulting.

  10. Curvature wavefront sensing performance evaluation for active correction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

    PubMed

    Manuel, Anastacia M; Phillion, Donald W; Olivier, Scot S; Baker, Kevin L; Cannon, Brice

    2010-01-18

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, modified Paul-Baker design, with an 8.4-meter primary mirror, a 3.4-m secondary, and a 5.0-m tertiary, along with three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat focal plane with a field of view of 9.6 square degrees. In order to maintain image quality during operation, the deformations and rigid body motions of the three large mirrors must be actively controlled to minimize optical aberrations, which arise primarily from forces due to gravity and thermal expansion. We describe the methodology for measuring the telescope aberrations using a set of curvature wavefront sensors located in the four corners of the LSST camera focal plane. We present a comprehensive analysis of the wavefront sensing system, including the availability of reference stars, demonstrating that this system will perform to the specifications required to meet the LSST performance goals. PMID:20173981

  11. Active Galactic Nuclei in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: II. Emission-Line Luminosity Function

    E-print Network

    Lei Hao; Michael A. Strauss; Xiaohui Fan; Christy A. Tremonti; David J. Schlegel; Timothy M. Heckman; Guinevere Kauffmann; Michael R. Blanton; James E. Gunn; Patrick B. Hall; Željko Ivezi?; Gillian R. Knapp; Julian H. Krolik; Robert H. Lupton; Gordon T. Richards; Donald P. Schneider; Iskra V. Strateva; Nadia L. Zakamska; J. Brinkmann; Robert J. Brunner; Gyula P. Szokoly

    2005-01-04

    The emission line luminosity function of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is measured from about 3000 AGN included in the main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey within a redshift range of $0survey. The inferred AGN number density is approximately 1/5 of all galaxies and about $6\\times 10^{-3}$ of the total light of galaxies in the $r$-band comes from the nuclear activity. The numbers of Seyfert 1s and Seyfert 2s are comparable at low luminosity, while at high luminosity, Seyfert 1s outnumber Seyfert 2s by a factor of 2-4. In making the luminosity function measurements, we assumed that the nuclear luminosity is independent of the host galaxy luminosity, an assumption we test {\\it a posteriori}, and show to be consistent with the data. Given the relationship between black hole mass and host galaxy bulge luminosity, the lack of correlation between nuclear and host luminosity suggests that the main variable that determines the AGN luminosity is the Eddington ratio, not the black hole mass. This appears to be different from luminous quasars, which are most likely to be shining near the Eddington limit.

  12. Evaluating Behaviorally Oriented Aviation Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) Training and Programs: Methods, Results, and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, James C.; Thomas, Robert L., III

    2003-01-01

    Assessment of the impact of Aviation Resource Management Programs on aviation culture and performance has compelled a considerable body of research (Taylor & Robertson, 1995; Taylor, 1998; Taylor & Patankar, 2001). In recent years new methods have been applied to the problem of maintenance error precipitated by factors such as the need for self-assessment of communication and trust. The present study - 2002 -- is an extension of that past work. This research project was designed as the conclusion of a larger effort to help understand, evaluate and validate the impact of Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) training programs, and other MRM interventions on participant attitudes, opinions, behaviors, and ultimately on enhanced safety performance. It includes research and development of evaluation methodology as well as examination of psychological constructs and correlates of maintainer performance. In particular, during 2002, three issues were addressed. First, the evaluation of two (independent & different) MRM programs for changing behaviors was undertaken. In one case we were able to further apply the approach to measuring written communication developed during 2001 (Taylor, 2002; Taylor & Thomas, 2003). Second, the MRM/TOQ surveys were made available for completion on the internet. The responses from these on-line surveys were automatically linked to a results calculator (like the one developed and described in Taylor, 2002) to aid industry users in analyzing and evaluating their local survey data on the internet. Third, the main trends and themes from our research about MRM programs over the past dozen years were reviewed.

  13. Aviation human factors research in U.S. universities: Potential contributions to national needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key Dismukes, R.

