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Sample records for awarded prestigious prize

  1. Prestigious award for SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    episodes into remarkable success stories. In June 1998, control of the spacecraft was lost and the team fought for three months before regaining contact with the spacecraft. Then all three on-board gyroscopes failed. Again, the team rose to the challenge by reprogramming the spacecraft to eliminate completely the reliance on gyroscopes. In doing so, they crossed another frontier in space - SOHO became the first three-axis stabilised spacecraft to be operated without gyroscopes. Most recently, in May 2003, the SOHO team recorded signs of a possible breakdown in the east-west pointing mechanism of the high-gain antenna. They feared that the mission was again in danger. After a long and careful analysis of all options, the team once more found a solution. They decided to 'park' the antenna in an ideal position (where data losses are minimised), by rotating the spacecraft 180 degrees every three months. In addition, they established new procedures and the use of larger ground antennae (when available) to all but eliminate the impacts to normal science operations. At all times of the mission, the team continued to produce excellent science, and SOHO has revolutionised the way scientists think about the Sun and how it might affect the Earth's environment. More than 1500 papers, representing the work of more than 1500 scientists, have been published based on SOHO data. With SOHO still going strong, the success story is set to continue. Bernhard Fleck and Pål Brekke, ESA's SOHO Project Scientist and Deputy Project Scientist, said: "We feel very honoured to receive this award on behalf of the SOHO science teams, especially considering the prestigious teams that have won before. It is a boost for all of us involved in this mission to know that our work has been recognised in this way." Note to editors The award ceremony took place on 28 September 2003, the opening day of the 54th International Astronautical Congress, in Bremen, Germany. The International Academy of Astronautics was

  2. Prestigious award for SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    episodes into remarkable success stories. In June 1998, control of the spacecraft was lost and the team fought for three months before regaining contact with the spacecraft. Then all three on-board gyroscopes failed. Again, the team rose to the challenge by reprogramming the spacecraft to eliminate completely the reliance on gyroscopes. In doing so, they crossed another frontier in space - SOHO became the first three-axis stabilised spacecraft to be operated without gyroscopes. Most recently, in May 2003, the SOHO team recorded signs of a possible breakdown in the east-west pointing mechanism of the high-gain antenna. They feared that the mission was again in danger. After a long and careful analysis of all options, the team once more found a solution. They decided to 'park' the antenna in an ideal position (where data losses are minimised), by rotating the spacecraft 180 degrees every three months. In addition, they established new procedures and the use of larger ground antennae (when available) to all but eliminate the impacts to normal science operations. At all times of the mission, the team continued to produce excellent science, and SOHO has revolutionised the way scientists think about the Sun and how it might affect the Earth's environment. More than 1500 papers, representing the work of more than 1500 scientists, have been published based on SOHO data. With SOHO still going strong, the success story is set to continue. Bernhard Fleck and Pål Brekke, ESA's SOHO Project Scientist and Deputy Project Scientist, said: "We feel very honoured to receive this award on behalf of the SOHO science teams, especially considering the prestigious teams that have won before. It is a boost for all of us involved in this mission to know that our work has been recognised in this way." Note to editors The award ceremony took place on 28 September 2003, the opening day of the 54th International Astronautical Congress, in Bremen, Germany. The International Academy of Astronautics was

  3. Society News: RAS Fellows are honoured with awards; Patrick Moore Medal; Best theses win prizes; New Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-08-01

    Congratulations to several Fellows of the RAS who have received prestigious awards this year. Congratulations to the winners of the annual prizes for the best PhD theses in astronomy and geophysics, awarded by the RAS and sponsored by Wiley-Blackwell. Winners receive a cheque for £1000, runners-up £50.

  4. Children's Books: Awards and Prizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colbert, Margaret, Comp.

    This document is a compilation of honors awarded in the children's book field by organizations, schools, universities, publishers, and newspapers. Major international and foreign awards of English speaking countries are included. The awards are arranged alphabetically. Each award entry includes a brief history of the award and a list of all…

  5. 26 CFR 1.74-1 - Prizes and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... all types, as well as any prizes and awards from an employer to an employee in recognition of some... received as a prize or award, if (1) such prize or award was made primarily in recognition of past... fields; (2) the recipient was selected without any action on his part to enter the contest or...

  6. 26 CFR 1.74-1 - Prizes and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... all types, as well as any prizes and awards from an employer to an employee in recognition of some... received as a prize or award, if (1) such prize or award was made primarily in recognition of past... fields; (2) the recipient was selected without any action on his part to enter the contest or...

  7. [On the Awarding of the First Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine to Emil von Behring].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Enke, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    In his will of 1895, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel laid the foundation for prizes in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace to those who had "conferred the greatest benefit on mankind" during the last year. The Nobel Prize is today widely considered as the most prestigious international symbol of scientific excellence, but it still is an exciting research question how it gained such prestige. Drawing on files from the Emil von Behring Archive in Marburg, Germany, and the Archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm this essay aims at shedding light on why the first Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1901 was awarded the German immunologist Emil von Behring, and how this decision was viewed at that time. This study is part of a research project that explores mechanisms leading to scientific recognition by using the example of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. PMID:26676474

  8. First AGU Climate Communication Prize awarded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Christine

    2012-02-01

    Gavin Schmidt, a climate scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and cofounder of the RealClimate blog (http://www.realclimate.org/), received the first AGU Climate Communication Prize at the honors ceremony. The prize recognizes excellence in climate communication as well as the promotion of scientific literacy, clarity of messaging, and efforts to foster respect and understanding for science-based values related to climate change. Sponsored by Nature's Own—a Boulder, Colo.-based company specializing in the sale of minerals, fossils, and decorative stone specimens—the prize comes with a $25,000 cash award. "AGU created this award to raise the visibility of climate change as a critical issue facing the world today, to demonstrate our support for scientists who commit themselves to the effective communication of climate change science, and to encourage more scientists to engage with the public and policy makers on how climate research can contribute to the sustainability of our planet," said AGU president Michael Mc Phaden. "That's why we are so pleased to recognize Gavin for his dedicated leadership and outstanding scientific achievements. We hope that his work will serve as an inspiration for others."

  9. 26 CFR 1.74-1 - Prizes and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prizes and awards. 1.74-1 Section 1.74-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.74-1 Prizes and awards. (a) Inclusion in gross income. (1) Section...

  10. 29 CFR 778.330 - Prizes or contest awards generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prizes or contest awards generally. 778.330 Section 778.330 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION Special Problems Prizes As Bonuses § 778.330...

  11. ESO Telescope Designer Raymond Wilson Wins Prestigious Kavli Award for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-06-01

    Raymond Wilson, whose pioneering optics research at ESO made today's giant telescopes possible thanks to "active optics" technology, has been awarded the 2010 Kavli Prize in astrophysics. The founder and original leader of the Optics and Telescopes Group at ESO, Wilson shares the million-dollar prize with two American scientists, Jerry Nelson and Roger Angel. The biennial prize, presented by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, the Kavli Foundation, and the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research, was instituted in 2008 and is given to researchers who significantly advance knowledge in the fields of nanoscience, neuroscience, and astrophysics, acting as a complement to the Nobel Prize. The award is named for and funded by Fred Kavli, the Norwegian entrepreneur and phi­lanthropist who later founded the Kavlico Corpora­tion in the US - today one of the world's largest suppliers of sensors for aeronautic, automotive and industrial applications. Wilson, who joined ESO in 1972, strived to achieve optical perfection, developing the concept of active optics as a way to enhance the size of telescopic primary mirrors. It is the size of these mirrors that determines the ability of a telescope to gather light and study faint and distant objects. Before active optics, mirrors over six metres in diameter were impossible, being too heavy, costly, and likely to bend from gravity and temperature changes. The use of active optics, which preserves optimal image quality by continually adjusting the mirror's shape during observations, made lighter, thinner so-called "meniscus mirrors" possible. Wilson first led the implementation of active optics in the revolutionary New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory, and continued to develop and improve the technology until his retirement in 1993. Since then, active optics have become a standard part of modern astronomy, applied in every big telescope including ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), a telescope array

  12. Children's Books: Awards and Prizes. 1975 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Book Council, New York, NY.

    This is a compilation of honors awarded in the children's book field including major international and foreign awards of English-speaking countries. It is revised biennially. The awards are arranged alphabetically. Each entry includes a brief history of the award. With a few exceptions, all the winners from the first to the most recent as of June…

  13. Children's Books: Awards & Prizes. 1975 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Book Council, New York, NY.

    A biennial compilation of honors awarded in the children's book field, this book includes major international and foreign awards of English-speaking countries. The awards are arranged alphabetically. Each entry includes a brief history of the award and, with a few exceptions, the titles of all winners from the first to the most recent, as of June…

  14. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School. PMID:27429747

  15. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Christiana N.; Kovats, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School. PMID:27429747

  16. Award of EC Television Prize for Broadcasts on Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (West Germany).

    The European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (CEDEFOP) is endeavoring to encourage television to provide more and better information on vocational and continuing education in the European Community (EC). Therefore, it held its first competition to award prizes for broadcasts presenting information on vocational training,…

  17. 45 CFR 73.735-505 - Acceptance of awards and prizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance of awards and prizes. 73.735-505 Section 73.735-505 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-505 Acceptance of awards and prizes. (a) Employees may accept awards, including cash...

  18. It's No Secret: Progress Prized in Brownsville

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article features Brownsville Independent School District which was awarded the prestigious 2008 Broad Prize for Urban Education for being the nation's most improved urban school district. The Texas border district sees teacher training and data-based instruction as paths to learning gains--and the $1 million Broad award adds validation. In…

  19. Which are the best nations and institutions for revolutionary science 1987-2006? Analysis using a combined metric of Nobel prizes, Fields medals, Lasker awards and Turing awards (NFLT metric).

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    I have previously suggested that Nobel prizes can be used as a scientometric measurement of 'revolutionary science'; and that for this purpose it would be better if more Nobel prizes were awarded, especially in three new subjects of mathematics, medicine and computing science which have become major sciences over recent decades. In the following analysis of the last 20 years from 1987 to 2006, I use three prestigious prizes in mathematics (Fields medal), medicine (Lasker award for Clinical Medical Research) and computing science (A.M. Turing award) which are plausible surrogates for Nobel prizes. The combined Nobel-Fields-Lasker-Turing (NFLT) metric is strongly dominated by the USA. However the distribution implies that revolutionary science may be somewhat more broadly distributed than the pure Nobel metric suggests. The UK and France seem to be significant nations in some types of revolutionary science (although the UK has declined substantially as a centre of revolutionary science); and Germany, Switzerland, Japan, Russia, Denmark and Norway also feature. The top world institutions for revolutionary science according to NFLT are MIT, Stanford and Princeton - all in the USA - and the USA has 19 institutions with at least three prize-winners. Second is France, with three institutions having three or more winners; the UK and Norway have one each. The NFLT metric confirms previous observations that many public universities in the Western USA have now become a major focus of revolutionary science; and that Harvard has declined from its previous status as the top world centre of revolutionary science to about seventh-place. This analysis confirms the potential value of increasing the number of Nobel prizes as a means of identifying and monitoring centres of excellence in revolutionary science. PMID:17234353

  20. [Tuberculosis 110 years after the Nobel Prize awarded to Koch].

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Viviana; Kantor, Isabel N

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 1905 to Robert Koch "for his investigations and discoveries in relation to tuberculosis (TB)". He discovered the causal agent of TB, described the four principles that since then have guided research in communicable diseases and also prepared the old tuberculin, a bacillary extract that failed as a healing element but allowed the early diagnosis of TB infection and promoted the understanding of cellular immunity. After his death, the most conspicuous achievements against TB were the BCG vaccine, and the discovery of streptomycin, the antibiotic that launched the era of the effective treatment of TB. Drug-resistance soon appeared. In Argentina, studies on drug resistance began in the 60s. In the 70s, shortened anti-TB drug schemes were introduced consisting in two-month treatment with four drugs, followed by four months with two drugs. The incidence of TB decreased worldwide, but the immune depression associated with awarded together with the misuse of anti-TB drugs allowed the emergence of multidrug resistance and extensive resistance, with the emergence of nosocomial outbreaks worldwide, including Argentina. New rapid diagnostic methods based on molecular biology were developed and also new drugs, but the treatment of multidrug resistant and extensively resistant TB is still difficult and expensive. TB research has marked several milestones in medical sciences, including the monumental Koch postulates, the tuberculin skin test that laid the basis for understanding cell-mediated immunity, the first design of randomized clinical trials and the use of combined multi-drug treatments. PMID:26707664

  1. Giving Prizes and Awards: A New Way to Recognize and Encourage Activities That Promote Equity for Women in Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Bonny; Sandler, Bernice

    The use of awards to stimulate activities designed to help women in education is considered. Using the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business award as a model, attention is directed to why awards are important, who can give them and to whom, and how to develop an awards program. An award or prize is defined as any form of recognition…

  2. Nobel prize awarded to pioneers in ozone research

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This article details the achievements of the three individuals who shared the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry - Paul Crutzen, Mario Molina, and F. Sherwood Rowland - for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly the chemical processes that deplete the ozone layer. Background information about the ozone layer is presented as well as highlights of the ozone research done by the prize winners.

  3. Quality Improvement Awards and Vocational Education Assessment. ERIC Digest No. 182.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bettina Lankard

    Quality system awards offer blueprints for assessing quality in vocational education as well as in business and industry. The three most prestigious awards recognizing quality improvement in business and industry are the Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award, Deming Application Prize, and ISO 9000 Registration. When comparing standards for the quality…

  4. Measuring revolutionary biomedical science 1992-2006 using Nobel prizes, Lasker (clinical medicine) awards and Gairdner awards (NLG metric).

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The Nobel prize for medicine or physiology, the Lasker award for clinical medicine, and the Gairdner international award are given to individuals for their role in developing theories, technologies and discoveries which have changed the direction of biomedical science. These distinctions have been used to develop an NLG metric to measure research performance and trends in 'revolutionary' biomedical science with the aim of identifying the premier revolutionary science research institutions and nations from 1992-2006. I have previously argued that the number of Nobel laureates in the biomedical field should be expanded to about nine per year and the NLG metric attempts to predict the possible results of such an expansion. One hundred and nineteen NLG prizes and awards were made during the past fifteen years (about eight per year) when overlapping awards had been removed. Eighty-five were won by the USA, revealing a massive domination in revolutionary biomedical science by this nation; the UK was second with sixteen awards; Canada had five, Australia four and Germany three. The USA had twelve elite centres of revolutionary biomedical science, with University of Washington at Seattle and MIT in first position with six awards and prizes each; Rockefeller University and Caltech were jointly second placed with five. Surprisingly, Harvard University--which many people rank as the premier world research centre--failed to reach the threshold of three prizes and awards, and was not included in the elite list. The University of Oxford, UK, was the only institution outside of the USA which featured as a significant centre of revolutionary biomedical science. Long-term success at the highest level of revolutionary biomedical science (and probably other sciences) probably requires a sufficiently large number of individually-successful large institutions in open competition with one another--as in the USA. If this model cannot be replicated within smaller nations, then it implies

  5. Pat Thiel talks about attending the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Pat Thiel, Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, was invited to be a guest at the ceremony on December 10th, in Stockholm, Sweden, where Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory scientist, received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Following her return to the Lab, Thiel shared some of her recollections of the momentous event.

  6. Pat Thiel talks about attending the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony

    ScienceCinema

    Thiel, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Pat Thiel, Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, was invited to be a guest at the ceremony on December 10th, in Stockholm, Sweden, where Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory scientist, received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Following her return to the Lab, Thiel shared some of her recollections of the momentous event.

