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Sample records for awake freely behaving

  1. Bidirectional synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus of the awake freely behaving mouse

    PubMed Central

    Koranda, Jessica L.; Masino, Susan A.; Blaise, J. Harry

    2008-01-01

    There is significant interest in in vivo synaptic plasticity in mice due to the many relevant genetic mutants now available. Nevertheless, use of in vivo models remains limited. To date long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied infrequently, and long-term depression (LTD) has not been characterized in the mouse in vivo. Herein we describe protocols and improved methodologies we developed to record hippocampal synaptic plasticity reliably from the dentate gyrus of the awake freely behaving mouse. Seven days prior to recording, we implanted microelectrodes encapsulated within a lightweight, low-profile headstage assembly. On the day of recording, we induced either LTP or LTD in the awake freely behaving animal and monitored subsequent changes in population spike amplitude for at least 24 hrs. Using this protocol we attained 80% success in inducing and maintaining either LTP or LTD. Recording from a chronic implant using this improved methodology is best suited to reveal naturally occurring brain activity, and avoids both acute effects of local electrode insertion and drifts in neuronal excitability associated with anesthesia. Ultimately a reliable freely behaving mouse model of bidirectional synaptic plasticity is invaluable for full characterization of genetic models of disease states and manipulations of the mechanisms implicated in learning and memory. PMID:17875326

  2. Wireless neural stimulation in freely behaving small animals.

    PubMed

    Arfin, Scott K; Long, Michael A; Fee, Michale S; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2009-07-01

    We introduce a novel wireless, low-power neural stimulation system for use in freely behaving animals. The system consists of an external transmitter and a miniature, implantable wireless receiver-stimulator. The implant uses a custom integrated chip to deliver biphasic current pulses to four addressable bipolar electrodes at 32 selectable current levels (10 microA to 1 mA). To achieve maximal battery life, the chip enters a sleep mode when not needed and can be awakened remotely when required. To test our device, we implanted bipolar stimulating electrodes into the songbird motor nucleus HVC (formerly called the high vocal center) of zebra finches. Single-neuron recordings revealed that wireless stimulation of HVC led to a strong increase of spiking activity in its downstream target, the robust nucleus of the arcopallium. When we used this device to deliver biphasic pulses of current randomly during singing, singing activity was prematurely terminated in all birds tested. Thus our device is highly effective for remotely modulating a neural circuit and its corresponding behavior in an untethered, freely behaving animal. PMID:19386759

  3. Wireless Neural Stimulation in Freely Behaving Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Arfin, Scott K.; Long, Michael A.; Fee, Michale S.; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel wireless, low-power neural stimulation system for use in freely behaving animals. The system consists of an external transmitter and a miniature, implantable wireless receiver–stimulator. The implant uses a custom integrated chip to deliver biphasic current pulses to four addressable bipolar electrodes at 32 selectable current levels (10 μA to 1 mA). To achieve maximal battery life, the chip enters a sleep mode when not needed and can be awakened remotely when required. To test our device, we implanted bipolar stimulating electrodes into the songbird motor nucleus HVC (formerly called the high vocal center) of zebra finches. Single-neuron recordings revealed that wireless stimulation of HVC led to a strong increase of spiking activity in its downstream target, the robust nucleus of the arcopallium. When we used this device to deliver biphasic pulses of current randomly during singing, singing activity was prematurely terminated in all birds tested. Thus our device is highly effective for remotely modulating a neural circuit and its corresponding behavior in an untethered, freely behaving animal. PMID:19386759

  4. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Shipley, Frederick B; Linder, Ashley N; Plummer, George S; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar U; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Leifer, Andrew M

    2016-02-23

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. We present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture, and locomotion. This instrument provides whole-brain imaging with cellular resolution in an unrestrained and behaving animal. We use spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 6 head-volumes/s. A suite of three cameras monitor neuronal fluorescence and the animal's position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal's head in real time and two feedback loops adjust a motorized stage and objective to keep the animal's head within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from up to 77 neurons for over 4 min and correlate this activity with the animal's behavior. We characterize noise in the system due to animal motion and show that, across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior corresponding to forward, backward, and turning locomotion. PMID:26712014

  5. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jeffrey P.; Shipley, Frederick B.; Linder, Ashley N.; Plummer, George S.; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar U.; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. We present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal’s position, posture, and locomotion. This instrument provides whole-brain imaging with cellular resolution in an unrestrained and behaving animal. We use spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 6 head-volumes/s. A suite of three cameras monitor neuronal fluorescence and the animal’s position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal’s head in real time and two feedback loops adjust a motorized stage and objective to keep the animal’s head within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from up to 77 neurons for over 4 min and correlate this activity with the animal’s behavior. We characterize noise in the system due to animal motion and show that, across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior corresponding to forward, backward, and turning locomotion. PMID:26712014

  6. Firing Rate Homeostasis in Visual Cortex of Freely Behaving Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hengen, Keith B.; Lambo, Mary E.; Van Hooser, Stephen D.; Katz, Donald B; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2013-01-01

    Summary It has been postulated that homeostatic mechanisms maintain stable circuit function by keeping neuronal firing within a set-point range, but such firing rate homeostasis has never been demonstrated in vivo. Here we use chronic multielectrode recordings to monitor firing rates in visual cortex of freely behaving rats during chronic monocular visual deprivation (MD). Firing rates in V1 were suppressed over the first 2 d of MD, but then rebounded to baseline over the next 2–3 d despite continued MD. This drop and rebound in firing was accompanied by bi-directional changes in mEPSC amplitude measured ex vivo. The rebound in firing was independent of sleep-wake state but was cell-type specific, as putative FS and regular spiking neurons responded to MD with different time-courses. These data establish for the first time that homeostatic mechanisms within the intact CNS act to stabilize neuronal firing rates in the face of sustained sensory perturbations. PMID:24139038

  7. Studying the freely-behaving brain with fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2012-01-01

    Given that the brain evolved to function in the real world then it seems reasonable to want to examine how it operates in that context. But of course the world is complex, as are the brain's responses to it, and MRI scanners are inherently restrictive environments. This combination of challenges makes the prospect of studying the freely-behaving brain with fMRI disconcerting to anyone sensible. When designing naturalistic fMRI experiments it is necessary to ensure that the thoughts or behaviours under scrutiny are not unduly perturbed or constrained by the imaging process, while still being amenable to experimental manipulation and control, and result in meaningful and interpretable data. This is difficult to achieve. Here, briefly, and in a highly subjective and selective manner, I consider: why we might want to deploy free-behaviour designs in an fMRI context, how to go about it, review some examples of it in action, and decide finally whether it is worth it (it is). PMID:22245643

  8. Imaging the Dynamics of Neocortical Population Activity in Behaving and Freely Moving Mammals.

    PubMed

    Grinvald, Amiram; Petersen, Carl C H

    2015-01-01

    The development of functional imaging techniques applicable to neuroscience and covering a wide range of spatial and temporal scales has greatly facilitated the exploration of the relationships between cognition, behaviour and electrical brain activity. For mammals, the neocortex plays a particularly profound role in generating sensory perception, controlling voluntary movement, higher cognitive functions and planning goal-directed behaviours. Since these remarkable functions of the neocortex cannot be explored in simple model preparations or in anesthetised animals, the neural basis of behaviour must be explored in awake behaving subjects. Because neocortical function is highly distributed across many rapidly interacting regions, it is essential to measure spatiotemporal dynamics of cortical activity in real-time. Extensive work in anesthetised mammals has shown that in vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging (VSDI) reveals the neocortical population membrane potential dynamics at millisecond temporal resolution and subcolumnar spatial resolution. Here, we describe recent advances indicating that VSDI is also already well-developed for exploring cortical function in behaving monkeys and mice. The first animal model, the non-human primate, is well-suited for fundamental exploration of higher-level cognitive function and behavior. The second animal model, the mouse, benefits from a rich arsenal of molecular and genetic technologies. In the monkey, imaging from the same patch of cortex, repeatedly, is feasible for a long period of time, up to a year. In the rodent, VSDI is applicable to freely moving and awake head-restrained mice. Interactions between different cortical areas and different cortical columns can therefore now be dynamically mapped through VSDI and related to the corresponding behaviour. Thus by applying VSDI to mice and monkeys one can begin to explore how behaviour emerges from neuronal activity in neuronal networks residing in different cortical areas

  9. Chronic monitoring of cortical hemodynamics in behaving, freely-moving rats using a miniaturized head-mounted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigal, Iliya; Gad, Raanan; Koletar, Margaret; Ringuette, Dene; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Growing interest within the neurophysiology community in assessing healthy and pathological brain activity in animals that are awake and freely-behaving has triggered the need for optical systems that are suitable for such longitudinal studies. In this work we report label-free multi-modal imaging of cortical hemodynamics in the somatosensory cortex of awake, freely-behaving rats, using a novel head-mounted miniature optical microscope. The microscope employs vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) at three distinct wavelengths (680 nm, 795 nm, and 850 nm) to provide measurements of four hemodynamic markers: blood flow speeds, HbO, HbR, and total Hb concentration, across a > 2 mm field of view. Blood flow speeds are extracted using Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI), while oxygenation measurements are performed using Intrinsic Optical Signal Imaging (IOSI). Longitudinal measurements on the same animal are made possible over the course of > 6 weeks using a chronic window that is surgically implanted into the skull. We use the device to examine changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in superficial cortical blood vessels and tissue in response to drug-induced absence-like seizures, correlating motor behavior with changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in the brain.

  10. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jeffrey; Shipley, Frederick; Linder, Ashley; Plummer, George; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar; Shaevitz, Joshua; Leifer, Andrew

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. Acquiring this data, however, is challenging because it is difficult to track and image individual neurons as an animal deforms its posture and moves many body lengths. Here, we present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture, and locomotion. 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s are recorded at 6 head-volumes/s using spinning disk confocal microscopy. At the same time, we record low magnification images of the animal to measure the animals behavior and track its head as it moves. We develop a time independent neuronal matching algorithm that uses non-rigid point set registration and machine learning to correctly match neurons across time. Using this method, we are able to observe calcium transients from up to 90 neurons for over 4 min and correlate the neural activity with the animal's behavior.

  11. Sampling phasic dopamine signaling with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in awake behaving rats

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, SM; Cone, JJ; Ng-Evans, S; McCutcheon, JE; Roitman, MF

    2015-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique which permits the in vivo measurement of extracellular fluctuations in multiple chemical species. The technique is frequently utilized to sample sub-second (phasic) concentration changes of the neurotransmitter dopamine in awake and behaving rats. Phasic dopamine signaling is implicated in reinforcement, goal-directed behavior, and locomotion and FSCV has been used to investigate how rapid changes in striatal dopamine concentration contribute to these and other behaviors. This unit describes the instrumentation and construction, implantation, and use of necessary components required to sample and analyze dopamine concentration changes in awake rats with FSCV. PMID:25559005

  12. Photoacoustic detection of functional responses in the motor cortex of awake behaving monkey during forelimb movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheney, Paul D.; Yang, Xinmai

    2012-11-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging was applied to detect the neuronal activity in the motor cortex of an awake, behaving monkey during forelimb movement. An adult macaque monkey was trained to perform a reach-to-grasp task while PA images were acquired through a 30-mm diameter implanted cranial chamber. Increased PA signal amplitude results from an increase in regional blood volume and is interpreted as increased neuronal activity. Additionally, depth-resolved PA signals enabled the study of functional responses in deep cortical areas. The results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing PA imaging for studies of functional activation of cerebral cortex in awake monkeys performing behavioral tasks.

  13. Evolving Models of Pavlovian Conditioning: Cerebellar Cortical Dynamics in Awake Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    ten Brinke, Michiel M.; Boele, Henk-Jan; Spanke, Jochen K.; Potters, Jan-Willem; Kornysheva, Katja; Wulff, Peer; IJpelaar, Anna C.H.G.; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K.E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Three decades of electrophysiological research on cerebellar cortical activity underlying Pavlovian conditioning have expanded our understanding of motor learning in the brain. Purkinje cell simple spike suppression is considered to be crucial in the expression of conditional blink responses (CRs). However, trial-by-trial quantification of this link in awake behaving animals is lacking, and current hypotheses regarding the underlying plasticity mechanisms have diverged from the classical parallel fiber one to the Purkinje cell synapse LTD hypothesis. Here, we establish that acquired simple spike suppression, acquired conditioned stimulus (CS)-related complex spike responses, and molecular layer interneuron (MLI) activity predict the expression of CRs on a trial-by-trial basis using awake behaving mice. Additionally, we show that two independent transgenic mouse mutants with impaired MLI function exhibit motor learning deficits. Our findings suggest multiple cerebellar cortical plasticity mechanisms underlying simple spike suppression, and they implicate the broader involvement of the olivocerebellar module within the interstimulus interval. PMID:26655909

  14. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach. Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13 week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results. In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance. These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  15. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13-week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  16. Long-term Potentiation of Perforant Pathway-dentate Gyrus Synapse in Freely Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blaise, J. Harry

    2013-01-01

    Studies of long-term potentiation of synaptic efficacy, an activity-dependent synaptic phenomenon having properties that make it attractive as a potential cellular mechanism underlying learning and information storage, have long been used to elucidate the physiology of various neuronal circuits in the hippocampus, amygdala, and other limbic and cortical structures. With this in mind, transgenic mouse models of neurological diseases represent useful platforms to conduct long-term potentiation (LTP) studies to develop a greater understanding of the role of genes in normal and abnormal synaptic communication in neuronal networks involved in learning, emotion and information processing. This article describes methodologies for reliably inducing LTP in the freely behaving mouse. These methodologies can be used in studies of transgenic and knockout freely behaving mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24327052

  17. Neural recording stability of chronic electrode arrays in freely behaving primates.

    PubMed

    Linderman, Michael D; Gilja, Vikash; Santhanam, Gopal; Afshar, Afsheen; Ryu, Stephen; Meng, Teresa H; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2006-01-01

    Chronically implanted electrode arrays have enabled a broad range of advances, particularly in the field of neural prosthetics. Those successes motivate development of prototype implantable prosthetic processors for long duration, continuous use in freely behaving subjects. However, traditional experimental protocols have provided limited information regarding the stability of the electrode arrays and their neural recordings. In this paper we present preliminary results derived from long duration neural recordings in a freely behaving primate which show variations in action potential shape and RMS noise across a range of time scales. These preliminary results suggest that spike sorting algorithms can no longer assume stable neural signals and will need to transition to adaptive signal processing methodologies to maximize performance. PMID:17946626

  18. TRP channel mediated neuronal activation and ablation in freely behaving zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shijia; Chiu, Cindy N; McArthur, Kimberly L; Fetcho, Joseph R; Prober, David A

    2016-02-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a useful vertebrate model system in which to study neural circuits and behavior, but tools to modulate neurons in freely behaving animals are limited. As poikilotherms that live in water, zebrafish are amenable to thermal and pharmacological perturbations. We exploit these properties by using transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to activate or ablate specific neuronal populations using the chemical and thermal agonists of heterologously expressed TRPV1, TRPM8 and TRPA1. PMID:26657556

  19. Imaging large-scale cellular activity in spinal cord of freely behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Kohei J; Shekhtmeyster, Pavel; Merten, Katharina; Arena, Alexander; Cook, Daniela; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Ngo, Alexander; Nimmerjahn, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Sensory information from mechanoreceptors and nociceptors in the skin plays key roles in adaptive and protective motor behaviours. To date, very little is known about how this information is encoded by spinal cord cell types and their activity patterns, particularly under freely behaving conditions. To enable stable measurement of neuronal and glial cell activity in behaving mice, we have developed fluorescence imaging approaches based on two- and miniaturized one-photon microscopy. We show that distinct cutaneous stimuli activate overlapping ensembles of dorsal horn neurons, and that stimulus type and intensity is encoded at the single-cell level. In contrast, astrocytes show large-scale coordinated calcium responses to intense but not weak sensory inputs. Sensory-evoked activity is potently suppressed by anaesthesia. By revealing the cellular and computational logic of spinal cord networks under behaving conditions, our approach holds promise for better understanding of healthy and aberrant spinal cord processes. PMID:27121084

  20. Imaging large-scale cellular activity in spinal cord of freely behaving mice

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Kohei J.; Shekhtmeyster, Pavel; Merten, Katharina; Arena, Alexander; Cook, Daniela; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Ngo, Alexander; Nimmerjahn, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Sensory information from mechanoreceptors and nociceptors in the skin plays key roles in adaptive and protective motor behaviours. To date, very little is known about how this information is encoded by spinal cord cell types and their activity patterns, particularly under freely behaving conditions. To enable stable measurement of neuronal and glial cell activity in behaving mice, we have developed fluorescence imaging approaches based on two- and miniaturized one-photon microscopy. We show that distinct cutaneous stimuli activate overlapping ensembles of dorsal horn neurons, and that stimulus type and intensity is encoded at the single-cell level. In contrast, astrocytes show large-scale coordinated calcium responses to intense but not weak sensory inputs. Sensory-evoked activity is potently suppressed by anaesthesia. By revealing the cellular and computational logic of spinal cord networks under behaving conditions, our approach holds promise for better understanding of healthy and aberrant spinal cord processes. PMID:27121084

  1. Controlled Iontophoresis Coupled with Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry/Electrophysiology in Awake, Freely Moving Animals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous electrochemical and electrophysiological data were recorded to evaluate the effects of controlled local application of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists in awake rats. Measurements were made with a probe consisting of a carbon-fiber microelectrode fused to three iontophoretic barrels used to introduce the drugs of interest. The probe and the manipulator used to position it in the brain of behaving animals were optimized to improve their performance. The effect of the dopamine autoreceptor on electrically stimulated release was demonstrated. Dopamine inhibited the release of endogenous dopamine whereas raclopride, a D2 antagonist, enhanced it, with similar responses in anesthetized and awake animals. We also examined changes in the firing rate of nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons in awake animals during and after brief (15 s) iontophoretic ejections of SCH 23390 (D1 receptor antagonist) or raclopride. Changes in response to these antagonists were seen both immediately and on a prolonged time scale. Application of raclopride increased the firing rate in 40% of medium spiny neurons (MSNs), of which half responded immediately. Decreases in firing rate were observed in 46% of MSNs after SCH 23390 application. Only 11% of MSNs responded to both antagonists and one MSN (3%) showed no response to either drug. The same prolonged response in firing rate was seen for electrically stimulated and locally applied dopamine in 75% of MSNs. These results are in agreement with previously reported distributions for dopamine receptor subtypes on MSNs and probe the effects of dopamine on these cell populations. PMID:23480099

  2. MATLAB-based automated patch-clamp system for awake behaving mice

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Jennifer J.; Taylor, William; Chitwood, Raymond A.; Johnston, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Automation has been an important part of biomedical research for decades, and the use of automated and robotic systems is now standard for such tasks as DNA sequencing, microfluidics, and high-throughput screening. Recently, Kodandaramaiah and colleagues (Nat Methods 9: 585–587, 2012) demonstrated, using anesthetized animals, the feasibility of automating blind patch-clamp recordings in vivo. Blind patch is a good target for automation because it is a complex yet highly stereotyped process that revolves around analysis of a single signal (electrode impedance) and movement along a single axis. Here, we introduce an automated system for blind patch-clamp recordings from awake, head-fixed mice running on a wheel. In its design, we were guided by 3 requirements: easy-to-use and easy-to-modify software; seamless integration of behavioral equipment; and efficient use of time. The resulting system employs equipment that is standard for patch recording rigs, moderately priced, or simple to make. It is written entirely in MATLAB, a programming environment that has an enormous user base in the neuroscience community and many available resources for analysis and instrument control. Using this system, we obtained 19 whole cell patch recordings from neurons in the prefrontal cortex of awake mice, aged 8–9 wk. Successful recordings had series resistances that averaged 52 ± 4 MΩ and required 5.7 ± 0.6 attempts to obtain. These numbers are comparable with those of experienced electrophysiologists working manually, and this system, written in a simple and familiar language, will be useful to many cellular electrophysiologists who wish to study awake behaving mice. PMID:26084901

  3. MATLAB-based automated patch-clamp system for awake behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Desai, Niraj S; Siegel, Jennifer J; Taylor, William; Chitwood, Raymond A; Johnston, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Automation has been an important part of biomedical research for decades, and the use of automated and robotic systems is now standard for such tasks as DNA sequencing, microfluidics, and high-throughput screening. Recently, Kodandaramaiah and colleagues (Nat Methods 9: 585-587, 2012) demonstrated, using anesthetized animals, the feasibility of automating blind patch-clamp recordings in vivo. Blind patch is a good target for automation because it is a complex yet highly stereotyped process that revolves around analysis of a single signal (electrode impedance) and movement along a single axis. Here, we introduce an automated system for blind patch-clamp recordings from awake, head-fixed mice running on a wheel. In its design, we were guided by 3 requirements: easy-to-use and easy-to-modify software; seamless integration of behavioral equipment; and efficient use of time. The resulting system employs equipment that is standard for patch recording rigs, moderately priced, or simple to make. It is written entirely in MATLAB, a programming environment that has an enormous user base in the neuroscience community and many available resources for analysis and instrument control. Using this system, we obtained 19 whole cell patch recordings from neurons in the prefrontal cortex of awake mice, aged 8-9 wk. Successful recordings had series resistances that averaged 52 ± 4 MΩ and required 5.7 ± 0.6 attempts to obtain. These numbers are comparable with those of experienced electrophysiologists working manually, and this system, written in a simple and familiar language, will be useful to many cellular electrophysiologists who wish to study awake behaving mice. PMID:26084901

  4. Decoding of Intentional Actions from Scalp Electroencephalography (EEG) in Freely-behaving Infants

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Zachery R.; Cruz-Garza, Jesus; Tse, Teresa; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2015-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) in humans is thought to enable an individual’s understanding of the meaning of actions performed by others and the potential imitation and learning of those actions. In humans, electroencephalographic (EEG) changes in sensorimotor α-band at central electrodes, which desynchronizes both during execution and observation of goal-directed actions (i.e., μ suppression), have been considered an analog to MNS function. However, methodological and developmental issues, as well as the nature of generalized μ suppression to imagined, observed, and performed actions, have yet to provide a mechanistic relationship between EEG μ-rhythm and MNS function, and the extent to which EEG can be used to infer intent during MNS tasks remains unknown. In this study we present a novel methodology using active EEG and inertial sensors to record brain activity and behavioral actions from freely-behaving infants during exploration, imitation, attentive rest, pointing, reaching and grasping, and interaction with an actor. We used δ-band (1–4Hz) EEG as input to a dimensionality reduction algorithm (locality-preserving Fisher’s discriminant analysis, LFDA) followed by a neural classifier (Gaussian mixture models, GMMs) to decode the each MNS task performed by freely-behaving 6–24 month old infants during interaction with an adult actor. Here, we present results from a 20-month male infant to illustrate our approach and show the feasibility of EEG-based classification of freely occurring MNS behaviors displayed by an infant. These results, which provide an alternative to the μ-rhythm theory of MNS function, indicate the informative nature of EEG in relation to intentionality (goal) for MNS tasks which may support action-understanding and thus bear implications for advancing the understanding of MNS function. PMID:25570402

  5. Tactile responses in the granule cell layer of cerebellar folium crus IIa of freely behaving rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, M. J.; Bower, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We recorded activity from the granule cell layer (GCL) of cerebellar folium Crus IIa as freely moving rats engaged in a variety of natural behaviors, including grooming, eating, and free tactile exploration. Multiunit responses in the 1000-4500 Hz range were found to be strongly correlated with tactile stimulation of lip and whisker (perioral) regions. These responses occurred regardless of whether the stimulus was externally or self-generated and during both active and passive touch. In contrast, perioral movements that did not tactually stimulate this region of the face (e.g., chewing) produced no detectable increases in GCL activity. In addition, GCL responses were not correlated with movement extremes. When rats used their lips actively for palpation and exploration, the tactile responses in the GCL were not detectably modulated by ongoing jaw movements. However, active palpation and exploratory behaviors did result in the largest and most continuous bursts of GCL activity: responses were on average 10% larger and 50% longer during palpation and exploration than during grooming or passive stimulation. Although activity levels differed between behaviors, the position and spatial extent of the peripheral receptive field was similar over all behaviors that resulted in tactile input. Overall, our data suggest that the 1000-4500 Hz multiunit responses in the Crus IIa GCL of awake rats are correlated with tactile input rather than with movement or any movement parameter and that these responses are likely to be of particular importance during the acquisition of sensory information by perioral structures.

  6. Autonomous Head-mounted Electrophysiology Systems for Freely-Behaving Primates

    PubMed Central

    Nuyujukian, Paul; Foster, Justin; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2011-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to new lightweight battery-operated systems for electrophysiology. Such systems are head mounted, run for days without experimenter intervention, and can record and stimulate from single or multiple electrodes implanted in a freely-behaving primates. Here we discuss existing systems, studies that use them, and how they can augment traditional, physically restrained, “in-rig” electrophysiology. With existing technical capabilities these systems can acquire multiple signal classes, such as spikes, local field potential, and electromyography signals, and can stimulate based on real-time processing of recorded signals. Moving forward, this class of technologies, along with advances in neural signal processing and behavioral monitoring, have the potential to dramatically expand the scope and scale of electrophysiological studies. PMID:20655733

  7. Rodent scope: a user-configurable digital wireless telemetry system for freely behaving animals.

    PubMed

    Ball, David; Kliese, Russell; Windels, Francois; Nolan, Christopher; Stratton, Peter; Sah, Pankaj; Wiles, Janet

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a wireless neural telemetry system that enables new experimental paradigms, such as neural recordings during rodent navigation in large outdoor environments. RoSco, short for Rodent Scope, is a small lightweight user-configurable module suitable for digital wireless recording from freely behaving small animals. Due to the digital transmission technology, RoSco has advantages over most other wireless modules of noise immunity and online user-configurable settings. RoSco digitally transmits entire neural waveforms for 14 of 16 channels at 20 kHz with 8-bit encoding which are streamed to the PC as standard USB audio packets. Up to 31 RoSco wireless modules can coexist in the same environment on non-overlapping independent channels. The design has spatial diversity reception via two antennas, which makes wireless communication resilient to fading and obstacles. In comparison with most existing wireless systems, this system has online user-selectable independent gain control of each channel in 8 factors from 500 to 32,000 times, two selectable ground references from a subset of channels, selectable channel grounding to disable noisy electrodes, and selectable bandwidth suitable for action potentials (300 Hz-3 kHz) and low frequency field potentials (4 Hz-3 kHz). Indoor and outdoor recordings taken from freely behaving rodents are shown to be comparable to a commercial wired system in sorting for neural populations. The module has low input referred noise, battery life of 1.5 hours and transmission losses of 0.1% up to a range of 10 m. PMID:24587144

  8. Rodent Scope: A User-Configurable Digital Wireless Telemetry System for Freely Behaving Animals

    PubMed Central

    Ball, David; Kliese, Russell; Windels, Francois; Nolan, Christopher; Stratton, Peter; Sah, Pankaj; Wiles, Janet

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a wireless neural telemetry system that enables new experimental paradigms, such as neural recordings during rodent navigation in large outdoor environments. RoSco, short for Rodent Scope, is a small lightweight user-configurable module suitable for digital wireless recording from freely behaving small animals. Due to the digital transmission technology, RoSco has advantages over most other wireless modules of noise immunity and online user-configurable settings. RoSco digitally transmits entire neural waveforms for 14 of 16 channels at 20 kHz with 8-bit encoding which are streamed to the PC as standard USB audio packets. Up to 31 RoSco wireless modules can coexist in the same environment on non-overlapping independent channels. The design has spatial diversity reception via two antennas, which makes wireless communication resilient to fading and obstacles. In comparison with most existing wireless systems, this system has online user-selectable independent gain control of each channel in 8 factors from 500 to 32,000 times, two selectable ground references from a subset of channels, selectable channel grounding to disable noisy electrodes, and selectable bandwidth suitable for action potentials (300 Hz–3 kHz) and low frequency field potentials (4 Hz–3 kHz). Indoor and outdoor recordings taken from freely behaving rodents are shown to be comparable to a commercial wired system in sorting for neural populations. The module has low input referred noise, battery life of 1.5 hours and transmission losses of 0.1% up to a range of 10 m. PMID:24587144

  9. Evaluation of a closed loop inductive power transmission system on an awake behaving animal subject.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mehdi; Kwon, Ki Yong; Zhang, Fei; Oweiss, Karim; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents in vivo experimental results for a closed loop wireless power transmission system to implantable devices on an awake behaving animal subject. In this system, wireless power transmission takes place across an inductive link, controlled by a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) radio frequency identification (RFID) transceiver (TRF7960) operating at 13.56 MHz. Induced voltage on the implantable secondary coil is rectified, digitized by a 10-bit analog to digital converter, and transmitted back to the primary via back telemetry. Transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) circuitry were mounted on the back of an adult rat with a nominal distance of ~7 mm between their coils. Our experiments showed that the closed loop system was able to maintain the Rx supply voltage at the designated 3.8 V despite changes in the coils' relative distance and alignment due to animal movements. The Tx power consumption changed between 410 ~ 560 mW in order to deliver 27 mW to the receiver. The open loop system, on the other hand, showed undesired changes in the Rx supply voltage while the Tx power consumption was constant at 660 mW. PMID:22256112

  10. Flexible Coupling of Respiration and Vocalizations with Locomotion and Head Movements in the Freely Behaving Rat

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Joseph Andrews; Boerner, Barbara Ciralli

    2016-01-01

    Quadrupedal mammals typically synchronize their respiration with body movements during rhythmic locomotion. In the rat, fast respiration is coupled to head movements during sniffing behavior, but whether respiration is entrained by stride dynamics is not known. We recorded intranasal pressure, head acceleration, instantaneous speed, and ultrasonic vocalizations from male and female adult rats while freely behaving in a social environment. We used high-speed video recordings of stride to understand how head acceleration signals relate to locomotion and developed techniques to identify episodes of sniffing, walking, trotting, and galloping from the recorded variables. Quantitative analysis of synchrony between respiration and head acceleration rhythms revealed that respiration and locomotion movements were coordinated but with a weaker coupling than expected from previous work in other mammals. We have recently shown that rats behaving in social settings produce high rates of ultrasonic vocalizations during locomotion bouts. Accordingly, rats emitted vocalizations in over half of the respiratory cycles during fast displacements. We present evidence suggesting that emission of these calls disrupts the entrainment of respiration by stride. The coupling between these two variables is thus flexible, such that it can be overridden by other behavioral demands. PMID:27525126

  11. Flexible Coupling of Respiration and Vocalizations with Locomotion and Head Movements in the Freely Behaving Rat.

    PubMed

    Alves, Joseph Andrews; Boerner, Barbara Ciralli; Laplagne, Diego Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Quadrupedal mammals typically synchronize their respiration with body movements during rhythmic locomotion. In the rat, fast respiration is coupled to head movements during sniffing behavior, but whether respiration is entrained by stride dynamics is not known. We recorded intranasal pressure, head acceleration, instantaneous speed, and ultrasonic vocalizations from male and female adult rats while freely behaving in a social environment. We used high-speed video recordings of stride to understand how head acceleration signals relate to locomotion and developed techniques to identify episodes of sniffing, walking, trotting, and galloping from the recorded variables. Quantitative analysis of synchrony between respiration and head acceleration rhythms revealed that respiration and locomotion movements were coordinated but with a weaker coupling than expected from previous work in other mammals. We have recently shown that rats behaving in social settings produce high rates of ultrasonic vocalizations during locomotion bouts. Accordingly, rats emitted vocalizations in over half of the respiratory cycles during fast displacements. We present evidence suggesting that emission of these calls disrupts the entrainment of respiration by stride. The coupling between these two variables is thus flexible, such that it can be overridden by other behavioral demands. PMID:27525126

  12. Anesthetized- and awake-patched whole-cell recordings in freely moving rats using UV-cured collar-based electrode stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doyun; Shtengel, Gleb; Osborne, Jason E; Lee, Albert K

    2014-12-01

    Intracellular recording allows precise measurement and manipulation of individual neurons, but it requires stable mechanical contact between the electrode and the cell membrane, and thus it has remained challenging to perform in behaving animals. Whole-cell recordings in freely moving animals can be obtained by rigidly fixing ('anchoring') the pipette electrode to the head; however, previous anchoring procedures were slow and often caused substantial pipette movement, resulting in loss of the recording or of recording quality. We describe a UV-transparent collar and UV-cured adhesive technique that rapidly (within 15 s) anchors pipettes in place with virtually no movement, thus substantially improving the reliability, yield and quality of freely moving whole-cell recordings. Recordings are first obtained from anesthetized or awake head-fixed rats. UV light cures the thin adhesive layers linking pipette to collar to head. Then, the animals are rapidly and smoothly released for recording during unrestrained behavior. The anesthetized-patched version can be completed in ∼4-7 h (excluding histology) and the awake-patched version requires ∼1-4 h per day for ∼2 weeks. These advances should greatly facilitate studies of neuronal integration and plasticity in identified cells during natural behaviors. PMID:25375992

  13. A Wirelessly Powered and Controlled Device for Optical Neural Control of Freely-Behaving Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wentz, Christian T.; Bernstein, Jacob G.; Monahan, Patrick; Guerra, Alexander; Rodriguez, Alex; Boyden, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    Optogenetics, the ability to use light to activate and silence specific neuron types within neural networks in vivo and in vitro, is revolutionizing neuroscientists’ capacity to understand how defined neural circuit elements contribute to normal and pathological brain functions. Typically awake behaving experiments are conducted by inserting an optical fiber into the brain, tethered to a remote laser, or by utilizing an implanted LED, tethered to a remote power source. A fully wireless system would enable chronic or longitudinal experiments where long duration tethering is impractical, and would also support high-throughput experimentation. However, the high power requirements of light sources (LEDs, lasers), especially in the context of the high-frequency pulse trains often desired in experiments, precludes battery-powered approaches from being widely applicable. We have developed a headborne device weighing 2 grams capable of wirelessly receiving power using a resonant RF power link and storing the energy in an adaptive supercapacitor circuit, which can algorithmically control one or more headborne LEDs via a microcontroller. The device can deliver approximately 2W of power to the LEDs in steady state, and 4.3W in bursts. We also present an optional radio transceiver module (1 gram) which, when added to the base headborne device, enables real-time updating of light delivery protocols; dozens of devices can be simultaneously controlled from one computer. We demonstrate use of the technology to wirelessly drive cortical control of movement in mice. These devices may serve as prototypes for clinical ultra-precise neural prosthetics that use light as the modality of biological control. PMID:21701058

  14. A wirelessly powered and controlled device for optical neural control of freely-behaving animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Christian T.; Bernstein, Jacob G.; Monahan, Patrick; Guerra, Alexander; Rodriguez, Alex; Boyden, Edward S.

    2011-08-01

    Optogenetics, the ability to use light to activate and silence specific neuron types within neural networks in vivo and in vitro, is revolutionizing neuroscientists' capacity to understand how defined neural circuit elements contribute to normal and pathological brain functions. Typically, awake behaving experiments are conducted by inserting an optical fiber into the brain, tethered to a remote laser, or by utilizing an implanted light-emitting diode (LED), tethered to a remote power source. A fully wireless system would enable chronic or longitudinal experiments where long duration tethering is impractical, and would also support high-throughput experimentation. However, the high power requirements of light sources (LEDs, lasers), especially in the context of the extended illumination periods often desired in experiments, precludes battery-powered approaches from being widely applicable. We have developed a headborne device weighing 2 g capable of wirelessly receiving power using a resonant RF power link and storing the energy in an adaptive supercapacitor circuit, which can algorithmically control one or more headborne LEDs via a microcontroller. The device can deliver approximately 2 W of power to the LEDs in steady state, and 4.3 W in bursts. We also present an optional radio transceiver module (1 g) which, when added to the base headborne device, enables real-time updating of light delivery protocols; dozens of devices can be controlled simultaneously from one computer. We demonstrate use of the technology to wirelessly drive cortical control of movement in mice. These devices may serve as prototypes for clinical ultra-precise neural prosthetics that use light as the modality of biological control.

  15. Spike count, spike timing and temporal information in the cortex of awake, freely moving rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaglione, Alessandro; Foffani, Guglielmo; Moxon, Karen A.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Sensory processing of peripheral information is not stationary but is, in general, a dynamic process related to the behavioral state of the animal. Yet the link between the state of the behavior and the encoding properties of neurons is unclear. This report investigates the impact of the behavioral state on the encoding mechanisms used by cortical neurons for both detection and discrimination of somatosensory stimuli in awake, freely moving, rats. Approach. Neuronal activity was recorded from the primary somatosensory cortex of five rats under two different behavioral states (quiet versus whisking) while electrical stimulation of increasing stimulus strength was delivered to the mystacial pad. Information theoretical measures were then used to measure the contribution of different encoding mechanisms to the information carried by neurons in response to the whisker stimulation. Main results. We found that the behavioral state of the animal modulated the total amount of information conveyed by neurons and that the timing of individual spikes increased the information compared to the total count of spikes alone. However, the temporal information, i.e. information exclusively related to when the spikes occur, was not modulated by behavioral state. Significance. We conclude that information about somatosensory stimuli is modulated by the behavior of the animal and this modulation is mainly expressed in the spike count while the temporal information is more robust to changes in behavioral state.

  16. 512-Channel and 13-Region Simultaneous Recordings Coupled with Optogenetic Manipulation in Freely Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kun; Fox, Grace E.; Liu, Jun; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2016-01-01

    The development of technologies capable of recording both single-unit activity and local field potentials (LFPs) over a wide range of brain circuits in freely behaving animals is the key to constructing brain activity maps. Although mice are the most popular mammalian genetic model, in vivo neural recording has been traditionally limited to smaller channel count and fewer brain structures because of the mouse’s small size and thin skull. Here, we describe a 512-channel tetrode system that allows us to record simultaneously over a dozen cortical and subcortical structures in behaving mice. This new technique offers two major advantages – namely, the ultra-low cost and the do-it-yourself flexibility for targeting any combination of many brain areas. We show the successful recordings of both single units and LFPs from 13 distinct neural circuits of the mouse brain, including subregions of the anterior cingulate cortices, retrosplenial cortices, somatosensory cortices, secondary auditory cortex, hippocampal CA1, dentate gyrus, subiculum, lateral entorhinal cortex, perirhinal cortex, and prelimbic cortex. This 512-channel system can also be combined with Cre-lox neurogenetics and optogenetics to further examine interactions between genes, cell types, and circuit dynamics across a wide range of brain structures. Finally, we demonstrate that complex stimuli – such as an earthquake and fear-inducing foot-shock – trigger firing changes in all of the 13 brain regions recorded, supporting the notion that neural code is highly distributed. In addition, we show that localized optogenetic manipulation in any given brain region could disrupt network oscillations and caused changes in single-unit firing patterns in a brain-wide manner, thereby raising the cautionary note of the interpretation of optogenetically manipulated behaviors. PMID:27378865

  17. 512-Channel and 13-Region Simultaneous Recordings Coupled with Optogenetic Manipulation in Freely Behaving Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kun; Fox, Grace E; Liu, Jun; Tsien, Joe Z

    2016-01-01

    The development of technologies capable of recording both single-unit activity and local field potentials (LFPs) over a wide range of brain circuits in freely behaving animals is the key to constructing brain activity maps. Although mice are the most popular mammalian genetic model, in vivo neural recording has been traditionally limited to smaller channel count and fewer brain structures because of the mouse's small size and thin skull. Here, we describe a 512-channel tetrode system that allows us to record simultaneously over a dozen cortical and subcortical structures in behaving mice. This new technique offers two major advantages - namely, the ultra-low cost and the do-it-yourself flexibility for targeting any combination of many brain areas. We show the successful recordings of both single units and LFPs from 13 distinct neural circuits of the mouse brain, including subregions of the anterior cingulate cortices, retrosplenial cortices, somatosensory cortices, secondary auditory cortex, hippocampal CA1, dentate gyrus, subiculum, lateral entorhinal cortex, perirhinal cortex, and prelimbic cortex. This 512-channel system can also be combined with Cre-lox neurogenetics and optogenetics to further examine interactions between genes, cell types, and circuit dynamics across a wide range of brain structures. Finally, we demonstrate that complex stimuli - such as an earthquake and fear-inducing foot-shock - trigger firing changes in all of the 13 brain regions recorded, supporting the notion that neural code is highly distributed. In addition, we show that localized optogenetic manipulation in any given brain region could disrupt network oscillations and caused changes in single-unit firing patterns in a brain-wide manner, thereby raising the cautionary note of the interpretation of optogenetically manipulated behaviors. PMID:27378865

  18. A novel method for modeling facial allodynia associated with migraine in awake and freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Wieseler, Julie; Ellis, Amanda; Sprunger, David; Brown, Kim; McFadden, Andrew; Mahoney, John; Rezvani, Niloofar; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder that induces debilitating headaches associated with multiple symptoms including facial allodynia, characterized by heightened responsivity to normally innocuous mechanical stimuli. It is now well accepted that immune activation and immune-derived inflammatory mediators enhance pain responsivity, including in the trigeminal system. Nociceptive (“pain” responsive) trigeminal nerves densely innervate the cranial meninges. We have recently proposed that the meninges may serve as a previously unidentified, key interface between the peripheral immune system and the CNS with potential implications for understanding underlying migraine mechanisms. Our focus here is the development of a model for facial allodynia associated with migraine. We developed a model wherein an indwelling catheter is placed between the skull and dura, allowing immunogenic stimuli to be administered over the dura in awake and freely moving rats. Since the catheter does not contact the brain itself, any proinflammatory cytokines induced following manipulation derive from resident or recruited meningeal immune cells. While surgery alone does not alter immune activation markers, TNF or IL6 mRNA and/or protein, it does decrease gene expression and increase protein expression of IL-1 at 4 days after surgery. Using this model we show the induction of facial allodynia in response to supradural administration of either the HIV glycoprotein gp120 or inflammatory soup (bradykinin, histamine, serotonin, and prostaglandin E2), and the induction of hindpaw allodynia in our model after inflammatory soup. This model allows time and dose dependent assessment of the relationship between changes in meningeal inflammation and corresponding exaggerated pain behaviors. PMID:19837113

  19. Head-mounted LED for optogenetic experiments of freely-behaving animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ki Yong; Gnade, Andrew G.; Rush, Alexander D.; Patten, Craig D.

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in optogenetics have demonstrated the ability to target specific types of neurons with sub-millisecond temporal precision via direct optical stimulation of genetically modified neurons in the brain. In most applications, the beam of a laser is coupled to an optical fiber, which guides and delivers the optical power to the region of interest. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are an alternative light source for optogenetics and they provide many advantages over a laser based system including cost, size, illumination stability, and fast modulation. Their compact size and low power consumption make LEDs suitable light sources for a wireless optogenetic stimulation system. However, the coupling efficiency of an LED's output light into an optical fiber is lower than a laser due to its noncollimated output light. In typical chronic optogenetic experiment, the output of the light source is transmitted to the brain through a patch cable and a fiber stub implant, and this configuration requires two fiber-to-fiber couplings. Attenuation within the patch cable is potential source of optical power loss. In this study, we report and characterize a recently developed light delivery method for freely-behaving animal experiments. We have developed a head-mounted light source that maximizes the coupling efficiency of an LED light source by eliminating the need for a fiber optic cable. This miniaturized LED is designed to couple directly to the fiber stub implant. Depending on the desired optical power output, the head-mounted LED can be controlled by either a tethered (high power) or battery-powered wireless (moderate power) controller. In the tethered system, the LED is controlled through 40 gauge micro coaxial cable which is thinner, more flexible, and more durable than a fiber optic cable. The battery-powered wireless system uses either infrared or radio frequency transmission to achieve real-time control. Optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal

  20. Nucleus accumbens neuronal activity in freely behaving rats is modulated following acute and chronic methylphenidate administration.

    PubMed

    Chong, Samuel L; Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2012-03-10

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a psychostimulant that enhances dopaminergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system by using mechanisms similar to cocaine and amphetamine. The mode of action of brain circuitry responsible for an animal's neuronal response to MPD is not fully understood. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) has been implicated in regulating the rewarding effects of psychostimulants. The present study used permanently implanted microelectrodes to investigate the acute and chronic effects of MPD on the firing rates of NAc neuronal units in freely behaving rats. On experimental day 1 (ED1), following a saline injection (control), a 30 min baseline neuronal recording was obtained immediately followed by a 2.5 mg/kg i.p. MPD injection and subsequent 60 min neuronal recording. Daily 2.5 mg/kg MPD injections were given on ED2 through ED6 followed by 3 washout days (ED7 to ED9). On ED10, neuronal recordings were resumed from the same animal after a saline and MPD (rechallenge) injection exactly as obtained on ED1. Sixty-seven NAc neuronal units exhibited similar wave shape, form and amplitude on ED1 and ED10 and their firing rates were used for analysis. MPD administration on ED1 elicited firing rate increases and decreases in 54% of NAc units when compared to their baselines. Six consecutive MPD administrations altered the neuronal baseline firing rates of 85% of NAc units. MPD rechallenge on ED10 elicited significant changes in 63% of NAc units. These alterations in firing rates are hypothesized to be through mechanisms that include D1 and D2-like DA receptor induced cellular adaptation and homeostatic adaptations/deregulation caused by acute and chronic MPD administration. PMID:22248440

  1. Direct Imaging of Hippocampal Epileptiform Calcium Motifs Following Kainic Acid Administration in Freely Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berdyyeva, Tamara K.; Frady, E. Paxon; Nassi, Jonathan J.; Aluisio, Leah; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Otte, Stephani; Wyatt, Ryan M.; Dugovic, Christine; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to abnormally high calcium concentrations is thought to be a core mechanism underlying hippocampal damage in epileptic patients; however, no prior study has characterized calcium activity during seizures in the live, intact hippocampus. We have directly investigated this possibility by combining whole-brain electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements with microendoscopic calcium imaging of pyramidal cells in the CA1 hippocampal region of freely behaving mice treated with the pro-convulsant kainic acid (KA). We observed that KA administration led to systematic patterns of epileptiform calcium activity: a series of large-scale, intensifying flashes of increased calcium fluorescence concurrent with a cluster of low-amplitude EEG waveforms. This was accompanied by a steady increase in cellular calcium levels (>5 fold increase relative to the baseline), followed by an intense spreading calcium wave characterized by a 218% increase in global mean intensity of calcium fluorescence (n = 8, range [114–349%], p < 10−4; t-test). The wave had no consistent EEG phenotype and occurred before the onset of motor convulsions. Similar changes in calcium activity were also observed in animals treated with 2 different proconvulsant agents, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), suggesting the measured changes in calcium dynamics are a signature of seizure activity rather than a KA-specific pathology. Additionally, despite reducing the behavioral severity of KA-induced seizures, the anticonvulsant drug valproate (VA, 300 mg/kg) did not modify the observed abnormalities in calcium dynamics. These results confirm the presence of pathological calcium activity preceding convulsive motor seizures and support calcium as a candidate signaling molecule in a pathway connecting seizures to subsequent cellular damage. Integrating in vivo calcium imaging with traditional assessment of seizures could potentially increase translatability of pharmacological

  2. Construction of Microdrive Arrays for Chronic Neural Recordings in Awake Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eric H.; Frattini, Stephen A.; Robbiati, Sergio; Huerta, Patricio T.

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art electrophysiological recordings from the brains of freely behaving animals allow researchers to simultaneously examine local field potentials (LFPs) from populations of neurons and action potentials from individual cells, as the animal engages in experimentally relevant tasks. Chronically implanted microdrives allow for brain recordings to last over periods of several weeks. Miniaturized drives and lightweight components allow for these long-term recordings to occur in small mammals, such as mice. By using tetrodes, which consist of tightly braided bundles of four electrodes in which each wire has a diameter of 12.5 μm, it is possible to isolate physiologically active neurons in superficial brain regions such as the cerebral cortex, dorsal hippocampus, and subiculum, as well as deeper regions such as the striatum and the amygdala. Moreover, this technique insures stable, high-fidelity neural recordings as the animal is challenged with a variety of behavioral tasks. This manuscript describes several techniques that have been optimized to record from the mouse brain. First, we show how to fabricate tetrodes, load them into driveable tubes, and gold-plate their tips in order to reduce their impedance from MΩ to KΩ range. Second, we show how to construct a custom microdrive assembly for carrying and moving the tetrodes vertically, with the use of inexpensive materials. Third, we show the steps for assembling a commercially available microdrive (Neuralynx VersaDrive) that is designed to carry independently movable tetrodes. Finally, we present representative results of local field potentials and single-unit signals obtained in the dorsal subiculum of mice. These techniques can be easily modified to accommodate different types of electrode arrays and recording schemes in the mouse brain. PMID:23851569

  3. Construction of microdrive arrays for chronic neural recordings in awake behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eric H; Frattini, Stephen A; Robbiati, Sergio; Huerta, Patricio T

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art electrophysiological recordings from the brains of freely behaving animals allow researchers to simultaneously examine local field potentials (LFPs) from populations of neurons and action potentials from individual cells, as the animal engages in experimentally relevant tasks. Chronically implanted microdrives allow for brain recordings to last over periods of several weeks. Miniaturized drives and lightweight components allow for these long-term recordings to occur in small mammals, such as mice. By using tetrodes, which consist of tightly braided bundles of four electrodes in which each wire has a diameter of 12.5 μm, it is possible to isolate physiologically active neurons in superficial brain regions such as the cerebral cortex, dorsal hippocampus, and subiculum, as well as deeper regions such as the striatum and the amygdala. Moreover, this technique insures stable, high-fidelity neural recordings as the animal is challenged with a variety of behavioral tasks. This manuscript describes several techniques that have been optimized to record from the mouse brain. First, we show how to fabricate tetrodes, load them into driveable tubes, and gold-plate their tips in order to reduce their impedance from MΩ to KΩ range. Second, we show how to construct a custom microdrive assembly for carrying and moving the tetrodes vertically, with the use of inexpensive materials. Third, we show the steps for assembling a commercially available microdrive (Neuralynx VersaDrive) that is designed to carry independently movable tetrodes. Finally, we present representative results of local field potentials and single-unit signals obtained in the dorsal subiculum of mice. These techniques can be easily modified to accommodate different types of electrode arrays and recording schemes in the mouse brain. PMID:23851569

  4. Optogenetic control of freely behaving adult Drosophila using a red-shifted channelrhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Hidehiko K.; Jung, Yonil; Hoopfer, Eric D.; Wong, Allan M.; Mishra, Neeli; Lin, John Y.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Anderson, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetics allows the manipulation of neural activity in freely moving animals with millisecond precision, but its application in Drosophila has been limited. Here we show that a recently described Red activatable Channelrhodopsin (ReaChR) permits control of complex behavior in freely moving adult flies, at wavelengths that are not thought to interfere with normal visual function. This tool affords the opportunity to control neural activity over a broad dynamic range of stimulation intensities. Using time-resolved activation, we show that the neural control of male courtship song can be separated into probabilistic, persistent and deterministic, command-like components. The former, but not the latter, neurons are subject to functional modulation by social experience, supporting the idea that they constitute a locus of state-dependent influence. This separation is not evident using thermogenetic tools, underscoring the importance of temporally precise control of neuronal activation in the functional dissection of neural circuits in Drosophila. PMID:24363022

  5. Imaging Circulating Tumor Cells in Freely Moving Awake Small Animals Using a Miniaturized Intravital Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Sasportas, Laura Sarah; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM) strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals. PMID:24497977

  6. Coherent 25- to 35-Hz Oscillations in the Sensorimotor Cortex of Awake Behaving Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Venkatesh N.; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    1992-06-01

    Synchronous 25- to 35-Hz oscillations were observed in local field potentials and unit activity in sensorimotor cortex of awake rhesus monkeys. The oscillatory episodes occurred often when the monkeys retrieved raisins from a Kluver board or from unseen locations using somatosensory feedback; they occurred less often during performance of repetitive wrist flexion and extension movements. The amplitude, duration, and frequency of oscillations were not directly related to movement parameters in behaviors studied so far. The occurrence of the oscillations was not consistently related to bursts of activity in forearm muscles, but cycle-triggered averages of electromyograms revealed synchronous modulation in flexor and extensor muscles. The phase of the oscillations changed continuously from the surface to the deeper layers of the cortex, reversing their polarity completely at depths exceeding 800 μm. The oscillations could become synchronized over a distance of 14 mm mediolaterally in precentral cortex. Coherent oscillations could also occur at pre- and postcentral sites separated by an estimated tangential intracortical distance of 20 mm. Activity of single units was commonly seen to burst in synchrony with field potential oscillations. These findings suggest that such oscillations may facilitate interactions between cells during exploratory and manipulative movements, requiring attention to sensorimotor integration.

  7. A wireless neural recording system with a precision motorized microdrive for freely behaving animals

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Taku; Fujimoto, Hisataka; Tashiro, Koichiro; Nonomura, Mayu; Tsuchiya, Akira; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-01-01

    The brain is composed of many different types of neurons. Therefore, analysis of brain activity with single-cell resolution could provide fundamental insights into brain mechanisms. However, the electrical signal of an individual neuron is very small, and precise isolation of single neuronal activity from moving subjects is still challenging. To measure single-unit signals in actively behaving states, establishment of technologies that enable fine control of electrode positioning and strict spike sorting is essential. To further apply such a single-cell recording approach to small brain areas in naturally behaving animals in large spaces or during social interaction, we developed a compact wireless recording system with a motorized microdrive. Wireless control of electrode placement facilitates the exploration of single neuronal activity without affecting animal behaviors. Because the system is equipped with a newly developed data-encoding program, the recorded data are readily compressed almost to theoretical limits and securely transmitted to a host computer. Brain activity can thereby be stably monitored in real time and further analyzed using online or offline spike sorting. Our wireless recording approach using a precision motorized microdrive will become a powerful tool for studying brain mechanisms underlying natural or social behaviors. PMID:25597933

  8. The olfactory bulb theta rhythm follows all frequencies of diaphragmatic respiration in the freely behaving rat

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Líbano, Daniel; Frederick, Donald E.; Egaña, José I.; Kay, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory-motor relationships are part of the normal operation of sensory systems. Sensing occurs in the context of active sensor movement, which in turn influences sensory processing. We address such a process in the rat olfactory system. Through recordings of the diaphragm electromyogram (EMG), we monitored the motor output of the respiratory circuit involved in sniffing behavior, simultaneously with the local field potential (LFP) of the olfactory bulb (OB) in rats moving freely in a familiar environment, where they display a wide range of respiratory frequencies. We show that the OB LFP represents the sniff cycle with high reliability at every sniff frequency and can therefore be used to study the neural representation of motor drive in a sensory cortex. PMID:24966821

  9. Electrocorticographic activity over sensorimotor cortex and motor function in awake behaving rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang Yang; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor cortex exerts both short-term and long-term control over the spinal reflex pathways that serve motor behaviors. Better understanding of this control could offer new possibilities for restoring function after central nervous system trauma or disease. We examined the impact of ongoing sensorimotor cortex (SMC) activity on the largely monosynaptic pathway of the H-reflex, the electrical analog of the spinal stretch reflex. In 41 awake adult rats, we measured soleus electromyographic (EMG) activity, the soleus H-reflex, and electrocorticographic activity over the contralateral SMC while rats were producing steady-state soleus EMG activity. Principal component analysis of electrocorticographic frequency spectra before H-reflex elicitation consistently revealed three frequency bands: μβ (5–30 Hz), low γ (γ1; 40–85 Hz), and high γ (γ2; 100–200 Hz). Ongoing (i.e., background) soleus EMG amplitude correlated negatively with μβ power and positively with γ1 power. In contrast, H-reflex size correlated positively with μβ power and negatively with γ1 power, but only when background soleus EMG amplitude was included in the linear model. These results support the hypothesis that increased SMC activation (indicated by decrease in μβ power and/or increase in γ1 power) simultaneously potentiates the H-reflex by exciting spinal motoneurons and suppresses it by decreasing the efficacy of the afferent input. They may help guide the development of new rehabilitation methods and of brain-computer interfaces that use SMC activity as a substitute for lost or impaired motor outputs. PMID:25632076

  10. A Wireless Multi-Channel Recording System for Freely Behaving Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Tahl; Ruther, Patrick; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Lopez, Alberto; Rossi, Mark A.; Barter, Joseph W.; Salas-Meza, Daniel; Herwik, Stanislav; Holzhammer, Tobias; Morizio, James; Yin, Henry H.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the neural basis of behavior, it is necessary to record brain activity in freely moving animals. Advances in implantable multi-electrode array technology have enabled researchers to record the activity of neuronal ensembles from multiple brain regions. The full potential of this approach is currently limited by reliance on cable tethers, with bundles of wires connecting the implanted electrodes to the data acquisition system while impeding the natural behavior of the animal. To overcome these limitations, here we introduce a multi-channel wireless headstage system designed for small animals such as rats and mice. A variety of single unit and local field potential signals were recorded from the dorsal striatum and substantia nigra in mice and the ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex simultaneously in rats. This wireless system could be interfaced with commercially available data acquisition systems, and the signals obtained were comparable in quality to those acquired using cable tethers. On account of its small size, light weight, and rechargeable battery, this wireless headstage system is suitable for studying the neural basis of natural behavior, eliminating the need for wires, commutators, and other limitations associated with traditional tethered recording systems. PMID:21765934

  11. A non-invasive head-holding device for chronic neural recordings in awake behaving monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Amemori, Satoko; Amemori, Ken-ichi; Cantor, Margaret L.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Background We have developed a novel head-holding device for behaving non-human primates that affords stability suitable for reliable chronic electrophysiological recording experiments. The device is completely non-invasive, and thus avoids the risk of infection and other complications that can occur with the use of conventional, surgically implanted head-fixation devices. New method The device consists of a novel non-invasive head mold and bar clamp holder, and is customized to the shape of each monkey’s head. The head-holding device that we introduce, combined with our recording system and reflection-based eye-tracking system, allows for chronic behavioral experiments and single-electrode or multi-electrode recording, as well as manipulation of brain activity. Results and comparison with existing methods With electrodes implanted chronically in multiple brain regions, we could record neural activity from cortical and subcortical structures with stability equal to that recorded with conventional head-post fixation. Consistent with the non-invasive nature of the device, we could record neural signals for more than two years with a single implant. Importantly, the monkeys were able to hold stable eye fixation positions while held by this device, demonstrating the possibility of analyzing eye movement data with only the gentle restraint imposed by the non-invasive head-holding device. Conclusions We show that the head-holding device introduced here can be extended to the head holding of smaller animals, and note that it could readily be adapted for magnetic resonance brain imaging over extended periods of time. PMID:25448381

  12. Dysregulation of coordinated neuronal firing patterns in striatum of freely behaving transgenic rats that model Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin R; Walker, Adam G; Fowler, Stephen C; von Hörsten, Stephan; Riess, Olaf; Johnson, Michael A; Rebec, George V

    2010-01-01

    Altered neuronal activity in the striatum appears to be a key component of Huntington's disease (HD), a fatal, neurodegenerative condition. To assess this hypothesis in freely behaving transgenic rats that model HD (tgHDs), we used chronically implanted micro-wires to record the spontaneous activity of striatal neurons. We found that relative to wild-type controls, HD rats suffer from population-level deficits in striatal activity characterized by a loss of correlated firing and fewer episodes of coincident spike bursting between simultaneously recorded neuronal pairs. These results are in line with our previous report of marked alterations in the pattern of striatal firing in mouse models of HD that vary in background strain, genetic construct, and symptom severity. Thus, loss of coordinated spike activity in striatum appears to be a common feature of HD pathophysiology, regardless of HD model variability. PMID:19818852

  13. Awake behaving electrophysiological correlates of forelimb hyperreflexia, weakness and disrupted muscular synchronization following cervical spinal cord injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ganzer, Patrick Daniel; Meyers, Eric Christopher; Sloan, Andrew Michael; Maliakkal, Reshma; Ruiz, Andrea; Kilgard, Michael Paul; Robert, LeMoine Rennaker

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord injury usually occurs at the level of the cervical spine and results in profound impairment of forelimb function. In this study, we recorded awake behaving intramuscular electromyography (EMG) from the biceps and triceps muscles of the impaired forelimb during volitional and reflexive forelimb movements before and after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) in rats. C5/C6 hemicontusion reduced volitional forelimb strength by more than 50% despite weekly rehabilitation for one month post-injury. Triceps EMG during volitional strength assessment was reduced by more than 60% following injury, indicating reduced descending drive. Biceps EMG during reflexive withdrawal from a thermal stimulus was increased by 500% following injury, indicating flexor withdrawal hyperreflexia. The reduction in volitional forelimb strength was significantly correlated with volitional and reflexive biceps EMG activity. Our results support the hypothesis that biceps hyperreflexia and descending volitional drive both significantly contribute to forelimb strength deficits after cSCI and provide new insight into dynamic muscular dysfunction after cSCI. The use of multiple automated quantitative measures of forelimb dysfunction in the rodent cSCI model will likely aid the search for effective regenerative, pharmacological, and neuroprosthetic treatments for spinal cord injury. PMID:27033345

  14. Odor-Taste Convergence in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract of the Awake Freely Licking Rat

    PubMed Central

    Escanilla, Olga D.; Victor, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Flavor is produced by the integration of taste, olfaction, texture, and temperature, currently thought to occur in the cortex. However, previous work has shown that brainstem taste-related nuclei also respond to multisensory inputs. Here, we test the hypothesis that taste and olfaction interact in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS; the first neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Electrophysiological recordings of taste and taste + odor responses were conducted in an experimental chamber following surgical electrode implantation and recovery. Tastants (0.1 m NaCl, 0.1 m sucrose, 0.01 m citric acid, and 0.0001 m quinine) were delivered for five consecutive licks interspersed with five licks of artificial saliva rinse delivered on a VR5 schedule. Odorants were n-amyl acetate (banana), acetic acid (vinegar), octanoic acid (rancid), and phenylethyl alcohol (floral). For each cell, metric space analyses were used to quantify the information conveyed by spike count, by the rate envelope, and by individual spike timing. Results revealed diverse effects of odorants on taste-response magnitude and latency across cells. Importantly, NTS cells were more competent at discriminating taste + odor stimuli versus tastants presented alone for all taste qualities using both rate and temporal coding. The strong interaction of odorants and tastants at the NTS underscores its role as the initial node in the neural circuit that controls food identification and ingestion. PMID:25904782

  15. Prosthetic Avian Vocal Organ Controlled by a Freely Behaving Bird Based on a Low Dimensional Model of the Biomechanical Periphery

    PubMed Central

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Goller, Franz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the parallels found with human language production and acquisition, birdsong is an ideal animal model to study general mechanisms underlying complex, learned motor behavior. The rich and diverse vocalizations of songbirds emerge as a result of the interaction between a pattern generator in the brain and a highly nontrivial nonlinear periphery. Much of the complexity of this vocal behavior has been understood by studying the physics of the avian vocal organ, particularly the syrinx. A mathematical model describing the complex periphery as a nonlinear dynamical system leads to the conclusion that nontrivial behavior emerges even when the organ is commanded by simple motor instructions: smooth paths in a low dimensional parameter space. An analysis of the model provides insight into which parameters are responsible for generating a rich variety of diverse vocalizations, and what the physiological meaning of these parameters is. By recording the physiological motor instructions elicited by a spontaneously singing muted bird and computing the model on a Digital Signal Processor in real-time, we produce realistic synthetic vocalizations that replace the bird's own auditory feedback. In this way, we build a bio-prosthetic avian vocal organ driven by a freely behaving bird via its physiologically coded motor commands. Since it is based on a low-dimensional nonlinear mathematical model of the peripheral effector, the emulation of the motor behavior requires light computation, in such a way that our bio-prosthetic device can be implemented on a portable platform. PMID:22761555

  16. The Neurochip-2: An Autonomous Head-Fixed Computer for Recording and Stimulating in Freely Behaving Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Zanos, Stavros; Richardson, Andrew G.; Shupe, Larry; Miles, Frank P.; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    2011-01-01

    The Neurochip-2 is a second generation, battery-powered device for neural recording and stimulating that is small enough to be carried in a chamber on a monkey’s head. It has three recording channels, with user-adjustable gains, filters, and sampling rates, that can be optimized for recording single unit activity, local field potentials, electrocorticography, electromyography, arm acceleration, etc. Recorded data are stored on a removable, flash memory card. The Neurochip-2 also has three separate stimulation channels. Two “programmable-system-on-chips” (PSoCs) control the data acquisition and stimulus output. The PSoCs permit flexible real-time processing of the recorded data, such as digital filtering and time-amplitude window discrimination. The PSoCs can be programmed to deliver stimulation contingent on neural events or deliver preprogrammed stimuli. Access pins to the microcontroller are also available to connect external devices, such as accelerometers. The Neurochip-2 can record and stimulate autonomously for up to several days in freely behaving monkeys, enabling a wide range of novel neurophysiological and neuroengineering experiments. PMID:21632309

  17. Prosthetic avian vocal organ controlled by a freely behaving bird based on a low dimensional model of the biomechanical periphery.

    PubMed

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Goller, Franz; Mindlin, Gabriel B

    2012-01-01

    Because of the parallels found with human language production and acquisition, birdsong is an ideal animal model to study general mechanisms underlying complex, learned motor behavior. The rich and diverse vocalizations of songbirds emerge as a result of the interaction between a pattern generator in the brain and a highly nontrivial nonlinear periphery. Much of the complexity of this vocal behavior has been understood by studying the physics of the avian vocal organ, particularly the syrinx. A mathematical model describing the complex periphery as a nonlinear dynamical system leads to the conclusion that nontrivial behavior emerges even when the organ is commanded by simple motor instructions: smooth paths in a low dimensional parameter space. An analysis of the model provides insight into which parameters are responsible for generating a rich variety of diverse vocalizations, and what the physiological meaning of these parameters is. By recording the physiological motor instructions elicited by a spontaneously singing muted bird and computing the model on a Digital Signal Processor in real-time, we produce realistic synthetic vocalizations that replace the bird's own auditory feedback. In this way, we build a bio-prosthetic avian vocal organ driven by a freely behaving bird via its physiologically coded motor commands. Since it is based on a low-dimensional nonlinear mathematical model of the peripheral effector, the emulation of the motor behavior requires light computation, in such a way that our bio-prosthetic device can be implemented on a portable platform. PMID:22761555

  18. Site-specific postural and locomotor changes evoked in awake, freely moving intact cats by stimulating the brainstem.

    PubMed

    Mori, S; Sakamoto, T; Ohta, Y; Takakusaki, K; Matsuyama, K

    1989-12-25

    Locomotor behaviors evoked by stimulating the hypothalamus and the brainstem were studied in freely moving, awake cats. To do this, stimulating microelectrodes were chronically implanted into the subthalamic locomotor region (SLR) in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) corresponding to the nucleus cuneiformis, the dorsal tegmental field (DTF) and the ventral tegmental field (VTF) of caudal pons along its midline. After recovery from surgery (2-3 days), open field tests were performed to study stimulus effects upon posture and locomotor movements. The stimuli consisted of pulses of 0.2 ms duration of less than 80 microA delivered at 50 pulses/s for 5-20 s. DTF stimulation resulted in suppression of postural support by the hindlimbs. When the cat was in a standing posture, DTF stimulation simply resulted in a sequential alteration of posture to a squatting and then to a final lying posture. In contrast, VTF stimulation evoked an almost opposite series of postural changes to those induced by DTF stimulation. With VTF stimulation, the cat changed from a lying or a squatting position, and then started to walk during continuation of the stimulation. With MLR stimulation, the cat invariably exhibited fast walking and then running movements. It ran straight forward, avoiding collision with walls or other obstacles, and even tried to jump over a fence placed in front of it. With LHA stimulation, the cat started to walk slowly extending its head forward and looking around repeatedly. It tended to walk with a stoop and stealthy steps along the corners of the room. Induced postural and locomotor changes were always accompanied by behavioral arousal reactions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2611678

  19. Mechanical characteristics of rat vibrissae: resonant frequencies and damping in isolated whiskers and in the awake behaving animal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Mitra J.; Johnson, Nicholas J.; Towal, R. Blythe; Assad, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the natural resonance properties and damping characteristics of rat macrovibrissae (whiskers). Isolated whiskers rigidly fixed at the base showed first-mode resonance peaks between 27 and 260 Hz, principally depending on whisker length. These experimentally measured resonant frequencies were matched using a theoretical model of the whisker as a conical cantilever beam, with Young's modulus as the only free parameter. The best estimate for Young's modulus was approximately 3-4 GPa. Results of both vibration and impulse experiments showed that the whiskers are strongly damped, with damping ratios between 0.11 and 0.17. In the behaving animal, whiskers that deflected past an object were observed to resonate but were damped significantly more than isolated whiskers. The time course of damping varied depending on the individual whisker and the phase of the whisking cycle, which suggests that the rat may modulate biomechanical parameters that affect damping. No resonances were observed for whiskers that did not contact the object or during free whisking in air. Finally, whiskers on the same side of the face were sometimes observed to move in opposite directions over the full duration of a whisk. We discuss the potential roles of resonance during natural exploratory behavior and specifically suggest that resonant oscillations may be important in the rat's tactile detection of object boundaries.