    1994-01-01

    Univesity research can make vital contributions to national needs in aviation human factors (AHF). This article examines the types of expertise and facilities available in universities and explores how university capabilities complement the work of government laboratories. The AHF infrastructure is discussed and compared to other fields of applied research. Policy and funding issues are also examined. This study is based on a survey conducted by the author, which included site visits to several universities, telephone interviews with faculty members at other universities, and a search of the AHF research literature.

  14. Design developments for advanced general aviation aircraft. [using Fly By Light Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, Jan; Gomer, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Design study results are presented for two advanced general-aviation aircraft incorporating fly-by-light/fly-by-wire controls and digital avionics and cockpit displays. The design exercise proceeded from a database of information derived from a market survey for the 4-10 passenger aircraft range. Pusher and tractor propeller configurations were treated, and attention was given to the maximization of passenger comfort. 'Outside-in' tooling methods were assumed for the primary structures of both configurations, in order to achieve surface tolerances which maximize the rearward extent of laminar flow.

  15. 78 FR 53195 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ...Survey of Healthcare Experiences, Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA...attention and to improve the quality of dental health care services delivered...VHA) is to provide high quality medical and dental care to eligible Veterans....

  16. 78 FR 79079 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...Survey of Healthcare Experiences, Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA...attention and to improve the quality of dental health care services delivered...VHA) is to provide high quality medical and dental care to eligible veterans....

  17. 76 FR 67459 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Survey of “Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ...Comment Request; Survey of ``Health Care Providers' Responses to Medical...proposed information collection ``Health Care Providers' Responses to Medical...information technology. Survey of ``Health Care Providers' Responses to...

  18. Outlook for alternative energy sources. [aviation fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Predictions are made concerning the development of alternative energy sources in the light of the present national energy situation. Particular emphasis is given to the impact of alternative fuels development on aviation fuels. The future outlook for aircraft fuels is that for the near term, there possibly will be no major fuel changes, but minor specification changes may be possible if supplies decrease. In the midterm, a broad cut fuel may be used if current development efforts are successful. As synfuel production levels increase beyond the 1990's there may be some mixtures of petroleum-based and synfuel products with the possibility of some shale distillate and indirect coal liquefaction products near the year 2000.

  19. Potential global jamming transition in aviation networks

    E-print Network

    Ezaki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonlinear transport model for an aviation network. The takeoff rate from an airport is characterized by the degree of ground congestion. Due to the effect of "surface congestion," the performance of an airport deteriorates because of inefficient configurations of waiting aircraft on the ground. Using a simple transport model, we performed simulations on a U. S. airport network and found a global jamming transition induced by local surface congestion. From a physical perspective, the mechanism of the transition is studied analytically and the resulting aircraft distribution is discussed considering system dynamics. This study shows that the knowledge of the relationship between a takeoff rate and a congestion level on the ground is vital for efficient air traffic operations.

  20. CAPPS II: the foundation of aviation security?

    PubMed

    Barnett, Arnold

    2004-08-01

    A new computer system is being developed to classify U.S. air travelers by the degree of terrorist threat they might pose. Reports indicate that the system--called CAPPS II--would use large amounts of information about each passenger, perhaps including such personal details as his or her magazine-subscription behavior. We argue that what is publicly known about CAPPS II raises questions about how substantially the system would improve aviation security. We discuss conditions under which CAPPS II could yield safety benefits, but suggest that it might be more prudent to view the system as one component of future security arrangements rather than the centerpiece of these arrangements. PMID:15357810

  1. Potential global jamming transition in aviation networks.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonlinear transport model for an aviation network. The takeoff rate from an airport is characterized by the degree of ground congestion. Due to the effect of surface congestion, the performance of an airport deteriorates because of inefficient configurations of waiting aircraft on the ground. Using a simple transport model, we performed simulations on a United States airport network and found a global jamming transition induced by local surface congestion. From a physical perspective, the mechanism of the transition is studied analytically and the resulting aircraft distribution is discussed considering system dynamics. This study shows that the knowledge of the relationship between a takeoff rate and a congestion level on the ground is vital for efficient air traffic operations. PMID:25215781

  2. The Nation's Needs in Aviation Formal Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.

    2008-01-01

    Aviation, both on-board systems and the National Airspace System, can be transformed by many current and future technical capabilities. To name but a few, improved efficiency may be achieved by integrating functions; robustness may be improved by distributing functions; and safety may be improved by building in risk mitigation through not only redundant, independent systems but also through operational concepts and effective interaction with human operators. This talk will review the key aspects of verification, validation and certification for which formal methods will provide a critical function in enabling truly revolutionary designs to enter the operational community, illustrating successes in formal modeling to date and posing further questions for the formal modeling community.