  7. The matilda effect in science: awards and prizes in the US, 1990s and 2000s.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Anne E; Pincus, Stephanie; Koster, Janet Bandows; Leboy, Phoebe S

    2012-04-01

    Science is stratified, with an unequal distribution of research facilities and rewards among scientists. Awards and prizes, which are critical for shaping scientific career trajectories, play a role in this stratification when they differentially enhance the status of scientists who already have large reputations: the 'Matthew Effect'. Contrary to the Mertonian norm of universalism--the expectation that the personal attributes of scientists do not affect evaluations of their scientific claims and contributions--in practice, a great deal of evidence suggests that the scientific efforts and achievements of women do not receive the same recognition as do those of men: the 'Matilda Effect'. Awards in science, technology, engineering and medical (STEM) fields are not immune to these biases. We outline the research on gender bias in evaluations of research and analyze data from 13 STEM disciplinary societies. While women's receipt of professional awards and prizes has increased in the past two decades, men continue to win a higher proportion of awards for scholarly research than expected based on their representation in the nomination pool. The results support the powerful twin influences of implicit bias and committee chairs as contributing factors. The analysis sheds light on the relationship of external social factors to women's science careers and helps to explain why women are severely underrepresented as winners of science awards. The ghettoization of women's accomplishments into a category of 'women-only' awards also is discussed. PMID:22849001

  8. Is the Nobel Prize good for science?

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2013-12-01

    The Nobel Prize is arguably the best known and most prestigious award in science. Here we review the effect of the Nobel Prize and acknowledge that it has had many beneficial effects on science. However, ever since its inaugural year in 1901, the Nobel Prize has also been beset by controversy, mostly involving the selection of certain individuals and the exclusion of others. In this regard, the Nobel Prize epitomizes the winner-takes-all economics of credit allocation and distorts the history of science by personalizing discoveries that are truly made by groups of individuals. The limitation of the prize to only 3 individuals at a time when most scientific discovery is the result of collaborative and cooperative research is arguably the major cause of Nobel Prize controversies. A simple solution to this problem would be to eliminate the restriction on the number of individuals who could be awarded the prize, a measure that would recognize all who contribute, from students to senior investigators. There is precedent for such a change in the Nobel Peace Prize, which has often gone to organizations. Changing the Nobel Prize to more fairly allocate credit would reduce the potential for controversy and directly benefit the scientific enterprise by promoting cooperation and collaboration of scientists within a field to reduce the negative consequences of competition between individual scientists. PMID:24008752

  9. Award for Excellence in Perioperative Nursing--AORN's ultimate prize.

    PubMed

    Voss, S J

    1992-12-01

    Excellence should be part of our daily practice. Through sharing of knowledge, ideas, and information, private excellence is transformed into public excellence and deserves recognition. AORN recognizes that many individuals have and do make a difference in their individual practice settings as well as by their national influence. The importance of recognizing members for their contributions to perioperative nursing is evidenced by the addition of the two new awards and the many other individual awards given by the Association. The importance of peer recognition and participation in the selection process for the awards cannot be underestimated. The Award for Excellence Committee encourages your continued involvement in the nomination process. Excellence is not just for a chosen few! It is something each of us is capable of doing each day. What we need to do now is to recognize it in ourselves and others and to accord those who display this quality the recognition they deserve. PMID:1463328

  10. Fermi Prize: J. Robert Oppenheimer Named to Receive Annual AEC Award.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, J R

    1963-04-12

    The White House announced last week that J. Robert Oppenheimer would be the recipient of the Atomic Energy Commission's 1963 Fermi prize. The prize, which is accompanied by a $50,000 award, is given for "especially meritorious contribution to the development, use or control of atomic energy," and, as such, is strictly a recognition of scientific merit. This fact cannot be overstated. Nevertheless, because of the bitter and emotional controversy that surrounded the removal of Oppenheimer's security clearance in 1954, the Oppenheimer case has come to symbolize the dark hour to which nonconformity and scientific integrity were subjected in the McCarthy era. Oppenheimer's selection for the award is thus widely regarded as an effort by the scientific community and the Kennedy administration to right a long-standing wrong. The following account is an appreciation of Oppenheimer, written especially for Science by his colleague, Hans Bethe, of Cornell University. PMID:17819826

  11. Looking back at the John Mitchell Crouch Fellowship: the most prestigious research award of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Boult, Margaret; Babidge, Wendy; Pleass, Susan; Scott, David

    2015-10-01

    The John Mitchell Crouch Fellowship is a generous endowment made to the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) by the young neurosurgeon's family, following his death from a brain tumour. In this article, we examine the significance and legacy of the grant since its inception in 1979. This is the highest level of research fellowship awarded by the RACS recognizing early career excellence, as part of its significant research funding programme (over $1.7 million in 2015). John Mitchell Crouch recipients have been pioneers in various areas of medicine where they have developed new technologies, established research centres, improved patient safety and military surgery and embraced evidence-based medicine. The funds they received have directly contributed to research published in numerous highly respected peer-reviewed journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine; established new laboratories, helped fund clinical trials and allowed new directions of research to be pursued. Recipients of the John Mitchell Crouch Fellowship have been recognized with many awards including 11 Australian and New Zealand Honours to date. Many other significant research funds have been subsequently bestowed, including over 120 National Health Medical Research Council (NHMRC) grants to Australian and New Zealand recipients subsequent to their Fellowship. This article also shows the range of disciplines in which the award has supported cutting-edge research leading to benefits for patients and health care. PMID:26183706

  12. RAS Awards and Prizes: RAS Awards 2009; Gold Medal: Prof. David Williams; Gold Medal: Prof. Eric Priest; Price Medal: Prof. Malcolm Sambridge; Eddington Medal: Prof. James Pringle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    Each year the RAS recognizes outstanding achievement in astronomy and geophysics by the award of medals and prizes. Candidates are nominated by Fellows and the awards made by a committee of Fellows, ensuring that these scientists have earned the respect and admiration of their peers in the research community. The Gold Medal for Astronomy is awarded to Prof. David Williams of University College London. The Gold Medal for Geophysics is awarded to Prof. Eric Priest of the University of St Andrews. The Price Medal is awarded to Prof. Malcolm Sambridge of the Australian National University. The Eddington Medal is given to Prof. James Pringle of the University of Cambridge.

  13. Society News: PhD theses could win prizes; Last chance for IYA2009 grants; New Fellows; RAS Fellows win prizes; Need a job? Need staff? RAS Library Saturdays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-08-01

    Fellows who are PhD student supervisors should be on the lookout for exceptionally good work from research students submitting their theses this year, for nomination for the RAS Michael Penston Astronomy Prize and the RAS Keith Runcorn Prize. The RAS is offering one last chance to apply for grants towards International Year of Astronomy activities, but you'll have to apply soon. The Society sends congratulations to Fellows of the RAS who have recently received prestigious awards for their work.

  14. Announcing the winner of the John J. Sciarra IJGO Prize Paper Award for 2014.

    PubMed

    Adanu, Richard M K

    2015-06-01

    The editors of the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics (IJGO) are pleased to announce the winner of the prize paper award for the best clinical research paper from a low- or middle-income country published in the IJGO during 2014. The winning paper is: Dan K. Kaye, Othman Kakaire, Annettee Nakimuli, Scovia N. Mbalinda,Michael O. Osinde, Nelson Kakande. Survivors' understanding of vulnerability and resilience to maternal near-miss obstetric events in Uganda. Int J Gynecol Obstet 2014;127(3):265–8. It was published in the December 2014 issue of the IJGO. PMID:25920580

  15. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    PubMed

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character. PMID:27256150

  16. Why there should be more science Nobel prizes and laureates - And why proportionate credit should be awarded to institutions.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The four science Nobel prizes (physics, chemistry, medicine/physiology and economics) have performed extremely well as a method of recognizing the highest level of achievement. The prizes exist primarily to honour individuals but also have a very important function in science generally. In particular, the institutions and nations which have educated, nurtured or supported many Nobel laureates can be identified as elite in world science. However, the limited range of subjects and a maximum of 12 laureates per year mean that many major scientific achievements remain un-recognized; and relatively few universities can gather sufficient Nobel-credits to enable a precise estimate of their different levels of quality. I advocate that the Nobel committee should expand the number of Nobel laureates and Prize categories as a service to world science. (1) There is a large surplus of high quality prize candidates deserving of recognition. (2) There has been a vast expansion of research with a proliferation of major sub-disciplines in the existing categories. (3) Especially, the massive growth of the bio-medical sciences has created a shortage of Nobel recognition in this area. (4) Whole new fields of major science have emerged. I therefore suggest that the maximum of three laureates per year should always be awarded in the categories of physics, chemistry and economics, even when these prizes are for diverse and un-related achievements; that the number of laureates in the 'biology' category of physiology or medicine should be increased to six or preferably nine per year; and that two new Prize categories should be introduced to recognize achievements in mathematics and computing science. Together, these measures could increase the science laureates from a maximum of 12 to a minimum of 24, and increase the range of scientific coverage. In future, the Nobel committee should also officially allocate proportionate credit to institutions for each laureate, and a historical task

  17. NRAO Astronomer Wins Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    Dr. Dale Frail, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, has been awarded a prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship, according to the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. The Guggenheim Foundation describes its fellowships as "mid-career" awards "intended for men and women who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts." Frail, 48, has worked at the NRAO for more than 20 years, first as a postdoctoral fellow, and then as a staff scientist. He received his bachelor's degree in physics from Acadia University in Nova Scotia, and his Ph.D in astronomy from the University of Toronto. Frail is best known for his landmark contributions to the understanding of gamma ray bursts, making critical measurements that provided key insights into the mechanisms of these superenergetic and once-mysterious explosions. He also has made important contributions to the understanding of other astronomical phenomena, including pulsars and their neighborhoods, supernova remnants, and magnetars. In 1992, he was the co-discoverer, with Alex Wolszczan, of the first planets outside our own solar system. "We congratulate Dale on this well-deserved honor that recognizes not only his past achievements but also his potential for exciting scientific work in the future," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. "We're very proud to see one of our scientists receive such a great honor," Lo added. Frail is one of 180 recipients of this year's Guggenheim Fellowships, chosen from some 3,000 applicants. The fellowships were established in 1925 and past recipients include photographer Ansel Adams, author Saul Bellow, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, and chemist Linus Pauling. 102 Guggenheim Fellows have subsequently won Nobel Prizes, and others have received Pulitzer Prizes and other honors. As a Guggenheim Fellow, Frail intends to intensify his research in the areas of pulsars

  18. Therapeutic Pneumothorax and the Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Polianski, Igor J

    2015-08-01

    At the turn of the 20th century, the epidemic proportions of tuberculosis puzzled great parts the scientific community. Thus it is not surprising that well-known scholars who worked on particularly promising solutions to fight the disease were nominated for the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, perhaps the most prestigious benchmark of scientific excellence. The authors have gathered files on the Italian phtisiologist Carlo Forlanini (1847 to 1918) at the Nobel Prize archive for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden. Drawing on these files and contemporary publications, the authors discuss the origin of artificial pneumothorax for treating pulmonary tuberculosis, show how it became an international gold standard operation, and trace why the Nobel committee finally chose not to award Forlanini. Twenty Nobel Prize nominations for Forlanini were submitted from 1912 to 1919 exclusively by Italian scholars. In 1913 and 1914, Forlanini was on the shortlist of the Nobel Committee and thus one of the prime candidates for the prestigious prize. Important aspects of the rise, fall, and revival of the artificial pneumothorax from 1815 to 2015 are highlighted along with its benefits and risks. PMID:26234863

  19. The van Niel International Prize for Studies in Bacterial Systematics awarded in 2014 to Nikos C. Kyrpides.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    The Senate of the University of Queensland is pleased to present the van Niel International Prize for Studies in Bacterial Systematics for the triennium 2011-2014 to Dr Nikos C. Kyrpides in recognition of the contributions made to the field of bacterial systematics. The award established by Professor V. B. D. Skerman of the University of Queensland honours the contribution of scholarship in the field of microbiology by Professor Cornelis Bernardus van Niel. PMID:26184666

  20. Ambitious Colleges End the Ivy Lock on Prestigious Fellowships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownstein, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Describes how Rhodes scholarships and other prestigious awards, once dominated by the Ivy League, are going to other colleges. Winning institutions are employing special advisers and programs to prepare competitors and lure top students and big donors. (EV)

  1. Prize Recipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    The John Bardeen Prize is awarded for theoretical work that has provided significant insights on the nature of superconductivity and has led to verifiable predictions. It is sponsored by the Dresdner Bank.

  2. The van Niel International Prize for Studies in Bacterial Systematics, awarded by The University of Queensland Awarded in 2011 to George M. Garrity.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    The Senate of The University of Queensland, on the recommendation of a panel of experts of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes, is pleased to present the van Niel International Prize for Studies in Bacterial Systematics for the triennium 2009-2011 to Professor George M. Garrity in recognition of his contribution made to the field of bacterial systematics. The award, established in 1986 by Professor V. B. D. Skerman of The University of Queensland, honours the contribution of scholarship in the field of microbiology by Professor Cornelis Bernardus van Niel. PMID:21900697

  3. The question of nepotism in the award of Nobel prizes: a critique of the view of Hans Krebs.

    PubMed

    Sri Kantha, S

    1991-01-01

    While reviewing his development as a scientist, in 1967, Hans Krebs traced his scientific geneology to the von Baeyer 'family'. Almost every other member of this scientific family became a Nobel laureate. Krebs was of the opinion that there was no nepotism in the selection of the Nobel awards. This paper presents evidence, based on the recently released census of Nobel nominees and nominators for the chemistry prize between 1901 and 1937, that the von Baeyer 'family' of scientists had in fact practised a sort of 'nomination-nepotism'. PMID:2056924

  4. Children's Literature Awards and Winners: A Directory of Prizes, Authors, and Illustrators. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dolores Blythe

    Updating and augmenting a first edition published in 1983, this book provides a comprehensive guide to awards granted in English-speaking countries for excellence in children's literature. Included in the book are awards presented to an author or illustrator for his or her body of work, awards presented for a particular title, and awards presented…

  5. Should We Beware of Donors Bearing Book Prizes?: Questioning the Walden Award.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Dirk P.

    1997-01-01

    Amelia E. Walden has offered the American Library Association $50,000 to establish a young adult book award in her name. This article examines the controversy surrounding the proposed award, focusing on two of its requirements: popularity, and a positive approach to life. Questions the need for another award and challenges the appropriateness of…

  6. Mega-prizes in medicine: big cash awards may stimulate useful and rapid therapeutic innovation.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    Following Horrobin's suggestion of 1986, I argue that offering very large prizes (tens of millions of US dollars, or more) for solving specific therapeutic problems, would be an excellent strategy for promoting the rapid development of effective new treatments. The two mainstream ways of paying for medical research are funding the process with grants or funding the outcome via patent protection. When grants are used to fund the process of research the result tends to be 'pure' science, guided by intrinsic scientific objectives. Practical results, such as useful therapeutic advances, are a by-product. Patent-seeking research, by contrast, is more focused on technology than science. It seeks practical results; and aims to pay for itself (and make a profit) in the long term by generating a patentable product or procedure. Prize-seeking research is subject to different incentives and applicable to different situations than either process-funded or patent-seeking research. Prize seeking researchers have a strong incentive to solve the specified problem as rapidly as possible, but the problem may be solved using old ideas that are scientifically mundane or unpatentable technologies and methods. Prizes therefore seem to generate solutions which are incremental extensions, new applications or novel combinations of already-existing technologies. The main use of mega-prizes in medicine would be to accelerate therapeutic progress in stagnant fields of research and to address urgent problems. For example, medical charities focused on specific diseases should consider accumulating their resources until they can offer a mega-prize for solving a clinical problem of special concern to their patients. Prize money should be big enough to pay for the research and development, the evaluation of the new treatment in a clinical trial, and with a large profit left-over to compensate for the intrinsic risk of competing. Sufficiently large amounts of money, and the prestige and publicity

  7. Nobel prize: 3 named for medicine, physiology award (George Wald, Ragnar Granit and Haldan Keffer Hartline).

    PubMed

    Dolwing, J E; Ratliff, F

    1967-10-27

    Three scientists, George Wald, Ragnar Granit, and Haldan Keffer Hartline, were named last week to share the 1967 Nobel prize in medicine or physiology. Wald is professor of biology at Harvard University. Granit is retired director of the Neurophysiological Institute of the Royal Medical School in Stockholm; at present he is serving as a visiting professor at St. Catherine's College in Oxford. Hartline is professor of biophysics at Rockefeller University. The following are appreciations and descriptions of Wald's work by John E. Dowling and of Granit's and Hartline's work by Floyd Ratliff. PMID:4860394

  8. [The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003 awarded for discoveries concerning molecular channels in cell membranes].

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, C D

    2003-12-27

    About 70% of the human body consists of salt water. The Nobel Prize 2003 in Chemistry rewards Peter Agre for the discovery of water channels and Roderick MacKinnon for structural and mechanistic studies of ion channels. Their studies have demonstrated how ions and water are transported through cell membranes. This transport is essential for the regulation of size and osmotic pressure in cells and organelles and it plays a major role in salt and water homoeostasis and in the generation of electrical signals in nerve cells. Agre succeeded in isolating a membrane protein which later studies revealed to be a long-postulated water channel, MacKinnon succeeded in determining the spatial structure of a potassium channel. PMID:14723023

  9. First Calderón Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundell, William; Somersalo, Erkki

    2008-07-01

    The Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) awarded the first Calderón Prize to Matti Lassas for his outstanding contributions to the field of inverse problems, especially in geometric inverse problems. The Calderón Prize is given to a researcher under the age of 40 who has made distinguished contributions to the field of inverse problems broadly defined. The first Calderón Prize Committee consisted of Professors Adrian Nachman, Lassi Päivärinta, William Rundell (chair), and Michael Vogelius. William Rundell For the Calderón Prize Committee Prize ceremony The ceremony awarding the Calderón Prize. Matti Lassas is on the left. He and William Rundell are on the right. Photos by P Stefanov. Brief Biography of Matti Lassas Matti Lassas was born in 1969 in Helsinki, Finland, and studied at the University of Helsinki. He finished his Master's studies in 1992 in three years and earned his PhD in 1996. His PhD thesis, written under the supervision of Professor Erkki Somersalo was entitled `Non-selfadjoint inverse spectral problems and their applications to random bodies'. Already in his thesis, Matti demonstrated a remarkable command of different fields of mathematics, bringing together the spectral theory of operators, geometry of Riemannian surfaces, Maxwell's equations and stochastic analysis. He has continued to develop all of these branches in the framework of inverse problems, the most remarkable results perhaps being in the field of differential geometry and inverse problems. Matti has always been a very generous researcher, sharing his ideas with his numerous collaborators. He has authored over sixty scientific articles, among which a monograph on inverse boundary spectral problems with Alexander Kachalov and Yaroslav Kurylev and over forty articles in peer reviewed journals of the highest standards. To get an idea of the wide range of Matti's interests, it is enough to say that he also has three US patents on medical imaging applications. Matti is

  10. "Highly qualified loser"? Harvey Cushing and the Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Schlich, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Neurosurgery, in particular surgery of the brain, was recognized as one of the most spectacular transgressions of the traditional limits of surgical work. With their audacious, technically demanding, laboratory-based, and highly promising new interventions, prominent neurosurgeons were primary candidates for the Nobel Prize. Accordingly, neurosurgical pioneers such as Victor Horsley and, in particular, Harvey Cushing continued to be nominated for the prize. However, only António Egas Moniz was eventually awarded the prestigious award in 1949 for the introduction of frontal lobotomy, an intervention that would no longer be prize-worthy from today's perspective. Horsley and Cushing, who were arguably the most important proponents of early neurosurgery, remained "highly qualified losers," as such cases have been called. This paper examines the nominations, reviews, and discussions kept in the Nobel Archives to understand the reasons for this remarkable choice. At a more general level, the authors use the example of neurosurgery to explore the mechanisms of scientific recognition and what could be called the enacting of excellence in science and medicine. PMID:25554824

  11. Our Own Pulitzer Prizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmon, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    A school board member in Gilman, Wisconsin, started a literary awards program to improve student writing. Students compete for prizes, and at the end of each year the winning entries are published in a literary magazine. (MLF)

  12. Breakthrough Prize for LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    A special Breakthrough Prize has been awarded to the 1000 scientists and engineers working on the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO) for the discovery of gravitational waves.

