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  1. Axial Skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site-specific Modules Resources Archived Modules Updates Axial Skeleton (80 bones) Skull (28) Cranial Bones Parietal (2) ... Sternum (1) Ribs (24) « Previous (Divisions of the Skeleton) Next (Appendicular Skeleton (126 bones)) » Contact Us | Privacy ...

  2. Estudio de NIH señala relación de la TC en la infancia con leucemia y cáncer de cerebro más tarde

    Cancer.gov

    Niños y adultos jóvenes a quienes se les hicieron exploraciones muchas veces con tomografía computarizada (TC), una herramienta de diagnóstico de uso frecuente, tienen un riesgo ligeramente mayor de padecer leucemia y tumores cerebrales en la década poste

  3. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  4. Axial superchargers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1944-01-01

    Improvements, however, have been attained which permit a shortening of the structure without any impairment of the efficiency. The axial supercharger has a better efficiency and a simpler design than the radial supercharger. The relatively narrow range in which it operates satisfactorily should not be a very disturbing factor for practical flight problems. The length of this type of supercharger may be reduced considerably if some impairment in the efficiency is permitted.

  5. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    J. Huffer

    2004-09-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I.

  6. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  7. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  8. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  9. Altered Axial Skeletal Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The axial skeleton is routinely examined in standard developmental toxicity bioassays and has proven to be sensitive to a wide variety of chemical agents. Dysmorphogenesis in the skull, vertebral column and ribs has been described in both human populations and in laboratory anima...

  10. Axially chiral BODIPYs.

    PubMed

    Lerrick, Reinner I; Winstanley, Thomas P L; Haggerty, Karen; Wills, Corinne; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W; Bultinck, Patrick; Herrebout, Wouter; Benniston, Andrew C; Hall, Michael J

    2014-05-11

    The synthesis and resolution of a class of chiral organic fluorophores, axially chiral 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacenes (Ax*-BODIPY), is described. Ax*-BODIPYs were prepared through a modular synthesis combined with a late stage Heck functionalisation. Resolution was achieved by preparative chiral HPLC. Absolute stereochemical assignment was performed by comparison of experimental ECD spectra with TD-DFT calculations. PMID:24676233

  11. GEOS axial booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    A booms and mechanisms subsystem was designed, developed, and qualified for the geostationary scientific satellite GEOS. Part of this subsystem consist of four axial booms consisting of one pair of 1 m booms and one pair of 2.5 m booms. Each of these booms is carrying one bird cage electric field sensor. Alignment accuracy requirements led to a telescopic type solution. Deployment is performed by pressurized nitrogen. At deployment in orbit two of these booms showed some anomalies and one of these two deployed only about 80%. Following this malfunction a detailed failure investigation was performed resulting in a design modification of some critical components as release mechanism, guide sleeves of the telescopic elements, and pressure system.

  12. Extra-axial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rapalino, Otto; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    Extra-axial brain tumors are the most common adult intracranial neoplasms and encompass a broad spectrum of pathologic subtypes. Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial brain tumor (approximately one-third of all intracranial neoplasms) and typically present as slowly growing dural-based masses. Benign meningiomas are very common, and may occasionally be difficult to differentiate from more aggressive subtypes (i.e., atypical or malignant varieties) or other dural-based masses with more aggressive biologic behavior (e.g., hemangiopericytoma or dural-based metastases). Many neoplasms that typically affect the brain parenchyma (intra-axial), such as gliomas, may also present with primary or secondary extra-axial involvement. This chapter provides a general and concise overview of the common types of extra-axial tumors and their typical imaging features. PMID:27432671

  13. Axial Patterning in Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Hans R.

    2009-01-01

    Morphogen gradients play an important role in pattern formation during early stages of embryonic development in many bilaterians. In an adult hydra, axial patterning processes are constantly active because of the tissue dynamics in the adult. These processes include an organizer region in the head, which continuously produces and transmits two signals that are distributed in gradients down the body column. One signal sets up and maintains the head activation gradient, which is a morphogenetic gradient. This gradient confers the capacity of head formation on tissue of the body column, which takes place during bud formation, hydra's mode of asexual reproduction, as well as during head regeneration following bisection of the animal anywhere along the body column. The other signal sets up the head inhibition gradient, which prevents head formation, thereby restricting bud formation to the lower part of the body column in an adult hydra. Little is known about the molecular basis of the two gradients. In contrast, the canonical Wnt pathway plays a central role in setting up and maintaining the head organizer. PMID:20066073

  14. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  15. Intra-axial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rapalino, Otto; Batchelor, Tracy; González, R Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide variety of intra-axial primary and secondary brain neoplasms. Many of them have characteristic imaging features while other tumors can present in a similar fashion. There are peculiar posttreatment imaging phenomena that can present as intra-axial mass-like lesions (such as pseudoprogression or radiation necrosis), further complicating the diagnosis and clinical follow-up of patients with intracerebral tumors. The purpose of this chapter is to present a general overview of the most common intra-axial brain tumors and peculiar posttreatment changes that are very important in the diagnosis and clinical follow-up of patients with brain tumors. PMID:27432670

  16. Achromatic axially symmetric wave plate.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Komaki, Kazuki; Otani, Yukitoshi; Yoshizawa, Toru

    2012-12-31

    An achromatic axially symmetric wave plate (AAS-WP) is proposed that is based on Fresnel reflections. The wave plate does not introduce spatial dispersion. It provides retardation in the wavelength domain with an axially symmetric azimuthal angle. The optical configuration, a numerical simulation, and the optical properties of the AAS-WP are described. It is composed of PMMA. A pair of them is manufactured on a lathe. In the numerical simulation, the achromatic angle is estimated and is used to design the devices. They generate an axially symmetric polarized beam. The birefringence distribution is measured in order to evaluate the AAS-WPs. PMID:23388751

  17. Axial structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Veronique Bernard; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Ulf-G Meissner

    2002-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental and theoretical understanding of the axial nucleon structure at low and moderate energies. Topics considered include (quasi)elastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering, charged pion electroproduction off nucleons and ordinary as well as radiative muon capture on the proton.

  18. Axial pumps for propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppert, M. C.; Rothe, K.

    1974-01-01

    The development of axial flow hydrogen pumps is examined. The design features and the performance data obtained during the course of the development programs are discussed. The problems created by the pump characteristics are analyzed. Graphs of four stage pump performance for various turbine blade configurations are developed. The characteristics and performance of a variety of pumps are included.

  19. Forced axial segregation in axially inhomogeneous rotating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, S.; Windows-Yule, C. R. K.; Luding, S.; Parker, D. J.; Thornton, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    Controlling segregation is both a practical and a theoretical challenge. Using a novel drum design comprising concave and convex geometry, we explore, through the application of both discrete particle simulations and positron emission particle tracking, a means by which radial size segregation may be used to drive axial segregation, resulting in an order of magnitude increase in the rate of separation. The inhomogeneous drum geometry explored also allows the direction of axial segregation within a binary granular bed to be controlled, with a stable, two-band segregation pattern being reliably and reproducibly imposed on the bed for a variety of differing system parameters. This strong banding is observed to persist even in systems that are highly constrained in the axial direction, where such segregation would not normally occur. These findings, and the explanations provided of their underlying mechanisms, could lead to radical new designs for a broad range of particle processing applications but also may potentially prove useful for medical and microflow applications.

  20. Quasi-axially symmetric stellarators

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Confinement of a plasma for controlled thermonuclear fusion is studied numerically. Toroidal equilibria are considered, with an emphasis on the Modular Helias-like Heliac 2 (MHH2), which is a stellarator of low aspect ratio with just two field periods surrounded by 16 modular coils. The geometry is fully three-dimensional, but there is an axial symmetry of the magnetic structure that is calculated to give confinement competitive with that in circular tokamaks. Additional vertical and toroidal field coils, together with a current drive, provide the flexibility and the control of rotational transform necessary for a successful experiment. An MHH3 device with three field periods and comparable quasi-axial symmetry is presented, too, and because of reversed shear, its physical properties may be better. Variational analysis of equilibrium and stability is shown to give a more reliable prediction of performance for these stellarators than linearized or local theories that suffer from a failure of differentiability and convergence. PMID:9707544

  1. Quasi-axially symmetric stellarators.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, P R

    1998-08-18

    Confinement of a plasma for controlled thermonuclear fusion is studied numerically. Toroidal equilibria are considered, with an emphasis on the Modular Helias-like Heliac 2 (MHH2), which is a stellarator of low aspect ratio with just two field periods surrounded by 16 modular coils. The geometry is fully three-dimensional, but there is an axial symmetry of the magnetic structure that is calculated to give confinement competitive with that in circular tokamaks. Additional vertical and toroidal field coils, together with a current drive, provide the flexibility and the control of rotational transform necessary for a successful experiment. An MHH3 device with three field periods and comparable quasi-axial symmetry is presented, too, and because of reversed shear, its physical properties may be better. Variational analysis of equilibrium and stability is shown to give a more reliable prediction of performance for these stellarators than linearized or local theories that suffer from a failure of differentiability and convergence. PMID:9707544

  2. High Power Co-Axial SRF Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Neubauer, R.A. Rimmer

    2009-05-01

    There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Two-thirds of these designs are coaxial couplers using disk or cylindrical ceramics in various combinations and configurations. While it is well known that dielectric losses go down by several orders of magnitude at cryogenic temperatures, it not well known that the thermal conductivity also goes down, and it is the ratio of thermal conductivity to loss tangent (SRF ceramic Quality Factor) and ceramic volume which will determine the heat load of any given design. We describe a novel robust co-axial SRF coupler design which uses compressed window technology. This technology will allow the use of highly thermally conductive materials for cryogenic windows. The mechanical designs will fit into standard-sized ConFlat® flanges for ease of assembly. Two windows will be used in a coaxial line. The distance between the windows is adjusted to cancel their reflections so that the same window can be used in many different applications at various frequencies.

  3. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-09-17

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

  4. Quark mass effect on axial charge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-dong; Lin, Shu

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of finite quark mass on the dynamics of the axial charge using the D3/D7 model in holography. The mass term in the axial anomaly equation affects both the fluctuation (generation) and dissipation of the axial charge. We studied the dependence of the effect on quark mass and an external magnetic field. For axial charge generation, we calculated the mass diffusion rate, which characterizes the helicity flipping rate. The rate is a nonmonotonous function of mass and can be significantly enhanced by the magnetic field. The diffusive behavior is also related to a divergent susceptibility of the axial charge. For axial charge dissipation, we found that in the long time limit, the mass term dissipates all the charge effectively generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields. The result is consistent with a relaxation time approximation. The rate of dissipation through mass term is a monotonous increasing function of both quark mass and a magnetic field.

  5. Sensorless Control of Axial Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumo, Daichi; Yoshida, Toshiya; Ohniwa, Katsumi

    This paper describes a sensorless control method of axial active magnetic bearings (AMBs). At high frequencies, inductance of the axial electromagnets is hardly dependent on the airgap because of the eddy current effects of the non-laminated core. Therefore the carrier frequency should be 3 kHz below to improve the sensitivity to the airgap. In the experiment, Sensorless controll of the axial AMBs have been achieved.

  6. Axial velocity in decaying swirl flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algifri, A. H.; Bhardwaj, R. K.; Rao, Y. V. N.

    1988-09-01

    Experiments were carried out on turbulent swirling flow with variable initial swirl at different flow rates to study the effect of swirl on axial velocity. A correlation was made between the defect in the swirling flow axial velocity and the swirl number which locally defines the swirl intensity. An expression which can be used to predict the axial velocity distribution of turbulent swirling flow in a pipe is presented.

  7. Unsteady Flows in Axial Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, F. E.; Rannie, W. D.

    1957-01-01

    Of the various unsteady flows that occur in axial turbomachines certain asymmetric disturbances, of wave length large in comparison with blade spacing, have become understood to a certain extent. These disturbances divide themselves into two categories: self-induced oscillations and force disturbances. A special type of propagating stall appears as a self-induced disturbance; an asymmetric velocity profile introduced at the compressor inlet constitutes a forced disturbance. Both phenomena have been treated from a unified theoretical point of view in which the asymmetric disturbances are linearized and the blade characteristics are assumed quasi-steady. Experimental results are in essential agreement with this theory wherever the limitations of the theory are satisfied. For the self-induced disturbances and the more interesting examples of the forced disturbances, the dominant blade characteristic is the dependence of total pressure loss, rather than the turning angle, upon the local blade inlet angle.

  8. Axially grooved heat pipe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A technology evaluation study on axially grooved heat pipes is presented. The state-of-the-art is reviewed and present and future requirements are identified. Analytical models, the Groove Analysis Program (GAP) and a closed form solution, were developed to facilitate parametric performance evaluations. GAP provides a numerical solution of the differential equations which govern the hydrodynamic flow. The model accounts for liquid recession, liquid/vapor shear interaction, puddle flow as well as laminar and turbulent vapor flow conditions. The closed form solution was developed to reduce computation time and complexity in parametric evaluations. It is applicable to laminar and ideal charge conditions, liquid/vapor shear interaction, and an empirical liquid flow factor which accounts for groove geometry and liquid recession effects. The validity of the closed form solution is verified by comparison with GAP predictions and measured data.

  9. Axial cylinder internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.

    1992-03-10

    This patent describes improvement in a barrel type internal combustion engine including an engine block having axial-positioned cylinders with reciprocating pistons arranged in a circular pattern: a drive shaft concentrically positioned within the cylinder block having an offset portion extending outside the cylinder block; a wobble spider rotatably journaled to the offset portion; connecting rods for each cylinder connecting each piston to the wobble spider. The improvement comprising: a first sleeve bearing means supporting the drive shaft in the engine block in a cantilevered manner for radial loads; a second sleeve bearing means rotatably supporting the wobble spider on the offset portion of the drive shaft for radial loads; a first roller bearing means positioned between the offset portion of the drive shaft and the wobble spider carrying thrust loadings only; a second roller bearing means carrying thrust loads only reacting to the first roller bearing located on the opposite end of the driveshaft between the shaft and the engine block.

  10. System Study for Axial Vane Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badley, Patrick R.; Smith, Michael R.; Gould, Cedric O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this engine feasibility study was to determine the benefits that can be achieved by incorporating positive displacement axial vane compression and expansion stages into high bypass turbofan engines. These positive-displacement stages would replace some or all of the conventional compressor and turbine stages in the turbine engine, but not the fan. The study considered combustion occurring internal to an axial vane component (i.e., Diesel engine replacing the standard turbine engine combustor, burner, and turbine); and external continuous flow combustion with an axial vane compressor and an axial vane turbine replacing conventional compressor and turbine systems.

  11. Cytokine profiles in axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Madej, Marta; Nowak, Beata; Sokolik, Renata; Chlebicki, Arkadiusz; Korman, Lucyna; Woytala, Patryk; Lubiński, Łukasz; Wiland, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Current studies concentrate on the cytokine network and its role in the pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis (SpA). In this study, we analyzed whether the serum cytokine profile (interleukins: IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33) correlates with demographic data, clinical manifestations, disease activity and treatment outcome in a group of patients with axial spondyloarthritis. Material and methods Forty-nine patients with an established diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (aSpA) and 19 healthy volunteers as controls were enrolled in the study. Clinical evaluation included patient's medical history, 44 joint count, back pain intensity and global disease activity in the preceding week (VAS), the duration of morning stiffness and blood tests. Disease activity was assessed using BASDAI and ASDAS-CRP. Serum concentration of IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33 was determined. Results In patients with aSpA, elevated serum concentration of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 was detected. In the aSpA group we detected higher values of serum concentration of IL-23 and IL-33 in the subgroup with anterior uveitis (83.1 ±184.0 pg/ml vs. 14.0 ±17.1 pg/ml, p < 0.0001 and 45.5 ±71.9 pg/ml vs. 18.4 ±14.3 pg/ml, p < 0.0001, respectively). Additionally, in the subgroup with peripheral arthritis, elevation of serum concentration of IL-12 (249.3 ±246.9 pg/ml vs. 99.9 ±105.9 pg/ml, p = 0.0001) was detected. Patients with preradiological SpA had higher serum concentration of IL-17 than patients with established diagnosis of AS (6.37 ±8.50 pg/ml vs. 2.04 ±2.98 pg/ml, p = 0.0295). No differences in serum concentration of analyzed cytokines were found between the subgroup with low to moderate disease activity and the subgroup with high to very high disease activity. Conclusions We report that in aSpA patients, compared to controls, elevated serum concentrations of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 were observed. Some cytokines may predispose to a more

  12. Liquid rocket engine axial-flow turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, D. D.; Huppert, M. C.; Viteri, F.; Farquhar, J.; Keller, R. B., Jr. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The axial pump is considered in terms of the total turbopump assembly. Stage hydrodynamic design, pump rotor assembly, pump materials for liquid hydrogen applications, and safety factors as utilized in state of the art pumps are among the topics discussed. Axial pump applications are included.

  13. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  14. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  15. Psychogenic axial myoclonus: report on two cases.

    PubMed

    Sławek, Jarosław; Wichowicz, Hubert M; Cubała, Wiesław Jerzy; Sołtan, Witold; Palasik, Witold; Wilczewska, Lucyna; Fiszer, Urszula

    2010-04-01

    Axial myoclonus (AM) is characterized by sudden muscle jerks involving axial and proximal muscles. It includes propriospinal myoclonus (PSM) which consists of trunk flexion or extension jerking with activity arising in axial muscles and spreading to caudal and rostral muscles at low velocity along propriospinal pathways. We report on two patients displaying flexion AM jerks in the absence of structural lesion of the central nervous system or electrophysiological evidence of organic origin. A conversion disorder was diagnosed. The jerks disappeared after psychoeducation with the patients remaining symptom free in 6-year long follow-up. The diagnoses of psychogenic axial (propriospinal-like) myoclonus were established. The literature on psychogenic axial (propriospinal-like myoclonus) is limited to a case report. Our cases demonstrate a good response to psychotropic medication and psychoeducation and fulfill the psychogenic movement disorder criteria. The phenomenology of psychogenic abnormal movements is diverse and PSM-like clinical picture may be a novel presentation. PMID:20135184

  16. Non-Radiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Eshed, Iris

    2015-12-01

    The term non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nrAxSpA) was coined for patients who have a clinical picture of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but do not exhibit radiographic sacroiliitis. The ASAS classification criteria for nrAxSpA, ensuring the recruitment of homogenous study cohorts, were accepted in 2009, although the respective diagnostic criteria for daily clinical practice have not yet been developed. The clinical diagnosis should be based on the composite of clinical symptoms and signs of the disease, HLA B27 status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of sacroiliac joints. Notably, a negative MRI or HLA B27 does not exclude the diagnosis in patients with a high clinical suspicion for nrAxSpA. The prevalence of nrAxSpA is similar to that of AS, but the former has a higher female preponderance. The rate of progression of nrAxSpA to the radiographic stage of disease (AS) ranges from 10% to 20% over 2 years. Current treatment strategies for nrAxSpA are the same as for AS and include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. While this review summarizes the current achievements in the field of nrAxSpA, further understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of the disease and, particularly, mechanisms of inflammation and subsequent new bone formation is essential for the development of new treatment strategies for nrAxSpA patients. PMID:26897981

  17. Combustion enhancement by axial vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Schadow, K. C.; Parr, T. P.; Parr, D. M.; Wilson, K. J.

    1987-06-01

    A tapered slot jet was studied experimentally in nonreacting and reacting tests using hot-wire anemometry, water-tunnel flow visualization, and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). The tapered slot jet is a modified elliptic jet which has a conical contraction leading to its outlet. The added contraction changes the entire flow field. The jet spread in the major axis plane is larger than in the minor axis plane, which is the opposite behavior of an elliptic jet. Consequently, no axes switching, typical to an elliptic jet, is observed. The turbulence amplification in the jet core is higher than in circular and elliptic jets. The different behavior is attributed to the change in flow direction, inside the nozzle, from the conical section to the slot outlet. During this transition, the flow acquires angular momentum thereby generating axial vorticity. The influence of the contraction angle and the outlet aspect ratio were investigated. The effect of the augmented turbulence on reactive flow was tested in a premixed flame. The combustion rate was augmented in both the core and edges of the flame relative to a circular burner.

  18. Novel Integration Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth; Brown, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics; separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and magnetic field modeling results will be presented.

  19. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  20. Non-axial muscle stress and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Zahalak, G I

    1996-09-01

    A generalization is developed of the classic two-state Huxley cross-bridge model to account for non-axial active stress and stiffness. The main ingredients of the model are: (i) a relation between the general three-dimensional deformation of an element of muscle and the deformations of the cross-bridges, that assumes macroscopic deformation is transmitted to the myofibrils, (ii) radial as well as axial cross-bridge stiffness, and (iii) variations of the attachment and detachment rates with lateral filament spacing. The theory leads to a generalized Huxley rate equation on the bond-distribution function, n(zeta, theta, t), of the form [equation: see text] where the Dij are the components of the relative velocity gradient and rho and ñ are functions of the polar angle, theta, and time that describe, respectively, the deformation of the myofilament lattice and the distribution of accessible actin sites (both of these functions can be calculated from the macroscopic deformation). Explicit expressions, in terms of n, are derived for the nine components of the active stress tensor, and the 21 non-vanishing components of the active stiffness tensor; the active stress tensor is found to be unsymmetric. The theory predicts that in general non-axial deformations will modify active axial stress and stiffness, and also give rise to non-axial (e.g., shearing) components. Under most circumstances the magnitudes of the non-axial stress and stiffness components will be small compared with the axial and, further, the effects of non-axial deformation rates will be small compared with those of the axial rate. Large transverse deformations may, however, greatly reduce the axial force and stiffness. The theory suggests a significant mechanical role for the non-contractile proteins in muscle, namely that of equilibrating the unsymmetric active stresses. Some simple applications of the theory are provided to illustrate its physical content. PMID:8917737

  1. Bone formation in axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lories, Rik J; Haroon, Nigil

    2014-10-01

    The success of targeted therapies directed against tumor necrosis factor for patients with spondyloarthritis has shifted the focus of physicians and scientists towards the prevention of structural damage to the involved structures, in particular the sacroiliac joints and the spine, to avoid loss of function and disability. Structural damage to the skeleton as witnessed by radiography mainly consists of new bone formation potentially progressively leading to spine or joint ankylosis. This important long-term outcome parameter has been difficult to study, not alone because the time window for change may be long but also because human tissues with direct translational relevance are rarely available. Data from rodent models have identified growth factor signaling pathways as relevant targets. Both human and animal studies have tried to understand the link between inflammation and new bone formation. At the current moment, most evidence points towards a strong link between both but with the question still lingering about the sequence of events, disease triggers, and the interdependence of both features of disease. New discoveries such as a masterswitch T cell population that carries the IL23 receptor and the analysis of auto-antibodies directed again noggin and sclerostin are contributing to innovative insights into the pathophysiology of disease. Long-term data with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors also suggest that some window of opportunity may exist to inhibit structural disease progression. All these data provide support for a further critical analysis of the available datasets and boost research in the field. The introduction of novel disease definitions, in particular the characterization of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis patients, will likely be instrumental in our further understanding of structural damage. PMID:25488783

  2. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing.

    PubMed

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-14

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  3. Flow Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.; LaBelle, James

    2000-02-22

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. An axially aligned outlet may also increase the flow efficiency. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane. A seal separator may increase the useful life of the seal between the fixed and rotatable portions.

  4. Two pad axially grooved hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    San Andres, Luis A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A hydrostatic bearing having two axial grooves on opposite sides of the bearing for breaking the rotational symmetry in the dynamic force coefficients thus reducing the whirl frequency ratio and increasing the damping and stiffness of the hydrostatic bearing.

  5. Axial Thermal Rotation of Slender Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dichuan; Fakhri, Nikta; Pasquali, Matteo; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2011-05-01

    Axial rotational diffusion of rodlike polymers is important in processes such as microtubule filament sliding and flagella beating. By imaging the motion of small kinks along the backbone of chains of DNA-linked colloids, we produce a direct and systematic measurement of axial rotational diffusivity of rods both in bulk solution and near a wall. The measured diffusivities decrease linearly with the chain length, irrespective of the distance from a wall, in agreement with slender-body hydrodynamics theory. Moreover, the presence of small kinks does not affect the chain’s axial diffusivity. Our system and measurements provide insights into fundamental axial diffusion processes of slender objects, which encompass a wide range of entities including biological filaments and linear polymer chains.

  6. Axial grading of inert matrix fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

  7. High temperature co-axial winding transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Novotny, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis and design of co-axial winding transformers is presented. The design equations are derived and the different design approaches are discussed. One of the most important features of co-axial winding transformers is the fact that the leakage inductance is well controlled and can be made low. This is not the case in conventional winding transformers. In addition, the power density of co-axial winding transformers is higher than conventional ones. Hence, using co-axial winding transformers in a certain converter topology improves the power density of the converter. The design methodology used in meeting the proposed specifications of the co-axial winding transformer specifications are presented and discussed. The final transformer design was constructed in the lab. Co-axial winding transformers proved to be a good choice for high power density and high frequency applications. They have a more predictable performance compared with conventional transformers. In addition, the leakage inductance of the transformer can be controlled easily to suit a specific application. For space applications, one major concern is the extraction of heat from power apparatus to prevent excessive heating and hence damaging of these units. Because of the vacuum environment, the only way to extract heat is by using a cold plate. One advantage of co-axial winding transformers is that the surface area available to extract heat from is very large compared to conventional transformers. This stems from the unique structure of the co-axial transformer where the whole core surface area is exposed and can be utilized for cooling effectively. This is a crucial issue here since most of the losses are core losses.

  8. Planned Axial Reorientation Investigation on Sloshsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper details the design and logic of an experimental investigation to study axial reorientation in low gravity. The Sloshsat free-flyer is described. The planned axial reorientation experiments and test matrixes are presented. Existing analytical tools are discussed. Estimates for settling range from 64 to 1127 seconds. The planned experiments are modelled using computational fluid dynamics. These models show promise in reducing settling estimates and demonstrate the ability of pulsed high thrust settling to emulate lower thrust continuous firing.

  9. Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.

    2000-08-29

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane.

  10. Axial-conductances angular filter investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannan, P. W.; Pedersen, J. F.

    1984-04-01

    This report describes the concept, analysis, design, construction, and tests of an angular filter using an axial-conductance medium. The filter provides rejection that increases with incidence angle in the E plane. It is essentially invisible at broadside incidence, does not have critical tolerances on dimensions or materials, and operates over a wide frequency band. Analysis of an ideal homogeneous axial-conductance medium shows that the optimum value for the axial loss tangent is unity. With this value, the homogeneous medium provides approximately 8 dB of absorptive rejection per wavelength of filter thickness at a 45 E-plane incidence angle. Analysis of a practical inhomogeneous axial-conductance medium shows that some loss is introduced at broadside incidence, and that two types of waves can exist in the medium when only one wave is incident at an oblique angle. When the practical medium has dimensions that are properly chosen, its broadside loss can be negligible, and its rejection versus incidence angle can approximate that of the ideal medium. Tests of inhomogeneous samples in simulator wave guide confirm these analytical results. A screen printing method for depositing thick-film resistive ink on thin dielectric sheets has been investigated. With this method a 5x5 foot angular filter, designed for operation at 10 GHz, has been constructed containing over 70,000 axial-conductance elements.

  11. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  12. Polarization converters based on axially symmetric twisted nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Ko, Shih-Wei; Ting, Chi-Lun; Fuh, Andy Y-G; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2010-02-15

    An axially symmetric twisted nematic liquid crystal (ASTNLC) device, based on axially symmetric photoalignment, was demonstrated. Such an ASTNLC device can convert axial (azimuthal) to azimuthal (axial) polarization. The optical properties of the ASTNLC device are analyzed and found to agree with simulation results. The ASTNLC device with a specific device can be adopted as an arbitrary axial symmetric polarization converter or waveplate for axially, azimuthally or vertically polarized light. A design for converting linear polarized light to axially symmetric circular polarized light is also demonstrated. PMID:20389369

  13. Axial flow positive displacement worm gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement engine has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes and the third twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. A combustor section extends axially downstream through at least a portion of the second section.

  14. Radial/axial power divider/combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaddiparty, Yerriah P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An electromagnetic power divider/combiner comprises N radial outputs (31) having equal powers and preferably equal phases, and a single axial output (20). A divider structure (1) and a preferably identical combiner structure (2) are broadside coupled across a dielectric substrate (30) containing on one side the network of N radial outputs (31) and on its other side a set of N equispaced stubs (42) which are capacitively coupled through the dielectric substrate (30) to the N radial outputs (31). The divider structure (1) and the combiner structure (2) each comprise a dielectric disk (12, 22, respectively) on which is mounted a set of N radial impedance transformers (14, 24, respectively). Gross axial coupling is determined by the thickness of the dielectric layer (30). Rotating the disks (12, 22) with respect to each other effectuates fine adjustment in the degree of axial coupling.

  15. Normal glow discharge in axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, S.; Shang, J.

    2014-10-01

    Theory and results of mathematical modeling of a glow discharge in a parallel-plate configuration with axial magnetic field is presented. The model consists of continuity equations for electron and ion fluids, the Poisson equation for the self-consistent electric field. Numerical simulation results are presented for two-dimensional glow discharge at various initial conditions. The results are obtained for molecular nitrogen at pressure 1-5 Torr, emf of power supply 1-2 kV, and magnetic field induction B = 0-0.5 T. It is shown that in the presence of the axial magnetic field the glow discharge is rotated around its axis of symmetry. Nevertheless it is shown that in the investigated range of discharge parameters in an axial magnetic field the law of the normal current density is retained.

  16. Cystic lesions accompanying extra-axial tumours.

    PubMed

    Lohle, P N; Wurzer, H A; Seelen, P J; Kingma, L M; Go, K G

    1999-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of cyst formation in extra-axial tumours in the central nervous system (CNS). Cyst fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma were analysed in eight patients with nine peritumoral cysts: four with meningiomas, two with intracranial and two spinal intradural schwannomas. Measuring concentrations of various proteins [albumin, immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, alpha 2-macroglobulin and IgM] in cyst fluid, CSF and blood plasma provides insight into the state of the semipermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Peritumoral cysts accompanying intra-axial brain tumours are the end result of disruption of the BBB and oedema formation. Unlike intra-axial tumours which lie embedded within nervous tissue, extra-axial tumours tend to be separated from nervous tissue by arachnoid and pia mater. High concentrations of proteins were measured in the cyst fluid, approaching blood plasma levels, suggesting a local barrier disruption, and passage across the arachnoid, pia mater and cortical/medullary layer into the CNS parenchyma, leaving the protein concentrations of CSF practically unchanged. We confirmed that very high concentrations of protein are to be found in tumour cysts, plasma proteins forming almost 90% of the total protein in the cyst. We review current hypotheses on the pathogenesis of cysts accompanying neoplasms, particularly meningiomas and schwannomas, and conclude that the majority of proteins in cyst fluid in extra-axial, intradural meningiomas and schwannomas are plasma proteins. This provides a strong argument for pathogenesis of extra-axial intradural tumour cysts in favour of leakage of plasma proteins out of the tumour vessels into the nervous tissue. PMID:9987761

  17. Actuator Exerts Tensile Or Compressive Axial Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozzi, John; Richards, Cuyler H.

    1994-01-01

    Compact, manually operated mechanical actuator applies controlled, limited tensile or compressive axial force. Designed to apply loads to bearings during wear tests in clean room. Intended to replace hydraulic actuator. Actuator rests on stand and imparts axial force to part attached to clevis inside or below stand. Technician turns control screw at one end of lever. Depending on direction of rotation of control screw, its end of lever driven downward (for compression) or upward (for tension). Lever pivots about clevis pin at end opposite of control screw; motion drives downward or upward link attached via shearpin at middle of lever. Link drives coupling and, through it, clevis attached to part loaded.

  18. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of lubricating plugs are disposed in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are disposed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  19. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H.

    1988-01-01

    A series of lubricating plugs is located in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are placed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  20. Theoretical Determination of Axial Fan Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struve, E.

    1943-01-01

    The report presents a method for the computation of axial fan characteristics. The method is based on the assumption that the law of constancy of the circulation along the blade holds, approximately, for all fan conditions for which the blade elements operate at normal angles of attack (up to the stalling angles). Pressure head coefficient K(sub a) and power coefficient K(sub u) for the force components in the axial and tangential directions, respectively, and analogous to the lift and drag coefficients C(sub y) and C(sub x) are conveniently introduced.

  1. High axial load termination for TLP tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a hollow high axial load termination for a composite tubular tendon. It comprises: a curved hollow termination body open at one end wit a circular opening and connected at the opposite curved end with an elongated hollow member of lesser diameter than the diameter of the circular opening of the termination body, a composite tubular tendon containing axial fibers and helical fibers laid on an inner hollow liner; fibers of the composite tubular tendon extending over and covering the termination body from the abutment with the composite tubular tendon to the elongated member of lesser diameter than the termination body.

  2. Investigations on Experimental Impellers for Axial Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Encke, W.

    1947-01-01

    A selection of measurements obtained on experimental impellers for axial blowers will be reported. In addition to characteristic curves plotted for low and for high peripheral velocities, proportions and blade sections for six different blower models and remarks on the design of blowers will be presented.

  3. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  4. Stability of structural members under axial load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E

    1937-01-01

    The principles of the cross method of moment distribution are used to check the stability of structural members under axial load. A brief theoretical treatment of the subject, together with an illustrative problem, is included as well as a discussion of the reduced modulus at high stresses and a set of tables to aid in the solution of practical problems.

  5. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  6. Ependimoma myxopapilar sacro gigante con osteolisis

    PubMed Central

    Ajler, Pablo; Landriel, Federico; Goldschmidt, Ezequiel; Campero, Álvaro; Yampolsky, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: la presentación de un caso de una paciente con un ependimoma sacro con extensa infiltración y destrucción ósea local. Descripción del caso: una mujer de 53 años acudió a la consulta por dolor lumbosacro y alteraciones sensitivas perineales y esfinterianas. La imágenes por Resonancia Magnética (IRM) y la Tomografía Axial Computada (TAC) mostraron una lesión expansiva gigante a nivel S2-S4 con extensa osteólisis e invasión de tejidos adyacentes. Se realizó una exéresis tumoral completa con mejoría del estatus funcional. La anatomía patológica informó ependimoma mixopapilar. Discusión: la extensión de la resección quirúrgica es el mejor predictor de buen pronóstico. El tratamiento radiante se reserva como opción adyuvante para las resecciones incompletas y recidiva tumoral. La quimioterapia sólo debería utilizarse en casos en que la cirugía y la radioterapia estén contraindicadas. Conclusión: Los ependimomas mixopapilares sacros con destrucción ósea y presentación intra y extradural son muy infrecuentes y deben ser tenidos en cuenta entre los diagnósticos diferenciales preoperatorios. Su resección total, siempre que sea posible, es la mejor alternativa terapéutica. PMID:25165615

  7. Description of Axial Detail for ROK Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Trellue, Holly R; Galloway, Jack D

    2012-04-20

    For the purpose of NDA simulations of the ROK fuel assemblies, we have developed an axial burnup distribution to represent the pins themselves based on gamma scans of rods in the G23 assembly. For the purpose of modeling the G23 assembly (both at ORNL and LANL), the pin-by-pin burnup map as simulated by ROK is being assumed to represent the radial burnup distribution. However, both DA and NDA results indicate that this simulated estimate is not 100% correct. In particular, the burnup obtained from the axial gamma scan of 7 pins does not represent exactly the same 'average' pin burnup as the ROK simulation. Correction for this discrepancy is a goal of the well-characterized assembly task but will take time. For now, I have come up with a correlation for 26 axial points of the burnup as obtained by gamma scans of 7 different rods (C13, G01, G02, J11, K10, L02, and M04, neglecting K02 at this time) to the average burnup given by the simulation for each of the rods individually. The resulting fraction in each axial zone is then averaged for the 7 different rods so that it can represent every fuel pin in the assembly. The burnup in each of the 26 axial zones of rods in all ROK assemblies will then be directly adjusted using this fraction, which is given in Table 1. Note that the gamma scan data given by ROK for assembly G23 included a length of {approx}3686 mm, so the first 12 mm and the last 14 mm were ignored to give an actual rod length of {approx}366 cm. To represent assembly F02 in which no pin-by-pin burnup distribution is given by ROK, we must model it using infinitely-reflected geometry but can look at the effects of measuring in different axial zones by using intermediate burnup files (i.e. smaller burnups than 28 GWd/MTU) and determining which axial zone(s) each burnup represents. Details for assembly F02 are then given in Tables 2 and 3, which is given in Table 1 and has 44 total axial zones to represent the top meter in explicit detail in addition to the

  8. Axial X Pinch Backlighting on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesener, Isaac; Greenly, John; Pikuz, Sergey; Shelkovenko, Tatiania; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce

    2008-11-01

    X pinch backlighting is a useful imaging technique whereby two or more wires are crossed at a single point and driven with a high current (300-500 kA). At the crossing point, a micron-scale sub-nanosecond x-ray source is produced that acts as a point source and can be used for point-projection imaging. Axial x pinch backlighting is a new technique that allows an end-on image of Z pinches. New load geometry was developed at Cornell University to allow all standard diagnostics to be used on the same shot as the axial x pinch backlighting diagnostic. High density plasma features have been observed that correlate well with XUV self-emission images previously recorded on COBRA and simulation results from GORGON. Data and images will be presented illustrating the latest results from COBRA. Future applications include the possibility of shockwave imaging in the center of thing foil cylinders.