  3. Forecasting Aviation Icing: Icing Type and Severity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    1998-03-13

    This module discusses the current theories of atmospheric conditions associated with aircraft icing and applies the theories to the icing diagnosis and forecast process. The contribution of liquid water content, temperature, and droplet size parameters to icing are examined. Identification of icing type, icing severity, and the hazards associated with icing features are presented. Tools to help diagnose atmospheric processes that may be contributing to icing and the special case of supercooled large drop (SLD) icing are examined and applied in short exercises. The use of graphics, animations, and interactive exercises in Forecasting Aviation Icing: Icing Type and Severity helps the forecaster to gain an understanding of icing processes, to identify icing hazards, and to apply diagnosis and forecast tools as aids to evaluate and anticipate potential aircraft icing threats. The subject matter expert for this module is Dr. Marcia Politovich of NCAR/Research Applications Program. This module is also available in French.

  4. Alternative fuels for general aviation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Transportation, Aviation, and Materials, U. S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, August 29, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Five witnesses representing general aviation and aviation fuel industries and the Federal Aviation Administration testified on the potential for using alternative fuels in general aviation to counteract the effects of high prices and supply vulnerability on the industry. The witnesses described test results of liquid methane and alcohol fuels, noting that those fuels which most closely emulate the properties of petroleum will best serve the industry's needs. Their testimony covered environmental and economic effects as well as fuel performance. The Synthetic Fuels Corporation, DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Department of Defense, as well as the aviation industry have research programs on aviation fuels.

  5. Measuring safety climate in aviation: A review and recommendations for the future

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul O’Connor; Angela O’Dea; Quinn Kennedy; Samuel E. Buttrey

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews 23 studies that have examined safety climate within commercial and military aviation. The safety climate factors identified in the aviation safety climate questionnaires were found to be consistent with the literature examining safety climate in non-aviation high reliability organizations. Therefore, it was concluded that the aviation safety climate tools had some construct validity (the extent to which

  6. Naval aviation and neurosurgery: traditions, commonalities, and lessons learned. The 2007 presidential address.

    PubMed

    Quest, Donald O

    2007-12-01

    In his presidential address to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, the author recounts lessons he learned while training to be a Naval Aviator and later a neurosurgeon. He describes his life as an aviator and neurosurgeon, compares naval aviation and neurosurgery, and points out lessons that neurosurgery can learn from naval aviation. PMID:18077941

  7. Family Health Education and Its Place in the Training of Student Aviators: A Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Stanley C.

    The real mission of a flight surgeon is often misunderstood by military aviation students and their families. Because of his prominent position in student aviator selection and retention, a flight surgeon may represent a threat to an aviator's career. While the Army aviation training program is rapidly expanding, formal contacts between students…

  8. Scholarship applications are open to: 1. applicants who have a passion for an Aviation career

    E-print Network

    Liley, David

    Scholarship applications are open to: 1. applicants who have a passion for an Aviation career 2. applicants who have been accepted into full-time Bachelor of Aviation or Bachelor of Aviation (Management. Australian Citizens. Swinburne University of Technology Sir Reginald Ansett Scholarship for Aviation Step 1

  9. 2003-01-2975 NASA's Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling Project

    E-print Network

    Maluf, David A.