  13. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes

    PubMed Central

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards. PMID:25055817

  14. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes.

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-09-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards. PMID:25055817

  15. EDITORIAL: Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2003 awarded to Paul Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield for discoveries concerning magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Martin O.

    2004-02-01

    The award of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine recognizes discoveries concerning the use of magnetic resonance to visualize different structures. The Assembly's decision to recognize the discoveries underpinning efficient spatial mapping of biological properties reflects the singular importance of imaging to the medical application of this technique. Without this, abnormalities in morphology cannot be recognized. Equally, the wealth of physiological information that can be obtained by manipulation of the magnetic resonance signal is of little value unless localized to identified organs, pathology or areas of tissue. Based on these early discoveries, a wide range of imaging and measurement techniques, together with enabling instrumentation, have been developed over the last 30 years. Commercial equipment became available in the early 1980s, and some 60 million MRI examinations are now performed each year. The power of the technique, and the range of applications, continues to develop rapidly. The full text of this editorial is given in the PDF file below.

  16. James P. Allison received the 2014 Szent-Györgi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie; Scully, Peter; Ba, Sujuan

    2014-01-01

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award established by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)—a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that is committed to supporting innovative cancer research on the global scale that aims to cure cancer. Each year, the Szent-Györgyi Prize honors an outstanding researcher whose original discoveries have expanded our understanding of cancer and resulted in notable advances in cancer prevention, diagnosis, or treatment. The prize also promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. This report highlights the history and mission of the Szent-Györgyi Prize, its role in promoting discovery-oriented cancer research, and the pioneering work led by the 2014 prize winner, Dr. James Allison. Dr. Allison's work in the area of cancer immunotherapy led to the successful development of immune checkpoint therapy, and the first drug approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:25189714

  17. BHP Billiton Science Teacher Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chittleborough, Gail; Campbell, Coral

    2012-01-01

    The prestigious BHP Billiton Science Teacher Awards are awarded annually to one teacher from each state of Australia. The awards recognise and value the time and effort that teachers give to the profession and to students conducting scientific research projects. This paper examines the Science Award scheme to identify the characteristics common to…

  18. No Silver Medal for Nobel Prize Contenders: Why Anesthesia Pioneers Were Nominated for but Denied the Award.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Fangerau, Heiner; Tuffs, Annette; Polianski, Igor J

    2016-07-01

    Taking the examples of the pioneers Carl Ludwig Schleich, Carl Koller, and Heinrich Braun, this article provides a first exploratory account of the history of anesthesiology and the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine. Besides the files collected at the Nobel Archive in Sweden, which are presented here for the first time, this article is based on medical literature of the early 20th century. Using Nobel Prize nominations and Nobel committee reports as points of departure, the authors discuss why no anesthesia pioneer has received this coveted trophy. These documents offer a new perspective to explore and to better understand aspects of the history of anesthesiology in the first half of the 20th century. PMID:26982509

  19. Nobel Prize 2012: Haroche & Wineland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Iulia

    2012-11-01

    The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems".

  20. Special issue: Culham Thesis Prize winners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Culham Thesis Prize is awarded annually to the nominee who has displayed an excellence in the execution of the scientific method as witnessed by the award of Doctor of Philosophy in Plasma Science from a UK or Irish university. The thesis content should exhibit significant new work and originality, clearly driven by the nominee, be well explained and demonstrate a good understanding of the subject. The prize is awarded at the Institute of Physics Plasma Physics Group Spring Conference and the prize winner gives an invited talk about their thesis work. The prize is sponsored by Culham Centre for Fusion Energy.

  1. In Brief: Trieste Prize nominations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-12-01

    Nominations for the 2008 Trieste Science Prize in Earth, space, ocean, and atmospheric sciences and in engineering sciences are being accepted through 31 January 2008. The prize has been established to give international recognition and visibility to outstanding scientific achievements made by scientists from developing countries. Candidates must be nationals of developing countries, and the prizes will only be awarded to individuals for scientific research of outstanding international merit carried out at institutions in developing countries. The prizes, each of which carries a US$50,000 monetary award, are administered by the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS) and funded by Illycaffè in collaboration with the Trieste (Italy) Town Council and the Trieste International Foundation for Scientific Progress and Freedom. For more information, contact the TWAS Secretariat at prizes@twas.org.

  2. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  3. The 2010 Broad Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  4. Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy has awarded the 1999 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Ahmed H. Zewail (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA) "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy". Zewail's work has taken the study of the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions to the ultimate degree of detail - the time scale of bond making and bond breaking.

  5. Frederick W. Alt received the 2015 Szent-Györgi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Scully, Peter; Zhao, Jie; Ba, Sujuan

    2016-01-01

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award established by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)-a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that is committed to supporting scientific research and public education relating to the prevention, early diagnosis, better treatments, and ultimately, a cure for cancer. Each year, the Szent-Györgyi Prize honors an outstanding researcher, nominated by colleagues or peers, who has contributed outstanding, significant research to the fight against cancer, and whose accomplishments have helped improve treatment options for cancer patients. The Prize also promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. This report highlights the pioneering work led by the 2015 Prize winner, Dr. Frederick Alt. Dr. Alt's work in the area of cancer genetics over four decades has helped to shape the very roots of modern cancer research. His work continues to profoundly impact the approaches that doctors around the globe use to diagnose and treat cancer. In particular, his seminal discoveries of gene amplification and his pioneering work on molecular mechanisms of DNA damage repair have helped to usher in the era of genetically targeted therapy and personalized medicine. PMID:26843073

  6. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  7. Optics pioneers scoop Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Three physicists who carried out pioneering work in former industrial research labs have picked up this year's Nobel Prize for Physics. One half of the SEK 10m prize has been awarded to Charles Kao, 75, for his work at the UK-based Standard Telephones and Cables (STC) on the transmission of light in optical fibres, which underpinned the telecommunications revolution. The other half of the prize is shared between Willard Boyle, 85, and George Smith, 79, of Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, US, for inventing the charge-coupled device (CCD) - an imaging semiconductor circuit that forms the basis of most digital cameras.

  8. Stephen Hawking bags big new 3m physics prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2013-01-01

    A massive 3m in prize money has gone to the British cosmologist Stephen Hawking for his work on black holes, quantum gravity and the early universe. The award is one of two "special fundamental physics prizes" from the Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation, which was set up earlier this year by the Russian physicist-turned-entrepreneur Yuri Milner.

  9. The 2006 Broad Prize for Urban Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad Foundation, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The $1 million Broad Prize in Urban Education is the nation's largest award in K-12 public education. The Broad Prize is given annually by The Broad Foundation in the form of scholarships to urban school districts that demonstrate the greatest overall performance and improvement in student achievement while reducing achievement gaps among ethnic…

  10. Broad Prize: Do the Successes Spread?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    When the Broad Prize for Urban Education was created in 2002, billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad said he hoped the awards, in addition to rewarding high-performing school districts, would foster healthy competition; boost the prestige of urban education, long viewed as dysfunctional; and showcase best practices. Over the 10 years the prize has…

  11. The Orthoworld Specialist Practitioner Prize Cases 2000.

    PubMed

    Johal, A

    2002-12-01

    This paper describes the orthodontic management of three diverse malocclusions that were awarded the Orthoworld Specialist Practitioner Prize (2000) and presented at the British Orthodontic Conference in Harrogate 2001. PMID:12444265

  12. Scientists share nobel prize for "nanoscopy".

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    Three scientists were awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their contributions to developing super-resolved fluorescence microscopy, which allows biologists to study cells on a nanometer scale. PMID:25477087

  13. Nobel Prize 2014: Akasaki, Amano & Nakamura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, Joerg

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources."

  14. Nobel Prize 2011: Perlmutter, Schmidt & Riess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Alison

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter, Brian Schmidt and Adam Riess, "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae".

  15. Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Celebrating optical nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrit, Michel

    2014-12-01

    The award of this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry to the pioneers of various optical schemes capable of achieving super-resolution and single-molecule detection is recognition of a revolution in optical imaging.

  16. The Brain Prize 2011

    PubMed Central

    Soltesz, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Foundation awarded the inaugural Brain Prize 2011 to Péter Somogyi, Tamás Freund and György Buzsáki ‘for their wide-ranging, technically and conceptually brilliant research on the functional organization of neuronal circuits in the cerebral cortex, especially in the hippocampus, a region that is crucial for certain forms of memory’. The present article highlights key findings and major conceptual contributions by these three scientists that were recognized by the award. PMID:21917323

  17. CASE Recognition Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A total of 294 schools, colleges, and universities received prizes in this year's CASE Recognition program. Awards were given in: public relations programs, student recruitment, marketing, program pulications, news writing, fund raising, radio programming, school periodicals, etc. (MLW)

  18. IPRO, New York Q10, wins prestigious quality award.

    PubMed

    2007-05-01

    Registration to the ISO-9001 Quality System Standard helps QIO stand out. IPRO leaders say they have to walk the 'quality walk' if they are to serve hospitals. Organization stresses effective employee communications, training, and rewards and recognition. PMID:17515017

  19. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Addison

    2002-05-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded shares of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2001 to three scientists for their development of methods for the efficient catalytic production of just one member of a pair of enantiomers. One-half of the prize was divided equally between William S. Knowles and Ryoji Noyori. The other half of the prize was awarded to K. Barry Sharpless. This paper briefly discusses their discoveries and the significance of the discoveries. It includes an annotated bibliography of their most relevant and easily obtained publications.

  20. Citations Prize 2010 Citations Prize 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2010-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Photograph of the 2010 Citations Prize winners The winning authors Fernando Rannou (left), George Alexandrakis (holding the Rotblat Medal) and Arion Chatziioannou (right). The winner of the 2010 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2005-2009) is Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by use of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system: a computer simulation feasibility study Authors: George Alexandrakis, Fernando R Rannou and Arion F Chatziioannou Reference: George Alexandrakis et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4225-41 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/44334). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher

  1. A prize for membrane magic.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof "for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells". I present a personal view of the membrane trafficking field, highlighting the contributions of these three Nobel laureates in a historical context. PMID:24315088

  2. Cosmic pioneers scoop Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize for Physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, US, Adam Riess at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and Brian Schmidt from the Australian National University, Weston Creek, "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae".

  3. A Prize for Membrane Magic

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof “for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells”. I present a personal view of the membrane trafficking field, highlighting the contributions of these three Nobel laureates in a historical context. PMID:24315088

  4. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: a large-scale prize for achievements on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Daniel

    2014-12-17

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of superresolved fluorescence microscopy" can be seen as a combined prize for single-molecule detection and superresolution imaging. Neurons, arguably the most morphologically complex cell type, are the subject of choice for this application, now generically called "nanoscopy." PMID:25521373

  5. News Conference: Brecon hosts 10th teacher's conference Summer school: Science summer school heads to Crete Award: The Corti Science Prize Radioactivity: Scottish beach is no beta off Workshop: Heureka project promotes teaching Experiments: Spanish project proves that learning science can be exciting Lecture: IOP schools lecture journeys from x-rays to antimatter Correction to the news item 'Delegates experience universality' Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-01-01

    Conference: Brecon hosts 10th teacher's conference Summer school: Science summer school heads to Crete Award: The Corti Science Prize Radioactivity: Scottish beach is no beta off Workshop: Heureka project promotes teaching Experiments: Spanish project proves that learning science can be exciting Lecture: IOP schools lecture journeys from x-rays to antimatter Correction to the news item 'Delegates experience universality' Forthcoming events

  6. Citations Prize 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2014-06-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat, a Nobel Prize winner who also was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winner of the 2013 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous five years (2008-2012) is Figure. Figure. Four of the prize winning authors. From left to right: Thomas Istel (Philips), Jens-Peter Schlomka (with medal, MorphoDetection), Ewald Roessl (Philips), and Gerhard Martens (Philips). Title: Experimental feasibility of multi-energy photon-counting K-edge imaging in pre-clinical computed tomography Authors: Jens Peter Schlomka1, Ewald Roessl1, Ralf Dorscheid2, Stefan Dill2, Gerhard Martens1, Thomas Istel1, Christian Bäumer3, Christoph Herrmann3, Roger Steadman3, Günter Zeitler3, Amir Livne4 and Roland Proksa1 Institutions: 1 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Hamburg, Germany 2 Philips Research Europe, Engineering & Technology, Aachen, Germany 3 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Aachen, Germany 4 Philips Healthcare, Global Research and Advanced Development, Haifa, Israel Reference: Schlomka et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 4031-47 This paper becomes the first to win both this citations prize and also the PMB best paper prize (The Roberts Prize), which it won for the year 2008. Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found in this medicalphysicsweb article from the time of the Roberts Prize win (http://medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/39907). The author's enthusiasm for their prototype spectral CT system has certainly been reflected in the large number of citations the paper subsequently has

  7. The 2007 Broad Prize for Urban Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The $1 million Broad Prize in Urban Education, the nation's largest K-12 public education award given annually by The Broad Foundation, is awarded to urban school districts that demonstrate the greatest overall performance and improvement in student achievement while reducing income and ethnic achievement gaps. One hundred of the largest urban…

  8. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Quick Facts Nomination Nomination Physics Prize Chemistry ... Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Nomination Archive Ceremonies Ceremonies Ceremony Archive Nobel ...

  9. New AGU Climate Communication Prize: Call for nominations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2011-08-01

    AGU is pleased to announce the newly launched AGU Climate Communication Prize. This new Union prize, generously funded by Nature's Own, a purveyor of fossils, minerals, and handcrafted jewelry in Boulder, Colo., will honor an AGU member-scientist for the communication of climate science. The prize highlights the importance of promoting scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respect and understanding of science-based values as they relate to the implications of climate change. The prize will be awarded annually and will be presented at AGU's Fall Meeting. It will carry a cash award of $25,000.

  10. [Advances in the investigation of structure and function of G protein-coupled receptors (by awarding the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2012 to Robert Lefkowitz and Bryan Kobilka)].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O

    2013-01-01

    The Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2012 was awarded to Robert Lefkowitz and Bryan Kobilka "for studies in G-protein-coupled receptors" (GPCR). In this review the most important discoveries of these Nobel Prize winners dealing with investigation of the structure and functions of GPCR were discussed and analyzed. In the 1980s, they were the first in the world to clone GPCR--the 32-adrenergic receptor. After 20 years, the team led by B. Kobilka for the first time prepared this receptor in the crystalline form and established its three-dimensional structure. In these studies, unique approaches for purification and crystallization of other receptors were developed. In 1980s, R. Lefkowitz and his colleagues discovered beta-arrestins that regulate signal transduction occurring via GPCR. Later they revealed that beta-arrestins were the most important members of signal transduction and were responsible for the signal transduction from the hormone-activated receptor to intracellular signaling cascades independently of heterotrimeric G-proteins. These and other outstanding discoveries of R. Lefkowitz and B. Kobilka have become the basis for the novel area of molecular biology and pharmacology--the molecular endocrinology of GPCR. PMID:25434187

  11. Plyler Prize and APS Fellow Introductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathanson, Gilbert

    2014-03-01

    The Division of Chemical Physics is delighted to announce the 2013 APS Fellows sponsored by DCP and to honor the 2014 Earl K. Plyler Prize Award winner. The new APS Fellows are: Ilan Benjamin, Hua Guo, Manos Mavrikakis, Josef Paldus, Joern Siepmann, Hans-Peter Steinrueck, Douglas Tobias, Angela Wilson, and Yijing Yan. The citations for each awardee will be read out loud. I will also introduce Prof. Lai-Sheng Wang of the Department of Chemistry at Brown University, who was awarded the 2014 Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics. Please come learn about these extraordinary scientists during this prize session. Prof. Wang's Plyler Prize talk will follow immediately after this introduction. For more information, see http://www.aps.org/units/dcp/.

  12. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Clean Energy Entrepreneurship Prize 2008 Final Report DOE Award # DE-FG36-07GO17110

    SciTech Connect

    2008-08-09

    The MIT Clean Energy Prize was established to accelerate the pace of innovation in the energy space, specifically with regard to clean energy and to reduce our dependence on foreign oil. Through a prize structure designed to incent new ideas to be brought forward coupled with a supporting infrastructure to educate, mentor, network and provide a platform for visibility, it was believed we could achieve this goal in a very efficient and effective manner. The grand prize of $200K was meant to be the highly visible and attractive carrot to achieve this and through a public-private partnership of sponsors who held a long term view (i.e., they were not Venture Capitalists or law firms looking for short term business through advantaged deal flow). It was also designed to achieve this in a highly inclusive manner. Towards this end, while MIT was the platform on which the competition was run, and this brought some instant cache and differentiation, the competition was open to all teams which had at least one US citizen. Both professional teams and student teams were eligible.