  9. Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.; Treanor, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    A pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  10. Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1994-12-06

    A pipe inspection instrument carriage is described for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a Y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure. 4 figures.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics of axially moving plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayesh, Mergen H.; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics for forced motions of an axially moving plate is numerically investigated using Von Kármán plate theory and retaining in-plane displacements and inertia. The equations of motion are obtained via an energy method based on Lagrange equations. This yields a set of second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations with coupled terms. The equations are transformed into a set of first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations and are solved via the pseudo-arclength continuation technique. The near-resonance nonlinear dynamics is examined via plotting the frequency-response curves of the system. Results are shown through frequency-response curves, time histories, and phase-plane diagrams. The effect of system parameters, such as the axial speed and the pretension, on the resonant responses is also highlighted.

  12. Axial flow positive displacement worm compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement compressor has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first and second sections of a compressor assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first and second twist slopes in the first and second sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. An engine including the compressor has in downstream serial flow relationship from the compressor a combustor and a high pressure turbine drivingly connected to the compressor by a high pressure shaft.

  13. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-01-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity. PMID:26477579

  14. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-01-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity. PMID:26477579

  15. Tri-axial tactile sensing element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos-Ramos, Julián.; Navas-González, Rafael; Vidal-Verdú, F.

    2013-05-01

    A 13 x 13 square millimetre tri-axial taxel is presented which is suitable for some medical applications, for instance in assistive robotics that involves contact with humans or in prosthetics. Finite Element Analysis is carried out to determine what structure is the best to obtain a uniform distribution of pressure on the sensing areas underneath the structure. This structure has been fabricated in plastic with a 3D printer and a commercial tactile sensor has been used to implement the sensing areas. A three axis linear motorized translation stage with a tri-axial precision force sensor is used to find the parameters of the linear regression model and characterize the proposed taxel. The results are analysed to see to what extent the goal has been reached in this specific implementation.

  16. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-10-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity.

  17. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  18. Atlanto-axial subluxation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Thurlow, Robert D

    1988-01-01

    One of the causes of death in rheumatoid patients is cord compression following atlanto-axial subluxation. Dislocations in the cervical spine are common with patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. Anterior subluxation occurs in up to 35%, followed by vertical subluxation in 22.2%, lateral subluxation in 20.6% and rarely posterior subluxation. A case report is presented to illustrate such a complication. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  19. Nucleon Axial Charge in Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.G.; Richards, D.G.; Fleming, G.T.; Haegler, Ph.; Negele, J.W.; Pochinsky, A.V.; Orginos, K.; Renner, D.B.; Schroers, W.

    2006-02-10

    The nucleon axial charge is calculated as a function of the pion mass in full QCD. Using domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks, we present the first calculation with pion masses as light as 354 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm){sup 3}. We show that finite volume effects are small for our volumes and that a constrained fit based on finite volume chiral perturbation theory agrees with experiment within 7% statistical errors.

  20. Axial pattern skin flaps in cats.

    PubMed

    Remedios, A M; Bauer, M S; Bowen, C V; Fowler, J D

    1991-01-01

    The major direct cutaneous vessels identified in the cat include the omocervical, thoracodorsal, deep circumflex iliac, and caudal superficial epigastric arteries. Axial pattern skin flaps based on the thoracodorsal and caudal superficial epigastric arteries have been developed in cats. Rotation of these flaps as islands allows skin coverage to the carpus and metatarsus, respectively. The thoracodorsal and caudal superficial epigastric flaps provide a practical, one-step option in the reconstruction of large skin defects involving the distal extremities of cats. PMID:2011063

  1. Cyclotron axial ion-beam-buncher system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.W.; Swenson, D.A.; Wangler, T.P.

    1982-02-11

    Adiabatic ion bunching is achieved in a cyclotron axial ion injection system through the incorporation of a radio frequency quadrupole system, which receives ions from an external ion source via an accelerate-decelerate system and a focusing einzel lens system, and which adiabatically bunches and then injects the ions into the median plane of a cyclotron via an electrostatic quadrupole system and an inflection mirror.

  2. Numerical simulation of an axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chua, Leok Poh; Su, Boyang; Lim, Tau Meng; Zhou, Tongming

    2007-07-01

    The axial blood pump with a magnetically suspended impeller is superior to other artificial blood pumps because of its small size. In this article, the distributions of velocity, path line, pressure, and shear stress in the straightener, the rotor, and the diffuser of the axial blood pump, as well as the gap zone were obtained using the commercial software, Fluent (version 6.2). The main focus was on the flow field of the blood pump. The numerical results showed that the axial blood pump could produce 5.14 L/min of blood at 100 mm Hg through the outlet when rotating at 11,000 rpm. However, there was a leakage flow of 1.06 L/min in the gap between the rotor cylinder and the pump housing, and thus the overall flow rate the impeller could generate was 6.2 L/min. The numerical results showed that 75% of the scalar shear stresses (SSs) were less than 250 Pa, and 10% were higher than 500 Pa within the whole pump. The high SS region appeared around the blade tip where a large variation of velocity direction and magnitude was found, which might be due to the steep angle variation at the blade tip. Because the exposure time of the blood cell at the high SS region within the pump was relatively short, it might not cause serious damage to the blood cells, but the improvement of blade profile should be considered in the future design of the axial pump. PMID:17584481

  3. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples

    PubMed Central

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern. PMID:26046671

  4. Wetting on axially-patterned heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Ruiz-Cabello, F J Montes; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, M A

    2008-05-19

    Contact angle variability, leading to errors in interpretation, arises from various sources. Contact angle hysteresis (history-dependent wetting) and contact angle multiplicity (corrugation of three-phase contact line) are irrespectively the most frequent causes of this uncertainty. Secondary effects also derived from the distribution of chemical defects on solid surfaces, and so due to the existence of boundaries, are the known "stick/jump-slip" phenomena. Currently, the underlying mechanisms in contact angle hysteresis and their connection to "stick/jump-slip" effects and the prediction of thermodynamic contact angle are not fully understood. In this study, axial models of smooth heterogeneous surface were chosen in order to mitigate contact angle multiplicity. For each axial pattern, advancing, receding and equilibrium contact angles were predicted from the local minima location of the system free energy. A heuristic model, based on the local Young equation for spherical drops on patch-wise axial patterns, was fruitfully tested from the results of free-energy minimization. Despite the very simplistic surface model chosen in this study, it allowed clarifying concepts usually misleading in wetting phenomena. PMID:18279819

  5. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern.

  6. Computational analysis of a multistage axial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamidoju, Chaithanya

    Turbomachines are used extensively in Aerospace, Power Generation, and Oil & Gas Industries. Efficiency of these machines is often an important factor and has led to the continuous effort to improve the design to achieve better efficiency. The axial flow compressor is a major component in a gas turbine with the turbine's overall performance depending strongly on compressor performance. Traditional analysis of axial compressors involves throughflow calculations, isolated blade passage analysis, Quasi-3D blade-to-blade analysis, single-stage (rotor-stator) analysis, and multi-stage analysis involving larger design cycles. In the current study, the detailed flow through a 15 stage axial compressor is analyzed using a 3-D Navier Stokes CFD solver in a parallel computing environment. Methodology is described for steady state (frozen rotor stator) analysis of one blade passage per component. Various effects such as mesh type and density, boundary conditions, tip clearance and numerical issues such as turbulence model choice, advection model choice, and parallel processing performance are analyzed. A high sensitivity of the predictions to the above was found. Physical explanation to the flow features observed in the computational study are given. The total pressure rise verses mass flow rate was computed.

  7. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed

    Masi, Alfonse T

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  8. Electrostatic mirror objective with eliminated spherical and axial chromatic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Bimurzaev, Seitkerim B; Serikbaeva, Gulnur S; Yakushev, Evgeniy M

    2003-01-01

    Computational formulae for the coefficients of the third-order spherical aberration and the second-order axial chromatic aberration are presented for an axially symmetric electrostatic electron mirror. A technique for eliminating the high-order derivatives of the potential axial distribution in mirror systems from the integrands is described. Conditions for elimination of spherical and axial chromatic aberrations, either separately or simultaneously, are found for a three-electrode axially symmetric mirror composed of coaxial cylinders of the same diameter. A principal scheme of the transmission electron microscope, where an electrostatic electron mirror serves as its objective, is presented. PMID:14599097

  9. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  10. CFD Simulation of Casing Treatment of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the physical mechanism responsible for the improvement in stall margin of an axial flow rotor due to the circumferential casing grooves. It is shown that the computational tool used predicts an increase in operating range of the rotor when casing grooves are present. A budget of the axial momentum equation is carried out at the rotor casing in the tip gap in order to uncover the physical process behind this stall margin improvement. It is shown that for the smooth casing the net axial pressure force . However in the presence of casing grooves the net axial shear stress force acting at the casing is augmented by the axial force due to the radial transport of axial momentum, which occurs across the grooves and power stream interface. This additional force adds to the net axial viscous sheer force and thus leads to an increase in the stall margin of the rotor.

  11. Drop size selection in axially heated co-axial fiber capillary instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowlavi, Saviz; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Gallaire, Francois

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the sphere size selection mechanism in silicon-in-silica sphere formation through the application of an external axial thermal gradient to a co-axial silicon-in-silica fiber (Gumennik et al., Nature Com., 2013). We first apply a convective/absolute stability analysis to the in-fibre capillary instability governing the sphere formation and demonstrate that the resulting wavelength selection predicts a finite but still too large wavelength. A global stability analysis is then pursued, which accounts for the spatial inhomogeneity of the base flow. F.G. acknowledges funding from ERC SimCoMiCs 280117.

  12. Designing and updating the flow part of axial and radial-axial turbines through mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, Andrey; Rusanov, Roman; Lampart, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes an algorithm for the design of axial and radial-axial type turbines. The algorithm is based on using mathematical models of various levels of complexity - from 1D to 3D. Flow path geometry is described by means of analytical methods of profiling using a limited number of parameters. 3D turbulent flow model is realised in the program complex IPMFlow, developed based on the earlier codes FlowER and FlowER-U. Examples of developed or modernized turbines for differentpurpose power machines are presented. They are: an expansion turbine, ORC turbine and cogeneration mediumpressure turbine.

  13. Water ingestion into jet engine axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    An axial flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A model for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.

  14. Ultrasound velocities for axial eye length measurement.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, K J

    1994-09-01

    Since 1974, I have used individual sound velocities for each eye condition encountered for axial length measurement. The calculation results in 1,555 M/sec for the average phakic eye. A slower speed of 1,549 M/sec was found for an extremely long (30 mm) eye and a higher speed of 1,561 M/sec was noted for an extremely short (20 mm) eye. This inversely proportional velocity change can best be adjusted for by measuring the phakic eye at 1,532 M/sec and correcting the result by dividing the square of the measured axial length (AL1,532)2 by the difference of the measured axial length (AL1,532) minus 0.35 mm. A velocity of 1,534 M/sec was found for all aphakic eyes regardless of their length, and correction is clinically significant. The velocity of an eye containing a poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lens is not different from an average phakic eye but it does magnify the effect of axial length change. I recommend measuring the pseudophakic eye at 1,532 M/sec and adding to the result (AL1,532), + 0.04 + 44% of the IOL thickness. The speed for an eye with a silicone IOL was found to be 1,476 M/sec (or AL1,532 + 0.04 - 56% of IOL thickness) and for glass, 1,549 M/sec (or AL1,532 + 0.04 + 75% of IOL thickness). A speed of 1,139 M/sec was found for a phakic eye with silicone oil filling most of the vitreous cavity and 1,052 M/sec for an aphakic eye filled with oil. For varying volumes of oil, each eye should be calculated individually. The speed was 534 M/sec for phakic eyes filled with gas. Eyes containing a silicone IOL or oil or gas will create clinically significant errors (3 to 10 diopters) if the sound velocity is not corrected. PMID:7996413

  15. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  16. G-A and Octet Axial Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress on lattice calculations of nucleon axial coupling constants, as well as couplings of other octet members. With a combined SU(3) fit to all octet baryons, we find a better determination of g_A = 1.18(4)_stat(6)_syst. Our predictions for g_SS = 0.450(21)_stat(27)_syst and g_XX = -0.277(15)_stat(19)_syst are better determined than previous theoretical estimations. Finally, we describe a preliminary first full-QCD calculation of semileptonic decay quantity (g1(0)= f1(0))S->n = -0.348(37).

  17. Digital enhancement of computerized axial tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic evaluation was conducted of certain digital image enhancement techniques performed in image space. Three types of images were used, computer generated phantoms, tomograms of a synthetic phantom, and axial tomograms of human anatomy containing images of lesions, artificially introduced into the tomograms. Several types of smoothing, sharpening, and histogram modification were explored. It was concluded that the most useful enhancement techniques are a selective smoothing of singular picture elements, combined with contrast manipulation. The most useful tool in applying these techniques is the gray-scale histogram.

  18. Flow field visualization about external axial corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to visualize the flow field about external axial corners. The investigation was initiated to provide answers to questions about the inviscid flow pattern for continuing numerical investigations. Symmetrical and asymmetrical corner models were tested at a Reynolds number per meter of 60,700,000. Oil-flow and vapor-screen photographs were taken for both models at angle of attack and yaw. The paper presents the results of the investigation in the form of oil-flow photographs and the surrounding shock wave location obtained from the vapor screens.

  19. Stall in axial flow aero engine compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Christopher J.

    The inception of stall in an aeroengine compressor over a range of speeds and the post stall behavior are described. Reference is made to the varying matching and system response as the speed is increased and the effects demonstrated on a single shaft gas turbine. In particular, the following are detailed: surge and stall in axial compressors, compressor matching, low speed stalls, mid speed stalls, stalls ending in rotating stalls, high speed surges, contour plots of stage 1, 4, and 7 pressures, and compressor behavior during surge.

  20. Electronic and optical properties of silicene under uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strains: A first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-07-01

    The uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strain mediated electronic band structures and dielectric properties of silicene have been investigated. It is found that on applying uni- and bi-axial strains, the band gap opens for smaller strain in silicene. However, on further increase of strain beyond 8% silicene changed into metal. The ultimate tensile strength estimated is 3.4 GPa. Imaginary part of dielectric function shows that the inter-band transitions are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial tensile strains and are blue shifted for uni- and bi-axial compressive strains. Electron energy loss (EEL) function shows that the π+σ plasmon energies are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial strains and blue-shifted for compressive strains. The π plasmons disappears for tensile and asymmetric strains. Bi-axial asymmetric strain is found to have no influence on inter-band transitions and π+σ plasmon energies.

  1. Atroposelective Synthesis of Axially Chiral Thiohydantoin Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sarigul, Sevgi; Dogan, Ilknur

    2016-07-15

    Nonracemic axially chiral thiohydantoins were synthesized atroposelectively by the reaction of o-aryl isothiocyanates with amino acid ester salts in the presence of triethylamine (TEA). The synthesis of the nonaxially chiral derivatives, however, gave thiohydantoins racemized at C-5 of the heterocyclic ring. The micropreparatively resolved enantiomers of the nonaxially chiral derivatives from the racemic products were found to be optically stable under neutral conditions. On formation of the 5-methyl-3-arylthiohydantoin ring, bulky o-aryl substituents at N3 were found to suppress the C-5 racemization and in this way enabled the transfer of chirality from the α-amino acid to the products. The corresponding 5-isopropylthiohydantoins turned out to be more prone to racemization at C-5 during the ring formation. The isomer compositions of the synthesized axially chiral thiohydantoins have been determined through HPLC analyses with chiral stationary phases. In most cases a high prevalence of the P isomers over the M isomers has been obtained. The barriers to rotation determined around the Nsp(2)-Caryl chiral axis were found to be dependent upon the size of the o-halo aryl substituents. PMID:27322739

  2. Single Rod Vibration in Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Noah; Wang, Shengfu; Bardet, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Fluid structure interaction of a single rod in axial flow is a coupled dynamical system present in many application including nuclear reactors, steam generators, and towed antenna arrays. Fluid-structure response can be quantified thanks to detailed experimental data where both structure and fluid responses are recorded. Such datum deepen understanding of the physics inherent to the system and provide high-dimensionality quantitative measurements to validate coupled structural and CFD codes with various level of complexity. In this work, single rods fixed on both ends in a concentric pipe, are subjected to an axial flow with Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter of Re =4000. Rods of varying material stiffness and diameter are utilized in the experiment resulting in a range of dimensionless U between 0.5 and 1, where U = (ρA/EI)1/2uL. Experimental measurements of the velocity field around the rod are taken with PIV from time-resolved Nd:YLF laser and a high speed CMOS camera. Three-dimensional and temporal vibration and deflection of the rod is recorded with shadowgraphy utilizing two sets of pulsed high power LED and dedicated CMOS camera. Through integration of these two diagnostics, it is possible to reconstruct the full FSI domain providing unique validation data.

  3. Axial vessel widening in arborescent monocots.

    PubMed

    Petit, Giai; DeClerck, Fabrice A J; Carrer, Marco; Anfodillo, Tommaso

    2014-02-01

    Dicotyledons have evolved a strategy to compensate for the increase in hydraulic resistance to water transport with height growth by widening xylem conduits downwards. In monocots, the accumulation of hydraulic resistance with height should be similar, but the absence of secondary growth represents a strong limitation for the maintenance of xylem hydraulic efficiency during ontogeny. The hydraulic architecture of monocots has been studied but it is unclear how monocots arrange their axial vascular structure during ontogeny to compensate for increases in height. We measured the vessel lumina and estimated the hydraulic diameter (Dh) at different heights along the stem of two arborescent monocots, Bactris gasipaes (Kunth) and Guadua angustifolia (Kunth). For the former, we also estimated the variation in Dh along the leaf rachis. Hydraulic diameter increased basally from the stem apex to the base with a scaling exponent (b) in the range of those reported for dicot trees (b = 0.22 in B. gasipaes; b = 0.31 and 0.23 in G. angustifolia). In B. gasipaes, vessels decrease in Dh from the stem's centre towards the periphery, an opposite pattern compared with dicot trees. Along the leaf rachis, a pattern of increasing Dh basally was also found (b = 0.13). The hydraulic design of the monocots studied revealed an axial pattern of xylem conduits similar to those evolved by dicots to compensate and minimize the negative effect of root-to-leaf length on hydrodynamic resistance to water flow. PMID:24488857

  4. Elastic Buckling of Orthotropic Plates Under Varying Axial Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badir, Ashraf; Hu, Hurang; Diallo, Abdouramane

    1997-01-01

    The elastic buckling load of simply supported rectangular orthotropic plates subjected to a second degree parabolic variation of axial stresses in the longitudinal direction is calculated using analytical methods. The variation of axial stresses is equilibrated by nonuniform shear stresses along the plate edges and transverse normal stresses. The influence of the aspect ratio is examined, and the results are compared with plates subjected to uniform axial stresses.

  5. Dynamics of Flapping Flag in Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Fayed, Mohamed; Gunter, Amy-Lee; Paidoussis, Michael P.; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2010-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the phenomenon of the flapping of a flag, placed within a low turbulent axial flow inside a small scale wind tunnel test section. Flags of different sizes and flexural rigidities were used. Image processing technique was used and the time series of a given point on the edge of the flag was analyzed. The stability condition of the flag was obtained and compared to the recent theoretical models and numerical simulations. Afterwards, the nonlinear dynamics of the flapping was investigated using nonlinear time series method. The nonlinear dynamics is depicted in phase space and the correlation dimension of the attractors is determined. On the basis of observations made in this study, some conclusions on the existing models were drawn.

  6. Axial flux machine, stator and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Carl, Ralph James

    2004-03-16

    An axial flux machine comprises: a soft magnetic composite stator extension positioned in parallel with a rotor disk and having slots; soft magnetic composite pole pieces attached to the stator extension and facing a permanent magnet on the rotor disk, each comprising a protrusion situated within a respective one of the slots, each protrusion shaped so as to facilitate orientation of the respective pole piece with respect to the stator extension; electrical coils, each wrapped around a respective one of the pole pieces. In another embodiment the soft magnetic composite pole pieces each comprise a base portion around with the electrical coils are wound and a trapezoidal shield portion a plurality of heights with a first height in a first region being longer than a second height in a second region, the second region being closer to a pole-to-pole gap than the first region.

  7. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  8. Numerical prediction of axial turbine stage aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.; Griffin, L. W.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of two NASA-developed unsteady turbine stage computer codes. The methodology and previous partial validation of the codes are briefly outlined. Application of these codes to a Space Shuttle main engine turbine for two sets of operating conditions is then described. Steady and unsteady, two and three-dimensional results are presented, compared, and discussed. These results include time-mean and instantaneous airfoil pressure distributions and pressure fluctuations, streamlines on the airfoil surfaces and endwalls, and relative total pressure contours at different axial locations in the rotor passage. Although not available at the time of this writing, experimental data for one of the operating conditions simulated is forthcoming and will be used to assess the accuracy of the unsteady, as well as, the steady predictions presented. Issues related to code usage and resource requirements of the two codes are also discussed.

  9. Fragmentation of an axially impacted slender rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, W.; Waas, A. M.

    2010-02-01

    Motivated by experimental results on the dynamic buckling and fragmentation of a vertical column impacted by a falling mass, results from an analytical model for dynamic buckling which considers the dynamic interaction between the axial column deformation and the out-of-plane buckling displacements are used to interpret the fragmentation process and the resulting fragment lengths. It is shown that a critical time exists for the rod to undergo fragmentation. At this critical time, the rod deforms in a modulated pattern of waves, setting up the stage for the ensuing fragmentation as a result of induced large curvatures that exceed the critical bending strain of the rod material. The resulting fragment length distributions, which show two characteristics peaks at \\frac{\\lambda}{2} and \\frac{\\lambda}{4} , where λ is a characteristic half-wavelength, are found to compare favorably with the experimental results.

  10. Axially symmetric shapes with minimum wave drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Fuller, Franklyn B

    1956-01-01

    The external wave drag of bodies of revolution moving at supersonic speeds can be expressed either in terms of the geometry of the body, or in terms of the body-simulating axial source distribution. For purposes of deriving optimum bodies under various given conditions, it is found that the second of the methods mentioned is the more tractable. By use of a quasi-cylindrical theory, that is, the boundary conditions are applied on the surface of a cylinder rather than on the body itself, the variational problems of the optimum bodies having prescribed volume or caliber are solved. The streamline variations of cross-sectional area and drags of the bodies are exhibited, and some numerical results are given.

  11. Temperature gradient formation while axial gas compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    A spinning gas in equilibrium has a rotation-dependent heat capacity. However, as equilibrium is approached, such as after sudden heating, significant variations in temperature appear. Surprisingly, when fast axial compression or instantaneous gas heating occurs, the temperature does not grow homogeneously in radial direction, but instead has a gradient towards to the maximum of potential energy of external or self potential. The gradient monotonically grows with compression rate and the amplitude of the potential. The gradient builds up due to change of equilibrium density distribution, yet, not due to acoustic waves created by the compression. This result was checked in numerical simulations for particles in an external constant gravitational potential and also for rotating gas in the cylinder with perfect slip boundary conditions on the walls. This work was supported by the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and by the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-FG52-08NA28553.

  12. Hierarchical tapered bar elements undergoing axial deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, N.; Thampi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described to model the dynamics of tapered axial bars of various cross sections based on the well-known Craig/Bampton component mode synthesis technique. This element is formed in terms of the static constraint modes and interface restrained normal modes. This is in contrast with the finite elements as implemented in NASTRAN where the interface restrained normal modes are neglected. These normal modes are in terms of Bessel functions. Restoration of a few of these modes leads to higher accuracy with fewer generalized coordinates. The proposed models are hierarchical so that all lower order element matrices are embedded in higher order element matrices. The advantages of this formulation compared to standard NASTRAN truss element formulation are demonstrated through simple numerical examples.

  13. Nuclear axial currents in chiral effective field theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baroni, Alessandro; Girlanda, Luca; Pastore, Saori; Schiavilla, Rocco; Viviani, Michele

    2016-01-11

    Two-nucleon axial charge and current operators are derived in chiral effective field theory up to one loop. The derivation is based on time-ordered perturbation theory and accounts for cancellations between the contributions of irreducible diagrams and the contributions owing to nonstatic corrections from energy denominators of reducible diagrams. Ultraviolet divergencies associated with the loop corrections are isolated in dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and conserved in the chiral limit, while the axial charge requires renormalization. As a result, a complete set of contact terms for the axial charge up to the relevant order in the power countingmore » is constructed.« less

  14. Elliptic instability in a Rankine vortex with axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, Laurent; Birbaud, Anne-Laure; Le Dizès, Stéphane

    2005-01-01

    The elliptic instability of a Rankine vortex with axial flow subject to a weak strain field perpendicular to its axis is analyzed by asymptotic methods in the limit of small strain rate. General unstable modes associated with resonant Kelvin modes of arbitrary azimuthal wavenumbers are considered. Both the effects of axial flow and viscosity are analyzed in details.

  15. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  16. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  17. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-04-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  18. An Axial-Torsional, Thermomechanical Fatigue Testing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1995-01-01

    A technique for conducting strain-controlled, thermomechanical, axial-torsional fatigue tests on thin-walled tubular specimens was developed. Three waveforms of loading, namely, the axial strain waveform, the engineering shear strain waveform, and the temperature waveform were required in these tests. The phasing relationships between the mechanical strain waveforms and the temperature and axial strain waveforms were used to define a set of four axial-torsional, thermomechanical fatigue (AT-TMF) tests. Real-time test control (3 channels) and data acquisition (a minimum of 7 channels) were performed with a software program written in C language and executed on a personal computer. The AT-TMF testing technique was used to investigate the axial-torsional thermomechanical fatigue behavior of a cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188. The maximum and minimum temperatures selected for the AT-TMF tests were 760 and 316 C, respectively. Details of the testing system, calibration of the dynamic temperature profile of the thin-walled tubular specimen, thermal strain compensation technique, and test control and data acquisition schemes, are reported. The isothermal, axial, torsional, and in- and out-of-phase axial-torsional fatigue behaviors of Haynes 188 at 316 and 760 C were characterized in previous investigations. The cyclic deformation and fatigue behaviors of Haynes 188 in AT-TMF tests are compared to the previously reported isothermal axial-torsional behavior of this superalloy at the maximum and minimum temperatures.

  19. Axial viewing of an ICP with a graphite torch injector

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, R.L.; Winge, R.K.; Praphairaksit, N.

    1996-09-01

    A hollow graphite torch injector constricts the analyte emission zone and prevents the production of off-axis emission from the upstream reaches of the axial channel. These properties should both improve signal, reduce background and alleviate matrix effects during axial viewing of the ICP through a metal sampling orifice thrust into the plasma. Recent results along these lines will be presented.

  20. Relation between retinal vein occlusions and axial length.

    PubMed Central

    Aritürk, N.; Oge, Y.; Erkan, D.; Süllü, Y.; Mohajerý, F.

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the ocular axial length as a risk factor for development of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). METHODS: Ocular axial lengths were measured, by A-scan ultrasonography, in 17 patients with CRVO and 41 patients with BRVO and compared with those of contralateral unaffected eyes and 66 age matched controls. RESULTS: In 17 patients with CRVO the mean axial length of affected eyes was 22.25 (SD 0.19) mm and of unaffected eyes was 22.61 (0.13) mm. In 41 patients with BRVO the mean axial length of affected eyes was 22.89 (0.11) mm and of unaffected eyes was 22.99 (0.12) mm. CONCLUSION: These findings confirm that the axial lengths in CRVO and BRVO were significantly shorter than in the controls. This significant difference may be a risk factor in the development of CRVO and BRVO. PMID:8795376

  1. Hypothetical silicon nanotubes under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung

    2003-03-01

    This study shows the response of silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) under axial compression using an atomistic simulation based on the Tersoff potential. The application of pressure, proportional to the deformation within Hook's law, eventually led to a collapse of the SiNT and an abrupt change in structure. Using the sum of the cross sections of the atoms on the SiNT cross section and the SiNT pressure, we determined Young's modulus for the SiNTs that was constant irrespective of the SiNTs' diameter. As the SiNTs' diameter increased, the collapse pressure, that is the critical stress, linearly decreased. However, the net forces on the SiNTs at their collapse were almost constant irrespective of the SiNTs' diameter. We calculated the variations in the unit cell volume as a function of pressure, which were not dealt with in previous works considering carbon nanotubes under compression. Using properly chosen parameters for the SiNTs (Young's modulus, effective spring constant, diameter, lattice constant and cylindrical volume modulus), the critical strain, the collapse pressure, the elastic energy and the critical volume at which the SiNT buckling occurs can be estimated by equations given in this work.

  2. Small axial turbine stator technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, W.; Kozak, A.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effects of surface finish, fillet radius, inlet boundary layer thickness, and free-stream inlet turbulence level on the aerodynamic performance of a small axial flow turbine stator. The principal objective of this program was to help understand why large turbine efficiency is not maintained when a large turbine is scaled to a smaller size. The stator used in this program as a one-sixth scale of a 762 mm (30 in.) diameter stator design with 50 vanes having a vane height of 17 mm (0.666 in.) and an aspect ratio of 1.77. A comprehensive overall test matrix was used to provide a complete engineering understanding of the effects of each variable over the full range of all the other variables. The range of each variable investigated was as follows: surface finish 0.1 micro (4 micro in.) to 2.4 micro (95 micro in.); boundary layer thickness 2 to 25 percent of channel height at each wall; fillet radius 0 mm (0 in.) to 1.0 mm (.040 in.) and turbulence 2 to 12 percent.

  3. Small axial compressor technology, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, F. F.; Kidwell, J. R.; Ware, T. C.

    1976-01-01

    A scaled single-stage, highly-loaded, axial-flow transonic compressor was tested at speeds from 70 to 110% design equivalent speed to evaluate the effects of scaling compromises and the individual and combined effects of rotor tip running clearance and rotor shroud casing treatment on the overall and blade element performance. At design speed and 1% tip clearance the stage demonstrated an efficiency of 83.2% at 96.4% design flow and a pressure ratio of 1.865. Casing treatment increased design speed surge margin 2.0 points to 12.8%. Overall performance was essentially unchanged. An increase in rotor running clearance to 2.2%, with smooth casing, reduced design speed peak efficiency 5.7 points, flow by 7.4%, pressure ratio to 1.740, and surge margin to 5.4%. Reinstalling casing treatment regained 3.5 points in design speed peak efficiency, 4.7% flow, increased pressure ratio to 1.800 and surge margin to 8.7%.

  4. Axial compressor middle stage secondary flow study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Dring, R. P.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation of the secondary flow within and aft of an axial compressor model with thick endwall boundary layers. The objective of the study was to obtain detailed aerodynamic and trace gas concentration traverse data aft of a well documented isolated rotor for the ultimate purpose of improving the design phases of compressor development based on an improved physical understanding of secondary flow. It was determined from the flow visualization, aerodynamic, and trace gas concentration results that the relative unloading of the midspan region of the airfoil inhibitied a fullspan separation at high loading preventing the massive radial displacement of the hub corner stall to the tip. Radial distribution of high and low total pressure fluid influenced the magnitude of the spanwise distribution of loss, such that, there was a general decreases in loss near the hub to the extent that for the least loaded case a negative loss (increase in total pressure) was observed. The ability to determine the spanwise distribution of blockage was demonstrated. Large blockage was present in the endwall regions due to the corner stall and tip leakage with little blockage in the core flow region. Hub blockage was found to increase rapidly with loading.

  5. Axially Loaded Behavior of Driven PC Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shih-Tsung

    2010-05-01

    To obtain a fair load-settlement curve of a driven pile, and to evaluate the ultimate pile capacity more accurately, a numerical model was created to simulate the ground movements during a pile being driven. After the procedure, the axially loaded behaviors of the piles in silty sand were analyzed. The numerical results are compared with those results by full scale pile load tests. It was found, although the loads added on the tested piles are different from those by the numerical analyses which applied displacement increments on piles, the load-settlement behaviors of piles calculated from the numerical model were close to those measured from field tests before the piles stressed to peak. Total load, shaft friction, and point bearing do not reach peak values at the same pile settlement; furthermore, the point bearing slowly increases all the while, with no peak. However, the point bearing only contributes 10˜20% of ultimate pile capacity. No matter which relative density of silty sand, pile diameter, and pile length increased, ultimate pile capacity increased as well.

  6. Axial channeling of boron ions into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Ferla, A.; Galvagno, G.; Raineri, V.; Setola, R.; Rimini, E.; Carbera, A.; Gasparotto, A.

    1992-04-01

    Channeling boron implants were performed into (100) and (110) silicon substrates in the energy range 80-700 keV. The dose ranged between 3.5 × 10 11 and 1 × 10 15 atoms/cm 2. The axial channeling concentration profiles of implanted B + were compared with that obtained for incidence along the random direction of the crystal and with that obtained by implantation in amorphous silicon. The electrical and chemical boron distributions were obtained by spreading resistance and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements, respectively. The inelastic stopping power, Sc, was extracted from the experimental maximum ranges for the [100] and [110] axis. The energ dependence of the electronic stopping power is given by Sc = KEp with p[100] = 0.469±0.010 and p[110] = 0.554±0.004. Simulations obtained by the MARLOWE code, using the Oen-Robinson impact parameter dependent formula, for the electronic energy loss reproduce quite well the experimental depth profiles.

  7. Giant Cell Tumors of the Axial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P.; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors. PMID:22448122

  8. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.

  9. Axially localized states in Taylor Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jose M.; Marques, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    We present numerical simulations of the flow in a Taylor Couette system with the inner cylinder rotating and aspect ratio Γ restricted to 0 . 86 <Γ/N < 0 . 95 , being N the number of Taylor vortices. For these values a complex experimental bifurcation scenario has been reported. The transition from wavy vortex flow (WVF) to a very low frequency mode VLF happens via an axisymmetric eigenfunction. The VLF plays an essential role in the dynamics, leading to chaos through a two-tori period-doubling route. This chaotic regime vanishes with further increase in Re and gives rise to a new flow regime ALS characterized by the existence of large jet oscillations localized in some pairs of vortices. The aim of this numerical study is to extend the available information on ALS by means of a detailed exploration of the parameter space in which it occurs. Frequency analysis from time series simultaneously recorded at several points of the domain has been applied to identify the different transitions taking place. The VLF occurs in a wide range of control parameters and its interaction with the axially localized states is crucial is most transitions, either between different ALS or to the chaotic regime. Spanish Ministry of Education and Science Grants (with FEDER funds) FIS2013-40880 and BES-2010-041542.

  10. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  11. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2013-08-14

    A superconducting RF (SRF) power coupler capable of handling 500 kW CW RF power at 750 MHz is required for present and future storage rings and linacs. There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Coupler windows vary from cylinders to cones to disks and RF power couplers will always be limited by the ability of ceramic windows and their matching systems to withstand the stresses due to non-uniform heating from dielectric and wall losses, multipactor, and mechanical flexure. In the Phase II project, we built a double window coaxial system with materials that would not otherwise be useable due to individual VSWRs. Double window systems can be operated such that one is cold (LN2) and one is warm. They can have different materials and still have a good match without using matching elements that create problematic multipactor bands. The match of the two windows will always result from the cancellation of the two window’s reflections when they are located approximately a quarter wavelength apart or multiples of a quarter wavelength. The window assemblies were carefully constructed to put the window material and its braze joint in compression at all times. This was done using explosion bonding techniques which allow for inexpensive fabrication of the vacuum / compression ring out of stainless steel with copper plating applied to the inner surface. The EIA 3-1/8” double window assembly was then successfully baked out and tested to 12 kW in a 3-1/8” co-axial system. The thermal gradient across the window was measured to be 90 C which represents about 15 ksi tensile stress in an uncompressed window. In our design the compression was calculated to be about 25 ksi, so the net compressive force was 5 ksi at full power.