    2003-01-2975 NASA's Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling Project Irving C. Statler and David A NASA's Aviation Safety Program, the Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) Project addresses Aviation System. This report is a brief overview of the ASMM Project as an introduction to the rest

  10. INVESTIGATION OF A CLASSIFICATION-BASED TECHNIQUE TO DETECT ILLICIT OBJECTS FOR AVIATION SECURITY

    E-print Network

    Blumenstein, Michael

    INVESTIGATION OF A CLASSIFICATION-BASED TECHNIQUE TO DETECT ILLICIT OBJECTS FOR AVIATION SECURITY of a classification-based technique for illicit object detection in aviation security. Current threats in aviation aviation authority with maximum security whilst minimising adverse impacts on airlines and airport

  11. Multiple Kernel Learning for Heterogeneous Anomaly Detection: Algorithm and Aviation Safety Case Study

    E-print Network

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    Multiple Kernel Learning for Heterogeneous Anomaly Detection: Algorithm and Aviation Safety Case-wide aviation system is one of the most complex dynamical systems ever developed and is generating data approaches to aviation safety are reactive, meaning that they are designed to react to an aviation safety

  12. Maximizing Participation of Women in Collegiate Aviation Education. NIAR Report 93-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luedtke, Jacqueline R.

    A study was done to examine the reasons for the low number of women in collegiate aviation education by focusing on the number and status of women aviation educators and on attitudes toward women in aviation. Information was sought from each of the 67 four-year University Aviation Association member institutions, with a response rate of 63%.…

  13. Aviation instruction through flight simulation and related learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Mavis Frankel

    The use of simulation in General Aviation flight training is an emergent practice and promises to increase substantially. Training through simulation is not addressed in the primary publication used to train flight instructors, however. In effect, training devices have been added into the curriculum by those using the technology as a cross between flight and ground instruction. The significance of how one learns in a training device is the potential effect on both in-flight learning and normal practices. A review of the literature, document review, interviews with flight instructors and students, and observations of instructional sessions in training devices, provided data to answer the prime research question: (a) What type(s) of learning best explain how learners are socialized to aviation through the use of simulation technology? One segment of the general aviation population, college and university flight programs, was sampled. Four types of learning provided a conceptual framework: reception; autonomous; guided inquiry; and social cognitive operationalized as cognitive apprenticeship. A central dilemma was identified from the data collected. This dilemma is the extent to which aviation and aviation instruction in training devices is perceived by instructors as being either safe or risky. Two sub-dilemmas of the central dilemma are also identified: (1) whether the perception of aviation on the part of instructors is one of control or autonomy and (2) whether aviators use and should be taught routines or innovation;. Three ways of viewing the aviation environment were identified from the combination of these sub-dilemmas by instructors: (1) aviation as safe; (2) aviation as somewhat safe; and (3) aviation as risky. Resolution of the fundamental dilemma results in an emergent view of aviation as risky and the implications of this view are discussed. Social cognitive learning operationalized as cognitive apprenticeship as an appropriate type of learning for high-risk fields is examined. A second dilemma was also identified from the data. This is a socio-technical dilemma addressing the influence of training device design on the type of learning employed by instructors. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of task analyses, curriculum development, equipment, and instructional resources and training.

  14. Policies, Activities and Structures Supporting Research Mentoring: A National Survey of Academic Health Centers with Clinical and Translational Science Awards

    PubMed Central

    Tillman, Robert E.; Jang, Susan; Abedin, Zainab; Richards, Boyd F.; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To document the frequency of policies and activities in support of mentoring practices at institutions receiving a U.S. National Institutes of Health’s Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). Method The study consisted of a 69-item survey with questions about the inclusion (formal or informal) of policies, programs/activities and structures supporting mentoring within CTSA-sponsored research (i.e., KL2 programs) and, more broadly, in the CTSA’s home institution. The survey, conducted from November 2010 through January 2011, was sent to the 55 institutions awarded a CTSA at the time of the survey. Follow-up phone interviews were conducted to clarify responses as needed. Results Fifty-one of 55 (92%) institutions completed the survey for institutional programs and 53 of 55 (96%) for KL2 programs. Responses regarding policies and activities involving mentor criteria, mentor–mentee relationship, incentives, and evaluative mechanisms revealed considerable variability between KL2 and institutional programs in some areas, such as having mentor qualification criteria and processes to evaluate mentors The survey also identified areas, such as training and women and minority mentoring programs, where there was frequent sharing of activities between the institutional and KL2 programs. Conclusions KL2 programs and institutional programs tend to have different preferences for policies versus activities to optimize qualification of mentors, the mentor–mentee relationship, incentives and evaluation mechanisms. Frequently, these elements are informal. Individuals in charge of implementing and maintaining mentoring initiatives can use the results of the study to consider their current mentoring policies, structures, and activities by comparing them to national patterns within CTSA institutions. PMID:23165278