  13. Citations Prize 2011 Citations Prize 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Susan Hagness (left) receiving the Rotblat Medal from Robert Jeraj of PMB's Editorial Board (right) on behalf of Mariya Lazebnik. The winner of the 2011 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2006-2010) is A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues obtained from cancer surgeries Authors: Mariya Lazebnik, Dijana Popovic, Leah McCartney, Cynthia B Watkins, Mary J Lindstrom, Josephine Harter, Sarah Sewall, Travis Ogilvie, Anthony Magliocco, Tara M Breslin, Walley Temple, Daphne Mew, John H Booske, Michal Okoniewski and Susan C Hagness Reference: Mariya Lazebnik et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 6093-115 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/47814). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher

  14. Citations Prize 2012 Citations Prize 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-01-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The authors of the winning paper. The authors of the winning paper. The winner of the 2012 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2007-2011) is Image reconstruction in circular cone-beam computed tomography by constrained, total-variation minimization Authors: Emil Y Sidky and Xiaochuan Pan Reference: Emil Y Sidky and Xiaochuan Pan 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 4777-807 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/51868). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Simon Cherry Editor-in-Chief Jon Ruffle Publisher

  15. Templeton Prize again goes to physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeandron, Michelle

    2008-04-01

    The Polish mathematical physicist and former priest Michael Heller has been awarded this year's Templeton Prize. Heller, whose more than 40-year-long career has encompassed research in theology, philosophy, mathematics and cosmology, intends to use the £820 000 prize to found an interuniversity institute in Poland to investigate questions in science, theology and philosophy. Dubbed the "Copernicus Centre", the institute will be affiliated to the Jagiellonian University and the Pontifical Academy of Theology in Cracow.

  16. Particle theorists scoop Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Every year the award of the Nobel Prize for Physics goes through a familiar pattern - a few days' heightened speculation, a warm congratulation and, more often than not, a trailing dispute. This year has been no exception. The three new laureates, whose predictions and concepts on symmetry breaking have become cornerstones of the Standard Model, had long been tipped to win at some point. Makoto Kobayashi, 64, of the KEK lab, and Toshihide Maskawa, 68, of the University of Kyoto, both in Japan, share one half of the SwKr 10m (about £800 000) prize for their work in 1972 on the mechanism of broken symmetry, which led to the prediction of a new family of quarks. Yoichiro Nambu, 87, of the University of Chicago in the US, wins the other half of the prize for realizing in 1960 how to apply spontaneous symmetry breaking to particle physics.

  17. Society News: Fellow sets new world record; RAS thesis prize winners; Galileo in the courtyard; Need a room? Society announces new award for early-career researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    Generous sponsorship from Winton Capital Management has made possible two new RAS Awards, to be given annually to postdoctoral researchers who have made outstanding progress in the years immediately after their PhD.

  18. [The 2008 Nobel Prizes in medicine and physiology].

    PubMed

    Valdespino, José Luis; Ponce-de-León, Samuel; de Lourdes Garcia, María

    2009-01-01

    For the last century, the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine has been awarded worldwide to significant discoveries. The prize allows the dissemination of information on the achievements of recipients, promotes understanding of scientific knowledge among the public and attracts young students to biomedical research. This paper briefly describes the prizes granted to the fields of physiology and medicine, emphasizing those that related to development of vaccines. PMID:19685833

  19. Citations Prize 2009 Citations Prize 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Photograph of the 2009 Citations Prize winners Some of the winning authors with their certificates, and Christian Morel with the Rotblat Medal, at the award ceremony in Orsay, near Paris. From left to right are Corinne Groiselle, Lydia Maigne, David Brasse, Irène Buvat, Dimitris Visvikis, Giovanni Santin, Uwe Pietrzyk, Pierre-François Honore, Christian Morel, Sébastien Jan and Arion Chatziioannou. The winner of the 2009 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2004-2008) is GATE: a simulation toolkit for PET and SPECT Authors: S Jan, G Santin, D Strul, S Staelens, K Assié, D Autret, S Avner, R Barbier, M Bardiès, P M Bloomfield, D Brasse, V Breton, P Bruyndonckx, I Buvat, A F Chatziioannou, Y Choi, Y H Chung, C Comtat, D Donnarieix, L Ferrer, S J Glick, C J Groiselle, D Guez, P-F Honore, S Kerhoas-Cavata, A S Kirov, V Kohli, M Koole, M Krieguer, D J van der Laan, F Lamare, G Largeron, C Lartizien, D Lazaro, M C Maas, L Maigne, F Mayet, F Melot, C Merheb, E Pennacchio, J Perez, U Pietrzyk, F R Rannou, M Rey, D R Schaart, C R Schmidtlein, L~Simon, T Y Song, J-M Vieira, D Visvikis, R Van de Walle, E Wieörs and C Morel Reference: S Jan et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4543-61 Since its publication in 2004 this article has received over 200 citations. This extremely high figure is a testament to the great influence and usefulness of the work to the nuclear medicine community. More discussion of the winning paper can be found on

  20. Nobel physics prize to Charpak for inventing particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzschild, B.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Georges Charpak of France leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Nobel Prize was awarded to Charpak [open quotes]for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber.[close quotes] Historical aspects of Charpak's life and research are given.

  1. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Andrew ML; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus infection and cervical carcinoma. PMID:18854052

  2. Defining physics: The Nobel Prize selection process, 1901-1937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, James

    1991-02-01

    The great prestige of the Nobel Prizes has come virtually to define physics in the public mind. An examination of the nominations and the selections in the first 37 years of Nobel awards shows that those in charge of the selections went through a process of development as they refined their conceptions of the kind of work appropriate to be rewarded. Analyses are presented of the 1800 nominations made by 448 nominators for 213 scientists, of whom 44 received physics prizes between 1901 and 1937, 10 more who were awarded Nobel Prizes in physics after 1937, and 12 in chemistry, although nominated also in physics.

  3. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Onder; Yalcin, Can Ege; Erkent, Mahmut Alp; Demirci, Mert; Uysal, Sanem Pinar; Ay, Nur Zeynep; Omeroglu, Asena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR) field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31%) in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of laureates in Literature (p<0.001). Since the Second World War, US-affiliated scientists have dominated the Nobel prizes (53%); however before 1945, German scientists did so (p=0.005). The new antimicrobials received Nobel prizes until 1960; however no treatment study was awarded the Prize until the discovery of artemisinin and ivermectin, for which the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2015. Collaborative works have increasingly been appreciated. In the future, more female laureates would be expected in the IDR field. Medical graduates and scientists involved in multi-institutional and multidisciplinary collaborative efforts seem to have an advantage. PMID:26945715

  4. How Einstein Got the Nobel Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pais, Abraham

    1982-01-01

    Discusses why the Nobel Committee for Physics waited so long before giving Einstein the Nobel Prize and why they did not award it for relativity, but for the photoelectric effect instead. Focuses on the judgments of leading scientists who made nominations as well as committee members' decisions. (Author/JN)

  5. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2014.

    PubMed

    Wall, E E van der; Umans, V A W M

    2015-06-01

    At the annual 2015 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2014, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This has been an annual tradition since the year 2006. PMID:25894471

  6. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2013.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E; Umans, V A W M

    2014-05-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2013, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006. PMID:24668222

  7. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2015.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E

    2016-05-01

    At the annual 2016 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original articles published in the year 2015, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006. PMID:27040677

  8. NVVC/NHJ Durrer Prizes 2012.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E; Schalij, M J; Umans, V A W M

    2013-06-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of the best original/review articles published in the year 2012, one paper being more basically-oriented and one paper being more clinically-oriented. This annual tradition exists already since the year 2006. PMID:23579987

  9. Nobel Prize 2013: Englert and Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Alison

    2013-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 has been awarded to François Englert and Peter Higgs "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider".

  10. Prizes for innovation of new medicines and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Love, James; Hubbard, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that prizes can help stimulate medical innovation, control costs and ensure greater access to new medicines and vaccines. The authors explore four increasingly ambitious prize options to reward medical innovation, each addressing flaws in the current patent system. The first option promotes innovation through a large prize fund linked to the impact on health outcomes; the second option rewards the sharing of knowledge, data, and technology with open source dividends; the third option awards prizes for interim benchmarks and discrete technical problems; and the final option removes the exclusive right to use patented inventions in upstream research in favor of prizes. The authors conclude that a system of prizes to reward drug development would break the link between R&D incentives and product prices, and that such a reform is needed to improve innovation and access to new medicines and vaccines. PMID:21950238

  11. Nominations sought for AAAS award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science seeks nominations for its Award for International Scientific Cooperation, which recognizes an individual or small group for outstanding contributions to furthering international cooperation in science or engineering.AAAS presents this award in collaboration with its affiliated organizations in the AAAS Consortium of Affiliates for International Programs. A prize of $2,500, a certificate of citation, and travel expenses to the AAAS annual meeting to receive the award are included.

  12. 29 CFR 778.331 - Awards for performance on the job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Awards for performance on the job. 778.331 Section 778.331 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS... Problems Prizes As Bonuses § 778.331 Awards for performance on the job. Where a prize is awarded for...

  13. 29 CFR 778.331 - Awards for performance on the job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Awards for performance on the job. 778.331 Section 778.331 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS... Problems Prizes As Bonuses § 778.331 Awards for performance on the job. Where a prize is awarded for...

  14. 29 CFR 778.331 - Awards for performance on the job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Awards for performance on the job. 778.331 Section 778.331 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS... Problems Prizes As Bonuses § 778.331 Awards for performance on the job. Where a prize is awarded for...

  15. 29 CFR 778.331 - Awards for performance on the job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Awards for performance on the job. 778.331 Section 778.331 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS... Problems Prizes As Bonuses § 778.331 Awards for performance on the job. Where a prize is awarded for...

  16. 29 CFR 778.331 - Awards for performance on the job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Awards for performance on the job. 778.331 Section 778.331 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS... Problems Prizes As Bonuses § 778.331 Awards for performance on the job. Where a prize is awarded for...

  17. Society News: Welcome to Griffiths Bay; RAS Associate wins Shaw Prize; Postgraduate prize preparations; Council minutes on-line; Birthday Honours; Kavli Prize; New Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    The late Donald Griffiths will be commemorated in the name of a bay on the Antarctic Peninsula. Prof. Reinhard Genzel, Associate of the Society since 1994, Darwin Lecturer in 2007, and Director of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics has been awarded the Shaw Prize in Astronomy for 2008. While postgrad students complete their PhD theses, supervisors should note the deadline for submissions to the annual Michael Penston and Keith Runcorn Prizes.

  18. The UNESCO Prize for Peace Education: Ten Years of Learning for Peace. Peace Education Miniprints, No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Unku Abdul; Reardon, Betty A.

    The UNESCO Prize for Peace Education was established in 1981. The purpose of the award is to honor outstanding contributions to the field of peace education in its most broadly defined sense. In this paper, two members of the international jury for the prize review the recipients of the awards from 1981 to 1991, and thus demonstrate the variety of…

  19. Nobel Awards--Physics and Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pellam, J R; Harker, D

    1962-11-01

    The Swedish Academy of Sciences announced last week that Lev Davidovich Landau, a Soviet scientist, has been awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for his studies of the low-temperature characteristics of helium. It was simultaneously announced that the prize in chemistry has been awarded to two Britons, John Cowdery Kendrew and Max Ferdinand Perutz, of Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, for their studies of protein structure. PMID:17829701

  20. [Space coding: a Nobel prize diary].

    PubMed

    Rondi-Reig, Laure

    2015-02-01

    The Nobel Prize in Medecine or Physiology for 2014 has been awarded to three neuroscientists: John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser for "their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain". This rewards innovative ideas which led to the development of intracerebral recording techniques in freely moving animals, thus providing links between behavior and physiology. This prize highlights how neural activity sustains our ability to localize ourselves and move around in the environment. This research provides key insights on how the brain drives behavior. PMID:25744268

  1. NCI’s Douglas R. Lowy and John T. Schiller awarded Sabin Medal

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists whose discovery provided the technology for commercially developed HPV vaccines were honored with the prestigious Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award at a ceremony held at the Sabin Vaccine Institute, May 18, 2011.

  2. On the Notions "Standard" and "Prestigious" in Arabic Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Muhammad H.

    This paper examines the results of two sociolinguistic studies of the Arabic spoken by men and women in Jordan and Syria in terms of sex differentiation in Arabic. The study reported in this paper proposes that the terms "prestigious" and "standard" should not be used interchangeably; accordingly, it reinterprets the previous findings. It is…

  3. Iranian PhD student wins human-rights prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2013-11-01

    A physicist imprisoned in Iran while on a break from his PhD studies in the US has been awarded a human-rights prize. Omid Kokabee, who had been based at the University of Texas in Austin, has been given the Andrei Sakharov Prize from the American Physical Society (APS) for "his courage in refusing to use his physics knowledge to work on projects that he deemed harmful to humanity, in the face of extreme physical and psychological pressure".

  4. Jeffrey T. Kiehl Receives 2012 Climate Communication Prize: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurrell, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Jeffrey T. Kiehl was awarded the 2012 Climate Communication Prize at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The Climate Communication Prize is funded by Nature's Own, a purveyor of fossils, minerals, and handcrafted jewelry based in Boulder, Colo. The prize honors an "AGU member-scientist for the communication of climate science, and highlights the importance of promoting scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respected and understanding of science-based values as they relate to the implications of climate change."

  5. Polio and Nobel prizes: looking back 50 years.

    PubMed

    Norrby, Erling; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2007-05-01

    In 1954, John Enders, Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue."5370 This discovery provided for the first time opportunities to produce both inactivated and live polio vaccines. By searching previously sealed Nobel Committee archives, we were able to review the deliberations that led to the award. It appears that Sven Gard, who was Professor of Virus Research at the Karolinska Institute and an adjunct member of the Nobel Committee at the time, played a major role in the events leading to the awarding of the Prize. It appears that Gard persuaded the College of Teachers at the Institute to decide not to follow the recommendation by their Nobel Committee to give the Prize to Vincent du Vigneaud. Another peculiar feature of the 1954 Prize is that Weller and Robbins were included based on only two nominations submitted for the first time that year. In his speech at the Nobel Prize ceremony, Gard mentioned the importance of the discovery for the future production of vaccines, but emphasized the implications of this work for growing many different, medically important viruses. We can only speculate on why later nominations highlighting the contributions of scientists such as Jonas Salk, Hilary Koprowski, and Albert Sabin in the development of poliovirus vaccines have not been recognized by a Nobel Prize. PMID:17469121

  6. Vouchers Versus Prizes: Contingency Management Treatment of Substance Abusers in Community Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Marx, Jacqueline; Austin, Mark; Tardif, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions usually use vouchers as reinforcers, but a new technique awards chances of winning prizes. This study compares these approaches. In community treatment centers, 142 cocaine- or heroin-dependent outpatients were randomly assigned to standard treatment (ST), ST with vouchers, or ST with prizes for 12 weeks.…

  7. The History of Molecular Structure Determination Viewed through the Nobel Prizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William P.; Palenik, Gus J.; Suh, Il-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of complex molecular structures. Emphasizes their individual significance through examination of the Nobel Prizes of the 20th century. Highlights prizes awarded to Conrad Rontgen, Francis H.C. Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice H.F. Wilkins, and others. (SOE)

  8. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced Through the Nobel Prizes. 1967: Eigen, Norrish, and Porter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-05-01

    The third Nobel Prize for research in chemical dynamics awarded during the middle decades of the Twentieth Century is reviewed. Manfred Eigen, Ronald Norrish, and George Porter received the Nobel Prize in 1967 "for studies of extremely fast chemical reactions, effected by disturbing the equilibrium by means of very short impulses of energy," i.e., temperature jump, pressure jump, and flash photolysis.

  9. Pioneers in ozone research receive Nobel Prize in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded its 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry to three AGU members for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone. Only one other Nobel prize has ever been awarded in the realm of atmospheric research. The honorees are professors Paul Crutzen of the Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany; Mario Molina of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and F. Sherwood Rowland of the University of California, Irvine. The Academy credits the three with contributing to “our salvation from a global environmental problem that could have catastrophic consequences.”

  10. Maria Goeppert Mayer and the Nobel Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Karen E.

    2013-04-01

    When Maria Goeppert Mayer was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963, she was only the second woman to receive that award and there have been no additional female physics laureates since. Mayer was uniquely prepared to carry out her prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. Furthermore, she worked with some of the most well-known figures in mid-twentieth century physics, and her award came at a time when American science was in ascendance. Why, then, is her name so little known beyond the physics community? There are several possible answers to this question, ranging from the personal (her modest reaction to public acclaim) and the scientific (the mathematically abstract nature of her prize-winning work), to the national (the nature of the issues commanding public attention in the 1960s). In this talk I will present an overview of the circumstances that enabled Mayer to make exceptional contributions to nuclear physics, and then examine some of the possible reasons why her exceptional status is not more widely known.

  11. The First Printz Award Designations: Winners All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimmitt, Jean Pollard

    2001-01-01

    Explains a major new book award, the Michael L. Printz Award honoring the best young adult book. Discusses the first prize-winning book: "Monster" by Walter Dean Myers, and three honor books. Discusses how these books are unusual and outstanding examples of young adult literature--structurally sophisticated with memorable characters who deal with…

  12. [Commentary on the Nobel Prize that has been granted in Medicine-Physiology, Chemistry and Physics to noteable investigators].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Apolinar, Leticia Manuel; Saucedo, Renata; Basurto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was established by Alfred Nobel in 1901 to award people who have made outstanding achievements in physics, chemistry and medicine. So far, from 852 laureates, 45 have been female. Marie Curie was the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize in 1903 for physics and eight years later also for chemistry It is remarkable that her daughter Irene and her husband also received the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935. Other two married couples, Cori and Moser, have also been awarded the Nobel Prize. The present commentary attempts to show the female participation in the progress of scientific activities. PMID:25946543

  13. The Limit of a strong Lobby: Why did August Bier and Ferdinand Sauerbruch never receive the Nobel Prize?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Schagen, Udo

    2014-01-01

    August Bier (1861-1949) and Ferdinand Sauerbruch (1875-1951) have remained two of the most influential figures during the first half of the 20th century in German and even in international surgery. They were jointly awarded Adolf Hitler's German Science Prize in 1937, but never the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, although no other German surgeons were nominated as often as Bier and Sauerbruch for the prestigeful award from 1901 to 1950. This contribution gives an overview of the reasons why and by whom Bier and Sauerbruch were nominated, and discusses the reasons of the Nobel Prize Committee for not awarding them. PMID:25094023

  14. Nuclear Fusion prize laudation Nuclear Fusion prize laudation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, W.