  12. An update on biomarkers in axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Prajzlerová, Klára; Grobelná, Kristýna; Pavelka, Karel; Šenolt, Ladislav; Filková, Mária

    2016-06-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with the onset at a young age, and, if undiagnosed and untreated, it may result in permanent damage and lifelong disability. Rates of early diagnosis have improved, due in particular to the addition of magnetic resonance imaging into the diagnostic armamentaria; however, it is costly, not widely available, and requires experienced readers to interpret the findings. In addition to clinical measures and imaging techniques, biomarkers that will be described in this review may represent useful tools for diagnosis, monitoring disease activity and outcomes as well as therapeutic responses. Currently, HLA-B27 remains the best genetic biomarker for making a diagnosis, while CRP currently appears to be the best circulating measure for assessing disease activity, predicting structural progression and therapeutic response. Interestingly, key molecules in the pathogenesis of the disease and essential therapeutic targets, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23, show only limited association with disease characteristics or disease progression. Some genetic biomarkers and particularly anti-CD74 antibodies, may become a promising tool for the early diagnosis of axSpA. Further biomarkers, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-3, calprotectin (S100A8/9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) or dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), are not sufficient to reflect disease activity, but may predict spinal structural progression. In addition, recent data have shown that monitoring calprotectin might represent a valuable biomarker of therapeutic response. However, all of these results need to be confirmed in large cohort studies prior to use in daily clinical practice. PMID:26851549

  13. Axial field spectrometer at the CERN ISR

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.; Hogue, R.; Killian, T.

    1981-01-01

    The Axial Field Spectrometer (AFS) was recently brought into operation at the CERN ISR. It is being exploited in a wide-ranging program to study different aspects of those proton-proton or proton-antiproton collisions which are characterized by a large transverse momentum (p/sub T/). Examples include the measurement of inclusive distributions of identified high p/sub T/ hadrons, and the study of event structures characterized by a large transverse energy (E/sub T/) or the production of one or several high-p/sub T/ electrons or photons. The experimental approach to this program emphasizes integration of advanced magnetic spectroscopy with state-of-the-art calorimetry. These techniques are fully exploited to provide maximal information on all particles produced. In addition, information from these detectors is used in new ways for on-line event triggering and filtering; this allows even very rare events to be selected with high efficiency, an essential prerequisite for studies at a high-luminosity hadron collider, such as the ISR. Considerable modularity of the detectors was sought. Apart from clear advantages of construction, debugging, running, and servicing of such components, modularity provides ease for addition or reconfiguration of the system to emphasize the study of specific final states. At present, for example, a 1 sr Cerenkov detector system allows hadron identification up to p approx. = 12 GeV/c; liquid-argon electromagnetic calorimeters and a uranium-scintillator calorimeter (Hexagon) are used for a study of events containing direct photons.

  14. Lack of Axial Rotation in Mobile-bearing Knee Designs

    PubMed Central

    Komistek, Richard D.; Zingde, Sumesh M.; Sheridan, Kate C.; Mahfouz, Mohamed R.

    2008-01-01

    It has often been assumed rotational kinematics are improved with mobile-bearing TKA designs as the terms mobile-bearing and rotating platform imply. We tested this assumption by assessing the in vivo axial rotation magnitudes and patterns of 527 knees implanted with 12 different mobile-bearing TKA designs. Implants were grouped and compared by type—posterior stabilized (PS), posterior cruciate retaining (PCR), and posterior cruciate sacrificing (PCS)—and by specific design. We hypothesized all three mobile-bearing types (PS, PCR, and PCS) would achieve greater than 10° average axial rotation and we would find no differences in axial rotation between types. Only 14% of PS knees, 3% of PCS knees, and 17% of PCR knees attained greater than 10° axial rotation when measured from 0° to 90°. The percentage of PCS knees with greater than 10° axial rotation was less compared with the other two groups. Axial rotation averaged 4.3°, 2.5°, and 3.8° for the PS, PCS, and PCR knees, respectively. Incidences of reverse rotation were observed in 17% of PS knees, 32% of PCS knees, and 28% of PCR knees. Compared with the PCS group, the PS group achieved greater average axial rotation and had a lower percentage of knees displaying incidences of reverse rotation. The data refuted the hypotheses. PMID:18581194

  15. A Model for Axial Magnetic Bearings Including Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Ladislav; Ahrens, Markus

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method of modelling eddy currents inside axial bearings. The problem is solved by dividing an axial bearing into elementary geometric forms, solving the Maxwell equations for these simplified geometries, defining boundary conditions and combining the geometries. The final result is an analytical solution for the flux, from which the impedance and the force of an axial bearing can be derived. Several impedance measurements have shown that the analytical solution can fit the measured data with a precision of approximately 5%.

  16. Buckling of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes under Axial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Seiji; Nishio, Mitsumasa; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated the axial buckling of multiwall nanotubes under the axial compression using nanomanipulation experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Experimentally, Young’s moduli of nanotubes with different inner hollow diameters for the same outer diameters are consistent with the Eulers buckling model based on the continuum analysis. The MD simulations for the buckling behavior of triple- and double-walled nanotubes are also consistent with the continuum analysis. This good agreement indicates that Euler’s buckling model is applicable to the analysis of the axial buckling behavior of the multiwall nanotubes.

  17. Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2012-06-15

    We describe a new technique, standing wave axial nanometry (SWAN), to image the axial location of a single nanoscale fluorescent object with sub-nanometer accuracy and 3.7 nm precision. A standing wave, generated by positioning an atomic force microscope tip over a focused laser beam, is used to excite fluorescence; axial position is determined from the phase of the emission intensity. We use SWAN to measure the orientation of single DNA molecules of different lengths, grafted on surfaces with different functionalities.

  18. A non-integral, axial-force measuring element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringel, M.; Levin, D.; Seginer, A.

    1989-10-01

    A new approach to the measurement of the axial force is presented. A nonintegral axial-force measuring element, housed within the wind-tunnel model, avoids the interactions that are caused by nonlinear elastic phenomena characteristic of integral balances. The new design overcomes other problems, such as friction, misalignment and relative motion between metric elements, that plagued previous attempts at separate measurement of the axial force. Calibration and test results prove the ability of the new approach to duplicate and even surpass the results of much more complicated and expensive integral balances. The advantages of the new design make it the best known solution for particular measurement problems.

  19. PRELIMINARY DESIGN ANALYSIS OF AXIAL FLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the preliminary design analysis of axial-flow turbines. Rapid approximate generalized procedures requiring minimum input are used to provide turbine overall geometry and performance adequate for screening studies. The computations are based on mean-diameter flow properties and a stage-average velocity diagram. Gas properties are assumed constant throughout the turbine. For any given turbine, all stages, except the first, are specified to have the same shape velocity diagram. The first stage differs only in the value of inlet flow angle. The velocity diagram shape depends upon the stage work factor value and the specified type of velocity diagram. Velocity diagrams can be specified as symmetrical, zero exit swirl, or impulse; or by inputting stage swirl split. Exit turning vanes can be included in the design. The 1991 update includes a generalized velocity diagram, a more flexible meanline path, a reheat model, a radial component of velocity, and a computation of free-vortex hub and tip velocity diagrams. Also, a loss-coefficient calibration was performed to provide recommended values for airbreathing engine turbines. Input design requirements include power or pressure ratio, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative speed. The design variables include inlet and exit diameters, stator angle or exit radius ratio, and number of stages. Gas properties are input as gas constant, specific heat ratio, and viscosity. The program output includes inlet and exit annulus dimensions, exit temperature and pressure, total and static efficiencies, flow angles, blading angles, and last stage absolute and relative Mach numbers. This program is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be ported to any computer with a standard FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST. It was originally developed on an IBM 7000 series computer running VM and has been implemented on IBM PC computers and compatibles running MS-DOS under Lahey FORTRAN, and

  20. Spatial information transmission using axial temporal coherence coding.

    PubMed

    Micó, Vicente; García, Javier; Ferreira, Carlos; Sylman, David; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2007-04-01

    We present an approach that can be used for transmission of information through space-limited systems or for superresolution. The spatial information is coded with different axial temporal coherence by interfering every spatial region in the input with the same region, but with a certain known delay in the longitudinal axis. Every spatial region has different delay. After mixing all of the spatial information, it is transmitted through the space-limited system. At the detection the information is passed through a similar interference setup containing certain axial delay. By temporally scanning along the longitudinal axis, each time a different spatial region that was coded with the corresponding axial delay is reconstructed. To allow coding of different spatial regions with different and small axial delays, we use a thermal light source that has very short coherence length. We include experimental validation of the presented approach. PMID:17339919

  1. Axial field shaping under high-numerical-aperture focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour, Toufic G.; Kuebler, Stephen M.

    2007-03-01

    Kant reported [J. Mod. Optics47, 905 (2000)] a formulation for solving the inverse problem of vector diffraction, which accurately models high-NA focusing. Here, Kant's formulation is adapted to the method of generalized projections to obtain an algorithm for designing diffractive optical elements (DOEs) that reshape the axial point-spread function (PSF). The algorithm is applied to design a binary phase-only DOE that superresolves the axial PSF with controlled increase in axial sidelobes. An 11-zone DOE is identified that axially narrows the PSF central lobe by 29% while maintaining the sidelobe intensity at or below 52% of the peak intensity. This DOE could improve the resolution achievable in several applications without significantly complicating the optical system.

  2. Numerical analysis of cocurrent conical and cylindrical axial cyclone separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, M. A. M.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Lemma, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Axial concurrent liquid-liquid separator is seen as an alternative unit to the traditional tangential counter current cyclone due to lower droplet break ups, turbulence and pressure drop. This paper presents the numerical analysis of a new conical axial cocurrent design along with a comparison to the cylindrical axial cocurrent type. The simulation was carried out using CFD technique in ANSYS-FLUENT software. The simulation results were validated by comparison with experimental data from literature, and mesh independency and quality were performed. The analysis indicates that the conical version achieves better separation performance compared to the cylindrical type. Simulation results indicate tangential velocity with 8% higher and axial velocity with 80% lower recirculation compared to the cylindrical type. Also, the flow visualization counters shows smaller recirculation region relative to the cylindrical unit. The proposed conical design seems more efficient and suits the crude/water separation in O&G industry.

  3. Historic Image: view of Axial Cemetery Road and Sections 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic Image: view of Axial Cemetery Road and Sections 1 and 2, from Receiving Vault looking to the entrance. Photograph 8 November 1937. NCA History Collection - Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Jamaica Avenue Unit, 625 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  4. The stresses in columns under combined axial and side loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnstein, Karl

    1922-01-01

    The problem before us is to determine the total stresses in an axially loaded column of any degree of restraint which is also subject to transverse bending both from a uniformly distributed load and from concentrated loads.

  5. 22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; view to southwest, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  6. Mapping AUV Survey of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, H.; Caress, D.; Conlin, D.; Clague, D.; Paduan, J.; Butterfield, D.; Chadwick, W.; Tucker, P.

    2006-12-01

    In late August and early September 2006, the MBARI Mapping Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was deployed for 5 missions on Axial Seamount during a NOAA NeMO cruise on the R/V Thompson. The objective of the survey was to determine the geologic history of the summit of Axial Seamount using high resolution multibeam, sidescan, and sub-bottom profiler data. The Mapping AUV is a torpedo-shaped, 6000 m rated vehicle designed and constructed by MBARI. The vehicle is equipped with a 200 kHz multibeam sonar, 110 kHz and 410 kHz chirp sidescan sonar, and a 2-16 kHz sweep chirp sub-bottom profiler. The multibeam provides a 120-degree swath with 0.94 degree by 0.94 degree beam resolution. The endurance of the AUV is eight hours at 3 knots. Navigation derives from an inertial navigation system (INS) incorporating a ring laser gyro aided by GPS at the surface and by velocity-over- ground observations from a Doppler velocity log (DVL) when within 130 m of the seafloor. A navigational precision of 0.05 percent of distance traveled is achieved with continuous DVL bottom lock. An acoustic modem allows surface aiding of navigation during deep descents. The AUV ran two types of missions: those on the rim of the caldera were run at 90 m altitude with a line spacing of 250 m and those on the caldera floor were run at 50 m altitude with a line spacing of 150 or 175 m. The surveys covered most of 1998 lava flow on the south rim of the caldera and northern part of the south rift zone, the southern region of the caldera floor where hydrothermal vents are common, the northeast rim of the caldera where volcaniclastic deposits related to caldera collapse drape the surface, the north rift zone, and the northern portion of the caldera floor. The low-altitude maps have a resolution of 1 m, so large individual lava pillars and hydrothermal chimneys can be seen, fissures stand out clearly, and the regions of collapsed lobate flows and lava channels are prominent. Many of the flows, including the

  7. Watson's theorem and the N Δ (1232 ) axial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Hernández, E.; Nieves, J.; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2016-01-01

    We present a new determination of the N Δ axial form factors from neutrino induced pion production data. For this purpose, the model of Hernandez et al. [Phys. Rev. D 76, 033005 (2007)] is improved by partially restoring unitarity. This is accomplished by imposing Watson's theorem on the dominant vector and axial multipoles. As a consequence, a larger C5A(0 ), in good agreement with the prediction from the off-diagonal Goldberger-Treiman relation, is now obtained.

  8. Limit loads for pipelines with axial surface flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Tyson, W.R.

    1996-12-31

    The limit loads for pipelines with axial surface flaws have been evaluated by using a strip yield model at levels of ligament yield and ligament collapse. The former was defined as that at which the plastic zone first reaches the back surface, and the later is that at which the plastic zone spreads over the entire ligament. The evaluated collapse load has been used to estimate the failure stress of pipelines containing axial surface flaws. Predictions have been compared with existing experimental data.

  9. Light-front view of the axial anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chueng-Ryong |; Rey, Soo-Jong

    1995-07-01

    Motivated by an apparent puzzle of the light-front vacua incompatible with the axial anomaly, we have considered the two-dimensional massless Schwinger model for an arbitrary interpolating angle of the quantization surface. By examining spectral deformation of the Dirac sea under an external electric field semiclassically, we have found that the axial anomaly is quantization angle independent. This indicates an intricate nontrivial vacuum structure present even in the light-front limit.

  10. Reactive control of subsonic axial fan noise in a duct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Choy, Y S; Huang, L; Cheng, L

    2014-10-01

    Suppressing the ducted fan noise at low frequencies without varying the flow capacity is still a technical challenge. This study examines a conceived device consisting of two tensioned membranes backed with cavities housing the axial fan for suppression of the sound radiation from the axial fan directly. The noise suppression is achieved by destructive interference between the sound fields from the axial fan of a dipole nature and sound radiation from the membrane via vibroacoustics coupling. A two-dimensional model with the flow effect is presented which allows the performance of the device to be explored analytically. The air flow influences the symmetrical behavior and excites the odd in vacuo mode response of the membrane due to kinematic coupling. Such an asymmetrical effect can be compromised with off-center alignment of the axial fan. Tension plays an important role to sustain the performance to revoke the deformation of the membrane during the axial fan operation. With the design of four appropriately tensioned membranes covered by a cylindrical cavity, the first and second blade passage frequencies of the axial fan can be reduced by at least 20 dB. The satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory demonstrates that its feasibility is practical. PMID:25324066

  11. Active axial spondyloarthritis: potential role of certolizumab pegol

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, Sriya; Miller, Anne V

    2014-01-01

    The axial spondyloarthropathies are a group of chronic inflammatory diseases that predominantly affect the axial joints. This group includes ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthropathy. While the pathogenesis of axial spondyloarthropathies is not clear, immunologically active tissues primarily include the entheses, ie, the areas where ligaments, tendons, and joint capsules attach to bone and to the annulus fibrosis at the vertebrae. One of the major mediators of the immune response in this group of diseases is tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα). Blockade of TNFα results in reduced vascularity and inflammatory cell infiltration in the synovial tissues of affected joints. Certolizumab pegol (CZP) is an Fc-free, PEGylated anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody. CZP has unique properties that differ from other available TNFα inhibitors by virtue of its lack of an Fc region, which minimizes potential Fc-mediated effects, and its PEGylation, which improves drug pharmacokinetics and bioavailability. It has been shown in clinical trials that CZP improves patient outcomes and reduces inflammation in the sacroiliac joints and spine in both ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthropathies. These data support CZP as a treatment option for axial spondyloarthropathies. PMID:24611014

  12. Combined correlation estimation of axial displacement in optical coherence elastography: assessment of axial displacement sensitivity performance relative to existing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimwood, A.; Messa, A.; Bamber, J. C.

    2015-03-01

    A combined correlation method is introduced to optical coherence elastography for axial displacement estimation. Its performance is compared with that of amplitude correlation tracking and phase shift estimation. Relative sensitivities to small (sub-micron), and large (pixel-scale) axial displacements are analysed for a Perspex test object and gelatine phantom. The combined correlation method exhibited good overall performance, with a larger dynamic range than phase shift estimation and higher sensitivity than amplitude correlation tracking.

  13. Development and Testing of an Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and tested a revolutionary Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing. The objective of this work is to develop a viable non-contact magnetic thrust bearing utilizing Halbach arrays for all-electric flight, and many other applications. This concept will help to reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels and mitigate many of the concerns and limitations encountered in conventional axial bearings such as bearing wear, leaks, seals and friction loss. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is inherently stable and requires no active feedback control system or superconductivity as required in many magnetic bearing designs. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is useful for very high speed applications including turbines, instrumentation, medical systems, computer memory systems, and space power systems such as flywheels. Magnetic fields suspend and support a rotor assembly within a stator. Advanced technologies developed for particle accelerators, and currently under development for maglev trains and rocket launchers, served as the basis for this application. Experimental hardware was successfully designed and developed to validate the basic principles and analyses. The report concludes that the implementation of Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings can provide significant improvements in rotational system performance and reliability.

  14. The window of opportunity: a relevant concept for axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The window of opportunity is a concept critical to rheumatoid arthritis treatment. Early treatment changes the outcome of rheumatoid arthritis treatment, in that response rates are higher with earlier disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment and damage is substantially reduced. Axial spondyloarthritis is an inflammatory axial disease encompassing both nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis and established ankylosing spondylitis. In axial spondyloarthritis, studies of magnetic resonance imaging as well as tumor necrosis factor inhibitor treatment and withdrawal studies all suggest that early effective suppression of inflammation has the potential to reduce radiographic damage. This potential would suggest that the concept of a window of opportunity is relevant not only to rheumatoid arthritis but also to axial spondyloarthritis. The challenge now remains to identify high-risk patients early and to commence treatment without delay. Developments in risk stratification include new classification criteria, identification of clinical risk factors, biomarkers, genetic associations, potential antibody associations and an ankylosing spondylitis-specific microbiome signature. Further research needs to focus on the evidence for early intervention and the early identification of high-risk individuals. PMID:25167369

  15. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor fuel module construction

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, Gary K.; DiGuiseppe, Carl P.

    1985-01-01

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wher the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements. The arrangements of the fissile and fertile regions in an alternating axial manner minimizes the radial power peaking factors and provides a more optional thermal-hydraulic design than is afforded by radial arrangements.

  16. Method to measure tone of axial and proximal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gurfinkel, Victor S; Cacciatore, Timothy W; Cordo, Paul J; Horak, Fay B

    2011-01-01

    The control of tonic muscular activity remains poorly understood. While abnormal tone is commonly assessed clinically by measuring the passive resistance of relaxed limbs, no systems are available to study tonic muscle control in a natural, active state of antigravity support. We have developed a device (Twister) to study tonic regulation of axial and proximal muscles during active postural maintenance (i.e. postural tone). Twister rotates axial body regions relative to each other about the vertical axis during stance, so as to twist the neck, trunk or hip regions. This twisting imposes length changes on axial muscles without changing the body's relationship to gravity. Because Twister does not provide postural support, tone must be regulated to counteract gravitational torques. We quantify this tonic regulation by the restive torque to twisting, which reflects the state of all muscles undergoing length changes, as well as by electromyography of relevant muscles. Because tone is characterized by long-lasting low-level muscle activity, tonic control is studied with slow movements that produce "tonic" changes in muscle length, without evoking fast "phasic" responses. Twister can be reconfigured to study various aspects of muscle tone, such as co-contraction, tonic modulation to postural changes, tonic interactions across body segments, as well as perceptual thresholds to slow axial rotation. Twister can also be used to provide a quantitative measurement of the effects of disease on axial and proximal postural tone and assess the efficacy of intervention. PMID:22214974

  17. An Axial-Vector Photon in a Mirror World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The unity of symmetry laws emphasizes, in the case of a mirror CP-even Dirac Lagrangian, the ideas of the left- and right-handed axial-vector photons referring to long- and short-lived bosons of true neutrality, respectively. Such a difference in lifetimes expresses the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of axial-vector photons of the different components. They define the unified field theory equation of C-odd particles with an integral spin. Together with a new equation of a theory of truly neutral particles with the half-integral spin, the latter reflects the availability in their nature of the second type of the local axial-vector gauge transformation responsible for origination in the Lagrangian of C-oddity of an interaction Newton component giving an axial-vector mass to all the interacting particles and fields. The mirror axial-vector mass, energy and momentum operators constitute a CP-invariant equation of quantum mechanics, confirming that each of them can individually influence on matter field. Thereby, findings suggest at the level of the mass-charge structure of gauge invariance a new equation for the C-noninvariant Lagrangian.

  18. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  19. Stationary axially symmetric solutions in Brans-Dicke theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirezli, Pınar; Delice, Özgür

    2015-11-01

    Stationary, axially symmetric Brans-Dicke-Maxwell solutions are reexamined in the framework of the Brans-Dicke (BD) theory. We see that, employing a particular parametrization of the standard axially symmetric metric simplifies the procedure of obtaining the Ernst equations for axially symmetric electrovacuum spacetimes for this theory. This analysis also permits us to construct a two parameter extension in both Jordan and Einstein frames of an old solution generating technique frequently used to construct axially symmetric solutions for BD theory from a seed solution of general relativity. As applications of this technique, several known and new solutions are constructed including a general axially symmetric BD-Maxwell solution of Plebanski-Demianski with vanishing cosmological constant, i.e., the Kinnersley solution and general magnetized Kerr-Newman-type solutions. Some physical properties and the circular motion of test particles for a particular subclass of Kinnersley solution, i.e., a Kerr-Newman-NUT-type solution for BD theory, are also investigated in some detail.

  20. STED microscopy based on axially symmetric polarized vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhehai, Zhou; Lianqing, Zhu

    2016-03-01

    A stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy scheme using axially symmetric polarized vortex beams is proposed based on unique focusing properties of such kinds of beams. The concept of axially symmetric polarized vortex beams is first introduced, and the basic principle about the scheme is described. Simulation results for several typical beams are then shown, including radially polarized vortex beams, azimuthally polarized vortex beams, and high-order axially symmetric polarized vortex beams. The results indicate that sharper doughnut spots and thus higher resolutions can be achieved, showing more flexibility than previous schemes based on flexible modulation of both phase and polarization for incident beams. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61108047 and 61475021), the Natural Science Foundation of Beijing, China (Grant No. 4152015), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in Universities of China (Grant No. NCET-13-0667), and the Top Young Talents Support Program of Beijing, China (Grant No. CIT&TCD201404113).

  1. Axial length influence on the performance of centrifugal impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Zubaidy, S. N. J.

    1992-12-01

    This article describes a general direct-design method for radial flow impellers (based on a prescribed relative velocity schedule). The design procedure has been used as a systematic means of studying the effects of impeller length along its axis of rotation on performance. This was achieved by analyzing a group of impellers with the same performance requirements, inlet and exit geometry, and meridional profile, but different in the blade-angle distributions. The axial length of each impeller was varied systematically in order to assess its impact on the efficiency. The results have shown that for impellers capable of delivering 1 kg of air/s and having a total-to-total pressure ratio of 6:1, there is a specific region of axial length band where the highest efficiency for all designs were calculated and found to vary between 37-49 mm (the measured axial length does not include the disk thickness).

  2. Stability of a helical vortex tube with axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yuji; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2011-11-01

    The stability of a helical vortex tube with axial flow is studied analytically. The base flow is obtained by solving the Euler equation perturbatively assuming small ratio of core to curvature radius, which is denoted by ɛ, and Rankine vortex with uniform axial flow at the leading order. We apply both local and modal stability analysis. By local stability analysis we show that the flow is subject to not only curvature instability but also Coriolis instability, both having the same resonance condition. The unstable growth rate is O(ɛ) and given by the magnitude of a sum of the complex numbers corresponding to the two instabilities. Combined effects of the axial flow and the torsion of the helical vortex tube appear as O(ɛ2) modification. These results are confirmed by the modal stability analysis.

  3. Some problems of sensitivity analysis of axially loaded piles

    SciTech Connect

    Budkowska, B.B.; Szymczak, C.

    1994-12-31

    The first variations of an axial displacement and an axial force at a specified cross-section of an axially loaded pile due to the changes of the design variables are derived. The parameters describing the pile material and the soil behavior as well as the pile cross-section dimensions are assumed to be the design variables. A simple one-dimensional idealization of the pile in conjunction with a nonlinear Winkler-type model of the soil is adopted. The considerations based on the virtual work theorems are valid for both linear and nonlinear ranges of the pile material and the soil behavior. Some presented numerical examples allow one to investigate the accuracy of approximation of changes of internal forces and displacements due to the increments of the design variables by means of their first order variations.

  4. Axial current generation from electric field: chiral electric separation effect.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Liao, Jinfeng

    2013-06-01

    We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the chiral electric separation effect (CESE). On a very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to μ(V)μ(A) with μ(V) and μ(A) the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable effects of CESE in heavy-ion collisions are also discussed. PMID:25167486

  5. Three-Dimensional Photon Counting Imaging with Axially Distributed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myungjin; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review three-dimensional (3D) photon counting imaging with axially distributed sensing. Under severely photon-starved conditions, we have proposed various imaging and algorithmic approaches to reconstruct a scene in 3D, which are not possible by using conventional imaging system due to lack of sufficient number of photons. In this paper, we present an overview of optical sensing and imaging system along with dedicated algorithms for reconstructing 3D scenes by photon counting axially distributed sensing, which may be implemented by moving a single image sensor along its optical axis. To visualize the 3D image, statistical estimation methods and computational reconstruction of axially distributed sensing is applied. PMID:27483262

  6. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  7. Linear optical response of carbon nanotubes under axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2010-04-01

    We considered single walled carbon naotubes (SWCNTs) as real three dimensional (3D) systems in a cylindrical coordinate. The optical matrix elements and linear susceptibility, χ(ω), in the tight binding approximation in terms of one-dimensional wave vector, kz and subband index, l are calculated. In an external axial magnetic field optical frequency dependence of linear susceptibility are investigated. We found that axial magnetic field has two effects on the imaginary part of the linear susceptibility spectrum, in agreement with experimental results. The first effect is broadening and the second, splitting. Also we found that for all metallic zigzag and armchair SWCNTs, the axial magnetic field leads to the creation of a peak with energy less than 1.5 eV, contrary to what is observed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  8. Temporal and Spatial Variability in the Geochemistry of Axial and CoAxial Segment Lavas and their Mantle Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. C.; Perfit, M. R.; Davis, C.; Kamenov, G. D.

    2011-12-01

    Three spatially related volcanic eruptions along the CoAxial Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) have documented emplacements between 1981 and 1993. Two of the historic flows outcrop at the "Flow Site" and were emplaced within less than 12 years and 500 m from one another. The third was emplaced at the "Floc Site" to the south in the 1980s. Previous studies have documented that CoAxial lavas are among the most incompatible element and isotopically depleted lavas along the entire JdFR, whereas the Axial Seamount segment immediately south of CoAxial has erupted the most chemically enriched lavas south of the Endeavor Segment. Geochemical studies have shown little temporal change in the chemistry of recent Axial Seamount eruptives, whereas CoAxial lavas exhibit distinct chemical differences over short time periods. Significant chemical differences observed among depleted CoAxial lavas emplaced close to one another in space and time are in marked contrast to the relatively constant chemical characteristics of enriched lavas erupted at the magmatically more robust Axial segment only 10's of kilometers to the south and west. New trace element and isotopic (Sr, Nd, Pb) geochemical analyses of historic and older CoAxial lavas have resulted in better documentation of interflow and intraflow chemical variation providing an improved understanding of spatial/temporal chemical variability in lavas, and further insight into JdFR magmatic processes. Modeling of major and trace element abundances suggest that the observed intraflow chemical variation within CoAxial lavas is largely due to shallow-level fractional crystallization but that a single fractional crystallization model cannot account for all interflow chemical variation. In fact, elemental and isotopic data require different parental magmas for each of the three recent CoAxial Segment lava flows suggesting very short-term differences or changes in the chemical character of the mantle source region. In particular

  9. NASA Low-speed Axial Compressor for Fundamental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, Charles A.; Weaver, Harold F.; Senyitko, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A low-speed multistage axial compressor built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The purpose of this compressor is to increase the understanding of the complex flow phenomena within multistage axial compressors and to obtain detailed data from a multistage compressor environment for use in developing and verifying models for computational fluid dynamic code assessment. The compressor has extensive pressure instrumentation in both stationary and rotating frames of reference, and has provisions for flow visualization and laser velocimetry. The compressor will accommodate rotational speeds to 1050 rpm and is rated at a pressure ratio of 1.042.

  10. Axial crack propagation and arrest in pressurized fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosai, M.; Shimamoto, A.; Yu, C.-T.; Walker, S. I.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Tan, P.

    1994-01-01

    The crack arrest capability of a tear strap in a pressurized precracked fuselage was studied through instrumented axial rupture tests of small scale models of an idealized fuselage. Upon pressurization, rapid crack propagation initiated at an axial through crack along the stringer and immediately kinked due to the mixed modes 1 and 2 state caused by the one-sided opening of the crack flap. The diagonally running crack further turned at the tear straps. Dynamic finite element analysis of the rupturing cylinder showed that the crack kinked and also ran straight in the presence of a mixed mode state according to a modified two-parameter crack kinking criterion.

  11. Reflective correctors for the Hubble Space Telescope axial instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottema, Murk

    1993-01-01

    Reflective correctors to compensate the spherical aberration in the Hubble Space Telescope are placed in front of three of the axial scientific instruments (a camera and two spectrographs) during the first scheduled refurbishment mission. The five correctors required are deployed from a new module that replaces the fourth axial instrument. Each corrector consists of a field mirror and an aspherical, aberration-correcting reimaging mirror. In the camera the angular resolution capability is restored, be it in reduced fields, and in the spectrographs the potential for observations in crowded areas is regained along with effective light collection at the slits.

  12. Fatigue life prediction in bending from axial fatigue information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Muralidharan, U.

    1982-01-01

    Bending fatigue in the low cyclic life range differs from axial fatigue due to the plastic flow which alters the linear stress-strain relation normally used to determine the nominal stresses. An approach is presented to take into account the plastic flow in calculating nominal bending stress (S sub bending) based on true surface stress. These functions are derived in closed form for rectangular and circular cross sections. The nominal bending stress and the axial fatigue stress are plotted as a function of life (N sub S) and these curves are shown for several materials of engineering interest.

  13. Buckling of Beams and Columns under Combined Axial and Horizontal Loading with Various Axial Loading Application Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidinejad, Amir

    2012-12-01

    In this paper the buckling behaviour of an I-beam under combined axial and horizontal side loading is examined. It is to shown that the actual application location of the axial loading governs the buck- ling behaviour of the long I-beam. Theoretical formulation is developed to determine the critical buckling load for such combined loading configura- tion from the elastic static theory. Both, the beam deflection theoretical model and the critical load capacity are derived for this combined loading condition. The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is utilized to apply the axial load on the beam at various configuration locations and it is shown that this application location determines the buckling behaviour and the critical load of the buckling of the I-beam. Numerical example is given.

  14. A survey of unclassified axial-flow-compressor literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G

    1955-01-01

    A survey of unclassified axial-flow-compressor literature is presented in the form of brief reviews of the methods, results, and conclusions of selected reports. The reports are organized into several main categories with subdivisions, and frequent references are made within the individual reviews to pertinent material elsewhere in the survey.

  15. Elevated temperature axial and torsional fatigue behavior of Haynes 188

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1992-01-01

    The results of high-temperature axial and torsional low-cycle fatigue experiments performed on Haynes 188, a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, are reported. Fatigue tests were performed at 760 C in air on thin-walled tubular specimens at various ranges under strain control. Data are also presented for coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, and shear modulus at various temperatures from room to 1000 C, and monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves in tension and in shear at 760 C. The data set is used to evaluate several multiaxial fatigue life models (most were originally developed for room temperature multiaxial life prediction) including von Mises equivalent strain range (ASME boiler and pressure vessel code), Manson-Halford, Modified Multiaxiality Factor (proposed here), Modified Smith-Watson-Topper, and Fatemi-Socie-Kurath. At von Mises equivalent strain ranges (the torsional strain range divided by the square root of 3, taking the Poisson's ratio to be 0.5), torsionally strained specimens lasted, on average, factors of 2 to 3 times longer than axially strained specimens. The Modified Multiaxiality Factor approach shows promise as a useful method of estimating torsional fatigue life from axial fatigue data at high temperatures. Several difficulties arose with the specimen geometry and extensometry used in these experiments. Cracking at extensometer probe indentations was a problem at smaller strain ranges. Also, as the largest axial and torsional strain range fatigue tests neared completion, a small amount of specimen buckling was observed.

  16. A general representation for axial-flow fans and turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perl, W; Tucker, M

    1945-01-01

    A general representation of fan and turbine arrangements on a single classification chart is presented that is made possible by a particular definition of the stage of an axial-flow fan or turbine. Several unconventional fan and turbine arrangements are indicated and the applications of these arrangements are discussed.

  17. Computational analysis of an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Allaire, Paul E; Wood, Houston G; Matherne, Gaynell Paul; Lim, David Scott; Peeler, Ben B; Olsen, Don B

    2004-10-01

    Longer-term (>2 weeks) mechanical circulatory support will provide an improved quality of life for thousands of pediatric cardiac failure patients per year in the United States. These pediatric patients suffer from severe congenital or acquired heart disease complicated by congestive heart failure. There are currently very few mechanical circulatory support systems available in the United States as viable options for this population. For that reason, we have designed an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device (PVAD) with an impeller that is fully suspended by magnetic bearings. As a geometrically similar, smaller scaled version of our axial flow pump for the adult population, the PVAD has a design point of 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg to meet the full physiologic needs of pediatric patients. Conventional axial pump design equations and a nondimensional scaling technique were used to estimate the PVAD's initial dimensions, which allowed for the creation of computational models for performance analysis. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the axial flow PVAD, which measures approximately 65 mm in length by 35 mm in diameter, shows that the pump will produce 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg for 8000 rpm. Fluid forces (approximately 1 N) were also determined for the suspension and motor design, and scalar stress values remained below 350 Pa with maximum particle residence times of approximately 0.08 milliseconds in the pump. This initial design demonstrated acceptable performance, thereby encouraging prototype manufacturing for experimental validation. PMID:15384993

  18. Calculation of the nucleon axial charge in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    D. B. Renner; R. G. Edwards; G. Fleming; Ph. Hagler; J. W. Negele; K. Orginos; A. V. Pochinsky; D. G. Richards; W. Schroers

    2006-09-01

    Protons and neutrons have a rich structure in terms of their constituents, the quarks and gluons. Understanding this structure requires solving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). However QCD is extremely complicated, so we must numerically solve the equations of QCD using a method known as lattice QCD. Here we describe a typical lattice QCD calculation by examining our recent computation of the nucleon axial charge.

  19. Correction of axial optical aberrations in hyperspectral imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špiclin, Žiga; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2011-03-01

    In hyper-spectral imaging systems with a wide spectral range, axial optical aberrations may lead to a significant blurring of image intensities in certain parts of the spectral range. Axial optical aberrations arise from the indexof- refraction variations that is dependent on the wavelength of incident light. To correct axial optical aberrations the point-spread function (PSF) of the image acquisition system needs to be identified. We proposed a multiframe joint blur identification and image restoration method that maximizes the likelihood of local image energy distributions between spectral images. Gaussian mixture model based density estimate provides a link between corresponding spatial information shared among spectral images so as to find and restore the image edges via a PSF update. Model of the PSF was assumed to be a linear combination of Gaussian functions, therefore the blur identification process had to find only the corresponding scalar weights of each Gaussian function. Using the identified PSF, image restoration was performed by the iterative Richardson-Lucy algorithm. Experiments were conducted on four different biological samples using a hyper-spectral imaging system based on acousto-optic tunable filter in the visible spectral range (0.55 - 1.0 μm). By running the proposed method, the quality of raw spectral images was substantially improved. Image quality improvements were quantified by a measure of contrast and demonstrate the potential of the proposed method for the correction of axial optical aberrations.

  20. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1988-07-19

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture is described. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combustor chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture. 10 figs.

  1. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combuston chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end of the combustor chamber and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture.

  2. 247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open vistas to either side of the roadway. These are maintained through vegetation management. The wood guide rail is a primary safety feature. View is to the northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  3. Performance analysis of axial-flow mixing impellers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Pullum, L.