  20. Zolpidem Reduces Hippocampal Neuronal Activity in Freely Behaving Mice: A Large Scale Calcium Imaging Study with Miniaturized Fluorescence Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Berdyyeva, Tamara; Otte, Stephani; Aluisio, Leah; Ziv, Yaniv; Burns, Laurie D.; Dugovic, Christine; Yun, Sujin; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic drugs for cognitive and psychiatric disorders are often characterized by their molecular mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate a new approach to elucidate drug action on large-scale neuronal activity by tracking somatic calcium dynamics in hundreds of CA1 hippocampal neurons of pharmacologically manipulated behaving mice. We used an adeno-associated viral vector to express the calcium sensor GCaMP3 in CA1 pyramidal cells under control of the CaMKII promoter and a miniaturized microscope to observe cellular dynamics. We visualized these dynamics with and without a systemic administration of Zolpidem, a GABAA agonist that is the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of insomnia in the United States. Despite growing concerns about the potential adverse effects of Zolpidem on memory and cognition, it remained unclear whether Zolpidem alters neuronal activity in the hippocampus, a brain area critical for cognition and memory. Zolpidem, when delivered at a dose known to induce and prolong sleep, strongly suppressed CA1 calcium signaling. The rate of calcium transients after Zolpidem administration was significantly lower compared to vehicle treatment. To factor out the contribution of changes in locomotor or physiological conditions following Zolpidem treatment, we compared the cellular activity across comparable epochs matched by locomotor and physiological assessments. This analysis revealed significantly depressive effects of Zolpidem regardless of the animal’s state. Individual hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differed in their responses to Zolpidem with the majority (∼65%) significantly decreasing the rate of calcium transients, and a small subset (3%) showing an unexpected and significant increase. By linking molecular mechanisms with the dynamics of neural circuitry and behavioral states, this approach has the potential to contribute substantially to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:25372144

  1. A Novel Experimental and Analytical Approach to the Multimodal Neural Decoding of Intent During Social Interaction in Freely-behaving Human Infants.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Garza, Jesus G; Hernandez, Zachery R; Tse, Teresa; Caducoy, Eunice; Abibullaev, Berdakh; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2015-01-01

    Understanding typical and atypical development remains one of the fundamental questions in developmental human neuroscience. Traditionally, experimental paradigms and analysis tools have been limited to constrained laboratory tasks and contexts due to technical limitations imposed by the available set of measuring and analysis techniques and the age of the subjects. These limitations severely limit the study of developmental neural dynamics and associated neural networks engaged in cognition, perception and action in infants performing "in action and in context". This protocol presents a novel approach to study infants and young children as they freely organize their own behavior, and its consequences in a complex, partly unpredictable and highly dynamic environment. The proposed methodology integrates synchronized high-density active scalp electroencephalography (EEG), inertial measurement units (IMUs), video recording and behavioral analysis to capture brain activity and movement non-invasively in freely-behaving infants. This setup allows for the study of neural network dynamics in the developing brain, in action and context, as these networks are recruited during goal-oriented, exploration and social interaction tasks. PMID:26485409

  2. A Novel Experimental and Analytical Approach to the Multimodal Neural Decoding of Intent During Social Interaction in Freely-behaving Human Infants

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Garza, Jesus G.; Hernandez, Zachery R.; Tse, Teresa; Caducoy, Eunice; Abibullaev, Berdakh; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding typical and atypical development remains one of the fundamental questions in developmental human neuroscience. Traditionally, experimental paradigms and analysis tools have been limited to constrained laboratory tasks and contexts due to technical limitations imposed by the available set of measuring and analysis techniques and the age of the subjects. These limitations severely limit the study of developmental neural dynamics and associated neural networks engaged in cognition, perception and action in infants performing “in action and in context”. This protocol presents a novel approach to study infants and young children as they freely organize their own behavior, and its consequences in a complex, partly unpredictable and highly dynamic environment. The proposed methodology integrates synchronized high-density active scalp electroencephalography (EEG), inertial measurement units (IMUs), video recording and behavioral analysis to capture brain activity and movement non-invasively in freely-behaving infants. This setup allows for the study of neural network dynamics in the developing brain, in action and context, as these networks are recruited during goal-oriented, exploration and social interaction tasks. PMID:26485409

  3. Integrated wireless fast-scan cyclic voltammetry recording and electrical stimulation for reward-predictive learning in awake, freely moving rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Ting; Wickens, Jeffery R.; Huang, Yi-Ling; Pan, Wynn H. T.; Chen, Fu-Yu Beverly; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is commonly used to monitor phasic dopamine release, which is usually performed using tethered recording and for limited types of animal behavior. It is necessary to design a wireless dopamine sensing system for animal behavior experiments. Approach. This study integrates a wireless FSCV system for monitoring the dopamine signal in the ventral striatum with an electrical stimulator that induces biphasic current to excite dopaminergic neurons in awake freely moving rats. The measured dopamine signals are unidirectionally transmitted from the wireless FSCV module to the host unit. To reduce electrical artifacts, an optocoupler and a separate power are applied to isolate the FSCV system and electrical stimulator, which can be activated by an infrared controller. Main results. In the validation test, the wireless backpack system has similar performance in comparison with a conventional wired system and it does not significantly affect the locomotor activity of the rat. In the cocaine administration test, the maximum electrically elicited dopamine signals increased to around 230% of the initial value 20 min after the injection of 10 mg kg-1 cocaine. In a classical conditioning test, the dopamine signal in response to a cue increased to around 60 nM over 50 successive trials while the electrically evoked dopamine concentration decreased from about 90 to 50 nM in the maintenance phase. In contrast, the cue-evoked dopamine concentration progressively decreased and the electrically evoked dopamine was eliminated during the extinction phase. In the histological evaluation, there was little damage to brain tissue after five months chronic implantation of the stimulating electrode. Significance. We have developed an integrated wireless voltammetry system for measuring dopamine concentration and providing electrical stimulation. The developed wireless FSCV system is proven to be a useful experimental tool for the continuous

  4. Flat-floored Air-lifted Platform: A New Method for Combining Behavior with Microscopy or Electrophysiology on Awake Freely Moving Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Kislin, Mikhail; Mugantseva, Ekaterina; Molotkov, Dmitry; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Khirug, Stanislav; Kirilkin, Ilya; Pryazhnikov, Evgeny; Kolikova, Julia; Toptunov, Dmytro; Yuryev, Mikhail; Giniatullin, Rashid; Voikar, Vootele; Rivera, Claudio; Rauvala, Heikki; Khiroug, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the use of general anesthetics can undermine the relevance of electrophysiological or microscopical data obtained from a living animal’s brain. Moreover, the lengthy recovery from anesthesia limits the frequency of repeated recording/imaging episodes in longitudinal studies. Hence, new methods that would allow stable recordings from non-anesthetized behaving mice are expected to advance the fields of cellular and cognitive neurosciences. Existing solutions range from mere physical restraint to more sophisticated approaches, such as linear and spherical treadmills used in combination with computer-generated virtual reality. Here, a novel method is described where a head-fixed mouse can move around an air-lifted mobile homecage and explore its environment under stress-free conditions. This method allows researchers to perform behavioral tests (e.g., learning, habituation or novel object recognition) simultaneously with two-photon microscopic imaging and/or patch-clamp recordings, all combined in a single experiment. This video-article describes the use of the awake animal head fixation device (mobile homecage), demonstrates the procedures of animal habituation, and exemplifies a number of possible applications of the method. PMID:24998224

  5. Flat-floored air-lifted platform: a new method for combining behavior with microscopy or electrophysiology on awake freely moving rodents.

    PubMed

    Kislin, Mikhail; Mugantseva, Ekaterina; Molotkov, Dmitry; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Khirug, Stanislav; Kirilkin, Ilya; Pryazhnikov, Evgeny; Kolikova, Julia; Toptunov, Dmytro; Yuryev, Mikhail; Giniatullin, Rashid; Voikar, Vootele; Rivera, Claudio; Rauvala, Heikki; Khiroug, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the use of general anesthetics can undermine the relevance of electrophysiological or microscopical data obtained from a living animal's brain. Moreover, the lengthy recovery from anesthesia limits the frequency of repeated recording/imaging episodes in longitudinal studies. Hence, new methods that would allow stable recordings from non-anesthetized behaving mice are expected to advance the fields of cellular and cognitive neurosciences. Existing solutions range from mere physical restraint to more sophisticated approaches, such as linear and spherical treadmills used in combination with computer-generated virtual reality. Here, a novel method is described where a head-fixed mouse can move around an air-lifted mobile homecage and explore its environment under stress-free conditions. This method allows researchers to perform behavioral tests (e.g., learning, habituation or novel object recognition) simultaneously with two-photon microscopic imaging and/or patch-clamp recordings, all combined in a single experiment. This video-article describes the use of the awake animal head fixation device (mobile homecage), demonstrates the procedures of animal habituation, and exemplifies a number of possible applications of the method. PMID:24998224

  6. Taste coding of complex naturalistic taste stimuli and traditional taste stimuli in the parabrachial pons of the awake, freely licking rat.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Joshua D; Weiss, Michael S; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have shown that taste-responsive cells in the brainstem taste nuclei of rodents respond to sensory qualities other than gustation. Such data suggest that cells in the classical gustatory brainstem may be better tuned to respond to stimuli that engage multiple sensory modalities than to stimuli that are purely gustatory. Here, we test this idea by recording the electrophysiological responses to complex, naturalistic stimuli in single neurons in the parabrachial pons (PbN, the second neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Following electrode implantation and recovery, we presented both prototypical and naturalistic taste stimuli and recorded the responses in the PbN. Prototypical taste stimuli (NaCl, sucrose, citric acid, and caffeine) and naturalistic stimuli (clam juice, grape juice, lemon juice, and coffee) were matched for taste quality and intensity (concentration). Umami (monosodium glutamate + inosine monophosphate) and fat (diluted heavy cream) were also tested. PbN neurons responded to naturalistic stimuli as much or more than to prototypical taste stimuli. Furthermore, they convey more information about naturalistic stimuli than about prototypical ones. Moreover, multidimensional scaling analyses showed that across unit responses to naturalistic stimuli were more widely separated than responses to prototypical taste stimuli. Interestingly, cream evoked a robust and widespread response in PbN cells. Collectively, these data suggest that natural foods are more potent stimulators of PbN cells than purely gustatory stimuli. Probing PbN cells with pure taste stimuli may underestimate the response repertoire of these cells. PMID:27121585

  7. Longitudinal testing of hippocampal plasticity reveals the onset and maintenance of endogenous human Aß-induced synaptic dysfunction in individual freely behaving pre-plaque transgenic rats: rapid reversal by anti-Aß agents.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yingjie; Klyubin, Igor; Harney, Sarah C; Hu, NengWei; Cullen, William K; Grant, Marianne K; Steffen, Julia; Wilson, Edward N; Do Carmo, Sonia; Remy, Stefan; Fuhrmann, Martin; Ashe, Karen H; Cuello, A Claudio; Rowan, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Long before synaptic loss occurs in Alzheimer's disease significant harbingers of disease may be detected at the functional level. Here we examined if synaptic long-term potentiation is selectively disrupted prior to extracellular deposition of Aß in a very complete model of Alzheimer's disease amyloidosis, the McGill-R-Thy1-APP transgenic rat. Longitudinal studies in freely behaving animals revealed an age-dependent, relatively rapid-onset and persistent inhibition of long-term potentiation without a change in baseline synaptic transmission in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. Thus the ability of a standard 200 Hz conditioning protocol to induce significant NMDA receptor-dependent short- and long-term potentiation was lost at about 3.5 months of age and this deficit persisted for at least another 2-3 months, when plaques start to appear. Consistent with in vitro evidence for a causal role of a selective reduction in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents, the deficit in synaptic plasticity in vivo was associated with a reduction in the synaptic burst response to the conditioning stimulation and was overcome using stronger 400 Hz stimulation. Moreover, intracerebroventricular treatment for 3 days with an N-terminally directed monoclonal anti- human Aß antibody, McSA1, transiently reversed the impairment of synaptic plasticity. Similar brief treatment with the BACE1 inhibitor LY2886721 or the γ-secretase inhibitor MRK-560 was found to have a comparable short-lived ameliorative effect when tracked in individual rats. These findings provide strong evidence that endogenously generated human Aß selectively disrupts the induction of long-term potentiation in a manner that enables potential therapeutic options to be assessed longitudinally at the pre-plaque stage of Alzheimer's disease amyloidosis. PMID:25540024

  8. Acute intracerebral treatment with amyloid-beta (1–42) alters the profile of neuronal oscillations that accompany LTP induction and results in impaired LTP in freely behaving rats

    PubMed Central

    Kalweit, Alexander Nikolai; Yang, Honghong; Colitti-Klausnitzer, Jens; Fülöp, Livia; Bozsó, Zsolt; Penke, Botond; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid plaques comprises one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In rodents, acute treatment with amyloid-beta (Aβ; 1–42) elicits immediate debilitating effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Whereas LTP contributes to synaptic information storage, information is transferred across neurons by means of neuronal oscillations. Furthermore, changes in theta-gamma oscillations, that appear during high-frequency stimulation (HFS) to induce LTP, predict whether successful LTP will occur. Here, we explored if intra-cerebral treatment with Aβ(1–42), that prevents LTP, also results in alterations of hippocampal oscillations that occur during HFS of the perforant path-dentate gyrus synapse in 6-month-old behaving rats. HFS resulted in LTP that lasted for over 24 h. In Aβ-treated animals, LTP was significantly prevented. During HFS, spectral power for oscillations below 100 Hz (δ, θ, α, β and γ) was significantly higher in Aβ-treated animals compared to controls. In addition, the trough-to-peak amplitudes of theta and gamma cycles were higher during HFS in Aβ-treated animals. We also observed a lower amount of envelope-to-signal correlations during HFS in Aβ-treated animals. Overall, the characteristic profile of theta-gamma oscillations that accompany successful LTP induction was disrupted. These data indicate that alterations in network oscillations accompany Aβ-effects on hippocampal LTP. This may comprise an underlying mechanism through which disturbances in synaptic information storage and hippocampus-dependent memory occurs in AD. PMID:25999827

  9. Recording chronically from the same neurons in awake, behaving primates.

    PubMed

    Tolias, Andreas S; Ecker, Alexander S; Siapas, Athanassios G; Hoenselaar, Andreas; Keliris, Georgios A; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of learning requires characterizing how the response properties of individual neurons and interactions across populations of neurons change over time. To study learning in vivo, we need the ability to track an electrophysiological signature that uniquely identifies each recorded neuron for extended periods of time. We have identified such an extracellular signature using a statistical framework that allows quantification of the accuracy by which stable neurons can be identified across successive recording sessions. Our statistical framework uses spike waveform information recorded on a tetrode's four channels to define a measure of similarity between neurons recorded across time. We use this framework to quantitatively demonstrate for the first time the ability to record from the same neurons across multiple consecutive days and weeks. The chronic recording techniques and methods of analyses we report can be used to characterize the changes in brain circuits due to learning. PMID:17942615

  10. In vivo extracellular recording of striatal neurons in the awake rat following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed

    Chen, M T; Morales, M; Woodward, D J; Hoffer, B J; Janak, P H

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to further understand the functional effects of dopaminergic input to the dorsal striatum and to compare the effects of dopaminergic lesions in awake and anesthetized animals. We examined the effects of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the ascending dopaminergic bundle on the firing properties of dorsal striatal neurons in the awake freely moving rat using chronically implanted microwire electrode arrays. We recorded extracellular activity of striatal neurons under baseline conditions and following the systemic injection of apomorphine in awake and anesthetized subjects. Firing rates were higher in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion compared to rates of neurons from the contralateral unlesioned hemisphere. Striatal firing rates from sham and no-surgery control rats were, in general, higher than those from the contralateral unlesioned striatum of experimental subjects. Apomorphine (0.05 mg/kg, sc) normalized the differences in firing rates in lesioned animals by increasing firing of neurons within the contralateral unlesioned side, while simultaneously decreasing firing of neurons within the ipsilateral lesioned side. Mean firing rates were substantially higher in awake animals than in subjects anesthetized with chloral hydrate, perhaps reflecting anesthesia-induced decreases in excitatory input to striatal neurons. Chloral hydrate anesthesia decreased firing rates of neurons in the lesioned, unlesioned, and control striata to a similar degree, although absolute firing rates of neurons from the 6-OHDA-lesioned striata remained elevated over all other groups. Unilateral 6-OHDA lesions also altered the pattern of spike output in the awake animal as indicated by an increase in the number of bursts per minute following dopaminergic deafferentation. This and other burst parameters were altered by apomorphine. Our findings show that effects of dopaminergic deafferentation can be measured in the awake behaving

  11. A low-cost, multiplexed μECoG system for high-density recordings in freely moving rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insanally, Michele; Trumpis, Michael; Wang, Charles; Chiang, Chia-Han; Woods, Virginia; Palopoli-Trojani, Kay; Bossi, Silvia; Froemke, Robert C.; Viventi, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Micro-electrocorticography (μECoG) offers a minimally invasive neural interface with high spatial resolution over large areas of cortex. However, electrode arrays with many contacts that are individually wired to external recording systems are cumbersome and make recordings in freely behaving rodents challenging. We report a novel high-density 60-electrode system for μECoG recording in freely moving rats. Approach. Multiplexed headstages overcome the problem of wiring complexity by combining signals from many electrodes to a smaller number of connections. We have developed a low-cost, multiplexed recording system with 60 contacts at 406 μm spacing. We characterized the quality of the electrode signals using multiple metrics that tracked spatial variation, evoked-response detectability, and decoding value. Performance of the system was validated both in anesthetized animals and freely moving awake animals. Main results. We recorded μECoG signals over the primary auditory cortex, measuring responses to acoustic stimuli across all channels. Single-trial responses had high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) (up to 25 dB under anesthesia), and were used to rapidly measure network topography within ∼10 s by constructing all single-channel receptive fields in parallel. We characterized evoked potential amplitudes and spatial correlations across the array in the anesthetized and awake animals. Recording quality in awake animals was stable for at least 30 days. Finally, we used these responses to accurately decode auditory stimuli on single trials. Significance. This study introduces (1) a μECoG recording system based on practical hardware design and (2) a rigorous analytical method for characterizing the signal characteristics of μECoG electrode arrays. This methodology can be applied to evaluate the fidelity and lifetime of any μECoG electrode array. Our μECoG-based recording system is accessible and will be useful for studies of perception and decision

  12. A low-cost, multiplexed μECoG system for high-density recordings in freely-moving rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charles; Chiang, Chia-Han; Woods, Virginia; Palopoli-Trojani, Kay; Bossi, Silvia; Froemke, Robert C.; Viventi, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Micro-electrocorticography (μECoG) offers a minimally invasive neural interface with high spatial resolution over large areas of cortex. However, electrode arrays with many contacts that are individually wired to external recording systems are cumbersome and make recordings in freely-behaving rodents challenging. We report a novel high-density 60-electrode system for μECoG recording in freely-moving rats. Approach Multiplexed headstages overcome the problem of wiring complexity by combining signals from many electrodes to a smaller number of connections We have developed a low-cost, multiplexed recording system with 60 contacts at 406 μm spacing. We characterized the quality of the electrode signals using multiple metrics that tracked spatial variation, evoked-response detectability, and decoding value. Performance of the system was validated both in anesthetized animals and freely-moving awake animals. Main results We recorded μECoG signals over the primary auditory cortex, measuring responses to acoustic stimuli across all channels. Single-trial responses had high signal-to-noise ratios (up to 25 dB under anesthesia), and were used to rapidly measure network topography within ~10 seconds by constructing all single-channel receptive fields in parallel. We characterized evoked potential amplitudes and spatial correlations across the array in the anesthetized and awake animals. Recording quality in awake animals was stable for at least 30 days. Finally, we used these responses to accurately decode auditory stimuli on single trials. Significance This study introduces (1) a μECoG recording system based on practical hardware design and (2) a rigorous analytical method for characterizing the signal characteristics of μECoG electrode arrays. This methodology can be applied to evaluate the fidelity and lifetime of any μECoG electrode array. Our μECoG-based recording system is accessible and will be useful for studies of perception and decision-making in

  13. Swept confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy for high speed volumetric imaging of behaving organisms

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Matthew B.; Voleti, Venkatakaushik; Mendes, César S.; Lacefield, Clay; Grueber, Wesley B.; Mann, Richard S.; Bruno, Randy M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new 3D microscopy technique that allows volumetric imaging of living samples at ultra-high speeds: Swept, confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy. While confocal and two-photon microscopy have revolutionized biomedical research, current implementations are costly, complex and limited in their ability to image 3D volumes at high speeds. Light-sheet microscopy techniques using two-objective, orthogonal illumination and detection require a highly constrained sample geometry, and either physical sample translation or complex synchronization of illumination and detection planes. In contrast, SCAPE microscopy acquires images using an angled, swept light-sheet in a single-objective, en-face geometry. Unique confocal descanning and image rotation optics map this moving plane onto a stationary high-speed camera, permitting completely translationless 3D imaging of intact samples at rates exceeding 20 volumes per second. We demonstrate SCAPE microscopy by imaging spontaneous neuronal firing in the intact brain of awake behaving mice, as well as freely moving transgenic Drosophila larvae. PMID:25663846

  14. Awake right hemisphere brain surgery.

    PubMed

    Hulou, M Maher; Cote, David J; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Smith, Timothy R; Chiocca, E Antonio; Johnson, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    We report the indications and outcomes of awake right hemispheric brain surgery, as well as a rare patient with crossed aphasia. Awake craniotomies are often performed to protect eloquent cortex. We reviewed the medical records for 35 of 96 patients, in detail, who had awake right hemisphere brain operations. Intraoperative cortical mapping of motor and/or language function was performed in 29 of the 35 patients. A preoperative speech impairment and left hand dominance were the main indicators for awake right-sided craniotomies in patients with right hemisphere lesions. Four patients with lesion proximity to eloquent areas underwent awake craniotomies without cortical mapping. In addition, one patient had a broncho-pulmonary fistula, and another had a recent major cardiac procedure that precluded awake surgery. An eloquent cortex representation was identified in 14 patients (48.3%). Postoperatively, seven of 17 patients (41.1%) who presented with weakness, experienced improvements in their motor functions, 11 of 16 (68.7%) with seizures became seizure-free, and seven of nine (77.7%) with moderate to severe headaches and one of two with a visual field deficit improved significantly. There were also improvements in speech and language functions in all patients who presented with speech difficulties. A right sided awake craniotomy is an excellent option for left handed patients, or those with right sided cortical lesions that result in preoperative speech impairments. When combined with intraoperative cortical mapping, both speech and motor function can be well preserved. PMID:26279501

  15. Freely floating smectic films.

    PubMed

    May, Kathrin; Harth, Kirsten; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    2014-05-19

    We have investigated the dynamics of freely floating smectic bubbles using high-speed optical imaging. Bubbles in the size range from a few hundred micrometers to several centimeters were prepared from collapsing catenoids. They represent ideal model systems for the study of thin-film fluid dynamics under well-controlled conditions. Owing to the internal smectic layer structure, the bubbles combine features of both soap films and vesicles in their unique shape dynamics. From a strongly elongated initial shape after pinch-off, they relax towards the spherical equilibrium, first by a slow redistribution of the smectic layers, and finally by weak, damped shape oscillations. In addition, we describe the rupture of freely floating smectic bubbles, and the formation and stability of smectic filaments. PMID:24692347

  16. Real-Time Dopamine Measurement in Awake Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Erik W.; Mitz, Andrew R.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2014-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is often used to measure real-time dopamine (DA) concentrations in awake, behaving rodents. Extending this technique to work in monkeys would provide a platform for advanced behavioral studies and a primate model for preclinical research. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of DA recordings in two awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta) using a mixture of techniques adapted from rodent, primate and brain slice work. We developed a long carbon fiber electrode to operate in the larger primate brain. This electrode was lowered into the striatum each day using a recording chamber and a detachable micromanipulator system. A manipulator also moved one or more tungsten stimulating electrodes into either the nearby striatum or the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra pars compacta (VTA/SNc). We developed an electrical stimulation controller to reduce artifacts during electrical stimulation. We also introduce a stimulation-based methodology for estimating distances between electrodes in the brain. Dopamine responses within the striatum were evoked by either stimulation of the striatum near the FSCV electrode, or stimulation within the VTA/SNc. Unexpected juice rewards also evoked dopamine responses in the ventral striatum. Thus, we demonstrate that robust dopamine responses can be recorded from awake, behaving primates with FSCV. In addition, we describe how a stimulation technique borrowed from the neuroprosthetics field can activate the distributed monkey midbrain dopamine system in a way that mimics rodent VTA stimulation. PMID:24921937

  17. Real-time dopamine measurement in awake monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schluter, Erik W; Mitz, Andrew R; Cheer, Joseph F; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2014-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is often used to measure real-time dopamine (DA) concentrations in awake, behaving rodents. Extending this technique to work in monkeys would provide a platform for advanced behavioral studies and a primate model for preclinical research. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of DA recordings in two awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta) using a mixture of techniques adapted from rodent, primate and brain slice work. We developed a long carbon fiber electrode to operate in the larger primate brain. This electrode was lowered into the striatum each day using a recording chamber and a detachable micromanipulator system. A manipulator also moved one or more tungsten stimulating electrodes into either the nearby striatum or the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra pars compacta (VTA/SNc). We developed an electrical stimulation controller to reduce artifacts during electrical stimulation. We also introduce a stimulation-based methodology for estimating distances between electrodes in the brain. Dopamine responses within the striatum were evoked by either stimulation of the striatum near the FSCV electrode, or stimulation within the VTA/SNc. Unexpected juice rewards also evoked dopamine responses in the ventral striatum. Thus, we demonstrate that robust dopamine responses can be recorded from awake, behaving primates with FSCV. In addition, we describe how a stimulation technique borrowed from the neuroprosthetics field can activate the distributed monkey midbrain dopamine system in a way that mimics rodent VTA stimulation. PMID:24921937

  18. Long-term imaging in awake mice using removable cranial windows

    PubMed Central

    Glickfeld, Lindsey L.; Kerlin, Aaron M.; Reid, R. Clay; Bonin, Vincent; Schafer, Dorothy P.; Andermann, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Cranial window implants in head-fixed rodents are becoming a preparation of choice for stable optical access to large areas of cortex over extended periods of time. Here, we provide a highly detailed and reliable surgical protocol for a cranial window implantation procedure for chronic widefield and cellular imaging in awake, head-fixed mice, which enables subsequent window removal and replacement in the weeks and months following the initial craniotomy. This protocol has facilitated awake, chronic imaging in adolescent as well as adult mice over several months from a large number of cortical brain regions; targeted virus and tracer injections from data obtained using prior awake functional mapping; and functionally-targeted two-photon imaging across all cortical layers in awake mice using a microprism attachment to the cranial window. Collectively, these procedures extend the reach of chronic imaging of cortical function and dysfunction in behaving animals. PMID:25275789

  19. Visually evoked activity in cortical cells imaged in freely moving animals

    PubMed Central

    Sawinski, Juergen; Wallace, Damian J.; Greenberg, David S.; Grossmann, Silvie; Denk, Winfried; Kerr, Jason N. D.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a miniaturized head-mounted multiphoton microscope and its use for recording Ca2+ transients from the somata of layer 2/3 neurons in the visual cortex of awake, freely moving rats. Images contained up to 20 neurons and were stable enough to record continuously for >5 min per trial and 20 trials per imaging session, even as the animal was running at velocities of up to 0.6 m/s. Neuronal Ca2+ transients were readily detected, and responses to various static visual stimuli were observed during free movement on a running track. Neuronal activity was sparse and increased when the animal swept its gaze across a visual stimulus. Neurons showing preferential activation by specific stimuli were observed in freely moving animals. These results demonstrate that the multiphoton fiberscope is suitable for functional imaging in awake and freely moving animals. PMID:19889973

  20. Swept confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy for high-speed volumetric imaging of behaving organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Matthew B.; Voleti, Venkatakaushik; Mendes, César S.; Lacefield, Clay; Grueber, Wesley B.; Mann, Richard S.; Bruno, Randy M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We report a three-dimensional microscopy technique—swept, confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy—that allows volumetric imaging of living samples at ultrahigh speeds. Although confocal and two-photon microscopy have revolutionized biomedical research, current implementations are costly, complex and limited in their ability to image three-dimensional volumes at high speeds. Light-sheet microscopy techniques using two-objective, orthogonal illumination and detection require a highly constrained sample geometry and either physical sample translation or complex synchronization of illumination and detection planes. In contrast, SCAPE microscopy acquires images using an angled, swept light sheet in a single-objective, en face geometry. Unique confocal descanning and image rotation optics map this moving plane onto a stationary high-speed camera, permitting completely translationless three-dimensional imaging of intact samples at rates exceeding 20 volumes per second. We demonstrate SCAPE microscopy by imaging spontaneous neuronal firing in the intact brain of awake behaving mice, as well as freely moving transgenic Drosophila larvae.

  1. Optical methods and integrated systems for brain imaging in awake, untethered animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, Kartikeya

    Imaging is a powerful tool for biomedical research offering non-contact and minimally or non-invasive means of investigating at multiple scales---from single molecules to large populations of cells. Imaging in awake, behaving animals is an emerging field that offers the additional advantage of being able to study physiological processes and structures in a more natural state than what is possible in tissue slices or even in anesthetized animals. To date, most imaging in awake animals has used optical fiber bundles or electrical cables to transfer signals to traditional imaging-system components. However, the fibers or cables tether the animal and greatly limit the kind and duration of animal behavior that can be studied using imaging methods. This work involves three distinct yet related approaches to fulfill the goal of imaging in unanesthetized, unrestrained animals---optical techniques for functional and structural imaging, development of novel photodetectors and the design of miniaturized imaging systems. I hypothesized that the flow within vessels might act as a contrast-enhancing agent and improve the visualization of vascular architecture using laser speckle imaging. When imaging rodent cerebral vasculature I saw a two to four fold increase in the contrast-to-noise ratios and was able to visualize 10--30% more vascular features over reflectance techniques. I designed a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) photodetector array that was comparable in sensitivity and noise performance to cooled CCD sensors, able to image fluorescence from a single cell, while running at faster frame rates. Next, I designed an imaging system weighing under 6 grams and occupying less than 4 cm3. The system incorporated multispectral illumination, adjustable focusing optics and the high-sensitivity CMOS imager. I was able to implement a variety of optical modalities with the system and performed reflectance, fluorescence, spectroscopic and laser speckle imaging with my

  2. Effects of a ketogenic diet on hippocampal plasticity in freely moving juvenile rats

    PubMed Central

    Blaise, J Harry; Ruskin, David N; Koranda, Jessica L; Masino, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    Ketogenic diets are low-carbohydrate, sufficient protein, high-fat diets with anticonvulsant activity used primarily as a treatment for pediatric epilepsy. The anticonvulsant mechanism is thought to involve elevating inhibition and/or otherwise limiting excitability in the brain. Such a mechanism, however, might also significantly affect normal brain activity and limit synaptic plasticity, effects that would be important to consider in the developing brain. To assess ketogenic diet effects on synaptic transmission and plasticity, electrophysiological recordings were performed at the perforant path/dentate gyrus synapse in awake, freely-behaving juvenile male rats. Electrodes were implanted 1 week prior to recording. Animals were fed regular chow or a ketogenic diet ad libitum for 3 weeks before recording. Although the ketogenic diet did not significantly alter baseline excitability (assessed by input–output curves) or short-term plasticity (using the paired-pulse ratio), it did reduce the magnitude of long-term potentiation at all poststimulation timepoints out to the last time measured (48 h). The results suggest an effect of ketogenic diet-feeding on the induction magnitude but not the maintenance of long-term potentiation. The lack of effect of the diet on baseline transmission and the paired-pulse ratio suggests a mechanism that limits excitation preferentially in conditions of strong stimulation, consonant with clinical reports in which the ketogenic diet alleviates seizures without a major impact on normal brain activity. Limiting plasticity in a seizure-susceptible network may limit seizure-induced epileptogenesis which may subserve the ongoing benefit of the ketogenic diet in epilepsy. PMID:26009636

  3. Effects of a ketogenic diet on hippocampal plasticity in freely moving juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Blaise, J Harry; Ruskin, David N; Koranda, Jessica L; Masino, Susan A

    2015-05-01

    Ketogenic diets are low-carbohydrate, sufficient protein, high-fat diets with anticonvulsant activity used primarily as a treatment for pediatric epilepsy. The anticonvulsant mechanism is thought to involve elevating inhibition and/or otherwise limiting excitability in the brain. Such a mechanism, however, might also significantly affect normal brain activity and limit synaptic plasticity, effects that would be important to consider in the developing brain. To assess ketogenic diet effects on synaptic transmission and plasticity, electrophysiological recordings were performed at the perforant path/dentate gyrus synapse in awake, freely-behaving juvenile male rats. Electrodes were implanted 1 week prior to recording. Animals were fed regular chow or a ketogenic diet ad libitum for 3 weeks before recording. Although the ketogenic diet did not significantly alter baseline excitability (assessed by input-output curves) or short-term plasticity (using the paired-pulse ratio), it did reduce the magnitude of long-term potentiation at all poststimulation timepoints out to the last time measured (48 h). The results suggest an effect of ketogenic diet-feeding on the induction magnitude but not the maintenance of long-term potentiation. The lack of effect of the diet on baseline transmission and the paired-pulse ratio suggests a mechanism that limits excitation preferentially in conditions of strong stimulation, consonant with clinical reports in which the ketogenic diet alleviates seizures without a major impact on normal brain activity. Limiting plasticity in a seizure-susceptible network may limit seizure-induced epileptogenesis which may subserve the ongoing benefit of the ketogenic diet in epilepsy. PMID:26009636

  4. Extracellular Wire Tetrode Recording in Brain of Freely Walking Insects

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peiyuan; Pollack, Alan J.; Varga, Adrienn G.; Martin, Joshua P.; Ritzmann, Roy E.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interest in the role of brain activity in insect motor control requires that we be able to monitor neural activity while insects perform natural behavior. We previously developed a technique for implanting tetrode wires into the central complex of cockroach brains that allowed us to record activity from multiple neurons simultaneously while a tethered cockroach turned or altered walking speed. While a major advance, tethered preparations provide access to limited behaviors and often lack feedback processes that occur in freely moving animals. We now present a modified version of that technique that allows us to record from the central complex of freely moving cockroaches as they walk in an arena and deal with barriers by turning, climbing or tunneling. Coupled with high speed video and cluster cutting, we can now relate brain activity to various parameters of the movement of freely behaving insects. PMID:24747699

  5. Large-scale chronically implantable precision motorized microdrive array for freely behaving animals.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Jun; Wilson, Matthew A

    2008-10-01

    Multiple single-unit recording has become one of the most powerful in vivo electro-physiological techniques for studying neural circuits. The demand has been increasing for small and lightweight chronic recording devices that allow fine adjustments to be made over large numbers of electrodes across multiple brain regions. To achieve this, we developed precision motorized microdrive arrays that use a novel motor multiplexing headstage to dramatically reduce wiring while preserving precision of the microdrive control. Versions of the microdrive array were chronically implanted on both rats (21 microdrives) and mice (7 microdrives), and relatively long-term recordings were taken. PMID:18667539

  6. Large-Scale Chronically Implantable Precision Motorized Microdrive Array for Freely Behaving Animals

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Jun; Wilson, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple single-unit recording has become one of the most powerful in vivo electro-physiological techniques for studying neural circuits. The demand has been increasing for small and lightweight chronic recording devices that allow fine adjustments to be made over large numbers of electrodes across multiple brain regions. To achieve this, we developed precision motorized microdrive arrays that use a novel motor multiplexing headstage to dramatically reduce wiring while preserving precision of the microdrive control. Versions of the microdrive array were chronically implanted on both rats (21 microdrives) and mice (7 microdrives), and relatively long-term recordings were taken. PMID:18667539

  7. Stimulation of the nucleus accumbens as behavioral reward in awake behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bichot, Narcisse P; Heard, Matthew T; Desimone, Robert

    2011-08-15

    It has been known that monkeys will repeatedly press a bar for electrical stimulation in several different brain structures. We explored the possibility of using electrical stimulation in one such structure, the nucleus accumbens, as a substitute for liquid reward in animals performing a complex task, namely visual search. The animals had full access to water in the cage at all times on days when stimulation was used to motivate them. Electrical stimulation was delivered bilaterally at mirror locations in and around the accumbens, and the animals' motivation to work for electrical stimulation was quantified by the number of trials they performed correctly per unit of time. Acute mapping revealed that stimulation over a large area successfully supported behavioral performance during the task. Performance improved with increasing currents until it reached an asymptotic, theoretically maximal level. Moreover, stimulation with chronically implanted electrodes showed that an animal's motivation to work for electrical stimulation was at least equivalent to, and often better than, when it worked for liquid reward while on water control. These results suggest that electrical stimulation in the accumbens is a viable method of reward in complex tasks. Because this method of reward does not necessitate control over water or food intake, it may offer an alternative to the traditional liquid or food rewards in monkeys, depending on the goals and requirements of the particular research project. PMID:21704383

  8. Sweet and bitter taste in the brain of awake behaving animals

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yueqing; Gillis-Smith, Sarah; Jin, Hao; Tränkner, Dimitri; Ryba, Nicholas J. P.; Zuker, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Taste is responsible for evaluating the nutritious content of food, guiding essential appetitive behaviors, preventing the ingestion of toxic substances, and helping ensure the maintenance of a healthy diet. Sweet and bitter are two of the most salient sensory percepts for humans and other animals; sweet taste permits the identification of energy-rich nutrients while bitter warns against the intake of potentially noxious chemicals1. In mammals, information from taste receptor cells in the tongue is transmitted through multiple neural stations to the primary gustatory cortex in the brain2. Recent imaging studies have shown that sweet and bitter are represented in the primary gustatory cortex by neurons organized in a spatial map3,4, with each taste quality encoded by distinct cortical fields4. Here we demonstrate that by manipulating the brain fields representing sweet and bitter taste we directly control an animal’s internal representation, sensory perception, and behavioral actions. These results substantiate the segregation of taste qualities in the cortex, expose the innate nature of appetitive and aversive taste responses, and illustrate the ability of gustatory cortex to recapitulate complex behaviors in the absence of sensory input. PMID:26580015

  9. Sweet and bitter taste in the brain of awake behaving animals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yueqing; Gillis-Smith, Sarah; Jin, Hao; Tränkner, Dimitri; Ryba, Nicholas J P; Zuker, Charles S

    2015-11-26

    Taste is responsible for evaluating the nutritious content of food, guiding essential appetitive behaviours, preventing the ingestion of toxic substances, and helping to ensure the maintenance of a healthy diet. Sweet and bitter are two of the most salient sensory percepts for humans and other animals; sweet taste allows the identification of energy-rich nutrients whereas bitter warns against the intake of potentially noxious chemicals. In mammals, information from taste receptor cells in the tongue is transmitted through multiple neural stations to the primary gustatory cortex in the brain. Recent imaging studies have shown that sweet and bitter are represented in the primary gustatory cortex by neurons organized in a spatial map, with each taste quality encoded by distinct cortical fields. Here we demonstrate that by manipulating the brain fields representing sweet and bitter taste we directly control an animal's internal representation, sensory perception, and behavioural actions. These results substantiate the segregation of taste qualities in the cortex, expose the innate nature of appetitive and aversive taste responses, and illustrate the ability of gustatory cortex to recapitulate complex behaviours in the absence of sensory input. PMID:26580015

  10. Oscillations in the premotor cortex: single-unit activity from awake, behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, M A; Wise, S P

    2000-01-01

    We examined single-unit activity in the dorsal premotor cortex for evidence of fast neuronal oscillations. Four rhesus monkeys performed a task in which visuospatial instruction stimuli indicated the direction of forelimb movement to be executed on each trial. After an instructed delay period of 1.5-3 s, movements to either the right or left of a central origin were triggered by a second visuospatial stimulus. From a database of 579 single units, 78 units (13%) contained periodic peaks in their autocorrelation histograms (ACHs), with oscillation frequencies typically 20-30 Hz (mean 27 Hz). An additional 26 units (5%) had oscillatory features that were identified in joint interspike-interval (ISI) plots. Three observations, taken together, suggest entrainment by rhythmic drive extrinsic to these neurons: shuffling ISIs attenuated ACH peaks, indicating a dependency on serial-order effects; oscillation frequency did not change during either increases or decreases in firing rate; and joint ISI plots contained features consistent with a rhythmicity interrupted by intervening discharges. In some cells, oscillations occurred for only one of the two directions of movement. During the delay period, such directional selectivity was observed in 37 units (60% of delay-period oscillators). For at least 17 of these units, we could exclude the possibility that oscillatory directional selectivity resulted from the difficulty in detecting oscillations due to low discharge rates (for one of the two movement directions). Directional selectivity in fast oscillations shows that they can reflect specific aspects of an intended action. PMID:10672473

  11. Awake operative videothoracoscopic pulmonary resections.

    PubMed

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Mineo, Tommaso C

    2008-08-01

    The authors' initial experience with awake videothoracoscopic lung resection suggests that these procedures can be easily and safely performed under sole thoracic epidural anesthesia with no mortality and negligible morbidity. One major concern was that operating on a ventilating lung would render surgical maneuvers more difficult because of the lung movements and lack of a sufficient operating space. Instead, the open pneumothorax created after trocar insertion produces a satisfactory lung collapse that does not hamper surgical maneuvers. These results contradict the accepted assumption that the main prerequisite for allowing successful thoracoscopic lung surgery is general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation. No particular training is necessary to accomplish an awake pulmonary resection for teams experienced in thoracoscopic surgery, and conversions to general anesthesia are mainly caused by the presence of extensive fibrous pleural adhesions or the development of intractable panic attacks. Overall, awake pulmonary resection is easily accepted and well tolerated by patients, as confirmed by the high anesthesia satisfaction score, which was better than in nonawake control patients. Nonetheless, thoracic epidural anesthesia has potential complications, including epidural hematoma, spinal cord injury, and phrenic nerve palsy caused by inadvertently high anesthetic level, but these never occurred in the authors' experience. Further concerns relate to patient participation in operating room conversations or risk for development of perioperative panic attacks. However, the authors have found that reassuring the patient during the procedure, explaining step-by-step what is being performed, and even showing the ongoing procedure on the operating video can greatly improve the perioperative wellness and expectations of patients, particularly if the procedure is performed for oncologic diseases. Panic attacks occurred in few patients and could be usually managed through

  12. Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Schmierer, Eric N.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2010-01-12

    A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

  13. Noninvasive high-speed photoacoustic tomography of cerebral hemodynamics in awake-moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianbo; Xi, Lei; Zhou, Junli; Huang, Hua; Zhang, Tao; Carney, Paul R; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-01-01

    We present a noninvasive method of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) for imaging cerebral hemodynamics in awake-moving rats. The wearable PAT (wPAT) system has a size of 15 mm in height and 33 mm in diameter, and a weight of ~8 g (excluding cabling). The wPAT achieved an imaging rate of 3.33 frames/s with a lateral resolution of 243 μm. Animal experiments were designed to show wPAT feasibility for imaging cerebral hemodynamics on awake-moving animals. Results showed that the cerebral oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin changed significantly in response to hyperoxia; and, after the injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), cerebral blood volume changed faster over time and larger in amplitude for rats in awake-moving state compared with rats under anesthesia. By providing a light-weight, high-resolution technology for in vivo monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics in awake-behaving animals, it will be possible to develop a comprehensive understanding on how activity alters hemodynamics in normal and diseased states. PMID:26082016

  14. Freely suspended quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, C.; Herz, M.; Bichler, M.; Ludwig, S.

    2010-05-01

    We present a versatile design of freely suspended quantum point contacts with particular large one-dimensional subband quantization energies of up to Δɛ≈10 meV. The nanoscale bridges embedding a two-dimensional electron system are fabricated from AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures by electron-beam lithography and etching techniques. Narrow constrictions define quantum point contacts that are capacitively controlled via local in-plane side gates. Employing transport spectroscopy, we investigate the transition from electrostatic subbands to Landau quantization in a perpendicular magnetic field. The large subband quantization energies allow us to utilize a wide magnetic field range and thereby observe a large exchange split spin-gap of the two lowest Landau-levels.

  15. Freely Suspended Liquid Crystalline Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonin, A. A.

    2003-05-01

    Freely Suspended Liquid Crystalline Films Andrei A. Sonin Centre d'Etudes Atomiques de Saclay, France and Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences with a Foreword by Professor Noel Clark University of Colorado, USA This book provides a brief introduction to the physics of liquid crystals and to macroscopic physical parameters characterising freely suspended liquid crystalline (FSLC) films, and then reviews the experimental techniques for preparing these films, measuring their thicknesses, and investigating their physical properties and structural aspects. Molecular structures and defects of FSLC films and the problems of film stability, thinning and rupture are discussed in later chapters. Physical phenomena, such as orientational and phase transitions, Frederick's and flexoelectric effects, hydroelectrodynamics, etc., are also analysed. Finally, some applications of FSLC films in industry and in various branches of science are discussed. Specialists working in the physics of liquid crystals and in surface physics will find this book of interest. Industrial firms and their research centres investigating liquid crystals, biological membranes, detergent/surfactant/biomedical areas; and graduates and postgraduates in solid state physics and crystallography will also benefit from this book. The book has an easy-to-read style with just the minimum amount of mathematics necessary to explain important concepts. This is the first book dedicated exclusively to the physics of FSLC in almost a century since their discovery and last twenty years of their active studies. Andrei Sonin, a scientist in the area of FSLC and author of many articles on surface phenomena in liquid crystals, the properties and behaviour of thin liquid crystalline and surfactant films, has a long standing reputation in liquid crystals and surfactant systems and has been particularly active in issues involving surface interactions.

  16. Evaluation of Language Function under Awake Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    KANNO, Aya; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is the only established way to assess patients’ language functions intraoperatively and to contribute to their preservation, if necessary. Recent guidelines have enabled the approach to be used widely, effectively, and safely. Non-invasive brain functional imaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging, have been used preoperatively to identify brain functional regions corresponding to language, and their accuracy has increased year by year. In addition, the use of neuronavigation that incorporates this preoperative information has made it possible to identify the positional relationships between the lesion and functional regions involved in language, conduct functional brain mapping in the awake state with electrical stimulation, and intraoperatively assess nerve function in real time when resecting the lesion. This article outlines the history of awake craniotomy, the current state of pre- and intraoperative evaluation of language function, and the clinical usefulness of such functional evaluation. When evaluating patients’ language functions during awake craniotomy, given the various intraoperative stresses involved, it is necessary to carefully select the tasks to be undertaken, quickly perform all examinations, and promptly evaluate the results. As language functions involve both input and output, they are strongly affected by patients’ preoperative cognitive function, degree of intraoperative wakefulness and fatigue, the ability to produce verbal articulations and utterances, as well as perform synergic movement. Therefore, it is essential to appropriately assess the reproducibility of language function evaluation using awake craniotomy techniques. PMID:25925758

  17. Awake Craniotomy: A New Airway Approach.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Chitra; Schlichter, Rolf A; Baranov, Dimitry; Kofke, W Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Awake craniotomies have been performed regularly at the University of Pennsylvania since 2004. Varying approaches to airway management are described for this procedure, including intubation with an endotracheal tube and use of a laryngeal mask airway, simple facemask, or nasal cannula. In this case series, we describe the successful use (i.e., no need for endotracheal intubation related to inadequate gas exchange) of bilateral nasopharyngeal airways in 90 patients undergoing awake craniotomies. The use of nasopharyngeal airways can ease the transition between the asleep and awake phases of the craniotomy without the need to stimulate the airway. Our purpose was to describe our experience and report adverse events related to this technique. PMID:26579845

  18. Awake animal SPECT: Overview and initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, A G; Majewski, S; McKisson, J; Popov, V; Proffitt, J; Stolin, A; Baba, J S; Goddard, J S; Lee, S J; Smith, M F; Tsui, B; Pomper, M

    2009-02-01

    A SPECT / X-ray CT system configured at Johns Hopkins University to image the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals in unrestrained, un-anesthetized mice has been constructed and tested on awake mice. The system was built by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. SPECT imaging is accomplished using two gamma cameras, 10 cm × 20 cm in size based on a 2 × 4 array of Hamamatsu H8500 flat panel position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. A real-time optical tracking system utilizing three infrared cameras provides time stamped pose data of an awake mouse head during a SPECT scan. The six degrees of freedom (three translational and three rotational) pose data are used for motion correction during 3-D tomographic list-mode iterative image reconstruction. SPECT reconstruction of awake, unrestrained mice with motion compensation for head movement has been accomplished.

  19. Reading Wide Awake: Politics, Pedagogies, and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    In his new book, popular author Patrick Shannon examines reading as agency--why reading critically is essential to civic engagement and a healthy democracy. We follow the author on a journey of self discovery as he practices "wide-awake reading" with a variety of everyday texts, from radio programs to legal documents to more traditional books and…

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake transgenic fragile X rats: evidence of dysregulation in reward processing in the mesolimbic/habenular neural circuit

    PubMed Central

    Kenkel, W M; Yee, J R; Moore, K; Madularu, D; Kulkarni, P; Gamber, K; Nedelman, M; Ferris, C F

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and social deficits, often involving communication impairment, are fundamental clinical features of fragile X syndrome. There is growing evidence that dysregulation in reward processing is a contributing factor to the social deficits observed in many psychiatric disorders. Hence, we hypothesized that transgenic fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (fmr1) KO (FX) rats would display alterations in reward processing. To this end, awake control and FX rats were imaged for changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal intensity in response to the odor of almond, a stimulus to elicit the innate reward response. Subjects were ‘odor naive' to this evolutionarily conserved stimulus. The resulting changes in brain activity were registered to a three-dimensional segmented, annotated rat atlas delineating 171 brain regions. Both wild-type (WT) and FX rats showed robust brain activation to a rewarding almond odor, though FX rats showed an altered temporal pattern and tended to have a higher number of voxels with negative BOLD signal change from baseline. This pattern of greater negative BOLD was especially apparent in the Papez circuit, critical to emotional processing and the mesolimbic/habenular reward circuit. WT rats showed greater positive BOLD response in the supramammillary area, whereas FX rats showed greater positive BOLD response in the dorsal lateral striatum, and greater negative BOLD response in the retrosplenial cortices, the core of the accumbens and the lateral preoptic area. When tested in a freely behaving odor-investigation paradigm, FX rats failed to show the preference for almond odor which typifies WT rats. However, FX rats showed investigation profiles similar to WT when presented with social odors. These data speak to an altered processing of this highly salient novel odor in the FX phenotype and lend further support to the notion that altered reward systems in the brain may contribute to fragile X syndrome symptomology. PMID:27003189

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake transgenic fragile X rats: evidence of dysregulation in reward processing in the mesolimbic/habenular neural circuit.

    PubMed

    Kenkel, W M; Yee, J R; Moore, K; Madularu, D; Kulkarni, P; Gamber, K; Nedelman, M; Ferris, C F

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and social deficits, often involving communication impairment, are fundamental clinical features of fragile X syndrome. There is growing evidence that dysregulation in reward processing is a contributing factor to the social deficits observed in many psychiatric disorders. Hence, we hypothesized that transgenic fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (fmr1) KO (FX) rats would display alterations in reward processing. To this end, awake control and FX rats were imaged for changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal intensity in response to the odor of almond, a stimulus to elicit the innate reward response. Subjects were 'odor naive' to this evolutionarily conserved stimulus. The resulting changes in brain activity were registered to a three-dimensional segmented, annotated rat atlas delineating 171 brain regions. Both wild-type (WT) and FX rats showed robust brain activation to a rewarding almond odor, though FX rats showed an altered temporal pattern and tended to have a higher number of voxels with negative BOLD signal change from baseline. This pattern of greater negative BOLD was especially apparent in the Papez circuit, critical to emotional processing and the mesolimbic/habenular reward circuit. WT rats showed greater positive BOLD response in the supramammillary area, whereas FX rats showed greater positive BOLD response in the dorsal lateral striatum, and greater negative BOLD response in the retrosplenial cortices, the core of the accumbens and the lateral preoptic area. When tested in a freely behaving odor-investigation paradigm, FX rats failed to show the preference for almond odor which typifies WT rats. However, FX rats showed investigation profiles similar to WT when presented with social odors. These data speak to an altered processing of this highly salient novel odor in the FX phenotype and lend further support to the notion that altered reward systems in the brain may contribute to fragile X syndrome symptomology. PMID:27003189

  2. Awake, Offline Processing during Associative Learning.

    PubMed

    Bursley, James K; Nestor, Adrian; Tarr, Michael J; Creswell, J David

    2016-01-01

    Offline processing has been shown to strengthen memory traces and enhance learning in the absence of conscious rehearsal or awareness. Here we evaluate whether a brief, two-minute offline processing period can boost associative learning and test a memory reactivation account for these offline processing effects. After encoding paired associates, subjects either completed a distractor task for two minutes or were immediately tested for memory of the pairs in a counterbalanced, within-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Results showed that brief, awake, offline processing improves memory for associate pairs. Moreover, multi-voxel pattern analysis of the neuroimaging data suggested reactivation of encoded memory representations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during offline processing. These results signify the first demonstration of awake, active, offline enhancement of associative memory and suggest that such enhancement is accompanied by the offline reactivation of encoded memory representations. PMID:27119345

  3. Path to AWAKE: Evolution of the concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, A.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Argyropoulos, T.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Cascella, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Elsen, E.; Farmer, J.; Fartoukh, S.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Geschonke, G.; Goddard, B.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Gschwendtner, E.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hillenbrand, S.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huang, C.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Kersevan, R.; Kumar, N.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Lu, W.; Machacek, J.; Mandry, S.; Martin, I.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Merminga, L.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Müller, A.-S.; Najmudin, Z.; Noakes, T. C. Q.; Norreys, P.; Osterhoff, J.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pozimski, J.; Pukhov, A.; Reimann, O.; Rieger, K.; Roesler, S.; Ruhl, H.; Rusnak, T.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; von der Schmitt, H.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Simon, F.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Tajima, T.; Tarkeshian, R.; Timko, H.; Trines, R.; Tückmantel, T.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Velotti, F.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Zhang, H.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability - a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude with the design of the experiment as it is being realized at CERN and some words on the future outlook. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status as presented in this conference is given in Gschwendtner et al. [1].

  4. Awake, Offline Processing during Associative Learning

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Adrian; Tarr, Michael J.; Creswell, J. David

    2016-01-01

    Offline processing has been shown to strengthen memory traces and enhance learning in the absence of conscious rehearsal or awareness. Here we evaluate whether a brief, two-minute offline processing period can boost associative learning and test a memory reactivation account for these offline processing effects. After encoding paired associates, subjects either completed a distractor task for two minutes or were immediately tested for memory of the pairs in a counterbalanced, within-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Results showed that brief, awake, offline processing improves memory for associate pairs. Moreover, multi-voxel pattern analysis of the neuroimaging data suggested reactivation of encoded memory representations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during offline processing. These results signify the first demonstration of awake, active, offline enhancement of associative memory and suggest that such enhancement is accompanied by the offline reactivation of encoded memory representations. PMID:27119345

  5. Human Cortical Excitability Increases with Time Awake

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Reto; Mäki, Hanna; Rosanova, Mario; Casarotto, Silvia; Canali, Paola; Casali, Adenauer G.; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness is associated not only with obvious changes in the way we feel and perform but also with well-known clinical effects, such as increased susceptibility to seizures, to hallucinations, and relief of depressive symptoms. These clinical effects suggest that prolonged wakefulness may be associated with significant changes in the state of cortical circuits. While recent animal experiments have reported a progressive increase of cortical excitability with time awake, no conclusive evidence could be gathered in humans. In this study, we combine transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to monitor cortical excitability in healthy individuals as a function of time awake. We observed that the excitability of the human frontal cortex, measured as the immediate (0–20 ms) EEG reaction to TMS, progressively increases with time awake, from morning to evening and after one night of total sleep deprivation, and that it decreases after recovery sleep. By continuously monitoring vigilance, we also found that this modulation in cortical responsiveness is tonic and not attributable to transient fluctuations of the level of arousal. The present results provide noninvasive electrophysiological evidence that wakefulness is associated with a steady increase in the excitability of human cortical circuits that is rebalanced during sleep. PMID:22314045

  6. Ammonia encephalopathy and awake craniotomy for brain language mapping: cause of failed awake craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Villalba Martínez, G; Fernández-Candil, J L; Vivanco-Hidalgo, R M; Pacreu Terradas, S; León Jorba, A; Arroyo Pérez, R

    2015-05-01

    We report the case of an aborted awake craniotomy for a left frontotemporoinsular glioma due to ammonia encephalopathy on a patient taking Levetiracetam, valproic acid and clobazam. This awake mapping surgery was scheduled as a second-stage procedure following partial resection eight days earlier under general anesthesia. We planned to perform the surgery with local anesthesia and sedation with remifentanil and propofol. After removal of the bone flap all sedation was stopped and we noticed slow mentation and excessive drowsiness prompting us to stop and control the airway and proceed with general anesthesia. There were no post-operative complications but the patient continued to exhibit bradypsychia and hand tremor. His ammonia level was found to be elevated and was treated with an infusion of l-carnitine after discontinuation of the valproic acid with vast improvement. Ammonia encephalopathy should be considered in patients treated with valproic acid and mental status changes who require an awake craniotomy with patient collaboration. PMID:25475698

  7. Calcium neuroimaging in behaving zebrafish larvae using a turn-key light field camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Perez, Carlos; Lauri, Antonella; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Cappetta, Michele; Erdmann, Arne; Westmeyer, Gil Gregor

    2015-09-01

    Reconstructing a three-dimensional scene from multiple simultaneously acquired perspectives (the light field) is an elegant scanless imaging concept that can exceed the temporal resolution of currently available scanning-based imaging methods for capturing fast cellular processes. We tested the performance of commercially available light field cameras on a fluorescent microscopy setup for monitoring calcium activity in the brain of awake and behaving reporter zebrafish larvae. The plenoptic imaging system could volumetrically resolve diverse neuronal response profiles throughout the zebrafish brain upon stimulation with an aversive odorant. Behavioral responses of the reporter fish could be captured simultaneously together with depth-resolved neuronal activity. Overall, our assessment showed that with some optimizations for fluorescence microscopy applications, commercial light field cameras have the potential of becoming an attractive alternative to custom-built systems to accelerate molecular imaging research on cellular dynamics.

  8. A Pressure Injection System for Investigating the Neuropharmacology of Information Processing in Awake Behaving Macaque Monkey Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Veith, Vera K.; Quigley, Cliodhna; Treue, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The top-down modulation of feed-forward cortical information processing is functionally important for many cognitive processes, including the modulation of sensory information processing by attention. However, little is known about which neurotransmitter systems are involved in such modulations. A practical way to address this question is to combine single-cell recording with local and temporary neuropharmacological manipulation in a suitable animal model. Here we demonstrate a technique combining acute single-cell recordings with the injection of neuropharmacological agents in the direct vicinity of the recording electrode. The video shows the preparation of the pressure injection/recording system, including preparation of the substance to be injected. We show a rhesus monkey performing a visual attention task and the procedure of single-unit recording with block-wise pharmacological manipulations. PMID:27023110

  9. Simultaneous telemetric monitoring of brain glucose and lactate and motion in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Rocchitta, Gaia; Secchi, Ottavio; Alvau, Maria Domenica; Farina, Donatella; Bazzu, Gianfranco; Calia, Giammario; Migheli, Rossana; Desole, Maria Speranza; O'Neill, Robert D; Serra, Pier A

    2013-11-01

    A new telemetry system for simultaneous detection of extracellular brain glucose and lactate and motion is presented. The device consists of dual-channel, single-supply miniature potentiostat-I/V converter, a microcontroller unit, a signal transmitter, and a miniaturized microvibration sensor. Although based on simple and inexpensive components, the biotelemetry device has been used for accurate transduction of the anodic oxidation currents generated on the surface of implanted glucose and lactate biosensors and animal microvibrations. The device was characterized and validated in vitro before in vivo experiments. The biosensors were implanted in the striatum of freely moving animals and the biotelemetric device was fixed to the animal's head. Physiological and pharmacological stimulations were given in order to induce striatal neural activation and to modify the motor behavior in awake, untethered animals. PMID:24102201

  10. Awake hippocampal sharp-wave ripples support spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Shantanu P; Kemere, Caleb; German, P Walter; Frank, Loren M

    2012-06-15

    The hippocampus is critical for spatial learning and memory. Hippocampal neurons in awake animals exhibit place field activity that encodes current location, as well as sharp-wave ripple (SWR) activity during which representations based on past experiences are often replayed. The relationship between these patterns of activity and the memory functions of the hippocampus is poorly understood. We interrupted awake SWRs in animals learning a spatial alternation task. We observed a specific learning and performance deficit that persisted throughout training. This deficit was associated with awake SWR activity, as SWR interruption left place field activity and post-experience SWR reactivation intact. These results provide a link between awake SWRs and hippocampal memory processes, which suggests that awake replay of memory-related information during SWRs supports learning and memory-guided decision-making. PMID:22555434

  11. Preparing to perform an awake fiberoptic intubation.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, M. E.; Shorten, G. D.

    1998-01-01

    Fiberoptically guided tracheal intubation represents one of the most important advances in airway management to occur in the past thirty years. Perhaps its most important role is in management of the anticipated difficult airway. This is a situation in which the dangers of encountering the life-threatening "can't intubate, can't ventilate" situation can be avoided by placement of an endotracheal tube while the patient is awake. Although skill at the procedure of endoscopy is obviously necessary in this setting, these authors hold that success or failure of the technique frequently depends on the adequacy of preparation. These measures include 1) pre-operative assessment of the patient; 2) careful explanation of what lies in store; 3) "setting the stage"; 4) preparing the equipment to be used; and 5) preparing the patient (antisialogue, sedation, application of topical anesthesia to the upper airway). If these preparatory measures are carried out meticulously, the likelihood of performing a successful and comfortable awake fiberoptic tracheal intubation is greatly increased. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10604785

  12. New methods for localizing and manipulating neuronal dynamics in behaving animals.

    PubMed

    Fee, Michale S; Long, Michael A

    2011-10-01

    Where are the 'prime movers' that control behavior? Which circuits in the brain control the order in which individual motor gestures of a learned behavior are generated, and the speed at which they progress? Here we describe two techniques recently applied to localizing and characterizing the circuitry underlying the generation of vocal sequences in the songbird. The first utilizes small, localized, temperature changes in the brain to perturb the speed of neural dynamics. The second utilizes intracellular manipulation of membrane potential in the freely behaving animal to perturb the dynamics within a single neuron. Both of these techniques are broadly applicable in behaving animals to test hypotheses about the biophysical and circuit dynamics that allow neural circuits to march from one state to the next. PMID:21763124

  13. A programmable closed-loop recording and stimulating wireless system for behaving small laboratory animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Boi, Fabio; Zordan, Stefano; Bonfanti, Andrea; Vato, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    A portable 16-channels microcontroller-based wireless system for a bi-directional interaction with the central nervous system is presented in this work. The device is designed to be used with freely behaving small laboratory animals and allows recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity wirelessly transmitted and stored on a personal computer. Biphasic current stimuli with programmable duration, frequency and amplitude may be triggered in real-time on the basis of the recorded neural activity as well as by the animal behavior within a specifically designed experimental setup. An intuitive graphical user interface was developed to configure and to monitor the whole system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo measurements on behaving rats chronically implanted with multi-channels microwire arrays.

  14. A programmable closed-loop recording and stimulating wireless system for behaving small laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Boi, Fabio; Zordan, Stefano; Bonfanti, Andrea; Vato, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    A portable 16-channels microcontroller-based wireless system for a bi-directional interaction with the central nervous system is presented in this work. The device is designed to be used with freely behaving small laboratory animals and allows recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity wirelessly transmitted and stored on a personal computer. Biphasic current stimuli with programmable duration, frequency and amplitude may be triggered in real-time on the basis of the recorded neural activity as well as by the animal behavior within a specifically designed experimental setup. An intuitive graphical user interface was developed to configure and to monitor the whole system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo measurements on behaving rats chronically implanted with multi-channels microwire arrays. PMID:25096831

  15. [Long-term potentiation and unit evoked responses in the cingulate cortex of freely moving rats].

    PubMed

    Gorkin, A G; Reymann, K G; Aleksandrov, Iu I

    2002-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic efficacy is considered to be the most probable physiological mechanism of long-term memory. However, lack of understanding of cellular and subcellular mechanisms of LTP induction in freely behaving animals does not correspond to the importance of the problem. It was tested whether the characteristics of potentiation in the cingulate cortex after tetanization of the subiculocingulate tract (SCT) meet the criteria of true LTP (that passes all known stages in its development and lasts for more than a day in freely-behaving animals). Additionally, characteristics of spike responses to SCT stimulation and the effects of application of different glutamate receptor blockers were studied. Without application of GABA receptor blockers, the LTP lasted for more than 24 hours. Application of NMDA glutamate receptor blockers significantly inhibited field potentials evoke by testing stimulation. Short-latency spike responses to SCT stimulation were recorded with low probability that increased with stimulation intensity. The obtained data reveal the possibility to compare the involvement of cingulate neurons in acquisition of adaptive behavior and changes in their spike responses during the LTP development in freely-moving rats. PMID:12528373

  16. A User-Configurable Headstage for Multimodality Neuromonitoring in Freely Moving Rats.

    PubMed

    Limnuson, Kanokwan; Narayan, Raj K; Chiluwal, Amrit; Golanov, Eugene V; Bouton, Chad E; Li, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal monitoring of brain activity, physiology, and neurochemistry is an important approach to gain insight into brain function, modulation, and pathology. With recent progress in micro- and nanotechnology, micro-nano-implants have become important catalysts in advancing brain research. However, to date, only a limited number of brain parameters have been measured simultaneously in awake animals in spite of significant recent progress in sensor technology. Here we have provided a cost and time effective approach to designing a headstage to conduct a multimodality brain monitoring in freely moving animals. To demonstrate this method, we have designed a user-configurable headstage for our micromachined multimodal neural probe. The headstage can reliably record direct-current electrocorticography (DC-ECoG), brain oxygen tension (PbrO2), cortical temperature, and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) simultaneously without significant signal crosstalk or movement artifacts for 72 h. Even in a noisy environment, it can record low-level neural signals with high quality. Moreover, it can easily interface with signal conditioning circuits that have high power consumption and are difficult to miniaturize. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time where multiple physiological, biochemical, and electrophysiological cerebral variables have been simultaneously recorded from freely moving rats. We anticipate that the developed system will aid in gaining further insight into not only normal cerebral functioning but also pathophysiology of conditions such as epilepsy, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. PMID:27594826

  17. A User-Configurable Headstage for Multimodality Neuromonitoring in Freely Moving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Limnuson, Kanokwan; Narayan, Raj K.; Chiluwal, Amrit; Golanov, Eugene V.; Bouton, Chad E.; Li, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal monitoring of brain activity, physiology, and neurochemistry is an important approach to gain insight into brain function, modulation, and pathology. With recent progress in micro- and nanotechnology, micro-nano-implants have become important catalysts in advancing brain research. However, to date, only a limited number of brain parameters have been measured simultaneously in awake animals in spite of significant recent progress in sensor technology. Here we have provided a cost and time effective approach to designing a headstage to conduct a multimodality brain monitoring in freely moving animals. To demonstrate this method, we have designed a user-configurable headstage for our micromachined multimodal neural probe. The headstage can reliably record direct-current electrocorticography (DC-ECoG), brain oxygen tension (PbrO2), cortical temperature, and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) simultaneously without significant signal crosstalk or movement artifacts for 72 h. Even in a noisy environment, it can record low-level neural signals with high quality. Moreover, it can easily interface with signal conditioning circuits that have high power consumption and are difficult to miniaturize. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time where multiple physiological, biochemical, and electrophysiological cerebral variables have been simultaneously recorded from freely moving rats. We anticipate that the developed system will aid in gaining further insight into not only normal cerebral functioning but also pathophysiology of conditions such as epilepsy, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. PMID:27594826

  18. Sonar location system for freely floating buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, I. G.

    1983-05-01

    A rf interrogated sonar location system for freely floating buoys is described. The location of an array of up to three buoys may be determined on an almost continuous basis within a radius of 500 m from a shipboard monitoring station. Location accuracy of typically ±0.5 m at 200-m range, low cost, and ease of operation are the major features of the system.

  19. A freely-moving monkey treadmill model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Justin D.; Nuyujukian, Paul; Freifeld, Oren; Gao, Hua; Walker, Ross; Ryu, Stephen I.; Meng, Teresa H.; Murmann, Boris; Black, Michael J.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Motor neuroscience and brain-machine interface (BMI) design is based on examining how the brain controls voluntary movement, typically by recording neural activity and behavior from animal models. Recording technologies used with these animal models have traditionally limited the range of behaviors that can be studied, and thus the generality of science and engineering research. We aim to design a freely-moving animal model using neural and behavioral recording technologies that do not constrain movement. Approach. We have established a freely-moving rhesus monkey model employing technology that transmits neural activity from an intracortical array using a head-mounted device and records behavior through computer vision using markerless motion capture. We demonstrate the flexibility and utility of this new monkey model, including the first recordings from motor cortex while rhesus monkeys walk quadrupedally on a treadmill. Main results. Using this monkey model, we show that multi-unit threshold-crossing neural activity encodes the phase of walking and that the average firing rate of the threshold crossings covaries with the speed of individual steps. On a population level, we find that neural state-space trajectories of walking at different speeds have similar rotational dynamics in some dimensions that evolve at the step rate of walking, yet robustly separate by speed in other state-space dimensions. Significance. Freely-moving animal models may allow neuroscientists to examine a wider range of behaviors and can provide a flexible experimental paradigm for examining the neural mechanisms that underlie movement generation across behaviors and environments. For BMIs, freely-moving animal models have the potential to aid prosthetic design by examining how neural encoding changes with posture, environment and other real-world context changes. Understanding this new realm of behavior in more naturalistic settings is essential for overall progress of basic

  20. Freely Suspended Smectic Films in Aqueous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddireddy, Karthik; Bahr, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Smectic liquid crystals easily form thin films which are freely suspended on a solid frame in air. These systems have been thoroughly studied for various purposes such as structural studies of smectic phases, investigating phase transitions in two-dimensional systems, and studying various physical properties of liquid crystals. In the present study, we explore the preparation of freely suspended smectic films in water. A prerequisite is the presence of a surfactant which accumulates at the liquid-crystal/water interface and induces a homeotropic anchoring of the director, so that the smectic layers align parallel to the two film surfaces. The presence of the surfactant might also serve as a handle to tune properties such as the surface tension of the films (which is hardly possible for freely suspended films in air). We study the formation of films in water using different frames and different surfactants, and we focus especially on the thinning behaviour which occurs when the temperature is increased towards the smectic - nematic or smectic - isotropic transition.