    2011-01-01

    Clean energy in abundance will be of critical importance to the pursuit of world peace and development. As part of the IAEA's activities to facilitate the dissemination of fusion related science and technology, the journal Nuclear Fusion is intended to contribute to the realization of such energy from fusion. In 2010, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the IAEA journal. The excellence of research published in the journal is attested to by its high citation index. The IAEA recognizes excellence by means of an annual prize awarded to the authors of papers judged to have made the greatest impact. On the occasion of the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon, Republic of Korea at the welcome dinner hosted by the city of Daejeon, we celebrated the achievements of the 2009 and 2010 Nuclear Fusion prize winners. Steve Sabbagh, from the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York is the winner of the 2009 award for his paper: 'Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas' [1]. This is a landmark paper which reports record parameters of beta in a large spherical torus plasma and presents a thorough investigation of the physics of resistive wall mode (RWM) instability. The paper makes a significant contribution to the critical topic of RWM stabilization. John Rice, from the Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge is the winner of the 2010 award for his paper: 'Inter-machine comparison of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks' [2]. The 2010 award is for a seminal paper that analyzes results across a range of machines in order to develop a universal scaling that can be used to predict intrinsic rotation. This paper has already triggered a wealth of experimental and theoretical work. I congratulate both authors and their colleagues on these exceptional papers. W. Burkart Deputy Director General Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna

  15. Training Quality: Before and after Winning the Deming Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magennis, Jo P.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Quality Improvement Program developed by Florida Power and Light's Nuclear Training organization that was awarded the Deming Application Prize for quality control. Training quality, team activities, training's role in business planning, customer involvement and evaluation, and continuous improvement of training are discussed. (LRW)

  16. How Robert A. Millikan Got the Physics Nobel Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panusch, Martin; Heering, Peter; Singh, Rajinder

    2010-01-01

    In 1923, R.A. Millikan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the elementary charge of electricity and on the photoelectric effect. Recently, historical research had a focus on Millikan's publication practice, as well as on the role of his assistant, Harvey Fletcher. Several studies have raised doubts on whether Millikan can…

  17. The Nobel Prize in Medicine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Medicine awarded in December 2003 to chemist Paul C. Lauterbur and physicist Peter Mansfield for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a long overdue recognition of the huge impact MRI has had in medical diagnostics and research is mentioned. MRI was derived, and remains an extension of nuclear magnetic resonance…

  18. Student Intern Lands Top Prize in National Science Competition | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Student intern Sam Pritt’s interest in improving geolocation led him to develop a project that won a top regional prize at the Siemens Competition in Math, Science, and Technology in November. Pritt was awarded a $3,000 college scholarship, and he competed in the national competition in early December.

  19. An Elusive Honor: Psychology, Behavior, and the Nobel Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickren, Wade E.

    2003-01-01

    Apart from economics, the human sciences have not generally been rewarded with high honors from the world community. Psychology has been awarded the distinction of a Nobel Prize only when it has served a role in explicating human behavior in relation to economics. Yet psychological science has played no small part in the work of a number of Nobel…

  20. John Hardy is the UK's first Breakthrough Prize laureate.

    PubMed

    Martin, Seamus J

    2015-12-01

    John Hardy, Professor of Neuroscience at University College London and Editorial Board member of The FEBS Journal, has been awarded The Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences in recognition of his work identifying mutations that cause amyloid build-up in the brain--research that has transformed the study of Alzheimer's disease and other major neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26573785

  1. Modular Curriculum: English, American Nobel Prize Winners in Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, James A.

    This independent study module treats those Americans who have been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. They include Sinclair Lewis, Eugene O'Neill, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Pearl Buck. Selections from the writings of these authors are included. Their works represent many literary genres and also…

  2. What’s Behind a Name: The Kaufman Prize of the Canadian Geriatrics Society

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The Kaufman Prize has been given by the Canadian Geriatrics Society for nearly 30 years, but few Society members are aware of who Kaufman was or why the Prize was named after him. They are equally unclear about the objectives established for the Prize and how successful it has been in achieving them. This paper reviews the history of the Kaufman Prize and the eponymous A.R. Kaufman. The original objectives of the award were to encourage clinical research in geriatric medicine and to foster research interest in medical residents. Over the years the Prize has allowed the Society to both recognize and encourage excellence in age-related research among trainees. With the renaming of the Prize, now would be an opportune time for the Society to review both its objectives and its format. PMID:23251314

  3. Historical Account And Branching To Rarefied Gas Dynamics Of Atomic and Molecular Beams : A Continuing And Fascinating Odyssey Commemorated By Nobel Prizes Awarded To 23 Laureates In Physics And Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, Roger

    2005-05-01

    This Historical Account derived in part from D. R. Herschbach was presented as an opening lecture of the Molecular Beam Session organized at the 24th International Symposium on Rarefied Gas Dynamics held in Bari, Italy, in July 2004. The emphasis is on the impressive results due to the molecular beam techniques in the last century. The first section summarizes the historical beam experiments performed by 14 Nobel Prize laureates having used the thermally effusive sources to establish the basic principles of Modern Physics. The second section is on the branching of Molecular Beams to Rarefied Gas Dynamics having permitted to investigate the physics of supersonic free jets and transform the molecular beam techniques. Finally, the last section relates the spectacular molecular beam experiments in helium free jet ultracooling, molecular spectroscopy, chemical reaction dynamics, clustering and modification of low density matter, and biomolecule mass spectrometry, rewarded by nine Nobel Prizes in Chemistry from 1986 to 2002.

  4. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau" (Barcelona,…

  5. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1986: Dudley Herschbach, Yuan Lee, and John Polanyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, J.

    2002-08-01

    The 1986 Nobel Prize was awarded to Dudley Herschbach, Yuan Lee, and John Polanyi for their work extending chemical dynamics to the level of individual atoms and molecules, using molecular beam and infrared chemiluminescence experiments.

  6. Kim Receives 2012 James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daehyun

    2013-08-01

    It is my great honor to be selected as a recipient of the James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award by AGU. I appreciate AGU and the award committee for the award. I first saw Professor Holton's name on his famous textbook when I was an undergraduate student. I remember his book made me think that atmospheric science was fun. I personally regard the prestigious award given to me as an encouraging message from the society, and I also feel that I have to pay back to the society in any way I can.

  7. International award received recognizing anti-HIV spermicide.

    PubMed

    1998-10-19

    Until recently, the only topical microbicide being considered for protection against sexually transmitted HIV infection contains nonoxynol-9 (N-9), a detergent ingredient widely used for more than 30 years in the form of gels, foams, aerosols, creams, sponges, suppositories, films, and foaming tablets. While N-9 has both spermicidal and antibacterial/antiviral properties against pathogens responsible for STDs, including HIV, recent clinical studies have found it to be ineffective in protecting against HIV and other STDs. Moreover, N-9 disrupts cell membranes, damages cervicovaginal epithelia, and causes an acute tissue inflammatory response, thus enhancing the likelihood of HIV infection. There is therefore an urgent need for new, effective, safe, and easy-to-use microbicides with anti-HIV activity lacking detergent-type membrane toxicity. Dr. Osmond D'Cruz et al. of the Hughes Institute in St. Paul, Minnesota, have developed an anti-HIV spermicide with the potential of becoming the active ingredient in many beneficial products. Its lead compound is 400 times more potent than N-9 against HIV and at least 10 times more potent than N-9 as a spermicide. These dual-function compounds are non-inflammatory by their nature. Hughes et al.'s discovery is expected to enter human clinical trials within 12 months. A clinical paper describing their achievement won the prestigious Prize Paper Award for the Plenary Session of the Conjoint 16th World Congress on Fertility and Sterility at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, held in San Francisco, California, during October 4-9, 1998. PMID:12294481

  8. The Hermann Weyl Prize - Laudatio for Guilio Chiribella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Olmo, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    The Hermann Weyl Prize was created in 2000 by the Standing Committee of the International Group Theory Colloquium. The purpose of the Weyl Prize is to provide recognition for young scientists (younger than 35) who have performed original work of significant scientific quality in the area of understanding physics through symmetries. The Hermann Weyl Prize consists of a certificate citing the accomplishments of the recipient, prize money of $500 and an allowance towards the attendance of the bi-annual International Group Theory Colloquium at which the award is presented. The previous winners of the award were: Edward Frenkel (2002), Nikita A Nekrasov (2004), Boyko Bakalov (2006) and Mohammad M Sheikh-Jabbari (2008). The Selection Committee of the Weyl Prize 2010 consisted of S T Ali (Concordia University), E Corrigan (Durham Univeristy), P Kulish (St Petersburg Mathematical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences), R Mosseri (CNRS Paris) and M A del Olmo (University of Valladolid, chairman). This committee has made the following announcement: The Weyl Prize for the year 2010 was awarded to Dr Giulio Chiribella, in recognition of his pioneering work on the application of group theoretical methods in Quantum Information Theory. In particular, for providing a general solution to the problem of optimal estimation of symmertry transformations based on the notion of quantum entanglement between representation and multiplicity spaces, for the derivation of optimal protocols for the alignment of quantum reference frames, for the characterization of extreme quantum measurements in finite dimensions, for the proof of equivalence between asymptotic cloning and state estimation and for the proof of the optimality of measure-and-reprepare for quantum learning of unitary transformations. The Laudatio of Guilio Chiribella, delivered by M A del Olmo, is included in the PDF.

  9. Science Underlying 2008 Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Bernadette A.

    2009-01-01

    JCE offers a wealth of materials for teaching and learning chemistry that you can explore online. In the list below, Bernadette Caldwell of the Editorial Staff suggests additional resources that are available through JCE for teaching the science behind some of the 2008 Nobel Prizes . Discovering and Applying the Chemistry of GFP The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP to three scientists: Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Y. Tsien. These scientists led the field in discovering and introducing a fluorescing protein from jellyfish into cells and genes under study, which allows researchers to witness biochemistry in action. Now tags are available that emit light in different colors, revealing myriad biological processes and their interactions simultaneously. Identifying HPV and HIV, HIV's Replication Cycle, and HIV Virus-Host Interactions The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to two scientists: Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier; and for his discovery of human papilloma viruses [HPV] causing cervical cancer to one scientist, Harald zur Hausen. Diseases caused by these infectious agents significantly affect global health. While isolating and studying the virus, researchers discovered HIV is an uncommon retrovirus that infects humans and relies on the host to make its viral DNA, infecting and killing the host's white blood cells, ultimately destroying the immune systems of infected humans. Related Resources at JCE Online The Journal has published articles relating to GFP specifically, and more generally to fluorescing compounds applied to biochemistry. The Journal has also published an article and a video on protease inhibition—a strategy to suppress HIV's biological processes. With the video clips, an accompanying guide

  10. IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, I. J. Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society is pleased to announce that the 2013 IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine is awarded to Prof. Marco Durante, Director of the Biophysics Department at GSI Helmholtz Center (Darmstadt, Germany); Professor at the Technical University of Darmstadt (Germany) and Adjunct Professor at the Temple University, Philadelphia, USA. The prize was presented in the closing Session of the INPC 2013 conference by Mr. Thomas Servais, R&D Manager for Accelerator Development at the IBA group, who sponsor the IBA Europhysics Prize. The Prize Diploma was presented by Dr. I J Douglas MacGregor, Chair-elect of the EPS Nuclear Physics Division and Chair of the IBA Prize committee.

  11. From Stealing Fire to Cellular Reprogramming: A Scientific History Leading to the 2012 Nobel Prize

    PubMed Central

    Lensch, M. William; Mummery, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming was recently “crowned” with the award of the Nobel Prize to two of its groundbreaking researchers, Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka. The recent link between reprogramming and stem cells makes this appear almost a new field of research, but its historical roots have actually spanned more than a century. Here, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2012 is placed in its historical context. PMID:24052937

  12. Multiscale modeling of nerve agent hydrolysis mechanisms: a tale of two Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Martin J.; Wymore, Troy W.

    2014-10-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, whereas the 2013 Peace Prize was given to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for their efforts to eliminate chemical warfare agents. This review relates the two by introducing the field of multiscale modeling and highlighting its application to the study of the biological mechanisms by which selected chemical weapon agents exert their effects at an atomic level.

  13. Background to the Nobel Prize to the Braggs.

    PubMed

    Liljas, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The Nobel Committees have to follow the nominations submitted for a specific year. During the early phase of X-ray crystallography, a limited number of scientists were active. In 1914 Max von Laue and William Henry Bragg were both nominated and could have been awarded a joint Nobel Prize. However, a member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, Allvar Gullstrand, was well aware of the activities in the field and strongly recommended that only von Laue should receive the prize since a main contributor, William Laurence Bragg, was not nominated. Next year, when the First World War had started, there were few nominations, but now both Braggs, father and son, were nominated. Gullstrand was very pleased and recommended them both for the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics. The rest of the committee agreed and this then became the decision of the Royal Academy for Sciences, Stockholm. PMID:23250055

  14. EDITORIAL: Annual prizes for best papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-09-01

    2005 Roberts Prize The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) in association with the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) jointly award an annual prize for an article published in PMB during the previous year. The following 14 articles, listed below in chronological order, were rated the best of 2005 based on the (two or three) referees' assessments: P Kundrát et al 2005 Probabilistic two-stage model of cell inactivation by ionizing particles Phys. Med. Biol. 50 1433-47 D Arora et al 2005 Direct thermal dose control of constrained focused ultrasound treatments: phantom and in vivo evaluation Phys. Med. Biol. 50 1919-35 J S Dysart et al 2005 Characterization of Photofrin photobleaching for singlet oxygen dose estimation during photodynamic therapy of MLL cells in vitro Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2597-616 M Defrise et al 2005 Fourier rebinning of time-of-flight PET data Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2749-63 Z Su et al 2005 Systematic investigation of the signal properties of polycrystalline HgI2 detectors under mammographic, radiographic, fluoroscopic and radiotherapy irradiation conditions Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2907-28 E Bräuer-Krisch et al 2005 New irradiation geometry for microbeam radiation therapy Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3103-11 H C Pyo et al 2005 Identification of current density distribution in electrically conducting subject with anisotropic conductivity distribution Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3183-96 R P Findlay et al 2005 Effects of posture on FDTD calculations of specific absorption rate in a voxel model of the human body Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3825-35 G Alexandrakis et al 2005 Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by use of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system: a computer simulation feasibility study Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4225-41 J Keshvari et al 2005 Comparison of radio frequency energy absorption in ear and eye region of children and adults at 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4355-69 J Laufer et al 2005 In vitro measurements of absolute blood

  15. EDITORIAL: Annual prizes for best papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    2006 Roberts Prize The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) in association with the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) jointly award an annual prize for an article published in PMB during the previous year. The following ten articles, listed below in chronological order, were rated the best of 2006 based on the (two or three) referees' assessments: D W Mundy et al 2006 Radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers: assumptions, theoretical assessment and future directions Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1377-91 Y Yang et al 2006 Investigation of optical coherence tomography as an imaging modality in tissue engineering Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1649-59 M Krämer and M Scholz 2006 Rapid calculation of biological effects in ion radiotherapy Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1959-70 P Crespo et al 2006 On the detector arrangement for in-beam PET for hadron therapy monitoring Phys. Med. Biol. 51 2143-63 R J Senden et al 2006 Polymer gel dosimeters with reduced toxicity: a preliminary investigation of the NMR and optical dose-response using different monomers Phys. Med. Biol. 51 3301-14 J Wang et al 2006 FDTD calculation of whole-body average SAR in adult and child models for frequencies from 30 MHz to 3 GHz Phys. Med. Biol. 51 4119-27 C A T Van den Berg et al 2006 The use of MR B+1 imaging for validation of FDTD electromagnetic simulations of human anatomies Phys. Med. Biol. 51 4735-46 S Qin and K W Ferrara 2006 Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5065-88 R Kramer et al 2006 Skeletal dosimetry in the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms for external exposure to photons based on vertebral 3D-microCT images Phys. Med. Biol. 51 6265-89 R Leiderman et al 2006 Coupling between elastic strain and interstitial fluid flow: ramifications for poroelastic imaging Phys. Med. Biol. 51 6291-313 An IPEM college of jurors then assessed and rated these papers in order to choose a winner. We have much

  16. Prizes to solve problems in and beyond medicine, big and small: it can work.

    PubMed

    Erren, Thomas C

    2007-01-01

    This article complements Dr. Charlton's follow-up of David Horrobin's suggestion in Nature two decades ago to offer sizeable prizes for practical approaches to either eliminate a problem in medicine or reduce the cost of its solution. Examples from the 20th and 21st centuries illustrate that prizes--small and big--have generated sustained and successful attacks on defined problems in biology, physics and, lately, mathematics. Provided that glittering prizes are offered and awarded with care, they can lead to effective problem-solving in medicine and related biomedical sciences as well. PMID:17207938

  17. Byline Canada: The 1984 National Newspaper Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarlane, Andrew, Ed.

    Representing some of the best of current Canadian newspaper journalism, the winning entries from the National Newspaper awards for 1983 are presented in this collection. Material in this book about each of the journalists includes a brief biography, the prize winning piece of writing, and an interview between the editor and the journalist. The…

  18. Stellar students win fantastic prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    will meet astronomers and be present during a night of observations. Learning that they won, the team was enthusiastic: "We are very pleased to hear this fantastic news and are looking forward to the trip!" Another winner was Marta Kotarba, with her teacher Grzegorz Sęk, from the school IV Liceum Ogólnokształcące im. Tadeusza Kościuszki, Poland. Her prize is a trip to the Hispano-German Astronomical Observatory of Calar Alto in Almeria, Spain, kindly donated by the Spanish Council for Scientific Research. Marta's project "Galaxy Zoo and I" tells how she joined the website "Galaxy Zoo" to study galaxies and help astronomical researchers understand the structure of the Universe. Galaxy Zoo volunteers classify galaxies into different types, such as spiral or elliptical - a task much more easily done by humans than computers. Marta explains that the project "is like an adventure to me. Galaxy Zoo gives me abilities to enlarge my knowledge about the Universe and to gain new skills." Her winning entry also shows how anyone can get involved in the world of real astronomical research, simply by using the Internet. A third winner, of a trip to Königsleiten Observatory in Austria, is Andreia Nascimento with her teacher Leonor Cabral, from Escola Secundária da Cidadela in Portugal. Her project, on "Hunting for Open Star Clusters" near young stars, used data from the robotic Faulkes Telescope in Hawaii, which is used for research-based science education. "Catch a Star" also includes an artwork competition, for which students created artwork with an astronomical theme. This competition, through which students can get involved with astronomy even outside of science classes, has become increasingly popular, with over one thousand entries this year from around the world. Not only were prizes awarded by public votes in a web gallery, but special prizes were awarded by Garry Harwood, a Fellow and life member of the International Association of Astronomy Artists. Harwood said: "It

  19. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1999: Ahmed H. Zewail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-12-01

    The 1999 Nobel Prize was awarded to Ahmed Zewail "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy." His pioneering investigation of fundamental chemical reactions using ultra-short flashes allowed chemists, for the first time, to monitor reactions on the time scale on which the atoms are actually moving as bonds are broken and formed. The fundamental limit of femtosecond resolution represents the culmination of a century of progress in chemical dynamics that began with the first Nobel Prize awarded to Jacobus van't Hoff in 1901.