    2000-03-01

    Theoretical formulations for impeller performance were evaluated based on a blade-element theory. These enable the calculation of the head and power vs. flow-rate curves of axial-flow impellers. The technique uses the life and drag coefficients of the blade section of an impeller to calculate the spanwise swirl-velocity distribution. Using the angular-momentum equation, it is possible to calculate the corresponding spanwise distribution of the energy head of the impeller. Integration of these distributions of head and torque gives the impeller's performance. Parameters including the flow number, the power number, the thrust force number, and the swirl velocity can be found at the impeller operating point, determined using the head curve and an experimentally calibrated resistance curve. A laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure the velocity distribution for different axial flow impellers in mixing tanks. Calculated flow and power numbers agreed well with the experimental results. Using the blade's spanwise head distribution and a set of calibrated flow-resistance data, it is also possible to estimate an impeller's outlet axial-velocity distribution. Predictions compared well with LDV experimental data. The effect of impeller-blade angle, number of blades, blade camber, and blade thickness on the performance of axial-flow impellers was investigated using the Agitator software.

  4. Electromagnetic fields in axial symmetric waveguides with variable cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1980-02-15

    A new class of separable variables is found which allows one to find an approximate analytical solution of the Maxwell equations for axial symmetric waveguides with slow (but not necessarily small) varying boundary surfaces. An example of the solution is given. Possible applications and limitations of this approach are discussed. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Perturbation approximation for orbits in axially symmetric funnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2014-11-01

    A perturbation method that can be traced back to Isaac Newton is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for objects sliding in axially symmetric funnels in near circular orbits. Some experimental observations are presented for balls rolling in inverted cones with different opening angles, and in a funnel with a hyperbolic surface that approximately simulates the gravitational force.

  6. Axial-Loading Circumferential Dovetail Turbine-Blade Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Martin J.; Ward, Steven D.; Eskridge, Ronald R.

    1992-01-01

    In new configuration, retaining ring holds base of blades in circumferential dovetail slot. Blades inserted axially via loading slots into circumferential dovetail slot. Ring placed over loading slots and fastened with split ring held by arm of disk. Blades less likely to be shaken loose during operation.

  7. Hydrostatic self-aligning axial/torsional mechanism

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, Daniel G.; Gerth, Howard L.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning axial/torsional loading mechanism for testing the strength of brittle materials which are sensitive to bending moments. Disposed inside said self-aligning loading mechanism is a frictionless hydrostatic ball joint with a flexure ring to accommodate torsional loads through said ball joint.

  8. Modifications to Axially Symmetric Simulations Using New DSMC (2007) Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications aimed at improving physical accuracy are proposed for solving axially symmetric problems building on the DSMC (2007) algorithms introduced by Bird. Originally developed to solve nonequilibrium, rarefied flows, the DSMC method is now regularly used to solve complex problems over a wide range of Knudsen numbers. These new algorithms include features such as nearest neighbor collisions excluding the previous collision partners, separate collision and sampling cells, automatically adaptive variable time steps, a modified no-time counter procedure for collisions, and discontinuous and event-driven physical processes. Axially symmetric solutions require radial weighting for the simulated molecules since the molecules near the axis represent fewer real molecules than those farther away from the axis due to the difference in volume of the cells. In the present methodology, these radial weighting factors are continuous, linear functions that vary with the radial position of each simulated molecule. It is shown that how one defines the number of tentative collisions greatly influences the mean collision time near the axis. The method by which the grid is treated for axially symmetric problems also plays an important role near the axis, especially for scalar pressure. A new method to treat how the molecules are traced through the grid is proposed to alleviate the decrease in scalar pressure at the axis near the surface. Also, a modification to the duplication buffer is proposed to vary the duplicated molecular velocities while retaining the molecular kinetic energy and axially symmetric nature of the problem.

  9. Momentos centrados en sistemas estelares a simetria axial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz Subirana, J.; Juan Zornoza, J. M.; Català Poch, M. A.

    Centered moments in the galactic plane have been analytically determined up to the fourth order for a non-stationary stellar system model with a distribution of peculiar velocities of the stars symmetric under point-axial transformations and equatorial plane reflexions. The obtained results explain satisfactorily the peculiar velocities distribution of the considered stellar samples in the solar neighborhood.

  10. On the Applications of Axial Representation of Trigonometric Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siadat, M. Vali

    2006-01-01

    In terms of modern pedagogy, having visual interpretation of trigonometric functions is useful and quite helpful. This paper presents, pictorially, an easy approach to prove all single angle trigonometric identities on the axes. It also discusses the application of axial representation in calculus--finding the derivative of trigonometric functions.

  11. Novel axially disubstituted non-aggregated silicon phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bıyıklıoğlu, Zekeriya; Çakır, Dilek

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization of a range of new axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines with 2-[2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy] or 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy] groups as axial ligands. 2-[2-(Dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethanol 2, 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy]ethanol 4 are reacted with silicon phthalocyanine 1, to give an axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines 3 and 5. Axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanine complexes were synthesized at the first time. Newly synthesized silicon phthalocyanines were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopy, ESI mass spectrometry. These new silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 showed excellent solubility in organic solvents such as CHCl3, CH2Cl2, acetone, DMF, DMSO, THF, EtOAc. The aggregation behavior of these compounds were investigated in different concentrations of DMSO. The effect of solvents on absorption spectra were studied in various organic solvents. The thermal stabilities of the silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 were determined by thermogravimetric analysis.

  12. Elevated temperature axial and torsional fatigue behavior of Haynes 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1992-06-01

    The results of high-temperature axial and torsional low-cycle fatigue experiments performed on Haynes 188, a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, are reported. Fatigue tests were performed at 760 C in air on thin-walled tubular specimens at various ranges under strain control. Data are also presented for coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, and shear modulus at various temperatures from room to 1000 C, and monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves in tension and in shear at 760 C. The data set is used to evaluate several multiaxial fatigue life models (most were originally developed for room temperature multiaxial life prediction) including von Mises equivalent strain range (ASME boiler and pressure vessel code), Manson-Halford, Modified Multiaxiality Factor (proposed here), Modified Smith-Watson-Topper, and Fatemi-Socie-Kurath. At von Mises equivalent strain ranges (the torsional strain range divided by the square root of 3, taking the Poisson's ratio to be 0.5), torsionally strained specimens lasted, on average, factors of 2 to 3 times longer than axially strained specimens. The Modified Multiaxiality Factor approach shows promise as a useful method of estimating torsional fatigue life from axial fatigue data at high temperatures. Several difficulties arose with the specimen geometry and extensometry used in these experiments. Cracking at extensometer probe indentations was a problem at smaller strain ranges. Also, as the largest axial and torsional strain range fatigue tests neared completion, a small amount of specimen buckling was observed.

  13. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with an axially levitated motor.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ezoe, Shiroh; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Okada, Yohji

    2003-07-01

    The longevity of a rotary blood pump is mainly determined by the durability of its wearing mechanical parts such as bearings and seals. Magnetic suspension techniques can be used to eliminate these mechanical parts altogether. This article describes a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump using an axially levitated motor. The motor comprises an upper stator, a bottom stator, and a levitated rotor-impeller between the stators. The upper stator has permanent magnets to generate an attractive axial bias force on the rotor and electric magnets to control the inclination of the rotor. The bottom stator has electric magnets to generate attractive forces and rotating torque to control the axial displacement and rotation of the rotor. The radial displacement of the rotor is restricted by passive stability. A shrouded impeller is integrated within the rotor. The performance of the magnetic suspension and pump were evaluated in a closed mock loop circuit filled with water. The maximum amplitude of the rotor displacement in the axial direction was only 0.06 mm. The maximum possible rotational speed during levitation was 1,600 rpm. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 120 mm Hg and 7 L/min, respectively. The pump shows promise as a ventricular assist device. PMID:12823418

  14. Dynamics of Axial Separation in Long Rotating Drums

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I.S.; Tsimring, L.S.

    1999-06-01

    We propose a continuum description for the axial separation of granular materials in a long rotating drum. The model, operating with two local variables, concentration difference and the dynamic angle of repose, describes both initial transient traveling wave dynamics and long-term segregation of the binary mixture. Segregation proceeds through ultraslow logarithmic coarsening. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Parametric study of axial trapping forces on an elliptically symmetric dielectric in the ray optics regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roque, Kristine Faith J.; Tapang, Giovanni A.; Saloma, Caesar A.

    2015-07-01

    We present the parametric investigation of the axial trapping forces generated by the interaction of an ellipsoidal dielectric and a focused, randomly polarized Gaussian beam in the geometrical optics regime. We show that particle elongation along the optical axis results to a more unstable axial trap compared to that of a reference sphere due to the more positive axial forces for positive axial displacements. Decreasing the refractive index difference between the particle and the surrounding medium (Δn = 0.09) decreases the magnitude of the axial force for positive particle displacements; and for a narrow range of axial displacements an axial trap can be achieved. Increasing the beam wavelength increases the magnitude of the axial force and for 1060 nm an axial trap can be achieved.

  16. Automated flexure testing of axially rotated optical fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachim, B. L.; Gaylord, T. K.

    2002-10-01

    The design and performance of an automated system for flexure testing of optical fiber gratings is described. In addition to flexing (bending) a fiber grating through a specified curvature range, the system can change the axial rotational orientation of the grating relative to the plane of curvature. Flexure is accomplished by holding the grating against a smooth plastic platform. A linear stage deflects the center of the pinned platform to create a curved surface. Two small weights, hanging on the optical fiber, hold the fiber grating against the curved platform and provide constant tension on the optical fiber over the entire range of curvatures. The fiber grating is axially rotated to a different orientation by returning the platform to zero curvature, removing the weights from the optical fiber, and rotating the optical fiber about its axis using a pair of rotation stages. After replacing the weights on the optical fiber, flexure testing resumes at the new axial rotational orientation. The grating transmission spectrum during flexure is monitored with a broadband source and optical spectrum analyzer. All of these steps are done in an automated fashion (unattended) under computer program control. The testing system allows complete characterization of the fiber grating response for curvatures from 0 to 4 m-1 and for axial rotational orientations from 0° to 360°. Use of this automated test fixture eliminates the need for human intervention during the measurements and greatly decreases the testing time while still allowing complete characterization of the flexure response with axial rotational orientation as a parameter. Additional advantages of the testing system include an absolute zero curvature starting position, an absence of hysteresis effects, and accurate frictionless rotation.

  17. Mechanism of Co-C bond photolysis in methylcobalamin: influence of axial base.

    PubMed

    Lodowski, Piotr; Jaworska, Maria; Garabato, Brady D; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2015-04-30

    A mechanism of Co-C bond photolysis in the base-off form of the methylcobalamin cofactor (MeCbl) and the influence of its axial base on Co-C bond photodissociation has been investigated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). At low pH, the MeCbl cofactor adopts the base-off form in which the axial nitrogenous ligand is replaced by a water molecule. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and photolysis studies have revealed that a new channel for rapid nonradiative decay in base-off MeCbl is opened, which competes with bond dissociation. To explain these experimental findings, the corresponding potential energy surface of the S1 state was constructed as a function of Co-C and Co-O bond distances, and the manifold of low-lying triplets was plotted as a function of Co-C bond length. In contrast to the base-on form of MeCbl in which two possible photodissociation pathways were identified on the basis of whether the Co-C bond (path A) or axial Co-N bond (path B) elongates first, only path B is active in base-off MeCbl. Specifically, path A is inactive because the energy barrier associated with direct dissociation of the methyl ligand is higher than the barrier of intersection between two different electronic states: a metal-to-ligand charge transfer state (MLCT), and a ligand field state (LF) along the Co-O coordinate of the S1 PES. Path B initially involves displacement of the water molecule, followed by the formation of an LF-type intermediate, which possesses a very shallow energy minimum with respect to the Co-C coordinate. This LF-type intermediate on path B may result in either S1/S0 internal conversion or singlet radical pair generation. In addition, intersystem crossing (ISC) resulting in generation of a triplet radical pair is also feasible. PMID:25837554

  18. Deformation associated with the 2015 Eruption of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooner, S. L.; Chadwick, W.; Caress, D. W.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Yoerger, D.; Sasagawa, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    On April 24th 2015, an eruption began at Axial Seamount, a seafloor volcano located about 480 km west of the Oregon coast at the intersection of the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This eruption was first detected in real time by the newly operational Ocean Observatories Initiative cabled instrumentation at Axial (Delaney, AGU-2015, Wilcock, AGU-2015, Caplan-Auerbach, AGU-2015). Two prior eruptions have been observed since routine observations began in the 1990's, one in January 1998 and the other in April 2011. Precise water pressure measurements made on the volcano have documented an inflation/deflation cycle within Axial's summit caldera for the past 15 years. These data are now being supplemented by repeat bathymetric mapping by AUV. The long-term pattern appears to be "inflation predictable", in which eruptions are triggered at or near the same level of inflation. This pattern allowed us to successfully forecast in September 2014 that the next eruption was expected to occur at Axial sometime in 2015 (a 1-year time window). It is noteworthy that the rate of inflation between the 2011 and 2015 eruptions was about 4 times higher than between the 1998 and 2011 eruptions (60 cm/yr vs. 15 cm/yr). Subsidence at the caldera center began at 06:00 on 24 April (all times GMT) and amounted to 2.2 m by 02:00 on 25 April (20 hours in), 2.4 m by 00:00 on 28 April, and 2.45 m by 05 May when subsidence ended and re-inflation began (which has continued ever since). This amount of subsidence is similar to that observed during the 2011 eruption, but in 2015 the initial rate of subsidence was higher (11 cm/hr during the first 20 hours vs. 7 cm/hr in 2011) and the duration appears to have been longer (11 days vs. 6 days). Also, the 1998 and 2011 eruptions occurred along the southeastern edge of the caldera and along Axial's south rift zone, whereas the 2015 eruption occurred along the north rift zone (Kelley, AGU-2015). Here we present preliminary results of our August

  19. Modelling larval transport in a axial convergence front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, P.

    2010-12-01

    Marine larvae exhibit different vertical swimming behaviours, synchronised by factors such as tidal currents and daylight, in order to aid retention near the parent populations and hence promote production, avoid predation, or to stimulate digestion. This paper explores two types of larval migration in an estuarine axial convergent front which is an important circulatory mechanism in many coastal regions where larvae are concentrated. A parallelised, three-dimensional, ocean model was applied to an idealised estuarine channel which was parameterised from observations of an axial convergent front which occurs in the Conwy Estuary, U.K. (Nunes and Simpson, 1985). The model successfully simulates the bilateral cross-sectional recirculation of an axial convergent front, which has been attributed to lateral density gradients established by the interaction of the lateral shear of the longitudinal currents with the axial salinity gradients. On the flood tide, there is surface axial convergence whereas on the ebb tide, there is (weaker) surface divergence. Further simulations with increased/decreased tidal velocities and with stronger/weaker axial salinity gradients are planned so that the effects of a changing climate on the secondary flow can be understood. Three-dimensional Lagrangian Particle Tracking Models (PTMs) have been developed which use the simulated velocity fields to track larvae in the estuarine channel. The PTMs take into account the vertical migrations of two shellfish species that are commonly found in the Conwy Estuary: (i) tidal migration of the common shore crab (Carcinus maenas) and (ii), diel (daily) migration of the Great scallop (Pecten maximus). These migration behaviours are perhaps the most widespread amongst shellfish larvae and have been compared with passive (drifting) particles in order to assess their relative importance in terms of larval transport. Preliminary results suggest that the net along-estuary dispersal over a typical larval

  20. Axial SiGe Heteronanowire Tunneling Field-Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Son T.; Jannaty, P.; Luo, Xu; Zaslavsky, A.; Perea, Daniel E.; Dayeh, Shadi A.; Picraux, Samuel T.

    2012-10-31

    We present silicon-compatible tri-gated p-Ge/i-Si/n-Si axial heteronanowire tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs), where on-state tunneling occurs in the Ge drain section, while off-state leakage is dominated by the Si junction in the source. Our TFETs have high ION ~ 2 µA/µm, fully suppressed ambipolarity, and a sub-threshold slope SS ~ 140 mV/decade over 4 decades of current with lowest SS ~ 50 mV/decade. Device operation in the tunneling mode is confirmed by three-dimensional TCAD simulation. Interestingly, in addition to the TFET mode, our devices work as standard nanowire FETs with good ION/IOFF ratio when the source-drain junction is forward-biased. The improved transport in both biasing modes confirms the benefits of utilizing bandgap engineered axial nanowires for enhancing device performance.

  1. Buckling Imperfection Sensitivity of Axially Compressed Orthotropic Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Structural stability is a major consideration in the design of lightweight shell structures. However, the theoretical predictions of geometrically perfect structures often considerably over predict the buckling loads of inherently imperfect real structures. It is reasonably well understood how the shell geometry affects the imperfection sensitivity of axially compressed cylindrical shells; however, the effects of shell anisotropy on the imperfection sensitivity is less well understood. In the present paper, the development of an analytical model for assessing the imperfection sensitivity of axially compressed orthotropic cylinders is discussed. Results from the analytical model for four shell designs are compared with those from a general-purpose finite-element code, and good qualitative agreement is found. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed, and potential design implications of this line of research are discussed.

  2. Investigation of performance limits in axial groove heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, K. T.

    1976-01-01

    The entrainment-shear performance limit which occurs in axial groove heat pipes was investigated and explained. In the existing heat pipe literature the entrainment heat flux limit is defined as the condition where the Weber number is greater than or equal to one. In this analysis, the critical value for the entrainment Weber number is found to be 2 pi less than or equal to 3 pi. Perhaps more important to the heat pipe designer than the entrainment performance limit is the prediction of the performance degradation due to vapor-liquid shearing stress which is also described. Preliminary qualitative experiments were conducted to observe the shear. stress wave formation phenomena. The equations presented may be used to predict and minimize the vapor-liquid shear stress performance effects that occur in axial groove and puddle flow artery heat pipes.

  3. Experimentally studying of axial compressor operation with steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenin, V. M.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Kosoi, A. S.; Datsenko, V. V.; Sinkevich, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    Steam offers numerous benefits when used as the working fluid in thermodynamic cycles. In lowtemperature cycles, where thermal energy is switched from one temperature potential to another (thermal transformers), steam is much less commonly used as a working fluid than in high-temperature cycles. The deficiencies of difficulties in using steam in thermal transformers include low pressure at the working temperatures and hence large specific volume. A compressor capable of high productivity having high discharge and relatively large increase in pressure is required. To that end, a multistage axial compressor from an airplane aircraft engine may be employed. To confirm the viability of this approach, the compressor of an AL-21 airplane aircraft engine is tested on a custom test bench. Experimental results are presented for a multistage axial compressor working with steam, when the input pressure is 0.5-5 kPa.

  4. Axially Tapered And Bilayer Microchannels For Evaporative Cooling Devices

    DOEpatents

    Nilson, Robert; Griffiths, Stewart

    2005-10-04

    The invention consists of an evaporative cooling device comprising one or more microchannels whose cross section is axially reduced to control the maximum capillary pressure differential between liquid and vapor phases. In one embodiment, the evaporation channels have a rectangular cross section that is reduced in width along a flow path. In another embodiment, channels of fixed width are patterned with an array of microfabricated post-like features such that the feature size and spacing are gradually reduced along the flow path. Other embodiments incorporate bilayer channels consisting of an upper cover plate having a pattern of slots or holes of axially decreasing size and a lower fluid flow layer having channel widths substantially greater than the characteristic microscale dimensions of the patterned cover plate. The small dimensions of the cover plate holes afford large capillary pressure differentials while the larger dimensions of the lower region reduce viscous flow resistance.

  5. Ward identities in a general axial gauge. II. Quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Capper, D.M.; Leibbrandt, G.

    1982-02-15

    We have calculated the pole part of the one-loop graviton self-energy in the noncovariant axial gauge n/sub ..mu../phi/sub munu/ = 0, n/sup 2/not =0, where phi/sub munu/ is the physical graviton field and n/sub ..mu../ is an arbitrary but constant vector. It is shown that the self-energy is, unexpectedly, both nontransverse and n/sub ..mu../ dependent, even though it satisfies the correct gravitational Ward identity. This Ward identity is found to contain a term corresponding to a ''pincer'' Feynman diagram which is directly responsible for the nontransversality of the graviton self-energy. Ghost particles do not contribute to the graviton amplitude. All axial-gauge integrals are consistently evaluated in the context of dimensional regularization and by applying the principal-value prescription.

  6. Fully Characterizing Axially Symmetric Szekeres Models with Three Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Célérier, Marie-Nöelle Mishra, Priti; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2015-01-01

    Inhomogeneous exact solutions of General Relativity with zero cosmological constant have been used in the literature to challenge the ΛCDM model. From one patch Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models to axially symmetric quasi-spherical Szekeres (QSS) Swiss-cheese models, some of them are able to reproduce to a good accuracy the cosmological data. It has been shown in the literature that a zero Λ LTB model with a central observer can be fully determined by two data sets. We demonstrate that an axially symmetric zero Λ QSS model with an observer located at the origin can be fully reconstructed from three data sets, number counts, luminosity distance and redshift drift. This is a first step towards a future demonstration involving five data sets and the most general Szekeres model.

  7. Axial Ge/Si nanowire heterostructure tunnel FETs

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Sanuel T; Daych, Shadi A

    2010-01-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of semiconductor nanowires allows doping and composition modulation along their axis and the realization of axial 1 D heterostructures. This provides additional flexibility in energy band-edge engineering along the transport direction which is difficult to attain by planar materials growth and processing techniques. We report here on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of asymmetric heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFETs) based on 100% compositionally modulated Si/Ge axial NWs for high on-current operation and low ambipolar transport behavior. We discuss the optimization of band-offsets and Schottky barrier heights for high performance HTFETs and issues surrounding their experimental realization. Our HTFET devices with 10 nm PECVD SiN{sub x} gate dielectric resulted in a measured current drive exceeding 100 {mu}A/{mu}m (I/{pi}D) and 10{sup 5} I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratios.

  8. Fuel axial relocation in ballooning fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fuel movement, in the longitudinal direction in ballooning fuel rods, shifts the position of heat generation and may cause an increase in cladding temperature in the ballooning region. This paper summarizes the axial fuel relocation data obtained in fuel rod tests conducted in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany, describes a model for calculating fuel axial relocation, and gives a quantitative analysis of the impact of fuel relocation on cladding temperature. The amount of fuel relocation in 18 ballooned fuel rods was determined from neutron radiographs, niobium gamma decay counts, and photomicrographs. The fuel rods had burnups in the range of 0 to 35,000 MWd/t and cladding hoop strains varying from 0 to 72%.

  9. The axial-torsional vibration of pretwisted beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuang-Chen; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the coupled axial-torsional vibration of pretwisted beams. The equations of motion governing the extension, torsion, and cross-sectional warping of pretwisted beams are derived from Hamiltons principle, and the common assumptions used to simplify the equations are carefully examined through scaling analysis. Inconsistencies in previous works—such as the neglect of spatial and time derivatives of torsion in the Lagrangian functional—are remedied, giving rise to fourth-order terms in the equations of motion that are significant for higher harmonics. Furthermore, scaling analysis of the governing equations yields a set of objective criteria for checking the validity of the frequently misused assumption that the warping function under pretwist is locally identical to that of a prismatic beam; we show that this simplification is responsible for the common poor prediction of axial resonance frequencies for pretwisted beams.

  10. Ritual relieved axial dystonia triggered by gaze-evoked amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Jacome, D E

    1997-11-01

    A woman with chronic posttraumatic axial lateropulsion cervical dystonia ("belly dancer's head") found relief of her spontaneous dystonic spasms by the sequential performance of an elaborate motor ritual. During an episode of left optic papillitis caused by central retinal vein occlusion, gaze-evoked amaurosis of the left eye developed, preceded by achromatopsia, during left lateral gaze. Gaze-evoked amaurosis triggered axial dystonia, which was followed by her unique, stereotyped, dystonia-relieving ritual that simulated a slow dance. Visual symptoms improved progressively in 1 year. Eventually, she was unable to trigger her dystonia by eye movements. Spontaneous dystonia remained otherwise unchanged from before the episode of papillitis and was still relieved by her unique ritual. PMID:9365340

  11. Axially staged combustion system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Bland, Robert J.

    2009-12-15

    An axially staged combustion system is provided for a gas turbine engine comprising a main body structure having a plurality of first and second injectors. First structure provides fuel to at least one of the first injectors. The fuel provided to the one first injector is adapted to mix with air and ignite to produce a flame such that the flame associated with the one first injector defines a flame front having an average length when measured from a reference surface of the main body structure. Each of the second injectors comprising a section extending from the reference surface of the main body structure through the flame front and having a length greater than the average length of the flame front. Second structure provides fuel to at least one of the second injectors. The fuel passes through the one second injector and exits the one second injector at a location axially spaced from the flame front.

  12. First Calculation of Hyperon Axial Couplings from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin; Konstantinos Orginos

    2007-12-06

    In this work, we report the first lattice calculation of the hyperon axial couplings, using the 2+1-flavor MILC configurations and domain-wall fermion valence quarks. Both the $\\Sigma$ and $\\Xi$ axial couplings are for the first time done in lattice QCD, and we find the numbers with greater precision than previous chiral perturbation theory and large-$N_c$ theory estimate: $g_{\\Sigma\\Sigma} = 0.450(21)_{\\rm stat}(22)_{\\rm syst}$ and $g_{\\Xi\\Xi} = -0.277(15)_{\\rm stat}(16)_{\\rm syst}$. As a side product, we also determine the low-energy chiral parameters $D$ and $F$ extracted from these coupling constants: $D=0.715(6)_{\\rm stat}(6)_{\\rm syst}$ and $F=0.453(5)_{\\rm stat}(5)_{\\rm syst}$.

  13. The type 1 copper site of pseudoazurin: axial and rhombic.

    PubMed

    Gast, Peter; Broeren, Freek G J; Sottini, Silvia; Aoki, Risa; Takashina, Akiko; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Kohzuma, Takamitsu; Groenen, Edgar J J

    2014-08-01

    We report on a high-frequency electron-paramagnetic-resonance study of the type 1 copper site of pseudoazurin. The spectra fully resolve the contribution of a nearly axial spectrum besides the rhombic spectrum, which unequivocally proves the existence of two conformations of the copper site. Pseudoazurins have been considered from Achromobacter cycloclastes including eight mutants and from Alcaligenes faecalis. The two conformations are virtually the same for all pseudoazurins, but the rhombic/axial population varies largely, between 91/9 and 33/67. These observations are discussed in relation to optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction structures. A similar observation for fern plastocyanin from Dryopteris crassirhizoma suggests that dual conformations of type 1 copper sites are more common. PMID:24813397

  14. Development of optimized, graded-permeability axial groove heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapolnek, Michael R.; Holmes, H. Rolland

    1988-01-01

    Heat pipe performance can usually be improved by uniformly varying or grading wick permeability from end to end. A unique and cost effective method for grading the permeability of an axial groove heat pipe is described - selective chemical etching of the pipe casing. This method was developed and demonstrated on a proof-of-concept test article. The process improved the test article's performance by 50 percent. Further improvement is possible through the use of optimally etched grooves.

  15. Axial form factor of the nucleon at large momentum transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikin, I. V.; Braun, V. M.; Offen, N.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the emerging possibilities to study threshold pion electroproduction at large momentum transfers at Jefferson Laboratory following the 12 GeV upgrade, we provide a short theory summary and an estimate of the nucleon axial form factor for large virtualities in the Q2=1 - 10 GeV2 range using next-to-leading-order light-cone sum rules.

  16. The nucleon axial charge in full lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; George Fleming; P Hagler; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Andrew Pochinsky; Dru Renner; David Richards; Wolfram Schroers

    2005-10-13

    The nucleon axial charge is calculated as a function of the pion mass in full QCD. Using domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks, we present the first calculation with pion masses as light as 354 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm)3. We show that finite volume effects are small for our volumes and that a constrained fit based on finite volume chiral perturbation theory agrees with experiment within 5% statistical errors.

  17. Axial Seamount - Under the hood of the volcano machine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    On the Juan de Fuca ridge, Axial volcano is the most volcanically active site of the northwestern Pacific and it has been continuously monitored through two complete eruption cycles, with an increased number of seafloor instruments, leading in 2014 to the deployment of a permanent, wired-to-shore, seafloor observatory. Accurate imaging of the internal structure of volcanic systems is critical in order to characterize and quantify mass and energy transport mechanisms in such dynamic environments. To produce high-resolution velocity/reflectivity structures of Axial volcano, here, we combined a synthetic ocean bottom experiment (SOBE), 3-D traveltime tomography, 2D elastic full waveform and a reverse time migration (RTM) formalism.We present an updated and more complete outlook of Axial volcano upper crustal structure. We find that the addition of 469,891 traveltime arrivals, from twelve different multichannel seismic lines, to a previous OBSs-based traveltime tomography inversion, greatly improved the resolution of the three-dimensional velocity structure. We observe two elongated crustal magma reservoir beneath the central volcano. We investigate the extent, volume and physical state of those magma reservoirs and provide images of the volcanic plumbing system. We use our 3D velocity structure to relocate several months of seismicity and track magma movements between the caldera and the eruption site. We show that crustal-aging is controlled by pipe-like pattern of focused hydrothermal circulation. We suggest that the subsiding caldera floor at Axial Volcano was initiated ~720kyr +/-100kyr and provides a near perfect trap for the ponding of lava flows.

  18. Axial Anomaly, Dirac Sea, and the Chiral Magnetic Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, D.E.

    2010-05-26

    Gribov viewed the axial anomaly as a manifestation of the collective motion of Dirac fermions with arbitrarily high momenta in the vacuum. In the presence of an external magnetic field and a chirality imbalance, this collective motion becomes directly observable in the form of the electric current - this is the chiral magnetic effect (CME). I give an elementary introduction into the physics of CME, and discuss the experimental status and recent developments.

  19. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.; Fazio, M.; Haynes, W.

    1995-12-31

    Free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that will make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that (1) the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and (2) such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. The axial FEL interaction is with a fast wave and does involve axial bunching of the electron beam, so the results found for this device also apply to transverse-coupling FELs. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. By changing the annulus radius, exact cancellation can be found for a variety of beam voltages and currents in the ranges of 0.5-1.0 MV and 1-5 kA. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons.

  20. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D.

    2015-06-01

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  1. The axial anomaly and the dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Franz; Ito, Hiroshi; Buck, Warren

    1991-10-01

    Using the quark triangle diagram for the Adler-Bell-Jackiw axial anomaly, we calculate the form factor for the {gamma}{sup *}{pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma} transition. This form factor depends on the quark mass, and we predict the right behavior with m{sub q}{approx_equal}250 MeV, the same quark mass generated by the dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry through a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio mechanism.

  2. Rotary-To-Axial Motion Converter For Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H.; Mohtar, Rafic

    1991-01-01

    Nearly frictionless mechanism converts rotary motion into axial motion. Designed for use in electronically variable pressure-regulator valve. Changes rotary motion imparted by motor into translation that opens and closes valve poppet. Cables spaced equidistantly around edge of fixed disk support movable disk. As movable disk rotated, cables twist, lifting it. When rotated in opposite direction, cables untwist, lowering it. Spider disk helps to prevent cables from tangling. Requires no lubrication and insensitive to contamination in fluid flowing through valve.

  3. Measurement of axial injection displacement with trim coil current unbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-08-15

    The Dee probe used for measuring internal radial beam intensity shows large losses inside the radius of 20 cm of the 88 in. cyclotron. The current of the top and bottom innermost trim coil 1 is unbalanced to study effects of the axial injection displacement. A beam profile monitor images the ion beam bunches, turn by turn. The experimental bunch center of mass position is compared with calculations of the magnetic mirror effect displacement and shows good agreement.

  4. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D.

    2015-06-15

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  5. Numerical analysis of a microwave torch with axial gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kulumbaev, E. B.; Lelevkin, V. M.

    2013-07-15

    The characteristics of a microwave discharge in an argon jet injected axially into a coaxial channel with a shortened inner electrode are numerically analyzed using a self-consistent equilibrium gas-dynamic model. The specific features of the excitation and maintenance of the microwave discharge are determined, and the dependences of the discharge characteristics on the supplied electromagnetic power and gas flow rate are obtained. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.

  6. Axial Spondylectomy and Circumferential Reconstruction via a Posterior Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jandial, Rahul; Kelly, Brandon; Bucklen, Brandon; Khalil, Saif; Chen, Mike Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal metastases of the second cervical vertebra are a subset of tumors that is particularly difficult to address surgically. Previously described techniques require highly morbid circumferential dissection posterior to the pharynx for resection and reconstruction. Objective To perform a biomechanical analysis of instrumented reconstruction configurations used after axial spondylectomy and demonstrate safe use of a novel construct in a patient case report. Methods Several different published and novel reconstruction configurations were inserted into 7 occipitocervical spines that underwent axial spondylectomy. A biomechanical analysis of the constructs’ stiffness in flexion and extension, lateral bending, and rotation was performed. A patient then underwent a posterior-only approach for axial spondylectomy and circumferential reconstruction. Results Biomechanical analysis of different constructs demonstrated that anterior column reconstruction with bilateral cages spanning C1 lateral mass to C3 facet in combination with occipitocervical instrumentation was superior in flexion-extension and equivalent in lateral bending and rotation to currently used constructs. In the patient in which this construct was placed via a posterior-only approach for axial spondylectomy and instrumentation, the patient remained at neurological baseline and demonstrated no recurrence of local disease or failure of instrumentation to date. Conclusion When comparing C1 lateral mass to C3 facet bilateral cage plus occipitocervical instrumentation to existing anterior and posterior constructs, this novel reconstruction is biomechanically equivalent if not superior in performance. In a patient, the posterior-only approach for C2 spondylectomy with the novel reconstruction was safe, durable, and avoided the morbidity of the anterior approach. PMID:23149951

  7. Measurement of axial injection displacement with trim coil current unbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-08-01

    The Dee probe used for measuring internal radial beam intensity shows large losses inside the radius of 20 cm of the 88 in. cyclotron. The current of the top and bottom innermost trim coil 1 is unbalanced to study effects of the axial injection displacement. A beam profile monitor images the ion beam bunches, turn by turn. The experimental bunch center of mass position is compared with calculations of the magnetic mirror effect displacement and shows good agreement.

  8. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix misdiagnosed as convexity meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yan; Yi, Lei; Ouyang, Yian; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Isolated cerebral varix is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly, which is easily misdiagnosed as other brain tumors. A 59-year-old female patient with noncontributory medical history presented with headache and insomnia for the last 2 months. Upon admission, her neurological examination was unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-demarcated extra medullary mass, 11 × 11 mm in size, within the subdural space at the right frontal lobe. The lesion was initially interpreted as a convexity meningioma. After conducting a craniotomy on the patient, an extra-axial varix was exposed and resected subsequently. The patient's headache was resolved soon after surgery and charged without neurologic sequelae. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix is mimicking convexity meningioma on MR images and should be considered as a differential diagnosis. The focal erosion in the inner table of the skull could be an important character of extra-axial isolated cerebral varix. An extremely round shape and smooth contour of the lesion was another important character. Isolated cerebral varix is rare vascular lesion that is treated surgically in the case of rupture or compression of adjacent structures. The information obtained with noninvasive imaging techniques should include CTA to make a clinical decision. PMID:27368037

  9. Axial stress localization facilitates pressure propagation in gelled pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrman, Jens; Skjæraasen, Olaf; Oschmann, Hans-Jörg; Paso, Kristofer; Sjöblom, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Paraffin wax-oil gels are unique rheological fluids which undergo shear degradation starting at a deformation (shear strain level) of approximately 1%. Flow commencement in pipelines filled with wax-oil gels is a complex hydrodynamic process involving propagation of acoustic, diffusive, and rheological degradation pressure wave fronts. Dynamic simulation informed by qualified rheological relations provides useful insight into the physical nature of these flow processes. Eulerian simulations are presented which emulate known physical phenomena and essential characteristics of wax-gel flow dynamics. A constitutive rheological equation set accounts for deformation-driven reduction in yield stress and viscosity terms. No explicit time-dependent rheological parameters are utilized in the equations. Rheological yielding alters the nature of the dominant pressure wave from inherently diffusive towards self-sharpening. Axial stress localization effectively sequentializes the gel breakage process, quantified by reduced length of the pressure wave-front zone. Ultimately, axial stress localization allows flow in longer pipe segments, albeit with a concomitant time delay. Viscous behavior and yielding degradation behavior are shown to account for upward and downward concavity in transient axial pressure profiles, respectively. Overall, a unique synergy between gel compressibility and gel degradation is revealed. Deformation-coupled interaction between compressibility and degradation allows pressure propagation and subsequent sustained flow through a gel material which is otherwise immobile in the incompressible case.