  1. Chronic, Wireless Recordings of Large Scale Brain Activity in Freely Moving Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, David A.; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Hanson, Timothy L.; Dimitrov, Dragan F.; Lehew, Gary; Meloy, Jim; Rajangam, Sankaranarayani; Subramanian, Vivek; Ifft, Peter J.; Li, Zheng; Ramakrishnan, Arjun; Tate, Andrew; Zhuang, Katie; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in techniques for recording large-scale brain activity contribute to both the elucidation of neurophysiological principles and the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). Here we describe a neurophysiological paradigm for performing tethered and wireless large-scale recordings based on movable volumetric three-dimensional (3D) multielectrode implants. This approach allowed us to isolate up to 1,800 units per animal and simultaneously record the extracellular activity of close to 500 cortical neurons, distributed across multiple cortical areas, in freely behaving rhesus monkeys. The method is expandable, in principle, to thousands of simultaneously recorded channels. It also allows increased recording longevity (5 consecutive years), and recording of a broad range of behaviors, e.g. social interactions, and BMI paradigms in freely moving primates. We propose that wireless large-scale recordings could have a profound impact on basic primate neurophysiology research, while providing a framework for the development and testing of clinically relevant neuroprostheses. PMID:24776634

  2. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy: A retrospective study of 54 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sokhal, Navdeep; Rath, Girija Prasad; Chaturvedi, Arvind; Dash, Hari Hara; Bithal, Parmod Kumar; Chandra, P Sarat

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: The anaesthetic challenge of awake craniotomy is to maintain adequate sedation, analgesia, respiratory and haemodynamic stability in an awake patient who should be able to co-operate during intraoperative neurological assessment. The current literature, sharing the experience on awake craniotomy, in Indian context, is minimal. Hence, we carried out a retrospective study with the aim to review and analyse the anaesthetic management and perioperative complications in patients undergoing awake craniotomy, at our centre. Methods: Medical records of 54 patients who underwent awake craniotomy for intracranial lesions over a period of 10 years were reviewed, retrospectively. Data regarding anaesthetic management, intraoperative complications and post-operative course were recorded. Results: Propofol (81.5%) and dexmedetomidine (18.5%) were the main agents used for providing conscious sedation to facilitate awake craniotomy. Hypertension (16.7%) was the most commonly encountered complication during intraoperative period, followed by seizures (9.3%), desaturation (7.4%), tight brain (7.4%), and shivering (5.6%). The procedure had to be converted to general anaesthesia in one of patients owing to refractory brain bulge. The incidence of respiratory and haemodynamic complications were comparable in the both groups (P > 0.05). There was less incidence of intraoperative seizures in patients who received propofol (P = 0.03). In post-operative period, 20% of patients developed new motor deficit. Mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 ± 1.9 day (1–14 days) and mean hospital stay was 7.0 ± 5.0 day (3–30 days). Conclusions: ‘Conscious sedation’ was the technique of choice for awake craniotomy, at our institute. Fentanyl, propofol, and dexmedetomidine were the main agents used for this purpose. Patients receiving propofol had less incidence of intraoperative seizure. Appropriate selection of patients, understanding the procedure of surgery, and judicious

  3. Awake craniotomy: A qualitative review and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanwy, Mahmood; Chakrabarti, Rajkalyan; Tewari, Anurag; Sinha, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Neurosurgery in awake patients incorporates newer technologies that require the anesthesiologists to update their skills and evolve their methodologies. They need effective communication skills and knowledge of selecting the right anesthetic drugs to ensure adequate analgesia, akinesia, along with patient satisfaction with the anesthetic conduct throughout the procedure. The challenge of providing adequate anesthetic care to an awake patient for intracranial surgery requires more than routine vigilance about anesthetic management. PMID:25422613

  4. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seungjoon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake. PMID:23536223

  5. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  6. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Endres, Christopher; Foss, Catherine; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  7. Ionic liquids behave as dilute electrolyte solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gebbie, Matthew A.; Valtiner, Markus; Banquy, Xavier; Fox, Eric T.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2013-01-01

    We combine direct surface force measurements with thermodynamic arguments to demonstrate that pure ionic liquids are expected to behave as dilute weak electrolyte solutions, with typical effective dissociated ion concentrations of less than 0.1% at room temperature. We performed equilibrium force–distance measurements across the common ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([C4mim][NTf2]) using a surface forces apparatus with in situ electrochemical control and quantitatively modeled these measurements using the van der Waals and electrostatic double-layer forces of the Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek theory with an additive repulsive steric (entropic) ion–surface binding force. Our results indicate that ionic liquids screen charged surfaces through the formation of both bound (Stern) and diffuse electric double layers, where the diffuse double layer is comprised of effectively dissociated ionic liquid ions. Additionally, we used the energetics of thermally dissociating ions in a dielectric medium to quantitatively predict the equilibrium for the effective dissociation reaction of [C4mim][NTf2] ions, in excellent agreement with the measured Debye length. Our results clearly demonstrate that, outside of the bound double layer, most of the ions in [C4mim][NTf2] are not effectively dissociated and thus do not contribute to electrostatic screening. We also provide a general, molecular-scale framework for designing ionic liquids with significantly increased dissociated charge densities via judiciously balancing ion pair interactions with bulk dielectric properties. Our results clear up several inconsistencies that have hampered scientific progress in this important area and guide the rational design of unique, high–free-ion density ionic liquids and ionic liquid blends. PMID:23716690

  8. Mapping brain function in freely moving subjects

    PubMed Central

    Holschneider, Daniel P.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of many fundamental mammalian behaviors such as, for example, aggression, mating, foraging or social behaviors, depend on locomotor activity. A central dilemma in the functional neuroimaging of these behaviors has been the fact that conventional neuroimaging techniques generally rely on immobilization of the subject, which extinguishes all but the simplest activity. Ideally, imaging could occur in freely moving subjects, while presenting minimal interference with the subject’s natural behavior. Here we provide an overview of several approaches that have been undertaken in the past to achieve this aim in both tethered and freely moving animals, as well as in nonrestrained human subjects. Applications of specific radiotracers to single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography are discussed in which brain activation is imaged after completion of the behavioral task and capture of the tracer. Potential applications to clinical neuropsychiatry are discussed, as well as challenges inherent to constraint-free functional neuroimaging. Future applications of these methods promise to increase our understanding of the neural circuits underlying mammalian behavior in health and disease. PMID:15465134

  9. [Continuous ECG recording for freely moving patients].

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Liu, Shengyang; Chen, Jianfang; Zhang, Genxuan; Tsau, Young

    2013-04-01

    As more and more people are becoming aged in China and many of them tend to suffer from chronic cardiac problems, the long-term dynamic cardiac monitoring for freely moving patients becomes essential. A new design for continuous ECG recording on the freely moving patients at home and/or at work is proposed here. It is miniature in size, using digital technologies of the low gain amplifier, the high resolution analog to digital converter and the real-time digital filter that features > 100dB input signal dynamic range (ISDR), > 100dB common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR), and < 5microV (RMS) internal noise. The device works continuously more than 24 hours with a pair of AAA batteries, and is capable of storing the recorded data into a storage card. The preliminary tests showed that the P-QRS-T waveforms were captured and displayed smoothly in resting, walking, and activities, making the device useful in monitoring and analyzing for the patients on the move. PMID:23858751

  10. Patient experiences during awake mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Prime, Danille; Arkless, Paul; Fine, Jonathan; Winter, Stephen; Wakefield, Dorothy B.; Scatena, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Sedation practices in an ICU have shifted significantly in the past 20 years toward the use of minimizing sedation in mechanically ventilated patients. While minimizing sedation is clearly in the best interest of patients, data are lacking about how this approach affects patients’ experiences. Methods We interviewed mechanically ventilated patients receiving minimal sedation, over a 6-month period in an ICU, in order to explore their emotional, comfort, and communication experiences. Their responses were compared with the responses of their available family members regarding their attitudes and perceptions of the patients’ experiences. Results Seventy-five percent of the patients agreed or strongly agreed that they experienced pain, and 50% agreed or strongly agreed that they were comfortable. Half of the patients agreed or strongly agreed that they preferred to be kept awake. Five patients (31%) indicated that they were frustrated while 17 relatives (89%) agreed or strongly agreed that the patients were frustrated. When controlling for age and gender of respondents, family members perceived higher levels of patient pain (least square [LS] mean [95% CI]: 4.2 [3.7, 4.7] vs. 3.1 [2.5, 3.8]; p=0.022), frustration (LS mean [95% CI]: 4.2 [3.7, 4.6] vs. 3.2 [2.6, 3.9]; p=0.031), and adequate communication with nurses and doctors (LS mean [95% CI]: 3.9 [3.5, 4.4] vs. 3.1 [2.4, 3.7]; p=0.046) than the patients themselves. Conclusion Patients tolerated minimal sedation without significant frustration while mechanically ventilated despite experiencing discomfort. Patient and family member perceptions of the patient experience may differ, especially in regards to pain and frustration. The use of a communication tool can facilitate understanding of patient experiences and preferences. PMID:26908386

  11. Changes in Activity of the Same Thalamic Neurons to Repeated Nociception in Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2015-01-01

    The sensory thalamus has been reported to play a key role in central pain sensory modulation and processing, but its response to repeated nociception at thalamic level is not well known. Current study investigated thalamic response to repeated nociception by recording and comparing the activity of the same thalamic neuron during the 1st and 2nd formalin injection induced nociception, with a week interval between injections, in awake and behaving mice. Behaviorally, the 2nd injection induced greater nociceptive responses than the 1st. Thalamic activity mirrored these behavioral changes with greater firing rate during the 2nd injection. Analysis of tonic and burst firing, characteristic firing pattern of thalamic neurons, revealed that tonic firing activity was potentiated while burst firing activity was not significantly changed by the 2nd injection relative to the 1st. Likewise, burst firing property changes, which has been consistently associated with different phases of nociception, were not induced by the 2nd injection. Overall, data suggest that repeated nociception potentiated responsiveness of thalamic neurons and confirmed that tonic firing transmits nociceptive signals. PMID:26070157

  12. Reverse Translation of Clinical Electrophysiological Biomarkers in Behaving Rodents under Acute and Chronic NMDA Receptor Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Elyse M; Timi, Patricia; Hong, L Elliot; O'Donnell, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) stands out as a highly translational tool for psychiatric research, yet rodent and human EEG are not typically obtained in the same way. In this study we developed a tool to record skull EEG in awake-behaving rats in a similar manner to how human EEG are obtained and then used this technique to test whether acute NMDA receptor antagonism alters rodent EEG signals in a similar manner as in humans. Acute MK-801 treatment elevated gamma power and reduced beta band power, which closely mirrored EEG data from healthy volunteers receiving acute ketamine. To explore the mechanisms behind these oscillatory changes, we examined the effects of GABA-A receptor blockade, finding that picrotoxin (PTX) recapitulated the decrease in sound-evoked beta oscillations observed with acute MK-801, but did not produce changes in gamma band power. Chronic treatment with either PTX or MK-801 did not affect frequency-specific oscillatory activity when tested 24 h after the last drug injection, but decreased total broadband oscillatory power. Overall, this study validated a novel platform for recording rodent EEG and demonstrated similar oscillatory changes after acute NMDA receptor antagonism in both humans and rodents, suggesting that skull EEG may be a powerful tool for further translational studies. PMID:25176166

  13. Implantable electrode for recording nerve signals in awake animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ninomiya, I.; Yonezawa, Y.; Wilson, M. F.

    1976-01-01

    An implantable electrode assembly consisting of collagen and metallic electrodes was constructed to measure simultaneously neural signals from the intact nerve and bioelectrical noises in awake animals. Mechanical artifacts, due to bodily movement, were negligibly small. The impedance of the collagen electrodes, measured in awake cats 6-7 days after implantation surgery, ranged from 39.8-11.5 k ohms at a frequency range of 20-5 kHz. Aortic nerve activity and renal nerve activity, measured in awake conditions using the collagen electrode, showed grouped activity synchronous with the cardiac cycle. Results indicate that most of the renal nerve activity was from postganglionic sympathetic fibers and was inhibited by the baroceptor reflex in the same cardiac cycle.

  14. Dual-headed SPECT for awake animal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; McKisson, J; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Smith, M F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract- Motion-corrected awake animal imaging is needed for normal-state investigations of models of neurological disease and brain activity. The awake animal brain SPECT/CT system, AwakeSPECT at Johns Hopkins University has in the past used a single gamma camera for imaging. Enhancements have been made by adding a pinhole collimator to the second gamma camera at the opposite side which has been previously equipped parallel hole collimator. Geometry calibration was performed using a custom built quality control phantom containing three Co-57 point sources and applied to the tomographic reconstruction code. Hot-rod phantom scans with Tc-99m were performed to test sensitivity and resolution improvements. The reconstruction results show significant resolution and sensitivity improvements.

  15. Dual-headed SPECT for awake animal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lee, B. Kross, D. Weisenberger, J. McKisson, J.S. Goddard, J.S. Baba, M.S. Smith

    2012-02-01

    Motion-corrected awake animal imaging is needed for normal-state investigations of models of neurological disease and brain activity. The awake animal brain SPECT/CT system, AwakeSPECT at Johns Hopkins University has in the past used a single gamma camera for imaging. Enhancements have been made by adding a pinhole collimator to the second gamma camera at the opposite side which has been previously equipped parallel hole collimator. Geometry calibration was performed using a custom built quality control phantom containing three Co-57 point sources and applied to the tomographic reconstruction code. Hot-rod phantom scans with Tc-99m were performed to test sensitivity and resolution improvements. The reconstruction results show significant resolution and sensitivity improvements.

  16. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of awake monkeys: some approaches for improving imaging quality

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Wang, Feng; Dillenburger, Barbara C.; Friedman, Robert M.; Chen, Li M.; Gore, John C.; Avison, Malcolm J.; Roe, Anna W.

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), at high magnetic field strength can suffer from serious degradation of image quality because of motion and physiological noise, as well as spatial distortions and signal losses due to susceptibility effects. Overcoming such limitations is essential for sensitive detection and reliable interpretation of fMRI data. These issues are particularly problematic in studies of awake animals. As part of our initial efforts to study functional brain activations in awake, behaving monkeys using fMRI at 4.7T, we have developed acquisition and analysis procedures to improve image quality with encouraging results. We evaluated the influence of two main variables on image quality. First, we show how important the level of behavioral training is for obtaining good data stability and high temporal signal-to-noise ratios. In initial sessions, our typical scan session lasted 1.5 hours, partitioned into short (<10 minutes) runs. During reward periods and breaks between runs, the monkey exhibited movements resulting in considerable image misregistrations. After a few months of extensive behavioral training, we were able to increase the length of individual runs and the total length of each session. The monkey learned to wait until the end of a block for fluid reward, resulting in longer periods of continuous acquisition. Each additional 60 training sessions extended the duration of each session by 60 minutes, culminating, after about 140 training sessions, in sessions that last about four hours. As a result, the average translational movement decreased from over 500 μm to less than 80 μm, a displacement close to that observed in anesthetized monkeys scanned in a 7 T horizontal scanner. Another major source of distortion at high fields arises from susceptibility variations. To reduce such artifacts, we used segmented gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences. Increasing the number of segments significantly decreased susceptibility

  17. A method for closed-loop presentation of sensory stimuli conditional on the internal brain-state of awake animals

    PubMed Central

    Rutishauser, Ueli; Kotowicz, Andreas; Laurent, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Brain activity often consists of interactions between internal—or on-going—and external—or sensory—activity streams, resulting in complex, distributed patterns of neural activity. Investigation of such interactions could benefit from closed-loop experimental protocols in which one stream can be controlled depending on the state of the other. We describe here methods to present rapid and precisely timed visual stimuli to awake animals, conditional on features of the animal’s on-going brain state; those features are the presence, power and phase of oscillations in local field potentials (LFP). The system can process up to 64 channels in real time. We quantified its performance using simulations, synthetic data and animal experiments (chronic recordings in the dorsal cortex of awake turtles). The delay from detection of an oscillation to the onset of a visual stimulus on an LCD screen was 47.5 ms and visual-stimulus onset could be locked to the phase of ongoing oscillations at any frequency ≤40 Hz. Our software’s architecture is flexible, allowing on-the-fly modifications by experimenters and the addition of new closed-loop control and analysis components through plugins. The source code of our system “StimOMatic” is available freely as open-source. PMID:23473800

  18. EOG responses in anesthetized freely breathing rats.

    PubMed

    Chaput, M A

    2000-12-01

    In mammals, access of odor molecules to the olfactory receptor neurons is controlled by respiratory activity. Thus, anesthetized, freely breathing rats were used to record from the olfactory mucosa in the intact nasal cavity (electroolfactogram or EOG) so as to study global response characteristics to odor stimuli. During alternation of the inspiratory phases of odor sampling and expiratory phases, the response was a succession of individual EOG events synchronized with respiration. These were characterized by a steep decrease that started approximately 100-150 ms after the beginning of inhalation, reached its maximum at the transition between inspiration and expiration and was followed by a slower rise until the next inhalation. They were greater during the first respiratory cycles following odor stimulation onset. Thereafter their amplitudes decreased throughout odor delivery, but a significant EOG signal was still present at the end of short (10 s) and long (60 s) odor presentations. Amplitude increased with odor concentration, but much less than expected from concentration changes. Lastly, for some odors EOG responses persisted well beyond the end of stimulation. These results are in agreement with the respiratory synchronization of mitral cell activities observed during short odor presentations and long duration odor exposures. They underline again the importance of taking into account the respiratory activity in studies on the functioning of the olfactory system. PMID:11114147

  19. Chronic second-by-second measures of l-glutamate in the central nervous system of freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Erin C.; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Strömberg, Ingrid; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    l-glutamate (Glu) is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) and is associated with motor behavior and sensory perception. While microdialysis methods have been used to record tonic levels of Glu, little is known about the more rapid changes in Glu signals that may be observed in awake rats. We have reported acute recording methods using enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEA) with fast response time and low detection levels of Glu in anesthetized animals with minimal interference. The current paper concerns modification of the MEA design to allow for reliable measures in the brain of conscious rats. In this study, we characterized the effects of chronic implantation of the MEA into the brains of rats. We were capable of measuring Glu levels for 7 days without loss of sensitivity. We performed studies of tail-pinch induced stress, which caused a robust biphasic increase in Glu. Histological data show chronic implantation of the MEAs caused minimal injury to the CNS. Taken together, our data show that chronic recordings of tonic and phasic Glu can be carried out in awake rats for up to 17 days in vivo allowing longer term studies of Glu regulation in behaving rats. PMID:17630982

  20. Measurement of Electroretinograms and Visually Evoked Potentials in Awake Moving Mice.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Yusuke; Fujita, Kosuke; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Tokashiki, Naoyuki; Daigaku, Reiko; Tabata, Kitako; Sugano, Eriko; Tomita, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The development of new treatments for intractable retinal diseases requires reliable functional assessment tools for animal models. In vivo measurements of neural activity within visual pathways, including electroretinogram (ERG) and visually evoked potential (VEP) recordings, are commonly used for such purposes. In mice, the ERG and VEPs are usually recorded under general anesthesia, a state that may alter sensory transduction and neurotransmission, but seldom in awake freely moving mice. Therefore, it remains unknown whether the electrophysiological assessment of anesthetized mice accurately reflects the physiological function of the visual pathway. Herein, we describe a novel method to record the ERG and VEPs simultaneously in freely moving mice by immobilizing the head using a custom-built restraining device and placing a rotatable cylinder underneath to allow free running or walking during recording. Injection of the commonly used anesthetic mixture xylazine plus ketamine increased and delayed ERG oscillatory potentials by an average of 67.5% and 36.3%, respectively, compared to unanesthetized mice, while having minimal effects on the a-wave and b-wave. Similarly, components of the VEP were enhanced and delayed by up to 300.2% and 39.3%, respectively, in anesthetized mice. Our method for electrophysiological recording in conscious mice is a sensitive and robust means to assess visual function. It uses a conventional electrophysiological recording system and a simple platform that can be built in any laboratory at low cost. Measurements using this method provide objective indices of mouse visual function with high precision and stability, unaffected by anesthetics. PMID:27257864

  1. Measurement of Electroretinograms and Visually Evoked Potentials in Awake Moving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tokashiki, Naoyuki; Daigaku, Reiko; Tabata, Kitako; Sugano, Eriko; Tomita, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The development of new treatments for intractable retinal diseases requires reliable functional assessment tools for animal models. In vivo measurements of neural activity within visual pathways, including electroretinogram (ERG) and visually evoked potential (VEP) recordings, are commonly used for such purposes. In mice, the ERG and VEPs are usually recorded under general anesthesia, a state that may alter sensory transduction and neurotransmission, but seldom in awake freely moving mice. Therefore, it remains unknown whether the electrophysiological assessment of anesthetized mice accurately reflects the physiological function of the visual pathway. Herein, we describe a novel method to record the ERG and VEPs simultaneously in freely moving mice by immobilizing the head using a custom-built restraining device and placing a rotatable cylinder underneath to allow free running or walking during recording. Injection of the commonly used anesthetic mixture xylazine plus ketamine increased and delayed ERG oscillatory potentials by an average of 67.5% and 36.3%, respectively, compared to unanesthetized mice, while having minimal effects on the a-wave and b-wave. Similarly, components of the VEP were enhanced and delayed by up to 300.2% and 39.3%, respectively, in anesthetized mice. Our method for electrophysiological recording in conscious mice is a sensitive and robust means to assess visual function. It uses a conventional electrophysiological recording system and a simple platform that can be built in any laboratory at low cost. Measurements using this method provide objective indices of mouse visual function with high precision and stability, unaffected by anesthetics. PMID:27257864

  2. [Awake intubation using Pentax Airway Scope as an alternative to awake fiberoptic intubation in management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation in major burn patients].

    PubMed

    Fayolle-Pivot, L; Magnin, C; Tissot, S; Bertin-Maghit, M; Allaouchiche, B

    2013-05-01

    Intubating patients with facial burn is difficult to most anesthesiologists. Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation is the gold standard for management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation. However, serious facial burn and dysmorphic syndrome can make fiberoptic intubation more difficult or impossible. We report the use of awake oral intubation using the Pentax-Airway Scope (AWS) in two major burn patients with facial injury, in whom awake fiberoptic intubation was impossible. As shown in morbidly obese patient and in patients with unstable necks, AWS could be useful to facilitate tracheal intubation in awake, facial burn patients presenting with a potentially difficult airway. Awake AWS intubation seems as a potential alternative to awake fiberoptic intubation. PMID:23453928

  3. PATTERN REVERSAL VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN AWAKE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for recording pattern reversal evoked potentials (PREPs) from awake restrained rats has been developed. The procedure of Onofrj et al. was modified to eliminate the need for anesthetic, thereby avoiding possible interactions of the anesthetic with other manipulations of ...

  4. Intrinsic Temporal Patterning in the Spontaneous Movement of Awake Neonates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Steven S.

    1982-01-01

    The temporal organization of spontaneous movement in healthy, awake neonates was studied on the second or third day after birth. Movement was recorded using time lapse photography and quantified as a function of time. Evidence of intrinsic temporal organization among subjects was found. (MP)

  5. Awake craniotomy using electromagnetic navigation technology without rigid pin fixation.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Ahmed A; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2015-11-01

    We report our institutional experience using an electromagnetic navigation system, without rigid head fixation, for awake craniotomy patients. The StealthStation® S7 AxiEM™ navigation system (Medtronic, Inc.) was used for this technique. Detailed preoperative clinical and neuropsychological evaluations, patient education and contrast-enhanced MRI (thickness 1.5mm) were performed for each patient. The AxiEM Mobile Emitter was typically placed in a holder, which was mounted to the operating room table, and a non-invasive patient tracker was used as the patient reference device. A monitored conscious sedation technique was used in all awake craniotomy patients, and the AxiEM Navigation Pointer was used for navigation during the procedure. This offers the same accuracy as optical navigation, but without head pin fixation or interference with intraoperative neurophysiological techniques and surgical instruments. The application of the electromagnetic neuronavigation technology without rigid head fixation during an awake craniotomy is accurate, and offers superior patient comfort. It is recommended as an effective adjunctive technique for the conduct of awake surgery. PMID:26249245

  6. Awake dynamics and brain-wide direct inputs of hypothalamic MCH and orexin networks

    PubMed Central

    González, J. Antonio; Iordanidou, Panagiota; Strom, Molly; Adamantidis, Antoine; Burdakov, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The lateral hypothalamus (LH) controls energy balance. LH melanin-concentrating-hormone (MCH) and orexin/hypocretin (OH) neurons mediate energy accumulation and expenditure, respectively. MCH cells promote memory and appropriate stimulus-reward associations; their inactivation disrupts energy-optimal behaviour and causes weight loss. However, MCH cell dynamics during wakefulness are unknown, leaving it unclear if they differentially participate in brain activity during sensory processing. By fiberoptic recordings from molecularly defined populations of LH neurons in awake freely moving mice, we show that MCH neurons generate conditional population bursts. This MCH cell activity correlates with novelty exploration, is inhibited by stress and is inversely predicted by OH cell activity. Furthermore, we obtain brain-wide maps of monosynaptic inputs to MCH and OH cells, and demonstrate optogenetically that VGAT neurons in the amygdala and bed nucleus of stria terminalis inhibit MCH cells. These data reveal cell-type-specific LH dynamics during sensory integration, and identify direct neural controllers of MCH neurons. PMID:27102565

  7. Integration of silicon-based neural probes and micro-drive arrays for chronic recording of large populations of neurons in behaving animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Frédéric; Aarts, Arno; Holzhammer, Tobias; Ruther, Patrick; Borghs, Gustaaf; McNaughton, Bruce; Kloosterman, Fabian

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Understanding how neuronal assemblies underlie cognitive function is a fundamental question in system neuroscience. It poses the technical challenge to monitor the activity of populations of neurons, potentially widely separated, in relation to behaviour. In this paper, we present a new system which aims at simultaneously recording from a large population of neurons from multiple separated brain regions in freely behaving animals. Approach. The concept of the new device is to combine the benefits of two existing electrophysiological techniques, i.e. the flexibility and modularity of micro-drive arrays and the high sampling ability of electrode-dense silicon probes. Main results. Newly engineered long bendable silicon probes were integrated into a micro-drive array. The resulting device can carry up to 16 independently movable silicon probes, each carrying 16 recording sites. Populations of neurons were recorded simultaneously in multiple cortical and/or hippocampal sites in two freely behaving implanted rats. Significance. Current approaches to monitor neuronal activity either allow to flexibly record from multiple widely separated brain regions (micro-drive arrays) but with a limited sampling density or to provide denser sampling at the expense of a flexible placement in multiple brain regions (neural probes). By combining these two approaches and their benefits, we present an alternative solution for flexible and simultaneous recordings from widely distributed populations of neurons in freely behaving rats.

  8. Awake Nonhuman Primate Brain PET Imaging with Minimal Head Restraint: Evaluation of GABAA Benzodiazepine Binding with [11C]Flumazenil in Awake and Anesthetized Animals

    PubMed Central

    Sandiego, Christine M.; Jin, Xiao; Mulnix, Tim; Fowles, Krista; Labaree, David; Ropchan, Jim; Huang, Yiyun; Cosgrove, Kelly; Castner, Stacy A.; Williams, Graham V.; Wells, Lisa; Rabiner, Eugenii A.; Carson, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroreceptor imaging in the nonhuman primate (NHP) is valuable for translational research approaches in humans. However, the majority of NHP studies are conducted under anesthesia, which affects the interpretability of receptor binding measures. The aims of this study are to develop awake NHP imaging with minimal head restraint and to compare in vivo binding of GABAA-benzodiazepine radiotracer [11C]flumazenil under anesthetized and awake conditions. We hypothesized that [11C]flumazenil binding potential (BPND) would be higher in isoflurane-anesthetized monkeys. Methods The Focus-220 small animal PET scanner was fitted to a mechanical device that raised and tilted the scanner 45° while the awake NHP was tilted back 35° in a custom chair for optimal brain positioning. This required acclimation of the animals to the chair, touch-screen tasks, i.v. catheter insertion, and tilting. For PET studies, the bolus plus constant infusion (B/I) method was used for [11C]flumazenil administration. Two rhesus monkeys were scanned under the awake (n=6 scans) and isoflurane-anesthetized (n=4 scans) conditions. The Vicra infrared camera was used to track head motion during PET scans. Under the awake condition, emission and head motion-tracking data were acquired for 40-75 min post-injection. Anesthetized monkeys were scanned for 90 min. Cortisol measurements were acquired during awake and anesthetized scans. Equilibrium analysis was used for both the anesthetized (n=4) and awake (n=5) datasets to compute mean BPND images in NHP template space, using the pons as a reference region. Percent change per min (%Δ/min) in radioactivity concentration was calculated in high and low binding regions to assess the quality of equilibrium. Results The monkeys acclimated to procedures in the NHP chair necessary to perform awake PET imaging. Image quality was comparable between awake and anesthetized conditions. The relationship between awake and anesthetized values was BPND(awake)=0.94BPND

  9. Measuring Whole-Brain Neural Dynamics and Behavior of Freely-Moving C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Frederick; Nguyen, Jeffrey; Plummer, George; Shaevitz, Joshua; Leifer, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Bridging the gap between an organism's neural dynamics and its ultimate behavior is the fundamental goal of neuroscience. Previously, to probe neural dynamics, we have been limited to measuring from a limited number of neurons, whether by electrode or optogenetic measurements. Here we present an instrument to simultaneously monitor neural activity from every neuron in a freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans' head, while recording behavior at the same time. Previously, whole-brain imaging has been demonstrated in C. elegans, but only in restrained and anesthetized animals (1). For studying neural coding of behavior it is crucial to study neural activity in freely behaving animals. Neural activity is recorded optically from cells expressing a calcium indicator, GCaMP6. Real time computer vision tracks the worm's position in x-y, while a piezo stage sweeps through the brain in z, yielding five brain-volumes per second. Behavior is recorded under infrared, dark-field imaging. This tool will allow us to directly correlate neural activity with behavior and we will present progress toward this goal. Thank you to the Simons Foundation and Princeton University for supporting this research.

  10. Avoidance and management of trigeminocardiac reflex complicating awake-craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Vikram C; Bamber, Norman I; Shea, John F; Jellish, W Scott

    2008-12-01

    The trigeminocardiac reflex occurs from manipulation or stimulation of peripheral branches or the central component of the trigeminal nerve and consists of bradycardia, hypotension, apnea, and increased gastric motility. The efferent limb of the response is mediated by the vagus nerve. This 65-year-old Caucasian male suffered an episode of bradycardia progressing to transient asystole during the course of an awake-craniotomy procedure for tumor resection. The cardiac rhythm changes resolved with administration of intravenous atropine, removal of the precipitating stimulus, and application of topical anesthetic on the dura of the middle cranial fossa. The trigeminocardiac response may complicate the course of a craniotomy and may place an awake, unintubated patient at increased risk for morbidity. The reflex may be prevented by anesthetizing the dura innervated by the trigeminal nerve via injection or topical application of local anesthetic. If encountered, removal of the stimulus, airway protection, and administration of vagolytic medications are measures that need to be considered. PMID:18845385

  11. Sonographically guided superior laryngeal nerve block during awake fiberoptic intubation.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Andrew; Tang, Raymond; Vaghadia, Himat

    2015-04-15

    We report 5 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided superior laryngeal nerve block before awake intubation and general anesthesia. We used a 8- to 15-MHz hockey stick-shaped ultrasound transducer (HST15-8/20 linear probe, Ultrasonix) to visualize the superior laryngeal nerve. A 3.8-cm 25-G needle was inserted in real time and directed toward the superior laryngeal nerve followed by circumferential placement of local anesthetic. All 5 patients tolerated subsequent awake fiberoptic intubation with either minimal or no sedation. Sonographically guided superior laryngeal nerve block may be useful in patients where identification of landmarks in the neck is difficult as a result of patient anatomy. PMID:25867195

  12. Enclosure for small animals during awake animal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S

    2013-11-26

    An enclosure or burrow restrains an awake animal during an imaging procedure. A tubular body, made from a radiolucent material that does not attenuate x-rays or gamma rays, accepts an awake animal. A proximal end of the body includes an attachment surface that corresponds to an attachment surface of an optically transparent and optically uniform window. An anti-reflective coating may be applied to an inner surface, an outer surface, or both surfaces of the window. Since the window is a separate element of the enclosure and it is not integrally formed as part of the body, it can be made with optically uniform thickness properties for improved motion tracking of markers on the animal with a camera during the imaging procedure. The motion tracking information is then used to compensate for animal movement in the image.

  13. Long-term Behavioral Tracking of Freely Swimming Weakly Electric Fish

    PubMed Central

    Jun, James J.; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Long-term behavioral tracking can capture and quantify natural animal behaviors, including those occurring infrequently. Behaviors such as exploration and social interactions can be best studied by observing unrestrained, freely behaving animals. Weakly electric fish (WEF) display readily observable exploratory and social behaviors by emitting electric organ discharge (EOD). Here, we describe three effective techniques to synchronously measure the EOD, body position, and posture of a free-swimming WEF for an extended period of time. First, we describe the construction of an experimental tank inside of an isolation chamber designed to block external sources of sensory stimuli such as light, sound, and vibration. The aquarium was partitioned to accommodate four test specimens, and automated gates remotely control the animals' access to the central arena. Second, we describe a precise and reliable real-time EOD timing measurement method from freely swimming WEF. Signal distortions caused by the animal's body movements are corrected by spatial averaging and temporal processing stages. Third, we describe an underwater near-infrared imaging setup to observe unperturbed nocturnal animal behaviors. Infrared light pulses were used to synchronize the timing between the video and the physiological signal over a long recording duration. Our automated tracking software measures the animal's body position and posture reliably in an aquatic scene. In combination, these techniques enable long term observation of spontaneous behavior of freely swimming weakly electric fish in a reliable and precise manner. We believe our method can be similarly applied to the study of other aquatic animals by relating their physiological signals with exploratory or social behaviors. PMID:24637642

  14. Presurgical Rehearsals for Patients Considering "Awake" Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Ramsey A; Rogers, Sean L; Brewer, Cristie M; Piscitani, Franco; Shenai, Mahesh B

    2016-01-01

    Simulated surgical environments are rapidly gaining adoption in training students, residents, and members of specialized surgical teams. However, minimal attention has been given to the use of simulated surgical environments to educate patients on surgical processes, particularly procedures that require the active participation of the patient. "Awake" neurosurgery provides a unique situation in which patients openly participate in their operation. We describe a case report, in which a 62-year-old male was referred for "awake" deep brain stimulation implantation, in relation to medically refractory Parkinson's disease. The patient had significant concerns regarding anxiety and claustrophobia, and toleration of the "awake" procedure. Consequently, we designed a simulated OR environment and process, to recreate the physical experience of the procedure, with minimal cost or risk. This experience was crucial in determining the care plan, as after this experience, the patient opted for an "asleep" alternative. Thus, in certain settings, presurgical rehearsals may have a dramatic impact in the overall course of care. PMID:27532036

  15. The evolution of brain surgery on awake patients.

    PubMed

    Surbeck, Werner; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of modern neurological surgery, the inconveniences and potential dangers of general anesthesia by chloroform and ether using the so-called "open-drop technique" led to the quest for alternative methods of anesthesia. Besides preventing the feared side effects, the introduction of regional anesthesia revealed another decisive advantage over general anesthesia in neurosurgery: While intraoperative direct cortical stimulation under general anesthesia could only delineate the motor area (by evocation of contralateral muscular contraction), now, the awake patients were able to report sensations elicited by this method. These properties advanced regional anesthesia to the regimen of choice for cranial surgeries in the first half of the 20th century. While technical advances and new drugs led to a progressive return to general anesthesia for neurosurgical procedures, the use of regional anesthesia for epilepsy surgery has only decreased in recent decades. Meanwhile, awake craniotomies regained popularity in oncologically motivated surgeries, especially in craniotomies for diffuse low-grade gliomas. Intraoperative mapping of brain functions using electrical stimulation in awake patients enables not only for increased tumor removal while preserving the functional status of the patients but also opens a window to cognitive neuroscience. Observations during such interventions and their correlation with both pre - and postoperative neuropsychological examinations and functional neuroimaging is progressively leading to new insights into the complex functional anatomy of the human brain. Furthermore, it broadens our knowledge on cerebral network reorganization in the presence of disease-with implications for all disciplines of clinical neuroscience. PMID:25352088

  16. Freely tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Ping; Peng, Ru-Wen; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xu, Di-Hu; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-02-18

    A freely tunable polarization rotator for broadband terahertz waves is demonstrated using a three-rotating-layer metallic grating structure, which can conveniently rotate the polarization of a linearly polarized terahertz wave to any desired direction with nearly perfect conversion efficiency. This low-cost, high-efficiency, and freely tunable device has potential applications as material analysis, wireless communication, and THz imaging. PMID:25545177

  17. Fuel model selection for BEHAVE in midwestern oak savannas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabner, K.W.; Dwyer, J.P.; Cutter, B.E.

    2001-01-01

    BEHAVE, a fire behavior prediction system, can be a useful tool for managing areas with prescribed fire. However, the proper choice of fuel models can be critical in developing management scenarios. BEHAVE predictions were evaluated using four standardized fuel models that partially described oak savanna fuel conditions: Fuel Model 1 (Short Grass), 2 (Timber and Grass), 3 (Tall Grass), and 9 (Hardwood Litter). Although all four models yielded regressions with R2 in excess of 0.8, Fuel Model 2 produced the most reliable fire behavior predictions.

  18. Delivering drugs, via microdialysis, into the environment of extracellularly recorded hippocampal neurons in behaving primates.

    PubMed

    Ludvig, N; Nguyen, M C; Botero, J M; Tang, H M; Scalia, F; Scharf, B A; Kral, J G

    2000-02-01

    Hippocampal neurons in primates have been extensively studied with electrophysiological and neuroanatomical methods. Much less effort has been devoted to examining these cells with contemporary pharmacological techniques. Therefore, we modified a recently developed integrative technique (N. Ludvig, P.E. Potter, S.E. Fox, Simultaneous single-cell recording and microdialysis within the same brain site in freely behaving rats: a novel neurobiological method, J. Neurosci. Methods 55 (1994) 31-40 [9] ) for cellular neuropharmacological studies in behaving monkeys. A driveable microelectrode-microdialysis probe guide assembly was implanted stereotaxically into the left hippocampus of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) under isoflurane anesthesia. The assembly was covered with a protective cap. After 3 weeks of postsurgical recovery and behavioral training, the experimental subject was seated in a primate chair. For 4-5 h, single-cell recording and microdialysis were simultaneously performed in the hippocampal implantation site. The technique allowed the recording of both complex-spike cells and fast-firing neurons without the use of head restraint. The control microdialysis solution, artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF), was replaced with either 1 M ethanol or 500 microM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) for 10-30 min intervals. The ethanol perfusions principally suppressed the firing of the neurons in the dialysis area. The NMDA perfusions initially increased the firing of local neurons, then caused electrical silence. These drug delivery/cell recording sessions were performed with 1-4 day intersession intervals over a 1-month period. The described method provides a tool to elaborate the pharmacology of primate hippocampal neurons during behavior and without the confounding effects of systemic drug administrations. PMID:10719268

  19. A chronically implantable, hybrid cannula-electrode device for assessing the effects of molecules on electrophysiological signals in freely behaving animals

    PubMed Central

    Greger, Bradley; Kateb, Babak; Gruen, Peter; Patterson, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a device for assessing the effects of diffusible molecules on electrophysiological recordings from multiple neurons. This device allows for the infusion of reagents through a cannula located among an array of micro-electrodes. The device can easily be customized to target specific neural structures. It is designed to be chronically implanted so that isolated neural units and local field potentials are recorded over the course of several weeks or months. Multivariate statistical and spectral analysis of electrophysiological signals acquired using this system could quantitatively identify electrical “signatures” of therapeutically useful drugs. PMID:17499854

  20. Differential changes of metabolic brain activity and interregional functional coupling in prefronto-limbic pathways during different stress conditions: functional imaging in freely behaving rodent pups

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Jörg; Riedel, Anett; Braun, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The trumpet-tailed rat or degu (Octodon degus) is an established model to investigate the consequences of early stress on the development of emotional brain circuits and behavior. The aim of this study was to identify brain circuits, that respond to different stress conditions and to test if acute stress alters functional coupling of brain activity among prefrontal and limbic regions. Using functional imaging (2-Fluoro-deoxyglucose method) in 8-day-old male degu pups the following stress conditions were compared: (A) pups together with parents and siblings (control), (B) separation of the litter from the parents, (C) individual separation from parents and siblings, and (D) individual separation and presentation of maternal calls. Condition (B) significantly downregulated brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and sensory areas compared to controls. Activity decrease was even more pronounced during condition (C), where, in contrast to all other regions, activity in the PAG was increased. Interestingly, brain activity in stress-associated brain regions such as the amygdala and habenula was not affected. In condition (D) maternal vocalizations “reactivated” brain activity in the cingulate and precentral medial cortex, NAcc, and striatum and in sensory areas. In contrast, reduced activity was measured in the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex (IL) and in the hippocampus and amygdala. Correlation analysis revealed complex, region- and situation-specific changes of interregional functional coupling among prefrontal and limbic brain regions during stress exposure. We show here for the first time that early life stress results in a widespread reduction of brain activity in the infant brain and changes interregional functional coupling. Moreover, maternal vocalizations can partly buffer stress-induced decrease in brain activity in some regions and evoked very different functional coupling patterns compared to the three other conditions. PMID:22590453

  1. Calcium imaging with genetically encoded indicators in behaving primates.

    PubMed

    Seidemann, Eyal; Chen, Yuzhi; Bai, Yoon; Chen, Spencer C; Mehta, Preeti; Kajs, Bridget L; Geisler, Wilson S; Zemelman, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the neural basis of behaviour requires studying brain activity in behaving subjects using complementary techniques that measure neural responses at multiple spatial scales, and developing computational tools for understanding the mapping between these measurements. Here we report the first results of widefield imaging of genetically encoded calcium indicator (GCaMP6f) signals from V1 of behaving macaques. This technique provides a robust readout of visual population responses at the columnar scale over multiple mm(2) and over several months. To determine the quantitative relation between the widefield GCaMP signals and the locally pooled spiking activity, we developed a computational model that sums the responses of V1 neurons characterized by prior single unit measurements. The measured tuning properties of the GCaMP signals to stimulus contrast, orientation and spatial position closely match the predictions of the model, suggesting that widefield GCaMP signals are linearly related to the summed local spiking activity. PMID:27441501

  2. Anticipating and Resisting the Temptation to Behave Unethically.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Oliver J; Fishbach, Ayelet

    2015-07-01

    Ethical dilemmas pose a self-control conflict between pursuing immediate benefits through behaving dishonestly and pursuing long-term benefits through acts of honesty. Therefore, factors that facilitate self-control for other types of goals (e.g., health and financial) should also promote ethical behavior. Across four studies, we find support for this possibility. Specifically, we find that only under conditions that facilitate conflict identification--including the consideration of several decisions simultaneously (i.e., a broad decision frame) and perceived high connectedness to the future self--does anticipating a temptation to behave dishonestly in advance promote honesty. We demonstrate these interaction patterns between conflict identification and temptation anticipation in negotiation situations (Study 1), lab tasks (Study 2), and ethical dilemmas in the workplace (Studies 3-4). We conclude that identifying a self-control conflict and anticipating a temptation are two necessary preconditions for ethical decision making. PMID:26001580

  3. Preparation of an Awake Mouse for Recording Neural Responses and Injecting Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Muniak, Michael A.; Mayko, Zachary M.; Ryugo, David K.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that anesthesia alters neural response properties in various regions of the brain.13. In the auditory system, fundamental response properties of brainstem neurons including threshold, frequency specificity, and inhibitory sidebands are altered in significant ways under anesthesia1-2. These observations prompted physiologists to seek ways to record from single neurons without the contaminating effects of anesthesia. One result was a decerebrate preparation, where the brainstem was completely transected at the level of the midbrain4. The drawbacks of this preparation are a formidable surgery, the elimination of descending projections from the forebrain, and an inability to use sensory stimulation to examine structures above the midbrain. A different strategy has been to implant electrode arrays chronically to record from single neurons and multiunit clusters while the animal is awake and/or behaving5,6. These techniques however are not compatible with injecting tracer dyes after first electrophysiologically characterizing a brain structure. To avoid altering neural response properties with anesthetics while recording electrophysiological response properties from single neurons, we have adapted a head restraint technique long used in bats7-9 to mouse10-12. Using this method, we are able to conduct electrophysiological recordings over several days in the unanesthetized mouse. At the end of the recording sessions, we can then inject a dye to reconstruct electrode positions and recording sites or inject a tracer so that pathways to and from the recording loci can be determined. This method allows for well isolated single neuron recordings over multiple days without the use anesthetics. PMID:22781848

  4. Wearable scanning photoacoustic brain imaging in behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianbo; Dai, Xianjin; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-06-01

    A wearable scanning photoacoustic imaging (wPAI) system is presented for noninvasive brain study in behaving rats. This miniaturized wPAI system consists of four pico linear servos and a single transducer-based PAI probe. It has a dimension of 50 mm × 35 mm × 40 mm, and a weight of 26 g excluding cablings. Phantom evaluation shows that wPAI achieves a lateral resolution of ∼0.5 mm and an axial resolution of ∼0.1 mm at a depth of up to 11 mm. Its imaging ability is also tested in a behaving rat, and the results indicate that wPAI is able to image blood vessels at a depth of up to 5 mm with intact scalp and skull. With its noninvasive, deep penetration, and functional imaging ability in behaving animals, wPAI can be used for behavior, cognition, and preclinical brain disease studies. PMID:26777064

  5. Characterizing Awake and Anesthetized States Using a Dimensionality Reduction Method.

    PubMed

    Mirsadeghi, M; Behnam, H; Shalbaf, R; Jelveh Moghadam, H

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing between awake and anesthetized states is one of the important problems in surgery. Vital signals contain valuable information that can be used in prediction of different levels of anesthesia. Some monitors based on electroencephalogram (EEG) such as the Bispectral (BIS) index have been proposed in recent years. This study proposes a new method for characterizing between awake and anesthetized states. We validated our method by obtaining data from 25 patients during the cardiac surgery that requires cardiopulmonary bypass. At first, some linear and non-linear features are extracted from EEG signals. Then a method called "LLE"(Locally Linear Embedding) is used to map high-dimensional features in a three-dimensional output space. Finally, low dimensional data are used as an input to a quadratic discriminant analyzer (QDA). The experimental results indicate that an overall accuracy of 88.4 % can be obtained using this method for classifying the EEG signal into conscious and unconscious states for all patients. Considering the reliability of this method, we can develop a new EEG monitoring system that could assist the anesthesiologists to estimate the depth of anesthesia accurately. PMID:26573650

  6. Mapping oxygen concentration in the awake mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Declan G; Parpaleix, Alexandre; Roche, Morgane; Charpak, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Although critical for brain function, the physiological values of cerebral oxygen concentration have remained elusive because high-resolution measurements have only been performed during anesthesia, which affects two major parameters modulating tissue oxygenation: neuronal activity and blood flow. Using measurements of capillary erythrocyte-associated transients, fluctuations of oxygen partial pressure (Po2) associated with individual erythrocytes, to infer Po2 in the nearby neuropil, we report the first non-invasive micron-scale mapping of cerebral Po2 in awake, resting mice. Interstitial Po2 has similar values in the olfactory bulb glomerular layer and the somatosensory cortex, whereas there are large capillary hematocrit and erythrocyte flux differences. Awake tissue Po2 is about half that under isoflurane anesthesia, and within the cortex, vascular and interstitial Po2 values display layer-specific differences which dramatically contrast with those recorded under anesthesia. Our findings emphasize the importance of measuring energy parameters non-invasively in physiological conditions to precisely quantify and model brain metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12024.001 PMID:26836304

  7. Robust Reproducible Resting State Networks in the Awake Rodent Brain

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Lino; Pendse, Gautam; Chang, Pei-Ching; Bishop, James; Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Resting state networks (RSNs) have been studied extensively with functional MRI in humans in health and disease to reflect brain function in the un-stimulated state as well as reveal how the brain is altered with disease. Rodent models of disease have been used comprehensively to understand the biology of the disease as well as in the development of new therapies. RSN reported studies in rodents, however, are few, and most studies are performed with anesthetized rodents that might alter networks and differ from their non-anesthetized state. Acquiring RSN data in the awake rodent avoids the issues of anesthesia effects on brain function. Using high field fMRI we determined RSNs in awake rats using an independent component analysis (ICA) approach, however, ICA analysis can produce a large number of components, some with biological relevance (networks). We further have applied a novel method to determine networks that are robust and reproducible among all the components found with ICA. This analysis indicates that 7 networks are robust and reproducible in the rat and their putative role is discussed. PMID:22028788

  8. Intrinsic Feature Pose Measurement for Awake Animal SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2009-01-01

    New developments have been made in optical motion tracking for awake animal imaging that measures 3D position and orientation (pose) for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system. Ongoing SPECT imaging research has been directed towards head motion measurement for brain studies in awake, unrestrained mice. In contrast to previous results using external markers, this work extracts and tracks intrinsic features from multiple camera images and computes relative pose from the tracked features over time. Motion tracking thus far has been limited to measuring extrinsic features such as retro-reflective markers applied to the mouse s head. While this approach has been proven to be accurate, the additional animal handling required to attach the markers is undesirable. A significant improvement in the procedure is achieved by measuring the pose of the head without extrinsic markers using only the external surface appearance. This approach is currently being developed with initial results presented here. The intrinsic features measurement extracts discrete, sparse natural features from 2D images such as eyes, nose, mouth and other visible structures. Stereo correspondence between features for a camera pair is determined for calculation of 3D positions. These features are also tracked over time to provide continuity for surface model fitting. Experimental results from live images are presented.

  9. Improvements in Intrinsic Feature Pose Measurement for Awake Animal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; McKisson, J; Smith, M F; Stolin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Development has continued with intrinsic feature optical motion tracking for awake animal imaging to measure 3D position and orientation (pose) for motion compensated reconstruction. Prior imaging results have been directed towards head motion measurement for SPECT brain studies in awake unrestrained mice. This work improves on those results in extracting and tracking intrinsic features from multiple camera images and computing pose changes from the tracked features over time. Previously, most motion tracking for 3D imaging has been limited to measuring extrinsic features such as retro-reflective markers applied to an animal s head. While this approach has been proven to be accurate, the use of external markers is undesirable for several reasons. The intrinsic feature approach has been further developed from previous work to provide full pose measurements for a live mouse scan. Surface feature extraction, matching, and pose change calculation with point tracking and accuracy results are described. Experimental pose calculation and 3D reconstruction results from live images are presented.

  10. Improvements in intrinsic feature pose measurement for awake animal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Goddard, J.S. Baba, S.J. Lee, A.G. Weisenberger, A. Stolin, J. McKisson, M.F. Smith

    2011-06-01

    Development has continued with intrinsic feature optical motion tracking for awake animal imaging to measure 3D position and orientation (pose) for motion compensated reconstruction. Prior imaging results have been directed towards head motion measurement for SPECT brain studies in awake unrestrained mice. This work improves on those results in extracting and tracking intrinsic features from multiple camera images and computing pose changes from the tracked features over time. Previously, most motion tracking for 3D imaging has been limited to measuring extrinsic features such as retro-reflective markers applied to an animal's head. While this approach has been proven to be accurate, the use of external markers is undesirable for several reasons. The intrinsic feature approach has been further developed from previous work to provide full pose measurements for a live mouse scan. Surface feature extraction, matching, and pose change calculation with point tracking and accuracy results are described. Experimental pose calculation and 3D reconstruction results from live images are presented.

  11. Robust reproducible resting state networks in the awake rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Lino; Pendse, Gautam; Chang, Pei-Ching; Bishop, James; Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Resting state networks (RSNs) have been studied extensively with functional MRI in humans in health and disease to reflect brain function in the un-stimulated state as well as reveal how the brain is altered with disease. Rodent models of disease have been used comprehensively to understand the biology of the disease as well as in the development of new therapies. RSN reported studies in rodents, however, are few, and most studies are performed with anesthetized rodents that might alter networks and differ from their non-anesthetized state. Acquiring RSN data in the awake rodent avoids the issues of anesthesia effects on brain function. Using high field fMRI we determined RSNs in awake rats using an independent component analysis (ICA) approach, however, ICA analysis can produce a large number of components, some with biological relevance (networks). We further have applied a novel method to determine networks that are robust and reproducible among all the components found with ICA. This analysis indicates that 7 networks are robust and reproducible in the rat and their putative role is discussed. PMID:22028788

  12. Wireless multi-channel single unit recording in freely moving and vocalizing primates

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sabyasachi; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    The ability to record well-isolated action potentials from individual neurons in naturally behaving animals is crucial for understanding neural mechanisms underlying natural behaviors. Traditional neurophysiology techniques, however, require the animal to be restrained which often restricts natural behavior. An example is the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a highly vocal New World primate species, used in our laboratory to study the neural correlates of vocal production and sensory feedback. When restrained by traditional neurophysiological techniques marmoset vocal behavior is severely inhibited. Tethered recording systems, while proven effective in rodents pose limitations in arboreal animals such as the marmoset that typically roam in a three-dimensional environment. To overcome these obstacles, we have developed a wireless neural recording technique that is capable of collecting single-unit data from chronically implanted multi-electrodes in freely moving marmosets. A lightweight, low power and low noise wireless transmitter (headstage) is attached to a multi-electrode array placed in the premotor cortex of the marmoset. The wireless headstage is capable of transmitting 15 channels of neural data with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) comparable to a tethered system. To minimize radio-frequency (RF) and electro-magnetic interference (EMI), the experiments were conducted within a custom designed RF/EMI and acoustically shielded chamber. The individual electrodes of the multi-electrode array were periodically advanced to densely sample the cortical layers. We recorded single-unit data over a period of several months from the frontal cortex of two marmosets. These recordings demonstrate the feasibility of using our wireless recording method to study single neuron activity in freely roaming primates. PMID:21933683

  13. Long-term Potentiation at Temporoammonic Path-CA1 Synapses in Freely Moving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jossina; Villarreal, Desiree M.; Morales, Isaiah S.; Derrick, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal area CA1 receives direct entorhinal layer III input via the temporoammonic path (TAP) and recent studies implicate TAP-CA1 synapses are important for some aspects of hippocampal memory function. Nonetheless, as few studies have examined TAP-CA1 synaptic plasticity in vivo, the induction and longevity of TAP-CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) has not been fully characterized. We analyzed CA1 responses following stimulation of the medial aspect of the angular bundle and investigated LTP at medial temporoammonic path (mTAP)-CA1 synapses in freely moving rats. We demonstrate monosynaptic mTAP-CA1 responses can be isolated in vivo as evidenced by observations of independent current sinks in the stratum lacunosum moleculare of both areas CA1 and CA3 following angular bundle stimulation. Contrasting prior indications that TAP input rarely elicits CA1 discharge, we observed mTAP-CA1 responses that appeared to contain putative population spikes in 40% of our behaving animals. Theta burst high frequency stimulation of mTAP afferents resulted in an input specific and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent LTP of mTAP-CA1 responses in behaving animals. LTP of mTAP-CA1 responses decayed as a function of two exponential decay curves with time constants (τ) of 2.7 and 148 days to decay 63.2% of maximal LTP. In contrast, mTAP-CA1 population spike potentiation longevity demonstrated a τ of 9.6 days. To our knowledge, these studies provide the first description of mTAP-CA1 LTP longevity in vivo. These data indicate TAP input to area CA1 is a physiologically relevant afferent system that displays robust synaptic plasticity. PMID:26903815

  14. Mini-coil for magnetic stimulation in the behaving primate.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Hadass; Wolfus, Shuki; Friedman, Alexander; Perel, Eli; Pashut, Tamar; Lavidor, Michal; Korngreen, Alon; Yeshurun, Yosef; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2011-01-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is rapidly becoming a leading method in both cognitive neuroscience and clinical neurology. However, the cellular and network level effects of stimulation are still unclear and their study relies heavily on indirect physiological measurements in humans. Direct electrophysiological studies of the effect of magnetic stimulation on neuronal activity in behaving animals are severely limited by both the size of the stimulating coils, which affect large regions of the animal brain, and the large artifacts generated on the recording electrodes. We present a novel mini-coil which is specifically aimed at studying the neurophysiological mechanism of magnetic stimulation in behaving primates. The mini-coil fits into a chronic recording chamber and provides focal activation of brain areas while enabling simultaneous extracellular multi-electrode recordings. We present a comparison of this coil to a commercial coil based on the theoretical and recorded magnetic fields and induced electric fields they generate. Subsequently, we present the signal recorded in the behaving primate during stimulation and demonstrate the ability to extract the spike trains of multiple single units from each of the electrodes with minimal periods affected by the stimulus artifact (median period <2.5 ms). The directly recorded effect of the magnetic stimulation on cortical neurons is in line with peripheral recordings obtained in humans. This novel mini-coil is a key part of the infrastructure for studying the neurophysiological basis of magnetic stimulation, thereby enabling the development and testing of better magnetic stimulation tools and protocols for both neuroscientists and clinicians. PMID:20974177

  15. Neutral atoms behave much like classical spherical capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellenbogen, James C.

    2006-09-15

    The scaling of the capacitance with radius is explored in detail for neutral atoms, and it is found that they behave much like macroscopic spherical capacitors. The quantum capacitances of atoms scale as a linear function of the mean radii of their highest occupied orbitals. The slopes of the linear scaling lines include a dimensionless constant of proportionality {kappa} that is somewhat analogous to a dielectric constant, but for individual atoms. The slope and {kappa} assume discrete values characteristic of elements in different regions of the periodic table. These observations provide a different, electrostatics-based way of understanding the periodic behavior of the elements.

  16. Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization with Chaotic Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kaiqiao; Nomura, Hirosato

    The chaotic search is introduced into Quantum-behaved Particle Swarm Optimization (QPSO) to increase the diversity of the swarm in the latter period of the search, so as to help the system escape from local optima. Taking full advantages of the characteristics of ergodicity and randomicity of chaotic variables, the chaotic search is carried out in the neighborhoods of the particles which are trapped into local optima. The experimental results on test functions show that QPSO with chaotic search outperforms the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and QPSO.

  17. Urgent awake thoracoscopic treatment of retained haemothorax associated with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Cristino, Benedetto; Rogliani, Paola; Dauri, Mario

    2015-05-01

    A number of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) procedures are being increasingly performed by awake anesthesia in an attempt of minimizing the surgical- and anesthesia-related traumas. However, so far the usefulness of awake VATS for urgent management of retained haemothorax has been scarcely investigated. Herein we present two patients with retained haemothorax following previous thoracentesis and blunt chest trauma, respectively, who developed acute respiratory failure and underwent successful urgent awake VATS management under local anesthesia through a single trocar access. PMID:26046053

  18. WIDE AWAKE mediates the circadian timing of sleep onset.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Lamaze, Angelique; Liu, Qili; Tabuchi, Masashi; Yang, Yong; Fowler, Melissa; Bharadwaj, Rajnish; Zhang, Julia; Bedont, Joseph; Blackshaw, Seth; Lloyd, Thomas E; Montell, Craig; Sehgal, Amita; Koh, Kyunghee; Wu, Mark N

    2014-04-01

    How the circadian clock regulates the timing of sleep is poorly understood. Here, we identify a Drosophila mutant, wide awake (wake), that exhibits a marked delay in sleep onset at dusk. Loss of WAKE in a set of arousal-promoting clock neurons, the large ventrolateral neurons (l-LNvs), impairs sleep onset. WAKE levels cycle, peaking near dusk, and the expression of WAKE in l-LNvs is Clock dependent. Strikingly, Clock and cycle mutants also exhibit a profound delay in sleep onset, which can be rescued by restoring WAKE expression in LNvs. WAKE interacts with the GABAA receptor Resistant to Dieldrin (RDL), upregulating its levels and promoting its localization to the plasma membrane. In wake mutant l-LNvs, GABA sensitivity is decreased and excitability is increased at dusk. We propose that WAKE acts as a clock output molecule specifically for sleep, inhibiting LNvs at dusk to promote the transition from wake to sleep. PMID:24631345

  19. The electron accelerator for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepitone, K.; Doebert, S.; Burt, G.; Chevallay, E.; Chritin, N.; Delory, C.; Fedosseev, V.; Hessler, Ch.; McMonagle, G.; Mete, O.; Verzilov, V.; Apsimon, R.

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE collaboration prepares a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the SPS beam at CERN. A long proton bunch extracted from the SPS interacts with a high power laser and a 10 m long rubidium vapour plasma cell to create strong wakefields allowing sustained electron acceleration. The electron bunch to probe these wakefields is supplied by a 20 MeV electron accelerator. The electron accelerator consists of an RF-gun and a short booster structure. This electron source should provide beams with intensities between 0.1 and 1 nC, bunch lengths between 0.3 and 3 ps and an emittance of the order of 2 mm mrad. The wide range of parameters should cope with the uncertainties and future prospects of the planned experiments. The layout of the electron accelerator, its instrumentation and beam dynamics simulations are presented.

  20. Calcium imaging with genetically encoded indicators in behaving primates

    PubMed Central

    Seidemann, Eyal; Chen, Yuzhi; Bai, Yoon; Chen, Spencer C; Mehta, Preeti; Kajs, Bridget L; Geisler, Wilson S; Zemelman, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the neural basis of behaviour requires studying brain activity in behaving subjects using complementary techniques that measure neural responses at multiple spatial scales, and developing computational tools for understanding the mapping between these measurements. Here we report the first results of widefield imaging of genetically encoded calcium indicator (GCaMP6f) signals from V1 of behaving macaques. This technique provides a robust readout of visual population responses at the columnar scale over multiple mm2 and over several months. To determine the quantitative relation between the widefield GCaMP signals and the locally pooled spiking activity, we developed a computational model that sums the responses of V1 neurons characterized by prior single unit measurements. The measured tuning properties of the GCaMP signals to stimulus contrast, orientation and spatial position closely match the predictions of the model, suggesting that widefield GCaMP signals are linearly related to the summed local spiking activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16178.001 PMID:27441501

  1. A Magnetic Rotary Optical Fiber Connector for Optogenetic Experiments in Freely Moving Animals

    PubMed Central

    Klorig, David C; Godwin, Dwayne W

    2014-01-01

    Background Performing optogenetic experiments in a behaving animal presents a unique technical challenge. In order to provide an optical path between a fixed light source and a chronically implanted fiber in a freely moving animal, a typical experimental set-up includes a detachable connection between the light source and the head of the animal, as well as a rotary joint to relieve torsional stress during movement. New Method We have combined the functionality of the head mounted connector and the rotary joint into a single integrated device that is inexpensive, simple to build and easy to use. Results A typical rotary connector has a transmission efficiency of 80% with a rotational variability of 4%, but can be configured to have a rotational variability of 2% at the expense of lower transmission efficiency. Depending on configuration, rotational torque ranges from 14 - 180 μN*m, making the rotary connector suitable for use with small animals such as mice. Comparison with Existing Methods Benchmark tests demonstrate that our connectors perform similarly to commercially available solutions in terms of transmission efficiency, rotational variability, and torque but at a fraction of the cost. Unlike currently available solutions, our unique design requires a single optical junction which significantly reduces overall light loss. In addition, magnets allow the connectors and caps to “snap into place” for quick yet reliable connection and disconnection. Conclusions Our rotary connector system offers superior performance, reduced cost, and is easily incorporated into existing optogenetic set-ups. PMID:24613796

  2. Flyception: imaging brain activity in freely walking fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Grover, Dhruv; Katsuki, Takeo; Greenspan, Ralph J

    2016-07-01

    Genetically encoded calcium sensors have enabled monitoring of neural activity in vivo using optical imaging techniques. Linking neural activity to complex behavior remains challenging, however, as most imaging systems require tethering the animal, which can impact the animal's behavioral repertoire. Here, we report a method for monitoring the brain activity of untethered, freely walking Drosophila melanogaster during sensorially and socially evoked behaviors to facilitate the study of neural mechanisms that underlie naturalistic behaviors. PMID:27183441

  3. Soot Formation in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Hassan, M. I.; Faeth, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science. Thus, the present study is considering soot formation in freely-propagating laminar premixed flames, exploiting the microgravity environment to simplify measurements at the high-pressure conditions of interest for many practical applications. The findings of the investigation are relevant to reducing emissions of soot and continuum radiation from combustion processes, to improving terrestrial and spacecraft fire safety, and to developing methods of computational combustion, among others. Laminar premixed flames are attractive for studying soot formation because they are simple one-dimensional flows that are computationally tractable for detailed numerical simulations. Nevertheless, studying soot-containing burner-stabilized laminar premixed flames is problematical: spatial resolution and residence times are limited at the pressures of interest for practical applications, flame structure is sensitive to minor burner construction details so that experimental reproducibility is not very good, consistent burner behavior over the lengthy test programs needed to measure soot formation properties is hard to achieve, and burners have poor durability. Fortunately, many of these problems are mitigated for soot-containing, freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. The present investigation seeks to extend work in this laboratory for various soot processes in flames by observing soot formation in freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. Measurements are being made at both Normal Gravity (NG) and MicroGravity (MG), using a short-drop free-fall facility to provide MG conditions.

  4. Behaving as or behaving as if? Children's conceptions of personified robots and the emergence of a new ontological category.

    PubMed

    Severson, Rachel L; Carlson, Stephanie M

    2010-01-01

    Imagining another's perspective is an achievement in social cognition and underlies empathic concern and moral regard. Imagination is also within the realm of fantasy, and may take the form of imaginary play in children and imaginative production in adults. Yet, an interesting and provocative question emerges in the case of personified robots: How do people conceive of life-like robots? Do people imagine about robots' experiences? If so, do these imaginings reflect their actual or pretend beliefs about robots? The answers to these questions bear on the possibility that personified robots represent the emergence of a new ontological category. We draw on simulation theory as a framework for imagining others' internal states as well as a means for imaginative play. We then turn to the literature on people's and, in particular, children's conceptions of personified technologies and raise the question of the veracity of children's beliefs about personified robots (i.e., are they behaving as or behaving as if?). Finally, we consider the suggestion that such personified technologies represent the emergence of a new ontological category and offer some suggestions for future research in this important emerging area of social cognition. PMID:20851571

  5. Pediatric awake craniotomy for seizure focus resection with dexmedetomidine sedation-a case report.

    PubMed

    Sheshadri, Veena; Chandramouli, B A

    2016-08-01

    Resection of lesions near the eloquent cortex of brain necessitates awake craniotomy to reduce the risk of permanent neurologic deficits during surgery. There are limited reports of anesthetic management of awake craniotomy in pediatric patients. This report is on use of dexmedetomidine sedation for awake craniotomy in a 11-year-old child, without any airway adjuncts throughout the procedure. Dexmedetomidine infusion administered at a dosage of 0.2 to 0.7μg kg(-1) h(-1) provided adequate sedation for the entire procedure. There were no untoward incidents or any interference with electrocorticography, intraoperative stimulation, and functional mapping. Adequate preoperative visits and counseling of patient and parents regarding course and nature of events along with well-planned intraoperative management are of utmost importance in a pediatric age group for successful intraoperative awake craniotomy. PMID:27290976

  6. Responses from parabrachial gustatory neurons in behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Nishijo, H; Norgren, R

    1990-04-01

    1. The responses of a total of 70 single neurons were recorded from the parabrachial nuclei (PBN) in awake rats. In 59 neurons, sapid stimuli (0.5 ml) elicited significant taste responses. Of these 59 neurons, 10 also had significant responses to water. The mean spontaneous rate of the taste neurons was 13.4 +/- 6.9 (SD) spikes/s. Of the remaining 11 neurons, 9 responded significantly only to water; 2 had no significant responses to the standard fluid stimuli. 2. Based on the magnitude of their response to our four standard stimuli, the taste neurons were classified as follows: 42 NaCl-best, 14 sucrose-best, 2 citric acid-best, and 1 QHCl-best. Of these, 25 responded only to one of four sapid stimuli; 20 of these specific cells responded only to NaCl. All the remaining 34 neurons responded to two or more of the four sapid stimuli, with NaCl and sucrose responsiveness dominant. For the 59 taste neurons, the mean entropy for the absolute value of the responses was 0.68; for the excitatory activity alone, it was 0.58. 3. The mean responses to NaCl and sucrose concentration series increased monotonically. Except at the lowest concentration, responses to citric acid also increased monotonically, but with a lower slope. Mean responses to QHCl, however, remained stable or even decreased with increasing concentration. Thus the power functions for the NaCl and sucrose intensity-response series were higher than those of citric acid and QHCl. 4. A hierarchical cluster analysis of 59 parabrachial neurons suggested four different categories: NaCl-best, sucrose-best, citric acid-best, and QHCl-best. These categories were less evident in the two-dimensional space produced by multidimensional analysis, because the positions of NaCl- and sucrose-best neurons formed a continuum in which neural response profiles change successively from sucrose-specific to NaCl-specific. 5. The results were consistent with previous anatomic and neurophysiological data suggesting convergence in the

  7. Pentax-AWS videolaryngoscope for awake nasal intubation in patients with unstable necks.

    PubMed

    Asai, T

    2010-01-01

    In patients with unstable necks and at risk of pulmonary aspiration, awake fibreoptic intubation is often appropriate. However, stabilization of the neck can make fibreoptic intubation more difficult. I report the use of awake nasal intubation using the Pentax-Aiway Scope (AWS) in three patients with restricted neck movement, in whom awake fibreoptic intubation had failed. Case 1: a 59-yr-old man, at risk of aspiration, required an emergency cervical laminectomy. Awake fibreoptic intubation was attempted while a Halo vest was being applied, but it was impossible to see the glottis, mainly due to pharyngeal and laryngeal oedema. The Pentax-AWS was easily inserted orally, and nasotracheal intubation was achieved within 20 s. Case 2: an 85-yr-old woman with neck injury required emergency surgical stabilization. A retropharyngeal haematoma prevented a fibreoptic bronchoscope from being advanced beyond the epiglottis. Nasotracheal intubation using the Pentax-AWS (with the aid of a gum elastic bougie) was achieved within 1 min. Case 3: a 22-yr-old man, with partial spinal cord damage, was undergoing cervical laminoplasty. He was at risk of aspiration and had an oedematous larynx. Although it was possible to insert a fibreoptic bronchoscope into the trachea while the neck was stabilized with a Halo vest, it was impossible to advance a tube over the fibrescope. Awake nasotracheal intubation using the Pentax-AWS was achieved within 15 s. The Pentax-AWS may be useful for nasotracheal intubation in awake patients with restricted necks. PMID:19923133

  8. Awake tracheal intubation using Pentax airway scope in 30 patients: A Case series

    PubMed Central

    Kajekar, Payal; Mendonca, Cyprian; Danha, Rati; Hillermann, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Pentax airway scope (AWS) has been successfully used for managing difficult intubations. In this case series, we aimed to evaluate the success rate and time taken to complete intubation, when AWS was used for awake tracheal intubation. Methods: We prospectively evaluated the use of AWS for awake tracheal intubation in 30 patients. Indication for awake intubation, intubation time, total time to complete tracheal intubation, laryngoscopic view (Cormack and Lehane grade), total dose of local anaesthetic used, anaesthetists rating and patient's tolerance of the procedure were recorded. Results: The procedure was successful in 25 out of the 30 patients (83%). The mean (standard deviation) intubation time and total time to complete the tracheal intubation was 5.4 (2.4) and 13.9 (3.7) min, respectively in successful cases. The laryngeal view was grade 1 in 24 and grade 2 in one of 25 successful intubations. In three out of the five patients where the AWS failed, awake tracheal intubation was successfully completed with the assistance of flexible fibre optic scope (FOS). Conclusion: Awake tracheal intubation using AWS was successful in 83% of patients. Success rate can be further improved using a combination of AWS and FOS. Anaesthesiologists who do not routinely use FOS may find AWS easier to use for awake tracheal intubation using an oral route. PMID:25197114

  9. The efficacy of combined regional nerve blocks in awake orotracheal fiberoptic intubation

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Sharan, Radhe; Jain, Payal; Bala, Anju; Ranjana; Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Aims of Study: To evaluate the efficacy, hemodynamic changes, and patient comfort during awake fiberoptic intubation done under combined regional blocks. Materials and Methods: In the present observational study, 50 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists ( ASA) Grade I–II, Mallampati Grade I–IV were given nerve blocks - bilateral glossopharyngeal nerve block, bilateral superior laryngeal nerve block, and recurrent laryngeal nerve block before awake fiberoptic intubation using 2% lidocaine. Results: Procedure was associated with minimal increases in hemodynamic parameters during the procedure and until 3 min after it. Most of the intubations were being carried out within 3 min. Patient comfort was satisfactory with 90% of patients having favorable grades. Discussion: The most common cause of mortality and serious morbidity due to anesthesia is from airway problems. One-third of all anesthetic deaths are due to failure to intubate and ventilate. Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation under local anesthesia is now an accepted technique for managing such situations. In awake patient's anatomy, muscle tone, airway protection, and ventilation are preserved, but it is essential to sufficiently anesthetize the upper airway before the performance of awake fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided intubation to ensure patient comfort and cooperation for which in our study we used the nerve block technique. Conclusion: A properly performed technique of awake fiberoptic intubation done under combined regional nerve blocks provides good intubating conditions, patient comfort and safety and results in minimal hemodynamic changes. PMID:27212757

  10. Local domains of motor cortical activity revealed by fiber-optic calcium recordings in behaving nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Adelsberger, Helmuth; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Romo, Ranulfo; Konnerth, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Brain mapping experiments involving electrical microstimulation indicate that the primary motor cortex (M1) directly regulates muscle contraction and thereby controls specific movements. Possibly, M1 contains a small circuit "map" of the body that is formed by discrete local networks that code for specific movements. Alternatively, movements may be controlled by distributed, larger-scale overlapping circuits. Because of technical limitations, it remained unclear how movement-determining circuits are organized in M1. Here we introduce a method that allows the functional mapping of small local neuronal circuits in awake behaving nonhuman primates. For this purpose, we combined optic-fiber-based calcium recordings of neuronal activity and cortical microstimulation. The method requires targeted bulk loading of synthetic calcium indicators (e.g., OGB-1 AM) for the staining of neuronal microdomains. The tip of a thin (200 µm) optical fiber can detect the coherent activity of a small cluster of neurons, but is insensitive to the asynchronous activity of individual cells. By combining such optical recordings with microstimulation at two well-separated sites of M1, we demonstrate that local cortical activity was tightly associated with distinct and stereotypical simple movements. Increasing stimulation intensity increased both the amplitude of the movements and the level of neuronal activity. Importantly, the activity remained local, without invading the recording domain of the second optical fiber. Furthermore, there was clear response specificity at the two recording sites in a trained behavioral task. Thus, the results provide support for movement control in M1 by local neuronal clusters that are organized in discrete cortical domains. PMID:24344287

  11. Velocity measurements around a freely swimming fish using PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamran Siddiqui, M. H.