  15. Quality-Assurance Plan for Water-Quality Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Miami, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, A. C., (compiler)

    2003-01-01

    In accordance with guidelines set forth by the Office of Water Quality in the Water Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey, a quality-assurance plan has been created for use by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Miami to conduct water-quality activities. This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Miami USGS for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of water-quality data. The policies and procedures that are documented in this quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities are meant to complement the Miami USGS quality-assurance plans for surface-water and ground-water activities.

  16. Association between physical activity and substance use behaviors among high school students participating in the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between physical activity, physical education class, and sports participation on the substance use practices of adolescents. Data was derived from the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey study of adolescent behaviors. The results of this study indicated that recreational physical activity, attending PE class, and participating in sports were independent protective factors for many cigarette use behaviors but not for smokeless tobacco use. Additionally, recreational physical activity and sports participation appears to be a protective factor for marijuana use among females but not males. On the other hand, recreational physical activity and sports participation appears to be a risk factor for alcohol use behaviors among males. PMID:25074297

  17. Unique and common variance in Structured Interview and Jenkins Activity Survey measures of Type A behavior pattern

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen A. Matthews; David S. Krantz; Theodore M. Dembroski; James M. MacDougall

    1982-01-01

    Examined factors that account for similarities and discrepancies in classification of Type A and B behavior by the Structured Interview (SI) and by the Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS). 163 31–70 yr old males and 202 male undergraduates were administered the SI and JAS. SI questions were coded for content of response and psychomotor behavior during the interview. Frequency of specific

  18. Type A behavior pattern in Japanese employees: Cross-cultural comparison of major factors in Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS) responses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Junichiro Hayano; Satoshi Takeuchi; Sanae Yoshida; Hajime Jozuka; Norio Mishima; Takao Fujinami

    1989-01-01

    The responses to the Japanese edition of the Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS) (Form C) were analyzed in 1682 male employees of a Japanese enterprise to investigate the characteristics of the Type A behavior pattern (TABP) in Japan. When the occupational level was controlled, the mean values of the Type A score were found to be quite similar to those of

  19. Magnetic Activity–related Radial Velocity Variations in Cool Stars: First Results from the Lick Extrasolar Planet Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven H. Saar; R. Paul Butler; Geoffrey W. Marcy

    1998-01-01

    The discovery of the radial velocity ( ) signatures of planets around several solar-like stars highlights the v rimportance of exploring the sources of variations intrinsic to the stars themselves. We study the stars in the v rLick planetary survey for variations related to stellar activity: the rotation of starspots and convective inhomv rogeneities and their temporal evolution. We study

  20. U.S. Geological Survey quality-assurance plan for surface-water activities in Kansas, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Painter, Collin C.; Loving, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    This Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of surface-water data.

  1. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the child?s activities at the day care center over the 48-h monitoring period. The diary was divided into three time periods over the 48-h monitoring interval. The Food Survey collected information on the frequency and types of fruits, veget...

  2. Chronology of diving activities and underground surveys in Devils Hole and Devils Hole Cave, Nye County, Nevada, 1950-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Ray J.

    1988-01-01

    A Chronology of diving activities and underground surveys in Devils Hole and Devils Hole Cave, southern Nevada, is presented for the period 1950-86. The report acknowledges the efforts of past underwater explorers, scientists, and observers of the cavern system, and provides a historical perspective for comparison with present investigations at that site. (Thacker-USGS, WRD)

  3. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form collects information on the child's activities at the day care center over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into three time periods over the 48-monitoring interval. The Food Survey collects information on the frequency and types of frui...