  10. Axial and Centrifugal Compressor Mean Line Flow Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a method to estimate key aerodynamic parameters of single and multistage axial and centrifugal compressors. This mean-line compressor code COMDES provides the capability of sizing single and multistage compressors quickly during the conceptual design process. Based on the compressible fluid flow equations and the Euler equation, the code can estimate rotor inlet and exit blade angles when run in the design mode. The design point rotor efficiency and stator losses are inputs to the code, and are modeled at off design. When run in the off-design analysis mode, it can be used to generate performance maps based on simple models for losses due to rotor incidence and inlet guide vane reset angle. The code can provide an improved understanding of basic aerodynamic parameters such as diffusion factor, loading levels and incidence, when matching multistage compressor blade rows at design and at part-speed operation. Rotor loading levels and relative velocity ratio are correlated to the onset of compressor surge. NASA Stage 37 and the three-stage NASA 74-A axial compressors were analyzed and the results compared to test data. The code has been used to generate the performance map for the NASA 76-B three-stage axial compressor featuring variable geometry. The compressor stages were aerodynamically matched at off-design speeds by adjusting the variable inlet guide vane and variable stator geometry angles to control the rotor diffusion factor and incidence angles.

  11. Free-Surface Induced Axial Flows in Oscillating Cylinder Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhees, A. V.; Wei, T.

    1999-11-01

    The problem to be discussed is that of the effect of a free surface on flow along the cores of Karman vortices shed from an inverted pendulum type cylinder. The motivation for this research was to determine the nature and extent of free surface effects in flow induced vibrations of structures aligned perpendicular to and penetrating a free surface. The 2.54 cm diameter cylinder studied had a low mass ratio and was attached at the bottom end by a leaf spring; the free, upper end protruded through the free surface of a large water tunnel. It has been observed that the vortex induced oscillations of the cylinder resulted in very strong axial flows upward toward the free surface, even for small amplitude motions. Approaching the free surface, however, there was an equal likelyhood that the axial flows would be directed down away from the surface. The connection between the direction of axial flow and the cylinder motion will be described using single and two view flow visualization techniques.

  12. Behavior of unbonded flexible risers subject to axial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shao-fei; Tang, Wen-yong; Guo, Jin-ting

    2014-04-01

    Owing to nonlinear contact problems with slip and friction, a lot of limiting assumptions are made when developing analytical models to simulate the behavior of an unbonded flexible riser. Meanwhile, in order to avoid convergence problems and excessive calculating time associated with running the detailed finite element (FE) model of an unbonded flexible riser, interlocked carcass and zeta layers with complicated cross section shapes are replaced by simple geometrical shapes (e.g. hollow cylindrical shell) with equivalent orthotropic materials. But the simplified model does not imply the stresses equivalence of these two layers. To solve these problems, based on ABAQUS/Explicit, a numerical method that is suitable for the detailed FE model is proposed. In consideration of interaction among all component layers, the axial stiffness of an eight-layer unbonded flexible riser subjected to axial tension is predicted. Compared with analytical and experimental results, it is shown that the proposed numerical method not only has high accuracy but also can substantially reduce the calculating time. In addition, the impact of the lay angle of helical tendons on axial stiffness is discussed.

  13. Preoperative Embolization of Extra-axial Hypervascular Tumors with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Matthew R.; Salem, Mohamed M.; Reddy, Arra S.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Thomas, Ajith J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preoperative endovascular embolization of intracranial tumors is performed to mitigate anticipated intraoperative blood loss. Although the usage of a wide array of embolic agents, particularly polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), has been described for a variety of tumors, literature detailing the efficacy, safety and complication rates for the usage of Onyx is relatively sparse. Materials and Methods We reviewed our single institutional experience with pre-surgical Onyx embolization of extra-axial tumors to evaluate its efficacy and safety and highlight nuances of individualized cases. Results Five patients underwent pre-surgical Onyx embolization of large or giant extra-axial tumors within 24 hours of surgical resection. Four patients harbored falcine or convexity meningiomas (grade I in 2 patients, grade II in 1 patient and grade III in one patient), and one patient had a grade II hemangiopericytoma. Embolization proceeded uneventfully in all cases and there were no complications. Conclusion This series augments the expanding literature confirming the safety and efficacy of Onyx in the preoperative embolization of extra-axial tumors, underscoring its advantage of being able to attain extensive devascularization via only one supplying pedicle. PMID:27114961

  14. Whispering gallery resonators with broken axial symmetry: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Fürst, J; Sturman, B; Buse, K; Breunig, I

    2016-09-01

    Axial symmetry is the cornerstone for theory and applications of high-Q optical whispering gallery resonators (WGRs). Nevertheless, research on birefringent crystalline material persistently pushes towards breaking this symmetry. We show theoretically and experimentally that the effect of broken axial symmetry, caused by optical anisotropy, is modest for the resonant frequencies and Q-factors of the WGR modes. Thus, the most important equatorial whispering gallery modes can be quantitatively described and experimentally identified. At the same time, the effect of broken axial symmetry on the light field distribution of the whispering gallery modes is typically very strong. This qualitatively modifies the phase-matching for the χ(2) nonlinear processes and enables broad-band second harmonic generation and optical parametric oscillation. The effect of weak geometric ellipticity in nominally symmetric WGRs is also considered. Altogether our findings pave the way for an extensive use of numerous birefringent (uniaxial and biaxial) crystals with broad transparency window and large χ(2) coefficients in nonlinear optics with WGRs. PMID:27607622

  15. The new performance calculation method of fouled axial flow compressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huadong; Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail. PMID:25197717

  16. Axial inlet conversion to a centrifugal compressor with magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Novecosky, T. )

    1994-01-01

    NOVA's Alberta Gas Transmission Division transports natural gas via pipeline throughout the province of Alberta, Canada, exporting it to eastern Canada, US, and British Columbia. There is a continuing effort to operate the facilities and pipeline at the highest possible efficiency. One area being addressed to improve efficiency is compression of the gas. By improving compressor efficiency, fuel consumption and hence operating costs can be reduced. One method of improving compressor efficiency is by converting the compressor to an axial inlet configuration, a conversion that has been carried out more frequently in the past years. Concurrently, conventional hydrodynamic bearings have been replaced with magnetic bearings on many centrifugal compressors. This paper discusses the design and installation for converting a radial overhung unit to an axial inlet configuration, having both magnetic bearings and a thrust reducer. The thrust reducer is required to reduce axial compressor shaft loads, to a level that allows the practical installation of magnetic bearings within the space limitations of the compressor (Bear and Gibson, 1992).

  17. Fundamental metallurgical aspects of axial splitting in zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.

    2000-04-03

    Fundamental metallurgical aspects of axial splitting in irradiated Zircaloy cladding have been investigated by microstructural characterization and analytical modeling, with emphasis on application of the results to understand high-burnup fuel failure under RIA situations. Optical microscopy, SEM, and TEM were conducted on BWR and PWR fuel cladding tubes that were irradiated to fluence levels of 3.3 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} to 5.9 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV) and tested in hot cell at 292--325 C in Ar. The morphology, distribution, and habit planes of macroscopic and microscopic hydrides in as-irradiated and posttest cladding were determined by stereo-TEM. The type and magnitude of the residual stress produced in association with oxide-layer growth and dense hydride precipitation, and several synergistic factors that strongly influence axial-splitting behavior were analyzed. The results of the microstructural characterization and stress analyses were then correlated with axial-splitting behavior of high-burnup PWR cladding reported for simulated-RIA conditions. The effects of key test procedures and their implications for the interpretation of RIA test results are discussed.

  18. Axial power monitoring uncertainty in the Savannah River Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Losey, D.C.; Revolinski, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of this analysis quantified the uncertainty associated with monitoring the Axial Power Shape (APS) in the Savannah River Reactors. Thermocouples at each assembly flow exit map the radial power distribution and are the primary means of monitoring power in these reactors. The remaining uncertainty in power monitoring is associated with the relative axial power distribution. The APS is monitored by seven sensors that respond to power on each of nine vertical Axial Power Monitor (APM) rods. Computation of the APS uncertainty, for the reactor power limits analysis, started with a large database of APM rod measurements spanning several years of reactor operation. A computer algorithm was used to randomly select a sample of APSs which were input to a code. This code modeled the thermal-hydraulic performance of a single fuel assembly during a design basis Loss-of Coolant Accident. The assembly power limit at Onset of Significant Voiding was computed for each APS. The output was a distribution of expected assembly power limits that was adjusted to account for the biases caused by instrumentation error and by measuring 7 points rather than a continuous APS. Statistical analysis of the final assembly power limit distribution showed that reducing reactor power by approximately 3% was sufficient to account for APS variation. This data confirmed expectations that the assembly exit thermocouples provide all information needed for monitoring core power. The computational analysis results also quantified the contribution to power limits of the various uncertainties such as instrumentation error.

  19. Axial power monitoring uncertainty in the Savannah River Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Losey, D.C.; Revolinski, S.M.

    1990-12-31

    The results of this analysis quantified the uncertainty associated with monitoring the Axial Power Shape (APS) in the Savannah River Reactors. Thermocouples at each assembly flow exit map the radial power distribution and are the primary means of monitoring power in these reactors. The remaining uncertainty in power monitoring is associated with the relative axial power distribution. The APS is monitored by seven sensors that respond to power on each of nine vertical Axial Power Monitor (APM) rods. Computation of the APS uncertainty, for the reactor power limits analysis, started with a large database of APM rod measurements spanning several years of reactor operation. A computer algorithm was used to randomly select a sample of APSs which were input to a code. This code modeled the thermal-hydraulic performance of a single fuel assembly during a design basis Loss-of Coolant Accident. The assembly power limit at Onset of Significant Voiding was computed for each APS. The output was a distribution of expected assembly power limits that was adjusted to account for the biases caused by instrumentation error and by measuring 7 points rather than a continuous APS. Statistical analysis of the final assembly power limit distribution showed that reducing reactor power by approximately 3% was sufficient to account for APS variation. This data confirmed expectations that the assembly exit thermocouples provide all information needed for monitoring core power. The computational analysis results also quantified the contribution to power limits of the various uncertainties such as instrumentation error.

  20. Notchless Is Required for Axial Skeleton Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Cormier, Sarah; Escande, Marie; Souilhol, Céline; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Sourice, Sophie; Pilet, Paul; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of cell survival is essential for proper embryonic development. In the mouse, Notchless homolog 1 (Drosophila) (Nle1) is instrumental for survival of cells of the inner cell mass upon implantation. Here, we analyze the function of Nle1 after implantation using the Meox2tm1(cre)Sor mouse that expresses the Cre recombinase specifically in the epiblast at E5.5. First, we find that NLE1 function is required in epiblast cells, as Nle1-deficient cells are rapidly eliminated. In this report, we also show that the Meox2Cre transgene is active in specific tissues during organogenesis. In particular, we detect high Cre expression in the vertebral column, ribs, limbs and tailbud. We took advantage of this dynamic expression profile to analyze the effects of inducing mosaic deletion of Nle1 in the embryo. We show that Nle1 deletion in this context, results in severe developmental anomalies leading to lethality at birth. Mutant embryos display multiple developmental defects in particular during axial skeletal formation. We also provide evidence that axial defects are due to an increase in apoptotic cell death in the somite at E9.5. These data demonstrate an essential role for Nle1 during organogenesis and in particular during axial development. PMID:24875805

  1. ASAS classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis: time to modify.

    PubMed

    Akkoc, Nurullah; Khan, Muhammad A

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between ankylosing spondylitis and the recently proposed entity called axial spondyloarthritis with its radiographic and non-radiographic forms that have been defined by the Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society (ASAS) criteria for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), is currently being debated. The Food and Drug Agency (FDA) had criticized the ASAS criteria and the studies which used these criteria to enroll patients in a clinical trial of certolizumab and adalimumab for the treatment of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis. The primary aim of classification criteria is to create homogenous patient populations for basic and clinical research. But the multi-arm construct of the ASAS criteria is a potential source of heterogeneity reducing their utility. Criteria sets should be regarded as dynamic concepts open to modifications or updates as our knowledge advances. We provide evidence to conclude that it is time to modify the ASAS Criteria for axSpA, and we propose some of the steps that can be taken to start moving forward in improving the validity of these criteria. PMID:27094940

  2. A mini axial and a permanent maglev radial heart pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun-Xi; Ru, Wei-Min; Wang, Hao; Jing, Teng

    2007-01-01

    The implantability and durability have been for decades the focus of artificial heart R&D. A mini axial and a maglev radial pump have been developed to meet with such requirements.The mini axial pump weighing 27g (incl.5g rotor) has an outer diameter of 21mm and a length of 10mm in its largest point, but can produce a maximal blood flow of 6l/min with 50mmHg pressure increase. Therefore, it is suitable for the patients of 40-60kg body weight. For other patients of 60-80kg or 80-100kg body weight, the mini axial pumps of 23mm and 25mm outer diameter had been developed before, these devices were acknowledged to be the world smallest LVADs by Guinness World Record Center in 2004.The permanent maglev radial pump weighing 150g is a shaft-less centrifugal pump with permanent magnetic bearings developed by the author. It needs no second coil for suspension of the rotor except the motor coil, different from all other maglev pumps developed in USA, Japan, European, etc. Thus no detecting and controlling systems as well as no additional power supply for maglev are necessary. The pump can produce a blood flow up to as large as 10l/min against 100mmHg pressure.An implantable and durable blood pump will be a viable alternative to natural donor heart for transplantation. PMID:19662120

  3. Axial length effects on lean NOx trap performance

    SciTech Connect

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Nguyen, Ke; Choi, Jae-Soon; Daw, C Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The effect of axial length on the NO{sub x} reduction performance of two different commercial Lean NO{sub x} Trap (LNT) monolithic catalysts was experimentally investigated in a bench flow reactor. The washcoat composition of one of the catalysts consisted of Pt and K on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; whereas the other catalyst contained a complex mixture of Pt, Pd, Rh, Ba, Ce, Zr, Mg, Al and others. The NO{sub x} removal characteristics of cylindrical monolith segments of constant diameter (2.22 cm) and axial lengths of 2.54, 5.08 and 7.62 cm were evaluated using a simulated lean engine exhaust containing water and carbon dioxide at a constant space velocity of 30,000 h{sup -1}. No significant effects of length were observed when the catalysts were fully reduced with hydrogen between NO{sub x} capture phases. However when the catalysts were only partially regenerated NO{sub x} reduction efficiency increased with monolith length. Intra-catalyst H{sub 2} measurements at different axial locations indicated that at least some of the efficiency loss during partial regeneration occurred when back-mixed H{sub 2} was directly oxidized and became unavailable for nitrate reduction.

  4. Imaging results and TOF studies with axial PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, Christian

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a fully operational PET demonstrator setup which allows true 3D reconstruction of the 511 keV photons and therefore leads to practically parallax free images. The AX-PET concept is based on thin 100 mm long scintillation crystals (LYSO), axially oriented and arranged in layers around the field of view. Layers of wavelength shifting plastic strips mounted in between the crystal layers give the axial coordinate. Both crystals and WLS strips are individually read out by G-APD (SiPM) photodetectors. The fully scalable concept overcomes the dilemma of sensitivity versus spatial resolution which is inherent to classical PET designs. A demonstrator set-up based on two axial modules was exhaustively characterized using point-like sources, phantoms filled with radiotracer and finally rats and a mouse. The results entirely meet the performance expectations (<2 mm FWHM in all three coordinates over the complete field of view) and also demonstrated the ability to include Compton interactions (inter-crystal scatter) in the reconstruction without noticeable performance loss. Our recent studies focus on a TOF extension of the AX-PET concept making use of the novel digital SiPM detectors by Philips. After reproducing comparable energy and spatial resolution on a small digital AX-PET set-up with 100 mm long crystals, we demonstrated a coincidence resolving time of about 210 ps FWHM.

  5. The New Performance Calculation Method of Fouled Axial Flow Compressor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail. PMID:25197717

  6. Period of vibration of axially vibrating truly nonlinear rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cveticanin, L.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the axial vibration of a muscle whose fibers are parallel to the direction of muscle compression is investigated. The model is a clamped-free rod with a strongly nonlinear elastic property. Axial vibration is described by a nonlinear partial differential equation. A solution of the equation is constructed for special initial conditions by using the method of separation of variables. The partial differential equation is separated into two uncoupled strongly nonlinear second order differential equations. Both equations, with displacement function and with time function are exactly determined. Exact solutions are given in the form of inverse incomplete and inverse complete Beta function. Using boundary and initial conditions, the frequency of vibration is obtained. It has to be mentioned that the determined frequency represents the exact analytic description for the axially vibrating truly nonlinear clamped-free rod. The procedure suggested in this paper is applied for calculation of the frequency of the longissimus dorsi muscle of a cow. The influence of elasticity order and elasticity coefficient on the frequency property is tested.

  7. Can the nucleon axial charge be O(Nc0)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojo, Toru

    2013-02-01

    The nucleon self-energy and its relation to the nucleon axial charge gA are discussed at large Nc. The energy is compared for the hedgehog, conventional, and recently proposed dichotomous nucleon wavefunctions which give different values for gA. We consider their energies at both perturbative and non-perturbative levels. In perturbative estimates, we take into account the pion exchanges among quarks up to the third orders of axial charge vertices, including the many-body forces such as the Wess-Zumino terms. It turns out that the perturbative pion exchanges among valence quarks give the same leading Nc contributions for three wavefunctions, while their mass differences are O(ΛQCD). The signs of splittings flip for different orders of the axial charge vertices, so it is hard to conclude which one is the most energetically favored. For non-perturbative estimates involving the modification of quark bases, we use the chiral quark soliton model as an illustration. With the hedgehog quark wavefunctions with gA of O(Nc), we investigate whether solutions with coherent pions are energetically favored. Again it is hard to give decisive conclusions, but it is possible that adding the confining effects disfavors the solution with the coherent pions, making a pion cloud around a nucleon quantum rather than coherent. The nuclear matter at large Nc is also discussed in light of the value of gA.

  8. Artery Remodeling Under Axial Twist in Three Days Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Liang; Xiao, Yangming; Voorhees, Andrew; Qi, Ying-Xin; Jiang, Zong-Lai; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-08-01

    Arteries often endure axial twist due to body movement and surgical procedures, but how arteries remodel under axial twist remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate early stage arterial wall remodeling under axial twist. Porcine carotid arteries were twisted axially and maintained for three days in ex vivo organ culture systems while the pressure and flow remained the same as untwisted controls. Cell proliferation, internal elastic lamina (IEL) fenestrae shape and size, endothelial cell (EC) morphology and orientation, as well as the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) were quantified using immunohistochemistry staining and immunoblotting. Our results demonstrated that cell proliferation in both the intima and media were significantly higher in the twisted arteries compared to the controls. The cell proliferation in the intima increased from 1.33 ± 0.21% to 7.63 ± 1.89%, and in the media from 1.93 ± 0.84% to 8.27 ± 2.92% (p < 0.05). IEL fenestrae total area decreased from 26.07 ± 2.13% to 14.74 ± 0.61% and average size decreased from 169.03 ± 18.85 μm(2) to 80.14 ± 1.96 μm(2) (p < 0.01), but aspect ratio increased in the twist group from 2.39 ± 0.15 to 2.83 ± 0.29 (p < 0.05). MMP-2 expression significantly increased (p < 0.05) while MMP-9 and TIMP-2 showed no significant difference in the twist group. The ECs in the twisted arteries were significantly elongated compared to the controls after three days. The angle between the major axis of the ECs and blood flow direction under twist was 7.46 ± 2.44 degrees after 3 days organ culture, a decrease from the initial 15.58 ± 1.29 degrees. These results demonstrate that axial twist can stimulate artery remodeling. These findings complement our understanding of arterial wall remodeling under mechanical stress resulting from pressure and flow variations. PMID:25503524

  9. Pro/con a precessional geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanyo, J.

    2003-04-01

    The modest amount of research that exists on the ability, or lack of ability, of mantle precession to power a geodynamo developed mostly during the last half of the 1900s. Papers by Roberts and Stewartson (1965) and by Busse (1968) studied precession generally without a pro/con conclusion. Malkus in the late 1960s attempted to advance a positive role for precession through experiments and analysis. His experiments have survived criticism, but his analyses were discounted, especially by Rochester, Jacobs, Smylie, and Chong (1975) and by Loper (1975). Rochester, et al. critiqued existing analyses of precession, including those of Malkus, but did not reach a strong position either pro or con a precessional geodynamo. Loper argued emphatically that precession was not capable of powering the geodynamo. Explicit analyses that either critique or support Loper’s arguments have yet to appear in the literature. During the 1970s, Vanyo and associates studied energy dissipation during precession of satellite liquid fuels and its effect on satellite attitude stability. Engineers and scientists in every country that has launched satellites completed similar research. Some is published in the aerospace literature, more is available in company and government reports. Beginning in 1981, Vanyo and associates applied this knowledge to the very similar problem of energy dissipation and flow patterns in precessing mechanical models scaled geometrically and dynamically to the Earth’s liquid core. Energy experiments indicate massive amounts of mechanical energy are dissipated at the CMB, and flow experiments show complex motions within the boundary layer and axial flows with helicity throughout the interior. Analysis of Earth core precession also advanced, especially in several papers by Kerswell and by Tilgner in the late 1990s. Detail numerical models have yet to appear. Although progress in understanding the role of precession in Earth core motions has advanced, there remains a

  10. Research on axial thrust of the waterjet pump based on CFD under cavitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z. H.; Pan, Z. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Based on RANS equations, performance of a contra-rotating axial-flow waterjet pump without hydrodynamic cavitation state had been obtained combined with shear stress transport turbulence model. Its cavitation hydrodynamic performance was calculated and analysed with mixture homogeneous flow cavitation model based on Rayleigh-Plesset equations. The results shows that the cavitation causes axial thrust of waterjet pump to drop. Furthermore, axial thrust and head cavitation characteristic curve is similar. However, the drop point of the axial thrust is postponed by 5.1% comparing with one of head, and the critical point of the axial thrust is postponed by 2.6%.

  11. Mean Velocity of Local Populations: Axiality, Age and Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael; Alcobé, Santiago

    2007-05-01

    The mean velocity of local stellar populations is analyzed by building a set of hierarchically selected samples from Hipparcos catalog, with the full space motions. The technique for scanning populations, MEMPHIS (Maximum Entropy of the Mixture Probability from HIerarchical Segregation), is a combination of two separate procedures: A sample selecting filter (Alcobé & Cubarsi 2005, A&A 442, 292) and a segregation method (Cubarsi & Alcobé 2004, A&A 427, 131). By continuously increasing the sampling parameter, in our case the absolute value of the stellar velocity, we build a set of nested subsamples containing an increasing number of populations. A bimodal pattern is then applied in order to identify differentiated kinematic populations. The resulting populations can be identified as early-type stars, young disk stars, old disk stars, and thick disk stars. Discontinuities of the velocity dispersion are found for early-type and thick disk stars, while young and old disk stars show a continuous trend that is asymptotically represented by the thin disk galactic component. Similarly, the mean velocity of early-type stars shows a particular behavior, while the remaining populations share a similar average motion. The later populations are studied on the basis of a time-dependent and non-axial Chandrasekhar model, allowing to estimate the degree of deviation from axial symmetry and steady-state hypotheses, as well as the average age of each population. According to this model, the no net radial movement point can be evaluated, having heliocentric velocities U=-18 ± 1 km/s in the radial direction, which is very close to the radial mean velocity of early-type stars, and V=-76 ± 2 km/s in rotation. The remaining populations share a common differential galactic movement, suggesting a common dynamical origin for the rupture of the axial symmetry.

  12. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-05-15

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube currentxrotation time)/pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning.

  13. Mechanical axial flow blood pump to support cavopulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, A L; Kapadia, J; Madduri, D

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a collapsible, percutaneously inserted, axial flow blood pump to support the cavopulmonary circulation in infants with a failing single ventricle physiology. An initial design of the impeller for this axial flow blood pump was performed using computational fluid dynamics analysis, including pressure-flow characteristics, scalar stress estimations, blood damage indices, and fluid force predictions. A plastic prototype was constructed for hydraulic performance testing, and these experimental results were compared with the numerical predictions. The numerical predictions and experimental findings of the pump performance demonstrated a pressure generation of 2-16 mm Hg for 50-750 ml/min over 5,500-7,500 RPM with deviation found at lower rotational speeds. The axial fluid forces remained below 0.1 N, and the radial fluid forces were determined to be virtually zero due to the centered impeller case. The scalar stress levels remained below 250 Pa for all operating conditions. Blood damage analysis yielded a mean residence time of the released particles, which was found to be less than 0.4 seconds for both flow rates that were examined, and a maximum residence time was determined to be less than 0.8 seconds. We are in the process of designing a cage with hydrodynamically shaped filament blades to act as a diffuser and optimizing the impeller blade shape to reduce the flow vorticity at the pump outlet. This blood pump will improve the clinical treatment of patients with failing Fontan physiology and provide a unique catheter-based therapeutic approach as a bridge to recovery or transplantation. PMID:19089799

  14. Crustal structure beneath the Kenya Rift from axial profile data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mechie, J.; Keller, Gordon R.; Prodehl, C.; Gaciri, S.; Braile, L.W.; Mooney, W.D.; Gajewski, D.; Sandmeier, K.-J.

    1994-01-01

    Modelling of the KRISP 90 axial line data shows that major crustal thinning occurs along the axis of the Kenya Rift from Moho depths of 35 km in the south beneath the Kenya Dome in the vicinity of Lake Naivasha to 20 km in the north beneath Lake Turkana. Low Pn velocities of 7.5-7.7 km/s are found beneath the whole of the axial line. The results indicate that crustal extension increases to the north and that the low Pn velocities are probably caused by magma (partial melt) rising from below and being trapped in the uppermost kilometres of the mantle. Along the axial line, the rift infill consisting of volcanics and a minor amount of sediments varies in thickness from zero where Precambrian crystalline basement highs occur to 5-6 km beneath the lakes Turkana and Naivasha. Analysis of the Pg phase shows that the upper crystalline crust has velocities of 6.1-6.3 km/s. Bearing in mind the Cainozoic volcanism associated with the rift, these velocities most probably represent Precambrian basement intruded by small amounts of igneous material. The boundary between the upper and lower crusts occurs at about 10 km depth beneath the northern part of the rift and 15 km depth beneath the southern part of the rift. The upper part of the lower crust has velocities of 6.4-6.5 km/s. The basal crustal layer which varies in thickness from a maximum of 2 km in the north to around 9 km in the south has a velocity of about 6.8 km/s. ?? 1994.

  15. Volcanic inflation of Axial Seamount since the 1998 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooner, S. L.; Chadwick, W.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2000, ambient seawater pressure has been precisely measured at five seafloor benchmarks inside the summit caldera at Axial Seamount in order to measure their relative depth and monitor volcanic inflation that has been occurring since an eruption in 1998. A remotely operated vehicle has been used to deploy a mobile pressure recorder (MPR) in campaign-style surveys, with additional seawater pressure data collected at the caldera center with multiyear deployments of continuously recording bottom pressure recorders (BPRs). Our previous measurements at Axial Seamount have shown steady inflation of the caldera center through 2007 and the spatial pattern of uplift has been consistent with magma storage in a shallow reservoir underlying the caldera at a depth of 3.5 km. This is the only location in the world where long-term monitoring of volcanic inflation has been accomplished at a submarine volcano. Here we present the results of new pressure data (both MPR and BPR) collected during a cruise on board the R/V Thomas Thompson in August-September 2010 and using the Jason ROV. Three years have passed since the previous survey, providing enough time to distinguish between two alternative models of inflation and magma recharge for the volcano. This allows us to refine our forecast for the next eruption at Axial and estimate total uplift that has occurred since the 1998 eruption. During the 2010 survey we also deployed new concrete benchmarks to replace our original galvanized steel benchmarks. The new benchmarks are larger and much heavier, and we expect them to be much more durable and stable over long time periods and help keep measurement errors as small as possible. We installed a sixth benchmark at a new site within the caldera, near the Ashes vent field, which will help constrain our modeling of the inflation signal in future years.

  16. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-01-01

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube current×rotation time)∕pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning. PMID:19544765

  17. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Fortgang, C.M.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; May, L.M.; Potter, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Present-day pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that win make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling-wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons. Detailed particle-in-cell simulations are included to demonstrate the transverse wiggling of the rf mode and the axial FEL interaction.

  18. Cylindrical diffuser axial detection profile is dependent on fiber design

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The axial emission and detection profiles of 1- and 2-cm cylindrical diffusing fibers based on concentration gradients of scatterers were measured. Based on these measurements, we describe a method for determination of the scatterer concentration gradient within the diffusers. Using a Monte Carlo model incorporating these concentrations, detection was simulated and found to agree with measurements. The measured and simulated detection profiles for these diffusers were found to be drastically different from those previously measured in an alternative diffuser design incorporating an end reflector. When using cylindrical diffusers as detection fibers, it is, therefore, important to understand the design of the fiber and characterize the detection behavior. PMID:25839428

  19. Stability analysis of restricted non-static axial symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem Ul Haq E-mail: mzaeem.math@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to investigate the instability of very restricted class of non-static axially symmetric spacetime with anisotropic matter configuration. The perturbation scheme is established for the Einstein field equations and conservation laws. The instability range in the Newtonian and post-Newtonian regions are explored by constructing the collapse equation in this scenario. It is found that the adiabatic index plays an important role in the stability analysis which depends upon the physical parameters i.e., energy density and anisotropic pressure of the fluid distribution.

  20. Lasnex Simulations of Axial Power Diagnostic for ZR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Heidi

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of energy loss through diagnostic and/or laser entrance holes with or without shine shields is of inertial confinement fusion experiments envisioned for the National Ignition and ZR Facilities. 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using Lasnex for power diagnostic experiments using a secondary gold hohlraum fielded at the ZR facility are discussed. The axial radiation exiting the aperture of the dynamic hohlraum is modeled as time and spectrum-dependent 1-D and 2-D sources. Hohlraum energy balance and implications for the measured power are discussed.

  1. Buckling of circular cylindrical shells under dynamically applied axial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulk, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was made of the buckling characteristics of perfect and imperfect circular cylindrical shells subjected to dynamic axial loading. Experimental data included dynamic buckling loads (124 data points), high speed photographs of buckling mode shapes and observations of the dynamic stability of shells subjected to rapidly applied sub-critical loads. A mathematical model was developed to describe the dynamic behavior of perfect and imperfect shells. This model was based on the Donnell-Von Karman compatibility and equilibrium equations and had a wall deflection function incorporating five separate modes of deflection. Close agreement between theory and experiment was found for both dynamic buckling strength and buckling mode shapes.

  2. End-wall boundary layer prediction for axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    An integral boundary layer procedure was developed for the computation of viscous and secondary flows along the annulus walls of an axial compressor. The procedure is an outgrowth and extension of the pitch-averaged methods of Mellor and Horlock. In the present work secondary flow theory is used to develop approximations for the velocity profiles inside a rotating blade row and for the blade force deficit terms in the momentum integral equations. The computer code based on this procedure was iteratively coupled to a quasi-one-dimensional model for the external inviscid flow. Computed results are compared with measurements in a compressor cascade.

  3. Axial cracks in pressurized eroded autofrettaged thick cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, A. A.; Plant, R. C. A.; Parker, A. P.

    1993-09-01

    The stress intensity factors associated with longitudinal axial cracks in pressurized autofrettaged thick cylinders are calculated using the boundary element (BE) method. The effect on the stress intensity factors of the presence of a semicircular erosion on the bore is investigated. Two loading cases are considered: internal pressure and autofrettage residual stresses. The residual stresses are incorporated by using a crack face loading based on the principle of superposition. The effect of the erosions and cracks on the fatigue lifetimes is calculated using the Paris law.

  4. HTS axial flux induction motor with analytic and FEA modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Fan, Y.; Fang, J.; Qin, W.; Lv, G.; Li, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) axial-flux induction motor, which can output levitation force and torque simultaneously. In order to analyze the character of the force, analytic method and finite element method are adopted to model the motor. To make sure the HTS can carry sufficiently large current and work well, the magnetic field distribution in HTS coil is calculated. An effective method to improve the critical current of HTS coil is presented. Then, AC losses in HTS windings in the motor are estimated and tested.

  5. Assignment of Axial Wavenumber in a Plasma Absorption Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Ramaswamy, Kartik

    2007-10-01

    A plasma absorption probe (PAP) developed in previous studies is a novel plasma diagnosis, which is adopted even in a reactive gas. In the previous studies, higher series of measured absorptions were attributed to the higher-order azimuthal modes of plasma surface waves, showing a poor agreement with the theoretical prediction. In this theoretical note, the data from the previous studies are processed by considering that the absorptions are caused by the higher-order axial modes of plasma surface waves. The treated data show a good agreement with the theory within the accuracy of measurement.

  6. Parametric design of tri-axial nested Helmholtz coils

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Jake J.

    2015-05-15

    This paper provides an optimal parametric design for tri-axial nested Helmholtz coils, which are used to generate a uniform magnetic field with controllable magnitude and direction. Circular and square coils, both with square cross section, are considered. Practical considerations such as wire selection, wire-wrapping efficiency, wire bending radius, choice of power supply, and inductance and time response are included. Using the equations provided, a designer can quickly create an optimal set of custom coils to generate a specified field magnitude in the uniform-field region while maintaining specified accessibility to the central workspace. An example case study is included.

  7. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in cylindrical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter cylindrical tanks in weightlessness. A convex hemispherically ended tank and two Centaur liquid-hydrogen-tank models were used for the study. Four distinct liquid flow patterns were observed to be a function of the tank geometry, the liquid-jet velocity, the volume of liquid in the tank, and the location of the tube from which the liquid jet exited.

  8. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in spherical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audelott, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter spherical containers in weightlessness. Complete liquid circulation flow patterns were easily established in containers that were less than half full of liquid, while for higher liquid fill conditions, vapor was drawn into the inlet of the simulated mixer unit. Increasing the liquid-jet or lowering the position at which the liquid jet entered the container caused increasing turbulence and bubble formation.

  9. Buckling Test under Axial Compression for Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Mitsumasa; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2005-08-01

    We have investigated buckling phenomena under axial compression for multiwall carbon nanotubes with the same outer diameter with different wall thicknesses obtained by the extraction of inner shells. According to the Euler’s buckling model described by the continuum model, Young’s moduli of the nanotube before and after the extraction of the inner shells were evaluated to be 0.77 and 0.80 TPa, respectively. This good agreement between the two values indicates that the classical continuum model is effective for describing the mechanical behaviors of multiwall nanotubes.

  10. Blade selection for a modern axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    The procedures leading to successful design of an axial flow compressor are discussed. The three related approaches to cascade selection are: (1) experimental approach which relies on the use of experimental results from identical cascades to satisfy the velocity diagrams calculated, (2) a purely analytical procedure whereby blade shapes are calculated from the theoretical cascade and viscous flow equations, and (3) a semiempirical procedure which used experimental data together with the theoretically derived functional relations to relate the cascade parameters. Diagrams of typical transonic blade sections with uncambered leading edges are presented.

  11. Transfer matrix approach to layered systems with axial symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahar, L. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The stress and displacement distribution in a layered medium is found by means of transfer matrices. The surface loading exhibits axial symmetry, and each layer is of infinite extent in the horizontal direction, of constant depth, and is considered to be linearly elastic, homogeneous, and isotropic. The method developed has the built-in advantage of enforcing interface continuity conditions automatically. Its application to layered composites shows the flexibility with which it predicts the local as well as the global response of the medium.

  12. Rotor wake characteristics of a transonic axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Gertz, J.; Epstein, A.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    State of the art turbomachinery flow analysis codes are not capable of predicting the viscous flow features within turbomachinery blade wakes. Until efficient 3D viscous flow analysis codes become a reality there is therefore a need for models which can describe the generation and transport of blade wakes and the mixing process within the wake. To address the need for experimental data to support the development of such models, high response pressure measurements and laser anemometer velocity measurements were obtained in the wake of a transonic axial flow fan rotor.

  13. The term 'non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis' is much more important to classify than to diagnose patients with axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Deodhar, Atul; Strand, Vibeke; Kay, Jonathan; Braun, Juergen

    2016-05-01

    The term axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) now is used frequently to describe patients with predominantly axial symptoms who fit into the spectrum of a well-recognised rheumatic disease that continues to be known as ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The 2009 Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria, developed to identify patients with early or atypical disease which could not be classified by the 1984 modified New York (mNY) criteria for AS, have led to a differentiation between non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) and radiographic axSpA, which is largely synonymous with AS. The main reason to distinguish between these ends of the spectrum of axSpA was that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors (TNFi) approved for AS could obtain additional labelling for nr-axSpA and be used to treat all patients manifesting clinical features of axSpA. These two terms are distinguished by the degree of 'radiographic sacroiliitis' assessed by conventional radiography, according to the 1984 mNY criteria for AS. Since this differentiation has been shown to be not very reliable, we argue that the terms nr-axSpA and AS should only be used for classification of patients with axSpA and not as separate diagnoses. Therefore, we propose that only the term axSpA be used to diagnose patients, unless there is a meaningful medical reason to differentiate nr-axSpA from AS. The available data justify performing randomised controlled trials designed to obtain regulatory approval for therapeutic agents in patients across the entire spectrum of axSpA. PMID:26768406

  14. Four Centuries of the Geocentric Axial Dipole Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, L.; Kent, D. V.

    2004-12-01

    William Gilbert first articulated what has come to be known as the geocentric axial dipole hypothesis. The GAD hypothesis is the principle on which paleogeographic reconstructions rely to constrain paleolatitude. For decades there have been calls for permanent non-dipole contributions to the time averaged field. Recently, these have demanded large contributions of the axial octupole, which, if valid, would call into question the general utility of the GAD hypothesis. In the process of geological recording of the geomagnetic field, ``Earth filters'' distort the directions. Many processes, for example, sedimentary inclination error and random tilting lead to a net shallowing of the observed direction. Therefore inclinations that are shallower than expected from GAD can be explained by recording biases, northward transport, or non-dipole geomagnetic fields. Using paleomagnetic data from the last five million years from well constrained lava flow data allows the construction of a statistical geomagnetic field model. Such a model can predict not only the average expected direction for a given latitude, but also the shape of the distribution of directions produced by secular variation. This allows us to differentiate among the possible explanations for shallow bias. We find no compelling reason to abandon the geocentric dipole hypothesis that has served us well for four centuries.