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional velocity fields around a freely swimming goldfish in a vertical plane have been measured using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. A novel scheme has been developed to detect the fish body in each PIV image. The scheme is capable of detecting the bodies of fish and other aquatic animals with multicolour skin and different patterns. In this scheme, the body portions brighter and darker than the background are extracted separately and then combined together to construct the entire body. The velocity fields show that the fins and tail produce jets. Vortices are also observed in the wake region.

  12. Hypothesis: solid tumours behave as systemic metabolic dictators.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang-Ming; Chang, Wei-Chun; Ma, Wen-Lung

    2016-06-01

    Current knowledge regarding mechanisms of carcinogenesis in human beings centres around the accumulation of genetic instability, amplified cellular signalling, disturbed cellular energy metabolism and microenvironmental regulation governed by complicated cell-cell interactions. In this article, we provide an alternative view of cancer biology. We propose that cancer behaves as a systemic dictator that interacts with tissues throughout the body to control their metabolism and eventually homeostasis. The mechanism of development of this endocrine organ-like tumour (EOLT) tissue might be the driving force for cancer progression. Here, we review the literature that led to the development of this hypothesis. The EOLT phenotype can be defined as a tumour that alters systemic homeostasis. The literature indicates that the EOLT phenotype is present throughout cancer progression. The feedback mechanism that governs the interaction between tumours and various organs is unknown. We believe that investigating the mechanism of EOLT development may advance the current knowledge of regulation within the tumour macroenvironment and consequently lead to new diagnostic methods and therapy. PMID:26843513

  13. Functional Connectivity Hubs and Networks in the Awake Marmoset Brain

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Annabelle M.; Yen, Cecil Chern-Chyi; Notardonato, Lucia; Ross, Thomas J.; Volkow, Nora D.; Yang, Yihong; Stein, Elliot A.; Silva, Afonso C.; Tomasi, Dardo

    2016-01-01

    In combination with advances in analytical methods, resting-state fMRI is allowing unprecedented access to a better understanding of the network organization of the brain. Increasing evidence suggests that this architecture may incorporate highly functionally connected nodes, or “hubs”, and we have recently proposed local functional connectivity density (lFCD) mapping to identify highly-connected nodes in the human brain. Here, we imaged awake nonhuman primates to test whether, like the human brain, the marmoset brain contains FC hubs. Ten adult common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were acclimated to mild, comfortable restraint using individualized helmets. Following restraint training, resting BOLD data were acquired during eight consecutive 10 min scans for each subject. lFCD revealed prominent cortical and subcortical hubs of connectivity across the marmoset brain; specifically, in primary and secondary visual cortices (V1/V2), higher-order visual association areas (A19M/V6[DM]), posterior parietal and posterior cingulate areas (PGM and A23b/A31), thalamus, dorsal and ventral striatal areas (caudate, putamen, lateral septal nucleus, and anterior cingulate cortex (A24a). lFCD hubs were highly connected to widespread areas of the brain, and further revealed significant network-network interactions. These data provide a baseline platform for future investigations in a nonhuman primate model of the brain’s network topology. PMID:26973476

  14. Carotid endarterectomy in awake patients: safety, tolerability and results

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Célio Teixeira; Fortunato Jr, Jerônimo A.; de Carvalho, Cláudio A.; Weingartner, Janaina; Filho, Otávio R. M.; Rezende, Felipe F.; Bertinato, Luciane P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the results of 125 carotid endarterectomies under loco-regional anesthesia, with selective use of shunt and bovine pericardium patch. Methods One hundred and seventeen patients with stenosis ≥ 70% in the internal carotid artery on duplex-scan + arteriography or magnetic resonance angiography underwent 125 carotid endarterectomies. Intraoperative pharmacological cerebral protection included intravenous administration of alfentanil and dexametasone. Clopidogrel, aspirin and statins were used in all cases. Seventy-seven patients were males (65.8%). Mean age was 70.8 years, ranging from 48 to 88 years. Surgery was performed to treat symptomatic stenosis in 69 arteries (55.2%) and asymptomatic stenosis in 56 arteries (44.8%). Results A carotid shunt was used in 3 cases (2.4%) due to signs and symptoms of cerebral ischemia after carotid artery clamping during the operation, and all 3 patients had a good outcome. Bovine pericardium patch was used in 71 arteries ≤ 6 mm in diameter (56.8%). Perioperative mortality was 0.8%: one patient died from a myocardial infarction. Two patients (1.6%) had minor ipsilateral strokes with good recovery, and 2 patients (1.6%) had non-fatal myocardial infarctions with good recovery. The mean follow-up period was 32 months. In the late postoperative period, there was restenosis in only three arteries (2.4%). Conclusion Carotid artery endarterectomy can be safely performed in the awake patient, with low morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:25714212

  15. Brainstem areas activated by intermittent apnea in awake unrestrained rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, C B; Schoorlemmer, G H; Rossi, M V; Takakura, A C; Barna, B F; Moreira, T S; Cravo, S L

    2015-06-25

    We investigated the role of the autonomic nervous system to cardiovascular responses to obstructive apnea in awake, unrestrained rats, and measured expression of Fos induced by apnea in the brainstem. We implanted a tracheal balloon contained in a rigid tube to allow the induction of apnea without inducing pain in the trachea. During bouts of 15s of apnea, heart rate fell from 371±8 to 161±11bpm (mean±SEM, n=15, p<0.01) and arterial pressure increased from 115±2 to 131±4mmHg (p<0.01). Bradycardia was due to parasympathetic activity because it was blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, methylatropine. The pressor response was due to vasoconstriction caused by sympathetic activation because it was blocked by the α1 antagonist, prazosin. Apnea induced Fos expression in several brainstem areas involved in cardiorespiratory control such as the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), ventrolateral medulla (VLM), and pons. Ligation of the carotid body artery reduced apnea-induced bradycardia, blocked heart rate responses to i.v. injection of cyanide, reduced Fos expression in the caudal NTS, and increased Fos expression in the rostral VLM. In conclusion, apnea activates neurons in regions that process signals from baroreceptors, chemoreceptors, pulmonary receptors, and regions responsible for autonomic and respiratory activity both in the presence and absence of carotid chemoreceptors. PMID:25862588

  16. Effect of nitroglycerin on myocardial collateral conductance in awake dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Brazzamano, S.; Rembert, J.C.; Greenfield, J.C. Jr. )

    1988-04-01

    Conductance of the coronary collateral circulation during the course of two abrupt circumflex coronary occlusions was measured in awake dogs {approximately} 2 wk after collateral vessels were stimulated to develop. The pressure gradient from the central aorta to the distal circumflex coronary artery was measured, and myocardial blood flow was determined by 9-{mu}m radioactive microspheres at 30 s and 4 min after coronary occlusions. Collateral conductance was calculated as mean collateral blood flow divided by the mean aorta-coronary pressure gradient. Before nitroglycerin, collateral conductance increased in all eight dogs from 30 s to 4 min. After nitroglycerin administration, the conductance at 30 s increased from the prenitroglycerin control value to 0.014 {+-} 0.012 ml{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}mmHg{sup {minus}1}. The mean change in conductance from 30 s to 4 min postnitroglycerin was significantly less than during prenitroglycerin. These data indicate that an increase in conductance during coronary occlusion occurs even in the immature collateral circulation. This effect presumably takes place in the arterial smooth muscle at the origin of the collateral vasculature.

  17. Neural representation of face familiarity in an awake chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hirokata; Hirata, Satoshi; Matsuda, Goh; Ueno, Ari; Fuwa, Kohki; Sugama, Keiko; Kusunoki, Kiyo; Hiraki, Kazuo; Tomonaga, Masaki; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the familiarity of faces is critical for social animals as it is the basis of individual recognition. In the present study, we examined how face familiarity is reflected in neural activities in our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. Skin-surface event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured while a fully awake chimpanzee observed photographs of familiar and unfamiliar chimpanzee faces (Experiment 1) and human faces (Experiment 2). The ERPs evoked by chimpanzee faces differentiated unfamiliar individuals from familiar ones around midline areas centered on vertex sites at approximately 200 ms after the stimulus onset. In addition, the ERP response to the image of the subject's own face did not significantly diverge from those evoked by familiar chimpanzees, suggesting that the subject's brain at a minimum remembered the image of her own face. The ERPs evoked by human faces were not influenced by the familiarity of target individuals. These results indicate that chimpanzee neural representations are more sensitive to the familiarity of conspecific than allospecific faces. PMID:24392287

  18. Dynamic Resting State Functional Connectivity in Awake and Anesthetized Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhifeng; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Nanyin

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) has been a powerful tool for investigating functional neural networks in both normal and pathological conditions. When measuring resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), most rsfMRI approaches do not consider its temporal variations and thus only provide the averaged RSFC over the scan time. Recently, there has been a surge of interest to investigate the dynamic characteristics of RSFC in humans, and promising results have been yielded. However, our knowledge regarding the dynamic RSFC in animals remains sparse. In the present study we utilized the single-volume coactivation method to systematically study the dynamic properties of RSFC within the networks of infralimbic cortex (IL) and primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in both awake and anesthetized rats. Our data showed that both IL and S1 networks could be decomposed into several spatially reproducible but temporally changing co-activation patterns (CAPs), suggesting that dynamic RSFC was indeed a characteristic feature in rodents. In addition, we demonstrated that anesthesia profoundly impacted the dynamic RSFC of neural circuits subserving cognitive and emotional functions but had less effects on sensorimotor systems. Finally, we examined the temporal characteristics of each CAP, and found that individual CAPs exhibited consistent temporal evolution patterns. Together, these results suggest that dynamic RSFC might be a general phenomenon in vertebrate animals. In addition, this study has paved the way for further understanding the alterations of dynamic RSFC in animal models of brain disorders. PMID:25315787

  19. Freely-tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ru-Wen; Fan, Ren-Hao; Zhou, Yu; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    It is known that commercially-available terahertz (THz) emitters usually generate linearly polarized waves only along certain directions, but in practice, a polarization rotator that is capable of rotating the polarization of THz waves to any direction is particularly desirable and it will have various important applications. In this work, we demonstrate a freely tunable polarization rotator for broadband THz waves using a three-rotating-layer metallic grating structure, which can conveniently rotate the polarization of a linearly polarized THz wave to any desired direction with nearly perfect conversion efficiency. The device performance has been experimentally demonstrated by both THz transmission spectra and direct imaging. The polarization rotation originates from multi wave interference in the three-layer grating structure based on the scattering-matrix analysis. We can expect that this active broadband polarization rotator has wide applications in analytical chemistry, biology, communication technology, imaging, etc.. Reference: R. H. Fan, Y. Zhou, X. P. Ren, R. W. Peng, S. C. Jiang, D. H. Xu, X. Xiong, X. R. Huang, and Mu Wang, Advanced Materials 27,1201(2015). Freely-tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves.

  20. Nonlinear fluctuation effects in dynamics of freely suspended films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.; Lebedev, V. V.

    2015-03-01

    Long-scale dynamic fluctuation phenomena in freely suspended films is analyzed. We consider isotropic films that, say, can be pulled from bulk smectic-A liquid crystals. The key feature of such objects is possibility of bending deformations of the film. The bending (also known as flexular) mode turns out to be anomalously weakly attenuated. In the harmonic approximation there is no viscous-like damping of the bending mode, proportional to q2 (q is the wave vector of the mode), since it is forbidden by the rotational symmetry. Therefore, the bending mode is strongly affected by nonlinear dynamic fluctuation effects. We calculate the dominant fluctuation contributions to the damping of the bending mode due to its coupling to the inplane viscous mode, which restores the viscous-like q2 damping of the bending mode. Our calculations are performed in the framework of the perturbation theory where the coupling of the modes is assumed to be small, then the bending mode damping is relatively weak. We discuss our results in the context of existing experiments and numeric simulations of the freely suspended films and propose possible experimental observations of our predictions.

  1. Optogenetic Control of Targeted Peripheral Axons in Freely Moving Animals

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shrivats M.; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetic control of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) would enable novel studies of motor control, somatosensory transduction, and pain processing. Such control requires the development of methods to deliver opsins and light to targeted sub-populations of neurons within peripheral nerves. We report here methods to deliver opsins and light to targeted peripheral neurons and robust optogenetic modulation of motor neuron activity in freely moving, non-transgenic mammals. We show that intramuscular injection of adeno-associated virus serotype 6 enables expression of channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in motor neurons innervating the injected muscle. Illumination of nerves containing mixed populations of axons from these targeted neurons and from neurons innervating other muscles produces ChR2-mediated optogenetic activation restricted to the injected muscle. We demonstrate that an implanted optical nerve cuff is well-tolerated, delivers light to the sciatic nerve, and optically stimulates muscle in freely moving rats. These methods can be broadly applied to study PNS disorders and lay the groundwork for future therapeutic application of optogenetics. PMID:23991144

  2. Towards direct numerical simulation of freely swimming fish.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curet, Oscar; Patankar, Neelesh; Maciver, Malcolm

    2006-11-01

    Swimming mechanisms employed by fish are currently inspiring unique underwater vehicles and robotic devices as well as basic science research into the neural control of movement. Key engineering issues include propulsion efficiency, precise motion control and maneuverability. A numerical scheme that simulates the motion of freely swimming fish will be a valuable design and research tool. We are working towards this goal. In particular we are interested in simulating the motion of a gymnotiform fish that swims by producing undulations of a ventral ribbon fin while keeping its body rigid. We model the fish as a rigid body with an attached undulating membrane. In our numerical scheme the key idea is to assume that the entire fluid-fish domain is a fluid. Then we impose two constraints: the first requires that the fluid in the region occupied by the fish body moves rigidly (a fictitious domain approach), and the second requires that the fluid at the location of the fin has the traveling wave velocity of the fin (an immersed boundary approach). Given the traveling wave form of the fin, the objective is for the numerical scheme to give the swimming velocity of the fish by solving the coupled fluid-fish problem. We will present results for the forces generated by a fin attached to a fixed body and preliminary results for freely swimming fish.

  3. Striatal hyperthermia associated with arousal: intracranial thermorecordings in behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, E A; Wise, R A

    2001-11-01

    Humans and experimental animals show strong increases in body temperature in response to a variety of stimuli presumed to have stress as their common denominator. To assess the brain's role in this 'emotional' hyperthermia, temperatures were continuously recorded in dorsal and ventral striatum and in deep temporal muscle of freely moving rats exposed to different arousing and mild stress stimuli (placement in the test cage, 20-s sound stimulation, i.v. saline injection, 3-min social interaction with conspecific, and 3-min tail-pinch). The stimuli caused brain hyperthermia of differing degrees but similar pattern, in both the dorsal and ventral striatum. Ventral striatum had approximately 0.4 degrees C higher basal temperature than dorsal striatum, each of these brain temperatures was higher than that in deep temporal muscle. Maximal increases in brain temperature ( approximately 0.8-1.2 degrees C for 20-40 min) occurred upon placement in the test cages, during tail-pinch and during social interaction, all of which were accompanied by behavioral activation. These increases developed with short onset latencies (up to 5-15 s) and always preceded increases in muscle temperature. Significant but smaller increases in brain temperature ( approximately 0.2 degrees C for 4-6 min) were detected after sound stimulation and i.v. saline injection that induced minimal changes in behavior and no change in muscle temperature. Thus, it appears that brain hyperthermia can be triggered by quite different arousing or stressful stimuli that disturb an organism's homeostasis and demand adaptive responding. Although the exact mechanisms of local heat production in brain tissue remain to be confirmed, neuronal activation appears to be the primary triggering force behind changes in brain temperature that are sufficient to affect body temperature. Because most neural processes are temperature-dependent, change in local temperature may result in dramatic modulation of the efficiency of

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2004-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1 D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline or quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enables the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new LC physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and Kosterlitz Thouless phase

  5. Gustatory responses of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract of behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Norgren, R

    1991-10-01

    1. The activity of 117 single neurons was recorded in the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) and tested with each of four standard chemical stimuli [sucrose, NaCl, citric acid, and quinine HCl (QHCl)] and distilled water in awake, behaving rats. In 101 of these neurons, at least one sapid stimulus elicited a significant taste response. The mean spontaneous rate of the taste neurons was 4.1 +/- 5.8 (SD) spike/s. The mean response magnitudes were as follows: sucrose, 10.6 +/- 11.7; NaCl, 8.6 +/- 14.6; citric acid, 6.2 +/- 7.8; and QHCl, 2.4 +/- 6.6 spikes/s. 2. On the basis of their largest response, 42 taste neurons were classified as sucrose-best, 25 as NaCl-best, 30 as citric acid-best, and 4 as QHCl-best. The mean spontaneous rates for these categories were 4.9 +/- 6.2 for sucrose-best cells, 5.8 +/- 7.4 for NaCl-best, 1.6 +/- 2.0 for citric acid-best, and 5.8 +/- 6.0 spikes/s for QHCl-best. The spontaneous rate of the citric acid-best neurons was significantly lower than that of the other categories. 3. At the standard concentrations, 45 taste cells (44.6%) responded significantly to only one of the gustatory stimuli. Of the 30 acid-best neurons, 23 (76.7%) responded only to citric acid. For sucrose-best cells, specific sensitivity was less common (18/42, 42.9%), and for NaCl-best neurons, it was relatively uncommon (3/25, 12%). One of the 4 QHCl-best neurons was specific. In a concentration series, more than one-half of the 19 specific neurons tested responded to only one chemical at any strength. 4. The mean entropy for the excitatory responses of all gustatory neurons was 0.60. Citric acid-best cells showed the least breadth of responsiveness (0.49), sucrose-best cells were somewhat broader (0.56), but NaCl-best and QHCl-best cells were considerably less selective (0.77 and 0.79, respectively). Inhibition was observed infrequently and never reached the criterion for significance. 5. In the hierarchical cluster analysis, the four largest clusters

  6. Awake craniotomy induces fewer changes in the plasma amino acid profile than craniotomy under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hol, Jaap W; Klimek, Markus; van der Heide-Mulder, Marieke; Stronks, Dirk; Vincent, Arnoud J; Klein, Jan; Zijlstra, Freek J; Fekkes, Durk

    2009-04-01

    In this prospective, observational, 2-armed study, we compared the plasma amino acid profiles of patients undergoing awake craniotomy to those undergoing craniotomy under general anesthesia. Both experimental groups were also compared with a healthy, age-matched and sex-matched reference group not undergoing surgery. It is our intention to investigate whether plasma amino acid levels provide information about physical and emotional stress, as well as pain during awake craniotomy versus craniotomy under general anesthesia. Both experimental groups received preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative dexamethasone. The plasma levels of 20 amino acids were determined preoperative, perioperative, and postoperatively in all groups and were correlated with subjective markers for pain, stress, and anxiety. In both craniotomy groups, preoperative levels of tryptophan and valine were significantly decreased whereas glutamate, alanine, and arginine were significantly increased relative to the reference group. Throughout time, tryptophan levels were significantly lower in the general anesthesia group versus the awake craniotomy group. The general anesthesia group had a significantly higher phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio, which may suggest higher oxidative stress, than the awake group throughout time. Between experimental groups, a significant increase in large neutral amino acids was found postoperatively in awake craniotomy patients, pain was also less and recovery was faster. A significant difference in mean hospitalization time was also found, with awake craniotomy patients leaving after 4.53+/-2.12 days and general anesthesia patients after 6.17+/-1.62 days; P=0.012. This study demonstrates that awake craniotomy is likely to be physically and emotionally less stressful than general anesthesia and that amino acid profiling holds promise for monitoring postoperative pain and recovery. PMID:19295387

  7. Effects of memantine on hippocampal long-term potentiation, gamma activity, and sensorimotor gating in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyi; Mufti, Asfandyar; Stan Leung, L

    2015-09-01

    Memantine, an uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, is used for treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms of memantine in relieving cognitive and behavioral symptoms are unclear, and this study attempts to elucidate its action on network and synaptic functions of the hippocampus. The effects of memantine on electrographic activity and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) were investigated in freely moving rats. Basal dendritic excitation on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells showed a robust LTP after theta-frequency primed bursts, and the LTP was higher after 5-10 mg/kg intraperitoneal (ip) memantine pretreatment, as compared with saline pretreatment. Injection of scopolamine (5 mg/kg ip) before memantine failed to block the LTP-enhancing effect of memantine. Memantine as compared with saline pretreatment did not affect the LTP after an afterdischarge induced by high-frequency (200-Hz) train stimulation. Memantine (5 or 10 mg/kg ip) significantly enhanced gamma oscillations in the hippocampal local field potentials of 40-100 Hz during walking and awake immobility. Memantine at 10 mg/kg ip, but not at 5 mg/kg ip, increased prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response, while both 5 and 10 mg/kg ip memantine enhanced the acoustic startle response as compared with saline-injected rats. These electrophysiological and behavioral effects of memantine are unique among N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists but are consistent with memantine's effects in improving cognitive and sensorimotor functions of Alzheimer's patients. PMID:26119223

  8. Respiratory plasticity in the behaving rat following chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Edge, Deirdre; Skelly, J Richard; Bradford, Aidan; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a feature of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) has been shown to have myriad effects on the respiratory control system. The effects on breathing are of great clinical significance for the sleep apnoea patient. We sought to determine the effect of CIH on normoxic ventilation. Both male and female adult Wistar rats were studied due to the evident sex difference in the prevalence of OSA. A role for oxidative stress in respiratory modifications was also explored. Adult male (n = 30) and female (n = 16) rats were exposed to alternating periods of N(2) and O(2) for 90 s each, bringing the ambient oxygen concentration to 5% at nadir (CIH) group. Sham groups were subject to cycles of air/air under identical experimental conditions. A subset of male rats (8 controls, 8 CIH) had free access to water containing 1 mM Tempol (SOD-mimetic) at all times. Treatments were carried out for 8 hours a day for 9 days. Following treatment, normoxic ventilation was assessed by whole body plethysmography in sleeping animals. Baseline normoxic ventilation was increased in both male and female treated rats but this did not achieve statistical significance. However, ventilatory drive (V(T)/Ti) was significantly increased in male rats. Chronic treatment with Tempol abolished this effect. Conversely, CIH had no significant effect on VT/Ti in female rats. Our results indicate subtle effects of intermittent hypoxia on breathing in conscious behaving rats. We speculate the increased ventilatory drive following CIH represents a form a neural plasticity - a ROS dependent phenomenon - with sexual dimorphism. PMID:20217363

  9. Chronic multiunit recordings in behaving animals: advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Supèr, Hans; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2005-01-01

    By simultaneous recording from neural responses at many different loci at the same time, we can understand the interaction between neurons, and thereby gain insight into the network properties of neural processing, instead of the functioning of individual neurons. Here we will discuss a method for recording in behaving animals that uses chronically implanted micro-electrodes that allow one to track neural responses over a long period of time. In a majority of cases, multiunit activity, which is the aggregate spiking activity of a number of neurons in the vicinity of an electrode tip, is recorded through these electrodes, and occasionally single neurons can be isolated. Here we compare the properties of multiunit responses to the responses of single neurons in the primary visual cortex. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the multiunit signal as opposed to a signal of single neurons. We demonstrate that multiunit recording provides a reliable and useful technique in cases where the neurons at the electrodes have similar response properties. Multiunit recording is therefore especially valuable when task variables have an effect that is consistent across the population of neurons. In the primary visual cortex, this is the case for figure-ground segregation and visual attention. Multiunit recording also has clear advantages for cross-correlation analysis. We show that the cross-correlation function between multiunit signals gives a reliable estimate of the average single-unit cross-correlation function. By the use of multiunit recording, it becomes much easier to detect relatively weak interactions between neurons at different cortical locations. PMID:15581712

  10. From viscous to elastic sheets: Dynamics of smectic freely floating films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Harth, Kirsten; May, Kathrin; Trittel, Torsten

    The dynamics of droplets and bubbles, particularly on microscopic scales, are of considerable importance in biological, environmental, and technical contexts. Soap bubbles, vesicles and components of biological cells are well known examples where the dynamic behavior is significantly influenced by the properties of thin membranes enclosed by fluids. Two-dimensional membrane motions couple to 3D shape transformations. Smectic liquid crystal mesogens form phases with internal molecular layer order. Free-standing films are easily prepared from this class of materials. They represent simple model systems for membrane dynamics and pattern formation in a quasi two-dimensional fluid. These films are usually spanned over a frame, and they can be inflated to bubbles on a support. Recently, closed microscopic shells of liquid-crystalline materials suspended in an outer fluid without contact to a solid support have been introduced and studied. With a special technique, we prepare millimetre to centimetre sized smectic bubbles in air (similar to soap bubbles). Their distinct feature is the fact that any change of surface area is coupled to a restructuring of the layers in the membrane. High-speed cameras are used to observe the shape transformations of freely floating bubbles from a distorted initial shape to a sphere. Bursting dynamics are recorded and compared to models. Most strikingly, an unpreceded cross-over from inviscid to viscous and elastic behaviour with increasing thickness of the membrane is found: Whereas thin bubbles behave almost like inviscid fluids, the relaxation dynamics slows down considerably for larger film thicknesses. Surface wrinkling and formation of extrusions are observed. We will present a characterization and an expalantion for the above phenomena.

  11. Adjustable frequency selectivity of auditory forebrain neurons recorded in a freely moving songbird via radiotelemetry.

    PubMed

    Nieder, A; Klump, G M

    1999-01-01

    One of the hearing system's basic properties that determines the detection of signals is its frequency selectivity. In the natural environment, a songbird may achieve an improved detection ability if the neuronal filters of its auditory system could be sharpened to adapt to the spectrum of the background noise. To address this issue, we studied 35 multi-unit clusters in the input layer of the primary auditory forebrain of nine European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Microelectrodes were chronically implanted in this songbird's cortex analogue and the neuronal activity was transmitted from unrestrained birds via a miniature FM transmitter. Frequency tuning curves (FTCs) and inhibitory sidebands were determined by presenting a matrix of frequency-level combinations of pure tones. From each FTC, the characteristic frequency (CF) and several parameters describing the neurons' filter characteristics were derived and compared to the same recording site's filter function while simultaneously stimulating with a continuous CF tone 20 dB above the response threshold. Our results show a significant improvement of frequency selectivity during two-tone stimulation, indicating that spectral filtering in the starling's auditory forebrain depends on the acoustic background in which a signal is presented. Moreover, frequency selectivity was found to be a function of the time over which the stimulus persisted, since FTCs were much sharper and inhibitory sidebands were largely expanded several milliseconds after response onset. Neuronal filter bandwidths during two-tone stimulation in the auditory forebrain are in good agreement with psychoacoustically measured critical bandwidths in the same species. Radiotelemetry proved to be a powerful tool in studying neuronal activity in freely behaving birds. PMID:9925015

  12. Awake brain tumor resection during pregnancy: Decision making and technical nuances.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingzhong; Han, Seunggu J; Rollins, Mark D; Gelb, Adrian W; Chang, Edward F

    2016-02-01

    The co-occurrence of primary brain tumor and pregnancy poses unique challenges to the treating physician. If a rapidly growing lesion causes life-threatening mass effect, craniotomy for tumor debulking becomes urgent. The choice between awake craniotomy versus general anesthesia becomes complicated if the tumor is encroaching on eloquent brain because considerations pertinent to both patient safety and oncological outcome, in addition to fetal wellbeing, are involved. A 31-year-old female at 30 weeks gestation with twins presented to our hospital seeking awake craniotomy to resect a 7 × 6 × 5 cm left frontoparietal brain tumor with 7 mm left-to-right subfalcine herniation on imaging that led to word finding difficulty, dysfluency, right upper extremity paralysis, and right lower extremity weakness. She had twice undergone tumor debulking under general anesthesia during the same pregnancy at an outside hospital at 16 weeks and 28 weeks gestation. There were considerations both for and against awake brain tumor resection over surgery under general anesthesia. The decision-making process and the technical nuances related to awake brain tumor resection in this neurologically impaired patient are discussed. Awake craniotomy benefits the patient who harbors a tumor that encroaches on the eloquent brain by allowing a greater extent of resection while preserving the language and sensorimotor function. It can be successfully done in pregnant patients who are neurologically impaired. The patient should be motivated and well informed of the details of the process. A multidisciplinary and collaborative effort is also crucial. PMID:26498092

  13. Associations of Sleep Quality and Awake Physical Activity with Fluctuations in Nocturnal Blood Pressure in Patients with Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kadoya, Manabu; Koyama, Hidenori; Kurajoh, Masafumi; Naka, Mariko; Miyoshi, Akio; Kanzaki, Akinori; Kakutani, Miki; Shoji, Takuhito; Moriwaki, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Inaba, Masaaki; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Sleep quality and awake physical activity are important behavioral factors involved in the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, potentially through nocturnal blood pressure (BP) changes. However, the impacts of quantitatively measured sleep quality and awake physical activity on BP fluctuation, and their relationships with several candidate causal factors for nocturnal hypertension are not well elucidated. Methods This cross-sectional study included 303 patients registered in the HSCAA study. Measurements included quantitatively determined sleep quality parameters and awake physical activity obtained by actigraph, nocturnal systolic BP (SBP) fall [100 × (1- sleep SBP/awake SBP ratio)], apnea hypopnea index, urinary sodium and cortisol secretion, plasma aldosterone concentration and renin activity, insulin resistance index, parameters of heart rate variability (HRV), and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Results Simple regression analysis showed that time awake after sleep onset (r = -0.150), a parameter of sleep quality, and awake physical activity (r = 0.164) were significantly correlated with nocturnal SBP fall. Among those, time awake after sleep onset (β = -0.179) and awake physical activity (β = 0.190) were significantly and independently associated with nocturnal SBP fall in multiple regression analysis. In a subgroup of patients without taking anti-hypertensive medications, both time awake after sleep onset (β = -0.336) and awake physical activity (β = 0.489) were more strongly and independently associated with nocturnal SBP falls. Conclusion Sleep quality and awake physical activity were found to be significantly associated with nocturnal SBP fall, and that relationship was not necessarily confounded by candidate causal factors for nocturnal hypertension. PMID:27166822

  14. Plug flow in a viscous freely-suspended film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Ilton, Mark; Couchman, Miles; Salez, Thomas; Benzaquen, Michael; Fowler, Paul; Raphael, Elie

    The flow of viscous polymer liquids supported by a solid substrate has been well characterized by a variety of experimental techniques. Previous studies found that the velocity profile within a flowing liquid film depends strongly on the friction at the liquid-substrate interface. For the case of low interfacial friction, liquid molecules can slide along the solid substrate. This is the ``slip'' boundary condition. Here we probe flow in a system with no interfacial friction: a viscous polymer film suspended at its edges. Using AFM, we measure the capillary-driven relaxation of freestanding polymer films with an initially stepped film thickness profile. The time evolution of the profile is consistent with plug flow. A freely-suspended viscous polymer film provides a physical realization of an idealized infinite slip boundary condition. Interestingly, in such a context, the profile evolution satisfies a diffusion-like equation, thus allowing for the use of a broad mathematical and physical toolbox by analogy.

  15. Two-Dimensional Microrheology of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, A.; Baumgarten, S.; Harth, K.; Stannarius, R.; Nguyen, Z. H.; Goldfain, A.; Park, C. S.; Maclennan, J. E.; Glaser, M. A.; Clark, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    Smectic liquid crystals form freely-suspended, fluid films of highly uniform structure and thickness, making them ideal systems for studies of hydrodynamics in two dimensions. We have measured particle mobility and shear viscosity by direct observation of the gravitational drift of silica spheres and smectic islands included in these fluid membranes. In thick films, we observe a hydrodynamic regime dominated by lateral confinement effects, with the mobility of the inclusion determined predominantly by coupling of the fluid flow to the fixed boundaries of the film. In thin films, the mobility of inclusions is governed primarily by coupling of the fluid to the surrounding air, as predicted by Saffman-Delbrück theory.

  16. Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Phase Transition of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2000-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enable the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable condensed phase fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new liquid crystal physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and

  17. Meal-contingent intestinal lymph sampling from awake, unrestrained rats.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Myrtha; Dai, Yunting; Tso, Patrick; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2012-06-15

    Standard procedures for intestinal lymph collection involve continuous, quantitative drainage of the lymph fluid in anesthetized or restrained animals that are often euthanized within 48 h. We here describe a novel technique for the nonocclusive cannulation of the major intestinal lymph duct in rats that allows for repetitive in vivo sampling of intestinal lymph from unrestrained, awake, and ad libitum-fed animals. The distinctive feature of this novel technique is that a 5- to 7-mm long piece of Vialon tubing (OD/ID: 0.8/0.7 mm) with a small hole in its wall is first implanted into the major intestinal lymph duct for stabilization. The tapered tip (OD: ≈0.1 mm) of the catheter is then inserted into the hole of the tubing and fixed in place with a polyamid suture and a drop of tissue glue. In our hands, catheters implanted this way remain patent for up to 6 wk after surgery. In an initial experiment we collected lymph from six adult rats before (0) and 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, and 180 min (120 μl, each) after the onset of isocaloric (12.5 kcal) low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) test meals and measured active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Intestinal lymphatic GLP-1 concentration increased (P < 0.05) from ≈4 pmol/l (0 min) to a peak of 33 ± 6 (means ± SE) or 22 ± 4 pmol/l at 15 (HF) or 30 min (LF) after meal onset and gradually returned to baseline levels by 180 min. With this new technique fewer animals are required to generate physiologically relevant data for various aspects of gastrointestinal physiology that involve the lymphatic system. Furthermore, the advantage of this system is that the animal can act as its own control when the effect of different experimental protocols is tested. PMID:22513747

  18. The biology of habitat dominance; can microbes behave as weeds?

    PubMed Central

    Cray, Jonathan A; Bell, Andrew N W; Bhaganna, Prashanth; Mswaka, Allen Y; Timson, David J; Hallsworth, John E

    2013-01-01

    Summary Competition between microbial species is a product of, yet can lead to a reduction in, the microbial diversity of specific habitats. Microbial habitats can resemble ecological battlefields where microbial cells struggle to dominate and/or annihilate each other and we explore the hypothesis that (like plant weeds) some microbes are genetically hard-wired to behave in a vigorous and ecologically aggressive manner. These ‘microbial weeds’ are able to dominate the communities that develop in fertile but uncolonized – or at least partially vacant – habitats via traits enabling them to out-grow competitors; robust tolerances to habitat-relevant stress parameters and highly efficient energy-generation systems; avoidance of or resistance to viral infection, predation and grazers; potent antimicrobial systems; and exceptional abilities to sequester and store resources. In addition, those associated with nutritionally complex habitats are extraordinarily versatile in their utilization of diverse substrates. Weed species typically deploy multiple types of antimicrobial including toxins; volatile organic compounds that act as either hydrophobic or highly chaotropic stressors; biosurfactants; organic acids; and moderately chaotropic solutes that are produced in bulk quantities (e.g. acetone, ethanol). Whereas ability to dominate communities is habitat-specific we suggest that some microbial species are archetypal weeds including generalists such as: Pichia anomala, Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas putida; specialists such as Dunaliella salina, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus spp. and other lactic acid bacteria; freshwater autotrophs Gonyostomum semen and Microcystis aeruginosa; obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium acetobutylicum; facultative pathogens such as Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Pantoea ananatis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and other extremotolerant and extremophilic microbes such as Aspergillus spp., Salinibacter ruber and Haloquadratum walsbyi

  19. The biology of habitat dominance; can microbes behave as weeds?

    PubMed

    Cray, Jonathan A; Bell, Andrew N W; Bhaganna, Prashanth; Mswaka, Allen Y; Timson, David J; Hallsworth, John E

    2013-09-01

    Competition between microbial species is a product of, yet can lead to a reduction in, the microbial diversity of specific habitats. Microbial habitats can resemble ecological battlefields where microbial cells struggle to dominate and/or annihilate each other and we explore the hypothesis that (like plant weeds) some microbes are genetically hard-wired to behave in a vigorous and ecologically aggressive manner. These 'microbial weeds' are able to dominate the communities that develop in fertile but uncolonized--or at least partially vacant--habitats via traits enabling them to out-grow competitors; robust tolerances to habitat-relevant stress parameters and highly efficient energy-generation systems; avoidance of or resistance to viral infection, predation and grazers; potent antimicrobial systems; and exceptional abilities to sequester and store resources. In addition, those associated with nutritionally complex habitats are extraordinarily versatile in their utilization of diverse substrates. Weed species typically deploy multiple types of antimicrobial including toxins; volatile organic compounds that act as either hydrophobic or highly chaotropic stressors; biosurfactants; organic acids; and moderately chaotropic solutes that are produced in bulk quantities (e.g. acetone, ethanol). Whereas ability to dominate communities is habitat-specific we suggest that some microbial species are archetypal weeds including generalists such as: Pichia anomala, Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas putida; specialists such as Dunaliella salina, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus spp. and other lactic acid bacteria; freshwater autotrophs Gonyostomum semen and Microcystis aeruginosa; obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium acetobutylicum; facultative pathogens such as Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Pantoea ananatis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and other extremotolerant and extremophilic microbes such as Aspergillus spp., Salinibacter ruber and Haloquadratum walsbyi. Some microbes

  20. [Awake intubation with landiolol and dexmedetomidine in a patient with anxiety neurosis].

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Tatsunari; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujitate, Yasutaka; Kuzukawa, Yosuke; Kitano, Manabu; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-08-01

    We report a successful case of awake intubation in a patient with anxiety neurosis via continuous administration of landiolol and dexmedetomidine. A 52-year-old woman weighing 46.8 kg with anxiety neurosis experienced postoperative bleeding after left-side thyroidectomy and was scheduled for emergent hemostasis under general anesthesia Due to swelling of the neck, we anticipated a difficult airway and decided to perform awake intubation. She showed extreme insecurity and shivering, and initially did not agree to the procedure. To calm her anxiety and panic, we continuously administered 10 microg x kg(-1). min(-1) landiolol and 1.0 microg x kg(-1) hr(-1) dexmedetomidine. After 10 minutes, her shivering disappeared, and she agreed to undergo awake intubation, which was performed with the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope and thin Intlock blade. The patient bucked slightly during intubation but hemodynamic changes were minimal. PMID:25199332

  1. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  2. Awake surgery between art and science. Part I: clinical and operative settings

    PubMed Central

    Talacchi, Andrea; Santini, Barbara; Casagrande, Francesca; Alessandrini, Franco; Zoccatelli, Giada; Squintani, Giovanna M.

    Summary Awake surgery requires coordinated teamwork and communication between the surgeon and the anesthesiologist, as he monitors the patient, the neuroradiologist as he interprets the images for intraoperative confirmation, and the neuropsychologist and neurophysiologist as they evaluate in real-time the patient’s responses to commands and questions. To improve comparison across published studies on clinical assessment and operative settings in awake surgery, we reviewed the literature, focusing on methodological differences and aims. In complex, interdisciplinary medical care, such differences can affect the outcome and the cost-benefit ratio of the treatment. Standardization of intraoperative mapping and related controversies will be discussed in Part II. PMID:24139657

  3. Tumescent Local Anesthesia for Hand Surgery: Improved Results, Cost Effectiveness, and Wide-Awake Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alison

    2014-01-01

    This is a review article of the wide-awake approach to hand surgery. More than 95% of all hand surgery can now be performed without a tourniquet. Epinephrine is injected with lidocaine for hemostasis and anesthesia instead of a tourniquet and sedation. This is sedation-free surgery, much like a visit to a dental office. The myth of danger of using epinephrine in the finger is reviewed. The wide awake technique is greatly improving results in tendon repair, tenolysis, and tendon transfer. Here, we will explain its advantages. PMID:25075350

  4. [Awake Nasotracheal Intubation for a 4-Year-old Boy with an Oral Penetrating Toothbrush Injury].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Ando, Kokichi; Saito, Kazutomo; Toyama, Hiroaki; Fudeta, Hiroto; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of an oral penetrating injury caused by a toothbrush in a 4-year-old 17-kg boy. The toothbrush was lodged in the right cervical region through the oral cavity, and emergency surgery for removal was planned under general anesthesia. Although mask ventilation was not possible because of the protruding toothbrush handle, awake nasotracheal intubation was successfully performed with a fiber-scope and intravenous fentanyl 25 μg. We conclude that appropriate analgesics could facilitate awake intubation in pediatric patients. PMID:26466500

  5. Freely propagating open premixed turbulent flames stabilized by swirl

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.K.; Lau, K.S.; Chin, W.K.; Cheng, R.K.

    1991-12-01

    A novel means has been developed for using weak swirl to stabilize freely propagating open premixed turbulent flames (swirl numbers between 0.05 to 0.3). By injecting a small amount of air tangentially into the co-flow of a concentric burner, stationary flames can be maintained above the burner exit for a large range of mixture, turbulence and flow conditions. The absence of physical surfaces in the vicinity of the flame provides free access to laser diagnostics. Laser Doppler anemometry and laser Mie scattering measurements of four flames with and without incident turbulence show that their features are typical of wrinkled laminar flames. The most distinct characteristics is that flame stabilization does not rely on flow recirculation. Centrifugal force induced by swirl causes flow divergence, and the flame is maintained at where the local mass flux balances the burning rate. The flame speeds can be estimated based on the centerline velocity vector, which is locally normal to the flame brush. This flame geometry is the closest approximation to the 1-D planar flame for determining fundamental properties to advance turbulent combustion theories. 18 refs.

  6. Freely Decaying Turbulence in Force-free Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.

    2016-02-01

    Freely decaying, relativistic force-free turbulence is studied for the first time. We initiate the magnetic field at a short wavelength and simulate its relaxation toward equilibrium on two- and three-dimensional periodic domains in both helical and nonhelical settings. Force-free turbulent relaxation is found to exhibit an inverse cascade in all settings and in three dimensions to have a magnetic energy spectrum consistent with the Kolmogorov 5/3 power law. Three-dimensional relaxations also obey the Taylor hypothesis; they settle promptly into the lowest-energy configuration allowed by conservation of the total magnetic helicity. However, in two dimensions, the relaxed state is a force-free equilibrium whose energy greatly exceeds the Taylor minimum and that contains persistent force-free current layers and isolated flux tubes. We explain this behavior in terms of additional topological invariants that exist only in two dimensions, namely the helicity enclosed within each level surface of the magnetic potential function. The speed and completeness of turbulent magnetic free-energy discharge could help account for rapidly variable gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula, gamma-ray bursts, blazars, and radio galaxies.

  7. Intersegmental coupling and recovery from perturbations in freely running cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Couzin-Fuchs, Einat; Kiemel, Tim; Gal, Omer; Ayali, Amir; Holmes, Philip

    2015-01-15

    Cockroaches are remarkably stable runners, exhibiting rapid recovery from external perturbations. To uncover the mechanisms behind this important behavioral trait, we recorded leg kinematics of freely running animals in both undisturbed and perturbed trials. Functional coupling underlying inter-leg coordination was monitored before and during localized perturbations, which were applied to single legs via magnetic impulses. The resulting transient effects on all legs and the recovery times to normal pre-perturbation kinematics were studied. We estimated coupling architecture and strength by fitting experimental data to a six-leg-unit phase oscillator model. Using maximum-likelihood techniques, we found that a network with nearest-neighbor inter-leg coupling best fitted the data and that, although coupling strengths vary among preparations, the overall inputs entering each leg are approximately balanced and consistent. Simulations of models with different coupling strengths encountering perturbations suggest that the coupling schemes estimated from our experiments allow animals relatively fast and uniform recoveries from perturbations. PMID:25609786

  8. Intersegmental coupling and recovery from perturbations in freely running cockroaches

    PubMed Central

    Couzin-Fuchs, Einat; Kiemel, Tim; Gal, Omer; Ayali, Amir; Holmes, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Cockroaches are remarkably stable runners, exhibiting rapid recovery from external perturbations. To uncover the mechanisms behind this important behavioral trait, we recorded leg kinematics of freely running animals in both undisturbed and perturbed trials. Functional coupling underlying inter-leg coordination was monitored before and during localized perturbations, which were applied to single legs via magnetic impulses. The resulting transient effects on all legs and the recovery times to normal pre-perturbation kinematics were studied. We estimated coupling architecture and strength by fitting experimental data to a six-leg-unit phase oscillator model. Using maximum-likelihood techniques, we found that a network with nearest-neighbor inter-leg coupling best fitted the data and that, although coupling strengths vary among preparations, the overall inputs entering each leg are approximately balanced and consistent. Simulations of models with different coupling strengths encountering perturbations suggest that the coupling schemes estimated from our experiments allow animals relatively fast and uniform recoveries from perturbations. PMID:25609786

  9. Acoustic tracking of a freely drifting sonobuoy field.

    PubMed

    Dosso, Stan E; Collison, Nicole E B

    2002-05-01

    This paper develops an acoustic inversion algorithm to track a field of freely drifting sonobuoys using travel-time measurements from a series of nonsimultaneous impulsive sources deployed around the field. In this scenario, the time interval between sources can be sufficiently long that significant independent movement of the individual sonobuoys occurs. In addition, the source transmission instants are unknown, and the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions are known only approximately. The formulation developed here solves for the track of each sonobuoy (parametrized by the sonobuoy positions at the time of each source transmission), allowing arbitrary, independent sonobuoy motion between transmissions, as well as for the source positions and transmission instants. This leads to a strongly underdetermined inverse problem. However, regularized inversion provides meaningful solutions by incorporating a priori information consisting of prior estimates (with uncertainties) for the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions, and a physical model for preferred sonobuoy motion. Several models for sonobuoy motion are evaluated, with the best results obtained by minimizing the second spatial derivative of the tracks to obtain the minimum-curvature or smoothest track, subject to fitting the acoustic data to a statistically appropriate level. PMID:12051436

  10. Hydrodynamics of Inclusions in Freely Suspended Liquid Crystal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhiyuan

    Hydrodynamic interaction of pairs of circular inclusions in two-dimensional (2D), fluid smectic membranes suspended in air has been studied systematically. By analyzing their Brownian motion, it is found that the radial mutual mobilities of identical inclusions are independent of their size but that the angular coupling becomes strongly size-dependent when their radius exceeds a characteristic hydrodynamic length. These observations are described well for arbitrary inclusion separations by a model that generalizes the Levine/MacKintosh theory of point-force response functions and uses a boundary-element approach to calculate the mobility matrix for inclusions of finite extent. Beyond that, 2D flow fields generated by a rigid, oscillating post inserted in the film have been measured by analyzing the motion of tracer particles and provide a detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior in the film/gas system. The Brownian diffusion of micron-scale inclusions in freely suspended smectic A liquid crystal films a few nanometers thick and several millimeters in diameter depends strongly on the air surrounding the film. Near atmospheric pressure, the three-dimensionally coupled film/gas system is well described by Hughes/Pailthorpe/White hydrodynamic theory but at lower pressure, the diffusion coefficient increases substantially, tending in high vacuum toward the two-dimensional limit where it is determined by film size. In the absence of air, the films are found to be a nearly ideal physical realization of a two-dimensional, incompressible Newtonian fluid.

  11. Near and far wake structures behind freely flying bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, Cosima; Swartz, Sharon M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2014-11-01

    While pseudo-volumetric reconstructions of the wakes of flying animals, based on transverse (Trefftz) wake measurements, have become a well-established tool in the study of animal aerodynamics in recent years, there are a number of concerns that persist regarding their use in estimating drag and flight efficiency. Here we report on stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements behind freely flying bats (Eptesicus fuscus) in both the transverse and streamwise planes. The streamwise plane measurements are taken on the wing as well as in the near and far wake region up to eight chord lengths behind the bat. By organizing the data according to the flight speed, wingbeat phase and the spanwise position of the laser sheet on the wing we are able to connect specific features of the wing and body geometry with observed wake structures and thereby construct a detailed time-space map of the wake. Furthermore, we can quantitatively assess wake distortion and assess the validity of lift and drag estimates based on transverse wake measurements. Supported by AFOSR.

  12. Acoustic tracking of a freely drifting sonobuoy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosso, Stan E.; Collison, Nicole E. B.

    2002-05-01

    This paper develops an acoustic inversion algorithm to track a field of freely drifting sonobuoys using travel-time measurements from a series of nonsimultaneous impulsive sources deployed around the field. In this scenario, the time interval between sources can be sufficiently long that significant independent movement of the individual sonobuoys occurs. In addition, the source transmission instants are unknown, and the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions are known only approximately. The formulation developed here solves for the track of each sonobuoy (parametrized by the sonobuoy positions at the time of each source transmission), allowing arbitrary, independent sonobuoy motion between transmissions, as well as for the source positions and transmission instants. This leads to a strongly underdetermined inverse problem. However, regularized inversion provides meaningful solutions by incorporating a priori information consisting of prior estimates (with uncertainties) for the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions, and a physical model for preferred sonobuoy motion. Several models for sonobuoy motion are evaluated, with the best results obtained by minimizing the second spatial derivative of the tracks to obtain the minimum-curvature or smoothest track, subject to fitting the acoustic data to a statistically appropriate level.

  13. Visualizing Nanoscopic Topography and Patterns in Freely Standing Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vivek; Zhang, Yiran; Yilixiati, Subinuer

    Thin liquid films containing micelles, nanoparticles, polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes and smectic liquid crystals undergo thinning in a discontinuous, step-wise fashion. The discontinuous jumps in thickness are often characterized by quantifying changes in the intensity of reflected monochromatic light, modulated by thin film interference from a region of interest. Stratifying thin films exhibit a mosaic pattern in reflected white light microscopy, attributed to the coexistence of domains with various thicknesses, separated by steps. Using Interferometry Digital Imaging Optical Microscopy (IDIOM) protocols developed in the course of this study, we spatially resolve for the first time, the landscape of stratifying freely standing thin films. We distinguish nanoscopic rims, mesas and craters, and follow their emergence and growth. In particular, for thin films containing micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), these topological features involve discontinuous, thickness transitions with concentration-dependent steps of 5-25 nm. These non-flat features result from oscillatory, periodic, supramolecular structural forces that arise in confined fluids, and arise due to complex coupling of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic effects at the nanoscale.

  14. Locomotor patterns in freely moving crayfish (Procambarus clarkii)

    PubMed

    Jamon; Clarac

    1995-01-01

    Freely walking crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, were studied using a video analysis procedure adapted especially for use with crayfish. The animals were placed in a tank and their homing behaviour was filmed as they returned in a straight line to their shelter. Various sequences were studied at the two following levels. First, the trajectory of each pair of legs (from leg 2 to leg 5) during the step cycle (power stroke and return stroke) was studied to measure stride length and to analyse in detail changes in acceleration. Each leg was found to contribute in a specific manner to locomotion. Second, ipsi- and contralateral leg coordination was investigated. Ipsilateral coordination was found to involve a metachronal organization from front to back in all the walking sequences recorded, whereas contralateral coordination involved, in addition to the weak alternate coupling commonly observed in treadmill walking, another coordination pattern where the legs on each side (legs 3 and 4) are in phase. The results obtained in these free-walking sequences are discussed and compared with those obtained previously, in particular in treadmill situations. PMID:9318428

  15. Do Friends and Nonfriends Behave Differently? A Social Relations Analysis of Children's Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpkins, Sandra D.; Parke, Ross D.

    2002-01-01

    Examined how children behave differently with friends and non-friends. Engaged 123 triads of target children, friends, and unacquainted peers in free-play and planning tasks. Found that children behaved more positively but also exhibited more negative behavior with friends than with non-friends. (KK)

  16. Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Motility in Awake Rats: A Learning Exercise for Undergraduate Biomedical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, M. A. N.; Souza, M. H. L. P.; Palheta, R. C., Jr.; Cruz, P. R. M.; Medeiros, B. A.; Rola, F. H.; Magalhaes, P. J. C.; Troncon, L. E. A.; Santos, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    Current medical curricula devote scarce time for practical activities on digestive physiology, despite frequent misconceptions about dyspepsia and dysmotility phenomena. Thus, we designed a hands-on activity followed by a small-group discussion on gut motility. Male awake rats were randomly submitted to insulin, control, or hypertonic protocols.…

  17. a-Band Oscillations in Intracellular Membrane Potentials of Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Awake Rodents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ross W.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus and dentate gyrus play critical roles in processing declarative memories and spatial information. Dentate granule cells, the first relay in the trisynaptic circuit through the hippocampus, exhibit low spontaneous firing rates even during locomotion. Using intracellular recordings from dentate neurons in awake mice operating a…

  18. "Awake" extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO): pathophysiology, technical considerations, and clinical pioneering.

    PubMed

    Langer, Thomas; Santini, Alessandro; Bottino, Nicola; Crotti, Stefania; Batchinsky, Andriy I; Pesenti, Antonio; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vv-ECMO) has been classically employed as a rescue therapy for patients with respiratory failure not treatable with conventional mechanical ventilation alone. In recent years, however, the timing of ECMO initiation has been readdressed and ECMO is often started earlier in the time course of respiratory failure. Furthermore, some centers are starting to use ECMO as a first line of treatment, i.e., as an alternative to invasive mechanical ventilation in awake, non-intubated, spontaneously breathing patients with respiratory failure ("awake" ECMO). There is a strong rationale for this type of respiratory support as it avoids several side effects related to sedation, intubation, and mechanical ventilation. However, the complexity of the patient-ECMO interactions, the difficulties related to respiratory monitoring, and the management of an awake patient on extracorporeal support together pose a major challenge for the intensive care unit staff. Here, we review the use of vv-ECMO in awake, spontaneously breathing patients with respiratory failure, highlighting the pros and cons of this approach, analyzing the pathophysiology of patient-ECMO interactions, detailing some of the technical aspects, and summarizing the initial clinical experience gained over the past years. PMID:27357690

  19. Awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by anesthesia induction in prone patients

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Lei; Wang, Ming-Yu; Sun, Hou-Liang; Zhu, Shan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anesthesia followed by placement in the prone position takes time and may result in complications. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by anesthesia induction in prone-positioned patients under general anesthesia. Sixty-two patients (ASA physical status I–II) scheduled for awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and prone self-positioning before surgery under general anesthesia were selected. Patient preparation began with detailed preoperative counseling regarding the procedure. Premedication with sedative and antisialagogue was followed by airway anesthesia with topical lidocaine; then, awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation was carried out. The patients then positioned themselves comfortably before induction of general anesthesia. The changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), incidence of coughing or gagging, and rate pressure product (RPP) were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated-measures one-way analysis of variance. Fifty-eight of the 62 patients completed prone self-positioning smoothly. Compared with values before intubation, SBP, DBP, HR, and RPP were slightly increased after intubation, although the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). One patient had moderate coughing and 1 patient had gagging during prone self-positioning, which were tolerable. These findings indicated that awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by induction of anesthesia is safe and feasible alternative to routine prone positioning after induction of general anesthesia. PMID:27512858

  20. Bursting Activity of Substantia Nigra pars Reticulata Neurons in Mouse Parkinsonism in Awake and Anesthetized States

    PubMed Central

    Lobb, CJ; Jaeger, D

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological changes in basal ganglia neurons are hypothesized to underlie motor dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Previous results in head-restrained MPTP-treated non-human primates have suggested that increased bursting within the basal ganglia and related thalamic and cortical areas may be a hallmark of pathophysiological activity. In this study, we investigated whether there is increased bursting in substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) output neurons in anesthetized and awake, head-restrained unilaterally lesioned 6-OHDA mice when compared to control mice. Confirming previous studies, we show that there are significant changes in the firing rate and pattern in SNpr neuron activity under urethane anesthesia. The regular firing pattern of control urethane-anesthetized SNpr neurons was not present in the 6-OHDA-lesioned group, as the latter neurons instead became phase locked with cortical slow wave activity (SWA). Next, we examined whether such robust electrophysiological changes between groups carried over to the awake state. SNpr neurons from both groups fired at much higher frequencies in the awake state than in the anesthetized state and surprisingly showed only modest changes between awake control and 6-OHDA groups. While there were no differences in firing rate between groups in the awake state, an increase in the coefficient of variation (CV) was observed in the 6-OHDA group. Contrary to the bursting hypothesis, this increased CV was not due to changes in bursting but was instead due to a mild increase in pausing. Together, these results suggest that differences in SNpr activity between control and 6-OHDA lesioned mice may be strongly influenced by changes in network activity during different arousal and behavioral states. PMID:25576395

  1. Taste responses of cortical neurons in freely ingesting rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Matsuo, R; Kiyomitsu, Y; Kitamura, R

    1989-06-01

    1. Activities of 35 taste-responsive neurons in the cortical gustatory area were recorded with chronically implanted fine wires in freely ingesting Wistar rats. Quantitative analyses were performed on responses to distilled water, food solution, and four taste stimuli: sucrose, NaCl, HCl, and quinine hydrochloride. 2. Taste-responsive neurons were classified into type-1 and type-2 groups according to the response patterns to licking of the six taste stimuli. Type-1 neurons (n = 29) responded in excitatory or inhibitory directions to one or more of the taste stimuli. Type-2 neurons (n = 6) showed responses in different directions depending upon palatability of the liquids to rats: neurons showing excitatory (or inhibitory) responses to palatable stimuli exhibited inhibitory (or excitatory) responses to unpalatable stimuli. 3. Correlation coefficients of responses to pairs of stimuli across neurons suggested that palatable stimuli (water, food solution, sucrose, and NaCl) and unpalatable stimuli (HCl and quinine) elicited reciprocal (excitatory vs. inhibitory) responses in type-2 neurons, whereas type-1 neurons showed positively correlated responses to specific combinations of stimuli such as food solution and NaCl, sucrose and HCl, NaCl and quinine, and HCl and quinine. 4. A tendency toward equalization of effectiveness in eliciting responses among the four basic taste stimuli was detected on the cortex. The ratios of mean evoked responses in 29 type-1 neurons in comparison with spontaneous rate (4.4 spikes/s) were 1.7, 1.9, 1.8, and 1.9 for sucrose, NaCl, HCl, and quinine, respectively. 5. The breadth of responsiveness to the four basic taste stimuli was quantified by means of the entropy measure introduced by Smith and Travers (33). The mean entropy value was 0.540 for 29 type-1 neurons, which was similar to 0.588 previously reported for rat chorda tympani fibers, suggesting that breadth of tuning is not more narrowly tuned in a higher level of the gustatory

  2. Curve walking in freely moving crayfish (Procambarus clarkii)

    PubMed

    Domenici; Jamon; Clarac

    1998-05-01

    The curve walking of freely moving crayfish trained to walk along a curved path during homing behaviour was investigated using a video-analysis system. The leg kinematics and leg phase relationships, as well as the relationship between stepping patterns and body axis rotation measured relative to external references, were studied.

    The anterior and posterior extreme positions of the power stroke (AEP and PEP, respectively) and step amplitudes were analysed. As in a previous study on crayfish curve walking on a treadmill, PEPs were more posterior in outer legs (the legs on the outside of the turn) than in the inner legs. As a result, outer legs showed larger step amplitudes than inner legs. Leg kinematics varied within each walking sequence. AEP leg angles (the angles between the body and leg axes at the AEP) tended to decrease over time for inner legs and increase for outer legs. This leg angle drift was present mainly in the anterior legs and it suggests that these legs did not completely compensate for the body rotation after each step. In addition, leg angle asymmetries in a direction opposite to that of leg angle drift were observed at the start of each curve-walking sequence, suggesting that the extensive training (3 weeks) may have allowed crayfish to anticipate the leg angle drift.

    The rotational component of curve walking showed a discontinuous pattern, with the animal's body axis turning towards the inside of the curve only periodically. Analysis of cross-correlation functions showed that the angular acceleration of the body axis in the direction of the turn occurred during the power strokes of inner legs 2 and 5 and outer leg 4. While the tripod formed by these three legs showed in-phase relationships, the legs of the corresponding contralateral tripod (outer legs 2 and 5 and inner leg 4) were not in phase. We hypothesize that inner legs 2 and 5 and outer leg 4 act synergically causing the inward body rotation observed in curve-walking crayfish and

  3. Rapid EEG desynchronization and EMG activation induced by intravenous cocaine in freely moving rats: a peripheral, nondopamine neural triggering.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Smirnov, Michael S

    2010-02-01

    Many important physiological, behavioral, and psychoemotional effects of intravenous (IV) cocaine (COC) are too fast and transient compared with pharmacokinetic predictions, suggesting a possible involvement of peripheral neural mechanisms in their triggering. In the present study, we examined changes in cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) and neck electromyogram (EMG) induced in freely moving rats by IV COC administration at low, reinforcing doses (0.25-1.0 mg/kg) and compared them with those induced by an auditory stimulus and IV COC methiodide, which cannot cross the blood-brain barrier. We found that COC induces rapid, strong, and prolonged EEG desynchronization, associated with decrease in alpha and increase in beta and gamma activities, and EMG activation and that both begin within 2-6 s following the start of a 10-s injection; immediate components of this effect were dose independent. The rapid COC-induced changes in EEG and EMG resembled those induced by an auditory stimulus; the latter effects had shorter onset latencies and durations and were fully blocked during urethane anesthesia. Although urethane anesthesia completely blocked COC-induced EMG activation and rapid components of EEG response, COC still induced EEG desynchronization that was much weaker, greatly delayed (approximately 60 s), and associated with tonic decreases in delta and increases in alpha, beta, and gamma activities. Surprisingly, IV saline delivered during slow-wave sleep (but not quite wakefulness) also induced a transient EEG desynchronization but without changes in EMG activity; these effects were also fully blocked during anesthesia. Peripherally acting COC methiodide fully mimicked rapid EEG and EMG effects of regular COC, but the effects at an equimolar dose were less prolonged than those with regular COC. These data suggest that in awake animals IV COC, like somato-sensory stimuli, induces cortical activation and a subsequent motor response via its action on peripheral neural

  4. Combination of Continuous Dexmedetomidine Infusion with Titrated Ultra-Low-Dose Propofol-Fentanyl for an Awake Craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Das, Samaresh; Al-Mashani, Ali; Suri, Neelam; Salhotra, Neeraj; Chatterjee, Nilay

    2016-08-01

    An awake craniotomy is a continuously evolving technique used for the resection of brain tumours from the eloquent cortex. We report a 29-year-old male patient who presented to the Khoula Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in 2016 with a two month history of headaches and convulsions due to a space-occupying brain lesion in close proximity with the left motor cortex. An awake craniotomy was conducted using a scalp block, continuous dexmedetomidine infusion and a titrated ultra-low-dose of propofolfentanyl. The patient remained comfortable throughout the procedure and the intraoperative neuropsychological tests, brain mapping and tumour resection were successful. This case report suggests that dexmedetomidine in combination with titrated ultra-low-dose propofolfentanyl are effective options during an awake craniotomy, ensuring optimum sedation, minimal disinhibition and a rapid recovery. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first awake craniotomy conducted successfully in Oman. PMID:27606116

  5. Combination of Continuous Dexmedetomidine Infusion with Titrated Ultra-Low-Dose Propofol-Fentanyl for an Awake Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Samaresh; Al-Mashani, Ali; Suri, Neelam; Salhotra, Neeraj; Chatterjee, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    An awake craniotomy is a continuously evolving technique used for the resection of brain tumours from the eloquent cortex. We report a 29-year-old male patient who presented to the Khoula Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in 2016 with a two month history of headaches and convulsions due to a space-occupying brain lesion in close proximity with the left motor cortex. An awake craniotomy was conducted using a scalp block, continuous dexmedetomidine infusion and a titrated ultra-low-dose of propofolfentanyl. The patient remained comfortable throughout the procedure and the intraoperative neuropsychological tests, brain mapping and tumour resection were successful. This case report suggests that dexmedetomidine in combination with titrated ultra-low-dose propofolfentanyl are effective options during an awake craniotomy, ensuring optimum sedation, minimal disinhibition and a rapid recovery. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first awake craniotomy conducted successfully in Oman. PMID:27606116

  6. Retrospective evaluation of airway management with blind awake intubation in temporomandibular joint ankylosis patients: A review of 48 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Duraiswamy; Krishnan, Radhika; Veerabahu, Muthusubramanian; Vikraman, Bhaskara Pandian; Nathan, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the morbidity or mortality associated with the blind awake intubation technique in temporomandibular ankylosis patients. Settings and Design: A total of 48 cases with radiographically and clinically confirmed cases of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis were included in the study for evaluation of anesthetic management and its complications. Materials and Methods: Airway assessment was done with standard proforma including Look externally, evaluate 3-3-2 rule, Mallampati classification, Obstruction, Neck mobility (LEMON) score assessment in all TMJ ankylosis patients. The intubation was carried out with the standard departmental anesthetic protocol in all the patients. The preoperative difficulty assessment and postoperative outcome were recorded. Results: Blind awake intubation was done in 92% of cases, 6% of cases were intubated by fiberoptic awake intubation, and 2% patient required surgical airway. Ninety-eight percent of the patients were cooperative during the awake intubation. The frequent complications encountered during the blind awake intubation were epistaxis and sore throat. Conclusion: In an anesthetic setup, where fiberoptic intubation is not available, blind awake intubation could be considered in the anesthetic management algorithm. PMID:27563608

  7. Behavioral Effects of Acclimatization To Restraint Protocol Used for Awake Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Michael D.; Pira, Ashley S.; Febo, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Functional MRI of awake rats involves acclimatization to restraint to minimize motion. We designed a study to examine the effects of an acclimatization protocol (5 days of restraint, 60 minutes per day) on the emission of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations and performance on a forced swim test (FST). Our results show that USV calls are reduced significantly by day 3, 4 and 5 of acclimatization. Although rats show less climbing activity (and more immobility) in FST on day 5 compared to the 1st day of restraint acclimatization, the difference is gone once animals are given a 2 week hiatus. Overall, we show that animals adapt to the restraint over the five day period, however, restraint may introduce confounding behavioral outcomes that may hinder the interpretation of results derived from awake rat imaging. The present data warrant further testing of the effects of MRI restraint on behavior. PMID:23562621

  8. Behavioral effects of acclimatization to restraint protocol used for awake animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Reed, Michael D; Pira, Ashley S; Febo, Marcelo

    2013-07-15

    Functional MRI in awake rats involves acclimatization to restraint to minimize motion. We designed a study to examine the effects of an acclimatization protocol (5 days of restraint, 60 min per day) on the emission of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations and performance in a forced swim test (FST). Our results showed that USV calls are reduced significantly by days 3, 4 and 5 of acclimatization. Although the rats showed less climbing activity (and more immobility) in FST on day 5 compared to the 1st day of restraint acclimatization, the difference was not detected once the animals were given a 2-week hiatus. Overall, we showed that animals adapt to the restraint over a five-day period; however, restraint may introduce confounding behavioral outcomes that may hinder the interpretation of results derived from awake rat imaging. The present data warrants further testing of the effects of MRI restraint on behavior. PMID:23562621

  9. 5-aminolevulinic acid guidance during awake craniotomy to maximise extent of safe resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Corns, Robert; Mukherjee, Soumya; Johansen, Anja; Sivakumar, Gnanamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Overall survival for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been consistently shown to improve when the surgeon achieves a gross total resection of the tumour. It has also been demonstrated that surgical adjuncts such as 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence--which delineates malignant tumour tissue--normal brain tissue margin seen using violet-blue excitation under an operating microscope--helps achieve this. We describe the case of a patient with recurrent left frontal GBM encroaching on Broca's area (eloquent brain). Gross total resection of the tumour was achieved by combining two techniques, awake resection to prevent damage to eloquent brain and 5-ALA fluorescence guidance to maximise the extent of tumour resection.This technique led to gross total resection of all T1-enhancing tumour with the avoidance of neurological deficit. The authors recommend this technique in patients when awake surgery can be tolerated and gross total resection is the aim of surgery. PMID:26177997

  10. Benefits of awake uniportal pulmonary resection in a patient with a previous contralateral lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Carlos; Navarro-Martinez, Jose; Bolufer, Sergio; Lirio, Francisco; Mafe, Juan Jose; Rivera, Maria Jesus; Roca, Joaquin; Baschwitz, Benno

    2014-09-01

    Surgical resection of a contralateral recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is indicated in patients without evidence of disseminated disease and considered functionally operable. General anesthesia and double-lumen intubation involves one lobe ventilation in a patient treated with a previous lobectomy, thus increasing the risks of ventilator-induced injuries and the morbidity. Awake procedures facilitate the surgery decreasing the anesthetic and surgical times, keeping the diaphragm motion and diminishing the ventilator-induced injuries into the remaining contralateral lobe. We present a 43-year-old woman with a previous left-lower lobectomy for a 3.1-cm mucinous adenocarcinoma 15 months before without nodal involvement, who presents a right-lower lobe 8-mm cavitated nodule, with evident radiological growth and fine-needle aspiration concordant with mucinous adenocarcinoma. We suggest an awake procedure with locoregional epidural anesthesia. PMID:25405168

  11. Episodic-like memory trace in awake replay of hippocampal place cell activity sequences.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory retrieval of events at a specific place and time is effective for future planning. Sequential reactivation of the hippocampal place cells along familiar paths while the animal pauses is well suited to such a memory retrieval process. It is, however, unknown whether this awake replay represents events occurring along the path. Using a subtask switching protocol in which the animal experienced three subtasks as 'what' information in a maze, I here show that the replay represents a trial type, consisting of path and subtask, in terms of neuronal firing timings and rates. The actual trial type to be rewarded could only be reliably predicted from replays that occurred at the decision point. This trial-type representation implies that not only 'where and when' but also 'what' information is contained in the replay. This result supports the view that awake replay is an episodic-like memory retrieval process. PMID:26481131

  12. [Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery in an awake patient].