  4. Enhancing physical activity guidelines: a needs survey of adults with spinal cord injury and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Foulon, Brianne L; Lemay, Valérie; Ainsworth, Victoria; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine preferences of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and health care professionals (HCP) regarding the content and format of a SCI physical activity guide to support recently released SCI physical activity guidelines. Seventy-eight people with SCI and 80 HCP completed a survey questionnaire. Participants with SCI identified desired content items and their preferences for format. HCP rated the helpfulness of content items to prescribe physical activity. All content items were rated favorably by participants with SCI and useful by HCP. The risks and benefits of activity and inactivity, and strategies for becoming more active, were rated high by both samples. Photographs and separate information for those with paraplegia versus tetraplegia were strongly endorsed. These data were used to guide the development of an SCI physical activity guide to enhance the uptake of physical activity guidelines for people with SCI. The guide was publically released November 11, 2011. PMID:23027146

  5. [Aviation noise: specifics of the biological action and protection].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the work was to examine the acoustic and work environment of air forces personnel, to look for the specific effects of aviation noise on human organism, and to put out evidence-based guidelines for protection. On-site acoustics measurements, hygiene inspection of labor conditions and analysis of disease incidence including review of clinical investigations results were carried out. It was demonstrated that the aviation noise spectrum spreads to the sound and infrasound high-frequency bands referring the aviation personnel environment to class 3.2-4 of harmful and hazardous occupations. The combination of noise and infrasound provokes specific (occupational) and nonspecific diseases. Choice of the protectors should be made with consideration of specifics of the biological effects of aviation noise. PMID:22953534

  6. Federal Aviation Administration's Airport Capital Improvement Program Development Process

    E-print Network

    Tener, Scott D.

    2009-12-18

    The Airport Capital Improvement Program (ACIP) serves as the primary tool for project planning and formulation by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The FAA relies on the ACIP to serve as the basis for the distribution ...

  7. A general equilibrium analysis of climate policy for aviation

    E-print Network

    Gillespie, Christopher Whittlesey

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of aviation's contribution to the global problem of climate change is increasingly likely in the near term, but the method agreed upon by most economists-a multi-sectoral market-based approach such as a cap and ...

  8. It's time to reinvent the general aviation airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Current designs for general aviation airplanes have become obsolete, and avenues for major redesign must be considered. New designs should incorporate recent advances in electronics, aerodynamics, structures, materials, and propulsion. Future airplanes should be optimized to operate satisfactorily in a positive air traffic control environment, to afford safety and comfort for point-to-point transportation, and to take advantage of automated manufacturing techniques and high production rates. These requirements have broad implications for airplane design and flying qualities, leading to a concept for the Modern Equipment General Aviation (MEGA) airplane. Synergistic improvements in design, production, and operation can provide a much needed fresh start for the general aviation industry and the traveling public. In this investigation a small four place airplane is taken as the reference, although the proposed philosophy applies across the entire spectrum of general aviation.

  9. 78 FR 14912 - International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) Program Change

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ...safety of its airlines. It does not assess the safety compliance of any particular air carrier (nor does it address aviation security, airports, or air traffic management). Although the FAA assessment team typically visits one or more air...

  10. NASA ASRS (Pub. 63) Aviation Safety Reporting System

    E-print Network

    ) Development and Data Collection 2 FINDINGS 3 Descriptive Information 3 Pilot Qualifications 4 Overall Pilot and Reporting System ADDS Aviation Digital Data Service ADF Automatic Direction Finders ADIZ Air Defense

  11. CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 295 April 2004

    E-print Network

    /Mechanics/Military/Other 115 TOTAL 3533 MD80 loss of cabin pressure ERJ135 loss of rudder control Northwestern U.S. airport Carrier / Air Taxi Pilots 2473 General Aviation Pilots 901 Controllers 44 Cabin

  12. CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 294 March 2004

    E-print Network

    Pilots 2040 General Aviation Pilots 636 Controllers 35 Cabin/Mechanics/Military/Other 171 TOTAL 2882, and forecasts feature a more benign vocabulary. Clear. Light and variable. High pressure. CAVU. Welcome words

  13. CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 290 November 2003

    E-print Network

    General Aviation Pilots 768 Controllers 25 Cabin/Mechanics/Military/Other 138 TOTAL 2850 ASRS Recently communication problem Eastern airport unmarked surface obstruction A330 escape slide pressure regulator problem

  14. Transcription of the Workshop on General Aviation Advanced Avionics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tashker, M. (editor)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with the design of reliable, low cost, advanced avionics systems applicable to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. Sensors, displays, integrated circuits, microprocessors, and minicomputers are among the topics discussed.