  15. Buffeting of a slender circular beam in axial turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.H.

    1984-05-01

    This paper deals with the buffeting of a slender, circular, flexible beam-rod in an axial turbulent flow. The principal excitation mechanisms are the turbulent wall pressure fluctuations and the motion-dependent (self-excited) aerodynamic force caused by the beam motion. On the assumption that the turbulent wall pressure fluctuations are independent of the beam motion, a linear forced-vibration model is used to determine the buffeting response of the beam and to investigate the length scale effects of turbulences on the beam buffeting. Transverse buffeting of the beam in an axial turbulent flow depends largely on the ratio of the longitudinal scale of the turbulences to the bending wavelength of the beam and on the ratio of the circumferential scale of the turbulences to the radius of the beam. The spectra and the mean square values of the buffeting displacement of the beam become vanishingly small, both when either of these ratios is very small (<10/sup -2/) and when the latter is very large (>10/sup 2/). When the former ratio is very large the first mode of the buffeting is dominant and other modes are less apparent, especially the high-frequency modes. 27 references, 3 figures.

  16. Dynamics of a flexible cylinder in subsonic axial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Paidoussis, M.P.; Ostoja-Starzewski, M.

    1981-11-01

    This paper examines the dynamics of a flexible cylinder with pinned ends immersed in axial subsonic flow, either bounded or unconfined. The problem proves to be surprisingly resistant to exact solution, as compared to the incompressible flow case, because of difficulties in determining precisely the inviscid aerodynamic forces. This paper presents a number of distinct formulations of these forces, involving different approximations: (1) a slender-body approximation; (2) an approximate three-dimensional formulation where, in the determination of the aerodynamic forces, the axial shape is prescribed in advance; and (3) an exact integral formulation of the generalized aerodynamic forces. In each case, Galerkin-type solutions yield the system eigenfrequencies which describe the dynamical behavior of the system. It is found that for sufficiently high flow velocities, divergence and flutter are possible. The different methods yield similar, but not quantitatively identical results. Interestingly, dependence of the dynamical characteristics on Mach number is shown to be weak for slender cylinders; for nonslender ones, it is stronger. Finally, a brief discussion of wave propagation in an unconstrained cylinder indicates the existence of a cutoff flow velocity for backward propagating waves, followed by wave amplification at higher flow, which is closely related to loss of stability in the constrained system.

  17. Competition between modes with different axial structures in gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khutoryan, Eduard M.; Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sinitsyn, Oleksandr V.

    2014-09-15

    This study was motivated by some experiments in which it was found that during the voltage rise, instead of expected excitation of a high-frequency parasitic mode, the excitation of a lower-frequency parasitic mode takes place in a certain range of voltages. For explaining this fact, the dependence of start currents of possible competing modes on the beam voltage was carried out in the cold-cavity approximation and by using the self-consistent approach. It was found that in the case of cavities, which consist of the combination of a section of constant radius waveguide and a slightly uptapered waveguide, these two approaches yield completely different results. Thus, experimentally observed excitation of the low-frequency parasitic mode can be explained by the self-consistent modification of the axial profile of the excited field, which has strong influence on the diffractive quality factor of competing modes. This modification is especially pronounced in the case of excitation of modes with many axial variations which can be excited in the region of beam interaction with the backward-wave component of such modes.

  18. Stall inception and development in an axial flow aeroengine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. G.; Freeman, C.

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes the phenomenon of stall and surge in an axial flow aeroengine using fast response static pressure measurements from the compressor of a Rolls-Royce VIPER engine. It details the growth of flow instability at various speeds, from a small zone of stalled fluid involving only a few blades into the violent surge motion of the entire machine. Various observations from earlier theoretical and compressor rig results are confirmed by these new engine measurements. The main findings are as follows: (1) The point of stall inception moves rearward as engine speed increases, and is shown to be simply related to the axial matching of the compressor. (2) The final unstable operation of the machine can be divided into rotating stall at low speed and surge or multiple surge at high speed. (3) The inception process is independent of whether the final unstable operation is rotating stall or multiple surge. (4) Stall/surge always starts as a circumferentially small flow disturbance, rotating around the annulus at some fraction of rotor speed.

  19. Axial Ge/Si nanowire heterostructure tunnel FETs.

    SciTech Connect

    Dayeh, Shadi A.; Gin, Aaron V.; Huang, Jian Yu; Picraux, Samuel Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Axial Ge/Si heterostructure nanowires (NWs) allow energy band-edge engineering along the axis of the NW, which is the charge transport direction, and the realization of asymmetric devices for novel device architectures. This work reports on two significant advances in the area of heterostructure NWs and tunnel FETs: (i) the realization of 100% compositionally modulated Si/Ge axial heterostructure NWs with lengths suitable for device fabrication and (ii) the design and implementation of Schottky barrier tunnel FETs on these NWs for high-on currents and suppressed ambipolar behavior. Initial prototype devices with 10 nm PECVD SiN{sub x} gate dielectric resulted in a very high current drive in excess of 100 {micro}A/{micro}m (I/{pi}D) and 10{sup 5} I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratios. Prior work on the synthesis of Ge/Si axial NW heterostructures through the VLS mechanism have resulted in axial Si/Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} NW heterostructures with x{sub max} {approx} 0.3, and more recently 100% composition modulation was achieved with a solid growth catalyst. In this latter case, the thickness of the heterostructure cannot exceed few atomic layers due to the slow axial growth rate and concurrent radial deposition on the NW sidewalls leading to a mixture of axial and radial deposition, which imposes a big challenge for fabricating useful devices form these NWs in the near future. Here, we report the VLS growth of 100% doping and composition modulated axial Ge/Si heterostructure NWs with lengths appropriate for device fabrication by devising a growth procedure that eliminates Au diffusion on the NW sidewalls and minimizes random kinking in the heterostructure NWs as deduced from detailed microscopy analysis. Fig. 1 a shows a cross-sectional SEM image of epitaxial Ge/Si axial NW heterostructures grown on a Ge(111) surface. The interface abruptness in these Ge/Si heterostructure NWs is of the order of the NW diameter. Some of these NWs develop a crystallographic kink that is {approx

  20. Embryonic Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 Causes Malformations in Axial Skeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Minsub; Foley, Julie; Anna, Colleen; Mishina, Yuji; Eling, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) have important functions in various physiological and pathological processes. COX-2 expression is highly induced by a variety of stimuli and is observed during certain periods of embryonic development. In this report, the direct effect of COX-2 expression on embryonic development is examined in a novel COX-2 transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses human COX-2 from the early stages of embryonic development. COX-2 transgenic fetuses exhibit severe skeletal malformations and die shortly after birth. Skeletal malformations are localized along the entire vertebral column and rib cage and are linked to defective formation of cartilage anlagen. The cartilage anlagen of axial skeleton fail to properly develop in transgenic embryos because of impaired precartilaginous sclerotomal condensation, which results from the reduction of cell number in the sclerotome. Despite the ubiquitous expression of COX-2, the number of apoptotic cells is highly increased in the sclerotome of transgenic embryos but not in other tissues, suggesting that it is a tissue-specific response. Therefore, the loss of sclerotomal cells due to an increased apoptosis is probably responsible for axial skeletal malformations in transgenic fetuses. In addition, the sclerotomal accumulation of p53 protein is observed in transgenic embryos, suggesting that COX-2 may induce apoptosis via the up-regulation of p53. Our results demonstrate that the aberrant COX-2 signaling during embryonic development is teratogenic and suggest a possible association of COX-2 with fetal malformations of unknown etiology. PMID:20236942

  1. A software tool for tomographic axial superresolution in STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koho, S; Deguchi, T; Hänninen, P E

    2015-11-01

    A method for generating three-dimensional tomograms from multiple three-dimensional axial projections in STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) superresolution microscopy is introduced. Our STED< method, based on the use of a micromirror placed on top of a standard microscopic sample, is used to record a three-dimensional projection at an oblique angle in relation to the main optical axis. Combining the STED< projection with the regular STED image into a single view by tomographic reconstruction, is shown to result in a tomogram with three-to-four-fold improved apparent axial resolution. Registration of the different projections is based on the use of a mutual-information histogram similarity metric. Fusion of the projections into a single view is based on Richardson-Lucy iterative deconvolution algorithm, modified to work with multiple projections. Our tomographic reconstruction method is demonstrated to work with real biological STED superresolution images, including a data set with a limited signal-to-noise ratio (SNR); the reconstruction software (SuperTomo) and its source code will be released under BSD open-source license. PMID:26258639

  2. Axial standing-wave illumination frequency-domain imaging (SWIF)

    PubMed Central

    Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    Despite their tremendous contribution to biomedical research and diagnosis, conventional spatial sampling techniques such as wide-field, point scanning or selective plane illumination microscopy face inherent limiting trade-offs between spatial resolution, field-of-view, phototoxicity and recording speed. Several of these trade-offs are the result of spatial sampling with diffracting beams. Here, we introduce a new strategy for fluorescence imaging, SWIF, which instead encodes the axial profile of a sample in the Fourier domain. We demonstrate how this can be achieved with propagation-invariant illumination patterns that extend over several millimeters and robustly propagate through layers of varying refractive index. This enabled us to image a lateral field-of-view of 0.8 mm x 1.5 mm with an axial resolution of 2.4 µm – greatly exceeding the lateral field-of-view of conventional illumination techniques (~100 µm) at comparable resolution. Thus, SWIF allowed us to surpass the limitations of diffracting illumination beams and untangle lateral field-of-view from resolution. PMID:24921798

  3. In Vivo Axial Loading of the Mouse Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Katherine M.; Robling, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Non-invasive methods to apply controlled, cyclic loads to the living skeleton are used as an anabolic agent to stimulate new bone formation in adults and enhance bone mass accrual in growing animals. These methods are also invaluable for understanding bone signaling pathways. Our focus here is on a particular loading model: in vivo axial compression of the mouse tibia. An advantage of loading the tibia is that changes are present in both the cancellous envelope of the proximal tibia and the cortical bone of the tibial diaphysis. To load the tibia of the mouse axially in vivo, a cyclic compressive load is applied up to five times a week to a single tibia per mouse for a duration lasting from 1 day to 6 weeks. With the contralateral limb as an internal control, the anabolic response of the skeleton to mechanical stimuli can be studied in a pairwise experimental design. Here, we describe the key parameters that must be considered before beginning an in vivo mouse tibial loading experiment, including methods for in vivo strain gauging of the tibial midshaft, and then we describe general methods for loading the mouse tibia for an experiment lasting multiple days. PMID:25331046

  4. Electrostatic waves in carbon nanotubes with an axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdikian, Alireza; Bagheri, Mehran

    2013-10-01

    Based on a linearized hydrodynamic model and within the quasi-static approximation, the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating through single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to an axial magnetic field is theoretically explored. In the classical limit, we obtain two main possible waves which in turn are divided into two branches, a low-frequency acoustical and a high-frequency optical plasmon branch. In the quantum case, we have found that the dispersion relation is substantially modified when the electron wavelength becomes large enough compared to the propagation wavelength of the electrostatic waves in the quantum plasma. We also show that the axial magnetic field manifest itself on the perturbed electron density through the quantum term and gives rise to the propagation of the electrostatic waves within the quantum plasma. As a result, the effect of the magnetic field is pronounced in the plasma dispersion relations in such a way that their curves approach to zero when the magnetic field is weak; and for the strong magnetic field, they asymptotically meet the constant lines.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of nanojoining between axially positioned Ag nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jianlei; Theogene, Barayavuga; Wang, Xuewen; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Kedian

    2016-08-01

    The miniaturization of electronics devices into nanometer scale is indispensable for next-generation semiconductor technology. Ag nanowires (Ag NWs) are considered to be the promising candidates for future electronic circuit owing to the excellent electrical and thermal properties. The nanojoining of axially positioned Ag NWs was performed by molecular dynamics simulation. Through the detailed atomic evolution during the nanojoining, the results indicate that the temperature and the distance between Ag NWs in axial direction have a great impact on nanojoining effect. When the nanojoining temperature is relatively high, the atoms are disordered and the atomic queues become to distort with strong thermodynamic properties and weak effect of metal bonds. At the relatively low temperature, the Ag NWs can be well connected with good junction quality and their own morphology, which is similar to the cold welding without fusion, while the distance between Ag NWs should be controlled for interaction and diffusion of interfacial atoms at nanowires head. When the Ag NWs are placed on Si and SiO2 substrate, because the atomic species and lattice structure of substrate material can differently affect the motions of Ag atoms through the interactive force between the atoms, the nanojoining quality of Ag NWs on Si substrate is better than that on the SiO2 substrate. So, for getting effective and reliable nanojoining without nanosolders and other materials, the temperature, distance and substrate surface should be reasonably controlled and selected, providing helpful theoretical guidance for experiment and application of nanojoining.

  6. Tgif1 and Tgif2 Regulate Axial Patterning in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wotton, David

    2016-01-01

    Tgif1 and Tgif2 are transcriptional repressors that inhibit the transcriptional response to transforming growth factor β signaling, and can repress gene expression by direct binding to DNA. Loss of function mutations in TGIF1 are associated with holoprosencephaly (HPE) in humans. In mice, embryos lacking both Tgif1 and Tgif2 fail to complete gastrulation, and conditional double null embryos that survive past gastrulation have HPE and do not survive past mid-gestation. Here we show that in mice of a relatively pure C57BL/6 strain background, loss of Tgif1 alone results in defective axial patterning and altered expression of Hoxc6. The primary defects in Tgif1 null embryos are the presence of extra ribs on the C7 vertebra, consistent with a posterior transformation phenotype. In addition we observed defective cervical vertebrae, primarily C1-C5, in both adult mice and embryos that lacked Tgif1. The combination of Tgif1 and Tgif2 mutations increases the severity and penetrance of the posterior transformation phenotype, without altering the type of defects seen. Similarly, exposure of Tgif1 mutant embryos to retinoic acid at E8.5 increased the severity and penetrance of the Tgif1 phenotype. This suggests that Tgif1 and Tgif2 regulate axial patterning and that reduced TGIF function sensitizes embryos to the effects of retinoic acid. PMID:27187787

  7. Analysis of vortical flow with axial swirl and toroidal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sukalyan

    2006-11-01

    Vortical flows with an axial swirl and a toroidal circulation can be observed in a wide range of fluid mechanical phenomena such as flow around rotary machines or natural vortices like tornadoes and hurricanes. These flows can be described by a general scalar equation if incompressible fluid and negligible viscous dissipation are assumed. We consider one of the simpler cases of this general formulation where the involved equation has a resemblance with the governing equation of the hydrogen problem. As a result, we obtain a quantization relation similar to the expression of quantized energies in an hydrogen atom. We solve the equation for two systems. First, we consider three- dimensional vortices confined between two parallel walls. Our examples include flows between two infinite plates, inside and outside of a vertical cylinder bounded at the ends by walls, and in an axially confined annular region. Then we also use our formulation to compute highly chaotic velocity fields with three-dimensional vortical structures which qualitatively mimic the features of physical flows. Hence, these solutions may be used in modeling of complicated flow systems.

  8. Computational Study of Axial Fatigue for Peripheral Nitinol Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meoli, Alessio; Dordoni, Elena; Petrini, Lorenza; Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele; Pennati, Giancarlo

    2014-07-01

    Despite their success as primary treatment for vascular diseases, Nitinol peripheral stents are still affected by complications related to fatigue failure. Hip and knee movements during daily activities produce large and cyclic deformations of the superficial femoral artery, that concomitant to the effects of pulsatile blood pressure, may cause fatigue failure in the stent. Fatigue failure typically occurs in cases of very extended lesions, which often require the use of two or more overlapping stents. In this study, finite element models were used to study the fatigue behavior of Nitinol stents when subjected to cyclic axial compression in different conditions. A specific commercial Nitinol stent was chosen for the analysis and subjected to cyclic axial compression typical of the femoral vascular region. Three different configurations were investigated: stent alone, stent deployed in a tube, and two overlapping stents deployed in a tube. Results confirm that stent oversizing has an influence in determining both the mean and amplitude strains induced in the stent and plays an important role in determining the fatigue response of Nitinol stents. In case of overlapping stents, numerical results suggest higher amplitude strains concentrate in the region close to the overlapping portion where the abrupt change in stiffness causes higher cyclic compression. These findings help to explain the high incidence of stent fractures observed in various clinical trials located close to the overlapping portion.

  9. Axial translation of field-reversing relativistic electron rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    1981-08-01

    As a consequence of experiments: (1) rings were generated for the first time in a low pressure ambient neutral gas (-10 mTorr H1 and D2), increasing their collisionally limited field-reversal times to over 1 millisecond or more than five times over that previously observed; (2) the first experimental test of adiabatic magnetic compression resulted in greater than factor of ten increases in the ring kinetic energy densities; and (3) two axially separted nonfield-reversed rings, generated from a single accelerator pulse, were successfully combined or stacked to form one field-reversed ring. A quantitative analysis of the translation data is made using retarding force calculations. The rings moved axially at the terminal speed associated with a balance between the accelerating and retarding forces. Conditions were found where the major contribution to the retarding force was due to either the resistive wall or plasma currents. The wall (plasma) force dominated when the rings were moved through the low (high) pressure background gas and inside of the higher (lower) conductivity wall.

  10. Modeling the aeroacoustics of axial fans from CFD calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesky, Alexandre; Hennemand, Vincent; Kouidri, Smaine; Berthelot, Yves

    2002-11-01

    The main source of aeroacoustic noise in axial fans is the distribution of the fluctuating, unsteady, aerodynamic forces on the blades. Numerical simulations were carried out with the CFD code (NUMECA), first with steady flow conditions to validate the aerolic performances (pressure drop as a function of flow rate) of the simulated six-bladed axial fans. Simulations were then made with unsteady flows to compute the fluctuating force distributions on the blades. The turbulence was modeled either with the Baldwin-Lomax model or with the K-epsilon model (extended wall function). The numerical results were satisfactory both in terms of numerical convergence and in terms of the physical characteristic of the forces acting on the blades. The numerical results were then coupled into an in-house aeroacoustics code that computes the farfield radiated noise spectrum and directivity, based on the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings formulation, or alternatively, on the simpler Lowson model. Results compared favorably with data obtained under nonanechoic conditions, based upon ISO 5801 and ISO 5136 standards.

  11. Second axial Fe3+ center in stoichiometric lithium tantalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malovichko, G.; Petersen, R.; Bäuman, Ch.; Grachev, V.

    2006-07-01

    The axial Fe3+ center Fe1 with the crystal field parameter b20≈3130×10-4cm-1 is well studied in congruent lithium tantalate crystals. The second axial Fe3+ center Fe2 was discovered and investigated by the electron paramagnetic resonance in stoichiometric samples prepared by vapor transport equilibrium treatment. The crystal field parameter of the Fe2 center (b20≈2050×10-4cm-1) is significantly smaller than for Fe1. The electron nuclear double resonance measurements have shown that hyperfine interactions of the Fe3+ electrons with the surrounding Li nuclei for Fe2 are stronger than for Fe1. Therefore, the conclusion was made that in the case of Fe2 center the iron ion substitutes for Ta and has Li nuclei in the nearest neighborhood, whereas in the case of Fe1 center it substitutes for Li, has Ta nuclei as nearest neighbors and Li nuclei in the second shell only.

  12. Electrostatic waves in carbon nanotubes with an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikian, Alireza; Bagheri, Mehran

    2013-10-15

    Based on a linearized hydrodynamic model and within the quasi-static approximation, the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating through single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to an axial magnetic field is theoretically explored. In the classical limit, we obtain two main possible waves which in turn are divided into two branches, a low-frequency acoustical and a high-frequency optical plasmon branch. In the quantum case, we have found that the dispersion relation is substantially modified when the electron wavelength becomes large enough compared to the propagation wavelength of the electrostatic waves in the quantum plasma. We also show that the axial magnetic field manifest itself on the perturbed electron density through the quantum term and gives rise to the propagation of the electrostatic waves within the quantum plasma. As a result, the effect of the magnetic field is pronounced in the plasma dispersion relations in such a way that their curves approach to zero when the magnetic field is weak; and for the strong magnetic field, they asymptotically meet the constant lines.

  13. The Effect of Axial Stress on YBCO Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, W.; Anerella, M.; Cozzolino, J.P.; Gupta, R.C.; Shiroyanagi, Y.; Evangelou, E.

    2011-03-28

    The large aspect ratio of typical YBCO conductors makes them ideal for constructing solenoids from pancake style coils. An advantage of this method is that each subunit can be tested before assembly into the finished magnet. The fact that conductors are available in relatively short lengths is another reason for using such a fabrication technique. The principal drawback is the large number of joints required to connect the coils together. When very high field solenoids such as those contemplated for the muon collider are built in this way the magnetic forces between pancakes can be very large. Extensive measurements have been made on the effect of stress on short lengths of conductor, but there is little or no data on the effect of intercoil loading. The experiment described in this paper was designed to test the ability of YBCO coils to withstand these forces. A spiral wound 'pancake' coil made from YBCO coated conductor has been stressed to a pressure of 100MPa in the axial direction at 77K. In this case axial refers to the coil so that the force is applied to the edge of the conductor. The effect on the critical current was small and completely reversible. Repeatedly cycling the pressure had no measureable permanent effect on the coil. The small current change observed exhibited a slight hysteretic behaviour during the loading cycle.

  14. Effective Fatigue Stress and Criterion for High-Cycle Multi-axial Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaojing; Xu, Jinquan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-axial fatigue criterion corresponding to the limiting condition of complicated multi-axial stress state is very important in application. Stresses and deformations are usually elastic if cyclic loadings are near to the limiting condition. A definition of effective fatigue stress has been proposed. Adopting the effective fatigue stress, a multi-axial fatigue criterion has been proposed by considering the equivalence of multi-axial stresses to a uni-axial problem. To clarify the fatigue criterion for a uni-axial problem with arbitrary mean stress, a quantitative relationship between fatigue limit and mean stress has also been proposed and examined. To verify the multi-axial fatigue criterion, examinations have been carried out for the cases of pure shear, shear and axial, and two-axial fatigue by experimental results. It is found that the criterion agrees well with experimental results, even for the cases with various multi-axial mean stresses and phase differences. It is also found that the shear fatigue limit is not an independent material property in common metals.

  15. Cyclic Axial-Torsional Deformation Behavior of a Cobalt-Base Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic, high-temperature deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base super-alloy, Haynes 188, is investigated under combined axial and torsional loads. This is accomplished through the examination of hysteresis loops generated from a biaxial fatigue test program. A high-temperature axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional fatigue database has been generated on Haynes 188 at 760 C. Cyclic loading tests have been conducted on uniform gage section tubular specimens in a servohydraulic axial-torsional test rig. Test control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. The fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 at 760 C under axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional loads and the monotonic and cyclic deformation behaviors under axial and torsional loads have been previously reported. In this paper, the cyclic hardening characteristics and typical hysteresis loops in the axial stress versus axial strain, shear stress ,versus engineering shear strain, axial strain versus engineering shear strain. and axial stress versus shear stress spaces are presented for cyclic in-phase and out-of-phase axial-torsional tests. For in-phase tests, three different values of the proportionality constant lambda (the ratio of engineering shear strain amplitude to axial strain amplitude, are examined, viz. 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46. In the out-of-phase tests, three different values of the phase angle, phi (between the axial and engineering shear strain waveforms), are studied, viz., 30, 60, and 90 degrees with lambda equals 1.73. The cyclic hardening behaviors of all the tests conducted on Haynes 188 at 760 C are evaluated using the von Mises equivalent stress-strain and the maximum shear stress-maximum engineering shear strain (Tresca) curves. Comparisons are also made between the hardening behaviors of cyclic axial, torsional, and combined in-phase (lambda = 1.73 and phi = 0) and out-of-phase (lambda = 1.73 and phi = 90') axial-torsional fatigue tests. These comparisons

  16. Synthetic slings: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Staskin, David R; Plzak, Louis

    2002-10-01

    Historically, the choice of sling material for the treatment of urinary incontinence has been based on the surgeon's preference and experience. In general, pelvic surgeons have not differentiated artificial graft materials by their inherent qualities or for biocompatibility in the female pelvis and vaginal wall. The introduction of new artificial graft materials and new methods of implantation for the correction of genuine stress incontinence has generated renewed interest in the "pros and cons" associated with nonabsorbable material use. In this review, we discuss and differentiate sling materials and techniques. We consider some of the physical and biologic qualities of artificial graft materials, present theories and practices associated with the successful use of permanent grafts, and discuss the natural evolution of artificial graft slings to the current use of the tension-free vaginal tape and Suprapubic Arc Sling System (American Medical Systems, Minneapolis, MN). PMID:12354353

  17. Are Axial Volcanic Ridges where all the (volcanic) action is?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Although axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) are generally recognised as the main loci for lithospheric generation at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, various recent studies have suggested that axial volcanism is not confined to them. Here I present evidence from three studies for significant amounts of off-AVR volcanism at three slow-spreading ridges. 1) Near-bottom side-scan sonar (TOBI) images of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13°N show a complex pattern of closely-spaced, active oceanic core complexes (OCCs) where plate separation is largely a-volcanic, separated by short segments of vigorous volcanic spreading. In one such volcanic segment, the brightest sea floor and therefore inferred youngest volcanism occurs not on the topographic axis (an apparently 'old' AVR) but at the edge of a broad axial valley. 2) A similar TOBI survey of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre reveals AVRs in the north and south flanking an OCC (Mt. Dent) and a non-volcanic ridge interpreted as tectonically extruded peridotite ('smooth' sea floor). In both AVR segments there are clear, young lava flows that have erupted from perched sources part way up the median valley walls and have partly flowed down into the valley. 3) The third case is from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 45°N, where we conducted a detailed geophysical and geological study of an AVR and surrounding median valley floor. The AVR is largely surrounded by flat sea floor composed mainly of lobate and sheet flows, whereas the AVR comprises predominantly pillow lavas. Although we have no firm dates, various indicators suggest most lavas on the AVR are around 10ka old or somewhat less. The apparently youngest (brightest acoustic returns, thinnest sediment cover) of the flat-lying lava flows appears to have a similar age from its degree of sediment cover. Contact relations between these lavas and the AVR flanks show no evidence of a clear age difference between the two, and we think both types of eruption may have occurred roughly

  18. Is axial dispersion within rotating cylinders governed by the Froude number?

    PubMed

    Third, J R; Müller, C R

    2012-12-01

    Axial dispersion rates of particles within horizontal rotating cylinders have been calculated for a decade of cylinder diameters. Throughout the range studied the rate of axial dispersion was found to be independent of the cylinder diameter. This phenomenon has been investigated further by spatially resolving the local contribution to the axial dispersion coefficient. This analysis demonstrates that, although the highest rates of axial dispersion occur at the free surface of the bed, there is a significant contribution to axial dispersion throughout the flowing region of the bed. Finally, based on an analogy with a Galton board, a linear relationship is proposed between the local rate of axial dispersion within a horizontal rotating cylinder and the product of the local particle concentration and the local shear rate in a plane perpendicular to the cylinder axis. PMID:23367939

  19. Launch Lock Assemblies Including Axial Gap Amplification Devices and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Davis, Torey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of a launch lock assembly are provided, as are embodiments of a spacecraft isolation system including one or more launch lock assemblies. In one embodiment, the launch lock assembly includes first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and an axial gap amplification device. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement; and, when actuated, releases the first and second mount pieces from clamped engagement to allow relative axial motion there between. The axial gap amplification device normally residing in a blocking position wherein the gap amplification device obstructs relative axial motion between the first and second mount pieces. The axial gap amplification device moves into a non-blocking position when the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement to increase the range of axial motion between the first and second mount pieces.

  20. Regenerative growth due to axial flow induced by vortex-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Eric; Hussain, Fazle

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a vortex column embedded in fine scale homogeneous, isotropic turbulence reveals an inviscid mechanism for induction of axial flow on the column. Vortex threads, produced outside the column during vortex-turbulence interaction, are shown to drive the mechanism of axial flow generation. Oppositely oriented threads radially separate by self-induction, hence causing net axial flow. At computationally accessible Reynolds numbers (Re ≡ vortex circulation/viscosity = 10 000), the axial flow due to a pair of oppositely signed vortex threads outside the column increases both with Re and time. At high Re, the axial flow can increase sufficiently to render the vortex column unstable by the well-known q criterion. The vorticity field reveals that axial flow is another mechanism, perhaps more dominant than the parent-offspring hairpin vortex scenario (Hussain, Pradeep & Stout JFM 2011), of regenerative energy growth - likely to be important for implementing breakup of aircraft trailing vortices.

  1. Second harmonic generation of off axial vortex beam in the case of walk-off effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shunyi; Ding, Panfeng; Pu, Jixiong

    2016-07-01

    Process of off axial vortex beam propagating in negative uniaxial crystal is investigated in this work. Firstly, we get the formulae of the normalized electric field and calculate the location of vortices for second harmonic beam in two type of phase matching. Then, numerical analysis verifies that the intensity distribution and location of vortices of the first order original vortex beam depend on the walk-off angle and off axial magnitude. It is shown that, in type I phase matching, the distribution of vortices is symmetrical about the horizontal axis, the separation distance increases as the off axial magnitude increases or the off axial magnitude deceases. However, in type II phase matching, the vortices are symmetrical along with some vertical axis, and increase of the walk-off angle or off axial magnitude leads to larger separation distance. Finally, the case of high order original off axial vortex beam is also investigated.

  2. Axial and torsional fatigue behavior of a cobalt-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1991-01-01

    In order to develop elevated temperature multiaxial fatigue life prediction models for the wrought cobalt-base alloy, Haynes 188, a multiaxial fatigue data base is required. To satisfy this need, an elevated temperature experimental program on Haynes 188 consisting of axial, torsional, inphase and out of phase axial-torsional fatigue experiments was designed. Elevated temperature axial and torsional fatigue experiments were conducted under strain control on thin wall tubular specimens of Haynes 188 in air. Test results are given.

  3. Effect of flow oscillations on axial energy transport in a porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of flow oscillations on axial energy diffusion in a porous medium, in which the flow is continuously disrupted by the irregularities of the porous structure, are analyzed. The formulation employs an internal heat transfer coefficient that couples the fluid and solid temperatures. The final relationship shows that the axial energy transport per unit cross-sectional area and time is directly proportional to the axial temperature gradient and the square of the maximum fluid displacement.

  4. Numerical evidences for the angular momentum-mass inequality for multiple axially symmetric black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Dain, Sergio; Ortiz, Omar E.

    2009-07-15

    We present numerical evidences for the validity of the inequality between the total mass and the total angular momentum for multiple axially symmetric (nonstationary) black holes. We use a parabolic heat flow to solve numerically the stationary axially symmetric Einstein equations. As a by-product of our method, we also give numerical evidences that there are no regular solutions of Einstein equations that describe two extreme, axially symmetric black holes in equilibrium.

  5. Nonlinear flap-lag axial equations of a rotating beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, K. R. V.; Kvaternik, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    It is possible to identify essentially four approaches by which analysts have established either the linear or nonlinear governing equations of motion for a particular problem related to the dynamics of rotating elastic bodies. The approaches include the effective applied load artifice in combination with a variational principle and the use of Newton's second law, written as D'Alembert's principle, applied to the deformed configuration. A third approach is a variational method in which nonlinear strain-displacement relations and a first-degree displacement field are used. The method introduced by Vigneron (1975) for deriving the linear flap-lag equations of a rotating beam constitutes the fourth approach. The reported investigation shows that all four approaches make use of the geometric nonlinear theory of elasticity. An alternative method for deriving the nonlinear coupled flap-lag-axial equations of motion is also discussed.

  6. Three-dimensional equilibria in axially symmetric tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, Paul R

    2006-12-19

    The NSTAB and TRAN computer codes have been developed to study equilibrium, stability, and transport in fusion plasmas with three-dimensional (3D) geometry. The numerical method that is applied calculates islands in tokamaks like the Doublet III-D at General Atomic and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. When bifurcated 3D solutions are used in Monte Carlo computations of the energy confinement time, a realistic simulation of transport is obtained. The significance of finding many 3D magnetohydrodynamic equilibria in axially symmetric tokamaks needs attention because their cumulative effect may contribute to the prompt loss of alpha particles or to crashes and disruptions that are observed. The 3D theory predicts good performance for stellarators. PMID:17159158

  7. Three-dimensional equilibria in axially symmetric tokamaks

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    The NSTAB and TRAN computer codes have been developed to study equilibrium, stability, and transport in fusion plasmas with three-dimensional (3D) geometry. The numerical method that is applied calculates islands in tokamaks like the Doublet III-D at General Atomic and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. When bifurcated 3D solutions are used in Monte Carlo computations of the energy confinement time, a realistic simulation of transport is obtained. The significance of finding many 3D magnetohydrodynamic equilibria in axially symmetric tokamaks needs attention because their cumulative effect may contribute to the prompt loss of α particles or to crashes and disruptions that are observed. The 3D theory predicts good performance for stellarators. PMID:17159158

  8. Interaction of Two Flapping Flags in Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunter, Amy-Lee; Fayed, Mohamed; Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Paidoussis, Michael P.; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2010-11-01

    The flapping of two parallel flags in axial low turbulence flow is investigated experimentally inside a small scale wind tunnel test section. The variables of the problem are the size and flexural rigidity of the flags, and the distance that separates the two flags. The flow velocity represents the control parameter that governs the coupling and flapping mode of the flags. Two flapping modes, in-phase and out-of-phase modes, were observed in the experiment. Image processing technique was used and the time series of a given point on the flag edge was analyzed. The stability condition of the flags was obtained and compared to the recent theoretical models. The dynamics of the coupling between the two flags is also studied.

  9. Adiabatic compressibility of myoglobin. Effect of axial ligand and denaturation.

    PubMed

    Leung, W P; Cho, K C; Lo, Y M; Choy, C L

    1986-03-01

    An ultrasonic technique has been employed to study the adiabatic compressibility of three metmyoglobin derivatives (aquomet-, fluoromet- and azidometmyoglobin) at neutral pH, and aquometmyoglobin as a function of pH in the frequency range of 1-10 MHz at 20 degrees C. No difference was observed in the adiabatic compressibility of the various derivatives. This indicates that the binding of different axial ligands to myoglobin does not affect significantly the conformational fluctuations of the protein. The finding is consistent with the results of the hydrogen exchange rate experiment, indicating that both types of measurements are useful for the study of protein dynamics. Upon acid-induced denaturation, the adiabatic compressibility of myoglobin drops from 5.3 X 10(-12) cm2/dyn to 0.5 X 10(-12) cm2/dyn. Plausible reasons for such a decrease are discussed. PMID:3947645

  10. Axial dependence of optical weak measurements in the critical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, M. P.; De Leo, Stefano; Maia, Gabriel G.

    2015-03-01

    The interference between optical beams of different polarizations plays a fundamental role in reproducing the optical analog of the electron spin weak measurement. The extraordinary point in optical weak measurements is represented by the possibility of estimating with great accuracy the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift by measuring the distance between the peaks of the outgoing beams for two opposite rotation angles of the polarizers located before and after the dielectric block. Starting from the numerical calculation of the GH shift, which clearly shows a frequency crossover for incidence near the critical angle, we present a detailed study of the interference between s and p polarized waves in the critical region. This makes it possible to determine in which conditions axial deformations can be avoided and the GH curves reproduced. In view of a possible experimental implementation, we give the expected weak measurement curves for Gaussian lasers of different beam waist sizes propagating through borosilicate (BK7) and fused silica dielectric blocks.

  11. Dynamic Electromechanical Characterization of Axially Poled PZT 95/5

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, Lalit C.; Furnish, Michael D.; Montgomery, Stephen T.; Setchell, Robert E.