  20. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2012-05-21

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  1. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2012-06-28

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  2. Elsevier/Spectrochimica Acta Atomic Spectroscopy Award 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omenetto, Nicolo'; de Loos, Greet

    2016-03-01

    This is to announce the 2014 Elsevier/Spectrochimica Acta Award, the annual award honoring the most significant article(s) published in a volume. Elsevier makes this award on behalf of Spectrochimica Acta, Part B, to encourage the publication of top articles in this journal. All papers published during one year are considered for this award and the Editorial Advisory Board and the Guest Editor(s) of the special issue(s) are responsible for the selection. The award consists of a monetary prize of 1000 together with a presentation certificate.

  3. Elsevier/Spectrochimica Acta Atomic Spectroscopy Award 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omenetto, Nicolo'; de Loos, Greet

    2015-01-01

    This is to announce the 2013 Elsevier/Spectrochimica Acta Award, the annual award honoring the most significant article(s) published in a volume. Elsevier makes this award on behalf of Spectrochimica Acta, Part B, to encourage the publication of top articles in this journal. All papers published during one year are considered for this award and the Editorial Advisory Board and the Guest Editor(s) of the special issue(s) are responsible for the selection. The award consists of a monetary prize of 1000 together with a presentation certificate.

  4. Introducing the Benson Prize for Discovery Methods of Near Earth Objects by Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, J. W.

    1997-05-01

    The Benson Prize Sponsored by Space Development Corporation The Benson Prize for Discovery Methods of Near Earth Objects by Amateurs is an annual competition which awards prizes to the best proposed methods by which amateur astronomers may discover such near earth objects as asteroids and comet cores. The purpose of the Benson Prize is to encourage the discovery of near earth objects by amateur astronomers. The utilization of valuable near earth resources can provide many new jobs and economic activities on earth, while also creating many new opportunities for opening up the space frontier. The utilization of near earth resources will significantly contribute to the lessening of environmental degradation on the Earth caused by mining and chemical leaching operations required to exploit the low grade ores now remaining on Earth. In addition, near earth objects pose grave dangers for life on earth. Discovering and plotting the orbits of all potentially dangerous near earth objects is the first and necessary step in protecting ourselves against the enormous potential damage possible from near earth objects. With the high quality, large size and low cost of todays consumer telescopes, the rapid development of powerful, high resolution and inexpensive CCD cameras, and the proliferation of inexpensive software for todays powerful home computers, the discovery of near earth objects by amateur astronomers is more attainable than ever. The Benson Prize is sponsored by the Space Development Corporation, a space resource exploration and utilization company. In 1997 one prize of \\500 will be awarded to the best proposed method for the amateur discovery of NEOs, and in each of the four following years, Prizes of \\500, \\250 and \\100 will be awarded. Prizes for the actual discovery of Near Earth Asteroids will be added in later years.

  5. It's Not the Book, It's Not the Author, It's the Award: The Lambda Literary Award and the Case for Strategic Essentialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    On September 16, 2009, the Lambda Literary Foundation (LLF) released a statement revising their eligibility guidelines for the Lambda Literary Award, the most prestigious citation offered for LGBT books and authors. This criteria, which demands that an author must self-identify as a member of the LGBT family of writers, has been met with…

  6. Stellar students win fantastic prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    will meet astronomers and be present during a night of observations. Learning that they won, the team was enthusiastic: "We are very pleased to hear this fantastic news and are looking forward to the trip!" Another winner was Marta Kotarba, with her teacher Grzegorz Sęk, from the school IV Liceum Ogólnokształcące im. Tadeusza Kościuszki, Poland. Her prize is a trip to the Hispano-German Astronomical Observatory of Calar Alto in Almeria, Spain, kindly donated by the Spanish Council for Scientific Research. Marta's project "Galaxy Zoo and I" tells how she joined the website "Galaxy Zoo" to study galaxies and help astronomical researchers understand the structure of the Universe. Galaxy Zoo volunteers classify galaxies into different types, such as spiral or elliptical - a task much more easily done by humans than computers. Marta explains that the project "is like an adventure to me. Galaxy Zoo gives me abilities to enlarge my knowledge about the Universe and to gain new skills." Her winning entry also shows how anyone can get involved in the world of real astronomical research, simply by using the Internet. A third winner, of a trip to Königsleiten Observatory in Austria, is Andreia Nascimento with her teacher Leonor Cabral, from Escola Secundária da Cidadela in Portugal. Her project, on "Hunting for Open Star Clusters" near young stars, used data from the robotic Faulkes Telescope in Hawaii, which is used for research-based science education. "Catch a Star" also includes an artwork competition, for which students created artwork with an astronomical theme. This competition, through which students can get involved with astronomy even outside of science classes, has become increasingly popular, with over one thousand entries this year from around the world. Not only were prizes awarded by public votes in a web gallery, but special prizes were awarded by Garry Harwood, a Fellow and life member of the International Association of Astronomy Artists. Harw

  7. Nobel Prize Literature; A Selection of the Works of Forty-Four Nobel Prize Winning Authors in the Library of Dutchess Community College, with Biographical and Critical Sketches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Terry E., Comp.

    This bibliography is a compilation of works by 44 Nobel Prize winning authors presently available at the Dutchess Community College library. Each entry describes the piece of literature for which the author received an award, provides a brief sketch of the writer, includes a commentary on the themes of major works, and lists the writer's works. An…

  8. Understanding the National Science Foundation CAREER Award Proposal Genre: A Rhetorical, Ethnographic, and System Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, David M.

    2011-01-01

    With tightening university budgets, never before has the activity level of research grant proposal writing been more intense. With increased proposal numbers, including for the National Science Foundation's (NSF) prestigious CAREER award, has also come increased competition and decreased funding rates. This dissertation has searched for successful…

  9. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  10. The Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Science: three years of honouring outstanding achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouchet, T.; Chatzichristou, E.; Heward, A.

    2012-09-01

    Europlanet launched an annual Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Sciences at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) in 2009. At EPSC 2012, the prize will be presented for the third time. To date, the prize has been awarded to: • 2010 - Dr Jean Lilensten of the Laboratoire de Planétologie de Grenoble for his development and dissemination of his 'planeterrella' experiment; • 2011 - The Austrian Space Forum for their coordinated programme of outreach activities, which range from simple classroom presentations to space exhibitions reaching 15 000 visitors; • 2012 - Yaël Nazé, for the diverse outreach programme she has individually initiated over the years, carefully tailored to audiences across the spectrum of society, including children, artists and elderly people. These three prizes cover a spectrum of different approaches to outreach and provide inspiration for anyone wishing to become engaged in public engagement, whether at an individual and institutional level.

  11. Shaw Prize Goes to Reinhard Genzel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    The Shaw Prize in Astronomy for 2008 is awarded to Professor Reinhard Genzel, Director of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), in recognition of his outstanding contribution in demonstrating that the Milky Way contains a supermassive black hole at its centre, a result largely obtained with the help of ESO's telescopes. Black Hole ESO PR Photo 18/08 Motion of a Star The Shaw Prize is awarded annually by the Shaw Prize Foundation in Hong Kong in the Life Sciences, Mathematical Sciences and Astronomy, each of the three prizes bearing a monetary award of one million US dollars. "I warmly congratulate Professor Genzel for this well-deserved award which highlights some of the best science produced with ESO's telescopes," says Tim de Zeeuw, ESO's Director General. "Professor Genzel and his team have made a dedicated, long-term effort, using our telescopes and co-developing instruments, to study the Centre of our Galaxy, and as such, he has allowed us to enter an era of observational black hole physics." In 1969, Donald Lynden-Bell and Martin Rees suggested that the Milky Way might contain a supermassive black hole at its centre. But evidence for such an object was lacking at the time because the centre of the Milky Way is obscured by interstellar dust, and was detected only as a relatively faint radio source. Reinhard Genzel and his collaborators obtained compelling evidence for this black hole by developing state-of-the-art astronomical instruments to be used on ESO's telescopes and carrying out a persistent programme of observing the Galactic Centre and its surrounding stars for many years, which ultimately led to the discovery of a black hole with a mass of about three million times that of the Sun. Genzel's group has in particular followed since 1992, the motion of several stars, around the Galactic Centre. These observations were first done with the MPE-built near-infrared speckle imaging camera SHARP on ESO's New Technology Telescope at La

  12. Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1913: The Highest Honor for the Lowest Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif-Acherman, Simón

    2013-12-01

    One century ago this year the Dutch experimental physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (1853-1926) was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in low-temperature physics, in particular for his production of liquid helium. I trace the route to his Nobel Prize within the context of his and his colleagues' research in his laboratory at the University of Leiden, and in light of his nominators and the nominations he received in the five years 1909-1913.

  13. Languages for Learning: Granting All Students Access to New Skills. Fishman Prize Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Steven; Zunkiewicz, Kelly; Strait, Laura; Towne, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A single great teacher can change a life by introducing a new language, helping you master a new skill or opening a door you never knew was there. That's why every year, TNTP awards the Fishman Prize for Superlative Classroom Practice: to celebrate a select cohort of public school teachers who demonstrate exceptionally effective teaching with…

  14. Prizing Children's Science Information Books: The Text, Reading and the Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Joy; Jarman, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The Royal Society Young People's Book Prize is awarded annually in the United Kingdom for the best science information book, and the winning book is chosen by panels of young people. This article discusses the findings of a study of the responses to the books and to their judging experience of young people who participated on panels in the 2011…

  15. A Nobel Prize for membrane traffic: Vesicles find their journey’s end

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cell biologists everywhere rejoiced when this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof for their contributions to uncovering the mechanisms governing vesicular transport. In this article, we highlight their achievements and also pay tribute to the pioneering scientists before them who set the stage for their remarkable discoveries. PMID:24215073

  16. Charting the Course: Four Years of the Thomas W. Payzant School on the Move Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Entremont, Chad; Norton, Jill; Bennett, Michael; Piazza, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Since 2006, the Thomas W. Payzant School on the Move (SOM) Prize has been awarded annually to a Boston public school that has made significant progress in improving student achievement. This case study identifies the structures and strategies that best serve students in prizewinning schools, provides a profile of each of the four winning schools…

  17. 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded "for the development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other…

  18. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1981: Fukui and Hoffmann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, J.

    2002-06-01

    The 1981 Nobel Prize was awarded to Kenichi Fukui and Roald Hoffmann "for their theories, developed independently, concerning the course of chemical reactions." Those theories, which have come to be known as "frontier orbital theory" and the "Woodward-Hoffmann rules" respectively, remain important tools for predicting the course of organic reactions and they are frequently taught in courses in mechanistic organic chemistry.

  19. Awards: RAS Awards 2010; Prof. John Woodhouse; Prof. Douglas Gough; Prof. Bernard Roberts; Prof. James Hough; Dr Ineke de Moortel; Dr Barbara Ercolano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    Each year the RAS recognizes outstanding achievement in astronomy and geophysics by the award of medals and prizes. Candidates are nominated by Fellows and the awards made by a committee of Fellows, ensuring that these scientists have earned the respect and admiration of their peers in the research community.

  20. Nobel Centennial Essays: A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1901: Jacobus van't Hoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2001-12-01

    December 2001 marks the centenary of the Nobel Prize. During the 20th century, the Nobel Prize was awarded 13 times, to a total of 22 recipients, for work involving various aspects of chemical dynamics--beginning with Jacobus van't Hoff in 1901, and continuing through Ahmed Zewail in 1999. Examining those prizes provides some interesting insights into the history and the evolution of chemical dynamics. In this essay, the first of a series of articles commemorating the Nobel centennial, the work of the first Nobel Laureate in chemical dynamics, Jacobus van't Hoff (1901), is examined.

  1. SPR awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Marcia

    The First Occasional Solar Planetary Relationships Award Ceremony was held in conjunction with the annual SPR banquet on December 8, 1982. The following awards were presented:The Golden Palate Award to Bruce T. Tsurutani for his intrepid tasting and superb menu planning;The Traveling Intercontinental Disturbance Award to Murray Dryer and Peggy Shea for their unflagging efforts to track down every last piece of relevant data;

  2. The Gender Role Perceptions of Male Students at a Prestigious, Single-Gender, Catholic High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Franklin T.; Austin, William P.

    2010-01-01

    This study utilized a data set of categorical responses measuring the gender role views of students (N = 701) from a prestigious, Midwestern, all-male, Catholic high school. Incongruence between student self-perceptions and the realities of gender role miseducation and the embracement of sexist ideology were readily apparent. Findings suggest that…

  3. EDITORIAL: The FDR Prize The FDR Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Shigeo

    2009-06-01

    From the 45 papers published in the year 2008 in Fluid Dynamics Research the following paper has been selected for the second FDR prize: 'Propagation of very long water waves, with vorticity, over variable depth, with applications to tsunamis' by Adrian Constantin and Robin S Johnson, published in volume 40 (March 2008) pp 175-211. This paper takes, as its main theme, the analysis of the propagation of very long gravity waves in the ocean environment, with the possibility of applying the results to tsunamis. Both variable depth and some pre-existing vorticity are allowed in the model, but under the over-arching assumption of long waves; indeed, it is argued, the waves are so long that it is impossible for classical soliton theory to be the appropriate description of a developing tsunami. This aspect is supported by some simple scaling arguments, together with some observations associated with the tsunami of Boxing Day 2004. The formulation is based on two small scales: the slow scale on which the depth varies and the small amplitude of the wave (as initially generated in deep water). The technique adopted is that of matched asymptotic expansions. The solution, constructed for deep water, is not valid in suitably reduced depth of water; the solution in this shallow region (close inshore) is then matched to the deep-water solution. A novel feature of this work is the inclusion of a general distribution of vorticity in the absence of waves—intended to model the realistic ocean—which is based on the slow evolution scale for the bottom topography. Some general properties of such background flows are proved, and two specific examples have been obtained: constant vorticity everywhere (as far as the shoreline), and regions of isolated vorticity (for appropriate bottom profiles). The way in which the wave properties are modified in the presence of vorticity is described. The significant overall proposal in this theory, specifically applicable to tsunamis, is that it is

  4. 29 CFR 778.332 - Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job. 778.332 Section 778.332 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION... of employee's job. (a) Where the prize is awarded for activities outside the customary working...

  5. 29 CFR 778.332 - Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job. 778.332 Section 778.332 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION... of employee's job. (a) Where the prize is awarded for activities outside the customary working...

  6. 29 CFR 778.332 - Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job. 778.332 Section 778.332 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION... of employee's job. (a) Where the prize is awarded for activities outside the customary working...

  7. 32 CFR 705.37 - Public affairs and public service awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Thomas Jefferson Awards are the prizes in an annual interservice competition sponsored by civilian media... Training. (C) Requests to establish an award which will involve more than one school (other than the Naval... decided by the Navy authority at the school concerned. (E) Directives in the 5061, 1650 and 3590...

  8. 32 CFR 705.37 - Public affairs and public service awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Thomas Jefferson Awards are the prizes in an annual interservice competition sponsored by civilian media... Training. (C) Requests to establish an award which will involve more than one school (other than the Naval... decided by the Navy authority at the school concerned. (E) Directives in the 5061, 1650 and 3590...

  9. 32 CFR 705.37 - Public affairs and public service awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Thomas Jefferson Awards are the prizes in an annual interservice competition sponsored by civilian media... Training. (C) Requests to establish an award which will involve more than one school (other than the Naval... decided by the Navy authority at the school concerned. (E) Directives in the 5061, 1650 and 3590...