  15. A program risk assessment method for aviation technology transitions

    E-print Network

    Gibbs, Jonathan Marcus

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a method for assessing the potential impacts of program risks on aviation technology transitions. It first establishes a framework that provides a methodology to complete the assessment of those risks. ...

  16. Flight test and evaluation of Omega navigation for general aviation

    E-print Network

    Hwoschinsky, Peter V.

    1975-01-01

    A seventy hour flight test program was accomplished to determine the suitability and accuracy of a low cost Omega navigation receiver in a general aviation aircraft. An analysis was made of signal availability in two widely ...

  17. The modern rotor aerodynamic limits survey: A report and data survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J.; Brilla, J.; Kufeld, R.; Balough, D.

    1993-01-01

    The first phase of the Modern Technology Rotor Program, the Modern Rotor Aerodynamic Limits Survey, was a flight test conducted by the United States Army Aviation Engineering Flight Activity for NASA Ames Research Center. The test was performed using a United States Army UH-60A Black Hawk aircraft and the United States Air Force HH-60A Night Hawk instrumented main-rotor blade. The primary purpose of this test was to gather high-speed, steady-state, and maneuvering data suitable for correlation purposes with analytical prediction tools. All aspects of the data base, flight-test instrumentation, and test procedures are presented and analyzed. Because of the high volume of data, only select data points are presented. However, access to the entire data set is available upon request.

  18. Prospective Safety Analysis and the Complex Aviation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Fatal accident rates in commercial passenger aviation are at historic lows yet have plateaued and are not showing evidence of further safety advances. Modern aircraft accidents reflect both historic causal factors and new unexpected "Black Swan" events. The ever-increasing complexity of the aviation system, along with its associated technology and organizational relationships, provides fertile ground for fresh problems. It is important to take a proactive approach to aviation safety by working to identify novel causation mechanisms for future aviation accidents before they happen. Progress has been made in using of historic data to identify the telltale signals preceding aviation accidents and incidents, using the large repositories of discrete and continuous data on aircraft and air traffic control performance and information reported by front-line personnel. Nevertheless, the aviation community is increasingly embracing predictive approaches to aviation safety. The "prospective workshop" early assessment tool described in this paper represents an approach toward this prospective mindset-one that attempts to identify the future vectors of aviation and asks the question: "What haven't we considered in our current safety assessments?" New causation mechanisms threatening aviation safety will arise in the future because new (or revised) systems and procedures will have to be used under future contextual conditions that have not been properly anticipated. Many simulation models exist for demonstrating the safety cases of new operational concepts and technologies. However the results from such models can only be as valid as the accuracy and completeness of assumptions made about the future context in which the new operational concepts and/or technologies will be immersed. Of course that future has not happened yet. What is needed is a reasonably high-confidence description of the future operational context, capturing critical contextual characteristics that modulate both the likelihood of occurrence of hazards, and the likelihood that those hazards will lead to negative safety events. Heuristics extracted from scenarios, questionnaires, and observed trends from scanning the aviation horizon may be helpful in capturing those future changes in a way conducive to safety assessment. What is also needed is a checklist of potential sources of emerging risk that arise from organizational features that are frequently overlooked. The ultimate goal is to develop a pragmatic, workable method for using descriptions of the future aviation context, to generate valid predictions of safety risks.

  19. Subsurface Resistivity Structures in and Around Strike-Slip Faults - Electromagnetic Surveys and Drillings Across Active Faults in Central Japan -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, K.; Ikeda, R.; Iio, Y.; Matsuda, T.