    1999-06-25

    We are conducting a comprehensive experimental study of the electromechanical behavior of poled PZT 95/5 (lead zirconate titattate). As part of this study, eight plane-wave tests have been conducted on axially poled PZT 95/5 at stress levels ranging from 0.9 to 4.6 GPa, using VISAR and electrical diagnos- tics. Observed wave velocities were slightly decreased from ultrasonic vahtes, by contrast' with unpoled samples. Compression waveforms show a step at 0.6 GPa more marked than for normally poled or unpoled samples; this may correspond to a poling effect on the ferroelectric/antiferroelectric transition. A similar step is observed on release. The released charge upon loading to 0.9 GPa is consistent with nearly complete depoling. Loading to higher stresses gave lower currents (factor of 10), suggesting shock-induced conduc- tivity or electrical breakdown.

  12. Nonlinear Interactions between Slender Structures and Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Li

    2015-03-01

    For decades, dynamic behaviors of a slender structure with axial flow have been extensively studied. However, the governing equation based on expansions of small quantities is complicatedly-expressed and can be inappropriate as amplitude becomes considerably large. In this research, we are dedicated to finding an approach to study the nonlinear dynamics of a fluid-conveying slender strcture with arbitrary amplitude. By introducing the Intrinsic Coordinate, we find a concise way to describe the configuration of the system. Differential relations of such coordinate are studied and the rigorous nonlinear equation of motion is derived. Then rather than small-deflection approximation, linear dynamics are studied using Argand Diagram under a weaker condition named low-varying approximation. Nonlinear properties including Hopf bifurcation, limit-cycle motion and vibration frequencies are studied theoretically and experimentally.

  13. Axial and transverse characterizations of ceramic candle filters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.-E.; Nishihama, Y.; Yue, P.C.

    2008-09-01

    Ceramic candle filters are stiff composite tubes used in particle-removal during hot-gas filtration in coal energy generation. These filters are designed to withstand high temperature and pressure gradients. To determine the consistency in manufactured qualities of these filters, dynamic characterization method is recommended as a nondestructive evaluation technique. Six filters of the same manufactured batch were tested dynamically to establish the baseline properties of these filters. The test results are compared to theoretical values and are used to identify the variation in the manufactured products. This paper reports the frequencies in both transverse and axial directions indicating acceptable variations between all filters that are compatible to variations in measured physical parameters including density, stiffness and elastic modulus.

  14. Scaling Instability in Buckling of Axially Compressed Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovsky, Yury; Harutyunyan, Davit

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we continue the development of mathematically rigorous theory of "near-flip" buckling of slender bodies of arbitrary geometry, based on hyperelasticity. In order to showcase the capabilities of this theory, we apply it to buckling of axially compressed circular cylindrical shells. The theory confirms the classical formula for the buckling load, whereby the perfect structure buckles at the stress that scales as the first power of shell's thickness. However, in the case of imperfections of load, the theory predicts scaling instability of the buckling stress. Depending on the type of load imperfections, buckling may occur at stresses that scale as thickness to the power 1.5 or 1.25, corresponding to the lower and upper ends, respectively, of the historically accumulated experimental data.

  15. Finite difference seismic modeling of axial magma chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, S.A.; Dougherty, M.E.; Stephen, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors tested the feasibility of using finite difference methods to model seismic propagation at {approximately}10 Hx through a two-dimensional representation of an axial magma chamber with a thin, liquid lid. This technique produces time series of displacement or pressure at seafloor receivers to mimic a seismic refraction experiment and snapshots of P and S energy propagation. The results indicate that the implementation is stable for models with sharp velocity contrasts and complex geometries. The authors observe a high-energy, downward-traveling shear phase, observable only with borehole receivers, that would be useful in studying the nature and shape of magma chambers. The ability of finite difference methods to model high-order wave phenomena makes this method ideal for testing velocity models of spreading axes and for planning near-axis drilling of the East Pacific Rise in order to optimize the benefits from shear wave imaging of sub-axis structure.

  16. AERODYNAMIC AND BLADING DESIGN OF MULTISTAGE AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The axial-flow compressor is used for aircraft engines because it has distinct configuration and performance advantages over other compressor types. However, good potential performance is not easily obtained. The designer must be able to model the actual flows well enough to adequately predict aerodynamic performance. This computer program has been developed for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. The aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at the blade row edges. The program yields aerodynamic and blading design results that can be directly used by flow and mechanical analysis codes. Two such codes are TSONIC, a blade-to-blade channel flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-10977), and MERIDL, a more detailed hub-to-shroud flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-12966). The aerodynamic and blading design program can reduce the time and effort required to obtain acceptable multistage axial-flow compressor configurations by generating good initial solutions and by being compatible with available analysis codes. The aerodynamic solution assumes steady, axisymmetric flow so that the problem is reduced to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. The streamline curvature method is used for the iterative aerodynamic solution at stations outside of the blade rows. If a blade design is desired, the blade elements are defined and stacked within the aerodynamic solution iteration. The blade element inlet and outlet angles are established by empirical incidence and deviation angles to the relative flow angles of the velocity diagrams. The blade element centerline is composed of two segments tangentially joined at a transition point. The local blade angle variation of each element can be specified as a fourth-degree polynomial function of path distance. Blade element thickness can also be specified

  17. Ward identities in a general axial gauge. II. Quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capper, D. M.; Leibbrandt, George

    1982-02-01

    We have calculated the pole part of the one-loop graviton self-energy in the noncovariant axial gauge nμφμν=0, n2≠0, where φμν is the physical gravition field and nμ is an arbitrary but constant vector. It is shown that the self-energy is, unexpectedly, both nontransverse and nμ dependent, even though it satisfies the correct gravitational Ward identity. This Ward identity is found to contain a term corresponding to a "pincer" Feynman diagram which is directly responsible for the nontransversality of the graviton self-energy. Ghost particles do not contribute to the graviton amplitude. All aixal-gauge integrals are consistently evaluated in the context of dimensional regularization and by applying the principal-value prescription.

  18. Investigation of an Experimental Supersonic Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, John R.; Wright, Linwood C.; Kantrowitz, Arthur

    1947-01-01

    An investigation is in progress at the Langley Laboratory of the NACA to explore the possibilities of axial-flow compressors operating with supersonic velocities relative to the blade rows. The first phase of this investigation, a study of supersonic diffusers, has been reported. The second phase, an analysis of supersonic compressors, has also been reported. Preliminary calculations have shown that very high pressure ratios across a stage, together with somewhat increased mass flows, are possible with compressors which decelerate air through the speed of sound in their rotor blading. These performance characteristics are desirable in compressors for aircraft jet propulsion units, gas turbines, or superchargers. The third phase, presented here, is a preliminary experimental investigation of a supersonic compressor designed to produce a high pressure ratio in a single stage.

  19. Complete axial torsion of pregnant uterus with leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Sachan, Rekha; Patel, M L; Sachan, Pushpalata; Arora, Anubha

    2014-01-01

    Uterine torsion is defined as a rotation of the uterus of more than 45° along its long axis. It is a rare complication during pregnancy; a common cause of torsion can be uterine myoma. Here we describe the case of a 27-year-old G2P1+0 woman at 15 weeks 3 day pregnancy, who presented to our outpatient department as a case of acute abdomen, in a state of shock. Clinical findings did not correlate with investigation. On lapratomy she was diagnosed as a case of complete axial torsion of pregnant uterus with fundal myoma with massive abruption. Early diagnosis and timely intervention would help in improving both maternal and fetal outcome. PMID:25193815

  20. Ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy for axial resolution of flurorophore distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Maximilian G. O.; Hoffmann, Andreas; Spielmann, Christian

    2014-12-01

    A new method for determining the fluorophore distribution along the propagation axis of an ultrashort optical pulse is presented. The axial resolution is obtained by temporal gating of the backward emitted fluorescence via optical parametric amplification, and we demonstrated a resolution in the order of a few 100 μm. With this approach, sampling of the fluorophore concentration of thin layers without using optics with a large numerical aperture will be possible, such as investigating the human retina via time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Additionally, we verified the gain is orders of magnitude higher for coherent seeding, making optical parametric gating very interesting for discriminating between coherently and incoherently scattered light for other multimodal imaging applications.

  1. Failure Processes in Embedded Monolayer Graphene under Axial Compression

    PubMed Central

    Androulidakis, Charalampos; Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Frank, Otakar; Tsoukleri, Georgia; Sfyris, Dimitris; Parthenios, John; Pugno, Nicola; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Galiotis, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Exfoliated monolayer graphene flakes were embedded in a polymer matrix and loaded under axial compression. By monitoring the shifts of the 2D Raman phonons of rectangular flakes of various sizes under load, the critical strain to failure was determined. Prior to loading care was taken for the examined area of the flake to be free of residual stresses. The critical strain values for first failure were found to be independent of flake size at a mean value of –0.60% corresponding to a yield stress up to -6 GPa. By combining Euler mechanics with a Winkler approach, we show that unlike buckling in air, the presence of the polymer constraint results in graphene buckling at a fixed value of strain with an estimated wrinkle wavelength of the order of 1–2 nm. These results were compared with DFT computations performed on analogue coronene/PMMA oligomers and a reasonable agreement was obtained. PMID:24920340

  2. Reprogramming of avian neural crest axial identity and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Simoes-Costa, Marcos; Bronner, Marianne E

    2016-06-24

    Neural crest populations along the embryonic body axis of vertebrates differ in developmental potential and fate, so that only the cranial neural crest can contribute to the craniofacial skeleton in vivo. We explored the regulatory program that imbues the cranial crest with its specialized features. Using axial-level specific enhancers to isolate and perform genome-wide profiling of the cranial versus trunk neural crest in chick embryos, we identified and characterized regulatory relationships between a set of cranial-specific transcription factors. Introducing components of this circuit into neural crest cells of the trunk alters their identity and endows these cells with the ability to give rise to chondroblasts in vivo. Our results demonstrate that gene regulatory circuits that support the formation of particular neural crest derivatives may be used to reprogram specific neural crest-derived cell types. PMID:27339986

  3. Axial Electron Heat Loss From Mirror Devices Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D

    2004-08-16

    An issue of the axial electron heat loss is of a significant importance for mirror-based fusion devices. This problem has been considered in a number of publications but it is still shrouded in misconceptions. In this paper we revisit it once again. We discuss the following issues: (1) Formation of the electron distribution function in the end tank at large expansion ratios; (2) The secondary emission from the end plates and the ways of suppressing it (if needed); (3) Ionization and charge exchange in the presence of neutrals in the end tanks; (4) Instabilities caused by the peculiar shape of the electron distribution function and their possible impact on the electron heat losses; (5) Electron heat losses in the pulsed mode of operation of mirror devices.

  4. Frequency response of a thermocouple wire: Effects of axial conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are derived for the steady-state frequency response of a thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a uniform thermocouple wire and a nonuniform wire with unequal material properties and wire diameters across the junction. For the case of a uniform wire, the amplitude ratio and phase angle compare favorably with the series solution of Scadron and Warshawsky (1952) except near the ends of the wire. For the case of a non-uniform wire, the amplitude ratio at low frequency omega yields 0 agrees with the results of Scadron and Warshawsky for a steady-state temperature distribution. Moreover, the frequency response for a non-uniform wire in the limit of infinite length l yields infinity is shown to reduce to a simple expression that is analogous to the classic first order solution for a thermocouple wire with uniform properties.

  5. Simple LMFBR axial-flow friction-factor correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Y.N.; Todreas, N.E.

    1982-12-01

    Complicated LMFBR axial lead-length averaged friction-factor correlations are reduced to an easy, ready-to-use function of bundle Reynolds number for wire-wrapped bundles. The function together with the power curves to calculate the associated constants are incorporated in a computer preprocessor, EZFRIC. The constants required for the calculation of the subchannels and bundle friction factors are derived and correlated into power curves of geometrical parameters. A computer program, FRIC, which can alternatively be used to accurately calculate these constants is also included. The accurate values of the constants and the corresponding values predicted by the power curves and percentage error of prediction are tabulated for a wide variety of geometries of interest.

  6. Revisiting the cylindrical positive column in an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, R. N.

    2012-09-15

    This paper seeks to bring together past and present work in this area and to remove some recent inconsistencies. It concludes that while some aspects were not completely correct in the early work, the general picture of azimuthal motion of electrons and ions is an important feature and accounts for the diamagnetism of a bounded active plasma and other features of an axially magnetised plasma. It also introduces a means of testing the equations derived by interchanging electrons and positive ions; under such a 'transformation,' the equations to be solved should be identical. This is a fundamental principle and is implicit in treatments given in many of the standard texts, but not made explicit.

  7. Stationary axially symmetric relativistic thin discs with nonzero radial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Guillermo A.; Gutiérrez-Piñeres, Antonio C.

    2012-07-01

    A detailed analysis of the surface energy-momentum (SEMT) tensor of stationary axially symmetric relativistic thin discs with nonzero radial pressure is presented. The physical content of the SEMT is analysed and expressions for the velocity vector, energy density, principal stresses and heat flow are obtained. We also present the counter-rotating model interpretation for these discs by considering the SEMT as the superposition of two counter-rotating perfect fluids. We analyse the possibility of counter-rotation along geodesics as well as counter-rotation with equal and opposite tangential velocities, and explicit expressions for the velocities are obtained in both the cases. By assuming a given choice for the counter-rotating velocities, explicit expressions for the energy densities and pressures of the counter-rotating fluids are then obtained. Some simple thin disc models obtained from the Kerr solution are also presented.

  8. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-flow Compressors. Volume III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Irving A; Bullock, Robert O; Graham, Robert W; Costilow, Eleanor L; Huppert, Merle C; Benser, William A; Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G; Jackson, Robert J; Yohner, Peggy L; Dugan, Ames F , Jr

    1956-01-01

    Chapters XI to XIII concern the unsteady compressor operation arising when compressor blade elements stall. The fields of compressor stall and surge are reviewed in Chapters XI and XII, respectively. The part-speed operating problem in high-pressure-ratio multistage axial-flow compressors is analyzed in Chapter XIII. Chapter XIV summarizes design methods and theories that extend beyond the simplified two-dimensional approach used previously in the report. Chapter XV extends this three-dimensional treatment by summarizing the literature on secondary flows and boundary layer effects. Charts for determining the effects of errors in design parameters and experimental measurements on compressor performance are given in Chapters XVI. Chapter XVII reviews existing literature on compressor and turbine matching techniques.

  9. Collimation of laser-produced plasmas using axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassan, Syed M.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas; Hassanein, A.

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the expansion dynamics of laser-produced plasmas expanding into an axial magnetic field. Plasmas were generated by focusing 1.064 µm Nd:YAG laser pulses onto a planar tin target in vacuum and allowed to expand into a 0.5 T magnetic-filed where field lines were aligned along the plume expansion direction. Gated images employing intensified CCD showed focusing of the plasma plume, which were also compared with results obtained using particle-in-cell modelling methods. The estimated density and temperature of the plasma plumes employing emission spectroscopy revealed significant changes in the presence and absence of the 0.5T magnetic field. In the presence of the field, the electron temperature is increased with distance from the target, while the density showed opposite effects.

  10. Optimal design of axial hydro turbine for micro hydropower plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshan, S.; Kasaeian, N.

    2012-11-01

    In our country we have enormous low head potation flows in agricultures and aquacultures with almost fix flow rates that can be used as micro hydro power plants for producing energy. But the main problem is the high capital price per kW. Therefore there is needed to design a simple machine with a good runner for covering the various potential flows. In this paper an axial hydro turbine has designed for some low heads micro potential flow with flow rates ranged from 50 lit/sec to 150 lit/sec and heads ranged from 1 m to 5 m. The initial runner designed using classical methods and then the runner geometry has been optimized by evolutionary optimization algorithms. The final design has been simulated by a commercial flow solver in a various blade positions. The results showed a wide range characteristic curve with a wide range high efficiency.

  11. Thermoacoustic mixture separation with an axial temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Drew W; Swift, Gregory A

    2008-01-01

    The theory of thermoacoustic mixture separation is extended to include the effect of a nonzero axial temperature gradient. The analysis yields a new term in the second-order mole flux that is proportional to the temperature gradient and to the square of the volumetric velocity and is independent of the phasing of the wave. Because of this new term, thermoacoustic separation stops at a critical temperature gradient and changes direction above that gradient. For a traveling wave, this gradient is somewhat higher than that predicted by a simple four-step model. An experiment tests the theory for temperature gradients from 0 to 416 K/m in 50-50 He-Ar mixtures.

  12. The Effect of Ultrapolish on a Transonic Axial Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William B.; Thorp, Scott; Prahst, Patricia S.; Strazisar, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Back-to-back testing has been done using NASA fan rotor 67 in the Glenn Research Center W8 Axial Compressor Test Facility. The rotor was baseline tested with a normal industrial RMS surface finish of 0.5-0.6 m (20-24 microinches) at 60, 80 and 100% of design speed. At design speed the tip relative Mach number was 1.38. The blades were then removed from the facility and ultrapolished to a surface finish of 0.125 m (5 microinch) or less and retested. At 100% speed near the design point, the ultrapolished blades showed approximately 0.3 - 0.5% increase in adiabatic efficiency. The difference was greater near maximum flow. Due to increased relative measurement error at 60 and 80% speed, the performance difference between the normal and ultrapolished blades was indeterminate at these speeds.

  13. Axially symmetric dissipative fluids in the quasi-static approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, L.; di Prisco, A.; Ospino, J.; Carot, J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a framework based on the 1 + 3 formalism, we carry out a study on axially and reflection symmetric dissipative fluids, in the quasi-static regime. We first derive a set of invariantly defined “velocities”, which allow for an inambiguous definition of the quasi-static approximation. Next, we rewrite all the relevant equations in this approximation and extract all the possible, physically relevant, consequences ensuing the adoption of such an approximation. In particular, we show how the vorticity, the shear and the dissipative flux, may lead to situations where different kind of “velocities” change their sign within the fluid distribution with respect to their sign on the boundary surface. It is shown that states of gravitational radiation are not a priori incompatible with the quasi-static regime. However, any such state must last for an infinite period of time, thereby diminishing its physical relevance.

  14. Continuum theory of axial segregation in a long rotating drum

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I.S.; Vinokur, V.M.; Tsimring, L.S.

    1999-08-01

    We develop a continuum description for the axial segregation of granular materials in a long rotating drum based on the dynamics of the thin near-surface granular flow coupled to bulk flow. The equations of motion are reduced to the one-dimensional system for two local variables only, the concentration difference and the dynamic angle of repose, or the average slope of the free surface. The parameters of the system are established from comparison with experimental data. The resulting system describes both initial transient traveling wave dynamics and the formation of quasi-stationary bands of segregated materials. A long-term evolution proceeds through slow logarithmic coarsening of the band structure which is analogous to the spinoidal decomposition described by the Cahn-Hilliard equation. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Design optimization of axially laminated rotors for synchronous reluctance motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakao, S.; Nishimura, Y.; Ando, H.; Onuki, T.

    2000-05-01

    This article describes a design optimization of an axially laminated rotor of the synchronous reluctance motor, using the optimization method combined with the magnetic field analysis. The magnetic flux distribution in the synchronous reluctance motor is distorted due to the complicated rotor configuration and the influence of magnetic saturation, which results in a large number of local minimum solutions. Therefore, taking account of the magnetic saturation by the finite element method, the authors propose a novel optimization approach by coupling the stochastic search method with the deterministic one. In the optimization process a suitable objective function for the stability of machine performances is also proposed. Finally some numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach are presented.

  16. Aerodynamic Design Study of Advanced Multistage Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Medd, Adam J.; Dang, Thong Q.

    2002-01-01

    As a direct response to the need for further performance gains from current multistage axial compressors, an investigation of advanced aerodynamic design concepts that will lead to compact, high-efficiency, and wide-operability configurations is being pursued. Part I of this report describes the projected level of technical advancement relative to the state of the art and quantifies it in terms of basic aerodynamic technology elements of current design systems. A rational enhancement of these elements is shown to lead to a substantial expansion of the design and operability space. Aerodynamic design considerations for a four-stage core compressor intended to serve as a vehicle to develop, integrate, and demonstrate aerotechnology advancements are discussed. This design is biased toward high efficiency at high loading. Three-dimensional blading and spanwise tailoring of vector diagrams guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to manage the aerodynamics of the high-loaded endwall regions. Certain deleterious flow features, such as leakage-vortex-dominated endwall flow and strong shock-boundary-layer interactions, were identified and targeted for improvement. However, the preliminary results were encouraging and the front two stages were extracted for further aerodynamic trimming using a three-dimensional inverse design method described in part II of this report. The benefits of the inverse design method are illustrated by developing an appropriate pressure-loading strategy for transonic blading and applying it to reblade the rotors in the front two stages of the four-stage configuration. Multistage CFD simulations based on the average passage formulation indicated an overall efficiency potential far exceeding current practice for the front two stages. Results of the CFD simulation at the aerodynamic design point are interrogated to identify areas requiring additional development. In spite of the significantly higher aerodynamic loadings, advanced CFD

  17. Axial couplings and strong decay widths of heavy hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, C.-J. David Lin, Stefan Meinel

    2012-04-01

    We calculate the axial couplings of mesons and baryons containing a heavy quark in the static limit using lattice QCD. These couplings determine the leading interactions in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory and are central quantities in heavy quark physics, as they control strong decay widths and the light-quark mass dependence of heavy hadron observables. Our analysis makes use of lattice data at six different pion masses, 227 MeV < m{sub {pi}} < 352 MeV, two lattice spacings, a = 0.085, 0.112 fm, and a volume of (2.7 fm){sup 3}. Our results for the axial couplings are g{sub 1} = 0.449(51), g{sub 2} = 0.84(20), and g{sub 3} = 0.71(13), where g{sub 1} governs the interaction between heavy-light mesons and pions and g{sub 2,3} are similar couplings between heavy-light baryons and pions. Using our lattice result for g{sub 3}, and constraining 1/m{sub Q} corrections in the strong decay widths with experimental data for {Sigma}{sub c}{sup (*)} decays, we obtain {Gamma}[{Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)} {yields} {Lambda}{sub b} {pi}{sup {+-}}] = 4.2(1.0), 4.8(1.1), 7.3(1.6), 7.8(1.8) MeV for the {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup *+}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup *-} initial states, respectively. We also derive upper bounds on the widths of the {Xi}{sub b}{sup prime(*)} baryons.

  18. Analysis of Mechanical Failure of Polymer Microneedles by Axial Force

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    A polymeric microneedle has been developed for drug delivery applications. The ultimate goal of the polymeric microneedle is insertion into the specified region without failure for effective transdermal drug delivery. Mechanical failure of various geometries of microneedles by axial load was modeled using the Euler formula and the Johnson formula to predict the failure force of tapered-column microneedles. These formulas were compared with measured data to identify the mechanical behavior of microneedles by determining the critical factors including the actual length and end-fixed factor. The comparison of the two formulas with the data showed good agreement at the end-fixity (K) of 0.7. This value means that a microneedle column has one fixed end and one pinned end, and that part of the microneedle was overloaded by axial load. When the aspect ratio of length to equivalent diameter is 12:1 at 3 GPa of Young’s modulus, there is a transition from the Euler region to the Johnson region by the decreased length and increased base diameter of the microneedle. A polymer having less than 3 GPa of stiffness would follow the Euler formula. A 12:1 aspect ratio of length to equivalent diameter of the microneedle was the mechanical indicator determining the failure mode between elastic buckling and inelastic buckling at less than 3 GPa of Young’s modulus of polymer. Microneedles with below a 12:1 aspect ratio of length-to-equivalent diameter and more than 3 GPa of Young’s were recommended for reducing sudden failure by buckling and for successfully inserting the microneedle into the skin. PMID:21218133

  19. Experimental and Analytical Investigation of Low - Axial Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irdmusa, Jamshid Zakizadeh

    This study redesigned the blade leading edges of a small low-solidity axial turbine to obtain operational flexibility. Further flexibility was gained by using a low-solidity cascade, which allowed the leading edges to have a higher radius of curvature. The cascade also allowed larger flow deflections, which resulted in higher utilization factors. Because of the smaller frictional surfaces associated with the low-solidity cascade, the losses were minimized and higher performance achieved. Two small low-solidity axial turbines, one with a high profile ratio and the other with a low profile ratio, were tested. Their performances were evaluated by the temperature drop across them and also by measuring their power output in a specially design test rig. The velocity fields at the exit of both turbines were mapped out by a one-component Laser Doppler Velocimeter. The internal flow in the nozzles was visualized by water flow simulation with dye injection. The internal fluid dynamics were stimulated by computer. The inviscid flow computer programs MERIDL and TSONIC from NASA were used to predict the flow field in both turbines. The location of stagnation points at the leading edge, streamline patterns, pressure distributions, and loading coefficients were determined. The Hele-Shaw apparatus was used to verify the computer program predictions. Observed streamline patterns were found to agree with predicted ones. Findings showed that the turbine with conventional leading edges (low profile ratio) was very susceptible to changes in the operating condition, while the turbine with newly designed blades (high profile ratio) had very high operational flexibility, complemented by high performance for a wide range of speeds. Findings also showed that high performance can be achieved with low-solidity cascades without being penalized for the losses due to flow separation. Inviscid computer codes MERIDL and TSONIC were effective in investigating the internal aerodynamics of the

  20. Correlation of Axial Spondyloarthritis with Anxiety and Depression.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qinghua; Jiang, Yi; Mu, Fangxiang; Shi, Ying; Fang, Yongfei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study compared anxiety and depression in patients with nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) versus patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and examined the relationship between clinical characteristics and psychological status. MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients diagnosed with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) were recruited for the study. Disease status was evaluated by the bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), the bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index, visual analog scale, and the level of inflammatory markers. Psychological status was evaluated by the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and the self-rating depression scale (SDS). RESULTS Sixty patients with axSpA were enrolled in the study, including 40 patients with AS and 20 patients with nr-axSpA. Patients with AS and patients with nr-axSpA had similar disease status and psychological status. Anxiety was significantly associated with disease status and SDS score (P<0.05 for all), whereas BASDAI (odds ratio [OR]=0.28, 95% CI=0.08-0.97, P=0.045) and SDS (OR=0.90, 95% CI=0.82-0.98, P=0.014) protected against anxiety. Depression was obviously correlated with smoking history, disease status, and SAS score (P<0.05 for all). Smoking history (OR=10.18, 95% CI=1.23-84.23, P=0.031) and SAS score (OR=0.85, 95% CI=0.75-0.97, P=0.014) were negatively correlated with risk of depression. CONCLUSIONS Patients with AS and patients with nr-axSpA had similar psychological status in terms of anxiety and depression. Disease status and smoking were significantly correlated with psychological status. Patients with higher SAS scores were more likely to have depression. The results of this study may be helpful to clinically guide psychological interventions for patients with axSpA. PMID:27611598

  1. Mind the gap - tip leakage vortex in axial turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, M.; Decaix, J.; Münch-Alligné, C.; Farhat, M.

    2014-03-01

    The tendency of designing large Kaplan turbines with a continuous increase of output power is bringing to the front the cavitation erosion issue. Due to the flow in the gap between the runner and the discharge ring, axial turbine blades may develop the so called tip leakage vortex (TLV) cavitation with negative consequences. Such vortices may interact strongly with the wake of guide vanes leading to their multiple collapses and rebounds. If the vortex trajectory remains close to the blade tip, these collapses may lead to severe erosion. One is still unable today to predict its occurrence and development in axial turbines with acceptable accuracy. Numerical flow simulations as well as the actual scale-up rules from small to large scales are unreliable. The present work addresses this problematic in a simplified case study representing TLV cavitation to better understand its sensitivity to the gap width. A Naca0009 hydrofoil is used as a generic blade in the test section of EPFL cavitation tunnel. A sliding mounting support allowing an adjustable gap between the blade tip and wall was manufactured. The vortex trajectory is visualized with a high speed camera and appropriate lighting. The three dimensional velocity field induced by the TLV is investigated using stereo particle image velocimetry. We have taken into account the vortex wandering in the image processing to obtain accurate measurements of the vortex properties. The measurements were performed in three planes located downstream of the hydrofoil for different values of the flow velocity, the incidence angle and the gap width. The results clearly reveal a strong influence of the gap width on both trajectory and intensity of the tip leakage vortex.

  2. Experimental and analytical investigation of low-solidity axial turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Irdmusa, J.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This study redesigned the blade leading edges of a small low-solidity axial turbine to obtain operational flexibility. Further flexibility was gained by using a low-solidity cascade, which allowed the leading edges to have a higher radius of curvature. The cascade also allowed larger flow deflections, which resulted in higher utilization factors. Because of the smaller frictional surfaces associated with the low-solidity cascade, the losses were minimized and higher performance achieved. Two small low-solidity axial turbines, one with a high profile ratio and the other with a low profile ratio, were tested. Their performances were evaluated by the temperature drop across them and also by measuring their power output in a specially design test rig. The internal flow in the nozzles was visualized by water flow simulation with dye injection. The internal fluid dynamics were stimulated by computer. The inviscid flow computer programs MERIDL and TSONIC from NASA were used to predict the flow field in both turbines. The location of stagnation points at the leading edge, streamline patterns, pressure distributions, and loading coefficients were determined. Findings showed that the turbine with conventional leading edges (low profile ratio) was very susceptible to changes in the operating condition, while the turbine with newly designed blades (high profile ratio) had very high operational flexibility, complemented by high performance for a wide range of speeds. Findings also showed that high performance can be achieved with low-solidity cascades without being penalized for the losses due to flow separation. Inviscid computer codes MERIDL and TSONIC were effective in investigating the internal aerodynamics of the turbine rotors.

  3. Global axial-torsional dynamics during rotary drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sunit K.; Wahi, Pankaj

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the global dynamics of the bottom hole assembly (BHA) during rotary drilling with a lumped parameter axial-torsional model for the drill-string and a linear cutting force model. Our approach accounts for bit-bounce and stick-slip along with the regenerative effect and is independent of the drill-string and the bit-rock interaction model. Regenerative axial dynamics due to variable depth of cut is incorporated through a functional description of the cut surface profile instead of a delay differential equation with a state-dependent delay. The evolution of the cut surface is governed by a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) which is coupled with the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the longitudinal and angular dynamics of the BHA. The boundary condition for the PDE captures multiple regeneration in the event of bit-bounce. Interruption in the torsional dynamics is included by considering separate evolution equations for the various states during the stick period. Finite-dimensional approximation for our coupled PDE-ODE model has been obtained and validated by comparing our results against existing results. Bifurcation analysis of our system reveals a supercritical Hopf bifurcation leading to periodic vibrations without bit-bounce and stick-slip which is followed by solutions involving bit-bounce or stick-slip depending on the operating parameters. Further inroads into the unstable regime leads to a variety of complex behavior including co-existence of periodic and chaotic solutions involving both bit-bounce and stick-slip.

  4. Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models of axial asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Iimura, H.; Buchinger, F.

    2007-11-15

    We show that the charge radii of axially asymmetric nuclei calculated in the frame of the finite-range droplet model are in better agreement with measured charge radii when axial asymmetry is taken into account. This improvement is mainly the result of a new set of ground-state quadrupole deformations {beta}{sub 2}, generated when masses are calculated including axial asymmetry, and to a much lesser degree due to the inclusion of the axial asymmetry in the calculation of the charge radii itself.

  5. Axial momentum lost to a lateral wall of a helicon plasma source.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Chiba, Aiki; Komuro, Atsushi; Ando, Akira

    2015-05-15

    Momentum exerted to a lateral wall of a helicon plasma source is individually measured for argon, krypton, and xenon gases. A significant loss of the axial plasma momentum to the lateral wall, which has been assumed to be negligible, is experimentally identified when an axially asymmetric density profile is formed in the source. This indicates that the radially lost ions deliver not only the radial momentum but also the axial momentum to the lateral wall. The formation of the axial asymmetry causing the momentum loss is interpreted with competition between the magnetic field and neutral depletion effects. PMID:26024174

  6. Extraordinary transmission-based super-resolved axial imaging using subwavelength metallic nanoaperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonju; Oh, Youngjin; Choi, Jong-ryul; Kim, Kyujung; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-03-01

    A super-resolved axial imaging technique was investigated based on extraordinary transmission (EOT) of light using metallic gradient nanoaperture arrays. Light through subwavelength nanoapertures at thick metal film can be transmitted and amplified by several orders of magnitude due to plasmonic coupling. Here, the feasibility of EOT-based axial imaging with super resolution is explored. Since light penetration of EOT is much deeper than that of evanescent waves, the axial range to obtain the distance information of fluorescence signals can be extended by EOT. The axial distribution of ganglioside in mouse macrophage cells was measured with sub-diffraction-limited resolution after reconstruction using differential fluorescence excitation on gradient aperture arrays.

  7. Axial disability and deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Aquino, Camila C; Krauss, Joachim K; Honey, Christopher R; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2015-02-01

    Axial motor signs-including gait impairment, postural instability and postural abnormalities-are common and debilitating symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson disease. Dopamine replacement therapy and physiotherapy provide, at best, partial relief from axial motor symptoms. In carefully selected candidates, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus or globus pallidus internus is an established treatment for 'appendicular' motor signs (limb tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity). However, the effects of DBS on axial signs are much less clear, presumably because motor control of axial and appendicular functions is mediated by different anatomical-functional pathways. Here, we discuss the successes and failures of DBS in managing axial motor signs. We systematically address a series of common clinical questions associated with the preoperative phase, during which patients presenting with prominent axial signs are considered for DBS implantation surgery, and the postoperative phase, in particular, the management of axial motor signs that newly develop as postoperative complications, either acutely or with a delay. We also address the possible merits of new targets-including the pedunculopontine nucleus area, zona incerta and substantia nigra pars reticulata-to specifically alleviate axial symptoms. Supported by a rapidly growing body of evidence, this practically oriented Review aims to support decision-making in the management of axial symptoms. PMID:25582445

  8. The method of axial drift compensation of laser differential confocal microscopy based on zero-tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yajie; Cui, Han; Wang, Yun; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian

    2015-08-01

    Laser differential confocal microscopy (DCM) has advantages of high axial resolution and strong ability of focus identification. However, the imaging mechanism of point scanning needs long measurement time, in the process due to itself mechanical instability and the influence of environment vibration the axial drift of object position is inevitable, which will reduce lateral resolution of the DCM. To ensure the lateral resolution we propose an axial drift compensation method based on zero-tracking in this paper. The method takes advantage of the linear region of differential confocal axial response curve, gets axial drift by detecting the laser intensity; uses grating sensor to monitor the real-time axial drift of lifting stage and realizes closed-loop control; uses capacitive sensor of objective driver to measure its position. After getting the axial drift of object, the lifting stage and objective driver will be driven to compensate position according to the axial drift. This method is realized by using Visual Studio 2010, and the experiment demonstrates that the compensation precision of the proposed method can reach 6 nm. It is not only easy to implement, but also can compensate the axial drift actively and real-timely. Above all, this method improves the system stability of DCM effectively.

  9. Stresses in reinforcing rings due to axial forces in cylindrical and conical stressed skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drescher, K; Gropler, H

    1938-01-01

    At the ends of a monocoque fuselage concentrated axial forces in the skin must generally be taken up. Such axial forces must also be taken up in the case of other members where axial forces from the neighboring stressed skin construction must be considered. In order to take up these axial forces two bulkheads or reinforcing frames may be arranged at the positions where the forces are applied. If these bulkheads are in the form of rings, bending moments are set up in them. In the present paper computations are performed for obtaining the value of these bending moments.