    PubMed

    Alonso-García, F J; Navarro-Martínez, J; Gálvez, C; Rivera-Cogollos, M J; Sgattoni, C; Tarí-Bas, I M

    2016-03-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery is traditionally carried out with general anaesthesia and endotracheal intubation with double lumen tube. However, in the last few years procedures, such as lobectomies, are being performed with loco-regional anaesthesia, with and without sedation, maintaining the patient awake and with spontaneous breathing, in order to avoid the inherent risks of general anaesthesia, double lumen tube intubation and mechanical ventilation. This surgical approach has also shown to be effective in that it allows a good level of analgesia, maintaining a correct oxygenation and providing a better post-operative recovery. Two case reports are presented in which video-assisted thoracic surgery was used, a lung biopsy and a lung resection, both with epidural anaesthesia and maintaining the patient awake and with spontaneous ventilation, as part of a preliminary evaluation of the anaesthetic technique in this type of surgery. PMID:26298720

  13. Laryngeal Radiation Fibrosis: A Case of Failed Awake Flexible Fibreoptic Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Huitink, Johannes M.; Zijp, Lambert

    2011-01-01

    Awake fibreoptic intubation is accepted as the gold standard for intubation of patients with an anticipated difficult airway. Radiation fibrosis may cause difficulties during the intubation procedure. We present an unusual severe case of radiation induced changes to the larynx, with limited clinical symptoms, that caused failure of the fibreoptic intubation technique. A review of the known literature on radiation fibrosis and airway management is presented. PMID:22606397

  14. Mapping Sensorimotor Cortex Using Slow Cortical Potential Resting-State Networks While Awake and Under Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Breshears, Jonathan D.; Gaona, Charles M.; Roland, Jarod L.; Sharma, Mohit; Bundy, David T.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Rashid, Samiya; Eisenman, Lawrence N.; Hogan, R. Edward; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The emerging insight into resting-state cortical networks has been important in understanding the fundamental architecture of brain organization. These networks, which were originally identified with functional MRI, are also seen in the correlation topography of the infraslow rhythms of local field potentials. Because of the fundamental nature of these networks and their independence from task-related activations, we posit that in addition to their neuroscientific relevance, these slow cortical potential (SCP) networks could also play an important role in clinical brain mapping. Objective We hypothesized that these networks would be useful in identifying eloquent cortex, such as sensorimotor cortex, in patients both awake and under anesthesia. Methods This study included eight subjects undergoing surgical treatment for intractable epilepsy. SCPs were recorded from the cortical surface while awake and under propofol anesthesia. To test brain-mapping utility, slow cortical potential networks were identified using data-driven (seed-independent) and anatomy-driven (seed-based) approaches. Using electrocortical stimulation as the gold standard for comparison, the sensitivity and specificity of these networks for identifying sensorimotor cortex was calculated. Results Networks identified with a data-driven approach in patients under anesthesia and awake were 90% and 93% sensitive, and 58% and 55% specific for sensorimotor cortex, respectively. Networks identified with systematic seed selection in patients under anesthesia and awake were 78% and 83% sensitive, and 67% and 60% specific, respectively. Conclusion Resting-state networks may be useful for tailoring stimulation mapping and could provide a means of identifying eloquent regions in patients while under anesthesia. PMID:22517255

  15. The kinematic architecture of the Active Headframe: A new head support for awake brain surgery.

    PubMed

    Malosio, Matteo; Negri, Simone Pio; Pedrocchi, Nicola; Vicentini, Federico; Cardinale, Francesco; Tosatti, Lorenzo Molinari

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the novel hybrid kinematic structure of the Active Headframe, a robotic head support to be employed in brain surgery operations for an active and dynamic control of the patient's head position and orientation, particularly addressing awake surgery requirements. The topology has been conceived in order to satisfy all the installation, functional and dynamic requirements. A kinetostatic optimization has been performed to obtain the actual geometric dimensions of the prototype currently being developed. PMID:23366166

  16. Development of a simultaneous optical/PET imaging system for awake mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ikoma, Yoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Shinaji, Tetsuya; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous measurements of multiple physiological parameters are essential for the study of brain disease mechanisms and the development of suitable therapies to treat them. In this study, we developed a measurement system for simultaneous optical imaging and PET for awake mice. The key elements of this system are the OpenPET, optical imaging and fixation apparatus for an awake mouse. The OpenPET is our original open-type PET geometry, which can be used in combination with another device because of the easily accessible open space of the former. A small prototype of the axial shift single-ring OpenPET was used. The objective lens for optical imaging with a mounted charge-coupled device camera was placed inside the open space of the AS-SROP. Our original fixation apparatus to hold an awake mouse was also applied. As a first application of this system, simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by laser speckle imaging (LSI) and [11C]raclopride-PET were performed under control and 5% CO2 inhalation (hypercapnia) conditions. Our system successfully obtained the CBF and [11C]raclopride radioactivity concentration simultaneously. Accumulation of [11C]raclopride was observed in the striatum where the density of dopamine D2 receptors is high. LSI measurements could be stably performed for more than 60 minutes. Increased CBF induced by hypercapnia was observed while CBF under the control condition was stable. We concluded that our imaging system should be useful for investigating the mechanisms of brain diseases in awake animal models.

  17. Off-pump awake coronary artery bypass grafting under high thoracic epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, Bharat; Kamal, Manoj; Chauhan, Dilip Singh; Purohit, Anamika

    2016-01-01

    Conventionally general anesthesia has been the preferred anesthetic technique for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Ever since the first awake CABG the concept though appearing promising is still being continually evaluated. From the Indian perspective, the practice has been largely limited to certain institutions and seems to be not widely practiced across India. This case reports our experience with this technique from the western part of the country. PMID:27275061

  18. Effects of specific carotid body and brain hypoxia on respiratory muscle control in the awake goat.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C A; Engwall, M J; Dempsey, J A; Bisgard, G E

    1993-01-01

    1. We assessed the effects of specific brain hypoxia on the control of inspiratory and expiratory muscle electromyographic (EMG) activities in response to specific carotid body hypoxia in seven awake goats. We used an isolated carotid body perfusion technique that permitted specific, physiological, steady-state stimulation of the carotid bodies or maintenance of normoxia and normocapnia at the carotid bodies while varying the level of systemic, and therefore, brain oxygenation. 2. Isolated brain normocapnic hypoxia of up to 1.5 h duration increased inspired minute ventilation (VI) by means of increases in both tidal volume (VT) and respiratory frequency (fR). Electromyographic activities of both inspiratory and expiratory muscles were augmented as well. These responses were similar to those produced by low levels of whole-body normoxic hypercapnia. We conclude that moderate levels of brain hypoxia (Pa,O2 approximately 40 mmHg) in awake goats caused a net stimulation of ventilatory motor output. 3. Hypoxic stimulation of the carotid bodies alone caused comparable increases in VT and fR, and EMG augmentation of both inspiratory and expiratory muscles whether the brain was hypoxic or normoxic. These responses were quite similar to those obtained over a wide range of whole-body normoxic hypercapnia. We conclude that the integration of carotid body afferent information is not affected by moderate brain hypoxia in awake goats. 4. We found no evidence for an asymmetrical recruitment pattern of inspiratory vs. expiratory muscles in response to carotid body hypoxia or in response to brain hypoxia alone. 5. Our data support the concept that moderate brain hypoxia results in a net stimulation of respiratory motor output. These findings question the significance of 'central hypoxic depression' to the regulation of breathing under physiological levels of hypoxaemia in the awake animal. PMID:8487210

  19. Mapping brain networks in awake mice using combined optical neural control and fMRI.

    PubMed

    Desai, M; Kahn, I; Knoblich, U; Bernstein, J; Atallah, H; Yang, A; Kopell, N; Buckner, R L; Graybiel, A M; Moore, C I; Boyden, E S

    2011-03-01

    Behaviors and brain disorders involve neural circuits that are widely distributed in the brain. The ability to map the functional connectivity of distributed circuits, and to assess how this connectivity evolves over time, will be facilitated by methods for characterizing the network impact of activating a specific subcircuit, cell type, or projection pathway. We describe here an approach using high-resolution blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) of the awake mouse brain-to measure the distributed BOLD response evoked by optical activation of a local, defined cell class expressing the light-gated ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). The utility of this opto-fMRI approach was explored by identifying known cortical and subcortical targets of pyramidal cells of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and by analyzing how the set of regions recruited by optogenetically driven SI activity differs between the awake and anesthetized states. Results showed positive BOLD responses in a distributed network that included secondary somatosensory cortex (SII), primary motor cortex (MI), caudoputamen (CP), and contralateral SI (c-SI). Measures in awake compared with anesthetized mice (0.7% isoflurane) showed significantly increased BOLD response in the local region (SI) and indirectly stimulated regions (SII, MI, CP, and c-SI), as well as increased BOLD signal temporal correlations between pairs of regions. These collective results suggest opto-fMRI can provide a controlled means for characterizing the distributed network downstream of a defined cell class in the awake brain. Opto-fMRI may find use in examining causal links between defined circuit elements in diverse behaviors and pathologies. PMID:21160013

  20. Development of a simultaneous optical/PET imaging system for awake mice.

    PubMed

    Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ikoma, Yoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Shinaji, Tetsuya; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous measurements of multiple physiological parameters are essential for the study of brain disease mechanisms and the development of suitable therapies to treat them. In this study, we developed a measurement system for simultaneous optical imaging and PET for awake mice. The key elements of this system are the OpenPET, optical imaging and fixation apparatus for an awake mouse. The OpenPET is our original open-type PET geometry, which can be used in combination with another device because of the easily accessible open space of the former. A small prototype of the axial shift single-ring OpenPET was used. The objective lens for optical imaging with a mounted charge-coupled device camera was placed inside the open space of the AS-SROP. Our original fixation apparatus to hold an awake mouse was also applied. As a first application of this system, simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by laser speckle imaging (LSI) and [(11)C]raclopride-PET were performed under control and 5% CO2 inhalation (hypercapnia) conditions. Our system successfully obtained the CBF and [(11)C]raclopride radioactivity concentration simultaneously. Accumulation of [(11)C]raclopride was observed in the striatum where the density of dopamine D2 receptors is high. LSI measurements could be stably performed for more than 60 minutes. Increased CBF induced by hypercapnia was observed while CBF under the control condition was stable. We concluded that our imaging system should be useful for investigating the mechanisms of brain diseases in awake animal models. PMID:27514436

  1. [Difficult Ventilation Requiring Emergency Endotracheal Intubation during Awake Craniotomy Managed by Laryngeal Mask Airway].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Asako; Mizota, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Segawa, Hajime; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of difficult ventilation requiring emergency endotracheal intubation during awake craniotomy managed by laryngeal mask airway (LMA). A 45-year-old woman was scheduled to receive awake craniotomy for brain tumor in the frontal lobe. After anesthetic induction, airway was secured using ProSeal LMA and patient was mechanically ventilated in pressure-control mode. Patient's head was fixed with head-pins at anteflex position, and the operation started. About one hour after the start of the operation, tidal volume suddenly decreased. We immediately started manual ventilation, but the airway resistance was extremely high and we could not adequately ventilate the patient. We administered muscle relaxant for suspected laryngospasm, but ventilatory status did not improve; so we decided to conduct emergency endotracheal intubation. We tried to intubate using Airwayscope or LMA-Fastrach, but they were not effective in our case. Finally trachea was intubated using transnasal fiberoptic bronchoscopy. We discuss airway management during awake craniotomy, focusing on emergency endotracheal intubation during surgery. PMID:27188111

  2. Glutamatergic function in the resting awake human brain is supported by uniformly high oxidative energy

    PubMed Central

    Hyder, Fahmeed; Fulbright, Robert K; Shulman, Robert G; Rothman, Douglas L

    2013-01-01

    Rodent 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies show that glutamatergic signaling requires high oxidative energy in the awake resting state and allowed calibration of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal in terms of energy relative to the resting energy. Here, we derived energy used for glutamatergic signaling in the awake resting human. We analyzed human data of electroencephalography (EEG), positron emission tomography (PET) maps of oxygen (CMRO2) and glucose (CMRglc) utilization, and calibrated fMRI from a variety of experimental conditions. CMRglc and EEG in the visual cortex were tightly coupled over several conditions, showing that the oxidative demand for signaling was four times greater than the demand for nonsignaling events in the awake state. Variations of CMRO2 and CMRglc from gray-matter regions and networks were within ±10% of means, suggesting that most areas required similar energy for ubiquitously high resting activity. Human calibrated fMRI results suggest that changes of fMRI signal in cognitive studies contribute at most ±10% CMRO2 changes from rest. The PET data of sleep, vegetative state, and anesthesia show metabolic reductions from rest, uniformly >20% across, indicating no region is selectively reduced when consciousness is lost. Future clinical investigations will benefit from using quantitative metabolic measures. PMID:23299240

  3. Spectrotemporal Response Properties of Core Auditory Cortex Neurons in Awake Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Massoudi, Roohollah; Van Wanrooij, Marc M.; Versnel, Huib; Van Opstal, A. John

    2015-01-01

    So far, most studies of core auditory cortex (AC) have characterized the spectral and temporal tuning properties of cells in non-awake, anesthetized preparations. As experiments in awake animals are scarce, we here used dynamic spectral-temporal broadband ripples to study the properties of the spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) of AC cells in awake monkeys. We show that AC neurons were typically most sensitive to low ripple densities (spectral) and low velocities (temporal), and that most cells were not selective for a particular spectrotemporal sweep direction. A substantial proportion of neurons preferred amplitude-modulated sounds (at zero ripple density) to dynamic ripples (at non-zero densities). The vast majority (>93%) of modulation transfer functions were separable with respect to spectral and temporal modulations, indicating that time and spectrum are independently processed in AC neurons. We also analyzed the linear predictability of AC responses to natural vocalizations on the basis of the STRF. We discuss our findings in the light of results obtained from the monkey midbrain inferior colliculus by comparing the spectrotemporal tuning properties and linear predictability of these two important auditory stages. PMID:25680187

  4. View of a stone age adze cutting tool floating freely in the flight deck.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    View of a stone age adze cutting tool floating freely in the forward flight deck and framed by the forward and side windows. On the Earth below, the big island of Hawaii can be seen through the window.

  5. Anaesthesia Management for Awake Craniotomy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rossaint, Rolf; Veldeman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Awake craniotomy (AC) renders an expanded role in functional neurosurgery. Yet, evidence for optimal anaesthesia management remains limited. We aimed to summarise the latest clinical evidence of AC anaesthesia management and explore the relationship of AC failures on the used anaesthesia techniques. Methods Two authors performed independently a systematic search of English articles in PubMed and EMBASE database 1/2007-12/2015. Search included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), observational trials, and case reports (n>4 cases), which reported anaesthetic approach for AC and at least one of our pre-specified outcomes: intraoperative seizures, hypoxia, arterial hypertension, nausea and vomiting, neurological dysfunction, conversion into general anaesthesia and failure of AC. Random effects meta-analysis was used to estimate event rates for four outcomes. Relationship with anaesthesia technique was explored using logistic meta-regression, calculating the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals [95%CI]. Results We have included forty-seven studies. Eighteen reported asleep-awake-asleep technique (SAS), twenty-seven monitored anaesthesia care (MAC), one reported both and one used the awake-awake-awake technique (AAA). Proportions of AC failures, intraoperative seizures, new neurological dysfunction and conversion into general anaesthesia (GA) were 2% [95%CI:1–3], 8% [95%CI:6–11], 17% [95%CI:12–23] and 2% [95%CI:2–3], respectively. Meta-regression of SAS and MAC technique did not reveal any relevant differences between outcomes explained by the technique, except for conversion into GA. Estimated OR comparing SAS to MAC for AC failures was 0.98 [95%CI:0.36–2.69], 1.01 [95%CI:0.52–1.88] for seizures, 1.66 [95%CI:1.35–3.70] for new neurological dysfunction and 2.17 [95%CI:1.22–3.85] for conversion into GA. The latter result has to be interpreted cautiously. It is based on one retrospective high-risk of bias study and significance was

  6. Freely-migrating defects: Their production and interaction with cascade remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Rehn, L.E.; Wiedersich, H.

    1991-05-01

    Many microstructural changes that occur during irradiation are driven primarily by freely-migrating defects, i.e. those defects which escape from nascent cascades to migrate over distances that are large relative to typical cascade dimensions. Several measurements during irradiation at elevated temperatures have shown that the survival rate of freely-migrating defects decreases much more strongly with increasing primary recoil energy than does the survival rate for defects generated at liquid helium temperatures. For typical fission or fusion recoil spectra, and for heavy-ion bombardment, the fraction of defects that migrate long-distances is apparently only {approximately}1% of the calculated dpa. This small surviving fraction of freely-migrating defects results at least partially from additional intracascade recombination at elevated temperatures. However, cascade remnants, e.g., vacancy and interstitial clusters, also contribute by enhancing intercascade defect annihilation. A recently developed rate-theory approach is used to discuss the relative importance of intra- and intercascade recombination to the survival rate of freely-migrating defects. Within the validity of certain simplifying assumptions, the additional sink density provided by defect clusters produced directly within individual cascades can explain the difference between a defect survival rate of about 30% for low dose, low temperature irradiations with heavy ions, and a survival rate of only {approximately}1% for freely-migrating defects at elevated temperatures. The status of our current understanding of freely-migrating defects, including remaining unanswered questions, is also discussed. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Temporal Structure of Receptor Neuron Input to the Olfactory Bulb Imaged in Behaving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Ryan M.; Verhagen, Justus V.; Wesson, Daniel W.; Pírez, Nicolás; Wachowiak, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of sensory input to the nervous system play a critical role in shaping higher-level processing. In the olfactory system, the dynamics of input from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) are poorly characterized and depend on multiple factors, including respiration-driven airflow through the nasal cavity, odorant sorption kinetics, receptor–ligand interactions between odorant and receptor, and the electrophysiological properties of ORNs. Here, we provide a detailed characterization of the temporal organization of ORN input to the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) during natural respiration, using calcium imaging to monitor ORN input to the OB in awake, head-fixed rats expressing odor-guided behaviors. We report several key findings. First, across a population of homotypic ORNs, each inhalation of odorant evokes a burst of action potentials having a rise time of about 80 ms and a duration of about 100 ms. This rise time indicates a relatively slow, progressive increase in ORN activation as odorant flows through the nasal cavity. Second, the dynamics of ORN input differ among glomeruli and for different odorants and concentrations, but remain reliable across successive inhalations. Third, inhalation alone (in the absence of odorant) evokes ORN input to a significant fraction of OB glomeruli. Finally, high-frequency sniffing of odorant strongly reduces the temporal coupling between ORN inputs and the respiratory cycle. These results suggest that the dynamics of sensory input to the olfactory system may play a role in coding odor information and that, in the awake animal, strategies for processing odor information may change as a function of sampling behavior. PMID:19091924

  8. Wearable 3-D Photoacoustic Tomography for Functional Brain Imaging in Behaving Rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianbo; Coleman, Jason E; Dai, Xianjin; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between brain function and behavior remains a major challenge in neuroscience. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging technique that allows for noninvasive in vivo brain imaging at micrometer-millisecond spatiotemporal resolution. In this article, a novel, miniaturized 3D wearable PAT (3D-wPAT) technique is described for brain imaging in behaving rats. 3D-wPAT has three layers of fully functional acoustic transducer arrays. Phantom imaging experiments revealed that the in-plane X-Y spatial resolutions were ~200 μm for each acoustic detection layer. The functional imaging capacity of 3D-wPAT was demonstrated by mapping the cerebral oxygen saturation via multi-wavelength irradiation in behaving hyperoxic rats. In addition, we demonstrated that 3D-wPAT could be used for monitoring sensory stimulus-evoked responses in behaving rats by measuring hemodynamic responses in the primary visual cortex during visual stimulation. Together, these results show the potential of 3D-wPAT for brain study in behaving rodents. PMID:27146026

  9. Collaborating with Parents for Early School Success: The Achieving-Behaving-Caring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConaughy, Stephanie H.; Kay, Pam; Welkowitz, Julie A.; Hewitt, Kim; Fitzgerald, Martha D.

    2007-01-01

    The Achieving-Behaving-Caring (ABC) Program is an evidence-based approach to addressing the needs of elementary students at risk for emotional and behavioral difficulties and promoting successful home-school collaboration. This practical guide demonstrates how classroom teachers and parents can work together to boost individual children's…

  10. Wearable 3-D Photoacoustic Tomography for Functional Brain Imaging in Behaving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianbo; Coleman, Jason E.; Dai, Xianjin; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between brain function and behavior remains a major challenge in neuroscience. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging technique that allows for noninvasive in vivo brain imaging at micrometer-millisecond spatiotemporal resolution. In this article, a novel, miniaturized 3D wearable PAT (3D-wPAT) technique is described for brain imaging in behaving rats. 3D-wPAT has three layers of fully functional acoustic transducer arrays. Phantom imaging experiments revealed that the in-plane X-Y spatial resolutions were ~200 μm for each acoustic detection layer. The functional imaging capacity of 3D-wPAT was demonstrated by mapping the cerebral oxygen saturation via multi-wavelength irradiation in behaving hyperoxic rats. In addition, we demonstrated that 3D-wPAT could be used for monitoring sensory stimulus-evoked responses in behaving rats by measuring hemodynamic responses in the primary visual cortex during visual stimulation. Together, these results show the potential of 3D-wPAT for brain study in behaving rodents. PMID:27146026

  11. Extracellular Recording of Neuronal Activity Combined with Microiontophoretic Application of Neuroactive Substances in Awake Mice.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Yaneri A; Pérez-González, David; Duque, Daniel; Palmer, Alan R; Malmierca, Manuel S

    2016-01-01

    Differences in the activity of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, and consequently different neural responses, can be found between anesthetized and awake animals. Therefore, methods allowing the manipulation of synaptic systems in awake animals are required in order to determine the contribution of synaptic inputs to neuronal processing unaffected by anesthetics. Here, we present methodology for the construction of electrodes to simultaneously record extracellular neural activity and release multiple neuroactive substances at the vicinity of the recording sites in awake mice. By combining these procedures, we performed microiontophoretic injections of gabazine to selectively block GABAA receptors in neurons of the inferior colliculus of head-restrained mice. Gabazine successfully modified neural response properties such as the frequency response area and stimulus-specific adaptation. Thus, we demonstrate that our methods are suitable for recording single-unit activity and for dissecting the role of specific neurotransmitter receptors in auditory processing. The main limitation of the described procedure is the relatively short recording time (~3 hr), which is determined by the level of habituation of the animal to the recording sessions. On the other hand, multiple recording sessions can be performed in the same animal. The advantage of this technique over other experimental procedures used to manipulate the level of neurotransmission or neuromodulation (such as systemic injections or the use of optogenetic models), is that the drug effect is confined to the local synaptic inputs to the target neuron. In addition, the custom-manufacture of electrodes allows adjustment of specific parameters according to the neural structure and type of neuron of interest (such as the tip resistance for improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the recordings). PMID:27286308

  12. The VetMousetrap: a device for computed tomographic imaging of the thorax of awake cats.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cintia R; Ranallo, Frank N; Pijanowski, Gerald J; Mitchell, Mark A; O'Brien, Mauria A; McMichael, Maureen; Hartman, Susan K; Matheson, Jodi S; O'Brien, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    The VetMousetrap, a novel device that allows computed tomography (CT) of awake cats and provides a clinically supportive environment, is described. Ten normal cats were used to test the device for ambient internal oxygen, carbon dioxide levels, and temperature. Twenty-two awake normal cats were imaged using a 16-multislice helical CT unit to evaluate dose-equivalent protocols. Two different X-ray tube potentials (kV), 80 and 120, and two different helical pitches, 0.562 and 1.75, were evaluated. The signal intensity of the pulmonary parenchyma (SIlung), signal intensity of background (SIbackgr), contrast, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Three evaluators ranked the images for sharpness of liver margins, motion, helical, and windmill artifacts. CT was successfully completed in 20 of 22 cats. No artifacts directly related to the device were detected. Overall, 75 of 80 (94%) examinations were judged to have absent or minimal motion artifact. A statistically significant difference was found for SNR (P = 0.001) and CNR (P = 0.001) between all protocols. The higher pitch protocols had significantly lower noise and higher SNR and CNR, lower motion artifact but greater helical artifacts. A protocol using 80 kV, 130 mA, 0.5s, and 0.562 pitch with 1.25mm slice thickness, and 0.625 mm slice reconstruction interval is recommended. The VetMousetrap appears to provide the opportunity for diagnostic CT imaging of the thorax of awake cats. PMID:21322386

  13. In Vivo Tumour Mapping Using Electrocorticography Alterations During Awake Brain Surgery: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Boussen, Salah; Velly, Lionel; Benar, Christian; Metellus, Philippe; Bruder, Nicolas; Trébuchon, Agnès

    2016-09-01

    During awake brain surgery for tumour resection, in situ EEG recording (ECoG) is used to identify eloquent areas surrounding the tumour. We used the ECoG setup to record the electrical activity of cortical and subcortical tumours and then performed frequency and connectivity analyses in order to identify ECoG impairments and map tumours. We selected 16 patients with cortical (8) and subcortical (8) tumours undergoing awake brain surgery. For each patient, we computed the spectral content of tumoural and healthy areas in each frequency band. We computed connectivity of each electrode using connectivity markers (linear and non-linear correlations, phase-locking and coherence). We performed comparisons between healthy and tumour electrodes. The ECoG alterations were used to implement automated classification of the electrodes using clustering or neural network algorithms. ECoG alterations were used to image cortical tumours.Cortical tumours were found to profoundly alter all frequency contents (normalized and absolute power), with an increase in the δ activity and a decreases for the other bands (P < 0.05). Cortical tumour electrodes showed high level of connectivity compared to surrounding electrodes (all markers, P < 0.05). For subcortical tumours, a relative decrease in the γ1 band and in the alpha band in absolute amplitude (P < 0.05) were the only abnormalities. The neural network algorithm classification had a good performance: 93.6 % of the electrodes were classified adequately on a test subject. We found significant spectral and connectivity ECoG changes for cortical tumours, which allowed tumour recognition. Artificial neural algorithm pattern recognition seems promising for electrode classification in awake tumour surgery. PMID:27324381

  14. Suicide and sleep: Is it a bad thing to be awake when reason sleeps?

    PubMed

    Perlis, Michael L; Grandner, Michael A; Chakravorty, Subhajit; Bernert, Rebecca A; Brown, Gregory K; Thase, Michael E

    2016-10-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death, worldwide, for those between the ages of 24 and 44 y old. In 2013, more than 41,000 suicides occurred in the United States. These statistics underscore the need to 1) understand why people die by suicide and 2) identify risk factors that are potentially modifiable. While it has been posited that sleep disturbance may represent one such factor, systematic research in this arena did not begin until the 2000s. Since that time, sleep disturbance has been reliably identified as a risk factor for suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and suicide. While insomnia, nightmares, and other sleep disorders have each been found to contribute to the risk for suicidal ideation and behavior, it is also possible that these factors share some common variance. One possibility is that sleep disturbance results in being awake at night, and being awake at night also confers risk. The hypothesis proffered here is that being awake when one is not biologically prepared to be so results in "hypofrontality" and diminished executive function, and that this represents a common pathway to suicidal ideation and behavior. Such a proposition is highly testable under a variety of possible protocols. The current review summarizes the extant literature on suicide rates by time-of-day, and discusses circadian, psychosocial, and neurocognitive explanations of risk. Such a focus promises to enhance our understanding of how sleep disturbance may confer risk, allows for the identification of future lines of research, and further justifies the need for interventions that promote good sleep continuity among at-risk individuals. PMID:26706755

  15. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain increases heart rate and arterial blood pressure in awake humans

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Judith M; Aziz, Tipu; Schlugman, David; Paterson, David J

    2002-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus, basal ganglia or pedunculopontine nucleus in decorticate animals results in locomotion and a cardiorespiratory response resembling that seen during exercise. This has led to the hypothesis that parallel activation of cardiorespiratory and locomotor systems from the midbrain could form part of the ‘central command’ mechanism of exercise. However, the degree to which subcortical structures play a role in cardiovascular activation in awake humans has not been established. We studied the effects on heart rate (HR) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of electrically stimulating the thalamus and basal ganglia in awake humans undergoing neurosurgery for movement disorders (n = 13 Parkinson's disease, n = 1 myoclonic dystonia, n = 1 spasmodic torticollis). HR and MAP increased during high frequency (> 90 Hz) electrical stimulation of the thalamus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 4 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.05, n = 9), subthalamic nucleus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 5 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.006, n = 8) or substantia nigra (HR 6 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.001, MAP 5 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005, n = 8). This was accompanied by the facilitation of movement, but without the movement itself. Stimulation of the internal globus pallidus did not increase cardiovascular variables but did facilitate movement. Low frequency (< 20 Hz) stimulation of any site did not affect cardiovascular variables or movement. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain in awake humans can cause a modest increase in cardiovascular variables that is not dependent on movement feedback from exercising muscles. The relationship between this type of response and that occurring during actual exercise is unclear, but it indicates that subcortical command could be involved in ‘parallel activation’ of the locomotor and cardiovascular systems and thus contribute to the neurocircuitry of ‘central command’. PMID:11882692

  16. High-field localized 1H NMR spectroscopy in the anesthetized and in the awake monkey.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, Josef; Juchem, Christoph; Merkle, Hellmut; Nauerth, Arno; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2004-12-01

    Localized cerebral in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy (MRS) was performed in the anesthetized as well as the awake monkey using a novel vertical 7 T/60 cm MR system. The increased sensitivity and spectral dispersion gained at high field enabled the quantification of up to 16 metabolites in 0.1- to 1-ml volumes. Quantification was accomplished by using simulations of 18 metabolite spectra and a macromolecule (MM) background spectrum consisting of 12 components. Major cerebral metabolites (concentrations >3 mM) such as glutamate (Glu), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr)/phosphocreatine (PCr) and myo-inositol (Ins) were identified with an error below 3%; most other metabolites were quantified with errors in the order of 10%. Metabolite ratios were 1.39:1 for total NAA, 1.38:1 for glutamate (Glu)/glutamine (Gln) and 0.09:1 for cholines (Cho) relative to total Cr. Taurine (Tau) was detectable at concentrations lower than 1 mM, while lactate (Lac) remained below the detection limit. The spectral dispersion was sufficient to separate metabolites of similar spectral patterns, such as Gln and Glu, N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) and NAA, and PCr-Cr. MRS in the awake monkey required the development and refinement of acquisition and correction strategies to minimize magnetic susceptibility artifacts induced by respiration and movement of the mouth or body. Periods with major motion artifacts were rejected, while a frequency/phase correction was performed on the remaining single spectra before averaging. In resting periods, both spectral amplitude and line width, that is, the voxel shim, were unaffected permitting reliable measurements. The corrected spectra obtained from the awake monkey afforded the reliable detection of 6-10 cerebral metabolites of 1-ml volumes. PMID:15707786

  17. BOLD fMRI in awake prairie voles: A platform for translational social and affective neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Yee, J R; Kenkel, W M; Kulkarni, P; Moore, K; Perkeybile, A M; Toddes, S; Amacker, J A; Carter, C S; Ferris, C F

    2016-09-01

    The advancement of neuroscience depends on continued improvement in methods and models. Here, we present novel techniques for the use of awake functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) - an important step forward in minimally-invasive measurement of neural activity in a non-traditional animal model. Imaging neural responses in prairie voles, a species studied for its propensity to form strong and selective social bonds, is expected to greatly advance our mechanistic understanding of complex social and affective processes. The use of ultra-high-field fMRI allows for recording changes in region-specific activity throughout the entire brain simultaneously and with high temporal and spatial resolutions. By imaging neural responses in awake animals, with minimal invasiveness, we are able to avoid the confound of anesthesia, broaden the scope of possible stimuli, and potentially make use of repeated scans from the same animals. These methods are made possible by the development of an annotated and segmented 3D vole brain atlas and software for image analysis. The use of these methods in the prairie vole provides an opportunity to broaden neuroscientific investigation of behavior via a comparative approach, which highlights the ethological relevance of pro-social behaviors shared between voles and humans, such as communal breeding, selective social bonds, social buffering of stress, and caregiving behaviors. Results using these methods show that fMRI in the prairie vole is capable of yielding robust blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes in response to hypercapnic challenge (inhaled 5% CO2), region-specific physical challenge (unilateral whisker stimulation), and presentation of a set of novel odors. Complementary analyses of repeated restraint sessions in the imaging hardware suggest that voles do not require acclimation to this procedure. Taken together, awake vole fMRI represents a new arena of neurobiological

  18. Cost analysis of awake versus asleep deep brain stimulation: a single academic health center experience.

    PubMed

    Jacob, R Lorie; Geddes, Jonah; McCartney, Shirley; Burchiel, Kim J

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to compare the cost of deep brain stimulation (DBS) performed awake versus asleep at a single US academic health center and to compare costs across the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Clinical Database. METHODS Inpatient and outpatient demographic and hospital financial data for patients receiving a neurostimulator lead implant (from the first quarter of 2009 to the second quarter of 2014) were collected and analyzed. Inpatient charges included those associated with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) procedure code 0293 (implantation or replacement of intracranial neurostimulator lead). Outpatient charges included all preoperative charges ≤ 30 days prior to implant and all postoperative charges ≤ 30 days after implant. The cost of care based on reported charges and a cost-to-charge ratio was estimated. The UHC database was queried (January 2011 to March 2014) with the same ICD-9 code. Procedure cost data across like hospitals (27 UHC hospitals) conducting similar DBS procedures were compared. RESULTS Two hundred eleven DBS procedures (53 awake and 158 asleep) were performed at a single US academic health center during the study period. The average patient age ( ± SD) was 65 ± 9 years old and 39% of patients were female. The most common primary diagnosis was Parkinson's disease (61.1%) followed by essential and other forms of tremor (36%). Overall average DBS procedure cost was $39,152 ± $5340. Asleep DBS cost $38,850 ± $4830, which was not significantly different than the awake DBS cost of $40,052 ± $6604. The standard deviation for asleep DBS was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05). In 2013, the median cost for a neurostimulator implant lead was $34,052 at UHC-affiliated hospitals that performed at least 5 procedures a year. At Oregon Health & Science University, the median cost was $17,150 and the observed single academic health center cost for a neurostimulator lead implant was

  19. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joulaei, A.; Moody, J.; Berti, N.; Kasparian, J.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  20. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation for functional mapping after aborted awake craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Prag; Bandt, S. Kathleen; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Awake craniotomy is currently the gold standard for aggressive tumor resections in eloquent cortex. However, a significant subset of patients is unable to tolerate this procedure, particularly the very young or old or those with psychiatric comorbidities, cardiopulmonary comorbidities, or obesity, among other conditions. In these cases, typical alternative procedures include biopsy alone or subtotal resection, both of which are associated with diminished surgical outcomes. Case Description: Here, we report the successful use of a preoperatively obtained resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software in order to perform functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy due to loss of airway. Conclusion: Resting state functional connectivity MRI integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software can provide an alternative option for functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy. PMID:26958419

  1. Comparison of transferred freely-suspended films and LB-films of liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Decher, G.; Reibel, J.; Sohling, U.

    1993-12-31

    Amphiphilic liquid crystalline (LC) compounds offer the possibility to obtain similar layered structures such as LB mono- and multilayers, freely suspended and transferred freely-suspended films or bulk LC-phases from a single compound. This way a structural comparison of all types of assemblies can be achieved, combining the experience from both the LB-and the LC-fields. There is a remarkable similarity of the structures of the transferred freely-suspended (TFS) and LB-films. Nevertheless both types of multilayer assemblies, prepared from the same substance (ethyl-4`-n-octyloxybiphenyl-4-carboxylate), show a different thermal behavior. Whereas the TFS-films undergo reversible phase transitions and are stable up to the clearing point of the bulk material (110{degrees}C), the LB-films show only one irreversible phase transition and start to melt already 30{degrees}C below the clearing point of the bulk material.

  2. Respiratory and hemodynamic outcomes following exchange extubation with laryngeal mask airway as compared to traditional awake extubation

    PubMed Central

    Suppiah, Ramanathan Kannan; Rajan, Sunil; Paul, Jerry; Kumar, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional awake extubation leads to respiratory complications and hemodynamic response which are detrimental in neurosurgery, ENT surgery and patients with comorbidities. Aims: The primary objective was to compare the respiratory complications and hemodynamic stress response between traditional awake extubation of a endotracheal tube (ETT) and that following exchange extubation of ETT by using a laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Settings and Design: This prospective randomized study was conducted in a Tertiary Care Centre in 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients coming for general surgery. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomized by permuted blocks into traditional awake extubation group and exchange extubation group. At the end of surgery in traditional group, awake extubation of ETT was done. In exchange group, 0.3 mg/kg propofol was administered, and the ETT was exchanged for a LMA. Awake extubation of LMA was then performed. Respiratory complications such as bucking, coughing, desaturation and the need for airway maneuvers and hemodynamic response were noted in both groups. Analysis Tools: Chi-square test, independent sample t- and paired t-tests were used as applicable. Results: Incidence of respiratory complication was 93.3% in traditional extubation while it was only 36.7% in exchange extubation group (P < 0.001). Hemodynamic response measured immediately at extubation in terms of heart rate, systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and rate pressure product were all significantly lesser in exchange group when compared to traditional extubation. Conclusion: Exchange extubation with LMA decreases respiratory complications and hemodynamic stress response when compared to traditional awake extubation. PMID:27212749

  3. The discriminatory value of cardiorespiratory interactions in distinguishing awake from anaesthetised states: a randomised observational study.

    PubMed

    Kenwright, D A; Bernjak, A; Draegni, T; Dzeroski, S; Entwistle, M; Horvat, M; Kvandal, P; Landsverk, S A; McClintock, P V E; Musizza, B; Petrovčič, J; Raeder, J; Sheppard, L W; Smith, A F; Stankovski, T; Stefanovska, A

    2015-12-01

    Depth of anaesthesia monitors usually analyse cerebral function with or without other physiological signals; non-invasive monitoring of the measured cardiorespiratory signals alone would offer a simple, practical alternative. We aimed to investigate whether such signals, analysed with novel, non-linear dynamic methods, would distinguish between the awake and anaesthetised states. We recorded ECG, respiration, skin temperature, pulse and skin conductivity before and during general anaesthesia in 27 subjects in good cardiovascular health, randomly allocated to receive propofol or sevoflurane. Mean values, variability and dynamic interactions were determined. Respiratory rate (p = 0.0002), skin conductivity (p = 0.03) and skin temperature (p = 0.00006) changed with sevoflurane, and skin temperature (p = 0.0005) with propofol. Pulse transit time increased by 17% with sevoflurane (p = 0.02) and 11% with propofol (p = 0.007). Sevoflurane reduced the wavelet energy of heart (p = 0.0004) and respiratory (p = 0.02) rate variability at all frequencies, whereas propofol decreased only the heart rate variability below 0.021 Hz (p < 0.05). The phase coherence was reduced by both agents at frequencies below 0.145 Hz (p < 0.05), whereas the cardiorespiratory synchronisation time was increased (p < 0.05). A classification analysis based on an optimal set of discriminatory parameters distinguished with 95% success between the awake and anaesthetised states. We suggest that these results can contribute to the design of new monitors of anaesthetic depth based on cardiovascular signals alone. PMID:26350998

  4. Distinct spatiotemporal activity in principal neurons of the mouse olfactory bulb in anesthetized and awake states

    PubMed Central

    Blauvelt, David G.; Sato, Tomokazu F.; Wienisch, Martin; Murthy, Venkatesh N.

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of olfactory information and its early processing in mammals are modulated by brain states through sniffing behavior and neural feedback. We imaged the spatiotemporal pattern of odor-evoked activity in a population of output neurons (mitral/tufted cells, MTCs) in the olfactory bulb (OB) of head-restrained mice expressing a genetically-encoded calcium indicator. The temporal dynamics of MTC population activity were relatively simple in anesthetized animals, but were highly variable in awake animals. However, the apparently irregular activity in awake animals could be predicted well using sniff timing measured externally, or inferred through fluctuations in the global responses of MTC population even without explicit knowledge of sniff times. The overall spatial pattern of activity was conserved across states, but odor responses had a diffuse spatial component in anesthetized mice that was less prominent during wakefulness. Multi-photon microscopy indicated that MTC lateral dendrites were the likely source of spatially disperse responses in the anesthetized animal. Our data demonstrate that the temporal and spatial dynamics of MTCs can be significantly modulated by behavioral state, and that the ensemble activity of MTCs can provide information about sniff timing to downstream circuits to help decode odor responses. PMID:23543674

  5. Technical and Conceptual Considerations for Performing and Interpreting Functional MRI Studies in Awake Rats

    PubMed Central

    Febo, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies in rodents have the potential to provide insight into neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions. The strength of the technique lies in its non-invasive nature that can permit longitudinal functional studies in the same animal over its adult life. The relatively good spatial and temporal resolution and the ever-growing database on the biological and biophysical basis of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal make it a unique technique in preclinical neuroscience research. Our laboratory has used imaging to investigate brain activation in awake rats following cocaine administration and during the presentation of lactation-associated sensory stimuli. Factors that deserve attention when planning functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in rats include technical issues, animal physiology and interpretability of the resulting data. The present review discusses the pros and cons of animal imaging with a particular focus on the technical aspects of studies with awake rats. Overall, the benefits of the technique outweigh its limitations and the rapidly evolving methods will open the way for more laboratories to employ the technique in neuroscience research. PMID:21808625

  6. A novel tablet computer platform for advanced language mapping during awake craniotomy procedures.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Melanie A; Tam, Fred; Garavaglia, Marco M; Golestanirad, Laleh; Hare, Gregory M T; Cusimano, Michael D; Schweizer, Tom A; Das, Sunit; Graham, Simon J

    2016-04-01

    A computerized platform has been developed to enhance behavioral testing during intraoperative language mapping in awake craniotomy procedures. The system is uniquely compatible with the environmental demands of both the operating room and preoperative functional MRI (fMRI), thus providing standardized testing toward improving spatial agreement between the 2 brain mapping techniques. Details of the platform architecture, its advantages over traditional testing methods, and its use for language mapping are described. Four illustrative cases demonstrate the efficacy of using the testing platform to administer sophisticated language paradigms, and the spatial agreement between intraoperative mapping and preoperative fMRI results. The testing platform substantially improved the ability of the surgeon to detect and characterize language deficits. Use of a written word generation task to assess language production helped confirm areas of speech apraxia and speech arrest that were inadequately characterized or missed with the use of traditional paradigms, respectively. Preoperative fMRI of the analogous writing task was also assistive, displaying excellent spatial agreement with intraoperative mapping in all 4 cases. Sole use of traditional testing paradigms can be limiting during awake craniotomy procedures. Comprehensive assessment of language function will require additional use of more sophisticated and ecologically valid testing paradigms. The platform presented here provides a means to do so. PMID:26473779

  7. Indirect self-modulation instability measurement concept for the AWAKE proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M.; Petrenko, A.; Biskup, B.; Burger, S.; Gschwendtner, E.; Lotov, K. V.; Mazzoni, S.; Vincke, H.

    2016-09-01

    AWAKE, the Advanced Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment, is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN using a 400 GeV / c proton beam from the CERN SPS (longitudinal beam size σz = 12 cm) which will be sent into a 10 m long plasma section with a nominal density of ≈ 7 ×1014 atoms /cm3 (plasma wavelength λp = 1.2 mm). In this paper we show that by measuring the time integrated transverse profile of the proton bunch at two locations downstream of the AWAKE plasma, information about the occurrence of the self-modulation instability (SMI) can be inferred. In particular we show that measuring defocused protons with an angle of 1 mrad corresponds to having electric fields in the order of GV/m and fully developed self-modulation of the proton bunch. Additionally, by measuring the defocused beam edge of the self-modulated bunch, information about the growth rate of the instability can be extracted. If hosing instability occurs, it could be detected by measuring a non-uniform defocused beam shape with changing radius. Using a 1 mm thick Chromox scintillation screen for imaging of the self-modulated proton bunch, an edge resolution of 0.6 mm and hence an SMI saturation point resolution of 1.2 m can be achieved.

  8. Brain imaging in awake infants by near-infrared optical topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taga, Gentaro; Asakawa, Kayo; Maki, Atsushi; Konishi, Yukuo; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2003-09-01

    Studies of young infants are critical to understand perceptual, motor, and cognitive processing in humans. However, brain mechanisms involved are poorly understood, because the use of brain-imaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake infants is difficult. In the present study we show functional brain imaging of awake infants viewing visual stimuli by means of multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy, a technique that permits a measurement of cerebral hemoglobin oxygenation in response to brain activation through the intact skull without subject constraint. We found that event-related increases in oxyhemoglobin were evident in localized areas of the occipital cortex of infants aged 2-4 months in response to a brief presentation of a checkerboard pattern reversal while they maintained fixation to attention-grabbing stimuli. The dynamic change in cerebral blood oxygenation was qualitatively similar to that observed in the adult brain. This result introduces near-infrared optical topography as a method for investigating the functional development of the brain in early infancy.

  9. Association of Awake Bruxism with Khat, Coffee, Tobacco, and Stress among Jazan University Students

    PubMed Central

    Quadri, Mir Faeq Ali; Mahnashi, Ali; Al Almutahhir, Ayman; Tubayqi, Hamzah; Hakami, Abdullah; Arishi, Mohamed; Alamir, Abdulwahab

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The objective is to assess the prevalence of bruxism among the university students and to check its association with their khat chewing habit. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study is designed using cluster random sampling. Pretested questionnaire was administered by a trained interviewer to assess awake bruxism and the use of variables like khat, coffee, tobacco, and stress. Chi-square test at 5% significance was used for assessing the association. Logistic regression was also performed after adjusting for covariates. Results. A high response rate (95%) was obtained as the distribution and collection of questionnaire was within an hour interval. 85% (63%, males; 22%, females) experienced an episode of bruxism at least one time in the past six months. Regression analysis revealed an association of stress (P = 0.00; OR = 5.902, 95% CI 2.614–13.325) and khat use (P = 0.05; OR = 1.629, 95% CI 0.360–7.368) with bruxism. Interestingly, it is observed that the one who chew khat experienced 3.56 times (95% CI; 2.62–11.22) less pain when compared to the nonusers. Conclusion. This study is the first of its kind to assess the association of bruxism with khat chewing. High amount of stress and khat use can be considered as important risk indicators for awake bruxism. PMID:26491448

  10. Status of the proton and electron transfer lines for the AWAKE Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. S.; Bauche, J.; Biskup, B.; Bracco, C.; Doebert, S.; Goddard, B.; Gschwendtner, E.; Jensen, L. K.; Jones, O. R.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Velotti, F. M.; Vorozhtsov, A.

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN is planned to study proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration with an externally injected electron beam. Therefore two transfer lines are being designed in order to provide the proton beam from the SPS and the electron beam from an RF gun to the plasma cell. The commissioning of the proton line will take place in 2016 for the first phase of the experiment, which is focused on the self-modulation of a 12 cm long proton bunch in the plasma. The electron line will be added for the second phase of AWAKE in 2017, when the wakefield will be probed with an electron beam of 10-20 MeV/c. The challenge for these transfer lines lies in the parallel operation of the proton, electron and laser beam used to ionize the plasma and seed the self-modulation. These beams, of different characteristics, need to be synchronized and positioned for optimized injection conditions into the wakefield. This task requires great flexibility in the transfer line optics. The status of these designs will be presented in this paper.

  11. Layer-Specific Refinement of Visual Cortex Function after Eye Opening in the Awake Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    The laminar structure and conserved cellular organization of mouse visual cortex provide a useful model to determine the mechanisms underlying the development of visual system function. However, the normal development of many receptive field properties has not yet been thoroughly quantified, particularly with respect to layer identity and in the absence of anesthesia. Here, we use multisite electrophysiological recording in the awake mouse across an extended period of development, starting at eye opening, to measure receptive field properties and behavioral-state modulation of responsiveness. We find selective responses for orientation, direction, and spatial frequency at eye opening, which are similar across cortical layers. After this initial similarity, we observe layer-specific maturation of orientation selectivity, direction selectivity, and linearity over the following week. Developmental increases in selectivity are most robust and similar between layers 2–4, whereas layers 5 and 6 undergo distinct refinement patterns. Finally, we studied layer-specific behavioral-state modulation of cortical activity and observed a striking reorganization in the effects of running on response gain. During week 1 after eye opening, running increases responsiveness in layers 4 and 5, whereas in adulthood, the effects of running are most pronounced in layer 2/3. Together, these data demonstrate that response selectivity is present in all layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) at eye opening in the awake mouse and identify the features of basic V1 function that are further shaped over this early developmental period in a layer-specific manner. PMID:25716837

  12. Disrupting neural activity related to awake-state sharp wave-ripple complexes prevents hippocampal learning.

    PubMed

    Nokia, Miriam S; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Penttonen, Markku; Wikgren, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Oscillations in hippocampal local-field potentials (LFPs) reflect the crucial involvement of the hippocampus in memory trace formation: theta (4-8 Hz) oscillations and ripples (~200 Hz) occurring during sharp waves are thought to mediate encoding and consolidation, respectively. During sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs), hippocampal cell firing closely follows the pattern that took place during the initial experience, most likely reflecting replay of that event. Disrupting hippocampal ripples using electrical stimulation either during training in awake animals or during sleep after training retards spatial learning. Here, adult rabbits were trained in trace eyeblink conditioning, a hippocampus-dependent associative learning task. A bright light was presented to the animals during the inter-trial interval (ITI), when awake, either during SPW-Rs or irrespective of their neural state. Learning was particularly poor when the light was presented following SPW-Rs. While the light did not disrupt the ripple itself, it elicited a theta-band oscillation, a state that does not usually coincide with SPW-Rs. Thus, it seems that consolidation depends on neuronal activity within and beyond the hippocampus taking place immediately after, but by no means limited to, hippocampal SPW-Rs. PMID:23316148

  13. DIEP Flap for Breast Reconstruction Using Epidural Anesthesia with the Patient Awake

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Marco; de la Garza, Jonatan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many articles have been published about breast reconstruction using the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap; however, few articles have been published in plastic/reconstructive surgery journals describing the difference between anesthetic techniques and recovery in microsurgical patients. Methods: We analyzed 16 patients who underwent DIEP flap for breast reconstruction. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1: general anesthesia (n = 9); group 2: epidural block with the patient awake (n = 7). In group 2, the peridural block was done at 2 levels: thoracic (T2–T3) and lumbar (L2–L3). Results: The success rate was 100% with no partial or total loss of the flap. There was no difference between groups in regard to postoperative pain in the first 5 days (Visual Analog Scale). Analgesia used in group 1 was buprenorphine and ketorolac, and in group 2, only ketorolac without opioid derivatives. Immediate postoperative recovery was better in the peridural group than in the group administered general anesthesia (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: DIEP flap with peridural block and the patient awake during surgery is a feasible technique with better recovery in the immediate postoperative period, achieving good analgesia level with minimal intravenous medication.

  14. Right Cortical and Axonal Structures Eliciting Ocular Deviation During Electrical Stimulation Mapping in Awake Patients.

    PubMed

    Montemurro, Nicola; Herbet, Guillaume; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the neural network underpinning eye movements, a cortical and subcortical intraoperative mapping using direct electrical stimulation (DES) was achieved in six awake patients during surgery for a right frontal low-grade glioma. We assessed the relationship between the occurrence of ocular deviation during both cortical and axonal DES and the anatomic location for each response. The corresponding stimulation sites were reported on a standard brain template for visual analysis and between-subjects comparisons. Our results showed that DES of the cortical frontal eye field (FEF) elicited horizontal (anterior FEF) or upward (posterior FEF) eye movements in 3 patients, supporting the fact that FEF comprises several distinct functional subregions. In addition, subcortical stimulation of the white matter tracts underneath the FEF evoked conjugate contraversive ocular deviation in 3 other patients. Interestingly, this region seems to be a crossroad between the fronto-striatal tract, the frontal aslant tract, the inferior fronto-occipital fascicle and the superior longitudinal fascicle. No deficits in eye movements were observed following surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting ocular deviation during axonal electrostimulation mapping of the white matter fibers in awake patients. Therefore, our original data issued from DES give new insights into the cortical and subcortical structures involved in the control of eye movements and their strong relationships with other functional pathways. PMID:27067598

  15. No short-term effects of digital mobile radio telephone on the awake human electroencephalogram

    SciTech Connect

    Roeschke, J.; Mann, K.

    1997-05-01

    A recent study reported the results of an exploratory study of alterations of the quantitative sleep profile due to the effects of a digital mobile radio telephone. Rapid eye movement (REM) was suppressed, and the spectral power density in the 8--13 Hz frequency range during REM sleep was altered. The aim of the present study was to illuminate the influence of digital mobile radio telephone on the awake electroencephalogram (EEG) of healthy subjects. For this purpose, the authors investigated 34 male subjects in a single-blind cross-over design experiment by measuring spontaneous EEGs under closed-eyes condition from scalp positions C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} and comparing the effects of an active and an inactive digital mobile radio telephone (GSM) system. During exposure of nearly 3.5 min to the 900 MHz electromagnetic field pulsed at a frequency of 217 Hz and with a pulse width of 580 {micro}s, the authors could not detect any difference in the awake EEGs in terms of spectral power density measures.

  16. Lower "awake and fed thermogenesis" predicts future weight gain in subjects with abdominal adiposity.

    PubMed

    Piaggi, Paolo; Krakoff, Jonathan; Bogardus, Clifton; Thearle, Marie S

    2013-12-01

    Awake and fed thermogenesis (AFT) is the energy expenditure (EE) of the nonactive fed condition above the minimum metabolic requirement during sleep and is composed of the thermic effect of food and the cost of being awake. AFT was estimated from whole-room 24-h EE measures in 509 healthy subjects (368 Native Americans and 141 whites) while subjects consumed a eucaloric diet. Follow-up data were available for 290 Native Americans (median follow-up time: 6.6 years). AFT accounted for ~10% of 24-h EE and explained a significant portion of deviations from expected energy requirements. Energy intake was the major determinant of AFT. AFT, normalized as a percentage of intake, was inversely related to age and fasting glucose concentration and showed a nonlinear relationship with waist circumference and BMI. Spline analysis demonstrated that AFT becomes inversely related to BMI at an inflection point of 29 kg/m(2). The residual variance of AFT, after accounting for covariates, predicted future weight change only in subjects with a BMI >29 kg/m(2). AFT may influence daily energy balance, is reduced in obese individuals, and predicts future weight gain in these subjects. Once central adiposity develops, a blunting of AFT may occur that then contributes to further weight gain. PMID:23974925

  17. [Perioperative management of an obese patient complicated with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) undergoing awake craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Komayama, Noriaki; Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Both obesity (BMI over 30) and SAS are risks for Supper airway maintenance. We report an obese patient (BMI 33.5) with SAS who underwent awake craniotomy. Weight reduction was instructed 1 month before the operation, and the patient lost enough weight to use intraoperative MRI. Under general anesthesia, surgical pads containing 2% lidocaine with adrenaline were inserted into the nasal cavities. The patient's airway S was secured by i-gel® until dura was opened. A nasal airway was then inserted to confirm the upper airway patency and anesthetics were terminated The patient regained consciousness and started respiration. The i-gel® was removed. The nasal airway was changed to an RAE tracheal tube ; the tube was fixed above the vocal cords under bronchofiberscopic observation. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via RAE tube was started. Neither coughing nor epistaxis was observed.The RAE tube prevented glossoptosis and did not disturb speech mapping. Emergent endotracheal intubation was easily managed because the tube was close to the glottis. The RAE tube was removed and nasal CP AP was applied overnight Carefully prepared CP AP support via nasal RAE tube was practical in keeping upper airway patency for an obese patient complicated with SAS undergoing awake craniotomy. PMID:25693340

  18. Membrane Potential Dynamics of Spontaneous and Visually Evoked Gamma Activity in V1 of Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perrenoud, Quentin; Pennartz, Cyriel M. A.; Gentet, Luc J.

    2016-01-01

    Cortical gamma activity (30–80 Hz) is believed to play important functions in neural computation and arises from the interplay of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV) and pyramidal cells (PYRs). However, the subthreshold dynamics underlying its emergence in the cortex of awake animals remain unclear. Here, we characterized the intracellular dynamics of PVs and PYRs during spontaneous and visually evoked gamma activity in layers 2/3 of V1 of awake mice using targeted patch-clamp recordings and synchronous local field potentials (LFPs). Strong gamma activity patterned in short bouts (one to three cycles), occurred when PVs and PYRs were depolarizing and entrained their membrane potential dynamics regardless of the presence of visual stimulation. PV firing phase locked unconditionally to gamma activity. However, PYRs only phase locked to visually evoked gamma bouts. Taken together, our results indicate that gamma activity corresponds to short pulses of correlated background synaptic activity synchronizing the output of cortical neurons depending on external sensory drive. PMID:26890123

  19. Influence of hemorrhage on adrenal secretion, blood glucose and serum insulin in the awake pig.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, L C; Curtin, R; Sapira, J D

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to quantitate the adrenal medullary and cortical response to hemorrhage in awake animals bled at different rates and to relate these responses to simultaneous changes in blood glucose and serum insulin. A series of awake pigs were bled either slowly or rapidly of 30% of their calculated blood volume. Infusions of exogenous epinephrine were performed in an additional series of unbled animals and infusions of epinephrine plus hydrocortisone were similarly performed in an additonal series. Increase in blood glucose and epinephrine secretion rate following hemorrhage were found to be significantly dependent upon the rate of initial hemorrhage. Cortisol secretion was found to rise significantly during and following hemorrhage in both rapidly and slowly bled animals. Serum insulin levels remained at baseline levels during shock, despite the presence of significant hyperglycemia. In unbled animals infused with epinephrine at rates comparable to those measured in shock, elevations in blood glucose were markedly lower, shifting to the right of the dose-response curve during hemorrhage. Simultaneous infusions of cortisol and epinephrine resulted in a dose-response curve which did not differ significantly from that following infusion of epinephrine alone. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1247317

  20. Mismatch Responses in the Awake Rat: Evidence from Epidural Recordings of Auditory Cortical Fields

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Fabienne; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Backes, Heiko; Moran, Rosalyn; Gramer, Markus; Kumagai, Tetsuya; Graf, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Detecting sudden environmental changes is crucial for the survival of humans and animals. In the human auditory system the mismatch negativity (MMN), a component of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), reflects the violation of predictable stimulus regularities, established by the previous auditory sequence. Given the considerable potentiality of the MMN for clinical applications, establishing valid animal models that allow for detailed investigation of its neurophysiological mechanisms is important. Rodent studies, so far almost exclusively under anesthesia, have not provided decisive evidence whether an MMN analogue exists in rats. This may be due to several factors, including the effect of anesthesia. We therefore used epidural recordings in awake black hooded rats, from two auditory cortical areas in both hemispheres, and with bandpass filtered noise stimuli that were optimized in frequency and duration for eliciting MMN in rats. Using a classical oddball paradigm with frequency deviants, we detected mismatch responses at all four electrodes in primary and secondary auditory cortex, with morphological and functional properties similar to those known in humans, i.e., large amplitude biphasic differences that increased in amplitude with decreasing deviant probability. These mismatch responses significantly diminished in a control condition that removed the predictive context while controlling for presentation rate of the deviants. While our present study does not allow for disambiguating precisely the relative contribution of adaptation and prediction error processing to the observed mismatch responses, it demonstrates that MMN-like potentials can be obtained in awake and unrestrained rats. PMID:23646197

  1. Episodic-like memory trace in awake replay of hippocampal place cell activity sequences

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory retrieval of events at a specific place and time is effective for future planning. Sequential reactivation of the hippocampal place cells along familiar paths while the animal pauses is well suited to such a memory retrieval process. It is, however, unknown whether this awake replay represents events occurring along the path. Using a subtask switching protocol in which the animal experienced three subtasks as ‘what’ information in a maze, I here show that the replay represents a trial type, consisting of path and subtask, in terms of neuronal firing timings and rates. The actual trial type to be rewarded could only be reliably predicted from replays that occurred at the decision point. This trial-type representation implies that not only ‘where and when’ but also ‘what’ information is contained in the replay. This result supports the view that awake replay is an episodic-like memory retrieval process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08105.001 PMID:26481131

  2. Patterns of activity evoked in cerebellar interpositus nuclear neurones by natural somatosensory stimuli in awake cats

    PubMed Central

    Cody, Frederick W. J.; Moore, R. Brantingham; Richardson, Helen C.

    1981-01-01

    1. Stable extracellular unitary recordings were made from 138 cerebellar interpositus nuclear neurones (IPNs) in awake cats. Mean background discharge, in animals in a state of relaxed wakefulness and in the absence of overt movement, was 41·0±2·6 impulses/sec (mean±s.e.m). 2. Animals were trained to accept a variety of sensory testing procedures without producing detectable motor reactions. Mechanical taps (1 mm amplitude; 20 msec overall duration) applied to the main pads or dorsal surfaces of the forepaws and/or hind paws modified discharge in forty-eight of 110 IPNs tested. Response patterns to taps generally comprised one or more of three basic components, namely: short-latency excitation, e1, at onset latencies of 13·0±0·9 msec (mean±s.e.m.) for ipsilateral forepaw (iF) and 17·0±0·7 msec for ipsilateral hind paw (iH); a period of reduced discharge, at latencies 25·6±2·6 msec for iF and 32·3±2·1 msec for iH; a delayed acceleration of discharge, e2, at latencies 47·4±4·6 msec for iF and 46·4±4·1 msec for iH. The component e1 was the most common (present in 80% of responses) and e2 the least common (present in 18% of responses). 3. The majority (> 70%) of responses of IPNs to tap stimulation of the paws comprised net excitation. 4. Convergence of tap-evoked sensory input from iF and iH on to individual IPNs was evident in eight of the thirty-five units tested with stimulation of both afferent sites. 5. Approximately one third of IPNs so tested were sensitive to passive manipulation of limb joints in the quiet, awake cat. Sixteen of the forty-three IPNs so tested responded to displacement of the ipsilateral wrist and/or elbow joints and three of ten IPNs so tested responded to movement of contralateral forepaw joints. Corresponding proportions of IPNs responding to passive ankle and/or knee joint displacements were sixteen of thirty-six units tested and three of three units tested for ipsilateral and contralateral hind paws respectively

  3. Speaking Freely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jamal Eric

    2012-01-01

    Ask Princeton University's Dr. Cornel West about his views on Black History Month, and somehow the conversation ends up with a sharp critique of the Obama administration. This article profiles West who pulls no punches when it comes to his advocacy for impoverished Americans. For more than three decades, the 58-year-old philosopher has combined…

  4. Simultaneous recording of the field-EPSP as well as the population spike in the CA1 region in freely moving rats by using a fixed "double"-recording electrode.

    PubMed

    Scherf, Thomas; Frey, Julietta U; Frey, Sabine

    2010-04-30

    The recording of field potentials in freely moving rats is a very appropriate and commonly used method to describe changes in cellular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. Recently, we introduced a method for the simultaneous recording of both the field-EPSP as well as the population spike in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats. We used self-made "double"-recording electrodes, consisting of two wires straighten together with a constant distance between both tips. This method was now further developed to obtain stable long-term recordings of CA1 field potentials. Rats were chronically implanted with a bipolar recording electrode; one tip of which reached the stratum radiatum to record the field-EPSP, the other tip was lowered into the stratum pyramidale of the same neuron population to record the population spike by stimulation of the contralateral CA3 (cCA3). In such prepared rats, simultaneously recorded field-EPSP as well as the population spike where thus obtained from their places of generation in a very reliable manner. This kind of preparation allowed a better standardization of stimulation intensities between different animals and stable electrophysiological recordings of both CA1-potentials over a time period of at least 24h in freely behaving animals. Furthermore, primed burst stimulation of the cCA3 (a single biphasic priming pulse was followed by a burst of 10 pulses (frequency of 100 Hz) 190 ms later; pulse duration per half-wave: 0.1 ms) resulted in an early-LTP of both measured parameters, the field-EPSP and the population spike in the CA1 region of freely moving rats. PMID:20105443

  5. Emotions in freely varying and mono-pitched vowels, acoustic and EGG analyses.

    PubMed

    Waaramaa, Teija; Palo, Pertti; Kankare, Elina

    2015-12-01

    Vocal emotions are expressed either by speech or singing. The difference is that in singing the pitch is predetermined while in speech it may vary freely. It was of interest to study whether there were voice quality differences between freely varying and mono-pitched vowels expressed by professional actors. Given their profession, actors have to be able to express emotions both by speech and singing. Electroglottogram and acoustic analyses of emotional utterances embedded in expressions of freely varying vowels [a:], [i:], [u:] (96 samples) and mono-pitched protracted vowels (96 samples) were studied. Contact quotient (CQEGG) was calculated using 35%, 55%, and 80% threshold levels. Three different threshold levels were used in order to evaluate their effects on emotions. Genders were studied separately. The results suggested significant gender differences for CQEGG 80% threshold level. SPL, CQEGG, and F4 were used to convey emotions, but to a lesser degree, when F0 was predetermined. Moreover, females showed fewer significant variations than males. Both genders used more hypofunctional phonation type in mono-pitched utterances than in the expressions with freely varying pitch. The present material warrants further study of the interplay between CQEGG threshold levels and formant frequencies, and listening tests to investigate the perceptual value of the mono-pitched vowels in the communication of emotions. PMID:24998780

  6. Spontaneous and repetitive cardiac slowdown in the freely moving spiny lobster, Panulirus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, T; Katsuyama, T

    2001-12-01

    The fluctuation of heartbeat interval was investigated to assess cardio-regulatory nervous function in freely moving spiny lobsters. This was performed by time series analysis of the heartbeat interval recorded from restrained animals, freely moving animals, and isolated hearts. The heart rate of freely moving animals exhibited on/off switching: i.e., an elevated and maintained rate was repetitively interrupted by periods of decreased rate. Each period was initiated by a sudden decrease in rate and was terminated by an exponential return to normal activity. In order to explain this characteristic change in heart rate, we have constructed a neurotransmitter release-reuptake model for such bi-stable activity of cardio-regulatory nerves. The model was successful in reproducing the characteristic observed fluctuation. In freely moving animals, the brain seems to regulate the heart through the inhibitory nerve in an "on/off" manner. In the hearts of restrained animals and isolated hearts, the heart rate exhibited white-noise like fluctuation. This implies that stress impairs the normal bi-stable regulatory mode. PMID:11800038

  7. Awake Craniotomy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... development and features the area’s only neuro intensive care unit. In today’s broadcast you will be part ... brain tumor centers are offering this type of care, and I feel like we’re fortunate here ...

  8. REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF AIRWAY RESPONSES TO SULOFUR DIOXIDE (SO2) IN AN INTACT, AWAKE GUINEA PIG MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time measurment of airway responses to Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) in an intact, awake guinea pig model. J Stanek1,2, Q Krantz2, J Nolan2, D Winsett2, W Watkinson2, and D Costa2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, NHEERL, US...

  9. COMPARISON OF CARDIOPULMONARY FUNCTION IN AWAKE FISCHER-344 AND SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS EXPOSED TO CARBON DIOXIDE: A COMPUTERIZED TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A system has been developed to measure simultaneously the effects of inhaled toxicants on cardiopulmonary function in four awake rats before, during and after exposure. ne day prior to testing, Fischer-344 and Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with an intrapleural or carotid cat...

  10. Awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by anesthesia induction in prone patients: A pilot observational study.

    PubMed

    Heng, Lei; Wang, Ming-Yu; Sun, Hou-Liang; Zhu, Shan-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Anesthesia followed by placement in the prone position takes time and may result in complications. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by anesthesia induction in prone-positioned patients under general anesthesia.Sixty-two patients (ASA physical status I-II) scheduled for awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and prone self-positioning before surgery under general anesthesia were selected. Patient preparation began with detailed preoperative counseling regarding the procedure. Premedication with sedative and antisialagogue was followed by airway anesthesia with topical lidocaine; then, awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation was carried out. The patients then positioned themselves comfortably before induction of general anesthesia. The changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), incidence of coughing or gagging, and rate pressure product (RPP) were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated-measures one-way analysis of variance.Fifty-eight of the 62 patients completed prone self-positioning smoothly. Compared with values before intubation, SBP, DBP, HR, and RPP were slightly increased after intubation, although the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). One patient had moderate coughing and 1 patient had gagging during prone self-positioning, which were tolerable.These findings indicated that awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by induction of anesthesia is safe and feasible alternative to routine prone positioning after induction of general anesthesia. PMID:27512858

  11. Characterization of motor units in behaving adult mice shows a wide primary range

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Laura K.; Tresch, Matthew C.; Heckman, C. J.; Manuel, Marin

    2014-01-01

    The mouse is essential for genetic studies of motor function in both normal and pathological states. Thus it is important to consider whether the structure of motor output from the mouse is in fact analogous to that recorded in other animals. There is a striking difference in the basic electrical properties of mouse motoneurons compared with those in rats, cats, and humans. The firing evoked by injected currents produces a unique frequency-current (F-I) function that emphasizes recruitment of motor units at their maximum force. These F-I functions, however, were measured in anesthetized preparations that lacked two key components of normal synaptic input: high levels of synaptic noise and neuromodulatory inputs. Recent studies suggest that the alterations in the F-I function due to these two components are essential for recreating firing behavior of motor units in human subjects. In this study we provide the first data on firing patterns of motor units in the awake mouse, focusing on steady output in quiet stance. The resulting firing patterns did not match the predictions from the mouse F-I behaviors but instead revealed rate modulation across a remarkably wide range (10–60 Hz). The low end of the firing range may be due to changes in the F-I relation induced by synaptic noise and neuromodulatory inputs. The high end of the range may indicate that, unlike other species, quiet standing in the mouse involves recruitment of relatively fast-twitch motor units. PMID:24805075

  12. A watertight acrylic-free titanium recording chamber for electrophysiology in behaving monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Economides, John R.; Jocson, Cristina M.; Parker, John M.; Horton, Jonathan C.