    2005-12-01

    Electrical resistivity is important property to investigate the structure of active faults. Pore fluid affect seriously the electrical properties of rocks, subsurface electrical resistivity can be an indicator of the existence of fluid and distribution of pores. Fracture zone of fault is expected to have low resistivity due to high porosity and small gain size. Especially, strike-slip type fault has nearly vertical fracture zone and the fracture zone would be detected by an electrical survey across the fault. We performed electromagnetic survey across the strike-slip active faults in central Japan. At the same faults, we also drilled borehole into the fault and did downhole logging in the borehole. We applied MT or CSAMT methods onto 5 faults: Nojima fault which appeared on the surface by the 1995 Great Kobe earthquake (M=7.2), western Nagano Ohtaki area(1984 Nagano-ken seibu earthquake (M=6.8), the fault did not appeared on the surface), Neodani fault which appeared by the 1891 Nobi earthquake (M=8.0), Atera fault which seemed to be dislocated by the 1586 Tensyo earthquake (M=7.9), Gofukuji fault that is considered to have activated about 1200 years ago. The sampling frequencies of electrical and magnetic field were 2 - 1024Hz (10 frequencies) for CSAMT survey and 0.00055 - 384Hz (40 frequencies) for MT survey. The electromagnetic data were processed by standard method and inverted to 2-D resistivity structure along transects of the faults. Results of the survey were compared with downhole electrical logging data and observational descriptions of drilled cores. Fault plane of each fault were recognized as low resistivity region or boundary between relatively low and high resistivity region, except for Gofukuji fault. As for Gofukuji fault, fault was located in relatively high resistivity region. During very long elapsed time from the last earthquake, the properties of fracture zone of Gofukuji fault might changed from low resistivity properties as observed for other faults. Downhole electrical logging data were consistent to values of resistivity estimated by electromagnetic survey for each fault. The existence of relatively low and high resistivity regions in 2-D structure from electromagnetic survey was observed again by downhole logging at the correspondent portion in the borehole. Cores recovered from depthes where the electrical logging showed low resistivity were hardly fractured and altered from host rock which showed high resistivity. Results of electromagnetic survey, downhole electrical logging and observation of drilled cores were consistent to each other. In present case, electromagnetic survey is useful to explore the properties of fault fracture zone. In the further investigations, it is important to explore relationships among features of resistivity structure and geological and geophysical situations of the faults.

  20. Ground penetrating radar survey of the ice-filled active crater of Mount Baker, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M.; Clark, D. H.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.

    2010-12-01

    Sherman Crater, the center of volcanic activity at Mount Baker, in northwest Washington, provides an excellent site to study glacier dynamics in an active crater because of its history of sudden, significant increases in geothermal activity, its confined geometry, the potential hazards it poses to downstream reservoirs, and the paucity of recent research related to these hazards. We present results from a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey of the crater conducted in the summers of 2009 and 2010, including characterization of the subglacial crater morphology, estimates for the crater glacier’s volume, maximum depth, annual mass balance and surface velocity and for the crater’s geothermal flux density. We used a GSSI SIR-3000 GPR system and a low frequency (80 MHz) antenna in common-offset (reflection) collection mode to image subglacial conditions along several west-east and south-north transects within the crater. We processed the GPR data with GSSI’s RADAN 6.0 and paired the surface elevations of each transect to the ice-surface topography using GPS locations and spot altimeter readings. GPR profiles reveal several sets of distinct basal and englacial reflectors. Along west-east (longitudinal) transects, the crater’s bedrock topography largely follows the glacier’s surface (high to the west, descending to the east), but the ice thins dramatically along the margin nearest the crater rim’s eastern breach. The prominent basal reflectors in the GPR transects are consistent with an ice/hydrothermally altered rock interface, but short more well-defined segments suggest the presence of bedrock (towards the center of the crater) and water (near the eastern breach) at the base of the ice. GPR data combined with surface ice melting measurements yield a first-order estimate for the area-averaged accumulation rate of 4.8 +/- 0.1 m yr-1 and ablation rate of 2.4 +/- 0.3 m yr-1 water equivalent from surface melting. The resulting calculated geothermal flux for Sherman Crater of ~20 Wm-2 is consistent with published calculations for active calderas (Mt. Veniaminof) and volcanic lakes. We estimate the maximum ice thickness to be ~50 m, and the ice velocity to range from ~3 to 4 m/month during the summer months. Highest surface ice velocities are found on moderate slopes above the deepest part of the crater, where the ice is thickest (inferred from GPR profiles).