  10. 32 CFR 705.37 - Public affairs and public service awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Thomas Jefferson Awards are the prizes in an annual interservice competition sponsored by civilian media... Training. (C) Requests to establish an award which will involve more than one school (other than the Naval... decided by the Navy authority at the school concerned. (E) Directives in the 5061, 1650 and 3590...

  11. 32 CFR 705.37 - Public affairs and public service awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Thomas Jefferson Awards are the prizes in an annual interservice competition sponsored by civilian media... Training. (C) Requests to establish an award which will involve more than one school (other than the Naval... decided by the Navy authority at the school concerned. (E) Directives in the 5061, 1650 and 3590...

  12. The Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books. 2011 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALA Editions, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Updated to include the 2011 award and honor books, this new edition of the annual guide to the Newbery and Caldecott awards gathers together the books deemed most distinguished in American children's literature and illustration since the inception of the renowned prizes. Librarians and teachers everywhere rely on this guidebook for quick reference…

  13. The Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books. 2012 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALA Editions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Updated to include the 2012 award and honor books, this new edition of the annual guide to the Newbery and Caldecott awards gathers together the books deemed most distinguished in American children's literature and illustration since the inception of the renowned prizes. Librarians and teachers everywhere rely on this guidebook for quick reference…

  14. The curious case of the 1960 Nobel Prize to Burnet and Medawar.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Arthur M

    2016-03-01

    The 1960 Nobel Prize was awarded to Macfarlane Burnet and Peter Medawar for immunological tolerance. The Nobel Archives reveal that the two were never nominated together by anyone; Burnet had repeatedly been nominated for his virology studies, and the Medawar group (including Rupert Billingham and Leslie Brent) had been nominated independently for their transplantation work. A review of the 1950s literature suggests that tolerance had not yet, by 1960, reached the level of acceptance and acclaim in the immunological community to appear to justify the award. Burnet probably should have received the Prize for his virus work, and perhaps also for his Clonal Selection Theory, whereas Billingham and Brent should have shared in a Prize with Medawar for transplantation. If a Prize were to be given for tolerance, most agree that Ray Owen should have shared in it, for his work on cattle chimerism. It is suggested that the 1960 Nobel Prize to Burnet and Medawar for immunological tolerance may have been given for the wrong reasons and to the wrong associates. PMID:26790994

  15. Recounting the History of the Albatross Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauss, John; Lill, Gordon; Maxwell, Arthur

    The origin of the Albatross Award can be traced directly to a dinner party in early 1959 at the home of Gordon and Mildred Lill in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C. Guests were Arthur Maxwell and his wife and John Knauss. Lill and Maxwell worked at the Office of Naval Research (ONR). Knauss was visiting from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in LaJolla, California. During the evening the subject of the lack of awards and prizes for oceanographers arose. The three decided that perhaps this was a situation that could be remedied by the American Miscellaneous Society (AMSOC).

  16. 2014 Lush Science Prize.

    PubMed

    McCann, Terry

    2015-11-01

    The Lush Prize supports animal-free testing by rewarding the most effective projects and individuals who have been working toward the goal of replacing animals in product or ingredient safety testing. A Background Paper is prepared each year, prior to the judging process, to provide the panel with a brief overview of current developments in the field of Replacement alternatives, particularly those relevant to the concept of toxicity pathways. This Background Paper includes information on recent work by the relevant scientific institutions and projects in this area, including AXLR8, OECD, CAAT, The Hamner Institutes, the Human Toxome Project, EURL ECVAM, ICCVAM, the US Tox21 Programme, the ToxCast programme, and the Human Toxicology Project Consortium. Recent developments in toxicity pathway research are also assessed by reviewing the relevant literature, with a view to presenting the two papers receiving the highest score to the judges for consideration. PMID:26551288

  17. Haagen-Smit Prize 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-01-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2015 ''Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  18. Haagen-Smit Prize 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-02-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2014 ''Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  19. Efficient Algorithms for the Prize Collecting Steiner Tree Problems with Interval Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Miranda, E.; Candia, A.; Chen, X.; Hu, X.; Li, B.

    Given a graph G = (V,E) with a cost on each edge in E and a prize at each vertex in V, and a target set V' ⊆ V, the Prize Collecting Steiner Tree (PCST) problem is to find a tree T interconnecting vertices in V' that has minimum total costs on edges and maximum total prizes at vertices in T. This problem is NP-hard in general, and it is polynomial-time solvable when graphs G are restricted to 2-trees. In this paper, we study how to deal with PCST problem with uncertain costs and prizes. We assume that edge e could be included in T by paying cost x_ein[c_e^-,c_e^+] while taking risk c_e^+-x_e/ c_e^+-c_e^- of losing e, and vertex v could be awarded prize p_vin [p_v^-,p_v^+] while taking risk y_v-p_v^-/p_v^+-p_v^- of losing the prize. We establish two risk models for the PCST problem, one minimizing the maximum risk over edges and vertices in T and the other minimizing the sum of risks. Both models are subject to upper bounds on the budget for constructing a tree. We propose two polynomial-time algorithms for these problems on 2-trees, respectively. Our study shows that the risk models have advantages over the tradional robust optimization model, which yields NP-hard problems even if the original optimization problems are polynomial-time solvable.

  20. The Comprehensive Assessment of Rational Thinking. 2013 Thorndike Award Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanovich, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Economics was awarded in 2002 for work on judgment and decision-making tasks that are the operational measures of rational thought in cognitive science. Because assessments of intelligence (and similar tests of cognitive ability) are taken to be the quintessence of good thinking, it might be thought that such measures would…

  1. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: A Spatial Model for Cognitive Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how the cognitive functions of the brain arise from its basic physiological components has been an enticing final frontier in science for thousands of years. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014 was awarded one half to John O’Keefe, the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser “for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain.” This prize recognizes both a paradigm shift in the study of cognitive neuroscience, and some of the amazing insights that have followed from it concerning how the world is represented within the brain. PMID:25521374

  2. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: a spatial model for cognitive neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Neil

    2014-12-17

    Understanding how the cognitive functions of the brain arise from its basic physiological components has been an enticing final frontier in science for thousands of years. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014 was awarded one half to John O'Keefe, the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser "for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain." This prize recognizes both a paradigm shift in the study of cognitive neuroscience, and some of the amazing insights that have followed from it concerning how the world is represented within the brain. PMID:25521374

  3. GFP: from jellyfish to the Nobel prize and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Marc

    2009-10-01

    On December 10, 2008 Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for "the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP". The path taken by this jellyfish protein to become one of the most useful tools in modern science and medicine is described. Osamu Shimomura painstakingly isolated GFP from hundreds of thousands of jellyfish, characterized the chromophore and elucidated the mechanism of Aequorean bioluminescence. Martin Chalfie expressed the protein in E. coli and C. elegans, and Roger Tsien developed a palette of fluorescent proteins that could be used in a myriad of applications. PMID:19771329

  4. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    PubMed

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck. PMID:16802565

  5. How Citation Boosts Promote Scientific Paradigm Shifts and Nobel Prizes

    PubMed Central

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the “boosting effect” of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying “boost factor” is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  6. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    PubMed

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  7. Revisiting the 1981 Nobel Prize to Roger Sperry, David Hubel, and Torsten Wiesel on the occasion of the centennial of the Prize to Golgi and Cajal.

    PubMed

    Berlucchi, Giovanni

    2006-12-01

    In 1981 the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology was awarded to Roger Sperry for his work on the functional specialization of the cerebral hemispheres, and to David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel for their work on information processing in the visual system. The present paper points to some important links between the work of Sperry and that of Hubel and Wiesel and to their influences on neuroscience in the best tradition going back to Cajal. PMID:16997764

  8. Engineering a Grand Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Tracie

    2005-01-01

    Columbia has the Pulitzer Prize, Harvard has the Nieman and the University of Georgia has the Peabody award. Now North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University has the lofty goal of joining the ranks of the elite with a prestigious journalism institute and prize all its own. With a new home and plans to unveil an award for journalistic…

  9. Chandra Telescope Designer Wins 2002 Rossi Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Leon Van Speybroeck of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts has been awarded the 2002 Bruno Rossi Prize of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society. The Rossi Prize recognizes significant contributions in high-energy astrophysics. It is awarded annually in honor of the late Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor Bruno Rossi, an authority on cosmic ray physics and a pioneer in the field of X-ray astronomy. The prize also includes an engraved certificate and a $1,500 award. Van Speybroeck, who led the effort to design and make the X-ray mirrors for NASA's premier X­ray observatory, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, was recognized for a career of stellar achievements in designing precision X-ray optics. As Telescope Scientist for Chandra, he has worked for more than 20 years with a team that includes scientists and engineers from the Harvard-Smithsonian, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, TRW, Inc., Hughes-Danbury (now B.F. Goodrich Aerospace), Optical Coating Laboratories, Inc., and Eastman-Kodak on all aspects of the X-ray mirror assembly that is the heart of the observatory. "Leon is one of the master mirror designers of our time," said Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Chandra X-ray Center. "His contributions were crucial to the spectacular success of the Chandra mission." The Chandra mirrors are the most precise mirrors ever made, smooth with tolerances of a few atoms. If the state of Colorado had the same relative smoothness as the surface of the Chandra X-ray Observatory mirrors, Pike's Peak would be less than an inch tall. The smoothness and alignment of the Chandra's mirrors are enabling scientists to make new discoveries about black holes, neutron stars, and galactic explosions. "Many, many other people made essential contributions to the Chandra program, and hopefully some of them will receive proper recognition," said Van Speybroeck. "In the meantime, I am thoroughly enjoying

  10. From Tomato King to World Food Prize laureate.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Philip E

    2014-01-01

    This autobiographical article describes my early years, education, and career at Purdue University. Helping form and expand the Department of Food Science at Purdue was exciting and gratifying, and working with students in the classroom and on research projects was rewarding and kept me feeling young. My research on bulk aseptic processing allowed me to help solve problems relevant to the tomato industry, but I learned later that it had much broader relevance. I certainly never expected the impact and visibility of the work to result in my being awarded the World Food Prize. Being the first food scientist to win this award has enabled me to focus increased attention on the need to reduce food losses. PMID:24328431

  11. Super-resolved fluorescence microscopy: Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 for Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William E. Moerner.

    PubMed

    Möckl, Leonhard; Lamb, Don C; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2014-12-15

    A big honor for small objects: The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was jointly awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy". This Highlight describes how the field of super-resolution microscopy developed from the first detection of a single molecule in 1989 to the sophisticated techniques of today. PMID:25371081

  12. Unlocking Student Effort: How Five Irreplaceable Teachers Engage, Challenge and Inspire Students to Excellence. Fishman Prize Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Shira; Henderson, Whitney; Irish, Jamie; Lyons, Katie; Ross, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Founded by TNTP, the Fishman Prize for Superlative Classroom Practice is an annual award for the nation's best teachers in high-poverty public schools. The goal is to shine a spotlight on great teaching and amplify the voices of some of the nation's best educators so that others can gain insight into their remarkable classrooms. No more than five…

  13. A Valentine's Day bouquet for Temperature readers: pleasing with prizes, searching for the right words, and keeping things mysterious.

    PubMed

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    This editorial tells its readers that the journal Temperature awards its first prizes for best papers to Boris Kingma and Assaf Yacobi. It also discusses the use of several thermoregulation-related terms and expressions, including "cold temperature," "thermoneutral temperature," and "warm-sensitive" and offers, arguably, better alternatives. The editorial also contains a new puzzle: how can color affect temperature perception? PMID:27226997

  14. Society News: RAS Awards 2011; Prof. Richard Ellis; Prof. Eberhard Grün; Prof. Gilles Chabrier; Prof. Roger Searle;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    Each year the RAS recognizes outstanding achievement in astronomy and geophysics by the award of medals and prizes. Candidates are nominated by Fellows and the awards made by a committee of Fellows, ensuring that these scientists have earned the respect and admiration of their peers in the research community.

  15. Waterman Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nominations are now being accepted for the Alan T. Waterman Award, which annually recognizes an outstanding young scientist in the forefront of science. The award, named for the first director of the National Science Foundation (NSF), was established by Congress in 1975 to mark the agency's silver anniversary.Candidates for the 1985 award must be U.S. citizens and must be 35 years old or younger (or not be more than 5 years beyond receipt of the Ph.D. degree by December 31, 1984). Candidates should have completed sufficient scientific or engineering research to have demonstrated through personal accomplishments outstanding capability and exceptional promise for significant future achievement, the award committee says. In addition, those nominated should exhibit quality, innovation, and potential for discovery in their research.

  16. Moynier Receives 2013 Hisashi Kuno Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moynier, Frédéric

    2014-09-01

    I would like to thank the Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology section for awarding me this prize and all the people who were involved in my nomination and wrote the letters. When Catherine McCammon phoned me to let me know that I was awarded the Kuno Award, I was very surprised at first, and then I felt very honored and lucky. I have been very lucky to have Francis Albarède and Janne Blichert-Toft as Ph.D. advisors. Without their mentoring, I would not be standing here today. Completing my Ph.D. in this dynamic laboratory was an incredible experience, and I was very fortunate to meet many people who became mentors, collaborators, and friends, among whom I will cite Arnaud Agranier, Pierre Beck, and Toshi Fujii.

  17. The discovery of artemisinin and Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xin-zhuan; Miller, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Professor Youyou Tu for her key contributions to the discovery of artemisinin. Artemisinin has saved millions of lives and represents one of the significant contributions of China to global health. Many scientists were involved in the previously unknown 523 Project, and the Nobel Prize given to a single person has not been without controversy. Here we summarized some key events in the 523 Project and present our views on the Award to help the public better understand the rationale of the Nobel committee’s decision, the significance of the discovery, and current issues related to artimisinin in treating malaria. PMID:26481135

  18. Nanoscopy—imaging life at the nanoscale: a Nobel Prize achievement with a bright future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Hans; Bates, Mark

    2015-10-01

    A grand scientific prize was awarded last year to three pioneering scientists, for their discovery and development of molecular ‘ON-OFF’ switching which, when combined with optical imaging, can be used to see the previously invisible with light microscopy. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science announced on October 8th their decision and explained that this achievement—rooted in physics and applied in biology and medicine—was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for controlling fluorescent molecules to create images of specimens smaller than anything previously observed with light. The story of how this noble switch in optical microscopy was achieved and how it was engineered to visualize life at the nanoscale is highlighted in this invited comment.

  19. The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics—ground-breaking experiments on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Y.

    2011-11-01

    The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to Professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for their ground-breaking experiments on graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, and more generally, for their pioneering work in uncovering a new class of materials, namely two-dimensional atomic crystals. This paper gives an accessible account and review of the story of graphene; from its first description in the literature, to the realization and confirmation of its remarkable properties, through to its impressive potential for broad-reaching applications. The story of graphene is written within the context of the enormous impact that Geim and Novoselovs' work has had on this field of research, and recounts their personal pathways of discovery, which ultimately led to their award of the 2010 Nobel Prize.

  20. [Nitric oxide (NO)--Nobel prize in medicine and physiology for 1998].

    PubMed

    Derentowicz, P; Markiewicz, K; Wawrzyniak, M; Czerwińska-Kartowicz, I; Buława, E; Siwińska-Gołebiowska, H

    2000-01-01

    On October 12, 1998. The Nobel Assembly announced the award of the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology to pharmacologists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad. The Nobel Committee decided to award the prize for their discoveries concerning--nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system. Nitric oxide (NO) has a key importance for vascular tonus, acts as a signal molecule in the nervous system and plays an important function in the immunological system. Nitric oxide is a multifunction molecule which controls the blood pressure, modulates gastrointestinal motility. It is produced in abnormal level intensifies septic shock and destruction of nervous tissue. NO is important in different branches of medicine. For instance NO gas has been used to reduced high blood pressure in the lung of infants. Several unknown NO applications in medicine are waiting for discovery. PMID:11013875

  1. Chemistry in the News: 1998 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jennifer B.

    1999-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Walter Kohn (University of California at Santa Barbara) for his development of the density-functional theory and to John A. Pople (Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois) for his development of computational methods in quantum chemistry. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute has awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Robert F. Fuchgott (State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn), Louis J. Ignarro (University of California at Los Angeles), and Ferid Murad (University of Texas Medical School at Houston) for identifying nitric oxide as a key biological signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system.

  2. Let there be light--with gallium nitride: the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics.

    PubMed

    Von Dollen, Paul; Pimputkar, Siddha; Speck, James S

    2014-12-15

    Significant gains in energy savings now underway can be traced to a single invention--the blue light-emitting diode. GaN-based blue LED technology not only resulted in efficient white light sources, but continues to enable a host of applications and scientific inquiries. The researchers primarily responsible for the development of the blue LED were awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics. PMID:25411140

  3. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1983: Henry Taube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, J.

    2002-07-01

    The 1983 Nobel Prize was awarded to Henry Taube for his work on the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions, especially in metal complexes. Taube's work represents a watershed in the development of the mechanistic chemistry of inorganic transition metal complexes. His studies of those reactions is a central feature in courses in mechanistic inorganic chemistry, and his description of inner-sphere and outer-sphere electron transfer mechanisms remain as the textbook examples.