    2011-01-01

    Neurophysiological recording in alert monkeys requires the creation of a permanent aperture in the skull for repeated insertion of microelectrodes. Most laboratories use polymethyl methacrylate to attach a recording chamber over the skull opening. Here, we describe a titanium chamber that fastens to the skull with screws, using no polymethyl methacrylate. The gap between the base of the chamber and the skull is filled with hydroxyapatite, forming a watertight gasket. As the chamber base osseointegates with the skull, the hydroxyapatite is replaced with bone. Rather than having a finite lifetime, the recording chamber becomes more firmly anchored the longer it is in place. It has a small footprint, low profile, and needs little maintenance to control infection. Toilette consists of occasional application of betadine to clean the scalp margin, followed by application of neomycin, polymyxin, and bacitracin ointment. Antibiotic is also placed inside the chamber to suppress bacterial proliferation. Thickening of the dura within the chamber can be prevented by regular application of mitocycin C and/or bevacizumab, an antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor. By conducting an e-mail survey, this protocol for chamber maintenance was compared with procedures used in 37 other vision research laboratories. Refinement of appliances and techniques used for recordings in awake monkeys promises to increase the pace of scientific discovery and to benefit animal welfare. PMID:21676928

  13. Characterization of motor units in behaving adult mice shows a wide primary range.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Laura K; Tresch, Matthew C; Heckman, C J; Manuel, Marin; Tysseling, Vicki M

    2014-08-01

    The mouse is essential for genetic studies of motor function in both normal and pathological states. Thus it is important to consider whether the structure of motor output from the mouse is in fact analogous to that recorded in other animals. There is a striking difference in the basic electrical properties of mouse motoneurons compared with those in rats, cats, and humans. The firing evoked by injected currents produces a unique frequency-current (F-I) function that emphasizes recruitment of motor units at their maximum force. These F-I functions, however, were measured in anesthetized preparations that lacked two key components of normal synaptic input: high levels of synaptic noise and neuromodulatory inputs. Recent studies suggest that the alterations in the F-I function due to these two components are essential for recreating firing behavior of motor units in human subjects. In this study we provide the first data on firing patterns of motor units in the awake mouse, focusing on steady output in quiet stance. The resulting firing patterns did not match the predictions from the mouse F-I behaviors but instead revealed rate modulation across a remarkably wide range (10-60 Hz). The low end of the firing range may be due to changes in the F-I relation induced by synaptic noise and neuromodulatory inputs. The high end of the range may indicate that, unlike other species, quiet standing in the mouse involves recruitment of relatively fast-twitch motor units. PMID:24805075

  14. Cardiorespiratory effects of a 5HT2 antagonist (R51703) in awake and anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, T J; McDonell, W N; Dyson, D H; Black, W D

    1996-01-01

    To investigate cardiorespiratory effects of an experimental 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist (R51703) with sedative properties, intramuscular doses of the drug were studied in 6 awake dogs of mixed breed, and in 6 anesthetized beagles. Two doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) of R51703 and a saline control were studied in the awake dogs using a randomized crossover trial. Subsequently, the higher dose of R51703 was included as a component of halothane anesthesia to determine whether the halothane sparing effect of R51703 produced a beneficial alteration of hemodynamic function. Data were obtained at equipotent halothane/R51703 (H/R) and halothane/saline (H/S) doses equivalent to 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 MAC. In awake dogs, heart rates tended to be lower in dogs sedated with R51703, significantly so at 30 min for both doses, and at 90 and 120 min for the 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg doses, respectively (P < 0.05). The cardiac index (CI) was lower at 60 min with both doses compared to the saline control group. Both doses of R51703 reduced mean blood pressure at 30, 90 and 120 min, and diastolic pressure at 30 and 90 min after administration; however, systolic blood pressure (SBP) was not altered. Overall, the cardiovascular alterations were minimal in conscious dogs and there was no evidence of respiratory depression. In the anesthetized dogs, at equipotent MAC, CI tended to be lower with H/R than with H/S, though the difference was not significant. Heart rate and stroke volume index also tended to be lower in the dogs treated with R51703, while systemic vascular resistance tended to be higher: these changes were not significant. Mean and SBP were higher at each MAC multiple in the H/R group. It was concluded that the halothane sparing effect of R51703 did not substantially improve hemodynamic function compared to the use of halothane alone at equipotent doses. PMID:8809379

  15. Single neurons with both form/color differential responses and saccade-related responses in the nonretinotopic pulvinar of the behaving macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Benevento, L A; Port, J D

    1995-01-01

    The nonretinotopic portion of the macaque pulvinar complex is interconnected with the occipitoparietal and occipitotemporal transcortical visual systems where information about the location and motion of a visual object or its form and color are modulated by eye movements and attention. We recorded from single cells in and about the border of the dorsal portion of the lateral pulvinar and the adjacent medial pulvinar of awake behaving Macaca mulatta in order to determine how the properties of these two functionally dichotomous cortical systems were represented. We found a class of pulvinar neurons that responded differentially to ten different patterns or broadband wavelengths (colors). Thirty-four percent of cells tested responded to the presentation of at least one of the pattern or color stimuli. These cells often discharged to several of the patterns or colors, but responded best to only one or two of them, and 86% were found to have statistically significant pattern and/or color preferences. Pattern/color preferential cells had an average latency of 79.1 +/- 46.0 ms (range 31-186 ms), responding well before most inferotemporal cortical cell responses. Visually guided and memory-guided saccade tasks showed that 58% of pattern/color preferential cells also had saccade-related properties, e.g. directional presaccadic and postsaccadic discharges, and inhibition of activity during the saccade. In the pulvinar, the mean presacadic response latency was earlier, and the mean postsaccadic response latency was later, than those reported for parietal cortex. We also discovered that the strength of response to patterns or colors changed depending upon the behavioral setting. In comparison to trials in which the monkey fixated dead ahead during passive presentations of pattern and color stimuli, 92% of the cells showed attenuated responses to the same passive presentation of patterns and colors during fixation when these trials were interleaved with trials which also

  16. Classifying multiple types of hand motions using electrocorticography during intraoperative awake craniotomy and seizure monitoring processes-case studies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Zhang, Dingguo; Wu, Zehan; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, some case studies were conducted to classify several kinds of hand motions from electrocorticography (ECoG) signals during intraoperative awake craniotomy & extraoperative seizure monitoring processes. Four subjects (P1, P2 with intractable epilepsy during seizure monitoring and P3, P4 with brain tumor during awake craniotomy) participated in the experiments. Subjects performed three types of hand motions (Grasp, Thumb-finger motion and Index-finger motion) contralateral to the motor cortex covered with ECoG electrodes. Two methods were used for signal processing. Method I: autoregressive (AR) model with burg method was applied to extract features, and additional waveform length (WL) feature has been considered, finally the linear discriminative analysis (LDA) was used as the classifier. Method II: stationary subspace analysis (SSA) was applied for data preprocessing, and the common spatial pattern (CSP) was used for feature extraction before LDA decoding process. Applying method I, the three-class accuracy of P1~P4 were 90.17, 96.00, 91.77, and 92.95% respectively. For method II, the three-class accuracy of P1~P4 were 72.00, 93.17, 95.22, and 90.36% respectively. This study verified the possibility of decoding multiple hand motion types during an awake craniotomy, which is the first step toward dexterous neuroprosthetic control during surgical implantation, in order to verify the optimal placement of electrodes. The accuracy during awake craniotomy was comparable to results during seizure monitoring. This study also indicated that ECoG was a promising approach for precise identification of eloquent cortex during awake craniotomy, and might form a promising BCI system that could benefit both patients and neurosurgeons. PMID:26483627

  17. Peri-infarct depolarizations during focal ischemia in the awake Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat. Minimizing anesthesia confounds in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Kudo, K; Zhao, L; Nowak, T S

    2016-06-14

    Anesthesia profoundly impacts peri-infarct depolarizations (PIDs), but only one prior report has described their monitoring during experimental stroke in awake animals. Since temporal patterns of PID occurrence are model specific, the current study examined PID incidence during focal ischemia in the awake Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR), and documented the impact of both prior and concurrent isoflurane anesthesia. For awake recordings, electrodes were implanted under isoflurane anesthesia 1day to 5weeks prior to occlusion surgery. Rats were then subjected to permanent or transient (2h) tandem occlusion of the middle cerebral and ipsilateral common carotid arteries, followed by PID monitoring for up to 3days. Comparison perfusion imaging studies evaluated PID-associated hyperemic transients during permanent ischemia under anesthesia at varied intervals following prior isoflurane exposure. Prior anesthesia attenuated PID number at intervals up to 1week, establishing 2weeks as a practical recovery duration following surgical preparation to avoid isoflurane preconditioning effects. PIDs in awake SHR were limited to the first 4h after permanent occlusions. Maintaining anesthesia during this interval reduced PID number, and prolonged their occurrence through several hours following anesthesia termination. Although PID number otherwise correlated with infarct size, PID suppression by anesthesia was not protective in the absence of reperfusion. PIDs persisted up to 36h after transient occlusions. These results differ markedly from the one previous report of such monitoring in awake Sprague-Dawley rats, which found an extended biphasic PID time course during 24h after both permanent and transient filament occlusions. PID occurrence closely reflects the time course of infarct progression in the respective models, and may be more useful than absolute PID number as an index of ongoing pathology. PMID:27026594

  18. Long-term optical imaging of intrinsic signals in anesthetized and awake monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Anna W.

    2007-04-01

    Some exciting new efforts to use intrinsic signal optical imaging methods for long-term studies in anesthetized and awake monkeys are reviewed. The development of such methodologies opens the door for studying behavioral states such as attention, motivation, memory, emotion, and other higher-order cognitive functions. Long-term imaging is also ideal for studying changes in the brain that accompany development, plasticity, and learning. Although intrinsic imaging lacks the temporal resolution offered by dyes, it is a high spatial resolution imaging method that does not require application of any external agents to the brain. The bulk of procedures described here have been developed in the monkey but can be applied to the study of surface structures in any in vivo preparation.

  19. Irregular spiking of pyramidal neurons organizes as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches in the awake state.

    PubMed

    Bellay, Timothy; Klaus, Andreas; Seshadri, Saurav; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in neuronal activity emerge at many spatial and temporal scales in cortex. Population measures found these fluctuations to organize as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches, suggesting cortical dynamics to be critical. Macroscopic dynamics, though, depend on physiological states and are ambiguous as to their cellular composition, spatiotemporal origin, and contributions from synaptic input or action potential (AP) output. Here, we study spontaneous firing in pyramidal neurons (PNs) from rat superficial cortical layers in vivo and in vitro using 2-photon imaging. As the animal transitions from the anesthetized to awake state, spontaneous single neuron firing increases in irregularity and assembles into scale-invariant avalanches at the group level. In vitro spike avalanches emerged naturally yet required balanced excitation and inhibition. This demonstrates that neuronal avalanches are linked to the global physiological state of wakefulness and that cortical resting activity organizes as avalanches from firing of local PN groups to global population activity. PMID:26151674

  20. The Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol: a valid linguistic approach to awake brain surgery.

    PubMed

    De Witte, E; Satoer, D; Robert, E; Colle, H; Verheyen, S; Visch-Brink, E; Mariën, P

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES) is increasingly used in patients operated on for tumours in eloquent areas. Although a positive impact of DES on postoperative linguistic outcome is generally advocated, information about the neurolinguistic methods applied in awake surgery is scarce. We developed for the first time a standardised Dutch linguistic test battery (measuring phonology, semantics, syntax) to reliably identify the critical language zones in detail. A normative study was carried out in a control group of 250 native Dutch-speaking healthy adults. In addition, the clinical application of the Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol (DuLIP) was demonstrated by means of anatomo-functional models and five case studies. A set of DuLIP tests was selected for each patient depending on the tumour location and degree of linguistic impairment. DuLIP is a valid test battery for pre-, intraoperative and postoperative language testing and facilitates intraoperative mapping of eloquent language regions that are variably located. PMID:25526520

  1. Epidural anaesthesia through caudal catheters for inguinal herniotomies in awake ex-premature babies.

    PubMed

    Peutrell, J M; Hughes, D G

    1993-02-01

    Ex-premature babies are at risk of apnoea after surgery. Regional anaesthesia has been used as an alternative to general anaesthesia for some surgical procedures in the belief that it may be safer. However, single dose caudal epidural and subarachnoid anaesthetics have a duration of action which may be insufficient for some operations. The level and duration of anaesthesia can be extended if local anaesthetic is given through an epidural catheter. In addition, the dose needed to provide adequate anaesthesia may be lower because the local anaesthetic is given at an appropriate segmental level. We report our experience of caudal epidural anaesthesia in nine, awake ex-premature babies who were having inguinal herniotomies. The anaesthesia was excellent in six babies. Two babies cried briefly with peritoneal or spermatic cord traction. One other baby needed supplementation with nitrous oxide in oxygen in order to complete the surgery. The majority of babies slept throughout surgery. There were no reported postoperative complications. PMID:8460759

  2. Pleural liquid clearance rate measured in awake sheep by the volume of dilution method

    SciTech Connect

    Broaddus, V.C.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Berthiaume, Y.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-03-01

    The authors reported 24h clearance of mock pleural effusions measured terminally in sheep. To measure effusion volume at different times in the same sheep, they injected /sup 111/In-transferrin and measured its dilution. In 5 sheep with effusions of known sizes, the method was accurate to +/-10%. In 5 awake sheep, the authors injected 10 ml/kg of a 1% protein solution via a non-penetrating rib capsule. At 6h, the authors measured the volume by the dilution method and at 24h by direct recovery. The clearance rate in each animal was constant at 2.9-6.0%/h (average 4.8 +/- 1.3%/h). This new method gives a reliable two point clearance rate and requires fewer animals.

  3. Inspiratory flow dynamics during phrenic nerve stimulation in awake normals during nasal breathing.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Demoule, A; Marc, I; Sanfaçon, C; Derenne, J P; Similowski, T

    1999-08-01

    The loss of upper airway (UA) dilators preactivation before inspiratory muscle contraction is an important determinant of the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea. We hypothetized that phrenic nerve stimulation could provide a practical way to explore the effects of the dissociation between UA dilators and inspiratory muscles, and possibly to determine UA critical closing pressure during wakefulness. The pattern of inspiratory airflow was therefore studied in normal awake subjects during diaphragm twitches induced by either electrical phrenic stimulation (ES) or cervical magnetic stimulation (CMS) (n = 9) and with and without a nasal stent during ES (n = 7). End-expiratory stimulations applied during exclusive nasal breathing induced 200 to 300 ms twitch inspiratory flow. The average maximal twitch flow of flow-limited twitches was higher during CMS than ES (1.18 +/- 0.29 L. PMID:10430737

  4. Replicability and Heterogeneity of Awake Unrestrained Canine fMRI Responses

    PubMed Central

    Berns, Gregory S.; Brooks, Andrew; Spivak, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the possibility of fMRI in two awake and unrestrained dogs. Here, we determined the replicability and heterogeneity of these results in an additional 11 dogs for a total of 13 subjects. Based on an anatomically placed region-of-interest, we compared the caudate response to a hand signal indicating the imminent availability of a food reward to a hand signal indicating no reward. 8 of 13 dogs had a positive differential caudate response to the signal indicating reward. The mean differential caudate response was 0.09%, which was similar to a comparable human study. These results show that canine fMRI is reliable and can be done with minimal stress to the dogs. PMID:24324719

  5. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network. PMID:27425612

  6. Spontaneous high-gamma band activity reflects functional organization of auditory cortex in the awake macaque.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Makoto; Saunders, Richard C; Leopold, David A; Mishkin, Mortimer; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2012-06-01

    In the absence of sensory stimuli, spontaneous activity in the brain has been shown to exhibit organization at multiple spatiotemporal scales. In the macaque auditory cortex, responses to acoustic stimuli are tonotopically organized within multiple, adjacent frequency maps aligned in a caudorostral direction on the supratemporal plane (STP) of the lateral sulcus. Here, we used chronic microelectrocorticography to investigate the correspondence between sensory maps and spontaneous neural fluctuations in the auditory cortex. We first mapped tonotopic organization across 96 electrodes spanning approximately two centimeters along the primary and higher auditory cortex. In separate sessions, we then observed that spontaneous activity at the same sites exhibited spatial covariation that reflected the tonotopic map of the STP. This observation demonstrates a close relationship between functional organization and spontaneous neural activity in the sensory cortex of the awake monkey. PMID:22681693

  7. Spontaneous high-gamma band activity reflects functional organization of auditory cortex in the awake macaque

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Makoto; Saunders, Richard C.; Leopold, David A.; Mishkin, Mortimer; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In the absence of sensory stimuli, spontaneous activity in the brain has been shown to exhibit organization at multiple spatiotemporal scales. In the macaque auditory cortex, responses to acoustic stimuli are tonotopically organized within multiple, adjacent frequency maps aligned in a caudorostral direction on the supratemporal plane (STP) of the lateral sulcus. Here we used chronic micro-electrocorticography to investigate the correspondence between sensory maps and spontaneous neural fluctuations in the auditory cortex. We first mapped tonotopic organization across 96 electrodes spanning approximately two centimeters along the primary and higher auditory cortex. In separate sessions we then observed that spontaneous activity at the same sites exhibited spatial covariation that reflected the tonotopic map of the STP. This observation demonstrates a close relationship between functional organization and spontaneous neural activity in the sensory cortex of the awake monkey. PMID:22681693

  8. Millisecond Coupling of Local Field Potentials to Synaptic Currents in the Awake Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Bilal; Schulz, David P.A.; Häusser, Michael; Carandini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Summary The cortical local field potential (LFP) is a common measure of population activity, but its relationship to synaptic activity in individual neurons is not fully established. This relationship has been typically studied during anesthesia and is obscured by shared slow fluctuations. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings in visual cortex of anesthetized and awake mice to measure intracellular activity; we then applied a simple method to reveal its coupling to the simultaneously recorded LFP. LFP predicted membrane potential as accurately as synaptic currents, indicating a major role for synaptic currents in the relationship between cortical LFP and intracellular activity. During anesthesia, cortical LFP predicted excitation far better than inhibition; during wakefulness, it predicted them equally well, and visual stimulation further enhanced predictions of inhibition. These findings reveal a central role for synaptic currents, and especially inhibition, in the relationship between the subthreshold activity of individual neurons and the cortical LFP during wakefulness. PMID:27021173

  9. Complex spatiotemporal haemodynamic response following sensory stimulation in the awake rat.

    PubMed

    Martin, Chris; Zheng, Ying; Sibson, Nicola R; Mayhew, John E W; Berwick, Jason

    2013-02-01

    Detailed understanding of the haemodynamic changes that underlie non-invasive neuroimaging techniques such as blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging is essential if we are to continue to extend the use of these methods for understanding brain function and dysfunction. The use of animal and in particular rodent research models has been central to these endeavours as they allow in-vivo experimental techniques that provide measurements of the haemodynamic response function at high temporal and spatial resolution. A limitation of most of this research is the use of anaesthetic agents which may disrupt or mask important features of neurovascular coupling or the haemodynamic response function. In this study we therefore measured spatiotemporal cortical haemodynamic responses to somatosensory stimulation in awake rats using optical imaging spectroscopy. Trained, restrained animals received non-noxious stimulation of the whisker pad via chronically implanted stimulating microwires whilst optical recordings were made from the contralateral somatosensory cortex through a thin cranial window. The responses we measure from un-anaesthetised animals are substantially different from those reported in previous studies which have used anaesthetised animals. These differences include biphasic response regions (initial increases in blood volume and oxygenation followed by subsequent decreases) as well as oscillations in the response time series of awake animals. These haemodynamic response features do not reflect concomitant changes in the underlying neuronal activity and therefore reflect neurovascular or cerebrovascular processes. These hitherto unreported hyperemic response dynamics may have important implications for the use of anaesthetised animal models for research into the haemodynamic response function. PMID:23063446

  10. Complex spatiotemporal haemodynamic response following sensory stimulation in the awake rat☆

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Chris; Zheng, Ying; Sibson, Nicola R.; Mayhew, John E.W.; Berwick, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the haemodynamic changes that underlie non-invasive neuroimaging techniques such as blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging is essential if we are to continue to extend the use of these methods for understanding brain function and dysfunction. The use of animal and in particular rodent research models has been central to these endeavours as they allow in-vivo experimental techniques that provide measurements of the haemodynamic response function at high temporal and spatial resolution. A limitation of most of this research is the use of anaesthetic agents which may disrupt or mask important features of neurovascular coupling or the haemodynamic response function. In this study we therefore measured spatiotemporal cortical haemodynamic responses to somatosensory stimulation in awake rats using optical imaging spectroscopy. Trained, restrained animals received non-noxious stimulation of the whisker pad via chronically implanted stimulating microwires whilst optical recordings were made from the contralateral somatosensory cortex through a thin cranial window. The responses we measure from un-anaesthetised animals are substantially different from those reported in previous studies which have used anaesthetised animals. These differences include biphasic response regions (initial increases in blood volume and oxygenation followed by subsequent decreases) as well as oscillations in the response time series of awake animals. These haemodynamic response features do not reflect concomitant changes in the underlying neuronal activity and therefore reflect neurovascular or cerebrovascular processes. These hitherto unreported hyperemic response dynamics may have important implications for the use of anaesthetised animal models for research into the haemodynamic response function. PMID:23063446

  11. Epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by glutamate decarboxylase inhibitors in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Patricia; Tapia, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsible for GABA synthesis, requires pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and γ-glutamyl-hydrazone (PLPGH) inhibit the free PLP-dependent isoform (GAD65) activity after systemic administration, leading to epilepsy in mice and in young, but not in adult rats. However, the competitive GAD inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) induces convulsions in both immature and adult rats. In the present study we tested comparatively the epileptogenic and neurotoxic effects of PLPGH, TSC and MPA, administered by microdialysis in the hippocampus of adult awake rats. Cortical EEG and motor behavior were analyzed during the next 2h, and aspartate, glutamate and GABA were measured by HPLC in the microdialysis-collected fractions. Twenty-four hours after drug administration rats were fixed for histological analysis of the hippocampus. PLPGH or TSC did not affect the motor behavior, EEG or cellular morphology, although the extracellular concentration of GABA was decreased. In contrast, MPA produced intense wet-dog shakes, EEG epileptiform discharges, a >75% reduction of extracellular GABA levels and remarkable neurodegeneration of the CA1 region, with >80% neuronal loss. The systemic administration of the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 30 min before MPA did not prevent the MPA-induced epilepsy but significantly protected against its neurotoxic effect, reducing neuronal loss to <30%. We conclude that in adult awake rats, drugs acting on PLP availability have only a weak effect on GABA neurotransmission, whereas direct GAD inhibition produced by MPA induces hyperexcitation leading to epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration. Because this degeneration was prevented by the blockade of NMDA receptors, we conclude that it is due to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity consequent to disinhibition of the hippocampal excitatory circuits. PMID:26354164

  12. Cardiovascular Alterations during the Interictal Period in Awake and Pithed Amygdala-Kindled Rats.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Salinas, Inna; Rocha, Luisa; Marichal-Cancino, Bruno A; Villalón, Carlos M

    2016-08-01

    Epileptic seizures are often accompanied by increased sympathetic cardiovascular activity (even interictally), but it remains unknown whether this increased activity is of central and/or peripheral origin. Hence, this study investigated the cardiovascular alterations produced by amygdala kindling in awake and pithed Wistar rats. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were initially recorded by tail cuff plethysmography in awake control, sham-operated and amygdala-kindled rats before and 24 hr after the kindling process. The after-discharge threshold (ADT) was measured under different conditions to correlate brain excitability with BP and HR in kindled rats. Twenty-four hours after the last kindling seizure, (i) HR, systolic and diastolic BP were increased and (ii) only higher HR values correlated with lower ADT values. Forty-eight hr after the last kindled seizure, all rats were pithed and prepared for analysing the tachycardic, vasopressor and vasodepressor responses by (i) stimulation of the sympathetic or sensory vasodepressor CGRPergic out-flows (stimulus-response curves, S-R curves) and (ii) intravenous injections of noradrenaline or α-CGRP (dose-response curves, D-R curves). Interestingly, (i) the tachycardic S-R and D-R curves were attenuated, whilst the CGRPergic S-R and D-R curves were potentiated in kindled rats, and (ii) the vasopressor noradrenergic S-R and D-R curves were not significantly different in all groups. Therefore, the kindling process may be associated with overstimulation in the central sympathetic and sensory out-flows interictally, producing (i) peripheral attenuation of cardiac sympathetic out-flow and β-adrenoceptor activity and (ii) peripheral potentiation of vasodepressor sensory CGRPergic out-flow and CGRP receptor activity. PMID:26797796

  13. Long-term facilitation of ventilation following repeated hypoxic episodes in awake goats.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, D L; Mitchell, G S

    1997-01-01

    1. This study tested two hypotheses: (1) that episodic hypoxia elicits long-term facilitation (LTF) in respiratory neurons that is manifest as an increase in ventilation in awake goats; and (2) that LTF causes complex changes in respiratory pattern which are responsible for the increase in ventilation. 2. Each goat participated in two protocols. In the first, inspired gas mixtures were alternated between isocapnic normoxia and hypoxia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen, Pa,O2 = 47 mmHg) for ten cycles. Each hypoxic episode lasted 3 min and normoxic intervals were 5 min. Ventilatory variables were measured during the last minute of each episode and periodically for up to 1 h following the last hypoxic episode. The second, sham protocol was undertaken at least 2 weeks later and was identical to the first, except that isocapnic hypoxia was replaced with normoxia. 3. Inspired ventilation (VI) increased during the first isocapnic hypoxic episode and reached progressively higher levels in subsequent hypoxic episodes. VI also increased progressively among normoxic intervals, such that by the tenth normoxic interval, it had increased 68% relative to the comparable sham value (P < 0.05). Respiratory frequency (FR), tidal volume and mean inspiratory flow all contributed to the augmented VI during both isocapnic normoxia and hypoxia. The increase in VI lasted up to 40 min after the final hypoxic episode, with an increased FR making the greatest contribution. The persistent increase in VI strongly suggests that episodic hypoxia elicits LTF in respiratory neurons in the awake goat. Complex changes in respiratory pattern underpin the ventilatory manifestation of LTF. PMID:9080380

  14. Continuous thoracic epidural anesthesia induces segmental sympathetic block in the awake rat.

    PubMed

    Freise, Hendrik; Anthonsen, Sören; Fischer, Lars G; Van Aken, Hugo K; Sielenkämper, Andreas W

    2005-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) is used increasingly in critical care, especially for cardiac and intestinal sympathetic block. In this study we evaluated cardiorespiratory function and sympathetic activity in a new model of continuous TEA in awake rats. Thirteen rats received epidural saline control (CON) or bupivacaine 0.5% epidural infusion (EPI) at 15 microl/h for 2 h on day 1 and day 3. Mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, arterial PCO2, and motor score were recorded at baseline and after 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Skin temperature was measured at front paws, high-thoracic, mid-thoracic, and low-thoracic, hind paws, and the proximal and distal tail. Changes in sympathetic activity were assessed by skin temperature changes from baseline (DeltaT). In the EPI group, hemodynamics and respiration remained unchanged and only mild motor deficits occurred. DeltaT in thoracic segments was higher in the EPI than in the CON group (P <0.001 at all times at high-thoracic, mid-thoracic, and low-thoracic segments). Skin temperature decreased in the distal tail in the EPI group, e.g., after 90 min DeltaT=-0.86 +/- 0.25 degrees C (EPI) versus 0.4 +/- 0.12 degrees C (CON) (P <0.05 at 60, 90, and 120 min). DeltaT on day 3 was comparable to day 1. TEA induced stable segmental sympathetic block without cardiorespiratory and motor side effects in awake rats. This new technique may be applied in prolonged models of critical illness. PMID:15616087

  15. Oligopoly market models applied to electric utilities: How will generating companies behave in a deregulated industry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Lance Brian

    An oligopoly market is analyzed which compares the oligopoly uniform market price to a fully competitive market price. The oligopoly consists of three electric utilities that behave as Cournot and Stackelberg leader---followers. A market simulation of the ERCOT market is also presented which includes the impact on market price when there are new market entrants into the oligopoly. The two case studies analyze the market with and without transmission constraints and identify how various transmission limitations can support strategic behavior by the utilities and ultimately impact the market price.

  16. An extra band within the human 9qh+ region that behaves like the surrounding constitutive heterochromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, J L; Pereira, S; Campos, A; Gosálvez, J; Goyanes, V

    1994-01-01

    An extra variant G band in a human 9qh+ region was analysed in normally condensed and 5-azacytidine undercondensed chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation showed that specific, classical, alphoid and beta satellite DNA was not present. Nevertheless, this extra band behaves like the surrounding heterochromatin because (1) its chromatin fibres showed condensation inhibition after 5-azacytidine treatment, as confirmed by electron microscopy, and (2) it was not affected by in situ digestion with the restriction endonucleases AluI and Sau3A. These results suggest that this variant band may correspond to euchromatin that has become inactivated by a position effect. Images PMID:7529317

  17. Multiple leading edge vortices of unexpected strength in freely flying hawkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, L. Christoffer; Engel, Sophia; Kelber, Almut; Heerenbrink, Marco Klein; Hedenström, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The Leading Edge Vortex (LEV) is a universal mechanism enhancing lift in flying organisms. LEVs, generally illustrated as a single vortex attached to the wing throughout the downstroke, have not been studied quantitatively in freely flying insects. Previous findings are either qualitative or from flappers and tethered insects. We measure the flow above the wing of freely flying hawkmoths and find multiple simultaneous LEVs of varying strength and structure along the wingspan. At the inner wing there is a single, attached LEV, while at mid wing there are multiple LEVs, and towards the wingtip flow separates. At mid wing the LEV circulation is ~40% higher than in the wake, implying that the circulation unrelated to the LEV may reduce lift. The strong and complex LEV suggests relatively high flight power in hawmoths. The variable LEV structure may result in variable force production, influencing flight control in the animals. PMID:24253180

  18. Multiple leading edge vortices of unexpected strength in freely flying hawkmoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, L. Christoffer; Engel, Sophia; Kelber, Almut; Heerenbrink, Marco Klein; Hedenström, Anders

    2013-11-01

    The Leading Edge Vortex (LEV) is a universal mechanism enhancing lift in flying organisms. LEVs, generally illustrated as a single vortex attached to the wing throughout the downstroke, have not been studied quantitatively in freely flying insects. Previous findings are either qualitative or from flappers and tethered insects. We measure the flow above the wing of freely flying hawkmoths and find multiple simultaneous LEVs of varying strength and structure along the wingspan. At the inner wing there is a single, attached LEV, while at mid wing there are multiple LEVs, and towards the wingtip flow separates. At mid wing the LEV circulation is ~40% higher than in the wake, implying that the circulation unrelated to the LEV may reduce lift. The strong and complex LEV suggests relatively high flight power in hawmoths. The variable LEV structure may result in variable force production, influencing flight control in the animals.

  19. Columnar transmitter based wireless power delivery system for implantable device in freely moving animals.

    PubMed

    Eom, Kyungsik; Jeong, Joonsoo; Lee, Tae Hyung; Lee, Sung Eun; Jun, Sang Bum; Kim, Sung June

    2013-01-01

    A wireless power delivery system is developed to deliver electrical power to the neuroprosthetic devices that are implanted into animals freely moving inside the cage. The wireless powering cage is designed for long-term animal experiments without cumbersome wires for power supply or the replacement of batteries. In the present study, we propose a novel wireless power transmission system using resonator-based inductive links to increase power efficiency and to minimize the efficiency variations. A columnar transmitter coil is proposed to provide lateral uniformity of power efficiency. Using this columnar transmitter coil, only 7.2% efficiency fluctuation occurs from the maximum transmission efficiency of 25.9%. A flexible polymer-based planar type receiver coil is fabricated and assembled with a neural stimulator and an electrode. Using the designed columnar transmitter coil, the implantable device successfully operates while it moves freely inside the cage. PMID:24110073

  20. Between soap bubbles and vesicles: The dynamics of freely floating smectic bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; May, Kathrin; Harth, Kirsten; Trittel, Torsten

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of droplets and bubbles, particularly on microscopic scales, are of considerable importance in biological, environmental, and technical contexts. We introduce freely floating bubbles of smectic liquid crystals and report their unique dynamic properties. Smectic bubbles can be used as simple models for dynamic studies of fluid membranes. In equilibrium, they form minimal surfaces like soap films. However, shape transformations of closed smectic membranes that change the surface area involve the formation and motion of molecular layer dislocations. These processes are slow compared to the capillary wave dynamics, therefore the effective surface tension is zero like in vesicles. Freely floating smectic bubbles are prepared from collapsing catenoid films and their dynamics is studied with optical high-speed imaging. Experiments are performed under normal gravity and in microgravity during parabolic flights. Supported by DLR within grant OASIS-Co.

  1. Dual-modal (OIS/LSCI) imager of cerebral cortex in freely moving animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongyang; Miao, Peng; Liu, Qi; Li, Yao; Tong, Shanbao

    2011-11-01

    Optical intrinsic signals (OIS) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) have been used for years in the study of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and hemodynamic responses to the neural activity under functional stimulation. So far, most in vivo rodent experiments are based on the anesthesia model when the animals are in unconscious and restrained conditions. The influences of anesthesia on the neural activity have been documented in literature. In this study, we designed a miniature head-mounted dual-modal imager in freely moving animals that could monitor in real time the coupling of local oxygen consumption and blood perfusion of CBF by integrating different imaging modalities of OIS and LSCI. The system facilitates the study the cortical hemodynamics and neural-hemodynamic coupling in real time in freely moving animals.

  2. Dual-modal (OIS/LSCI) imager of cerebral cortex in freely moving animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongyang; Miao, Peng; Liu, Qi; Li, Yao; Tong, Shanbao

    2012-03-01

    Optical intrinsic signals (OIS) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) have been used for years in the study of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and hemodynamic responses to the neural activity under functional stimulation. So far, most in vivo rodent experiments are based on the anesthesia model when the animals are in unconscious and restrained conditions. The influences of anesthesia on the neural activity have been documented in literature. In this study, we designed a miniature head-mounted dual-modal imager in freely moving animals that could monitor in real time the coupling of local oxygen consumption and blood perfusion of CBF by integrating different imaging modalities of OIS and LSCI. The system facilitates the study the cortical hemodynamics and neural-hemodynamic coupling in real time in freely moving animals.

  3. Development of implantable optoelectronic module for optical brain tissue stimulation in freely moving mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakov, Konstantin; Czajkowski, Rafał; Kaźmierczak, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    The research aims to design and manufacture of wireless optogenetics devices for freely moving animals in cages IntelliCage system. The purpose of the device is to stimulate specific brain regions using light. The constructed device consists of a light source and optical fibre structure responsible for delivering light into the corresponding region of the brain of the animal. The size of the animal (mouse) and the fact that it is freely moving imposes substantial limitations with respect to the size and weight of the optoelectronic device. The present paper describes research on optical fibre structure fabrication, assembling it to the small size (less than 500 × 500 μm2 top surface) LED chip and experimental validation of the optoelectronic stimulator.

  4. Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics of thermal collapse in a freely cooling granular gas.

    PubMed

    Kolvin, Itamar; Livne, Eli; Meerson, Baruch

    2010-08-01

    We show that, in dimension higher than one, heat diffusion and viscosity cannot arrest thermal collapse in a freely evolving dilute granular gas, even in the absence of gravity. Thermal collapse involves a finite-time blowup of the gas density. It was predicted earlier in ideal, Euler hydrodynamics of dilute granular gases in the absence of gravity, and in nonideal, Navier-Stokes granular hydrodynamics in the presence of gravity. We determine, analytically and numerically, the dynamic scaling laws that characterize the gas flow close to collapse. We also investigate bifurcations of a freely evolving dilute granular gas in circular and wedge-shaped containers. Our results imply that, in general, thermal collapse can only be arrested when the gas density becomes comparable with the close-packing density of grains. This provides a natural explanation to the formation of densely packed clusters of particles in a variety of initially dilute granular flows. PMID:20866801

  5. Labyrinthine instability in freely suspended films of a polarization-modulated smectic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Alexey; Kornek, Ulrike; Stannarius, Ralf; Weissflog, Wolfgang; Nádasi, Hajnalka; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo

    2013-12-01

    We report on fingering and labyrinthine instabilities of the layer dislocation lines in freely suspended polar liquid-crystalline films. These polar fingerlike and labyrinth structures reversibly form upon a transition into a modulated phase. External electric fields of several kV/m applied in the film plane can reversibly influence the formation of the finger textures. We show that the labyrinthine pattern is intrinsically related to regular splay deformations of the polarization.

  6. Hybrid Metameterials Enable Fast Electrical Modulation Of Freely Propagating Terahertz Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; O' Hara, John F; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate fast electrical modulation of freely propagating THz waves at room temperature using hybrid metamaterial devices. the devices are planar metamaterials fabricated on doped semiconducor epitaxial layers, which form hybrid metamaterial - Schottky diode structures. With an applied ac voltage bias, we show modulation of THz radiation at inferred frequencies over 2 MHz. The modulation speed is limited by the device depletion capacitance which may be reduced for even faster operation.

  7. Experimental measurement of the flow field around a freely swimming microorganism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Marco; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond; Michel, Nicolas; Tuval, Idan

    2010-03-01

    Despite their small size, the fluid flows produced by billions of microscopic swimmers in nature can have dramatic macroscopic effects (e.g. biogenic mixing in the ocean). Understanding the flow structure of a single swimming microorganism is essential to explain and model these macroscopic phenomena. Here we report the first detailed measurement of the flow field around an isolated, freely swimming microorganism, the spherical alga Volvox, and discuss the implications of this measurement for other species.

  8. Using dislocations to probe surface reconstruction in thick freely suspended liquid crystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, J. A.; Martinez Zambrano, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Surface interactions can cause freely suspended thin liquid crystalline films to form phases different from the bulk material, but it is not known what happens at the surface of thick films. Edge dislocations can be used as a marker for the boundary between the bulk center and the reconstructed surface. We use noncontact mode atomic force microscopy to determine the depth of edge dislocations below the surface of freely suspended thick films of 4-n -heptyloxybenzylidene-4-n -heptylaniline (7O.7) in the crystalline B phase. Here, 3.0 ±0.1 nm high steps are found with a width that varies with temperature between 56 and 59 ∘C. Using a strain model for the profile of liquid crystalline layers above an edge dislocation to estimate the depth of the dislocation, we find that the number of reconstructed surface layers increases from 4 to 50 layers as the temperature decreases from 59 to 56 ∘C . This trend tracks the behavior of the phase boundary in the thickness dependent phase diagram of freely suspended films of 7O.7, suggesting that the surface may be reconstructed into a smectic F region.

  9. Nanoscopic Terraces, Mesas, and Ridges in Freely Standing Thin Films Sculpted by Supramolecular Oscillatory Surface Forces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiran; Yilixiati, Subinuer; Pearsall, Collin; Sharma, Vivek

    2016-04-26

    Freely standing thin liquid films containing supramolecular structures including micelles, nanoparticles, polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes, and smectic liquid crystals undergo drainage via stratification. The layer-by-layer removal of these supramolecular structures manifests as stepwise thinning over time and a coexistence of domains and nanostructures of discretely different thickness. The layering of supramolecular structures in confined thin films contributes additional non-DLVO, supramolecular oscillatory surface forces to disjoining pressure, thus influencing both drainage kinetics and stability of thin films. Understanding and characterizing the spontaneous creation and evolution of nanoscopic topography of stratifying, freely standing thin liquid films have been long-standing challenges due to the absence of experimental techniques with the requisite spatial (thickness <10 nm) and temporal resolution (<1 ms). Using Interferometry Digital Imaging Optical Microscopy (IDIOM) protocols developed herein, we visualize and characterize size, shape, and evolution kinetics of nanoscopic mesas, terraces, and ridges. The exquisite thickness maps created using IDIOM protocols provide much needed and unprecedented insights into the role of supramolecular oscillatory surface forces in driving growth of such nanostructures as well as in controlling properties and stability of freely standing thin films and, more generally, of colloidal dispersions like foams. PMID:27057959

  10. Cocaine action on peripheral, non-monoamine neural substrates as a trigger of electroencephalographic desynchronization and electromyographic activation following i.v. administration in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, M S; Kiyatkin, E A

    2010-01-20

    Many important physiological, behavioral and subjective effects of i.v. cocaine (COC) are exceptionally rapid and transient, suggesting a possible involvement of peripheral neural substrates in their triggering. In the present study, we used high-speed electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings (4-s resolution) in freely moving rats to characterize the central electrophysiological effects of i.v. COC at low doses within a self-administration range (0.25-1.0 mg/kg). We found that COC induces rapid, strong, and prolonged desynchronization of cortical EEG (decrease in alpha and increase in beta and gamma activity) and activation of the neck EMG that begin within 2-6 s following the start of a 10-s injection; immediate components of both effects were dose-independent. The rapid effects of COC were mimicked by i.v. COC methiodide (COC-MET), a derivative that cannot cross the blood-brain barrier. At equimolar doses (0.33-1.33 mg/kg), COC-MET had equally fast and strong effects on EEG and EMG total powers, decreasing alpha and increasing beta and gamma activities. Rapid EEG desynchronization and EMG activation was also induced by i.v. procaine, a structurally similar, short-acting local anesthetic with virtually no effects on monoamine uptake; at equipotential doses (1.25-5.0 mg/kg), these effects were weaker and shorter in duration than those of COC. Surprisingly, i.v. saline injection delivered during slow-wave sleep (but not during quiet wakefulness) also induced a transient EEG desynchronization but without changes in EMG and motor activity; these effects were significantly weaker and much shorter than those induced by all tested drugs. These data suggest that in awake animals, i.v. COC induces rapid cortical activation and a subsequent motor response via its action on peripheral non-monoamine neural elements, involving neural transmission via visceral sensory pathways. By providing a rapid neural signal and triggering neural activation, such

  11. Spatiotemporal patterns of current source density in the prefrontal cortex of a behaving monkey.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Norihiko; Yagi, Kohei; Mushiake, Hajime

    2015-02-01

    One of the fundamental missions of neuroscience is to explore the input and output properties of neuronal networks to reveal their functional significance. However, it is technically difficult to examine synaptic inputs into neuronal circuits in behaving animals. Here, we conducted current source density (CSD) analysis on local field potentials (LFPs) recorded simultaneously using a multi-contact electrode in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of a behaving monkey. We observed current sink task-dependent spatiotemporal patterns considered to reflect the synaptic input to neurons adjacent to the recording site. Specifically, the inferior convex current sink in the PFC was dominant during the delay period, whereas the current sink was prominent in the principal sulcus during the sample cue and test cue periods. Surprisingly, sulcus current sink patterns were spatially periodic, which corresponds to the columnar structure suggested by previous anatomical studies. The approaches used in the current study will help to elucidate how the PFC network performs executive functions according to its synaptic input. PMID:25027732

  12. An Improved Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm with Elitist Breeding for Unconstrained Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen-Lun; Wu, Angus; Min, Hua-Qing

    2015-01-01

    An improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization with elitist breeding (EB-QPSO) for unconstrained optimization is presented and empirically studied in this paper. In EB-QPSO, the novel elitist breeding strategy acts on the elitists of the swarm to escape from the likely local optima and guide the swarm to perform more efficient search. During the iterative optimization process of EB-QPSO, when criteria met, the personal best of each particle and the global best of the swarm are used to generate new diverse individuals through the transposon operators. The new generated individuals with better fitness are selected to be the new personal best particles and global best particle to guide the swarm for further solution exploration. A comprehensive simulation study is conducted on a set of twelve benchmark functions. Compared with five state-of-the-art quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithms, the proposed EB-QPSO performs more competitively in all of the benchmark functions in terms of better global search capability and faster convergence rate. PMID:26064085

  13. A Novel Quantum-Behaved Bat Algorithm with Mean Best Position Directed for Numerical Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenyong; Liu, Zijuan; Duan, Qingyan; Cao, Long

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel quantum-behaved bat algorithm with the direction of mean best position (QMBA). In QMBA, the position of each bat is mainly updated by the current optimal solution in the early stage of searching and in the late search it also depends on the mean best position which can enhance the convergence speed of the algorithm. During the process of searching, quantum behavior of bats is introduced which is beneficial to jump out of local optimal solution and make the quantum-behaved bats not easily fall into local optimal solution, and it has better ability to adapt complex environment. Meanwhile, QMBA makes good use of statistical information of best position which bats had experienced to generate better quality solutions. This approach not only inherits the characteristic of quick convergence, simplicity, and easy implementation of original bat algorithm, but also increases the diversity of population and improves the accuracy of solution. Twenty-four benchmark test functions are tested and compared with other variant bat algorithms for numerical optimization the simulation results show that this approach is simple and efficient and can achieve a more accurate solution. PMID:27293424

  14. Examining transactional influences between reading achievement and antisocially-behaving friends

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Sara A.; Mikolajewski, Amy J.; Johnson, Wendy; Schatschneider, Christopher; Taylor, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    The association between poorer academic outcomes and having antisocial friends is reliably demonstrated yet not well understood. Genetically sensitive designs uniquely allow for measuring genetic vulnerabilities and/or environmental risk in the association of antisocial friend behavior and poor school achievement, allowing for a better understanding of the nature of the association. This study included 233 pairs of twins from the Florida Twin Project on Reading. First, the role of antisocial friends as an environmental moderator of reading comprehension was examined. Antisocial friends significantly moderated the nonshared environmental variance in reading comprehension, with increased variation at lower levels of association with antisocial friends, with niche-picking indicated. Second, the role of reading comprehension as an environmental moderator of antisocial friends was examined. Reading comprehension significantly moderated the nonshared environmental variance in associating with antisocial friends, with increased variance at lower levels of reading comprehension and indication that common genetic influences contributed to higher reading achievement and better-behaved friends. In total, these results suggested reciprocal influences between reading achievement and antisocially-behaving friends. The impact of antisocial friends appeared to be limited in the extent to which they can undermine reading achievement, and high reading achievement appeared to support less association with antisocial friends. PMID:25242836

  15. A Novel Quantum-Behaved Bat Algorithm with Mean Best Position Directed for Numerical Optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Binglian; Zhu, Wenyong; Liu, Zijuan; Duan, Qingyan; Cao, Long

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel quantum-behaved bat algorithm with the direction of mean best position (QMBA). In QMBA, the position of each bat is mainly updated by the current optimal solution in the early stage of searching and in the late search it also depends on the mean best position which can enhance the convergence speed of the algorithm. During the process of searching, quantum behavior of bats is introduced which is beneficial to jump out of local optimal solution and make the quantum-behaved bats not easily fall into local optimal solution, and it has better ability to adapt complex environment. Meanwhile, QMBA makes good use of statistical information of best position which bats had experienced to generate better quality solutions. This approach not only inherits the characteristic of quick convergence, simplicity, and easy implementation of original bat algorithm, but also increases the diversity of population and improves the accuracy of solution. Twenty-four benchmark test functions are tested and compared with other variant bat algorithms for numerical optimization the simulation results show that this approach is simple and efficient and can achieve a more accurate solution. PMID:27293424

  16. Use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an awake patient after a major trauma with an incidental finding of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Haneke, F; Schildhauer, T A; Strauch, J; Swol, J

    2016-05-01

    We report the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in a trauma patient with an incidental finding of open tuberculosis (TB). Sedation was reduced during extracorporeal support and awake veno-venous ECMO was successfully performed. Subsequently, accidental cannula removal caused major blood loss which required the administration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Our case report demonstrates that the incidental finding of open TB is an important hint for differential diagnosis and that it should still be considered in high-income countries. In addition, awake ECMO appears to be a feasible therapeutic option in non-transplant patients, although the described case demonstrates that patient compliance and nursing care are important for therapeutic success to avoid complications, for example, inadvertent decannulation. PMID:26498750

  17. Adaptation of the quantitative 2-[14C]deoxyglucose method for use in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Crane, A M; Porrino, L J

    1989-10-01

    A procedure for venous and arterial catheterization is described which allows the quantitative 2-[14C]deoxyglucose method to be applied to freely moving animals for behavioral and pharmacological studies. The catheterization method is rapid, minimally invasive, and requires no complicated equipment. Physiological conditions and rates of cerebral glucose utilization in freely moving rats and in restrained rats have been compared. The results demonstrate that local cerebral glucose utilization can readily be measured in freely moving animals engaged in behavioral experiments. PMID:2804673

  18. Significance of time awake for predicting pilots' fatigue on short-haul flights: implications for flight duty time regulations.

    PubMed

    Vejvoda, Martin; Elmenhorst, Eva-Maria; Pennig, Sibylle; Plath, Gernot; Maass, Hartmut; Tritschler, Kristjof; Basner, Mathias; Aeschbach, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    European regulations restrict the duration of the maximum daily flight duty period for pilots as a function of the duty start time and the number of scheduled flights. However, late duty end times that may include long times awake are not specifically regulated. In this study, fatigue levels in pilots finishing their duty late at night (00:00-01:59 hour) were analysed and compared with pilots starting their duty early (05:00-06:59 hour). Fatigue levels of 40 commercial short-haul pilots were studied during a total of 188 flight duty periods, of which 87 started early and 22 finished late. Pilots used a small handheld computer to maintain a duty and sleep log, and to indicate fatigue levels immediately after each flight. Sleep logs were checked with actigraphy. Pilots on late-finishing flight duty periods were more fatigued at the end of their duty than pilots on early-starting flight duty periods, despite the fact that preceding sleep duration was longer by 1.1 h. Linear mixed-model regression identified time awake as a preeminent factor predicting fatigue. Workload had a minor effect. Pilots on late-finishing flight duty periods were awake longer by an average of 5.5 h (6.6 versus 1.1 h) before commencing their duty than pilots who started early in the morning. Late-finishing flights were associated with long times awake at a time when the circadian system stops promoting alertness, and an increased, previously underestimated fatigue risk. Based on these findings, flight duty limitations should consider not only duty start time, but also the time of the final landing. PMID:25040665

  19. Modafinil Increases Awake EEG Activation and Improves Performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David; Bai, Xiao Xue; Williams, Shaun C.; Hua, Shu Cheng; Kim, Jong-Won; Marshall, Nathaniel S.; D'Rozario, Angela; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the changes in waking electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers with modafinil during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to investigate neurophysiological evidence for potential neurocognitive improvements. Design: Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. CPAP was used for the first night and then withdrawn for 2 subsequent nights. Each morning after the 2 CPAP withdrawal nights, patients received either 200 mg modafinil or placebo. After a 5-w washout, the procedure repeated with the crossover drug. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: Stable CPAP users (n = 23 men with OSA) Measurement and Results: Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (awake EEG measurement with eyes open and closed), Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), and driving simulator Performance were assessed bihourly during the 3 testing days following CPAP treatment and CPAP withdrawal nights. Compared to placebo, modafinil significantly increased awake EEG activation (faster EEG frequency) with increased alpha/delta (A/D) ratio (P < 0.0001) and fast ratio = (alpha+beta)/(delta+theta) (P < 0.0001) across the 2 days of CPAP withdrawal. The A/D ratio significantly correlated with the driving simulator response time (P = 0.015), steering variation (P = 0.002), and PVT reaction time (P = 0.006). In contrast, individual EEG band power of alpha, beta, theta, and delta did not correlate with any neurocognitive performance. Conclusions: Modafinil administration during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal increased awake EEG activation, which correlated to improved performance. This study provides supporting neurophysiological evidence that modafinil is a potential short-term treatment option during acute CPAP withdrawal. Citation: Wang D, Bai XX, Williams SC, Hua SC, Kim JW, Marshall NS, D'Rozario A, Grunstein RR. Modafinil increases awake EEG activation and improves performance

  20. Application of quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization to motor imagery EEG classification.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Yen

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we propose a recognition system for single-trial analysis of motor imagery (MI) electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Applying event-related brain potential (ERP) data acquired from the sensorimotor cortices, the system chiefly consists of automatic artifact elimination, feature extraction, feature selection and classification. In addition to the use of independent component analysis, a similarity measure is proposed to further remove the electrooculographic (EOG) artifacts automatically. Several potential features, such as wavelet-fractal features, are then extracted for subsequent classification. Next, quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) is used to select features from the feature combination. Finally, selected sub-features are classified by support vector machine (SVM). Compared with without artifact elimination, feature selection using a genetic algorithm (GA) and feature classification with Fisher's linear discriminant (FLD) on MI data from two data sets for eight subjects, the results indicate that the proposed method is promising in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. PMID:24156669

  1. Preliminary research on abnormal brain detection by wavelet-energy and quantum- behaved PSO.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yudong; Ji, Genlin; Yang, Jiquan; Wang, Shuihua; Dong, Zhengchao; Phillips, Preetha; Sun, Ping

    2016-04-29

    It is important to detect abnormal brains accurately and early. The wavelet-energy (WE) was a successful feature descriptor that achieved excellent performance in various applications; hence, we proposed a WE based new approach for automated abnormal detection, and reported its preliminary results in this study. The kernel support vector machine (KSVM) was used as the classifier, and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) was introduced to optimize the weights of the SVM. The results based on a 5 × 5-fold cross validation showed the performance of the proposed WE + QPSO-KSVM was superior to ``DWT + PCA + BP-NN'', ``DWT + PCA + RBF-NN'', ``DWT + PCA + PSO-KSVM'', ``WE + BPNN'', ``WE +$ KSVM'', and ``DWT $+$ PCA $+$ GA-KSVM'' w.r.t. sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. The work provides a novel means to detect abnormal brains with excellent performance. PMID:27163327

  2. Why consumers behave as they do with respect to food safety and risk information.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Wim; Frewer, Lynn J; Scholderer, Joachim; De Brabander, Hubert F

    2007-03-14

    In recent years, it seems that consumers are generally uncertain about the safety and quality of their food and their risk perception differs substantially from that of experts. Hormone and veterinary drug residues in meat persist to occupy a high position in European consumers' food concern rankings. The aim of this contribution is to provide a better understanding to food risk analysts of why consumers behave as they do with respect to food safety and risk information. This paper presents some cases of seemingly irrational and inconsistent consumer behaviour with respect to food safety and risk information and provides explanations for these behaviours based on the nature of the risk and individual psychological processes. Potential solutions for rebuilding consumer confidence in food safety and bridging between lay and expert opinions towards food risks are reviewed. These include traceability and labelling, segmented communication approaches and public involvement in risk management decision-making. PMID:17386689

  3. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus whenever bruxism occurs. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of research into biofeedback for bruxism; to assess the efficacy and acceptability of biofeedback therapy in management of awake bruxism and, separately, sleep bruxism in adults; and to compare findings between the two variants. Methods A systematic review of published literature examining biofeedback as an intervention directed at controlling primary bruxism in adults. We will search electronic databases and the grey literature using a predefined search strategy to identify randomised and non-randomised studies, technical reports and patents. Searches will not be restricted by language or date and will be expanded through contact with authors and experts, and by following up reference lists and citations. Two authors, working independently, will conduct screening of search results, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment and a third will resolve any disagreements. The primary outcomes of acceptability and effectiveness will be assessed using only randomised studies, segregated by bruxism subtype. A meta-analysis of these data will be conducted only if pre-defined conditions for quality and heterogeneity are met, otherwise the data will be summarized in narrative form. Data from non-randomised studies will be used to augment a narrative synthesis of the state of technical developments and any safety-related issues. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013006880

  4. Restraint training for awake functional brain scanning of rodents can cause long-lasting changes in pain and stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lucie A.; Bauer, Lucy C.; Pitcher, Mark H.; Bushnell, M. Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the increased interest in longitudinal brain imaging of awake rodents, it is important to understand both the short-term and long-term effects of restraint on sensory and emotional processing in the brain. To understand the effects of repeated restraint on pain behaviors and stress responses, we modeled a restraint protocol similar to those used to habituate rodents for magnetic resonance imaging scanning, and studied sensory sensitivity and stress hormone responses over 5 days. To uncover lasting effects of training, we also looked at responses to the formalin pain test 2 weeks later. We found that while restraint causes acute increases in the stress hormone corticosterone, it can also cause lasting reductions in nociceptive behavior in the formalin test, coupled with heightened corticosterone levels and increased activation of the “nociceptive” central nucleus of the amygdala, as seen by Fos protein expression. These results suggest that short-term repeated restraint, similar to that used to habituate rats for awake functional brain scanning, could potentially cause long-lasting changes in physiological and brain responses to pain stimuli that are stress-related, and therefore could potentially confound the functional activation patterns seen in awake rodents in response to pain stimuli. PMID:27058679

  5. [Incidence and causes of early end in awake surgery for language mapping not directly related to eloquence].

    PubMed

    Villalba, Gloria; Pacreu, Susana; Fernández-Candil, Juan Luis; León, Alba; Serrano, Laura; Conesa, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and causes that may lead to an early end (unfinished cortical/subcortical mapping) of awake surgery for language mapping are little known. A study was conducted on 41 patients with brain glioma located in the language area that had awake surgery under conscious sedation. Surgery was ended early in 6 patients. The causes were: tonic-clonic seizure (1), lack of cooperation due to fatigue/sleep (4), whether or not word articulation was involved, a decreased level of consciousness for ammonia encephalopathy that required endotracheal intubation (1). There are causes that could be expected and in some cases avoided. Tumour size, preoperative aphasia, valproate treatment, and type of anaesthesia used are variables to consider to avoid failure in awake surgery for language mapping. With these results, the following measures are proposed: l) If the tumour is large, perform surgery in two times to avoid fatigue, 2) if patient has a preoperative aphasia, do not use sedation during surgery to ensure that sleepiness does not cause worse word articulation, 3) if the patient is on valproate treatment, it is necessary to rule out the pre-operative symptoms that are not due to ammonia encephalopathy. PMID:26260205

  6. Diagnostic work up for language testing in patients undergoing awake craniotomy for brain lesions in language areas.

    PubMed

    Bilotta, Federico; Stazi, Elisabetta; Titi, Luca; Lalli, Diana; Delfini, Roberto; Santoro, Antonio; Rosa, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    Awake craniotomy is the technique of choice in patients with brain tumours adjacent to primary and accessory language areas (Broca's and Wernicke's areas). Language testing should be aimed to detect preoperative deficits, to promptly identify the occurrence of new intraoperative impairments and to establish the course of postoperative language status. Aim of this case series is to describe our experience with a dedicated language testing work up to evaluate patients with or at risk for language disturbances undergoing awake craniotomy for brain tumour resection. Pre- and intra operative testing was accomplished with 8 tests. Intraoperative evaluation was accomplished when patients were fully cooperative (Ramsey < 3). Postoperative evaluation was scheduled at early (within 21 days) and long-term follow-up (3-6 months). Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively recruited. Preoperative language testings were normal in 9 patients (45%), showed mild to moderate language deficit in 8 (40%) and severe language deficit or aphasic disorders in 3 (15%). Broca's area was identified in 15 patients, in all cases by counting arrest during stimulation and in 12 cases by naming arrest. In this article we describe our experience using a language testing work up to evaluate - pre, intra and postoperatively - patients undergoing awake craniotomy for brain tumour resection with preoperative language disturbances or at risk for postoperative language deficits. This approach allows a systematic evaluation and recording of language function status and can be accomplished even when a neuropsychologist or speech therapist are not involved in the operation crew. PMID:24195669

  7. Transition to total one-stop wide-awake hand surgery service-audit: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Bismil, MSK; Bismil, QMK; Harding, David; Harris, Phillip; Lamyman, Elaine; Sansby, Lizzie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To document the transition to a totally one-stop (patient seen and treated in one appointment) wide-awake (local anaesthesia only) hand surgery service. Design Retrospective review of 10 year service with detailed analysis of last 1000 cases including process and cost-effectiveness and efficiency analysis. Setting Purpose-built CQC-certified day-case surgical facility where we have pioneered the UK's first totally one-stop wide-awake orthopaedic service. Participants Approximately five thousand orthopaedic patients treated in the last ten years. Main outcome measures Surgical outcomes, patient satisfaction and cost-effectiveness and efficiency. Results The OSWA model is safe, efficient and effective; with a low complication rate, extremely high patient satisfaction; and cost-savings to the NHS of 50–75% of the national tariff. The service saved the NHS approximately £750,000 for the 1000 cases presented; and over £2 million since the inception of the service. Conclusions A totally one-stop wide-awake hand surgery service is a practicable and feasible alternative to the conventional treatment pathway with benefits in terms of efficiency and cost-effectiveness. PMID:22715424

  8. Flood Inundation Modelling Under Uncertainty Using Globally and Freely Available Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, K.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Giustarini, L.; Solomatine, D. P.

    2012-04-01

    The extreme consequences of recent catastrophic events have highlighted that flood risk prevention still needs to be improved to reduce human losses and economic damages, which have considerably increased worldwide in recent years. Flood risk management and long term floodplain planning are vital for living with floods, which is the currently proposed approach to cope with floods. To support the decision making processes, a significant issue is the availability of data to build appropriate and reliable models, from which the needed information could be obtained. The desirable data for model building, calibration and validation are often not sufficient or available. A unique opportunity is offered nowadays by globally available data which can be freely downloaded from internet. This might open new opportunities for filling the gap between available and needed data, in order to build reliable models and potentially lead to the development of global inundation models to produce floodplain maps for the entire globe. However, there remains the question of what is the real potential of those global remote sensing data, characterized by different accuracy, for global inundation monitoring and how to integrate them with inundation models. This research aims at contributing to understand whether the current globally and freely available remote sensing data (e.g. SRTM, SAR) can be actually used to appropriately support inundation modelling. In this study, the SRTM DEM is used for hydraulic model building, while ENVISAT-ASAR satellite imagery is used for model validation. To test the usefulness of these globally and freely available data, a model based on the high resolution LiDAR DEM and ground data (high water marks) is used as benchmark. The work is carried out on a data-rich test site: the River Alzette in the north of Luxembourg City. Uncertainties are estimated for both SRTM and LiDAR based models. Probabilistic flood inundation maps are produced under the framework of

  9. Long-term potentiation and evoked spike responses in the cingulate cortex of freely mobile rats.

    PubMed

    Gorkin, A G; Reymann, K G; Aleksandrov, Yu I

    2003-10-01

    Long-term potentiation of synaptic efficiency is regarded as a major candidate for the role of the physiological mechanism of long-term memory. However, the limited development of concepts of the cellular and subcellular characteristics of the induction of long-term potentiation in animals in conditions of free behavior does not correspond to the importance of this question. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the characteristics of potentiation in the cingulate cortex in response to stimulation of fibers of the subiculo-cingulate tract are truly long-term, i.e., develop through all known phases and last at least 24 h, in freely moving animals. In addition, the study aims included identification of the effects of application of blockers of different types of glutamate receptors on the development of long-term potentiation and identification of the characteristics of spike responses of single cingulate cortex neurons to stimulation of the subiculo-cingulate tract. Long-term potentiation, lasting more than 24 h, was obtained in freely moving adult rats not treated with GABA blockers. Injection of glutamate NMDA synapse blockers led to significant decreases in evoked cingulate cortex potentials in response to test stimulation. Activatory short-latency spike responses were characterized by a low probability of spike generation, and this increased with increases in the stimulation current. These data demonstrated that it is methodologically possible to compare, in freely moving rats, the involvement of individual neurons in the mechanisms involved in learning one or another type of adaptive behavior and the dynamics of their evoked spike activity during the formation of long-term potentiation. PMID:14635990

  10. How to easily provide zero order release of freely soluble drugs from coated pellets.

    PubMed

    Dekyndt, B; Verin, J; Neut, C; Siepmann, F; Siepmann, J

    2015-01-15

    Coated pellets offer a great potential as controlled drug delivery systems. However, constant drug release rates are difficult to achieve with this type of dosage forms if the drug is freely water-soluble. This is because diffusional mass transport generally plays a major role and with time the drug concentration within the system decreases, resulting in decreased concentration gradients, which are the driving forces for drug release. Thus, generally "curve-shaped" release profiles with monotonically decreasing slopes are observed. This type of release kinetics might be inappropriate for an efficient and safe drug treatment. Despite the great practical importance of this potentially crucial formulation challenge, surprisingly little is yet known on how to effectively address it. In this study, a novel approach is presented based on sequential layers of drug and polymer (initially free of drug) to provide a non-homogeneous initial drug distribution, combined with lag-time effects, and partial initial drug diffusion towards the pellet's core. Sugar and microcrystalline cellulose beads were used as starter cores, metoprolol succinate as freely soluble drug, ethylcellulose, and poly(vinyl acetate) as release rate controlling polymers. The type, number, thickness, and sequence of the drug and polymer layers were varied. Interestingly, a rather simple four layer system (two drug and two polymer layers) allowed providing about constant drug release during 8h. Compared to previously proposed coated pellets aiming at constant release of freely water-soluble drugs based on non-homogeneous initial drug distribution, the total coating level in this study was very much reduced: to only about 20%. Hence, the suggested formulation approach is relatively simple and can help overcoming a potentially major hurdle in practice. Its applicability has also been demonstrated for another type of drug: propranolol hydrochloride. PMID:25445976

  11. PROGRAM DROP: A computer program for prediction of evaporation from freely falling multicomponent drops

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, P.M.

    1996-12-01

    PROGRAM DROP consists of a series of FORTRAN routine which together are used to model the evaporation of a freely falling, multicomponent drop composed of an arbitrary number of volatile species and a single nonvolatile, inert component. The physics underlying the model are clearly identified, and the model`s relationship to previous work in the literature is described. Test cases are used to illustrate the viability of the model and to highlight its potential usefulness in the accurate prediction of multicomponent droplet vaporization in a variety of applications.

  12. Trapped modes around freely floating bodies in a two-layer fluid channel

    PubMed Central

    Cal, Filipe S.; Dias, Gonçalo A. S.; Videman, Juha H.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike the trapping of time-harmonic water waves by fixed obstacles, the oscillation of freely floating structures gives rise to a complex nonlinear spectral problem. Still, through a convenient elimination scheme the system simplifies to a linear spectral problem for a self-adjoint operator in a Hilbert space. Under symmetry assumptions on the geometry of the fluid domain, we present conditions guaranteeing the existence of trapped modes in a two-layer fluid channel. Numerous examples of floating bodies supporting trapped modes are given. PMID:25294970

  13. Feedback localization of freely diffusing fluorescent particles near the optical shot-noise limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Andrew J.; McHale, Kevin; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    We report near-optimal tracking of freely diffusing fluorescent particles in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry via photon counting and real-time feedback. We present a quantitative statistical model of our feedback network and find excellent agreement with the experiment. We monitor the motion of a single fluorescent particle with a sensitivity of 15 nm/sqrt Hz while collecting fewer than 5000 fluorescence photons/s. Fluorescent microspheres (diffusion coefficient 1.3 μm2/s) are tracked with a root-mean-square tracking error of 170 nm, within a factor of 2 of the theoretical limit set by photon counting shot noise.

  14. Relativistic electron scattering from a freely movable proton in a strong laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ai-Hua; Li, Shu-Min

    2014-11-01

    We study the electron scattering from the freely movable spin-1/2 proton in the presence of a linearly polarized laser field in the first Born approximation. The dressed state of the electron is described by a time-dependent wave function derived from a perturbation treatment (in a laser field). With the aid of numerical results we explore the dependencies of the differential cross section (DCS) on the electron-impact energy. Due to the mobility of the target, the DCS of this process is modified compared to the Mott scattering, especially in large scattering angles.

  15. Cardiovascular aspects of experimental meningococcal sepsis in young and older awake piglets: age-related differences.

    PubMed

    Hazelzet, J A; Stubenitsky, R; Petrov, A B; van Wieringen, G W; van der Voort, E; Hess, J; Hop, W C; Thijs, L G; Duncker, D J; Poolman, J T; Verdouw, P D

    1999-08-01

    Severe meningococcal disease is characterized by: a high load of specific endotoxin, capillary leakage and coagulation disorders. We studied the possible age-related differences in global hemodynamic and regional blood flow responses to different dosages (1 and 10 microg/kg body weight) of rough meningococcal endotoxin in young (8 kg) and older piglets (40 kg). Animals were chronically instrumented and studied in the awake state. The response to plasma infusion (30 mL/kg in 30 min) was evaluated after placebo and endotoxin infusion. The clinical picture was similar in all groups. The mortality was 0/8, 3/8,1/8, 4/9 in young-low, young-high, old-low, and old-high dose respectively. Most important findings were that cardiac index (CI) decreased in the young animals after endotoxin infusion, while it was well preserved in the older animals; in the older animals the systemic vascular resistance dropped 20%, while in the younger ones there was no change in resistance. Conductance to the kidneys, intestines, and spleen decreased significantly more in the young animals, while the increase in conductance and flow to the liver was higher in the old animals; subsequent volume loading resulted only partly in a recovery of the hemodynamic parameters, but failed to improve oxygen delivery. PMID:10446896

  16. Automated working distance adjustment enables optical coherence tomography of the human larynx in awake patients.

    PubMed

    Donner, Sabine; Bleeker, Sebastian; Ripken, Tammo; Ptok, Martin; Jungheim, Michael; Krueger, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides structural information of laryngeal tissue which is comparable to histopathological analysis of biopsies taken under general anesthesia. In awake patients, movements impede clinically useful OCT acquisition. Therefore, an automatic compensation of movements was implemented into a swept source OCT-laryngoscope. Video and OCT beam path were combined in one tube of 10-mm diameter. Segmented OCT images served as distance sensor and a feedback control adjusted the working distance between 33 and 70 mm by synchronously translating the reference mirror and focusing lens. With this motion compensation, the tissue was properly visible in up to 88% of the acquisition time. During quiet respiration, OCT contrasted epithelium and lamina propria. Mean epithelial thickness was measured to be 109 and [Formula: see text] in female and male, respectively. Furthermore, OCT of mucosal wave movements during phonation enabled estimation of the oscillation frequency and amplitude. Regarding clinical issues, the OCT-laryngoscope with automated working distance adjustment may support the estimation of the depth extent of epithelial lesions and contribute to establish an indication for a biopsy. Moreover, OCT of the vibrating vocal folds provides functional information, possibly giving further insight into mucosal behavior during the vibratory cycle. PMID:26158116

  17. Efficacy of "Awake ECMO" for critical respiratory failure after pediatric open-heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Akihiko; Hoashi, Takaya; Kagisaki, Koji; Shimada, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Yuzo; Hayashi, Teruyuki; Ichikawa, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    A 4-year-old boy with atrioventricular discordance, double-outlet right ventricle, pulmonary stenosis, and mitral regurgitation, was undergoing anatomical repair consisting of Senning, Rastelli, Damus-Kaye-Stansel procedures, and a mitral valve repair, complained of post-operative excessive airway tract secretion, which ultimately developed into acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) 28 days after the operation. The cause of the ARDS was thought to be frequent manual positive pressure recruitment and prolonged inhalation of pure oxygen. At 45 days after the operation, hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis turned out to be irreversible, and therefore, veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was established utilizing the Endumo(®)4000 system. Pulmonic interstitial inflammation gradually improved while resting the lung under ECMO support; however, effective ventilation volume decreased critically because a massive pulmonary hemorrhage occurred at 2 and 9 days after the initiation of ECMO. To maximize the effectiveness of respiratory physical therapy, "Awake ECMO" was started and tidal volume dramatically increased with a regained cough reflex. Five days later, he was successfully weaned off from ECMO, and discharged 7 months after the operation without any neurological and physiological sequelae. PMID:26670317

  18. Neurobehavioral evidence for individual differences in canine cognitive control: an awake fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Peter F; Spivak, Mark; Berns, Gregory

    2016-09-01

    Based on behavioral evidence, the domestic dog has emerged as a promising comparative model of human self-control. However, while research on human inhibition has probed heterogeneity and neuropathology through an integration of neural and behavioral evidence, there are no parallel data exploring the brain mechanisms involved in canine inhibition. Here, using a combination of cognitive testing and awake neuroimaging in domestic dogs, we provide evidence precisely localizing frontal brain regions underpinning response inhibition in this species and demonstrate the dynamic relationship between these regions and behavioral measures of control. Thirteen dogs took part in an in-scanner go/no-go task and an out-of-scanner A-not-B test. A frontal brain region was identified showing elevated neural activity for all subjects during successful inhibition in the scanner, and dogs showing greater mean brain activation in this region produced fewer false alarms. Better performance in the go/no-go task was also correlated with fewer errors in the out-of-scanner A-not-B test, suggesting that dogs show consistent neurobehavioral individual differences in cognitive control, as is seen in humans. These findings help establish parity between human and canine mechanisms of self-control and pave the way for future comparative studies examining their function and dysfunction. PMID:27062134

  19. Masking and scrambling in the auditory thalamus of awake rats by Gaussian and modulated noises.

    PubMed

    Martin, Eugene M; West, Morris F; Bedenbaugh, Purvis H

    2004-10-12

    This paper provides a look at how modulated broad-band noises modulate the thalamic response evoked by brief probe sounds in the awake animal. We demonstrate that noise not only attenuates the response to probe sounds (masking) but also changes the temporal response pattern (scrambling). Two brief probe sounds, a Gaussian noise burst and a brief sinusoidal tone, were presented in silence and in three ongoing noises. The three noises were targeted at activating the auditory system in qualitatively distinct ways. Dynamic ripple noise, containing many random tone-like elements, is targeted at those parts of the auditory system that respond well to tones. International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology noise, comprised of the sum of several simultaneous streams of Schroeder-phase speech, is targeted at those parts of the auditory system that respond well to modulated sounds but lack a well defined response to tones. Gaussian noise is targeted at those parts of the auditory system that respond to acoustic energy regardless of modulation. All noises both attenuated and decreased the precise temporal repeatability of the onset response to probe sounds. In addition, the modulated noises induced context-specific changes in the temporal pattern of the response to probe sounds. Scrambling of the temporal response pattern may be a direct neural correlate of the unfortunate experience of being able to hear, but not understand, speech sounds in noisy environments. PMID:15452349

  20. Effect of geometric and motion tracking errors on awake small animal SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Joon; Baba, Justin S; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2009-01-01

    A series of simulation studies were performed to evaluate the effects of geometric and motion tracking errors on reconstruction image quality for a single pinhole collimator awake animal imaging SPECT system. List-mode SPECT data generated using a custom Monte Carlo program that incorporated experimental mouse motion data were reconstructed by MLEM with Siddon's ray tracing. To better understand the impact of motion tracking and system geometric parameter errors on reconstructed system data, an offset of up to 1 mm or degree was separately applied to each for evaluation. In the absence of motion tracking or system geometric error, the applied motion compensation algorithm successfully reconstructed volumes without any degradation or distortion. Presented results reveal that motion tracking errors propagate through the SPECT reconstruction process. However, it is confirmed that the impact of tracking errors in the currently employed motion tracking system, is minimal because of their accuracy. The results also reveal the direct and indirect impact of geometric errors to motion compensated reconstruction quality and that a wrong assumption of pinhole transaxial position produces the most amount of distortion of all the investigated errors. Finally, system geometric errors are shown to have a greater impact on reconstruction quality than equivalent tracking errors.

  1. Effect of geometric and motion tracking error for awake small animal SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Lee, J.S. Baba, J. S. Goddard, A. Stolin, J. McKisson, A.G. Weisenberger, M.F. Smith

    2010-01-01

    A series of simulation studies were performed to evaluate the effects of geometric and motion tracking errors on reconstruction image quality for a single pinhole collimator awake animal imaging SPECT system. List-mode SPECT data generated using a custom Monte Carlo program that incorporated experimental mouse motion data were reconstructed by MLEM with Siddon's ray tracing. To better understand the impact of motion tracking and system geometric parameter errors on reconstructed system data, an offset of up to 1 mm or degree was separately applied to each for evaluation. In the absence of motion tracking or system geometric error, the applied motion compensation algorithm successfully reconstructed volumes without any degradation or distortion. Presented results reveal that motion tracking errors propagate through the SPECT reconstruction process. However, it is confirmed that the impact of tracking errors in the currently employed motion tracking system, is minimal because of their accuracy. The results also reveal the direct and indirect impact of geometric errors to motion compensated reconstruction quality and that a wrong assumption of pinhole transaxial position produces the most amount of distortion of all the investigated errors. Finally, system geometric errors are shown to have a greater impact on reconstruction quality than equivalent tracking errors.

  2. Improved Pose Measurement and Tracking System for Motion Correction of Awake, Unrestrained Small Animal SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Weisenberger, A G; Smith, M F

    2007-01-01

    An improved optical landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system has been developed to provide 3D animal pose data for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for awake, unanesthetized, unrestrained laboratory animals. The six degree of freedom animal position and orientation measurement data are time synchronized with the SPECT list mode data to provide for motion correction after the scan and before reconstruction. The tracking system employs infrared (IR) markers placed on the animal's head along with synchronized, strobed IR LEDs to illuminate the reflectors and freeze motion while minimizing reflections. A new design trinocular stereo image acquisition system using IEEE 1394 CMOS cameras acquires images of the animal with markers contained within a transparent enclosure. The trinocular configuration provides improved accuracy, range of motion, and robustness over the binocular stereo used previously. Enhanced software detects obstructions, automatically segments the markers, rejects reflections, performs marker correspondence, and calculates the 3D pose of the animal's head using image data from three cameras. The new hardware design provides more compact camera positioning with enhanced animal viewing through the 360 degree SPECT scan. This system has been implemented on a commercial scanner and tested using live mice and has been shown to be more reliable with higher accuracy than the previous system. Experimental results showing the improved motion tracking results are given.

  3. Real-time Awake Animal Motion Tracking System for SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2008-01-01

    Enhancements have been made in the development of a real-time optical pose measurement and tracking system that provides 3D position and orientation data for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for awake, unanesthetized, unrestrained small animals. Three optical cameras with infrared (IR) illumination view the head movements of an animal enclosed in a transparent burrow. Markers placed on the head provide landmark points for image segmentation. Strobed IR LED s are synchronized to the cameras and illuminate the markers to prevent motion blur for each set of images. The system using the three cameras automatically segments the markers, detects missing data, rejects false reflections, performs trinocular marker correspondence, and calculates the 3D pose of the animal s head. Improvements have been made in methods for segmentation, tracking, and 3D calculation to give higher speed and more accurate measurements during a scan. The optical hardware has been installed within a Siemens MicroCAT II small animal scanner at Johns Hopkins without requiring functional changes to the scanner operation. The system has undergone testing using both phantoms and live mice and has been characterized in terms of speed, accuracy, robustness, and reliability. Experimental data showing these motion tracking results are given.

  4. Effects of lesions of the caudal cerebellar vermis on cardiovascular regulation in awake cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, M. J.; Cotter, L. A.; Arendt, H. E.; Cass, S. P.; Yates, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    The vestibular system is known to participate in cardiovascular regulation during movement and postural alterations. The present study considered whether lesions of two regions of the posterior cerebellar vermis (the nodulus and uvula) that provide inputs to vestibular nucleus regions that affect control of blood pressure would alter cardiovascular responses during changes in posture. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in awake cats during nose-up tilts up to 60 degrees in amplitude before and following aspiration lesions of the nodulus or uvula; in most animals, cardiovascular responses were also recorded following the subsequent removal of vestibular inputs. Lesions of the nodulus or uvula did not affect baseline blood pressure or heart rate, although cardiovascular responses during nose-up tilts were altered. Increases in heart rate that typically occurred during 60 degrees nose-up tilt were attenuated in all three animals with lesions affecting both dorsal and ventral portions of the uvula; in contrast, the heart rate responses were augmented in the two animals with lesions mainly confined to the nodulus. Furthermore, following subsequent removal of vestibular inputs, uvulectomized animals, but not those with nodulus lesions, experienced more severe orthostatic hypotension than has previously been reported in cerebellum-intact animals with bilateral labyrinthectomies. These data suggest that the cerebellar nodulus and uvula modulate vestibulo-cardiovascular responses, although the two regions play different roles in cardiovascular regulation.

  5. A system for neural recording and closed-loop intracortical microstimulation in awake rodents.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Subramaniam; Elkabany, Ken; Long, John D; Yao, Yimin; Carmena, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in intracortical microstimulation as a means of providing sensory input in neuroprosthetic systems. We believe that precisely controlling the timing and parameters of stimulation in closed loop can significantly improve the efficacy of this technique. Here, we present a system for closed-loop microstimulation in awake rodents chronically implanted with multielectrode arrays. The system interfaces with existing commercial recording and stimulating hardware. Using custom-made hardware, we can stimulate and record from electrodes on the same implanted array and significantly reduce the stimulation artifact. Stimulation sequences can either be preprogrammed or triggered by neural or behavioral events. Specifically, this system can provide feedback stimulation in response to action potentials or features in the local field potential recorded on any of the electrodes within 15 ms. It can also trigger stimulation based on behavioral events, such as real-time tracking of rat whiskers captured with high-speed video. We believe that this system, which can be recreated easily, will help to significantly refine the technique of intracortical microstimulation and advance the field of neuroprostheses. PMID:19224714

  6. Selective acceleration of arachidonic acid reincorporation into brain membrane phospholipid following transient ischemia in awake gerbil.

    PubMed

    Rabin, O; Chang, M C; Grange, E; Bell, J; Rapoport, S I; Deutsch, J; Purdon, A D

    1998-01-01

    Awake gerbils were subjected to 5 min of forebrain ischemia by clamping the carotid arteries for 5 min and then allowing recirculation. Radiolabeled arachidonic or palmitic acid was infused intravenously for 5 min at the start of recirculation, after which the brains were prepared for quantitative autoradiography or chemical analysis. Dilution of specific activity of the acyl-CoA pool was independently determined for these fatty acids in control gerbils and following 5 min of ischemia and 5 min of reperfusion. Using a quantitative method for measuring regional in vivo fatty acid incorporation into and turnover within brain phospholipids and determining unlabeled concentrations of acyl-CoAs following recirculation, it was shown that reperfusion after 5 min of ischemia was accompanied by a threefold increase compared with the control in the rate of reincorporation of unlabeled arachidonate that had been released during ischemia, whereas reincorporation of released palmitate was not different from the control. Selective and accelerated reincorporation of arachidonate into brain phospholipids shortly after ischemia may ameliorate specific deleterious effects of arachidonate and its metabolites on brain membranes. PMID:9422378

  7. Inhibition shapes selectivity to vocalizations in the inferior colliculus of awake mice

    PubMed Central

    Mayko, Zachary M.; Roberts, Patrick D.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is a major center for integration of auditory information as it receives ascending projections from a variety of brainstem nuclei as well as descending projections from the thalamus and auditory cortex. The ascending projections are both excitatory and inhibitory and their convergence at the IC results in a microcircuitry that is important for shaping responses to simple, binaural, and modulated sounds in the IC. Here, we examined the role inhibition plays in shaping selectivity to vocalizations in the IC of awake, normal-hearing adult mice (CBA/CaJ strain). Neurons in the IC of mice show selectivity in their responses to vocalizations, and we hypothesized that this selectivity is created by inhibitory microcircuitry in the IC. We compared single unit responses in the IC to pure tones and a variety of ultrasonic mouse vocalizations before and after iontophoretic application of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and glycine receptor (GlyR) antagonists. The most pronounced effects of blocking GABAAR and GlyR on IC neurons were to increase spike rates and broaden excitatory frequency tuning curves in response to pure tone stimuli, and to decrease selectivity to vocalizations. Thus, inhibition plays an important role in creating selectivity to vocalizations in the IC. PMID:23087616

  8. Validation of a Modified Algometer to Measure Mechanical Nociceptive Thresholds in Awake Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui Cheng; Goh, Yong Meng; Abubakar, Adamu Abdul; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to validate the use of a modified algometer device to measure mechanical nociceptive thresholds in six dogs. Dogs were administered morphine intravenously (IV) at 1 mg/kg or saline at equivolume in a crossover design with one-week washout period. Mechanical nociceptive thresholds were determined before, after the administration of treatments at 5 minutes, and hourly for 8 hours. Thresholds were recorded at the carpal pad, metacarpal foot pad, tibia, femur, and abdomen. Heart rates, body temperature, and respiration were recorded at similar time points. Thresholds increased significantly (P < 0.05) from baseline values for up to 3 hours at tibia and abdomen, 4 hours at metacarpal pad, and 5 hours at the carpal pad and femur. Hypothermia, bradycardia, and change in respiration were observed in all dogs after morphine injection. Saline did not alter any threshold levels during the eight-hour study period, indicating no evidence of tolerance, learned avoidance, or local hyperaesthesia. The device and methods of testing were well tolerated by all the dogs. Results suggest that the modified algometer and method of application are useful to measure nociceptive mechanical thresholds in awake dogs. PMID:26075236

  9. PET measured evoked cerebral blood flow responses in an awake monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, J.S.; Lich, L.L.; Margenau, W.; Buchholz, S. )

    1991-03-01

    We have developed a method to measure task-related regional cerebral blood flow (BF) responses in an awake, trained monkey using positron emission tomography (PET) and H215O. We trained an animal with operant conditioning using only positive reinforcement to climb unassisted into a modified primate chair that was then positioned in the PET scanner. A special headholder and acrylic skull cap permitted precise placement and accurate repositioning. We measured BF qualitatively with bolus injection of H215O and 40-s scan. Each session included scans at rest interposed with scans during vibration of a forepaw. Regional responses were identified using subtraction image analysis. After global normalization, a resting image was subtracted on a pixel-by-pixel basis from a comparable image collected during vibration. The region of peak response occurred in contralateral sensorimotor cortex with a mean magnitude of 11.6% (+/- 3.2%) of the global mean value for 10 separate experiments, significantly greater than the mean qualitative BF change (0.4 +/- 3.6%; p less than 0.00001) in the same region for seven rest-rest pairs. This newly developed technique forms the basis for a wide variety of experiments.

  10. Regional cerebral palmitate incorporation following transient bilateral carotid occlusion in awake gerbils

    SciTech Connect

    Tone, O.; Miller, J.C.; Bell, J.M.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 14/C)Palmitate was injected intravenously in awake gerbils at various times after 5 minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion or a sham operation. Regional rates of incorporation of plasma palmitate into the hippocampus and other regions of the anterior circulation were determined relative to the mean rate of incorporation into regions of the posterior circulation using quantitative autoradiography and a ratio method of analysis. One day after bilateral carotid occlusion, relative palmitate incorporation was elevated significantly by 16% in the CA4 pyramidal cell layer and by 20% in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus compared with sham-operated gerbils. At 3 days, significant elevations of this magnitude were found in the CA3 and CA4 cell layers, whereas relative incorporation was reduced by 26% in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. At 7 days, the only significant difference from control was a 15% elevated incorporation in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer. Histologic examination indicated substantial cell death in the CA1 pyramidal layer at 3 days, with extensive glial reaction and phagocytic invasion at 7 days. Our results suggest that the turnover of palmitate-containing lipids is reduced in the CA1 layer of the gerbil hippocampus but that lipid synthesis is stimulated in hippocampal regions (CA3, CA4, dentate gyrus) affected by but recovering from transient bilateral carotid occlusion.

  11. Spatial structure of neuronal receptive field in awake monkey secondary visual cortex (V2).

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; She, Liang; Chen, Ming; Liu, Tianyi; Lu, Haidong D; Dan, Yang; Poo, Mu-ming

    2016-02-16

    Visual processing depends critically on the receptive field (RF) properties of visual neurons. However, comprehensive characterization of RFs beyond the primary visual cortex (V1) remains a challenge. Here we report fine RF structures in secondary visual cortex (V2) of awake macaque monkeys, identified through a projection pursuit regression analysis of neuronal responses to natural images. We found that V2 RFs could be broadly classified as V1-like (typical Gabor-shaped subunits), ultralong (subunits with high aspect ratios), or complex-shaped (subunits with multiple oriented components). Furthermore, single-unit recordings from functional domains identified by intrinsic optical imaging showed that neurons with ultralong RFs were primarily localized within pale stripes, whereas neurons with complex-shaped RFs were more concentrated in thin stripes. Thus, by combining single-unit recording with optical imaging and a computational approach, we identified RF subunits underlying spatial feature selectivity of V2 neurons and demonstrated the functional organization of these RF properties. PMID:26839410

  12. Coding of stimulus strength via analog calcium signals in Purkinje cell dendrites of awake mice

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Farzaneh; Giovannucci, Andrea; Wang, Samuel S-H; Medina, Javier F

    2014-01-01

    The climbing fiber input to Purkinje cells acts as a teaching signal by triggering a massive influx of dendritic calcium that marks the occurrence of instructive stimuli during cerebellar learning. Here, we challenge the view that these calcium spikes are all-or-none and only signal whether the instructive stimulus has occurred, without providing parametric information about its features. We imaged ensembles of Purkinje cell dendrites in awake mice and measured their calcium responses to periocular airpuffs that serve as instructive stimuli during cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning. Information about airpuff duration and pressure was encoded probabilistically across repeated trials, and in two additional signals in single trials: the synchrony of calcium spikes in the Purkinje cell population, and the amplitude of the calcium spikes, which was modulated by a non-climbing fiber pathway. These results indicate that calcium-based teaching signals in Purkinje cells contain analog information that encodes the strength of instructive stimuli trial-by-trial. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03663.001 PMID:25205669

  13. Characterization of flexible ECoG electrode arrays for chronic recording in awake rats

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, John D.; Phillips, Derrick J.; Rector, David M.; Bahr, David F.

    2008-01-01

    We developed a 64 channel flexible polyimide ECoG electrode array and characterized its performance for long term implantation, chronic cortical recording and high resolution mapping of surface evoked potentials in awake rats. To achieve the longest possible recording periods, the flexibility of the electrode array, adhesion between the metals and carrier substrate, and biocompatibility was critical for maintaining the signal integrity. Experimental testing of thin film adhesion was applied to a gold – polyimide system in order to characterize relative interfacial fracture energies for several different adhesion layers, yielding an increase in overall device reliability. We tested several different adhesion techniques including: gold alone without an adhesion layer, titanium-tungsten, tantalum and chromium. We found the titanium-tungsten to be a suitable adhesion layer considering the biocompatibility requirements as well as stability and delamination resistance. While chromium and tantalum produced stronger gold adhesion, concerns over biocompatibility of these materials require further testing. We implanted the polyimide ECoG electrode arrays through a slit made in the skull of rats and recorded cortical surface evoked responses. The arrays performed reliably over a period of at least 100 days and signals compared well with traditional screw electrodes, with better high frequency response characteristics. Since the ultimate goal of chronically implanted electrode arrays is for neural prosthetic devices that need to last many decades, other adhesion layers that would prove safe for implantation may be tested in the same way in order to improve the device reliability. PMID:18640155

  14. Automated working distance adjustment enables optical coherence tomography of the human larynx in awake patients

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Sabine; Bleeker, Sebastian; Ripken, Tammo; Ptok, Martin; Jungheim, Michael; Krueger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides structural information of laryngeal tissue which is comparable to histopathological analysis of biopsies taken under general anesthesia. In awake patients, movements impede clinically useful OCT acquisition. Therefore, an automatic compensation of movements was implemented into a swept source OCT-laryngoscope. Video and OCT beam path were combined in one tube of 10-mm diameter. Segmented OCT images served as distance sensor and a feedback control adjusted the working distance between 33 and 70 mm by synchronously translating the reference mirror and focusing lens. With this motion compensation, the tissue was properly visible in up to 88% of the acquisition time. During quiet respiration, OCT contrasted epithelium and lamina propria. Mean epithelial thickness was measured to be 109 and 135  μm in female and male, respectively. Furthermore, OCT of mucosal wave movements during phonation enabled estimation of the oscillation frequency and amplitude. Regarding clinical issues, the OCT-laryngoscope with automated working distance adjustment may support the estimation of the depth extent of epithelial lesions and contribute to establish an indication for a biopsy. Moreover, OCT of the vibrating vocal folds provides functional information, possibly giving further insight into mucosal behavior during the vibratory cycle. PMID:26158116

  15. Deep brain optical measurements of cell type–specific neural activity in behaving mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guohong; Jun, Sang Beom; Jin, Xin; Luo, Guoxiang; Pham, Michael D; Lovinger, David M; Vogel, Steven S; Costa, Rui M

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genetically encoded fluorescent sensors enable the monitoring of cellular events from genetically defined groups of neurons in vivo. In this protocol, we describe how to use a time-correlated single-photon counting (tcspc)–based fiber optics system to measure the intensity, emission spectra and lifetime of fluorescent biosensors expressed in deep brain structures in freely moving mice. When combined with cre-dependent selective expression of genetically encoded ca2+ indicators (GecIs), this system can be used to measure the average neural activity from a specific population of cells in mice performing complex behavioral tasks. as an example, we used viral expression of GcaMps in striatal projection neurons (spns) and recorded the fluorescence changes associated with calcium spikes from mice performing a lever-pressing operant task. the whole procedure, consisting of virus injection, behavior training and optical recording, takes 3–4 weeks to complete. With minor adaptations, this protocol can also be applied to recording cellular events from other cell types in deep brain regions, such as dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area. the simultaneously recorded fluorescence signals and behavior events can be used to explore the relationship between the neural activity of specific brain circuits and behavior. PMID:24784819

  16. Excitation and Inhibition Compete to Control Spiking during Hippocampal Ripples: Intracellular Study in Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    English, Daniel F.; Peyrache, Adrien; Stark, Eran; Roux, Lisa; Vallentin, Daniela; Long, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency ripple oscillations, observed most prominently in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal layer, are associated with memory consolidation. The cellular and network mechanisms underlying the generation of the rhythm and the recruitment of spikes from pyramidal neurons are still poorly understood. Using intracellular, sharp electrode recordings in freely moving, drug-free mice, we observed consistent large depolarizations in CA1 pyramidal cells during sharp wave ripples, which are associated with ripple frequency fluctuation of the membrane potential (“intracellular ripple”). Despite consistent depolarization, often exceeding pre-ripple spike threshold values, current pulse-induced spikes were strongly suppressed, indicating that spiking was under the control of concurrent shunting inhibition. Ripple events were followed by a prominent afterhyperpolarization and spike suppression. Action potentials during and outside ripples were orthodromic, arguing against ectopic spike generation, which has been postulated by computational models of ripple generation. These findings indicate that dendritic excitation of pyramidal neurons during ripples is countered by shunting of the membrane and postripple silence is mediated by hyperpolarizing inhibition. PMID:25471587

  17. Manipulating freely diffusing single 20-nm particles in an Anti-Brownian Electrokinetic Trap (ABELtrap)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarrabi, Nawid; Clausen, Caterina; Düser, Monika G.; Börsch, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Conformational changes of individual fluorescently labeled proteins can be followed in solution using a confocal microscope. Two fluorophores attached to selected domains of the protein report fluctuating conformations. Based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between these fluorophores on a single protein, sequential distance changes between the dyes provide the real time trajectories of protein conformations. However, observation times are limited for freely diffusing biomolecules by Brownian motion through the confocal detection volume. A. E. Cohen and W. E. Moerner have invented and built microfluidic devices with 4 electrodes for an Anti-Brownian Electrokinetic Trap (ABELtrap). Here we present an ABELtrap based on a laser focus pattern generated by a pair of acousto-optical beam deflectors and controlled by a programmable FPGA chip. Fluorescent 20-nm beads in solution were used to mimic freely diffusing large proteins like solubilized FoF1-ATP synthase. The ABELtrap could hold these nanobeads for about 10 seconds at the given position. Thereby, observation times of a single particle were increased by a factor of 1000.

  18. Single-molecule-sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer in freely-diffusing attoliter droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Ramos, Kieran P.; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S.; Milas, Peker

    2015-05-11

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from individual, dye-labeled RNA molecules confined in freely-diffusing attoliter-volume aqueous droplets is carefully compared to FRET from unconfined RNA in solution. The use of freely-diffusing droplets is a remarkably simple and high-throughput technique that facilitates a substantial increase in signal-to-noise for single-molecular-pair FRET measurements. We show that there can be dramatic differences between FRET in solution and in droplets, which we attribute primarily to an altered pH in the confining environment. We also demonstrate that a sufficient concentration of a non-ionic surfactant mitigates this effect and restores FRET to its neutral-pH solution value. At low surfactant levels, even accounting for pH, we observe differences between the distribution of FRET values in solution and in droplets which remain unexplained. Our results will facilitate the use of nanoemulsion droplets as attoliter volume reactors for use in biophysical and biochemical assays, and also in applications such as protein crystallization or nanoparticle synthesis, where careful attention to the pH of the confined phase is required.

  19. Single-molecule-sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer in freely-diffusing attoliter droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Milas, Peker; Ramos, Kieran P.; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S.

    2015-05-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from individual, dye-labeled RNA molecules confined in freely-diffusing attoliter-volume aqueous droplets is carefully compared to FRET from unconfined RNA in solution. The use of freely-diffusing droplets is a remarkably simple and high-throughput technique that facilitates a substantial increase in signal-to-noise for single-molecular-pair FRET measurements. We show that there can be dramatic differences between FRET in solution and in droplets, which we attribute primarily to an altered pH in the confining environment. We also demonstrate that a sufficient concentration of a non-ionic surfactant mitigates this effect and restores FRET to its neutral-pH solution value. At low surfactant levels, even accounting for pH, we observe differences between the distribution of FRET values in solution and in droplets which remain unexplained. Our results will facilitate the use of nanoemulsion droplets as attoliter volume reactors for use in biophysical and biochemical assays, and also in applications such as protein crystallization or nanoparticle synthesis, where careful attention to the pH of the confined phase is required.

  20. Force estimation and turbulence in the wake of a freely flying European Starling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Gida, Hadar; Kirchhefer, Adam; Kopp, Gregory; Gurka, Roi

    2011-11-01

    Flapping wings are one of the most complex yet widespread propulsion method found in nature. Although aeronautical technology has advanced rapidly over the past 100 years, natural flyers, which have evolved over millions of years, still feature higher efficiency and represent one of nature's finest locomotion methods. One of the key questions is the role of the unsteady motion in the flow due to the wing flapping and its contribution to the forces acting on a bird during downstroke and upstroke. The wake of a freely flying European Starling is investigated as a case study of unsteady wing aerodynamics. Measurements of the near wake have been taken using long duration high-speed PIV in the wake behind a freely flying bird in a specially designed avian wind tunnel. The wake has been characterized by means of velocity and vorticity fields. The measured flow field is decomposed based on the wing position phases. Drag and lift have been estimated using the mean velocity deficit and the circulation at the wake region. In addition, kinematic analysis of the wing motion and the body has been performed using additional high-speed cameras that recorded the bird movement simultaneously with the PIV. Correlations between the wing kinematics and the flow field characteristics are presented as well as the time evolution of the velocity, vorticity and additional turbulence parameters.

  1. Statistics of the electrosensory input in the freely swimming weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Fotowat, Haleh; Harrison, Reid R; Krahe, Rüdiger

    2013-08-21

    The neural computations underlying sensory-guided behaviors can best be understood in view of the sensory stimuli to be processed under natural conditions. This input is often actively shaped by the movements of the animal and its sensory receptors. Little is known about natural sensory scene statistics taking into account the concomitant movement of sensory receptors in freely moving animals. South American weakly electric fish use a self-generated quasi-sinusoidal electric field for electrolocation and electrocommunication. Thousands of cutaneous electroreceptors detect changes in the transdermal potential (TDP) as the fish interact with conspecifics and the environment. Despite substantial knowledge about the circuitry and physiology of the electrosensory system, the statistical properties of the electrosensory input evoked by natural swimming movements have never been measured directly. Using underwater wireless telemetry, we recorded the TDP of Apteronotus leptorhynchus as they swam freely by themselves and during interaction with a conspecific. Swimming movements caused low-frequency TDP amplitude modulations (AMs). Interacting with a conspecific caused additional AMs around the difference frequency of their electric fields, with the amplitude of the AMs (envelope) varying at low frequencies due to mutual movements. Both AMs and envelopes showed a power-law relationship with frequency, indicating spectral scale invariance. Combining a computational model of the electric field with video tracking of movements, we show that specific swimming patterns cause characteristic spatiotemporal sensory input correlations that contain information that may be used by the brain to guide behavior. PMID:23966697

  2. Virally mediated optogenetic excitation and inhibition of pain in freely moving non-transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shrivats Mohan; Montgomery, Kate L.; Towne, Chris; Lee, Soo Yeun; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Primary nociceptors are the first neurons involved in the complex processing system that regulates normal and pathological pain1. Our ability to excite and inhibit these neurons has been limited by pharmacological and electrical stimulation constraints; non-invasive excitation and inhibition of these neurons in freely moving non-transgenic animals has not been possible. Here we use an optogenetic2 strategy to bidirectionally control nociceptors of non-transgenic mice. Intra-sciatic nerve injection of adeno-associated viruses encoding an excitatory opsin enabled light-inducible stimulation of acute pain, place aversion, and optogenetically mediated reductions in withdrawal thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, viral delivery of an inhibitory opsin enabled light-inducible inhibition of acute pain perception, and reversed mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a model of neuropathic pain. Light was delivered transdermally enabling these behaviors to be induced in freely moving animals. This approach may have utility in basic and translational pain research, and enable rapid drug screening and testing of newly engineered opsins. PMID:24531797

  3. The WURM project - a web-based freely available database of computed physical properties for minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracas, R.; Bobocioiu, E.

    2013-12-01

    Teaching of vibrational spectra for minerals is highly improved by visual media support. The atomic vibrations are usually described by words such as breathing, symmetric or asymmetric stretching, bending, rolling and so on. However only the visualization of these modes can bring a thorough understanding of the dynamics of a crystalline lattice. Here we present the WURM database, whose aim is to build a freely accessible web-based repository of computed physical properties for minerals. Apart from the crystal structure used in the calculation, the dynamical charges and the dielectric tensors, and the refractive index, the WURM database presents at length the Raman spectra with both peak position and intensity and the infrared peak positions. In fact the vibrational information makes the bulk of the database and constitutes the major computational effort. For each vibrational mode in the zone-center we determine the frequency, the symmetry assignment, the atomic displacement patterns, and the Raman tensors. The database is freely available on the web at http://www.wurm.info and is highly interactive. Jmol-powered applets incorporated in the website allow the quick visualization of the crystal structure and of the atomic displacement patters of all vibrational modes. All the results are exclusively obtained from first-principles calculations performed using the local density approximation of density functional theory and density functional perturbation theory in the ABINIT implementation [http://www.abinit.org], based on planewaves and pseudopotentials.

  4. Walking freely in the energy and temperature space by the modified replica exchange molecular dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changjun; Huang, Yanzhao

    2016-06-30

    Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (REMD) method is a powerful sampling tool in molecular simulations. Recently, we made a modification to the standard REMD method. It places some inactive replicas at different temperatures as well as the active replicas. The method completely decouples the number of the active replicas and the number of the temperature levels. In this article, we make a further modification to our previous method. It uses the inactive replicas in a different way. The inactive replicas first sample in their own knowledge-based energy databases and then participate in the replica exchange operations in the REMD simulation. In fact, this method is a hybrid between the standard REMD method and the simulated tempering method. Using different active replicas, one can freely control the calculation quantity and the convergence speed of the simulation. To illustrate the performance of the method, we apply it to some small models. The distribution functions of the replicas in the energy space and temperature space show that the modified REMD method in this work can let the replicas walk freely in both of the two spaces. With the same number of the active replicas, the free energy surface in the simulation converges faster than the standard REMD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059441

  5. The total and freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons content in residues from biogas production.

    PubMed

    Stefaniuk, Magdalena; Oleszczuk, Patryk

    2016-01-01

    In the situation of increasing agricultural utilization of residues from biogas production (RBP) it is important to determine the concentration of contaminants, which could occur in these materials. The group of contaminants that requires special attention are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The objective of the study was to determine the total and freely dissolved (Cfree) of PAHs in RBP from 6 different biogas plants operating under various temperature conditions and without or with the separation into the solid and liquid fractions. The freely dissolved PAHs were determined using polyoxymethylene (POM method). The total content of the Σ16 PAHs in RBP varied from 449 to 6147 μg/kgdw, while that of Cfree PAHs was at the level from 57 to 653 ng/L. No significant differences were noted in the content of the Σ16 PAHs (total) between the solid and the liquid fractions. This indicates that in the course of the separation, the PAHs are distributed proportionally between the fractions. However in the case of Cfree, PAHs content in the solid fraction was over twice as high as in the liquid fraction. This was probably due to the greater affinity of the particles present in the liquid fraction to the analysed PAHs than to the particles of the solid fraction. Higher affinity to liquid fraction was also confirmed by the distribution coefficients KTOC determined on the basis of Cfree. PMID:26586628

  6. A novel miniature telemetric system for recording EEG activity in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Lapray, Damien; Bergeler, Jürgen; Dupont, Erwan; Thews, Oliver; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2008-02-15

    Telemetric recording systems offer the advantage to monitor physiological parameters in freely moving animals without any restrictions in their explorative behaviour. We present a novel, inexpensive, portable and reusable telemetric system to record the electroencephalogram (EEG) from adult freely moving rats under various experimental conditions. Our system consists of an implantable transmitter which communicates at a sampling rate of 500 Hz bi-directional with a receiver via radio transmission (in EU: 868.35 MHz; in USA: 916.5 MHz) over a distance of up to 3m. The switching time between receiving and transmitting signals is 20 mus and the data transmission rate amounts to 115.2 kbps. The receiver is connected to a laptop via an USB connection and the data are displayed and saved by a software developed by the authors. This system allows the simultaneous recording and storage of a video signal for direct comparison of the animal's EEG with its behaviour. EEG recordings could be obtained over 4-5 weeks and under various experimental conditions (i.e. from rats swimming in water). The current system is optimized for recording electrical activity from the animal's brain, but can be easily modified to record other physiological parameters. PMID:17983664

  7. A multi-channel telemetry system for brain microstimulation in freely roaming animals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaohua; Talwar, Sanjiv K; Hawley, Emerson S; Li, Lei; Chapin, John K

    2004-02-15

    A system is described that enables an experimenter to remotely deliver electrical pulse train stimuli to multiple different locations in the brains of freely moving rats. The system consists of two separate components: a transmitter base station that is controlled by a PC operator, and a receiver-microprocessor integrated pack worn on the back of the animals and which connects to suitably implanted brain locations. The backpack is small and light so that small animal subjects can easily carry it. Under remote command from the PC the backpack can be configured to provide biphasic pulse trains of arbitrarily specified parameters. A feature of the system is that it generates precise brain-stimulation behavioral effects using the direct constant-voltage TTL output of the backpack microprocessor. The system performs with high fidelity even in complex environments over a distance of about 300 m. Rat self-stimulation tests showed that this system produced the same behavioral responses as a conventional constant-current stimulator. This system enables a variety of multi-channel brain stimulation experiments in freely moving animals. We have employed it to develop a new animal behavior model ("virtual" conditioning) for the neurophysiological study of spatial learning, in which a rat can be accurately guided to navigate various terrains. PMID:14757345

  8. The BEHAVE-AD Assessment System: A Perspective, A Commentary on New Findings, and A Historical Review

    PubMed Central

    Reisberg, Barry; Monteiro, Isabel; Torossian, Carol; Auer, Stefanie; Shulman, Melanie B.; Ghimire, Santosh; Boksay, Istvan; BenArous, Francoise Guillo; Osorio, Ricardo; Vengassery, Aninditha; Imran, Sheema; Shaker, Hussam; Noor, Sadaf; Naqvi, Shazia; Kenowsky, Sunnie; Xu, Jinfeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and associated disturbances in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are a source of distress and burden for spouses, professional caregivers, and others with responsibilities for the care of individuals with AD. BPSD with behavioral disturbances are also associated with more rapid institutionalization and increased morbidity and mortality for persons with AD. Objectives In this review and commentary, we discuss the history of the development of BPSD and behavioral disturbance assessments, which are distinct from those evaluating cognitive and functional symptoms of AD. In particular, we review the informant-based Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Rating Scale (BEHAVE-AD), the related, potentially more sensitive, BEHAVE-AD Frequency-Weighted Severity Scale (BEHAVE-AD-FW), and the direct subject evaluation-based Empirical BEHAVE-AD Rating Scale (E-BEHAVE-AD). The kinds of medications that alleviate behavioral symptoms on these measures as well as the problems and possibilities for further advances with these medications are discussed. Finally, the importance of distinguishing BPSD and behavioral disturbance remediation in AD from the treatment of cognitive decline and other aspects of AD is emphasized in the context of appropriate assessment methodology. The objective of this paper is to provide a framework for further advances in the treatment of BPSD and associated behavioral disturbances in AD and, consequently, a framework for continuing improvements in the lives of individuals with AD and those who share the burden of the disease with the AD person. PMID:24714384

  9. Quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization: analysis of individual particle behavior and parameter selection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Fang, Wei; Wu, Xiaojun; Palade, Vasile; Xu, Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    Quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO), motivated by concepts from quantum mechanics and particle swarm optimization (PSO), is a probabilistic optimization algorithm belonging to the bare-bones PSO family. Although it has been shown to perform well in finding the optimal solutions for many optimization problems, there has so far been little analysis on how it works in detail. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the QPSO algorithm. In the theoretical analysis, we analyze the behavior of a single particle in QPSO in terms of probability measure. Since the particle's behavior is influenced by the contraction-expansion (CE) coefficient, which is the most important parameter of the algorithm, the goal of the theoretical analysis is to find out the upper bound of the CE coefficient, within which the value of the CE coefficient selected can guarantee the convergence or boundedness of the particle's position. In the experimental analysis, the theoretical results are first validated by stochastic simulations for the particle's behavior. Then, based on the derived upper bound of the CE coefficient, we perform empirical studies on a suite of well-known benchmark functions to show how to control and select the value of the CE coefficient, in order to obtain generally good algorithmic performance in real world applications. Finally, a further performance comparison between QPSO and other variants of PSO on the benchmarks is made to show the efficiency of the QPSO algorithm with the proposed parameter control and selection methods. PMID:21905841

  10. Noninnocently Behaving Bridging Anions of the Widely Distributed Antioxidant Ellagic Acid in Diruthenium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhishek; Grupp, Anita; Schwederski, Brigitte; Kaim, Wolfgang; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2015-10-19

    Dinuclear compounds [L2Ru(μ-E)RuL2](n) where L is acetylacetonate (acac(-), 2,4-pentanedionate), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), or 2-phenylazopyridine (pap) and EH4 is ellagic acid, an antioxidative bis-catechol natural product, were studied by voltammetric and spectroelectrochemical techniques (UV-vis-NIR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)). The electronic structures of the isolated forms (NBu4)2[(acac)2Ru(μ-E)Ru(acac)2] ((NBu4)2[1]), [(bpy)2Ru(μ-E)Ru(bpy)2]ClO4 ([2]ClO4), and [(pap)2Ru(μ-E)Ru(pap)2] ([3]) were characterized by density functional theory (DFT) in conjunction with EPR and UV-vis-NIR measurements. The crystal structure of (NBu4)2[1] revealed the meso form and a largely planar Ru(μ-E)Ru center. Several additional charge states of the compounds were electrochemically accessible and were identified mostly as complexes with noninnocently behaving pap(0/•-) or bridging ellagate (E(n-)) anions (n = 2, 3, 4) but not as mixed-valence intermediates. The free anions E(n-), n = 1-4, were calculated by time-dependent DFT to reveal NIR transitions for the radical forms with n = 1 and 3 and a triplet ground state for the bis(o-semiquinone) dianion E(2-). PMID:26441246

  11. Selective Persistence of Sensorimotor Mismatch Signals in Visual Cortex of Behaving Alzheimer's Disease Mice.

    PubMed

    Liebscher, Sabine; Keller, Georg B; Goltstein, Pieter M; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Hübener, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Neurodegenerative processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) affect the structure and function of neurons [1-4], resulting in altered neuronal activity patterns comprising neuronal hypo- and hyperactivity [5, 6] and causing the disruption of long-range projections [7, 8]. Impaired information processing between functionally connected brain areas is evident in defective visuomotor integration, an early sign of the disease [9-11]. The cellular and neuronal circuit mechanisms underlying this disruption of information processing in AD, however, remain elusive. Recent studies in mice suggest that visuomotor integration already occurs in primary visual cortex (V1), as it not only processes sensory input but also exhibits strong motor-related activity, likely driven by neuromodulatory or excitatory inputs [12-17]. Here, we probed the integration of visual-and motor-related-inputs in V1 of behaving APP/PS1 [18] mice, a well-characterized mouse model of AD, using two-photon calcium imaging. We find that sensorimotor signals in APP/PS1 mice are differentially affected: while visually driven and motor-related signals are strongly reduced, neuronal responses signaling a mismatch between expected and actual visual flow are selectively spared. We furthermore observe an increase in aberrant activity during quiescent states in APP/PS1 mice. Jointly, the reduction in running-correlated activity and the enhanced aberrant activity degrade the coding accuracy of the network, indicating that the impairment of visuomotor integration in AD is already taking place at early stages of visual processing. PMID:27020746

  12. Fuzzy logic autopilot synthesis for a nonlinearly behaved thruster-controlled missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Wayne Kevin

    A methodology to design a fuzzy logic based autopilot control system that works with vehicle nonlinearities (not merely accommodating them) is defined. The application is a forward propulsive controlled, nonlinearly behaved missile. The three distinct types of nonlinearities studied are nonlinear aerodynamics, impulsive thruster control, and aerodynamic and propulsive jet interaction. To permit sufficient fidelity of simulation models, an empirical approach to defining the jet interaction characteristics is developed and applied to the study missile configuration. The non-minimum phase trait of jet interaction coupled with the transient effects of impulsive control pose the greatest challenge to the autopilot design. The key innovation for controlling the coupled and destabilizing nonlinear missile behavior is to incorporate dynamic compensation into the inherently static fuzzy logic control structure. The autopilot structure is defined and an efficient path for finding a controller solution is identified. Acceleration step responses which respond more rapidly than the linearized airframe approximations with minimal airframe oscillation validate the achievement of the research goal.

  13. How Do Children Behave Regarding Their Birth Order in Dental Setting?

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderi, Faezeh; Fijan, Soleiman; Hamedani, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Prediction of child cooperation level in dental setting is an important issue for a dentist to select the proper behavior management method. Many psychological studies have emphasized the effect of birth order on patient behavior and personality; however, only a few researches evaluated the effect of birth order on child’s behavior in dental setting. Purpose This study was designed to evaluate the influence of children ordinal position on their behavior in dental setting. Materials and Method A total of 158 children with at least one primary mandibular molar needing class I restoration were selected. Children were classified based on the ordinal position; first, middle, or last child as well as single child. A blinded examiner recorded the pain perception of children during injection based on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Sound, Eye and Movement (SEM) scale. To assess the child's anxiety, the questionnaire known as “Dental Subscale of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule” (CFSS-DS) was employed. Results The results showed that single children were significantly less cooperative and more anxious than the other children (p<0.001). The middle children were significantly more cooperative in comparison with the other child's position (p< 0.001). Conclusion Single child may behave less cooperatively in dental setting. The order of child birth must also be considered in prediction of child’s behavior for behavioral management. PMID:26636121

  14. Activity of Caudate Nucleus Neurons in a Visual Fixation Paradigm in Behaving Cats

    PubMed Central

    Nagypál, Tamás; Gombkötő, Péter; Barkóczi, Balázs; Benedek, György; Nagy, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Beside its motor functions, the caudate nucleus (CN), the main input structure of the basal ganglia, is also sensitive to various sensory modalities. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of visual stimulation on the CN by using a behaving, head-restrained, eye movement-controlled feline model developed recently for this purpose. Extracellular multielectrode recordings were made from the CN of two cats in a visual fixation paradigm applying static and dynamic stimuli. The recorded neurons were classified in three groups according to their electrophysiological properties: phasically active (PAN), tonically active (TAN) and high-firing (HFN) neurons. The response characteristics were investigated according to this classification. The PAN and TAN neurons were sensitive primarily to static stimuli, while the HFN neurons responded primarily to changes in the visual environment i.e. to optic flow and the offset of the stimuli. The HFNs were the most sensitive to visual stimulation; their responses were stronger than those of the PANs and TANs. The majority of the recorded units were insensitive to the direction of the optic flow, regardless of group, but a small number of direction-sensitive neurons were also found. Our results demonstrate that both the static and the dynamic components of the visual information are represented in the CN. Furthermore, these results provide the first piece of evidence on optic flow processing in the CN, which, in more general terms, indicates the possible role of this structure in dynamic visual information processing. PMID:26544604

  15. Precise rhythmicity in activity of neocortical, thalamic and brain stem neurons in behaving cats and rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dunin-Barkowski, Witali L.; Sirota, Mikhail G.; Lovering, Andrew T.; Orem, John M.; Vidruk, Edward H.; Beloozerova, Irina N.

    2006-01-01

    Rhythmic discharges of neurons are believed to be involved in information processing in both sensory and motor systems. However their fine structure and functional role need further elucidation. We employed a pattern-based approach to search for episodes of precisely rhythmic activity of single neurons recorded in different brain structures in behaving cats and rabbits. We defined discharge patterns using an algorithmic description, which is different from the previously suggested template methods. We detected episodes of precisely rhythmic discharges, specifically, triads of constant (precision ± 2.5%) inter-spike intervals in the 10–70 ms range. In 54% (67/125) of neurons tested, these patterns could not be explained by random occurrences or by steady or slowly changing input. Rhythmic patterns occurred at a wide range of inter-spike intervals, and were imbedded in non-rhythmic activity. In many neurons, timing of these precisely rhythmic patterns was related to different locomotion tasks or to respiration. PMID:16956677

  16. A minimally invasive approach to long-term head fixation in behaving nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Davis, T.S.; Torab, K.; House, P.; Greger, B.

    2009-01-01

    We have designed a device for long-term head fixation for use in behaving nonhuman primates that is robust yet minimally invasive and simple to use. This device is a modified version of the halo system that is used in humans for cervical traction and stabilization after spinal column injuries. This device consists of an aluminum halo with four titanium skull pins offset from the halo by aluminum posts. The titanium pins insert onto small segments of cranially reinforcing titanium plate, which are attached to the skull with titanium cortex screws. The surgery involves four scalp incisions, placement of the reinforcing plates, insertion of the pins for attachment of the halo, and incision closure. After the halo is attached, the animal’s head can be fixed to a primate chair using a custom-built attachment arm that provides three degrees of adjustability for proper positioning during behavioral tasks. We have installed this device on two Macaque monkeys weighing seven and ten kilograms. The halos have been in place on these animals for up to eight months without signs of discomfort or loss of fixation. Using this method of head fixation, we have been able to track the animals’ eye positions with an accuracy of less than two visual degrees while they perform behavioral tasks. PMID:19394360

  17. Characteristics of fast-spiking neurons in the striatum of behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Inokawa, Hitoshi; Hori, Yukiko; Pan, Xiaochuan; Matsuzaki, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Kae; Samejima, Kazuyuki; Shidara, Munetaka; Kimura, Minoru; Sakagami, Masamichi; Minamimoto, Takafumi

    2016-04-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are the fundamental constituents of neural circuits that organize network outputs. The striatum as part of the basal ganglia is involved in reward-directed behaviors. However, the role of the inhibitory interneurons in this process remains unclear, especially in behaving monkeys. We recorded the striatal single neuron activity while monkeys performed reward-directed hand or eye movements. Presumed parvalbumin-containing GABAergic interneurons (fast-spiking neurons, FSNs) were identified based on narrow spike shapes in three independent experiments, though they were a small population (4.2%, 42/997). We found that FSNs are characterized by high-frequency and less-bursty discharges, which are distinct from the basic firing properties of the presumed projection neurons (phasically active neurons, PANs). Besides, the encoded information regarding actions and outcomes was similar between FSNs and PANs in terms of proportion of neurons, but the discharge selectivity was higher in PANs than that of FSNs. The coding of actions and outcomes in FSNs and PANs was consistently observed under various behavioral contexts in distinct parts of the striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen, and anterior striatum). Our results suggest that FSNs may enhance the discharge selectivity of postsynaptic output neurons (PANs) in encoding crucial variables for a reward-directed behavior. PMID:26477717

  18. A Bayesian approach for characterizing direction tuning curves in the supplementary motor area of behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Taubman, Hadas; Vaadia, Eilon; Paz, Rony; Chechik, Gal

    2013-06-01

    Neural responses are commonly studied in terms of "tuning curves," characterizing changes in neuronal response as a function of a continuous stimulus parameter. In the motor system, neural responses to movement direction often follow a bell-shaped tuning curve for which the exact shape determines the properties of neuronal movement coding. Estimating the shape of that tuning curve robustly is hard, especially when directions are sampled unevenly and at a coarse resolution. Here, we describe a Bayesian estimation procedure that improves the accuracy of curve-shape estimation even when the curve is sampled unevenly and at a very coarse resolution. Using this approach, we characterize the movement direction tuning curves in the supplementary motor area (SMA) of behaving monkeys. We compare the SMA tuning curves to tuning curves of neurons from the primary motor cortex (M1) of the same monkeys, showing that the tuning curves of the SMA neurons tend to be narrower and shallower. We also show that these characteristics do not depend on the specific location in each region. PMID:23468391

  19. The embodiment of tourism among bisexually-behaving Dominican male sex workers.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Mark B

    2008-10-01

    While theories of "structure" and social inequality have increasingly informed global health efforts for HIV prevention--with growing recognition of the linkages between large-scale political and economic factors in the distribution and impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic--there is still little theorization of precisely how structural factors shape the very bodies and sexualities of specific populations and groups. In order to extend the theoretical understanding of these macro-micro linkages, this article examines how the growth of the tourism industry in the Dominican Republic has produced sexual practices and identities that reflect both the influence of large-scale structural processes and the resistant responses of local individuals. Drawing on social science theories of political economy, embodiment, and authenticity, I argue that an understanding of patterns of sexuality and HIV risk in the region requires analysis of how political-economic transformations related to tourism intersect with the individual experiences and practices of sexuality on the ground. The analysis draws on long-term ethnographic research with bisexually behaving male sex workers in two cities in the Dominican Republic, including participant observation, in-depth interviews, focus groups, and surveys. By examining the global and local values placed on these men's bodies and the ways sex workers use their bodies to broker tourists' pleasure, we may better understand how the large-scale structures of the tourism industry are linked to the specific meanings and practices of sexuality. PMID:18506615

  20. Awake Intranasal Insulin Delivery Modifies Protein Complexes and Alters Memory, Anxiety, and Olfactory Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Marks, D.R.; Tucker, K.; Cavallin, M.A.; Mast, T.G.; Fadool, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of insulin pathways in olfaction is of significant interest with the widespread pathology of Diabetes mellitus and its associated metabolic and neuronal co-morbidities. The insulin receptor kinase (IR) is expressed at high levels in the olfactory bulb (OB), where it suppresses a dominant Shaker ion channel (Kv1.3) via tyrosine phosphorylation of critical N- and C-terminal residues. We optimized a seven day intranasal insulin delivery (IND) in awake mice to ascertain the biochemical and behavioral effects of insulin to this brain region, given that nasal sprays for insulin have been marketed notwithstanding our knowledge of the role of Kv1.3 in olfaction, metabolism, and axon targeting. IND evoked robust phosphorylation of Kv1.3, as well as increased channel protein-protein interactions with IR and post-synaptic density 95. IND-treated mice had an increased short- and long-term object memory recognition, increased anxiolytic behavior, and an increased odor-discrimination using an odor habituation protocol but only moderate change in odor threshold using a two-choice paradigm. Unlike Kv1.3 gene-targeted deletion that alters metabolism, adiposity, and axonal targeting to defined olfactory glomeruli, suppression of Kv1.3 via IND had no effect on body weight nor the size and number of M72 glomeruli or the route of its sensory axon projections. There was no evidence of altered expression of sensory neurons in the epithelium. In mice made pre-diabetic via diet-induced obesity, IND was no longer effective in increasing long-term object memory recognition nor increasing anxiolytic behavior, suggesting state dependency or a degree of insulin resistance related to these behaviors. PMID:19458242

  1. Awake reactivation of emotional memory traces through hippocampal-neocortical interactions.

    PubMed

    de Voogd, Lycia D; Fernández, Guillén; Hermans, Erno J

    2016-07-01

    Emotionally arousing experiences are typically well remembered not only due to immediate effects at encoding, but also through further strengthening of subsequent consolidation processes. A large body of research shows how neuromodulatory systems promote synaptic consolidation. However, how emotionally arousing experiences alter systems-level interactions, presumably a consequence of modifications at a synaptic level, remains unclear. Animal models predict that memory traces are maintained by spontaneous reactivations across hippocampal-neocortical circuits during "offline" periods such as post-learning rest, and suggest this might be stronger for emotional memories. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis in humans using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Participants underwent a two-category localizer paradigm followed by a categorical differential delay fear conditioning paradigm interleaved with blocks of awake rest. Counterbalanced across participants, exemplars of one category (CS+), but not the other (CS-), were paired with mild electrical shocks. Fear recall (differential conditioned pupil dilation) was tested 24h later. Analyses of the localizer paradigm replicate earlier work showing category-specific response patterns in neocortical higher-order visual regions. Critically, we show that during post-learning rest, spontaneous reactivation of these neocortical patterns was stronger for the CS+ than the CS- category. Furthermore, hippocampal connectivity with the regions exhibiting these reactivations predicted strength of fear recall 24h later. We conclude that emotional arousal during learning promotes spontaneous post-learning reactivation of neocortical representations of recent experiences, which leads to better memory when coinciding with hippocampal connectivity. Our findings reveal a systems-level mechanism that may explain the persistence of long-term memory for emotional experiences. PMID:27095308

  2. Neuropeptides in the posterodorsal medial amygdala modulate central cardiovascular reflex responses in awake male rats

    PubMed Central

    Quagliotto, E.; Casali, K.R.; Dal Lago, P.; Rasia-Filho, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The rat posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) links emotionally charged sensory stimuli to social behavior, and is part of the supramedullary control of the cardiovascular system. We studied the effects of microinjections of neuroactive peptides markedly found in the MePD, namely oxytocin (OT, 10 ng and 25 pg; n=6/group), somatostatin (SST, 1 and 0.05 μM; n=8 and 5, respectively), and angiotensin II (Ang II, 50 pmol and 50 fmol; n=7/group), on basal cardiovascular activity and on baroreflex- and chemoreflex-mediated responses in awake adult male rats. Power spectral and symbolic analyses were applied to pulse interval and systolic arterial pressure series to identify centrally mediated sympathetic/parasympathetic components in the heart rate variability (HRV) and arterial pressure variability (APV). No microinjected substance affected basal parameters. On the other hand, compared with the control data (saline, 0.3 µL; n=7), OT (10 ng) decreased mean AP (MAP50) after baroreflex stimulation and increased both the mean AP response after chemoreflex activation and the high-frequency component of the HRV. OT (25 pg) increased overall HRV but did not affect any parameter of the symbolic analysis. SST (1 μM) decreased MAP50, and SST (0.05 μM) enhanced the sympathovagal cardiac index. Both doses of SST increased HRV and its low-frequency component. Ang II (50 pmol) increased HRV and reduced the two unlike variations pattern of the symbolic analysis (P<0.05 in all cases). These results demonstrate neuropeptidergic actions in the MePD for both the increase in the range of the cardiovascular reflex responses and the involvement of the central sympathetic and parasympathetic systems on HRV and APV. PMID:25424367

  3. Downregulation of the cough reflex by aclidinium and tiotropium in awake and anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mutolo, Donatella; Cinelli, Elenia; Iovino, Ludovica; Pantaleo, Tito; Bongianni, Fulvia

    2016-06-01

    Long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) have been reported to attenuate cough in preclinical and clinical studies. The present study was performed on rabbits to compare aclidinium and tiotropium efficacy in the downregulation of the cough reflex. This reflex was evoked by citric acid inhalation in unanesthetized animals and by both citric acid inhalation and mechanical stimulation of the tracheobronchial tree in anesthetized animals 90 min following the inhalation of each drug (nebulizer output always at 1 mL/min). Aclidinium 4 mg/mL and tiotropium 200 μg/mL inhaled in 1 min proved to have similar protective effect on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in anesthetized animals. The total dosage employed for aclidinium and tiotropium was 4 mg and 200 μg, respectively. In awake animals, similar reductions in the cough number were observed following 10-min inhalation of each drug with a slight, not significant tendency to higher antitussive effects for aclidinium. In anesthetized animals, 1-min inhalation of each drug caused similar depressant effects on cough responses induced by both mechanical and chemical stimulation. A complete suppression of cough responses to mechanical stimuli was seen in some preparations. The results strongly suggest that the LAMA-induced downregulation of cough may be mediated not only by transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channels, as already reported, but also by acid-sensing ion channels and mechanoreceptors. The route of administration along with the more rapid hydrolysis of aclidinium into inactive metabolites minimize potential systemic side effects and give to this drug a very favorable safety profile. PMID:27080033

  4. Comparison between remifentanil and dexmedetomidine for sedation during modified awake fiberoptic intubation

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HUI-HUI; ZHOU, TAO; WEI, JIAN-QI; MA, WU-HUA

    2015-01-01

    Cricothyroid membrane injections and the application of a coarse fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) below the vocal cords for topical anesthesia have a number of limitations for certain patients. Thus, the aim of the present observational study was to assess the effect of a novel modified topical anesthesia method using the effective sedation drugs, remifentanil (Rem) or dexmedetomidine (Dex), during awake fiberoptic orotracheal intubation (AFOI). In total, 90 adult patients, who had been classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists I–II, were included in the study. The patients had anticipated difficult airways and were to undergo orotracheal intubation for elective surgery. The patients were enrolled in the double-blinded randomized pilot study and received Rem or Dex for sedation during the modified AFOI procedure. The two groups received 2% lidocaine for topical anesthesia via an epidural catheter, which was threaded through the suction channel of the FOB. The main clinical outcomes were evaluated by graded scores representing the conditions for intubation and post-intubation. Additional parameters analyzed included airway obstruction, hemodynamic changes, time required for intubation, amnesia level and subjective satisfaction. All 90 patients were successfully intubated using the modified AFOI technique. The comfort scores and airway events during intubation did not significantly differ between the two groups. However, the Rem group experienced less coughing, and less time was required for tracheal intubation when compared with the Dex group. No statistically significant differences were observed in the changes to the mean arterial pressure and heart rate at any time point between the two groups. Therefore, the current study demonstrated that the modified AFOI method is feasible and effective for difficult airway management, and that Dex and Rem exhibit similar efficacy as adjuvant therapies. PMID:25780419

  5. Energy substrates protect hippocampus against endogenous glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Netzahualcoyotzi, Citlalli; Tapia, Ricardo

    2014-07-01

    Excitotoxicity due to excessive glutamatergic neurotransmission is a well-studied phenomenon that has been related to the mechanisms of neuronal death occurring in some disorders of the CNS. We have previously shown that the intrahippocampal perfusion by microdialysis of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in rats stimulates endogenous glutamate release from nerve endings and this results in excitotoxic effects such as immediate seizures and delayed neuronal death, due to the overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. To study whether mitochondrial energy dysfunction and oxidative stress could be involved in this 4-AP-induced excitotoxicity, we evaluated in awake rats the protective effect of several energy substrates and antioxidant compounds, using microdialysis, electroencephalographic (EEG) recording and histological analysis. The 4-AP-induced behavioral and EEG seizures, which progressed to status epilepticus in about 30 min, were prevented by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, whereas acetoacetate, DL- and L-β-hydroxybutyrate did not protect against seizures but increased the latency to the onset of status epilepticus; pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate and glutathione ethyl ester did not show any protective effect. 4-AP also produced nearly complete loss of pyramidal neurons in CA1 and CA3 regions of the ipsilateral hippocampus 24 h after the experiment. MK-801 totally prevented this neuronal death and the energy substrates tested protected by about 50%, whereas the antioxidants showed only a weak protection. We conclude that ketone bodies possess weak anticonvulsant effects and that energy metabolism impairment plays a more important role than oxidative stress in the delayed hippocampal neurodegeneration resulting from the excitotoxic action of 4-AP mediated by endogenous glutamate. PMID:24789366

  6. Assessment of upper airway dynamics in awake patients with sleep apnea using phrenic nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Straus, C; Demoule, A; Attali, V; Arnulf, I; Derenne, J P; Similowski, T

    2000-09-01

    Phrenic nerve stimulation can reproduce during wakefulness the dissociation between upper airway and inspiratory muscles that is associated with obstructive sleep-related breathing disorders. This could provide a useful management tool in the study of passive upper airway (UA) dynamics during wakefulness in patients with the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). To assess the feasibility of the technique in this setting, we studied the dynamics of diaphragm twitch-associated inspiratory flow in eight patients with OSAHS. Cervical magnetic stimulation (CMS) and bilateral anterior magnetic phrenic stimulation (BAMPS) were applied at end-expiration during exclusive nasal breathing. Electrical phrenic nerve stimulation (ES) proved not feasible. The driving pressure and the respiratory resistance at peak twitch esophageal pressure obtained at maximal stimulation intensity were significantly higher with BAMPS than with CMS. A twitch-flow limitation pattern was observed in seven of eight subjects; VI(max) values of flow-limited twitches obtained at 100% stimulation intensity was 0.81 +/- 0.5 L/s with BAMPS and 0.87 +/- 0.5 L/s with CMS (p = 0.4). The number of flow-limited BAMPS twitches dropped from an average 77.5% to 18.4% with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) levels corresponding to the patient's home treatment. We conclude that (1) BAMPS is potentially a useful tool to evaluate the dynamics of flow through the passive UA in awake OSAHS patients, (2) BAMPS may be superior to CMS in evaluating UA properties in OSAHS. PMID:10988085

  7. Plasma and CSF oxytocin levels after intranasal and intravenous oxytocin in awake macaques.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Sara M; Samineni, Sridhar; Allen, Philip C; Stockinger, Diane; Bales, Karen L; Hwa, Granger G C; Roberts, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide that mediates a variety of complex social behaviors in animals and humans. Intranasal OT has been used as an experimental therapeutic for human conditions characterized by deficits in social functioning, especially autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. However, it is currently under intense debate whether intranasal delivery of OT reaches the central nervous system. In this study, four female rhesus macaques were implanted with chronic intrathecal catheters and used to investigate the pharmacokinetic profile of OT in the central nervous system and the peripheral vasculature following intravenous (IV) and intranasal (IN) administration of OT. In a randomized, crossover design, OT was given to four awake monkeys at three different doses based on body weight (0.1 IU/kg; 1 IU/kg; 5 IU/kg). A time course of concurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma samples were taken following administration. We found a dose-dependent effect of IV OT treatment on plasma OT levels, which peaked at 5 min post-dose and gradually returned to baseline by 120 min. In contrast, a change in CSF OT was only observed at the highest IV dose (5 IU/kg) at 15 min post-dose and gradually returned to baseline by 120 min. After IN administration, there was no significant change in plasma OT at any of the three doses. However, at the highest dose level, we found a significant increase in CSF OT at 15-30 min post- dose. The results of this study in light of recent, similar publications highlight the importance of methodological consistency across studies. This study also establishes a non-human primate model that can provide a stable platform for carrying out serial sampling from the central nervous system and peripheral vasculature concurrently. PMID:26826355

  8. Dexmedetomidine provides optimum conditions during awake fiberoptic intubation in simulated cervical spine injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Pooja; Dixit, Madhu Bala; Dang, Aashish; Gupta, Vibhuti

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: We undertook this study to assess if a small-dose of dexmedetomidine (DEX) for conscious sedation during awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI) in simulated cervical spine injury (CSI) patients provides optimum conditions and fulfills the need of postintubation neurological examination required in such patients. The aim was to assess the efficacy of DEX on arousability and patient's comfort during AFOI in simulated CSI patients. Material and Methods: In this prospective, randomized double-blind study, 100 American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade I-II patients aged between 18 and 65 years scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia underwent AFOI under conscious sedation with DEX. After locally anesthetizing the airway and applying a cervical collar, patients either received DEX 1 μg/kg over 10 min followed by 0.7 μg/kg/h maintenance infusion or normal saline in the same dose and rate during AFOI. Targeted sedation (Ramsay sedation score [RSS] ≥2) during AFOI was maintained with midazolam [MDZ] in both groups. Statistical Analysis was performed using unpaired Student's t-test, Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney test and Wilcoxon-w test. Results: The total number of patients requiring MDZ and the mean dose of MDZ required to achieve targeted sedation (RSS ≥2) was significantly less in DEX group compared to the placebo group (P < 0.001). Similarly, patient satisfaction score, heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure and respiratory parameters were significantly better in DEX group (P < 0.001). Postintubation arousability in the two groups was comparable (P = 0.29). Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine provides optimum sedation without compromising airway or hemodynamic instability with better patient tolerance and satisfaction for AFOI. It also preserves patient arousability for the postintubation neurological assessment. PMID:27006542

  9. Imaging the Awake Visual Cortex with a Genetically Encoded Voltage Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, L. Federico; Sato, Tatsuo K.; Benucci, Andrea; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) promise to reveal the membrane potential of genetically targeted neuronal populations through noninvasive, chronic imaging of large portions of cortical space. Here we test a promising GEVI in mouse cortex during wakefulness, a challenging condition due to large hemodynamic activity, and we introduce a straightforward projection method to separate a signal dominated by membrane voltage from a signal dominated by hemodynamic activity. We expressed VSFP-Butterfly 1.2 plasmid in layer 2/3 pyramidal cells of visual cortex through electroporation in utero. We then used wide-field imaging with two cameras to measure both fluorophores of the indicator in response to visual stimuli. By taking weighted sums and differences of the two measurements, we obtained clear separation of hemodynamic and voltage signals. The hemodynamic signal showed strong heartbeat oscillations, superimposed on slow dynamics similar to blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) or “intrinsic” signals. The voltage signal had fast dynamics similar to neural responses measured electrically, and showed an orderly retinotopic mapping. We compared this voltage signal with calcium signals imaged in transgenic mice that express a calcium indicator (GCaMP3) throughout cortex. The voltage signal from VSFP had similar signal-to-noise ratios as the calcium signal, it was more immune to vascular artifacts, and it integrated over larger regions of visual space, which was consistent with its reporting mostly subthreshold activity rather than the spiking activity revealed by calcium signals. These results demonstrate that GEVIs provide a powerful tool to study the dynamics of neural populations at mesoscopic spatial scales in the awake cortex. PMID:25568102

  10. Nicotine effects on regional cerebral blood flow in awake, resting tobacco smokers.

    PubMed

    Domino, E F; Minoshima, S; Guthrie, S; Ohl, L; Ni, L; Koeppe, R A; Zubieta, J K

    2000-12-01

    The hypothesis for this research was that regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) would increase following nasal nicotine administration to overnight abstinent tobacco smokers in relationship to the known brain distribution of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs). Nine male and nine female healthy adult smokers were studied. They abstained overnight from tobacco products for 10 or more hours prior to study the next morning. Nicotine nasal spray was given in doses of 1-2.5 mg total with half in each nostril while the subject was awake and resting in a supine position. Oleoresin of pepper solution in a similar volume was used as an active placebo to control for the irritating effects of nicotine. Both substances were given single blind to the subjects. Positron emission tomography (PET) with H(2)(15)O was used to measure rCBF. The data from each subject volunteer were normalized to global activity to better assess regional brain changes. Both nasal nicotine and pepper spray produced similar increases in CBF in somesthetic area II, consistent with the irritant effects of both substances. The mean rCBF effects of nasal pepper were subtracted from those of nasal nicotine to determine the actions of nicotine alone. The latter produced increases in rCBF in the thalamus, pons, Brodman area 17 of the visual cortex, and cerebellum. Some brain areas that contain a large number of nAChRs, such as the thalamus, showed an increase in CBF. Other areas that have few nAChRs, such as the cerebellum, also showed an increase in relative CBF. The hippocampal/parahippocampal areas showed greater regional decreases (left) and lesser increases (right) in CBF that correlated with the increase in plasma arterial nicotine concentrations. The results obtained indicate complex primary and secondary effects of nicotine in which only some regional brain CBF changes correlate with the known distribution of nAChR. No gender differences were noted. PMID:11020234

  11. Ventilatory stability to transient CO2 disturbances in hyperoxia and normoxia in awake humans.

    PubMed

    Lai, J; Bruce, E N

    1997-08-01

    Modarreszadeh and Bruce (J. Appl. Physiol. 76: 2765-2775, 1994) proposed that continuous random disturbances in arterial PCO2 are more likely to elicit ventilatory oscillation patterns that mimic periodic breathing in normoxia than in hyperoxia. To test this hypothesis experimentally, in nine awake humans we applied pseudorandom binary inspired CO2 fraction stimulation in normoxia and hyperoxia to derive the closed-loop and open-loop ventilatory responses to a brief CO2 disturbance in terms of impulse responses and transfer functions. The closed-loop impulse response has a significantly higher peak value [0.143 +/- 0.071 vs. 0.079 +/- 0.034 (SD) l . min-1 . 0.01 l CO2-1, P = 0.014] and a significantly shorter 50% response duration (42.7 +/- 13.3 vs. 72.3 +/- 27.6 s, P = 0.020) in normoxia than in hyperoxia. Therefore, the ventilatory responses to transient CO2 disturbances are less damped (but generally not oscillatory) in normoxia than in hyperoxia. For the closed-loop transfer function, the gain in normoxia increased significantly (P < 0.0005), while phase delay decreased significantly (P < 0.0005). The gain increased by 108.5, 186.0, and 240.6%, while phase delay decreased by 26.0, 18.1, and 17.3%, at 0. 01, 0.03, and 0.05 Hz, respectively. Changes in the same direction were found for the open-loop system. Generally, an oscillatory ventilatory response to a small transient CO2 disturbance is unlikely during wakefulness. However, changes in parameters that lead to additional increases in chemoreflex loop gain are more likely to initiate oscillations in normoxia than in hyperoxia. PMID:9262442

  12. Fast transmission from the dopaminergic ventral midbrain to the sensory cortex of awake primates.

    PubMed

    Mylius, Judith; Happel, Max F K; Gorkin, Alexander G; Huang, Ying; Scheich, Henning; Brosch, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by the increasing evidence that auditory cortex is under control of dopaminergic cell structures of the ventral midbrain, we studied how the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra affect neuronal activity in auditory cortex. We electrically stimulated 567 deep brain sites in total within and in the vicinity of the two dopaminergic ventral midbrain structures and at the same time, recorded local field potentials and neuronal discharges in cortex. In experiments conducted on three awake macaque monkeys, we found that electrical stimulation of the dopaminergic ventral midbrain resulted in short-latency (~35 ms) phasic activations in all cortical layers of auditory cortex. We were also able to demonstrate similar activations in secondary somatosensory cortex and superior temporal polysensory cortex. The electrically evoked responses in these parts of sensory cortex were similar to those previously described for prefrontal cortex. Moreover, these phasic responses could be reversibly altered by the dopamine D1-receptor antagonist SCH23390 for several tens of minutes. Thus, we speculate that the dopaminergic ventral midbrain exerts a temporally precise, phasic influence on sensory cortex using fast-acting non-dopaminergic transmitters and that their effects are modulated by dopamine on a longer timescale. Our findings suggest that some of the information carried by the neuronal discharges in the dopaminergic ventral midbrain, such as the motivational value or the motivational salience, is transmitted to auditory cortex and other parts of sensory cortex. The mesocortical pathway may thus contribute to the representation of non-auditory events in the auditory cortex and to its associative functions. PMID:25084746

  13. Negative Expiratory Pressure Technique: An Awake Test to Measure Upper Airway Collapsibility in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Helena Larramona; Marcus, Carole L.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Morera, Joan C. Oliva; Huang, Jingtao; Farre, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Upper airway (UA) collapsibility is a major pathophysiologic feature of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In adolescents, it is measured by obtaining the slope of pressure-flow relationship (SPF) while applying negative nasal pressure during sleep. An easier technique to assess UA collapsibility, consisting of application of negative expiratory pressure (NEP) during wakefulness, has demonstrated differences between control and OSAS subjects. We hypothesized that the NEP technique would correlate with SPF as a measurement of UA collapsibility in adolescents. Design: During wakefulness, NEP of −5 cm H2O in the seated and supine position was applied during the first second of expiration. The area under the expiratory flow-volume curve during NEP was compared to tidal breathing (RatioNEP). In addition, adolescents underwent SPF measurements during sleep. Two SPF techniques were performed to measure the activated and relatively hypotonic UA. Setting: Pediatric sleep laboratory. Participants: Seven adolescents with OSAS and 20 controls. Results: In the seated position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and both hypotonic SPF (r = −0.39, P = 0.04) and activated SPF (r = −0.62, P = 0.001). In the supine position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and activated SPF (r = −0.43, P = 0.03) and a trend for hypotonic SPF (r = −0.38, P = 0.06). Conclusions: The negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique correlates with the hypotonic and activated slope of pressure-flow relationship measurements. The seated position showed the strongest correlation. The NEP technique can be used as an alternative method to evaluate upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. Citation: Carrera HL, Marcus CL, McDonough JM, Morera JC, Huang J, Farre R, Montserrat JM. Negative expiratory pressure technique: an awake test to measure upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1783–1791. PMID:26158888

  14. Directional responses of visual wulst neurones to grating and plaid patterns in the awake owl.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jerome; Pinto, Lucas; Dias, Marcelo Oliveira; Lima, Bruss; Neuenschwander, Sergio

    2007-10-01

    The avian retinothalamofugal pathway reaches the telencephalon in an area known as visual wulst. A close functional analogy between this area and the early visual cortex of mammals has been established in owls. The goal of the present study was to assess quantitatively the directional selectivity and motion integration capability of visual wulst neurones, aspects that have not been previously investigated. We recorded extracellularly from a total of 101 cells in awake burrowing owls. From this sample, 88% of the units exhibited modulated directional responses to sinusoidal gratings, with a mean direction index of 0.74 +/- 0.03 and tuning bandwidth of 28 +/- 1.16 degrees . A direction index higher than 0.5 was observed in 66% of the cells, thereby qualifying them as direction selective. Motion integration was tested with moving plaids, made by adding two sinusoidal gratings of different orientations. We found that 80% of direction-selective cells responded optimally to the motion direction of the component gratings, whereas none responded to the global motion of plaids, whose direction was intermediate to that of the gratings. The remaining 20% were unclassifiable. The strength of component motion selectivity rapidly increased over a 200 ms period following stimulus onset, maintaining a relatively sustained profile thereafter. Overall, our data suggest that, as in the mammalian primary visual cortex, the visual wulst neurones of owls signal the local orientated features of a moving object. How and where these potentially ambiguous signals are integrated in the owl brain might be important for understanding the mechanisms underlying global motion perception. PMID:17897399

  15. Enhanced glucose tolerance by intravascularly administered piceatannol in freely moving healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Oritani, Yukihiro; Okitsu, Teru; Nishimura, Eisaku; Sai, Masahiko; Ito, Tatsuhiko; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-02-12

    Piceatannol is a phytochemical in the seeds of passion fruit that has a hypoglycemic effect when orally administered. To elucidate the contribution of intact and metabolites of piceatannol after gastro-intestinal absorption to hypoglycemic effect, we examined the influence of piceatannol and isorhapontigenin on blood glucose concentrations during fasting and glucose tolerance tests by administering them intravascularly to freely moving healthy rats. We found that intravascularly administered piceatannol reduced the blood glucose concentrations during both fasting and glucose tolerance tests, but isorhapontigenin did not during either of them. Furthermore, we found that piceatannol increased the insulinogenic index during glucose tolerance tests and that piceatannol had no influence on insulin sensitivity by performing hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamping tests. These results suggest that piceatannol orally intaken may enhance glucose tolerance by the effect of intact piceatannol through enhanced early-phase secretion of insulin. Therefore, oral intake of piceatannol might contribute to proper control of postprandial glycemic excursions in healthy subjects. PMID:26773506

  16. An open access pilot freely sharing cancer genomic data from participants in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Becnel, Lauren B.; Pereira, Stacey; Drummond, Jennifer A.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R.; Kovar, Christie L.; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Hu, Jianhong; Muzny, Donna; McGuire, Amy L.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic data sharing in cancer has been restricted to aggregate or controlled-access initiatives to protect the privacy of research participants. By limiting access to these data, it has been argued that the autonomy of individuals who decide to participate in data sharing efforts has been superseded and the utility of the data as research and educational tools reduced. In a pilot Open Access (OA) project from the CPRIT-funded Texas Cancer Research Biobank, many Texas cancer patients were willing to openly share genomic data from tumor and normal matched pair specimens. For the first time, genetic data from 7 human cancer cases with matched normal are freely available without requirement for data use agreements nor any major restriction except that end users cannot attempt to re-identify the participants (http://txcrb.org/open.html). PMID:26882539

  17. Crucial tests of macrorealist and semiclassical gravity models with freely falling mesoscopic nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, Samuel; Durt, Thomas; Willox, Ralph

    2016-06-01

    Recently, several proposals have been made to test the quantum superposition principle in the mesoscopic regime. Most of these tests consist of a careful measurement of the loss of interference due to decoherence. Here we consider, instead, the spread in position of a freely falling nanosphere. We study in depth the dependence of this spread on self-gravity in the presence of decoherence (exotic and nonexotic). We show that the influence of self-gravity is robust in the presence of weak decoherence, and quantify this robustness by introducing a parameter, the critical decoherence, aimed at estimating the critical value above which self-gravity is overwhelmed by decoherence. We also emphasize the crucial role played by the spread of the initial wave packet for the sensitivity of free-fall experiments to decoherence.