  4. The Netherlands' School Building Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEB Exchange, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents awardees of the Netherland's School Building Prize: those schools that have shown they can embrace new directions in school building design while adhering to budgetary limitations. Highlights general findings of the judges on school design and construct as presented by the 41 participating schools. (GR)

  5. 1993 Gordon Bell Prize Winners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, Alan H.; Simon, Horst; Heller, Don; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Gordon Bell Prize recognizes significant achievements in the application of supercomputers to scientific and engineering problems. In 1993, finalists were named for work in three categories: (1) Performance, which recognizes those who solved a real problem in the quickest elapsed time. (2) Price/performance, which encourages the development of cost-effective supercomputing. (3) Compiler-generated speedup, which measures how well compiler writers are facilitating the programming of parallel processors. The winners were announced November 17 at the Supercomputing 93 conference in Portland, Oregon. Gordon Bell, an independent consultant in Los Altos, California, is sponsoring $2,000 in prizes each year for 10 years to promote practical parallel processing research. This is the sixth year of the prize, which Computer administers. Something unprecedented in Gordon Bell Prize competition occurred this year: A computer manufacturer was singled out for recognition. Nine entries reporting results obtained on the Cray C90 were received, seven of the submissions orchestrated by Cray Research. Although none of these entries showed sufficiently high performance to win outright, the judges were impressed by the breadth of applications that ran well on this machine, all nine running at more than a third of the peak performance of the machine.

  6. [Two Nobel prizes for psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Knezević, Aleksandar; Knezević, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    It was pointed out that both Nobel prizes for medicine in the field of psychiatry have lost their importance in contemporary medicine. Modern achievements in psychiatry have suppresed both psychosurgery of Egas Moniz and malaria treatment of Wagner-Jauregg as methods in the treatment of mental diseases. PMID:19368289

  7. The mantle of the heavens: Reflections on the 2014 Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard G M

    2015-06-01

    The award of the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology in 2014 for the discovery of place and grid cells was both a personal award to three great scientists and also a mark of the maturity of systems neuroscience as a discipline. This article offers both personal and scientific reflections on these discoveries, detailing both how getting to know all three winners had an impact on my life and the research questions that we shared in common work together. It ends with brief reflections on three important outstanding questions. PMID:25786661

  8. The new date, new format, new goals and new sponsor of the Archon Genomics X PRIZE competition.

    PubMed

    Kedes, Larry; Campany, Grant

    2011-11-01

    The Archon Genomics X PRIZE presented by MEDCO is a $10 million prize for whole human genome sequencing that will test 100 samples and establish a defined method for determining quality and cost per genome. The contest will entail a head-to-head competition starting on 3 January 2013. The $10 million grand prize will be awarded to the first team to meet all the quality standards. If there is no grand prize winner, lesser awards will be made for single achievements in the three categories of accuracy, completeness and haplotype phasing. Similar to the open comment period offered earlier this year for the validation protocol, the X PRIZE Foundation seeks commentary from the scientific community on the revised competition format and judging criteria prior to publishing final rules as part of a master agreement with competing teams next year. The official validation protocol will make the competition judging transparent and fair using multiple standard techniques and robust bioinformatics. With sponsorship from Medco Health Solutions (MEDCO), the 100 samples will be derived from genomes of appropriately consented centenarian subjects. At the conclusion of the contest, the data from the redundantly sequenced genomes will be deposited into a scientific database and provide a heretofore unrealized depth of sequence data based on multiple technologies. The sample set and the bioinformatic pipeline will also be made available to the scientific community. PMID:22030612

  9. [The assessment process within science and the nomination of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine].

    PubMed

    Pittella, José Eymard Homem

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest achievements in the history of medicine was the description of Chagas disease by the physician and scientist Carlos Chagas. A hundred years after the discovery of the disease, speculation still remains regarding the two official nominations of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel Prize, the biggest worldwide scientific award, in 1913 and in 1921. It has been accepted that the reason why the prize was not awarded to this brilliant scientist may have been the strong opposition that he faced in Brazil, from some physicians and researchers of that time. They went as far as questioning the existence of Chagas disease, thereby possibly influencing the decision of the Nobel Committee not to award the prize to him. Analysis of the database of the Nobel prize archives, with the revelation of the names of nominators, nominees and prizewinners spanning the years 1901-1951, brought information not only about what was considered to be a scientific achievement at that time, but also about who the important scientists were and what the relationships between them were. The non-recognition of Carlos Chagas' discoveries by the Nobel Committee appears to be more correctly explained by these factors than by the negative impact of the local opposition. PMID:19287939

  10. Waterman award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nominations are being accepted for the Alan T. Waterman Award, which annually recognizes an outstanding young scientist in the forefront of science. The award, named for the first director of the National Science Foundation, was established by Congress 8 years ago to mark the agency's silver anniversary.Candidates must be U.S. citizens and must be 35 years old or younger (or not be more than 5 years beyond receipt of the Ph.D. degree by December 31 of the year in which nominated). Candidates should have completed sufficient scientific or engineering research to have demonstrated through personal accomplishments outstanding capability and exceptional promise for significant future achievement, the award committee says. In addition, those nominated should exhibit quality, innovation, and potential for discovery in their research.

  11. Improbable Research and the Ig Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Marc

    2008-10-01

    The Ig Nobel Prizes honor achievements that first make people laugh, then make them think. Marc Abrahams, father of the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony and editor of the magazine Annals of Improbable Research, will show us some of the most outstanding Ig Nobel winners. He will also discuss why Ohio has been such a good producer of Ig Nobel Prize winners, and of improbable research.

  12. [The Nobel Prize for nitric oxide. The unjust exclusion of Dr. Salvador Moncada].

    PubMed

    de Berrazueta, J R

    1999-04-01

    The 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded jointly to North-American scientists, Dr Robert F. Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro and Ferid Murad, for their discoveries in relation to "nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system". This has raised an important polemic because of the exclusion the South-American scientist, now nationalized British, Dr. Salvador Moncada. This short historical review examines some of the fundamental contributions to the knowledge in this field. It shows the sequence of the discoveries and the communication of them to the scientific community by the rewarded scientists and by Dr. Moncada. It is based on some fundamental publications in order to better understand this story, which does not coincide with the writing in 1996 by the Lasker Prize Committee, and which in 1998 was re-written again by the Nobel Committee of the Swedish Academy. More than 90 universities, academies and societies have acknowledged Dr. Moncada up to now with priority in the discovery of the fact that nitric oxide is released by endothelial cells, and the revealing of its metabolic way. More than 20,000 citations of their fundamental papers endorse in the scientific community his primacy in this field. Even Robert Furchgott, author of the brilliant discovery of the endothelium derived relaxing factor, that opened this field to the science, declared about the award of the 1998 Nobel Prize: "I feel that the Nobel Prize Committee could have made an exception this year and chosen a fourth person, Salvador Moncada (to share the prize)". PMID:10217961

  13. Landau's Nobel Prize in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, M.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Work of Lev Landau had a profound impact on the physics in 20th century. Landau had created the paradigms that had framed the conversations on the outstanding problems in physics for decades. He had laid foundations for our understanding of quantum matter like superfluidity, superconductivity and the theory of Fermi liquid. Here we present some Nobel Archive data on the winning nomination that led to the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1962.

  14. Society News: RAS Awards 2012; Prof. Andy Fabian; Prof. John C Brown; Prof. Andrew Fazakerley; Dr. Mike Irwin; Joss Bland-Hawthorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-02-01

    Each year the RAS recognizes outstanding achievement in astronomy and geophysics by the award of medals and prizes. Candidates are nominated by Fellows and the awards made by a committee of Fellows, ensuring that these scientists have earned the respect and admiration of their peers in the research community.

  15. Leon Van Speybroeck Wins Astrophysics Bruno Rossi Prize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Leon Van Speybroeck of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge Massachusetts was awarded the 2002 Bruno Rossi Prize of the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomy Society. The Rossi Prize is an arnual recognition of significant contributions in high-energy astrophysics in honor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's late Professor Bruno Rossi, an authority on cosmic ray physics and a pioneer in the field of x-ray astronomy. Van Speybroeck, who led the effort to design and make the x-ray mirrors for NASA's premier Chandra X-Ray Observatory, was recognized for a career of stellar achievements in designing precision x-ray optics. As Telescope Scientist for Chandra, he has worked for more than 20 years with a team that includes scientists and engineers from the Harvard-Smithsonian, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, TRW, Inc., Huhes-Danbury (now B.F. Goodrich Aerospace), Optical Coating Laboratories, Inc., and Eastman-Kodak on all aspects of the x-ray mirror assembly that is the heart of the observatory.

  16. Honoring antiparasitics: The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-June

    2016-04-01

    Protozoa and helminths are the two main groups that cause parasitic diseases with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms. Protozoa are unicellular organisms like the malaria parasite Plasmodium, which is responsible for the majority of deaths associated with parasitic infections. Helminths are alternative parasites that can produce debilitating diseases in hosts, some of which result in chronic infections. The discovery of effective therapeutic drugs is the key to improving health in regions of poverty and poor sanitation where these parasites usually occur. It is very encouraging that the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Youyou Tu as well as William C. Campbell and Satoshi Õmura for their considerable contributions in discovering artemisinin and avermectin, respectively. Both drugs revolutionized therapies for filariasis and malaria, significantly reducing by large percentages their morbidity and mortality. PMID:27372164

  17. Innovation Inducement Prizes: Connecting Research to Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besharov, Douglas J.; Williams, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Innovation inducement prizes have been used for centuries. In the United States, a recent federal policy change--the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010--clarified and simplified a path by which all federal agencies can offer innovation inducement prizes, thus intensifying interest in how government agencies can most effectively design…

  18. Using prize-based incentives to enhance daily interactive voice response (IVR) compliance: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Jan A.; Minard, Charles G.; Hudson, Sonora; Green, Charles E.; Schmitz, Joy M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of a prize-based contingency-management (CM) approach to encourage interactive voice response (IVR) compliance in a cocaine-treatment study and explored the association between IVR call rate and outcome during a cocaine abstinence-induction trial. Subjects called into the IVR system daily to complete a brief interview assessing cocaine use for past 24 hours. One group earned $1 for each call; the other earned one draw per call from a “prize bowl” with a range of awards. Abstinence was rewarded according to a high-value voucher incentive schedule, which was the same for both groups, and confirmed by thrice-weekly urine testing at clinic visits. Odds of calling were 4.7 times greater (95% CI: 1.23, 17.91) in the prize-CM group than in the fixed dollar CM group. In addition, the percent of IVR calls was significantly associated with abstinence achievement, χ2 (1) = 5.147, p<0.023. The use of prize-based CM to increase the use of IVR is feasible and deserves examination as an innovation for helping participants engage in treatment. PMID:24029622

  19. New Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize announced for 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., AGU announced the creation of a new award: the Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize. The prize, which is being made possible by a generous contribution from longtime AGU members and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, scientists Bruce Tsurutani and Olga Verkhoglyadova, will recognize an AGU member scientist and will come with a $10,000 award. Tsurutani has served as a researcher with JPL since 1972 and is currently a senior research scientist. He was also the president of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy section from 1990 to 1992 and is a recipient of AGU's John Adam Fleming Medal, given “for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences.” Verkhoglyadova served as a professor of space physics in the Department of Astrophysics and Space Physics at Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, in the Ukraine, prior to coming to the United States. Their leadership and dedication to AGU and to their field are apparent in their passion for this prize.

  20. Climate Change Draws World Attention: The 2007 Nobel Peace Award Goes to Gore and IPCC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisland, Beverly Milner; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, the Nobel Committee awarded their Peace Prize to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization and by the United Nations Environment Program) and to former Vice-President Al Gore, Jr. The committee praised the United Nations panel for creating…

  1. Preserving a legacy for our patients: The bedside-to-bench award in translational research

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Translational Medicine is pleased to announce a prize to recognize outstanding contributions in the field of translational medicine. This year, the Bedside-to-Bench Award was provided by an anonymous donor and supported by the Journal of Translational Medicine Editorial Board. Applications should be submitted directly to the Journal of Translational Medicine [1].

  2. Inside the "Long Beach Way"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article features Long Beach Unified School District, the 2003 winner of a prestigious prize in urban education. The district of more than 90,000 students is the first winner of the award to return to the competition as a finalist. Its reappearance on the list after earning the prize in 2003 raises interesting questions about how districts…

  3. AWARD program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppert, Frank

    1998-07-01

    The All Weather ARrival and Departure (AWARD) program is supported by the European Commission under the Brite-EuRam III structure. Following the VERSATILE preparation program, it started on June 1996 and is planned to finish end of 1999. The program consortium consists of ten partners such as a major airline, aircraft and equipment manufacturers, research and tests centers, and an university. Contractors from France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy and The Netherlands are coordinated by Sextant Avionique. AWARD main objective is to demonstrate the efficiency of vision systems under adverse weather conditions. In order to evaluate the added benefits of these concepts within aircraft operations of approach, landing, taxi and takeoff, two applications are developed: (1) Enhanced Vision System (EVS) based on Head Up Display enhancement with Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) and Millimeter Wave Radar (MMWR) images. (2) Synthetic Vision System (SVS) displaying an overlaid symbology on a perspective presentation of the environment, thanks to the combination of database and accurate positioning systems. The evaluation of these two tests systems will focus on: (1) Performance and human acceptability aspects. They will be appreciated according to human factors criteria as well as an integration within realistic environments. The NLR Research Flight Simulator and the DLR ATTAS flight test aircraft will be used. (2) Reliability, integrity aspects thanks to a theoretical certification/system study which will propose guidelines for certification, and will address impact on the system architecture. The paper addresses the work structure of AWARD in order to show what are the keypoints addressed in this program.

  4. Oswald Avery: the professor, DNA, and the Nobel Prize that eluded him.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Tarunendu

    2004-01-01

    In 1944, two Canadians, Oswald Avery and Colin MacLeod, and an American, MacLyn McCarty, published a paper in The Journal of Experimental Medicine that demonstrated genes to be the chemical, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Even though this paper is now regarded as the single mos important publication in biology of the 20th century, Avery was not awarded the Nobel Prize. This raises the question as to why his work did not earn him the Prize. These are several possible reasons: the discovery may have been ahead of tis time; all three authors were physician-scientists ans not recognized chemists or geneticists; and Avery, the principal author, had reached an advanced age and characteristically took an extremely cautious and low-key approach to his work. Discussion of these reasons in turn raises other issues surrounding the recognition of the work of celebrated scientist, from Galileo and Copernicus onwards. PMID:15202433

  5. A Valentine's Day bouquet for Temperature readers: pleasing with prizes, searching for the right words, and keeping things mysterious

    PubMed Central

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    This editorial tells its readers that the journal Temperature awards its first prizes for best papers to Boris Kingma and Assaf Yacobi. It also discusses the use of several thermoregulation-related terms and expressions, including “cold temperature,” “thermoneutral temperature,” and “warm-sensitive” and offers, arguably, better alternatives. The editorial also contains a new puzzle: how can color affect temperature perception? PMID:27226997

  6. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1995: Paul Crutzen, Sherwood Rowland, and Mario Molina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-10-01

    The 1995 Nobel Prize was awarded to Paul Crutzen, Sherwood Rowland, and Mario Molina "for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone". Collectively, their work established atmospheric chemistry as a major focus at the end of the twentieth century. The results have drawn attention to significant environmental issues in particular, the threat posed to the ozone layer by chlorofluorocarbons.

  7. [Karl Sudhoff and the Nobel Prize].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on files in the Nobel Prize archive for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden, this paper illuminates the Nobel Prize nominations for and by Karl Sudhoff from 1918 to 1923. He was nominated by Max Cloetta and Max Neuburger, and Sudhoff himself put forward Julius Hirschberg, Erwin Payr and Georg Sticker. Even though none of the proposals led to a prize, the nomination letters offer insights in the relationships between leading historians of medicine in the immediate post-war years. The study is part of a project exploring the construction and enactment of scientific excellence. PMID:26821496

  8. Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    of Dr Todd Evans, another significant mentor of mine, as winner of this prestigious award? Then, it happened. The paper covers several key topics related to high beta tokamak physics. For me, the greatest satisfaction in receiving this award is because it was the first Nuclear Fusion Award to recognize research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) located at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The achievement of record stability parameters in a mega-Ampere class spherical torus (ST) device reported in the paper represents a multi-year effort, contributed to by the entire research team. Research to maintain such plasmas for an indefinite period continues today. Understanding RWM stabilization physics is crucial for this goal, and leveraging the high beta ST operating space uniquely tests theory for application to future STs and to tokamaks in general, including advanced operational scenarios of ITER. For instance, the RWM was found to have significant amplitude in components with the toroidal mode number greater than unity. This has important implications for general active RWM control. Evidence that the RWM passive stabilization physics and marginal stability criterion are indeed more complex than originally thought was shown in this paper. Present work shows the greater complexity has a direct impact on how we should extrapolate RWM stabilization to future devices. The paper also reported the qualitative observation of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV), followed by a companion paper by our group in 2006 reporting the quantitative observation of this effect and comparison to theory. The physics of this interesting and important phenomenon was introduced to me by Professor J. Callen (who has given an overview talk at this conference including this subject) and Professor Kerchung Shaing of the University of Wisconsin, to whom I am quite indebted. The paper also reported the first measurement of resonant field amplification at high beta in the NSTX

  9. Children's Book Awards Annual 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Matt; Dupuy, Marigny J.

    This publication reviews the books from the major national children's book awards and lists. The following awards are covered: John Newberry Awards, Randolph Caldecott Awards, Coretta Scott King Awards, Mildred L. Batchelder Awards, Pura Belpre, Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, and the National Book Award for Young People's Literature. The lists are…

  10. Eyes on the Baldrige Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Jay

    2002-01-01

    Describes the first school districts to win 2001 Malcom Baldrige National Quality Awards: The Chugach School District in Prince William Sound, Alaska (www.chugachschools.com), and the Pearl River Union Free School District in Pearl River, New York (www.pearlriver.k12.ny.us). (PKP)