  18. Picosecond supercontinuum light source for stroboscopic white-light interferometry with freely adjustable pulse repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Steffen; Durairaj, Vasuki; Shavrin, Igor; Lipiäinen, Lauri; Kokkonen, Kimmo; Kaivola, Matti; Ludvigsen, Hanne

    2014-06-01

    We present a picosecond supercontinuum light source designed for stroboscopic white-light interferometry. This source offers a potential for high-resolution characterization of vibrational fields in electromechanical components with frequencies up to the GHz range. The light source concept combines a gain-switched laser diode, the output of which is amplified in a two-stage fiber amplifier, with supercontinuum generation in a microstructured optical fiber. Implemented in our white-light interferometer setup, optical pulses with optimized spectral properties and below 310 ps duration are used for stroboscopic illumination at freely adjustable repetition rates. The performance of the source is demonstrated by characterizing the surface vibration field of a square-plate silicon MEMS resonator at 3.37 MHz. A minimum detectable vibration amplitude of less than 100 pm is reached. PMID:24921556

  19. An open access pilot freely sharing cancer genomic data from participants in Texas.

    PubMed

    Becnel, Lauren B; Pereira, Stacey; Drummond, Jennifer A; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R; Kovar, Christie L; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Hu, Jianhong; Muzny, Donna; McGuire, Amy L; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Genomic data sharing in cancer has been restricted to aggregate or controlled-access initiatives to protect the privacy of research participants. By limiting access to these data, it has been argued that the autonomy of individuals who decide to participate in data sharing efforts has been superseded and the utility of the data as research and educational tools reduced. In a pilot Open Access (OA) project from the CPRIT-funded Texas Cancer Research Biobank, many Texas cancer patients were willing to openly share genomic data from tumor and normal matched pair specimens. For the first time, genetic data from 7 human cancer cases with matched normal are freely available without requirement for data use agreements nor any major restriction except that end users cannot attempt to re-identify the participants (http://txcrb.org/open.html). PMID:26882539

  20. Layer Thinning in Freely-Suspended Thin Liquid Films of a Symmetric Liquid Crystal Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardaev, Shokir; Parsouzi, Zeinab; Gleeson, James; Jakli, Antal; Sprunt, Samuel

    We report optical reflectivity and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies on freely suspended smectic films of a symmetric liquid crystal dimer, which exhibits the phase sequence isotropic--nematic--twist-bend nematic--smectic in cooling. In sufficiently thin films the reflectivity R is expected to scale as the square of the number of smectic layers (N2) while the frequency f of underdamped layer fluctuations scales as N - 1 / 2. On heating thin films drawn in the smectic phase, we observe a sequence of layer thinning transitions, with R and f following the expected scaling relations, provided the stepwise melting involves double rather than single layers. We will describe a model to explain the unusual layer thinning process. We thank M. G. Tamba and G. Mehl for providing the liquid crystal compound: NSF grant DMR-1307674.

  1. Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Katsuragawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm. PMID:25748023

  2. Anomalies of a meniscus of microinclusions in freely suspended smectic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Kats, E. I.

    2015-08-01

    It has been shown that a meniscus of microinclusions in freely suspended smectic films can be significantly different from a meniscus near a flat surface. Measurements have been performed in smectic A films into which glycerol drops have been dispersed. The formation of the meniscus near a glycerol drop is accompanied by an increase in the size of the meniscus and by an increase in the corresponding material flow to the central part of the meniscus with the parallel dissolution of glycerol in the film. Structural instability associated with different curvatures of the surfaces of the meniscus of microinclusions, together with hydrodynamic instability associated with the motion of the material, can result in the transformation of particles with the meniscus to other structures.

  3. AstroNavigation: Freely-available Online Instruction for Performing a Sight Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner Stewart, Susan; Grundstrom, Erika; Caudel, Dave

    2015-08-01

    A reliable method of obtaining your geographic location from observations of celestial bodies is globally available. This online learning module, developed through a collaboration between Vanderbilt University and the U.S. Naval Observatory, serves to address the need for freely-available comprehensive instruction in celestial navigation online. Specifically targeted are the steps of preforming a sight reduction to obtain a terrestrial position using this technique. Difficult concepts such as plotting on a navigational chart and the complexities of using navigation publications are facilitated through this online content delivery, rooted in effective course design principles. There is good potential in using celestial navigation as a tool for stimulating interest in astronomy given its resourcefulness and accessibility.

  4. dynamical evolution of an ultra-relativistic fireball colliding with a freely expanding gas

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the hydrodynamical evolution of an ultra-relativistic fireball colliding with a freely expanding gas. The hydrodynamical interaction of the fireball and the gas results in the formation of a geometrically thin shell. We study the dynamical evolution of the shell analytically and perform a numerical simulation equipped with adaptive mesh refinement to investigate the internal structure of the shell. The shocked gas can give rise to bright emission in the X-ray and gamma-ray energy range. We propose that the breakout emission from the forward shock and the photospheric emission from the reverse-shocked fireball contribute to early gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts.

  5. A Photographic Study of Freezing of Water Droplets Falling Freely in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Levine, Joseph

    1952-01-01

    A photographic technique for investigating water droplets of diameter less than 200 microns falling freely in air at temperatures between 0 C and -50 C has been devised and used to determine: (i) The shape of frozen droplets (2) The occurrence of collisions of partly frozen or of frozen and liquid droplets (3) The statistics on the freezing temperatures of individual free-falling droplets A considerable number of droplets were found to have a nonspherical shape after freezing because of various protuberances and frost growth, and droplet aggregates formed by collision. The observed frequency of collision of partly frozen droplets showed good order of magnitude agreement with the frequency computed from theoretical collection efficiencies. The freezing temperature statistics indicated a general similarity of the data to those obtained for droplets frozen on a metallic surface in previous experiments.

  6. Studies of Islands on Freely Suspended Bubbles of Smectic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattanaporkratana, A.; Mavel, B.; Park, C. S.; Maclennan, J. E.; Clark, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    We have constructed an optical system for observing the internal structure of freely suspended smectic liquid crystal bubbles using a reflected light microscope. Liquid crystal bubbles can have thicker circular regions (islands) which can easily be generated by shrinking the bubble diameter. The diameter of these islands is approximately 10 microns and they are typically up to five times thicker than the surrounding liquid crystal film (500 angstroms). In the Laboratory, the location of the islands is strongly influenced by gravity, which causes the majority of islands to migrate to the bottom half of the bubble. We will describe the size and thickness distributions of islands and their time evolution, and also discuss two-dimensional hydrodynamics and turbulence of smectic bubbles, the shapes of islands and holes affected by bubble vibrations, and the interactions between islands, which we have probed using optical tweezers.

  7. Quantitative wake analysis of a freely swimming fish using 3D synthetic aperture PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic aperture PIV (SAPIV) is used to quantitatively analyze the wake behind a giant danio ( Danio aequipinnatus) swimming freely in a seeded quiescent tank. The experiment is designed with minimal constraints on animal behavior to ensure that natural swimming occurs. The fish exhibits forward swimming and turning behaviors at speeds between 0.9 and 1.5 body lengths/second. Results show clearly isolated and linked vortex rings in the wake structure, as well as the thrust jet coming off of a visual hull reconstruction of the fish body. As a benchmark for quantitative analysis of volumetric PIV data, the vortex circulation and impulse are computed using methods consistent with those applied to planar PIV data. Volumetric momentum analysis frameworks are discussed for linked and asymmetric vortex structures, laying a foundation for further volumetric studies of swimming hydrodynamics with SAPIV. Additionally, a novel weighted refocusing method is presented as an improvement to SAPIV reconstruction.

  8. Single linearly polarized, widely and freely tunable two wavelengths Yb3+-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongfeng; Wang, Chinhua

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel single linearly polarized, widely, freely and continuously tunable two wavelengths Yb3+-doped fiber laser. The laser generates stable arbitrary two wavelengths output between 1003.1 and 1080.7 nm peak wavelengths simultaneously with a 346.0 mW CW power by using polarization beam splitting (PBS) for separation of two wavelengths. Each lasing line shows a single polarization with a polarization extinction ratio of >20 dB under different pump levels. The central and the interval of the two wavelengths can be tuned smoothly and independently in the entire gain region of >70 nm of PM Yb3+-doped single mode fiber. Strongly enhanced polarization-hole burning (PHB) phenomena in polarization maintain (PM) Yb3+-doped fiber was observed in the tunable two wavelengths Yb3+-doped fiber laser.

  9. The stability of freely-propagating ion acoustic waves in 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    The stability of a freely-propagating ion acoustic wave (IAW) is a basic science problem that is made difficult by the need to resolve electron kinetic effects over a timescale that greatly exceeds the IAW period during numerical simulation. Recent results examining IAW stability using a 1D+1V Vlasov-Poisson solver indicate that instability is a fundamental property of IAWs that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to ICF experiments. We present here new results addressing the fundamental question of IAW stability across a broad range of plasma conditions in a 2D+2V system using LOKI, ranging from a regime of relatively weak to a regime of relatively strong ion kinetic effects. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL (DE-AC52-07NA27344) and funded by the LDRD Program at LLNL (12-ERD-061).

  10. Three dimensional simulations of pattern formation during high-pressure, freely localized microwave breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtzanidis, K. Boeuf, J. P.; Rogier, F.

    2014-12-15

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that a freely localized 100 GHz microwave discharge can propagate towards the microwave source with high speed, forming a complex pattern of self-organized filaments. We present three-dimensional simulations of the formation and propagation of such patterns that reveal more information on their nature and interaction with the electromagnetic waves. The developed three-dimensional Maxwell-plasma solver permits the study of different forms of incident field polarization. Results for linear and circular polarization of the wave are presented and comparisons with recent experiments show a good overall agreement. The three dimensional simulations provide a quantitative analysis of the parameters controlling the time and length scales of the strongly non-linear plasma dynamics and could be useful for potential microwave plasma applications such as aerodynamic flow and combustion control.

  11. Noninvasive telemetric gaze tracking in freely-moving socially-housed prosimian primates

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Stephen V.; Platt, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Behavioral and neurophysiological studies strongly suggest that visual orienting reflects the integration of sensory, motor, and motivational variables with behavioral goals. Relatively little is known, however, regarding the goals that govern visual orienting of animals in their natural environments. Field observations suggest that most nonhuman primates orient to features of their natural environments whose salience is dictated by the visual demands of foraging, locomotion and social interaction. This hypothesis is difficult to test quantitatively, however, in part because accurate gaze-tracking technology has not been employed in field studies. We here report the implementation of a new, telemetric, infrared-video gaze-tracker (ISCAN) to measure visual orienting in freely-moving, socially-housed prosimian primates (Lemur catta). Two male lemurs tolerated the system at approximately ¼ body weight, permitting successful measurements of gaze behavior during spontaneous locomotion through both terrestrial and arboreal landscapes, and in both social and asocial environments. PMID:16431130

  12. A new rapid kindling variant for induction of cortical epileptogenesis in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Juan Carlos; Alvarez-Ferradas, Carla; Roncagliolo, Manuel; Fuenzalida, Marco; Wellmann, Mario; Nualart, Francisco Javier; Bonansco, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Kindling, one of the most used models of experimental epilepsy is based on daily electrical stimulation in several brain structures. Unlike the classic or slow kindling protocols (SK), the rapid kindling types (RK) described until now require continuous stimulation at suprathreshold intensities applied directly to the same brain structure used for subsequent electrophysiological and immunohistochemical studies, usually the hippocampus. However, the cellular changes observed in these rapid protocols, such as astrogliosis and neuronal loss, could be due to experimental manipulation more than to epileptogenesis-related alterations. Here, we developed a new RK protocol in order to generate an improved model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) which allows gradual progression of the epilepsy as well as obtaining an epileptic hippocampus, thus avoiding direct surgical manipulation and electric stimulation over this structure. This new protocol consists of basolateral amygdala (BLA) stimulation with 10 trains of biphasic pulses (10 s; 50 Hz) per day with 20 min-intervals, during 3 consecutive days, using a subconvulsive and subthreshold intensity, which guarantees tissue integrity. The progression of epileptic activity was evaluated in freely moving rats through electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from cortex and amygdala, accompanied with synchronized video recordings. Moreover, we assessed the effectiveness of RK protocol and the establishment of epilepsy by evaluating cellular alterations of hippocampal slices from kindled rats. RK protocol induced convulsive states similar to SK protocols but in 3 days, with persistently lowered threshold to seizure induction and epileptogenic-dependent cellular changes in amygdala projection areas. We concluded that this novel RK protocol introduces a new variant of the chronic epileptogenesis models in freely moving rats, which is faster, highly reproducible and causes minimum cell damage with respect to that observed in other

  13. A new rapid kindling variant for induction of cortical epileptogenesis in freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan Carlos; Álvarez-Ferradas, Carla; Roncagliolo, Manuel; Fuenzalida, Marco; Wellmann, Mario; Nualart, Francisco Javier; Bonansco, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Kindling, one of the most used models of experimental epilepsy is based on daily electrical stimulation in several brain structures. Unlike the classic or slow kindling protocols (SK), the rapid kindling types (RK) described until now require continuous stimulation at suprathreshold intensities applied directly to the same brain structure used for subsequent electrophysiological and immunohistochemical studies, usually the hippocampus. However, the cellular changes observed in these rapid protocols, such as astrogliosis and neuronal loss, could be due to experimental manipulation more than to epileptogenesis-related alterations. Here, we developed a new RK protocol in order to generate an improved model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) which allows gradual progression of the epilepsy as well as obtaining an epileptic hippocampus, thus avoiding direct surgical manipulation and electric stimulation over this structure. This new protocol consists of basolateral amygdala (BLA) stimulation with 10 trains of biphasic pulses (10 s; 50 Hz) per day with 20 min-intervals, during 3 consecutive days, using a subconvulsive and subthreshold intensity, which guarantees tissue integrity. The progression of epileptic activity was evaluated in freely moving rats through electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from cortex and amygdala, accompanied with synchronized video recordings. Moreover, we assessed the effectiveness of RK protocol and the establishment of epilepsy by evaluating cellular alterations of hippocampal slices from kindled rats. RK protocol induced convulsive states similar to SK protocols but in 3 days, with persistently lowered threshold to seizure induction and epileptogenic-dependent cellular changes in amygdala projection areas. We concluded that this novel RK protocol introduces a new variant of the chronic epileptogenesis models in freely moving rats, which is faster, highly reproducible and causes minimum cell damage with respect to that observed in other

  14. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Philipp; Parkerton, Thomas F; Adams, Rachel G; Cargill, John G; Gan, Jay; Gouin, Todd; Gschwend, Philip M; Hawthorne, Steven B; Helm, Paul; Witt, Gesine; You, Jing; Escher, Beate I

    2014-01-01

    Passive sampling methods (PSMs) allow the quantification of the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) of an organic contaminant even in complex matrices such as sediments. Cfree is directly related to a contaminant's chemical activity, which drives spontaneous processes including diffusive uptake into benthic organisms and exchange with the overlying water column. Consequently, Cfree provides a more relevant dose metric than total sediment concentration. Recent developments in PSMs have significantly improved our ability to reliably measure even very low levels of Cfree. Application of PSMs in sediments is preferably conducted in the equilibrium regime, where freely dissolved concentrations in the sediment are well-linked to the measured concentration in the sampler via analyte-specific partition ratios. The equilibrium condition can then be assured by measuring a time series or a single time point using passive samplers with different surface to volume ratios. Sampling in the kinetic regime is also possible and generally involves the application of performance reference compounds for the calibration. Based on previous research on hydrophobic organic contaminants, it is concluded that Cfree allows a direct assessment of 1) contaminant exchange and equilibrium status between sediment and overlying water, 2) benthic bioaccumulation, and 3) potential toxicity to benthic organisms. Thus, the use of PSMs to measure Cfree provides an improved basis for the mechanistic understanding of fate and transport processes in sediments and has the potential to significantly improve risk assessment and management of contaminated sediments. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:197–209. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:24288295

  15. Design and validation of Segment - freely available software for cardiovascular image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Commercially available software for cardiovascular image analysis often has limited functionality and frequently lacks the careful validation that is required for clinical studies. We have already implemented a cardiovascular image analysis software package and released it as freeware for the research community. However, it was distributed as a stand-alone application and other researchers could not extend it by writing their own custom image analysis algorithms. We believe that the work required to make a clinically applicable prototype can be reduced by making the software extensible, so that researchers can develop their own modules or improvements. Such an initiative might then serve as a bridge between image analysis research and cardiovascular research. The aim of this article is therefore to present the design and validation of a cardiovascular image analysis software package (Segment) and to announce its release in a source code format. Results Segment can be used for image analysis in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Some of its main features include loading of DICOM images from all major scanner vendors, simultaneous display of multiple image stacks and plane intersections, automated segmentation of the left ventricle, quantification of MRI flow, tools for manual and general object segmentation, quantitative regional wall motion analysis, myocardial viability analysis and image fusion tools. Here we present an overview of the validation results and validation procedures for the functionality of the software. We describe a technique to ensure continued accuracy and validity of the software by implementing and using a test script that tests the functionality of the software and validates the output. The software has been made freely available for research purposes in a source code format on the project home page http

  16. Streamwise Oscillations of Freely Vibrating Circular Cylinder in the Vicinity of a Stationary Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiman, Rajeev; Tham, Daniel; Zhong, Li; Gurugubelli, Pardha

    2015-11-01

    We present a numerical study on vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a freely vibrating two degree-of-freedom circular cylinder in close proximity to a stationary plane wall. Fully implicit combined field scheme based on Petrov-Galerkin formulation has been employed to analyze the nonlinear effects of wall proximity on the vibrational amplitudes and hydrodynamic forces. Two-dimensional simulations are performed as function of decreasing gap to cylinder diameter ratio e / D ∈ [ 0 . 5 , 10 ] for reduced velocities U* ∈ [ 2 , 10 ] at ReD = 100 and ReL = 2900 , where ReD and ReL denote the Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter and the upstream distance, respectively. We investigate the origin of enhanced streamwise oscillation of freely vibrating near-wall cylinder as compared to the isolated cylinder counterpart. For that purpose, detailed analysis of the amplitudes, frequency characteristics and the phase relations has been performed for the isolated and near-wall configurations. Initial and lower branches in the amplitude response are found from the gap ratios of 0.75 to 10, similar in nature to the isolated cylinder laminar VIV. For near-wall cases, phase relation between drag force and streamwise displacement varies from close to 0° to 180°. Effects of mass-ratio, thickness of wall boundary layer and cylinder depth from the top surface are further investigated. Finally, we introduce new correlations for characterizing peak amplitudes and forces as a function of the gap ratio for a cylinder vibrating in the vicinity of a stationary plane wall.

  17. High-speed tracking of rupture and clustering in freely falling granular streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, John R.

    It is a common, well known occurrence for a thin liquid stream to break up into droplets due to the surface-tension driven Plateau-Rayleigh instability [1]. Surprisingly, this effect can also occur in granular materials, where an initially uniform stream of grains breaks up into discrete clusters, or droplets, of grains, even though granular materials are generally considered to lack surface tension. This thesis investigates this break up in a stream of grains freely falling out of a nozzle. We employ high-speed video imaging in the co-moving frame with the freely-falling granular stream, which allows us to track the onset of clustering and the subsequent cluster evolution in detail. By directly measuring grain-grain interactions with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and carefully controlling the surface properties of the grains, we demonstrate that the cluster formation is driven by minute, nanoNewton cohesive forces due to a combination of van der Waals interactions and capillary bridges between nanoscale surface asperities. The shapes of these weakly cohesive, non-thermal clusters of macroscopic particles closely resemble droplets resulting from thermally induced rupture of liquid nanojets and ultra-low surface tension fluids. Like in the liquid break up, the size of the clusters is determined solely by the stream width and independent of particle-scale details though the range of selected aspect ratios differs from the fluid case. The scaling for the minimum neck diameter near break up is consistent with the scaling for an inviscid liquid, allowing us to extract an effect surface tension nearly four orders of magnitude lower than in normal liquids. These free falling streams are both an exquisite probe of the weak interactions between grains and a unique system to probe the ultra-low surface tension fluid regime in the absence of thermal fluctuations.

  18. HermesC: low-power wireless neural recording system for freely moving primates.

    PubMed

    Chestek, Cynthia A; Gilja, Vikash; Nuyujukian, Paul; Kier, Ryan J; Solzbacher, Florian; Ryu, Stephen I; Harrison, Reid R; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2009-08-01

    Neural prosthetic systems have the potential to restore lost functionality to amputees or patients suffering from neurological injury or disease. Current systems have primarily been designed for immobile patients, such as tetraplegics functioning in a rather static, carefully tailored environment. However, an active patient such as amputee in a normal dynamic, everyday environment may be quite different in terms of the neural control of movement. In order to study motor control in a more unconstrained natural setting, we seek to develop an animal model of freely moving humans. Therefore, we have developed and tested HermesC-INI3, a system for recording and wirelessly transmitting neural data from electrode arrays implanted in rhesus macaques who are freely moving. This system is based on the integrated neural interface (INI3) microchip which amplifies, digitizes, and transmits neural data across a approximately 900 MHz wireless channel. The wireless transmission has a range of approximately 4 m in free space. All together this device consumes 15.8 mA and 63.2 mW. On a single 2 A-hr battery pack, this device runs contiguously for approximately six days. The smaller size and power consumption of the custom IC allows for a smaller package (51 x 38 x 38 mm (3)) than previous primate systems. The HermesC-INI3 system was used to record and telemeter one channel of broadband neural data at 15.7 kSps from a monkey performing routine daily activities in the home cage. PMID:19497829

  19. A novel detachable head-mounted device for simultaneous EEG and photoacoustic monitoring of epilepsy in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-02-01

    The study of neuro-hemodynamic changes in freely moving animals provides for a better understanding of brain dynamics in normal and disease states. While it has been shown that hemodynamic changes are closely related to seizures, methods for detection in freely moving animals are limited. In this work, we integrate photoacoustic sensor technology and electroencephalography into a small portable device that can be attached on the head of wake freely moving animals. We demonstrate chronic simultaneous monitoring of photoacoustic and electroencephalographic signals in an acute seizure model of epilepsy. Our results demonstrate that both the neural and vascular responses during seizures in freely moving rats have characteristics which are observed to be different and more diverse from that of anesthetized rats. This implies that the neurovascular coupling in seizure in free moving animals are more complicated, which calls for more detailed study in future. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time for hemodynamic monitoring of seizure in free moving animals. This technology also promises for other hemodynamic related research study in freely moving small animals. PMID:25450312

  20. Riding on the fast lane: how sea turtles behave in post-nesting migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-H.; Cheng, I.-J.; Centurioni, L.

    2014-07-01

    Sea turtles are known as powerful swimmers. How do they behave when riding in strong currents during their migrations? In this study, three, satellite-tagged, post-nesting green turtles travelled from Lanyu Island, east of Taiwan, partly within the Kuroshio to their foraging sites approximately 1000 km away in the Ryukyu Archipelago. Their swimming behaviors were analyzed by comparing their migration velocities estimated from Argos tag data with ocean currents derived from a data simulation model and from AVISO advection estimates. Results suggest that the turtles take advantage of Kuroshio during the initial portion of their migration routes. They must then make a great effort to swim eastward, at speeds over 1 m s-1, toward their foraging sites to avoid being carried off course by the strong current. The cues that might cause the change in swimming direction were evaluated with a Principle Component Analysis. The factors considered are ambient current velocity, wind, eddy activity (vorticity), magnetic field (latitude) and water temperature. The analysis shows that the ambient current and water temperature are negatively correlated with the eastward swimming velocity. This suggests that the changes in ocean current and a drop of water temperature, likely due to eddies impinging on the Kuroshio, may trigger the eastward swimming. Despite the differences among migratory routes of three Argos-tagged turtles after leaving the Kuroshio, they all reached foraging sites in the same general area. That suggests there may be more complex cues that guide the turtles to their foraging sites during their post-nesting migrations.

  1. Differing Presynaptic Contributions to LTP and Associative Learning in Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Madroñal, Noelia; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M.

    2009-01-01

    The hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse is an excellent experimental model for studying the interactions between short- and long-term plastic changes taking place following high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of Schaffer collaterals and during the acquisition and extinction of a classical eyeblink conditioning in behaving mice. Input/output curves and a full-range paired-pulse study enabled determining the optimal intensities and inter-stimulus intervals for evoking paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) or depression (PPD) at the CA3-CA1 synapse. Long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by HFS lasted ≈10 days. HFS-induced LTP evoked an initial depression of basal PPF. Recovery of PPF baseline values was a steady and progressive process lasting ≈20 days, i.e., longer than the total duration of the LTP. In a subsequent series of experiments, we checked whether PPF was affected similarly during activity-dependent synaptic changes. Animals were conditioned using a trace paradigm, with a tone as a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an electrical shock to the trigeminal nerve as an unconditioned stimulus (US). A pair of pulses (40 ms interval) was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs) during the CS-US interval. Basal PPF decreased steadily across conditioning sessions (i.e., in the opposite direction to that during LTP), reaching a minimum value during the 10th conditioning session. Thus, LTP and classical eyeblink conditioning share some presynaptic mechanisms, but with an opposite evolution. Furthermore, PPF and PPD might play a homeostatic role during long-term plastic changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse. PMID:19636387

  2. Polymorphic Chromosomes Bearing the Tox2 Locus in Cochliobolus carbonum Behave as Homologs during Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Canada, S. R.; Dunkle, L. D.

    1997-01-01

    The HTS1 gene in the Tox2 locus of the fungal pathogen Cochliobolus carbonum race 1 is required for synthesis of a host-selective phytotoxin and for increased virulence on susceptible genotypes of maize. The locus is present in race 1 isolates but absent from isolates of the other races, which do not produce the toxin. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern analysis with HTS1 sequences and chromosome-specific markers, the HTS1 gene was detected on a 4-Mb chromosome in one group of isolates and on a 2.3-Mb chromosome in another group, which lacked the 4-Mb chromosome. A chromosome-specific marker from C. heterostrophus hybridized to a 2.3-Mb chromosome in non-toxin-producing isolates and in toxin-producing isolates, including those with a 4-Mb chromosome. A marker from C. carbonum hybridized to the 4-Mb chromosome, but in isolates lacking the 4-Mb chromosome, this marker hybridized to a smaller, 2.0-Mb chromosome. Thus, the Tox2 locus is on different chromosomes in different groups of race 1 isolates. Single ascospore progeny from crosses between isolates having HTS1 on different chromosomes were analyzed for toxin-producing ability, virulence, and the presence and chromosomal location of HTS1. All progeny produced HC toxin in culture, incited race 1-type lesions on susceptible maize genotypes, and contained HTS1 sequences, as determined by PCR amplification with gene-specific primers. Analysis of the chromosomal complements of several progeny indicated that they all had only one Tox2-containing chromosome. Thus, despite their differences in size, these chromosomes behave as homologs during meiosis and may have arisen by a translocation. PMID:16535561

  3. Colonizing while migrating: how do individual enteric neural crest cells behave?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Directed cell migration is essential for normal development. In most of the migratory cell populations that have been analyzed in detail to date, all of the cells migrate as a collective from one location to another. However, there are also migratory cell populations that must populate the areas through which they migrate, and thus some cells get left behind while others advance. Very little is known about how individual cells behave to achieve concomitant directional migration and population of the migratory route. We examined the behavior of enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCCs), which must both advance caudally to reach the anal end and populate each gut region. Results The behavior of individual ENCCs was examined using live imaging and mice in which ENCCs express a photoconvertible protein. We show that individual ENCCs exhibit very variable directionalities and speed; as the migratory wavefront of ENCCs advances caudally, each gut region is populated primarily by some ENCCs migrating non-directionally. After populating each region, ENCCs remain migratory for at least 24 hours. Endothelin receptor type B (EDNRB) signaling is known to be essential for the normal advance of the ENCC population. We now show that perturbation of EDNRB principally affects individual ENCC speed rather than directionality. The trajectories of solitary ENCCs, which occur transiently at the wavefront, were consistent with an unbiased random walk and so cell-cell contact is essential for directional migration. ENCCs migrate in close association with neurites. We showed that although ENCCs often use neurites as substrates, ENCCs lead the way, neurites are not required for chain formation and neurite growth is more directional than the migration of ENCCs as a whole. Conclusions Each gut region is initially populated by sub-populations of ENCCs migrating non-directionally, rather than stopping. This might provide a mechanism for ensuring a uniform density of ENCCs along the

  4. Stronger efferent suppression of cochlear neural potentials by contralateral acoustic stimulation in awake than in anesthetized chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Aedo, Cristian; Tapia, Eduardo; Pavez, Elizabeth; Elgueda, Diego; Delano, Paul H.; Robles, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There are two types of sensory cells in the mammalian cochlea, inner hair cells, which make synaptic contact with auditory-nerve afferent fibers, and outer hair cells that are innervated by crossed and uncrossed medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent fibers. Contralateral acoustic stimulation activates the uncrossed efferent MOC fibers reducing cochlear neural responses, thus modifying the input to the central auditory system. The chinchilla, among all studied mammals, displays the lowest percentage of uncrossed MOC fibers raising questions about the strength and frequency distribution of the contralateral-sound effect in this species. On the other hand, MOC effects on cochlear sensitivity have been mainly studied in anesthetized animals and since the MOC-neuron activity depends on the level of anesthesia, it is important to assess the influence of anesthesia in the strength of efferent effects. Seven adult chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger) were chronically implanted with round-window electrodes in both cochleae. We compared the effect of contralateral sound in awake and anesthetized condition. Compound action potentials (CAP) and cochlear microphonics (CM) were measured in the ipsilateral cochlea in response to tones in absence and presence of contralateral sound. Control measurements performed after middle-ear muscles section in one animal discarded any possible middle-ear reflex activation. Contralateral sound produced CAP amplitude reductions in all chinchillas, with suppression effects greater by about 1–3 dB in awake than in anesthetized animals. In contrast, CM amplitude increases of up to 1.9 dB were found in only three awake chinchillas. In both conditions the strongest efferent effects were produced by contralateral tones at frequencies equal or close to those of ipsilateral tones. Contralateral CAP suppressions for 1–6 kHz ipsilateral tones corresponded to a span of uncrossed MOC fiber innervation reaching at least the central third of the chinchilla

  5. A comparison of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination with dexmedetomidine alone for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sunil Kumar; Joshiraj, Bandi; Chaudhary, Lalita; Hayaran, Nitin; Kaur, Manpreet; Jain, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: We designed a study to compare the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination with dexmedetomidine alone in search of an ideal sedation regime, which would achieve better intubating conditions, hemodynamic stability, and sedation for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 adult patients of age group 18-60 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II posted for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each in this prospective randomized controlled double-blinded study. Groups I and II patients received a bolus dose of dexmedetomidine at 1 mcg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine at 0.5 mcg/kg/h. Upon completion of the dexmedetomidine bolus, Group I patients received 15 mg of ketamine and an infusion of ketamine at 20 mg/h followed by awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation, while Group II patients upon completion of dexmedetomidine bolus received plain normal saline instead of ketamine. Hemodynamic variables like heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram changes, sedation score (modified Observer assessment of alertness/sedation score), intubation score (vocal cord movement and coughing), grimace score, time taken for intubation, amount of lignocaine used were noted during the course of study. Patient satisfaction score and level of recall were assessed during the postoperative visit the next day. Results: Group I patients maintained a stable HR and MAP (<10% fall when compared with the baseline value). Sedation score (3.47 vs. 3.93) and patient satisfaction score were better in Group I patients. There was no significant difference in intubation scores, grimace scores, oxygen saturation and level of recall when compared between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The use of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination in awake fiberoptic nasotracheal

  6. Stronger efferent suppression of cochlear neural potentials by contralateral acoustic stimulation in awake than in anesthetized chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Aedo, Cristian; Tapia, Eduardo; Pavez, Elizabeth; Elgueda, Diego; Delano, Paul H; Robles, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There are two types of sensory cells in the mammalian cochlea, inner hair cells, which make synaptic contact with auditory-nerve afferent fibers, and outer hair cells that are innervated by crossed and uncrossed medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent fibers. Contralateral acoustic stimulation activates the uncrossed efferent MOC fibers reducing cochlear neural responses, thus modifying the input to the central auditory system. The chinchilla, among all studied mammals, displays the lowest percentage of uncrossed MOC fibers raising questions about the strength and frequency distribution of the contralateral-sound effect in this species. On the other hand, MOC effects on cochlear sensitivity have been mainly studied in anesthetized animals and since the MOC-neuron activity depends on the level of anesthesia, it is important to assess the influence of anesthesia in the strength of efferent effects. Seven adult chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger) were chronically implanted with round-window electrodes in both cochleae. We compared the effect of contralateral sound in awake and anesthetized condition. Compound action potentials (CAP) and cochlear microphonics (CM) were measured in the ipsilateral cochlea in response to tones in absence and presence of contralateral sound. Control measurements performed after middle-ear muscles section in one animal discarded any possible middle-ear reflex activation. Contralateral sound produced CAP amplitude reductions in all chinchillas, with suppression effects greater by about 1-3 dB in awake than in anesthetized animals. In contrast, CM amplitude increases of up to 1.9 dB were found in only three awake chinchillas. In both conditions the strongest efferent effects were produced by contralateral tones at frequencies equal or close to those of ipsilateral tones. Contralateral CAP suppressions for 1-6 kHz ipsilateral tones corresponded to a span of uncrossed MOC fiber innervation reaching at least the central third of the chinchilla cochlea

  7. Awake intubation using fast-track laryngeal mask airway as an alternative to fiberoptic bronchoscopy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Parnell, J David; Mills, Jeff

    2006-12-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pose a unique challenge to the anesthetist. The manifestations of RA may include cervical spine instability, limited range of motion, and temperomandibular joint involvement limiting mouth opening. Therefore, securing the airway while maintaining the head and neck in a neutral position is of particular concern to the anesthetist. While this is most commonly accomplished using an awake fiberoptic technique, the following case is presented as a safe and efficient initial alternative to the primary use of fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the appropriate patient population. PMID:17236388

  8. Transcranial Two-Photon Imaging of Synaptic Structures in the Cortex of Awake Head-Restrained Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Pan, Feng; Chang, Paul C.; Gooden, Frank; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial two-photon microscopy allows long-term imaging of neurons, glia, and vasculature in the intact cortex of living animals. So far, this technique has been primarily used to acquire images in anesthetized animals. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for high-resolution two-photon imaging of neuronal structures in the cortex of awake head-restrained mice. Surgery is done within 1 h in anesthetized mice. After animals recover from anesthesia, two-photon imaging can be performed multiple times over minutes to days, allowing longitudinal studies of synaptic plasticity and pathology without the complication induced by anesthesia reagents. PMID:23754217

  9. Awake intubating laryngeal mask airway placement in a morbidly obese patient with ankylosing spondylitis and unstable thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Herman, Abbey G; Mahla, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Intubating laryngeal mask airways can be used to provide continuous ventilation throughout intubation. This is a case of a morbidly obese (body mass index = 58) 65-year-old woman with T10 and T11 compression fractures. Optimal positioning for airway management was hindered by her unstable spine, minimal neck range of motion, and extreme pain with any movement. An intubating laryngeal mask airway was placed in the awake, topically anesthetized patient, and the laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube combination was left in place throughout surgery. PMID:27290947

  10. Behavioral and electrophysiological changes induced by acetyl-L-carnitine in aged freely-moving rats.

    PubMed

    Marini, G; Calvani, M; Ceccarelli, P; Mancia, M

    2006-02-01

    In chronically-implanted, drug-free, behaving aged Fischer rats, intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) and intraperitoneally (i.p.) acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) injections powerfully enhanced motor behavior and head movements aimed at attention and exploratory activity. This effect was dose-dependent and associated with the abolition or substantial reduction of the incidence and duration of the spontaneous EEG generalized hypersynchronous patterns termed High Voltage Spindle (HVS), with an increase in EEG monitored theta activity. The results suggest that ALCAR may stimulate the motivational system and disrupt the hypersynchronous processes by inhibiting the GABAergic thalamic reticular neurons and/or activating the brain stem cholinergic reticular system (pedunculo pontine tegmental, PPT and laterodorsal tegmental, LDT nuclei). PMID:16425616

  11. Distinct BOLD Activation Profiles Following Central and Peripheral Oxytocin Administration in Awake Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Craig F.; Yee, Jason R.; Kenkel, William M.; Dumais, Kelly Marie; Moore, Kelsey; Veenema, Alexa H.; Kulkarni, Praveen; Perkybile, Allison M.; Carter, C. Sue

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature has suggested that intranasal oxytocin (OT) or other systemic routes of administration can alter prosocial behavior, presumably by directly activating OT sensitive neural circuits in the brain. Yet there is no clear evidence that OT given peripherally can cross the blood–brain barrier at levels sufficient to engage the OT receptor. To address this issue we examined changes in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity in response to peripheral OT injections (0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/kg) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in awake rats imaged at 7.0 T. These data were compared to OT (1 μg/5 μl) given directly to the brain via the lateral cerebroventricle. Using a 3D annotated MRI atlas of the rat brain segmented into 171 brain areas and computational analysis, we reconstructed the distributed integrated neural circuits identified with BOLD fMRI following central and peripheral OT. Both routes of administration caused significant changes in BOLD signal within the first 10 min of administration. As expected, central OT activated a majority of brain areas known to express a high density of OT receptors, e.g., lateral septum, subiculum, shell of the accumbens, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This profile of activation was not matched by peripheral OT. The change in BOLD signal to peripheral OT did not show any discernible dose–response. Interestingly, peripheral OT affected all subdivisions of the olfactory bulb, in addition to the cerebellum and several brainstem areas relevant to the autonomic nervous system, including the solitary tract nucleus. The results from this imaging study do not support a direct central action of peripheral OT on the brain. Instead, the patterns of brain activity suggest that peripheral OT may interact at the level of the olfactory bulb and through sensory afferents from the autonomic nervous system to influence brain activity. PMID:26441574

  12. Gating of tactile information through gamma band during passive arm movement in awake primates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiguo; Francis, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    To make precise and prompt action in a dynamic environment, the sensorimotor system needs to integrate all related information. The inflow of somatosensory information to the cerebral cortex is regulated and mostly suppressed by movement, which is commonly referred to as sensory gating or gating. Sensory gating plays an important role in preventing redundant information from reaching the cortex, which should be considered when designing somatosensory neuroprosthetics. Gating can occur at several levels within the sensorimotor pathway, while the underlying mechanism is not yet fully understood. The average sensory evoked potential is commonly used to assess sensory information processing, however the assumption of a stereotyped response to each stimulus is still an open question. Event related spectral perturbation (ERSP), which is the power spectrum after time-frequency decomposition on single trial evoked potentials (total power), could overcome this limitation of averaging and provide additional information for understanding the underlying mechanism. To this aim, neural activities in primary somatosensory cortex (S1), primary motor cortex (M1), and ventral posterolateral (VPL) nucleus of thalamus were recorded simultaneously in two areas (S1 and M1 or S1 and VPL) during passive arm movement and rest in awake monkeys. Our results showed that neural activity at different recording areas demonstrated specific and unique response frequency characteristics. Tactile input induced early high frequency responses followed by low frequency oscillations within sensorimotor circuits, and passive movement suppressed these oscillations either in a phase-locked or non-phase-locked manner. Sensory gating by movement was non-phase-locked in M1, and complex in sensory areas. VPL showed gating of non-phase-locked at gamma band and mix of phase-locked and non-phase-locked at low frequency, while S1 showed gating of phase-locked and non-phase-locked at gamma band and an early phase

  13. FRETBursts: An Open Source Toolkit for Analysis of Freely-Diffusing Single-Molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Eitan; Chung, SangYoon; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) allows probing intermolecular interactions and conformational changes in biomacromolecules, and represents an invaluable tool for studying cellular processes at the molecular scale. smFRET experiments can detect the distance between two fluorescent labels (donor and acceptor) in the 3-10 nm range. In the commonly employed confocal geometry, molecules are free to diffuse in solution. When a molecule traverses the excitation volume, it emits a burst of photons, which can be detected by single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detectors. The intensities of donor and acceptor fluorescence can then be related to the distance between the two fluorophores. While recent years have seen a growing number of contributions proposing improvements or new techniques in smFRET data analysis, rarely have those publications been accompanied by software implementation. In particular, despite the widespread application of smFRET, no complete software package for smFRET burst analysis is freely available to date. In this paper, we introduce FRETBursts, an open source software for analysis of freely-diffusing smFRET data. FRETBursts allows executing all the fundamental steps of smFRET bursts analysis using state-of-the-art as well as novel techniques, while providing an open, robust and well-documented implementation. Therefore, FRETBursts represents an ideal platform for comparison and development of new methods in burst analysis. We employ modern software engineering principles in order to minimize bugs and facilitate long-term maintainability. Furthermore, we place a strong focus on reproducibility by relying on Jupyter notebooks for FRETBursts execution. Notebooks are executable documents capturing all the steps of the analysis (including data files, input parameters, and results) and can be easily shared to replicate complete smFRET analyzes. Notebooks allow beginners to execute complex workflows and advanced users to

  14. Impact of extraneous mispositioned events on motion-corrected brain SPECT images of freely moving animals

    SciTech Connect

    Angelis, Georgios I. Ryder, William J.; Bashar, Rezaul; Meikle, Steven R.; Fulton, Roger R.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain imaging of freely moving small animals would allow a wide range of important neurological processes and behaviors to be studied, which are normally inhibited by anesthetic drugs or precluded due to the animal being restrained. While rigid body motion of the head can be tracked and accounted for in the reconstruction, activity in the torso may confound brain measurements, especially since motion of the torso is more complex (i.e., nonrigid) and not well correlated with that of the head. The authors investigated the impact of mispositioned events and attenuation due to the torso on the accuracy of motion corrected brain images of freely moving mice. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of a realistic voxelized mouse phantom and a dual compartment phantom were performed. Each phantom comprised a target and an extraneous compartment which were able to move independently of each other. Motion correction was performed based on the known motion of the target compartment only. Two SPECT camera geometries were investigated: a rotating single head detector and a stationary full ring detector. The effects of motion, detector geometry, and energy of the emitted photons (hence, attenuation) on bias and noise in reconstructed brain regions were evaluated. Results: The authors observed two main sources of bias: (a) motion-related inconsistencies in the projection data and (b) the mismatch between attenuation and emission. Both effects are caused by the assumption that the orientation of the torso is difficult to track and model, and therefore cannot be conveniently corrected for. The motion induced bias in some regions was up to 12% when no attenuation effects were considered, while it reached 40% when also combined with attenuation related inconsistencies. The detector geometry (i.e., rotating vs full ring) has a big impact on the accuracy of the reconstructed images, with the full ring detector being more

  15. FRETBursts: An Open Source Toolkit for Analysis of Freely-Diffusing Single-Molecule FRET.

    PubMed

    Ingargiola, Antonino; Lerner, Eitan; Chung, SangYoon; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) allows probing intermolecular interactions and conformational changes in biomacromolecules, and represents an invaluable tool for studying cellular processes at the molecular scale. smFRET experiments can detect the distance between two fluorescent labels (donor and acceptor) in the 3-10 nm range. In the commonly employed confocal geometry, molecules are free to diffuse in solution. When a molecule traverses the excitation volume, it emits a burst of photons, which can be detected by single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detectors. The intensities of donor and acceptor fluorescence can then be related to the distance between the two fluorophores. While recent years have seen a growing number of contributions proposing improvements or new techniques in smFRET data analysis, rarely have those publications been accompanied by software implementation. In particular, despite the widespread application of smFRET, no complete software package for smFRET burst analysis is freely available to date. In this paper, we introduce FRETBursts, an open source software for analysis of freely-diffusing smFRET data. FRETBursts allows executing all the fundamental steps of smFRET bursts analysis using state-of-the-art as well as novel techniques, while providing an open, robust and well-documented implementation. Therefore, FRETBursts represents an ideal platform for comparison and development of new methods in burst analysis. We employ modern software engineering principles in order to minimize bugs and facilitate long-term maintainability. Furthermore, we place a strong focus on reproducibility by relying on Jupyter notebooks for FRETBursts execution. Notebooks are executable documents capturing all the steps of the analysis (including data files, input parameters, and results) and can be easily shared to replicate complete smFRET analyzes. Notebooks allow beginners to execute complex workflows and advanced users to

  16. Modulation of arterial pressure by P2 purinoceptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of awake rats.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Josiane C; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Machado, Benedito H

    2010-12-01

    In the present study we evaluated the role of purinergic mechanisms in the PVN on the tonic modulation of the autonomic function to the cardiovascular system as well on the cardiovascular responses to peripheral chemoreflex activation in awake rats. Guide-cannulae were bilaterally implanted in the direction of the PVN of male Wistar rats. Femoral artery and vein were catheterized one day before the experiments. Chemoreflex was activated with KCN (80 μg/0.05 ml, i.v.) before and after microinjections of P2 receptors antagonist into the PVN. Microinjection of PPADS, a non selective P2X antagonist, into the PVN (n=6) produced a significant increase in the baseline MAP (99±2 vs 112±3 mmHg) and HR (332±8 vs 375±8 bpm) but had no effect on the pressor and bradycardic responses to chemoreflex activation. Intravenous injection of vasopressin receptors antagonist after microinjection of PPADS into the PVN produced no effect on the increased baseline MAP. Simultaneous microinjection of PPADS and KYN into the PVN (n=6) had no effect in the baseline MAP, HR or in the pressor and bradycardic responses to chemoreflex activation. We conclude that P2 purinoceptors in the PVN are involved in the modulation of baseline autonomic function to the cardiovascular system but not in the cardiovascular responses to chemoreflex activation in awake rats. PMID:20655811

  17. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M.; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (rs = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (rs = −0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (rs = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP. PMID:26881088

  18. A comparison of the Enk Fiberoptic Atomizer Set(™) with boluses of topical anaesthesia for awake fibreoptic intubation.

    PubMed

    Pirlich, N; Lohse, J A; Schmidtmann, I; Didion, N; Piepho, T; Noppens, R R

    2016-07-01

    We compared the Enk Fiberoptic Atomizer Set(™) with boluses of topical anaesthesia administered via the working channel during awake fibreoptic tracheal intubation in 96 patients undergoing elective surgery. Patients who received topical anaesthesia via the atomiser, compared with boluses via the fibreoptic scope, reported a better median (IQR [range]) level of comfort: 1 (1-3 [1-10]) vs. 4 (2-6 [1-10]), p < 0.0001; experienced a reduced total number of coughs: 6 (3-10 [0-34]) vs. 11 (6-13 [0-25]), p = 0.0055; and fewer distinct coughing episodes: 7% vs. 27% respectively, p = 0.0133. The atomiser technique was quicker: 5 (3-6 [2-12]) min vs. 6 (5-7 [2-15]) min, p = 0.0009; and required less topical lidocaine: 100 mg (100-100 [80-160]) vs. 200 mg (200-200 [200-200]), p < 0.0001. Four weeks after nasal intubation, the incidence of nasal pain was less in the atomiser group compared with the control group (8% vs. 50%, p = 0.0015). We conclude that the atomiser was superior to bolus application for awake fibreoptic tracheal intubation. PMID:27150724

  19. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Zaghi, Soroush; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (r s = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (r s = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (r s = -0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (r s = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP. PMID:26881088

  20. Rapid and low-invasive functional brain mapping by realtime visualization of high gamma activity for awake craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Kamada, K; Ogawa, H; Kapeller, C; Prueckl, R; Guger, C

    2014-01-01

    For neurosurgery with an awake craniotomy, the critical issue is to set aside enough time to identify eloquent cortices by electrocortical stimulation (ECS). High gamma activity (HGA) ranging between 80 and 120 Hz on electrocorticogram (ECoG) is assumed to reflect localized cortical processing. In this report, we used realtime HGA mapping and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for rapid and reliable identification of motor and language functions. Three patients with intra-axial tumors in their dominant hemisphere underwent preoperative fMRI and lesion resection with an awake craniotomy. All patients showed significant fMRI activation evoked by motor and language tasks. After the craniotomy, we recorded ECoG activity by placing subdural grids directly on the exposed brain surface. Each patient performed motor and language tasks and demonstrated realtime HGA dynamics in hand motor areas and parts of the inferior frontal gyrus. Sensitivity and specificity of HGA mapping were 100% compared to ECS mapping in the frontal lobe, which suggested HGA mapping precisely indicated eloquent cortices. The investigation times of HGA mapping was significantly shorter than that of ECS mapping. Specificities of the motor and language-fMRI, however, did not reach 85%. The results of HGA mapping was mostly consistent with those of ECS mapping, although fMRI tended to overestimate functional areas. This novel technique enables rapid and accurate functional mapping. PMID:25571558

  1. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments

    PubMed Central

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4–8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic). PMID:21243106

  2. Freely Suspended Smectic Filaments and the Structure of the B7 Phase of MHOBOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, N.; Link, D. R.; Maclennan, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    Our recent discovery of the spontaneous formation of chiral domains in fluid smectic phases of achiral bow-shaped molecules opens up a wide variety of possibilities for new liquid crystal phases and phenomena. The basic, spontaneously chiral layer structure of the highest temperature fluid smectic phases, the B2 and B7, are shown. One of the most intriguing aspects of this structure is the plethora of possible phases coming from different stacking sequences of the polar ordering and tilt directions. The four possibilities of next-nearest neighbor alternation are shown. In the original material studied, NOBOW, the ground states found are antiferroelectric, either the racemic SmC(sub S)P(sub A) or the chiral SmC(sub A)P(sub A). We are currently studying MHOBOW, synthesized by D. Walba which, by virtue of its methyl hexyloxy tail has a tendency to form anticlinic layer interfaces, in the hope of finding a phase with a ferroelectric ground state, either SmC(sub A)P(sub S) or SmC(sub S)P(sub A), which can be obtained in NOBOW only by applying a field. Preliminary observations of MHO-BOW have made its study, from the point of view of understanding novel LC structures, extremely high priority. The following truly remarkable characteristics have been revealed: (i) The smectic phase grows out of the isotropic in the form of helical ribbons. The resulting planar aligned textures of focal conics with layers normal to glass plates exhibit bizarre modulations, including stripes and checker-boards. These have also been seen in other materials suggesting that this is a new phase (tentatively called B7), which is a fluid smectic with some kind of in-layer structure. (ii) It is virtually impossible to make freely suspended films of MHOBOW. Rather it makes the freely suspended filaments which preliminary x-ray scattering experiments reveal to have the nested cylinder layer structure indicated; (iii) The powder x-ray diffraction exhibits four resolution-limited smectic layering peaks

  3. Combined cardiopulmonary assessments with implantable telemetry device in conscious freely moving cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Authier, S; Haefner, Paul; Fournier, S; Troncy, E; Moon, L B

    2010-01-01

    Female cynomolgus monkeys were surgically implanted with telemetry transmitters recording ECG (DII), arterial pressure, physical activity, body temperature, and tidal volume. Respiratory rate (RR) and tidal volume (TV) were monitored simultaneously with the telemetry transmitter using impedance. Impedance-based monitoring of RR and TV by telemetry correlated with controlled TV and with pneumotachometer (>98%) in restrained animals. Control drugs with cardiovascular and respiratory effects, including saline, medetomidine (0.01, 0.02 and 0.04mg/kg) and cocaine (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5mg/kg) were administered intravenously. An averaging epoch of 5min was used for analysis of respiratory data. Medetomidine induced significant respiratory depression with decrease in RR and TV in freely moving animals while cocaine increased TV, RR and minute ventilation (MV) with concomitant increase in heart rate when compared with time matched values from saline-treated animals. The onset, duration and magnitude of cardiovascular and respiratory changes were correlated. This highlights the dependency of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The use of cardiopulmonary monitoring can allow continuous monitoring including during night time when variability of respiratory parameters is lower. Monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory parameters in the same animals could also help to decrease the number of animals used in research. PMID:20570745

  4. A numerical study of a freely-falling maple seed with autorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Injae; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    Many single winged seeds such as those of maples exploit autorotation to decrease the descending velocity and increase the dispersal distance for the conservation of species. In this study, a numerical simulation is conducted for flow around a freely-falling maple seed (Acer palmatum) at the Reynolds number of 1186 (based on the mean chord length and characteristic terminal velocity). We use an immersed boundary method in a non-inertial reference frame (Kim & Choi, JCP, 2006) for the simulation. After a transient period, the seed reaches the steady autorotation with a stable leading edge vortex attached on the surface of the wing at which the descending velocity significantly decreases. At steady autorotation, the descending velocity is proportional to the square root of disc loading. We also study the effect of the initial position of the seeds on the timing of autorotation, and show that the autorotation occurs earlier when the wing leading edge or nut is initially positioned upward. Supported by NRF-2011-0028032.

  5. Marangoni Effect on the Shape of Freely Receding Evaporating Sessile Droplets of Perfectly Wetting Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumpas, Yannis; Dehaeck, Sam; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    Freely receding evaporating sessile droplets of perfectly wetting liquids (HFE-7100, 7200 and 7500), with small finite contact angles induced by evaporation, are studied with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Surprisingly, the experimentally obtained profiles turn out to deviate from the classical macroscopic static shape of a sessile droplet (as determined by gravity and capillarity), often used when modeling evaporating droplets. These deviations can be seen in two ways. Namely, either the droplet appears to be inflated as compared to the classical static shape assuming the same contact angle and contact radius, or the apparent contact angle appears lower than the classical static one assuming the same volume and contact radius. In reality, the experimental profiles exhibit a local decrease of the slope near the contact line, which we attribute to the Marangoni effect in an evaporating sessile droplet. In this case, the radially inward (along the liquid-air interface) direction of the flow delivers more liquid to the center of the droplet making it appear inflated. When the Marangoni effect is weak, as in the case of the poorly volatile HFE-7500, no significant influence is noticed on the drop shape. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of a lubrication-type theoretical model that incorporates the evaporation-induced Marangoni flow. Financial support of FP7 Marie Curie MULTIFLOW Network (PITN-GA-2008-214919), ESA/BELSPO-PRODEX, BELSPO- μMAST (IAP 7/38) & FRS-FNRS is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Analysis of freely dissolved alcohol ethoxylate homologues in various seawater matrixes using solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Droge, Steven T J; Sinnige, Theo L; Hermens, Joop L M

    2007-04-01

    Solid-phase microextraction fibers (SPME) were tested as tools to determine freely dissolved alcohol ethoxylate (AE) surfactants in seawater matrixes. Partitioning of a wide range of AE homologues into a 35-mum polyacrylate fiber coating was linearly related to aqueous concentrations as low as submicrograms per liter, with high reproducibility. The exposure time needed to reach equilibrium between aqueous phase and the SPME fiber depended on the fiber-water partitioning coefficient (Kfw) of the AE homologue. Specific attention was given to the influence of various matrixes on the analysis via SPME. The presence of sediment increases the uptake kinetics of AE homologues for which diffusion in the aqueous phase is rate limiting. The Kfw in equilibrated systems was not affected by the presence of other homologues, micelles, or varying amounts of sediment phase. SPME is therefore a suitable tool for analysis of AE in sorption studies and sediment toxicity tests. A strong linear relation was observed between Kfw and the hydrophobicity of the AE homologue, using estimated octanol-water partition coefficients. This relation can be used to predict the partitioning coefficient of any AE homologue to the SPME fiber, which facilitates the analysis of complex mixtures. PMID:17338502

  7. Circadian and ultradian rhythms of clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of freely moving mice

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the temporal order of physiology and behavior is primarily regulated by the circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Rhythms are generated in cells by an auto-regulatory transcription/translation feedback loop, composed of several clock genes and their protein products. Taking advantage of bioluminescence reporters, we have succeeded in continuously monitoring the expression of clock gene reporters Per1-luc, PER2::LUC and Bmal1-ELuc in the SCN of freely moving mice for up to 3 weeks in constant darkness. Bioluminescence emitted from the SCN was collected with an implanted plastic optical fiber which was connected to a cooled photomultiplier tube. We found robust circadian rhythms in the clock gene expression, the phase-relation of which were the same as those observed ex vivo. The circadian rhythms were superimposed by episodic bursts which had ultradian periods of approximately 3.0 h. Episodic bursts often accompanied activity bouts, but stoichiometric as well as temporal analyses revealed no causality between them. Clock gene expression in the SCN in vivo is regulated by the circadian pacemaker and ultradian rhythms of unknown origin. PMID:26194231

  8. Transition induced by fixed and freely convecting spherical particles in laminar boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, H. L.; Morris, P. J.; Bajwa, A. R.; Vincent, D. C.

    1993-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of aspects of transition induced by disturbances from spherical particles in laminar boundary layers is discussed. The generation of turbulent wedges by fixed spherical particles in a laminar boundary layer on or near the surface of a flat plate is considered experimentally using flow visualization with fluorescent dye and laser Doppler velocimetry. Turbulent spots generated by freely convecting spherical particles that are released in the freestream to fall into a flat plate laminar boundary layer and impact the plate are also discussed. A combination of dye flow visualization and a video based particle tracking technique was used to study the convecting particle problem. Although the Reynolds number at the critical condition for turbulent wedge generation by fixed particles and turbulent spot generation by convecting particles are similar, transition in these two situations appears to be fundamentally different. The development of a turbulent wedge near the critical condition is a relatively gradual process. In contrast, turbulent spots form relatively quickly after the convecting particles enter the boundary layer and impact the plate. Turbulent wedge formation downstream of a fixed particle results from the destabilization of the near wall flow by the vortical structures shed into particle wake. This shedding process is dominated by periodically shed loop shaped hairpin vortices. Observation of subharmonic oscillations at 1/2 and 1/4 of this shedding frequency suggest that a chaotic route to turbulence by a series of period doubling bifurcations is possible.

  9. A quantitative framework for whole-body coordination reveals specific deficits in freely walking ataxic mice

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Ana S; Darmohray, Dana M; Fayad, João; Marques, Hugo G; Carey, Megan R

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of movement across the body is a fundamental, yet poorly understood aspect of motor control. Mutant mice with cerebellar circuit defects exhibit characteristic impairments in locomotor coordination; however, the fundamental features of this gait ataxia have not been effectively isolated. Here we describe a novel system (LocoMouse) for analyzing limb, head, and tail kinematics of freely walking mice. Analysis of visibly ataxic Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mice reveals that while differences in the forward motion of individual paws are fully accounted for by changes in walking speed and body size, more complex 3D trajectories and, especially, inter-limb and whole-body coordination are specifically impaired. Moreover, the coordination deficits in pcd are consistent with a failure to predict and compensate for the consequences of movement across the body. These results isolate specific impairments in whole-body coordination in mice and provide a quantitative framework for understanding cerebellar contributions to coordinated locomotion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07892.001 PMID:26433022

  10. Experimetal study of a freely falling plate with an inhomogeneous mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wentao; Liu, Hong; Wang, Fuxin; Wu, Junqi; Zhang, H. P.

    2013-11-01

    A homogeneous thin plate often flutters while falling through a fluid under gravity. The center of gravity of the plate moves back-and-forth horizontally and the plate tilting angle oscillates symmetrically from the horizontal. Here we show that such a scenario is qualitatively changed for a plate with noncoinciding centers of gravity and buoyancy due to an inhomogeneous mass distribution. Mismatch of the centers causes an external torque that breaks the symmetry of rotational motion, shifts the mean tilting position from the horizontal, and leads to a net horizontal plate displacement. In laboratory experiments with a Reynolds number around 1500, we found that the net horizontal displacement scales linearly with the separation between the centers up to a critical value, beyond which the plate falls vertically in an edge-on configuration with the heavier side downward. Experimental results are compared to predictions of a quasi-steady numerical model. Our work demonstrates that motion of freely moving objects in a fluid depends sensitively on external torques, which potentially can be used as an effective control method.

  11. A wireless power transmission system for implantable devices in freely moving rodents.

    PubMed

    Eom, Kyungsik; Jeong, Joonsoo; Lee, Tae Hyung; Kim, Jinhyung; Kim, Junghoon; Lee, Sung Eun; Kim, Sung June

    2014-08-01

    Reliable wireless power delivery for implantable devices in animals is highly desired for safe and effective experimental use. Batteries require frequent replacement; wired connections are inconvenient and unsafe, and short-distance inductive coupling requires the attachment of an exterior transmitter to the animal's body. In this article, we propose a solution by which animals with implantable devices can move freely without attachments. Power is transmitted using coils attached to the animal's cage and is received by a receiver coil implanted in the animal. For a three-dimensionally uniform delivery of power, we designed a columnar dual-transmitter coil configuration. A resonator-based inductive link was adopted for efficient long-range power delivery, and we used a novel biocompatible liquid crystal polymer substrate as the implantable receiver device. Using this wireless power delivery system, we obtain an average power transfer efficiency of 15.2% (minimum efficiency of 10% and a standard deviation of 2.6) within a cage of 15×20×15 cm3. PMID:24946939

  12. Investigation of the freely available easy-to-use software 'EZR' for medical statistics.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Y

    2013-03-01

    Although there are many commercially available statistical software packages, only a few implement a competing risk analysis or a proportional hazards regression model with time-dependent covariates, which are necessary in studies on hematopoietic SCT. In addition, most packages are not clinician friendly, as they require that commands be written based on statistical languages. This report describes the statistical software 'EZR' (Easy R), which is based on R and R commander. EZR enables the application of statistical functions that are frequently used in clinical studies, such as survival analyses, including competing risk analyses and the use of time-dependent covariates, receiver operating characteristics analyses, meta-analyses, sample size calculation and so on, by point-and-click access. EZR is freely available on our website (http://www.jichi.ac.jp/saitama-sct/SaitamaHP.files/statmed.html) and runs on both Windows (Microsoft Corporation, USA) and Mac OS X (Apple, USA). This report provides instructions for the installation and operation of EZR. PMID:23208313

  13. Spatial and temporal variation of freely dissolved PAHs in an urban river undergoing Superfund remediation

    PubMed Central

    Sower, GJ; Anderson, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Urban rivers with a history of industrial use can exhibit spatial and temporal variations in contaminant concentrations that may significantly affect risk evaluations and even the assessment of remediation efforts. Concentrations of 15 biologically available priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured over five years along 18.5 miles of the lower Willamette River using passive sampling devices and HPLC. The study area includes the Portland Harbor Superfund megasite with several PAH sources including remediation operations for coal tar at RM 6.3 west and an additional Superfund site, McCormick and Baxter, at RM 7 east consisting largely of creosote contamination. Study results show that organoclay capping at the McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site reduced PAHs from a pre-cap average of 440 ± 422 ng/L to 8 ± 3 ng/L post-capping. Results also reveal that dredging of submerged coal tar nearly tripled nearby freely dissolved PAH concentrations. For apportioning sources, fluoranthene/ pyrene and phenanthrene/anthracene diagnostic ratios from passive sampling devices were established for creosote and coal tar contamination and compared to published sediment values. PMID:19174872

  14. Quantification of gait parameters in freely walking wild type and sensory deprived Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, César S; Bartos, Imre; Akay, Turgay; Márka, Szabolcs; Mann, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Coordinated walking in vertebrates and multi-legged invertebrates such as Drosophila melanogaster requires a complex neural network coupled to sensory feedback. An understanding of this network will benefit from