  10. Petrological variability in recent magmatism at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Clague, D. A.; Gill, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount is known for its compositional homogeneity. We report on petrological variability in lavas from the summit caldera and rims of Axial Seamount during the last ~1.2ka and its implications for shallow crustal magma dynamics. AUVs have mapped the summit at ~1 m resolution, and ROVs have collected numerous lavas and volcaniclastic cores. Geospatial, superpositional, compositional, and age constraint data were used to outline flow units and construct geologic maps. Nearly 200 glasses from summit lavas were analyzed for major elements. A subset of ~20 samples were analyzed for selected trace elements, Pb-, U-, and Th- isotope ratios, and 226Ra and 210Pb. The results a) confirm a high degree compositional homogeneity, b) demonstrate a more restricted range in Pb-isotope ratios than previous data, c) indicate uniform compositional source component(s) genetically linked to that of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, and d) expand the dataset of distinctly-low 230Th/232Th lavas and subdivide them into geospatial groups. Hundreds of volcaniclastic grains collected from subsurface depths of up to several tens of cm analyzed for major elements extend the record of summit magmatism beyond what is exposed. Summit lava glasses are compositionally N-MORB. Summit volcaniclastics range to higher MgO (+1%); thus, magmatism likely included more mafic episodes than is recorded in the flows as yet sampled or that volcaniclastics preferentially sample higher temperature lavas. Negative correlation of CaO/Al2O3 with MgO in all glasses suggests fractionation from parental melt(s) of plag ± ol but not cpx. K2O/TiO2 ranges are typical for much of the JdFR. Summit lavas range from aphyric to ~35% plag phyric ± a few % ol. Plag-phyric summit lavas tend to have greater MgO (>7.5%), lower CaO/Al2O3 (<0.80), and lower K2O/TiO2 (<0.10) compared to aphyric lavas. For ~18 caldera flows with absolute or relative age control, plag-phyric lavas are older than aphyric lavas, the oldest of

  11. Inclination flattening and the geocentric axial dipole hypothesis [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, Lisa

    2005-05-01

    William Gilbert first articulated what has come to be known as the geocentric axial dipole hypothesis. The GAD hypothesis is the principle on which paleogeographic reconstructions rely to constrain paleolatitude. For decades, there have been calls for permanent non-dipole contributions to the time-averaged field. Recently, these have demanded large contributions of the axial octupole, which, if valid, would call into question the general utility of the GAD hypothesis. In the process of geological recording of the geomagnetic field, "Earth filters" distort the directions. Many processes, for example, sedimentary inclination flattening and random tilting, can lead to a net shallowing of the observed direction. Therefore, inclinations that are shallower than expected from GAD can be explained by recording biases, northward transport, or non-dipole geomagnetic fields. Using paleomagnetic data from the last 5 million years from well-constrained lava flow data allows the construction of a statistical geomagnetic field model. Such a model can predict not only the average expected direction for a given latitude, but also the shape of the distribution of directions produced by secular variation. The elongation of predicted directions varies as a function of latitude (from significantly elongate in the up/down direction at the equator to circularly symmetric at the poles). Sedimentary inclination flattening also works in a predictable manner producing elongations that are stretched side to side and the degree of flattening depending on the inclination of the applied field and a "flattening factor" f. The twin tools of the predicted elongation/inclination relationship characteristic of the geomagnetic field for the past 5 million years and the distortion of the directions predicted from sedimentary inclination flattening allows us to find the flattening factor that yields corrected directions with an elongation and average inclination consistent with the statistical field

  12. Impulsive Seafloor Signals from the 2015 Eruption of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Tan, Y. J.; Tolstoy, M.

    2015-12-01

    Axial Seamount is a hotspot volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge that has erupted three times over the past two decades. The most recent eruption was recorded by a cabled seismic network in the southern half of the summit caldera that has been operated by the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) since November 2014. After five months of increasing seismicity, a 10-hour seismic crisis involving thousands of earthquakes began at 0500 GMT on April 24, 2015 accompanied by ~2 m of deflation in the central caldera (Nooner et al., this meeting). Local seismicity declined rapidly after the eruption, but thousands of impulsive waterborne events were observed across the network starting immediately after the seismic crisis. Over 1500 events per day were recorded on April 25 and 26, decreasing to less than 500 per day after May 1, and ceasing altogether around May 20. Each event comprises a train of three to five consistently spaced arrivals visible on all 3 seismometer channels with a broad frequency content of 10-100 Hz. The timing of arrivals across the network is consistent with water column multiples from a seafloor source to the north. A subset of events has been manually picked and located by modeling travel times of the first three arrivals assuming flat bathymetry at a range of depths between 1500-1800 m and a sound speed of 1.5 km/s. The preliminary locations are clustered around Axial Seamount's northern rift at a distance of 10-15 km from the north rim of the caldera. In July, an OOI cruise discovered fresh pillow lavas up to 100 m thick and 670 m wide, and extending for 7 km along the rift in the same region (Kelley et al., this meeting). The source of the impulsive events is uncertain and could involve gas explosions, bubble collapse, and thermal or mechanical cracking, but their colocation with the fresh lava flow suggests that ocean bottom seismic networks can not only track the faulting and fracturing associated with subsurface magma movements but also the

  13. Unsteady Flow Field in a Multistage Axial Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suryavamshi, N.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Prato, J.

    1997-01-01

    The flow field in a multistage compressor is three-dimensional, unsteady, and turbulent with substantial viscous effects. Some of the specific phenomena that has eluded designers include the effects of rotor-stator and rotor-rotor interactions and the physics of mixing of velocity, pressure, temperature and velocity fields. An attempt was made, to resolve experimentally, the unsteady pressure and temperature fields downstream of the second stator of a multistage axial flow compressor which will provide information on rotor-stator interaction effects and the nature of the unsteadiness in an embedded stator of a three stage axial flow compressor. Detailed area traverse measurements using pneumatic five hole probe, thermocouple probe, semi-conductor total pressure probe (Kulite) and an aspirating probe downstream of the second stator were conducted at the peak efficiency operating condition. The unsteady data was then reduced through an ensemble averaging technique which splits the signal into deterministic and unresolved components. Auto and cross correlation techniques were used to correlate the deterministic total temperature and velocity components (acquired using a slanted hot-film probe at the same measurement locations) and the gradients, distributions and relative weights of each of the terms of the average passage equation were then determined. Based on these measurements it was observed that the stator wakes, hub leakage flow region, casing endwall suction surface corner region, and the casing endwall region away from the blade surfaces were the regions of highest losses in total pressure, lowest efficiency and highest levels of unresolved unsteadiness. The deterministic unsteadiness was found to be high in the hub and casing endwall regions as well as on the pressure side of the stator wake. The spectral distribution of hot-wire and kulite voltages shows that at least eight harmonics of all three rotor blade passing frequencies are present at this

  14. NASA Glenn's Single-Stage Axial Compressor Facility Upgraded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokopp, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Single-Stage Axial Compressor Facility was upgraded in fiscal year 2003 to expand and improve its research capabilities for testing high-speed fans and compressors. The old 3000-hp drive motor and gearbox were removed and replaced with a refurbished 7000-hp drive motor and gearbox, with a maximum output speed of 21,240 rpm. The higher horsepower rating permits testing of fans and compressors with higher pressure ratio or higher flow. A new inline torquemeter was installed to provide an alternate measurement of fan and compressor efficiency, along with the standard pressure and temperature measurements. A refurbished compressor bearing housing was also installed with bidirectional rotation capability, so that a variety of existing hardware could be tested. Four new lubrication modules with backup capability were installed for the motor, gearbox, torquemeter, and compressor bearing housing, so that in case the primary pump fails, the backup will prevent damage to the rotating hardware. The combustion air supply line for the facility inlet air system was activated to provide dry air for repeatable inlet conditions. New flow conditioning hardware was installed in the facility inlet plenum tank, which greatly reduced the inlet turbulence. The new inlet can also be easily modified to accommodate 20- or 22-in.-diameter fans and compressors, so a variety of existing hardware from other facilities (such as Glenn's 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel) can be tested in the Single-Stage Axial Compressor Facility. An exhaust line was also installed to provide bleed capability to remove the inlet boundary layer. To improve the operation and control of the facility, a new programmable logic controller (PLC) was installed to upgrade from hardwired relay logic to software logic. The PLC also enabled the usage of human-machine interface software to allow for easier operation of the facility and easier reconfiguration of the facility controls when

  15. Dopant segregation during vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger growth with melt stabilization by strong axial magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthiesen, D. H.; Wargo, M. J.; Motakef, S.; Carlson, D. J.; Nakos, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    Ga-doped germanium was grown in a vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger system with melt stabilization by axial magnetic fields of 30 kG. It was found that radial segregation of gallium is negligible and that the initial transient of axial macro-segregation is in apparent compliance with the theory of diffusion controlled plane front solidification.

  16. Measurements of inlet flow distortions in an axial flow fan (6 and 9 blade rotor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    A large quantity of experimental data on inlet flow distortions in an axial flow fan were obtained. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of design and operating variables and the type of distortion on the response of an axial flow turbomachinery rotor. Included are background information and overall trends observed in distortion attenuation and unsteady total pressure losses.

  17. Lungfish axial muscle function and the vertebrate water to land transition.

    PubMed

    Horner, Angela M; Jayne, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    The role of axial form and function during the vertebrate water to land transition is poorly understood, in part because patterns of axial movement lack morphological correlates. The few studies available from elongate, semi-aquatic vertebrates suggest that moving on land may be powered simply from modifications of generalized swimming axial motor patterns and kinematics. Lungfish are an ideal group to study the role of axial function in terrestrial locomotion as they are the sister taxon to tetrapods and regularly move on land. Here we use electromyography and high-speed video to test whether lungfish moving on land use axial muscles similar to undulatory swimming or demonstrate novelty. We compared terrestrial lungfish data to data from lungfish swimming in different viscosities as well as to salamander locomotion. The terrestrial locomotion of lungfish involved substantial activity in the trunk muscles but almost no tail activity. Unlike other elongate vertebrates, lungfish moved on land with a standing wave pattern of axial muscle activity that closely resembled the pattern observed in terrestrially locomoting salamanders. The similarity in axial motor pattern in salamanders and lungfish suggests that some aspects of neuromuscular control for the axial movements involved in terrestrial locomotion were present before derived appendicular structures. PMID:24788982

  18. Traumatic Carpal Axial Instability in a Professional Football Player: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rettig, Lance; Rettig, Arthur; Cleland, Kirk

    2016-05-01

    This is a case of traumatic carpal axial instability in a professional football player. Traumatic carpal axial instability characteristically involves longitudinal separation of the ulnar or radial distal carpal row along with intermetacarpal injury. Rarely, pancarpal ligament disruption occurs, as in this case. Early diagnosis and treatment of unstable wrist injuries is important in achieving a satisfactory outcome. PMID:26502186

  19. Cyclic axial-torsional deformation behavior of a cobalt-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1992-01-01

    Multiaxial loading, especially at elevated temperature, can cause the inelastic response of a material to differ significantly from that predicted by simple flow rules, i.e., von Mises or Tresca. To quantify some of these differences, the cyclic high-temperature, deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-based superalloy, Haynes 188, is investigated under combined axial and torsional loads. Haynes 188 is currently used in many aerospace gas turbine and rocket engine applications, e.g., the combustor liner for the T800 turboshaft engine for the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and the liquid oxygen posts in the main injector of the space shuttle main engine. The deformation behavior of this material is assessed through the examination of hysteresis loops generated from a biaxial fatigue test program. A high-temperature axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional fatigue data base has been generated on Haynes 188 at 760 C. Cyclic loading tests have been conducted on uniform gauge section tubular specimens in a servohydraulic axial-torsional test rig. Test control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. In this paper, the cyclic hardening characteristics and typical hysteresis loops in the axial stress versus axial strain, shear stress versus engineering shear strain, axial strain versus engineering shear strain, and axial stress versus shear stress spaces are presented for cyclic, in-phase and out-of-phase, axial torsional tests. For in-phase tests three different values of the proportionality constant, lambda (ratio of engineering shear strain amplitude to axial strain amplitude), are examined, viz., 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46. In the out-of-phase tests, three different values of the phase angle, phi (between the axial and engineering shear strain waveforms), are studied, viz., 30, 60, and 90 deg with lambda = 1.73. The cyclic hardening behaviors of all the tests conducted on Haynes 188 at 760 C are evaluated using the von Mises equivalent stress

  20. Ultrastructural evidence of the excretory function in the asteroid axial organ (Asteroidea, Echinodermata).

    PubMed

    Ezhova, O V; Egorova, E A; Malakhov, V V

    2016-05-01

    The ultrastructure of the axial organ of Asterias amurensis has been studied The organ is a network of canals of the axial coelom separated by haemocoelic spaces. The axial coelom is lined with two types of monociliary cells: podocytes and musculo-epithelial cells. Podocytes form numerous basal processes adjacent to the basal lamina on the coelomic side. Musculo-epithelial cells form processes running along the basal lamina. Some bundles of these processes wrapped in the basal lamina pass through haemocoelic spaces between neighboring coelomic canals. It is hypothesized that the axial organ serves for filtration of fluid from haemocoelic spaces into the axial coelom cavity, from which urine is excreted through the madreporite to the exterior. PMID:27411825

  1. Exploring the utility of axial lumbar MRI for automatic diagnosis of intervertebral disc abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the importance of axial lumbar MRI slices for automatic detection of abnormalities. In the past, only the sagittal views were taken into account for lumbar CAD systems, ignoring the fact that a radiologist scans through the axial slices as well, to confirm the diagnosis and quantify various abnormalities like herniation and stenosis. Hence, we present an automatic diagnosis system from axial slices using CNN(Convolutional Neural Network) for dynamic feature extraction and classification of normal and abnormal lumbar discs. We show 80:81% accuracy (with a specificity of 85:29% and sensitivity of 75:56%) on 86 cases (391 discs) using only an axial slice for each disc, which implies the usefulness of axial views for automatic lumbar abnormality diagnosis in conjunction with sagittal views.

  2. Prebuckling and Postbuckling Response of Tailored Composite Stiffened Panels with Axial-Shear Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a numerical parametric study of the prebuckling and postbuckling response of tailored composite stiffened panels with axial-shear coupling are presented. In the stiffened panels, axial-shear stiffness coupling is created by rotating the stiffener orientation and tailoring the skin laminate anisotropy. The panels are loaded in axial compression and the effects of stiffener orientation and skin anisotropy on the panel stiffness, buckling parameters, and axial-shear coupling response are described. Results are obtained from a nonlinear general shell finite element analysis computer code. The prebuckling and postbuckling responses can be affected by both the stiffener orientation and skin laminate anisotropy, and the effects are different and load dependent. The results help identify different mechanisms for axial-shear coupling, and show that a load-dependent structural response can be controlled by selecting appropriate stiffener and skin parameters.

  3. Numerical validation of axial plasma momentum lost to a lateral wall induced by neutral depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Kazunori

    2015-11-01

    Momentum imparted to a lateral wall of a compact inductively coupled plasma thruster is numerically investigated for argon and xenon gases by a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). Axial plasma momentum lost to a lateral wall is clearly shown when axial depletion of the neutrals is enhanced, which is in qualitative agreement with the result in a recent experiment using a helicon plasma source [Takahashi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 195001 (2015)]. The PIC-MCC calculations demonstrate that the neutral depletion causes an axially asymmetric profile of the plasma density and potential, leading to axial ion acceleration and the non-negligible net axial force exerted to the lateral wall in the opposite direction of the thrust.

  4. What changed during the axial age: Cognitive styles or reward systems?

    PubMed Central

    Baumard, Nicolas; Hyafil, Alexandre; Boyer, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Axial Age’ (500–300 BCE) refers to the period during which most of the main religious and spiritual traditions emerged in Eurasian societies. Although the Axial Age has recently been the focus of increasing interest,1-5 its existence is still very much in dispute. The main reason for questioning the existence of the Axial Age is that its nature, as well as its spatial and temporal boundaries, remain very much unclear. The standard approach to the Axial Age defines it as a change of cognitive style, from a narrative and analogical style to a more analytical and reflective style, probably due to the increasing use of external memory tools. Our recent research suggests an alternative hypothesis, namely a change in reward orientation, from a short-term materialistic orientation to a long-term spiritual one.6 Here, we briefly discuss these 2 alternative definitions of the Axial Age. PMID:27066164

  5. Dynamic and failure properties of high damping rubber bearing under high axial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Hidetake; Murota, Nobuo; Fukumori, Takeshi

    1995-12-01

    Seismic isolation bearings have been used under axial stresses less than 100(kgf/cm{sup 2}) for many years. If higher axial loads can be applied, however, a larger period shift will be achieved and the size of the isolation devices may be reduced resulting in a cost reduction of the bearing. This paper describes experimental studies of dynamic and failure properties of high damping rubber bearings (HDR) under high axial stress of over 120(kgf/cm{sup 2}) compared with the conventional stress of 65(kgf/cm{sup 2}). The results show that HDR continues to have stable performance under high axial stress with high shear strain. It indicates that high axial stress over 100(kgf/cm{sup 2}) is within the capability of the BDR isolation bearing.

  6. Reduced Toxicity Fuel Satellite Propulsion System Including Axial Thruster and ACS Thruster Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A reduced toxicity fuel satellite propulsion system including a reduced toxicity propellant supply for consumption in an axial class thruster and an ACS class thruster. The system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to the ACS decomposing element of an ACS thruster. The ACS decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot propulsive gases. In addition the system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to an axial decomposing element of the axial thruster. The axial decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot gases. The system further includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying a second propellant to a combustion chamber of the axial thruster, whereby the hot gases and the second propellant auto-ignite and begin the combustion process for producing thrust.

  7. Numerical validation of axial plasma momentum lost to a lateral wall induced by neutral depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Kazunori

    2015-11-15

    Momentum imparted to a lateral wall of a compact inductively coupled plasma thruster is numerically investigated for argon and xenon gases by a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). Axial plasma momentum lost to a lateral wall is clearly shown when axial depletion of the neutrals is enhanced, which is in qualitative agreement with the result in a recent experiment using a helicon plasma source [Takahashi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 195001 (2015)]. The PIC-MCC calculations demonstrate that the neutral depletion causes an axially asymmetric profile of the plasma density and potential, leading to axial ion acceleration and the non-negligible net axial force exerted to the lateral wall in the opposite direction of the thrust.

  8. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2013-12-15

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread.

  9. What changed during the axial age: Cognitive styles or reward systems?

    PubMed

    Baumard, Nicolas; Hyafil, Alexandre; Boyer, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The 'Axial Age' (500-300 BCE) refers to the period during which most of the main religious and spiritual traditions emerged in Eurasian societies. Although the Axial Age has recently been the focus of increasing interest,(1-5) its existence is still very much in dispute. The main reason for questioning the existence of the Axial Age is that its nature, as well as its spatial and temporal boundaries, remain very much unclear. The standard approach to the Axial Age defines it as a change of cognitive style, from a narrative and analogical style to a more analytical and reflective style, probably due to the increasing use of external memory tools. Our recent research suggests an alternative hypothesis, namely a change in reward orientation, from a short-term materialistic orientation to a long-term spiritual one.(6) Here, we briefly discuss these 2 alternative definitions of the Axial Age. PMID:27066164

  10. Co-Axial pulse tube for oxygen liquifaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Nick; Caughley, Alan; Glasson, Neil; Meier, J.

    2012-06-01

    Industrial Research Ltd (IRL) previously developed a single-stage, inline, pulse tube for use with their metallic-diaphragm pressure wave generator (PWG), achieving 45 W of cooling power at 77 K, with 19.5 % of Carnot efficiency (based on the PV input power). This paper describes the conversion of the inline pulse tube to a co-axial configuration that provides a more accessible cold finger. Sage pulse tube simulation software was used to model the modified pulse tube and predicted 105 W of cooling power at 90 K, with an indicated input power of 1350 W. The pulse tube operated at 50 Hz, with a mean helium working pressure of 2.5 MPa and was closely coupled to a 60 ml swept volume PWG. The experimental results yielded more than 100 W @ 90 K with 2.5 MPa of gas pressure, with a lowest no load temperature of 39.7 K with 1.4 MPa of gas pressure. Details of the development, experimental results and correlations to the Sage model are discussed

  11. The valvo-pump. An axial, nonpulsatile blood pump.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Y; Yozu, R; Tanaka, T; Yamazaki, K

    1991-01-01

    The valvo-pump, an axial, nonpulsatile blood pump implanted at the heart valve position while preserving diseased heart muscle, has several advantages over an artificial heart replacement, including 1) a good anatomic fit to the natural heart, 2) less blood contacting surface, and 3) ease of implantation. The housing for the pump is a tube, 37 mm in diameter (maximum) and 33 mm in length. Within the housing there is an impeller with either 10 vanes (33 mm in diameter) or 5 vanes (22 mm in diameter). The impeller is connected to a samarium-cobalt-rare-earth magnet direct current (DC) brushless motor measuring 23.8 mm in diameter and 30.2 mm in length. Sealing is achieved by means of a magnetic fluid seal. A guiding wheel with 4 vanes is located behind the impeller. The pump was studied on a hydraulic mock circulatory system to evaluate its performance characteristics. A pump flow of 6.9 L/min was obtained at a pump differential pressure of 48 mmHg, and flow of 3.1 L/min was obtained at 58 mmHg. The valvo-pump can be made feasible by developing a small, high-output, power motor and an endurable seal, as well as by optimizing the impeller design. PMID:1751257

  12. Neoclassical transport in quasi-axially symmetric stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1997-04-01

    The author presents a numerical and analytic assessment of the transport in two quasi-axially symmetric stellarators, including one variant of the MHH2 class of such devices, and a configuration they refer to as NHH2, closely related to MHH2. Monte Carlo simulation results are compared with expectations from established stellarator neoclassical theory, and with some empirical stellarator scalings, used as an estimate of the turbulent transport which might be expected. From the standpoint of transport, these may be viewed as either tokamaks with large ({delta} {approximately} 1%) but low-n ripple, or as stellarators with small ripple. For NHH2, numerical results are reasonably well explained by analytic neoclassical theory. MHH2 adheres less to assumptions made in most analytic theory, and its numerical results agree less well with theory than those for NHH2. However, for both, the non-axisymmetric contribution to the heat flux is comparable with the symmetric neoclassical contribution, and also falls into the range of the expected anomalous (turbulent) contribution. Thus, it appears effort to further optimize the thermal transport beyond the particular incarnations studied here would be of at most modest utility. However, the favorable thermal confinement relies heavily on the radial electric field. Thus, the present configurations will have a loss cone for trapped energetic ions, so that further optimization may be indicated for large devices of this type.

  13. Control of vortex breakdown by axial gradient of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir

    2001-11-01

    It is shown that vortex breakdown (VB) can be suppressed or enhanced with help of temperature gradients. The underlying mechanism of such VB control is centrifugal convection. An axial gradient of temperature in a rotating fluid induces a counterflow that is parallel to the temperature gradient at periphery and anti-parallel near the axis (Shtern et.al. 2001, Phys. Fluids, 13, 2296). This centrifugal convection is utilized here to control VB in a compressible flow induced by a rotating lid in a sealed cylinder. To this end, we have developed an efficient 2D time-evolution code for compressible swirling flows. In our numerical studies, the temperature gradient, eps, and Mach number vary, while Reynolds number Re = 2450 and aspect ratio H/R = 2.5 are fixed. At eps= 0, there are two VB 'bubbles' which diminish and then totally disappear as increases eps, (eps > 0), which corresponds to the temperature gradient accelerating the near-axis flow. The opposite gradient of temperature (eps < 0) enhances VB: the bubble size increases and the flow becomes unsteady. These effects of temperature gradients are more prominent with increasing Mach number. The mechanism revealed can be applied to control VB in vortex burners and over delta wings of aircraft.

  14. Internal resonance of axially moving laminated circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Qing; Liang, Li; Guo, Xing Hui

    2013-11-01

    The nonlinear vibrations of a thin, elastic, laminated composite circular cylindrical shell, moving in axial direction and having an internal resonance, are investigated in this study. Nonlinearities due to large-amplitude shell motion are considered by using Donnell's nonlinear shallow-shell theory, with consideration of the effect of viscous structure damping. Differently from conventional Donnell's nonlinear shallow-shell equations, an improved nonlinear model without employing Airy stress function is developed to study the nonlinear dynamics of thin shells. The system is discretized by Galerkin's method while a model involving four degrees of freedom, allowing for the traveling wave response of the shell, is adopted. The method of harmonic balance is applied to study the nonlinear dynamic responses of the multi-degrees-of-freedom system. When the structure is excited close to a resonant frequency, very intricate frequency-response curves are obtained, which show strong modal interactions and one-to-one-to-one-to-one internal resonance phenomenon. The effects of different parameters on the complex dynamic response are investigated in this study. The stability of steady-state solutions is also analyzed in detail.

  15. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  16. [What is ascertained in the therapy of axial spondyloarthritis?].

    PubMed

    Braun, J; Baraliakos, X; Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U

    2013-12-01

    The new term axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) includes classic ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic (nr-) axSpA. The definition was introduced in 2009 as part of the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria for axSpA, where-apart from chronic back pain starting before the age of 45 years and the presence of HLA-B27-magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated bone marrow edema of the sacroiliac joints (osteomyelitis) or structural changes on x-rays may play an important role. These criteria can also be used for diagnosis. A major advantage of the new criteria is the identification of patients in early disease stages. In addition to physical therapy, drug treatment with steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs), corticosteroid injections, and biologics [blocker of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)] have all been shown to be effective, while conventional disease modifying drugs (DMARDs) such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate seem to work mainly for peripheral arthritis but not for enthesitis. Biologics are indicated when NSAIDs in optimal dosage have failed. Both these drugs have the potential to improve pain, stiffness, and function but they may also have an influence on new bone formation (syndesmophytes). NSAIDs need to be given continuously and biologics for longer periods of time. Patients with elevated C-reactive protein levels benefit most when treated consequently. PMID:24281787

  17. Old and new treatment targets in axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rios Rodriguez, Valeria; Poddubnyy, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Two main treatment targets in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) could be currently defined: (1) reduction of inflammation resulting in control of signs and symptoms such as pain and stiffness and (2) prevention or retardation of structural damage progression in the spine resulting in preservation of functional status and improvement in the long-term outcome. A good control of signs and symptoms could be successfully achieved nowadays in the majority of patients treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs—the first-line therapy in axSpA) and with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α blockers (the second-line therapy, if NSAIDs fail). Several pipeline drugs including interleukin (IL) 17 and IL-23 antagonists might be helpful in the immediate future in achievement of this treatment target in case of inefficacy of NSAIDs and TNFα blockers. Retardation of radiographical spinal progression in axSpA—disease modification—is currently a much more challenging task than a good symptom control. In this review, we discuss symptomatic and possible disease-modifying properties of current and forthcoming treatment options for axSpA. PMID:26557376

  18. Genetic control of segmentation of axial structures in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Mglinets, V.A.

    1995-07-01

    The processes of segmentation of axial structures in vertebrates during early embryonic development are reviewed. These processes include the formation of neuromeres, somitomeres, cranial ganglia, and branchial arches in the head and of neuromeres, somites, spinal ganglia, and motor nerves in the body of the embryo. The class of vertebrate homeobox genes Hox is described with respect to the arrangement of these genes in four clusters, the structural and functional similarity of paralogues in gene subfamilies, and the type of Hox gene expression in the head and body. A hypothesis concerning the existence of a genetic Hox code, determining the fate of individual segments in neuroectodermal and mesenchymal derivatives, is discussed. In the context of this hypothesis, phenotypic expression of the mutant Hox genes, accompanied by the loss of their function and cases of excessive and ectopic expression of Hox genes, are analyzed. Only in such cases do mutant phenotypes demonstrate symptoms of actual homeotic transformation, in which specific segmental structures are substituted by their homologues, as has been described for homeotic mutations in Drosophila. 56 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Pre-bilaterian origin of the blastoporal axial organizer

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Yulia; Aman, Andy; Technau, Ulrich; Genikhovich, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    The startling capacity of the amphibian Spemann organizer to induce naïve cells to form a Siamese twin embryo with a second set of body axes is one of the hallmarks of developmental biology. However, the axis-inducing potential of the blastopore-associated tissue is commonly regarded as a chordate feature. Here we show that the blastopore lip of a non-bilaterian metazoan, the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, possesses the same capacity and uses the same molecular mechanism for inducing extra axes as chordates: Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We also demonstrate that the establishment of the secondary, directive axis in Nematostella by BMP signaling is sensitive to an initial Wnt signal, but once established the directive axis becomes Wnt-independent. By combining molecular analysis with experimental embryology, we provide evidence that the emergence of the Wnt/β-catenin driven blastopore-associated axial organizer predated the cnidarian-bilaterian split over 600 million years ago. PMID:27229764

  20. Modeling shrouded stator cavity flows in axial-flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, S.R.; Tolchinsky, I.; Okiishi, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computational analyses were completed to understand the nature of shrouded stator cavity flows. From this understanding, a one-dimensional model of the flow through shrouded stator cavities was developed. This model estimates the leakage mass flow, temperature rise, and angular momentum increase through the cavity, given geometry parameters and the flow conditions at the interface between the cavity and primary flow path. This cavity model consists of two components, one that estimates the flow characteristics through the labyrinth seals and the other that predicts the transfer of momentum due to windage. A description of the one-dimensional model is given. The incorporation and use of the one-dimensional model in a multistage compressor primary flow analysis tool is described. The combination of this model and the primary flow solver was used to reliably simulate the significant impact on performance of the increase of hub seal leakage in a twelve-stage axial-flow compressor. Observed higher temperatures of the hub region fluid, different stage matching, and lower overall efficiencies and core flow than expected could be correctly linked to increased hub seal clearance with this new technique. The importance of including these leakage flows in compressor simulations is shown.

  1. Time-dependent transonic flow solutions for axial turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdos, J.; Alzner, E.; Kalben, P.; Mcnally, W.; Slutsky, S.

    1975-01-01

    Three-dimensional unsteady transonic flow through an axial turbomachine stage is described in terms of a pair of two-dimensional formulations pertaining to orthogonal surfaces, namely, a blade-to-blade surface and a hub-to-casing surface. The resulting systems of nonlinear, inviscid, compressible equations of motion are solved by an explicit finite-difference technique. The blade-to-blade program includes the periodic interaction between rotor and stator blade rows. Treatment of the boundary conditions and of the blade slipstream motion by a characteristic type procedure is discussed in detail. Harmonic analysis of the acoustic far field produced by the blade row interaction, including an arbitrary initial transient, is outlined. Results from the blade-to-blade program are compared with experimental measurements of the rotating pressure field at the tip of a high-speed fan. The hub-to-casing program determines circumferentially averaged flow properties on a meridional plane. Blade row interactions are neglected in this formulation, but the force distributions over the entire blade surface for both the rotor and stator are obtained. Results from the hub-to-casing program are compared with a relaxation method solution for a subsonic rotor. Results are also presented for a quiet fan stage which includes transonic flow in both the rotor and stator and a normal shock in the stator.

  2. Pre-bilaterian origin of the blastoporal axial organizer.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Yulia; Aman, Andy; Technau, Ulrich; Genikhovich, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    The startling capacity of the amphibian Spemann organizer to induce naïve cells to form a Siamese twin embryo with a second set of body axes is one of the hallmarks of developmental biology. However, the axis-inducing potential of the blastopore-associated tissue is commonly regarded as a chordate feature. Here we show that the blastopore lip of a non-bilaterian metazoan, the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, possesses the same capacity and uses the same molecular mechanism for inducing extra axes as chordates: Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We also demonstrate that the establishment of the secondary, directive axis in Nematostella by BMP signaling is sensitive to an initial Wnt signal, but once established the directive axis becomes Wnt-independent. By combining molecular analysis with experimental embryology, we provide evidence that the emergence of the Wnt/β-catenin driven blastopore-associated axial organizer predated the cnidarian-bilaterian split over 600 million years ago. PMID:27229764

  3. Practical application of a tri-axial intensity array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Victor W.; Hines, Paul C.; Hutt, Daniel L.; Humphrey, Victor F.

    2003-10-01

    Sound intensity is a vector quantity representing the magnitude and direction of propagating energy within an acoustic field. In an underwater environment, a single omni-directional hydrophone can be used to measure instantaneous acoustic pressure and a finite difference approximation applied to the pressure signals from a pair of such hydrophones can be used to calculate particle velocity in a single direction. Because the time average of the product of instantaneous pressure and particle velocity is intensity, a pair of hydrophones is all that is required to measure a single component of the intensity vector. The complete three-dimensional intensity vector can be calculated using three orthogonal pairs of hydrophones. To evaluate this concept a tri-axial array consisting of three orthogonal pairs of omni-directional hydrophones has been developed and tested on both calibrated sources at a laboratory facility and sources of opportunity during sea trails in littoral waters. The use of this array to calculate the intensity vector and thereby localize both near-field and far-field acoustic sources and characterize the directionality of ambient noise fields will be discussed. The impact of signal-to-noise ratio and the effect of self-noise will also be examined.

  4. Axial creep-rupture time of boron-aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Koichi; Hamada, Jun`ichi

    1995-11-01

    Axial creep tests of a 10vol% boron-aluminum hotpressed monolayer composite were carried out under several constant loads at 300 C in air. The composite behaved with slight primary creep, but did not show appreciable secondary creep. Several specimens encountered a momentary increase of strain during the creep test which separated the creep curve into two regions, because of the individual fiber breaks in the composite. And then, almost all the specimens suddenly fractured without tertiary creep. From the viewpoint of reliability engineering the statistical properties of the creep-rupture time were investigated. The average creep-rupture time decreased with an increase in the applied stress, and the relatively large coefficient of variation was estimated in every case, being around 1,000%. However, these scatters were estimated to be smaller than the scatter of creep-rupture time in the boron fiber itself. That means, the reliability of the fiber`s creep-rupture time is improved by compositing with matrix material.

  5. Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    While information exists on high energy negative particle channeling there has been little study of the challenges of negative particle bending and channeling collimation. Partly this is because negative dechanneling lengths are relatively much shorter. Electrons are not particularly useful for investigating negative particle channeling effects because their material interactions are dominated by channeling radiation. Another important factor is that the current central challenge in channeling collimation is the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) where both beams are positive. On the other hand in the future the collimation question might reemerge for electon-positron or muon colliders. Dechanneling lengths increase at higher energies so that part of the negative particle experimental challenge diminishes. In the article different approaches to determining negative dechanneling lengths are reviewed. The more complicated case for axial channeling is also discussed. Muon channeling as a tool to investigate dechanneling is also discussed. While it is now possible to study muon channeling it will probably not illuminate the study of negative dechanneling.

  6. CIAXE: co-axial achromatic interferential coronagraph: first laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, Fatmé; Gay, Jean; Rabbia, Yves; Assus, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    In 1996, Jean Gay and Yves Rabbia presented their Achromatic Interferential Coronagraph (AIC) for detecting and imaging faint companions (ultimately exoplanets) in the neighboring of a star. As presented then, the Michleson-like Interferometer configuration of the AIC hardens its insertion into an existing (coaxial) optical train, the output beam of the AIC being delivered at right angle from the input beam. To overcome this, they reconfigured the AIC into a compact and fully axial coronagraph, the CIAXE, which main feature consists of using two thick lenses machined in the same optical material. For the CIAXE to deliver the output beam along the same axis as the input beam, the two lenses are coaxially disposed on the optical axis and are separated, at their common spherical contact surface by a thin air gap acting like a beam splitter. We have set up a laboratory experiment aiming at validating the principle of the concept. Our first step was to equalize the thicknesses of the two lenses, so as to make zero the optical path difference between both arms. For this, the (residual) value of the OPD has been evaluated and then the lenses have been re-machined so as to decrease as far as technologically possible, the thicknesses mismatch. As a second step, a micro-controlled rotation around the common curvature center of the spherical surfaces of the lenses is applied. This allows a fine tuning of the residual OPD at the required accuracy level. Are presented here test bench, steps and results.

  7. Measurements for the JASPER program Axial Shield Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Spencer, R.R.; Hunter, H.T.; Shono, A.; Chatani, K.

    1991-08-01

    The Axial Shield Experiment was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990--1991 as part of the continuing series of eight experiments planned for the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER) program starting in 1986. The program is intended to provide support for the development of current designs proposed for advanced liquid metal reactor (LMR) system both in Japan and the United States. As in the previous two experiments, the same spectrum modifier was used to alter the Tower Shielding Reactor source spectrum to one representing the LMR neutron spectra directly above the core in the area of the fission-gas plenum. In one of the measurements the spectrum was further modified by the fission gas plenum. In all cases the modified spectrum was followed by combinations of seven hexagon assemblies that represented different coolant flow and shielding patterns within the assemblies. The varied configuration permitted not only a study of the different designs, but also allowed a comparison to be made of the relative neutron attenuation effectiveness of boron carbide and stainless steel in such designs. This experiment was the third in a series of eight experiments to be performed as part of a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) and the Japan Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). This experiment, as was the previous Radial Shield Attenuation and Fission Gas Plenum Experiments, intended to provide support for the development of advanced sodium-cooled reactors. 5 refs.

  8. Redshift drift in axially symmetric quasispherical Szekeres models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Priti; Célérier, Marie-Noëlle; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2012-10-01

    Models of inhomogeneous universes constructed with exact solutions of Einstein’s general relativity have been proposed in the literature with the aim of reproducing the cosmological data without any need for a dark energy component. Besides large scale inhomogeneity models spherically symmetric around the observer, Swiss-cheese models have also been studied. Among them, Swiss cheeses where the inhomogeneous patches are modeled by different particular Szekeres solutions have been used for reproducing the apparent dimming of the type Ia supernovae. However, the problem of fitting such models to the type Ia supernovae data is completely degenerate and we need other constraints to fully characterize them. One of the tests which is known to be able to discriminate between different cosmological models is the redshift drift. This drift has already been calculated by different authors for Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi models. We compute it here for one particular axially symmetric quasispherical Szekeres Swiss cheese which has previously been shown to reproduce to a good accuracy the type Ia supernovae data, and we compare the results to the drift in the ΛCDM model and in some Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi models that can be found in the literature. We show that it is a good discriminator between them. Then, we discuss our model’s remaining degrees of freedom and propose a recipe to fully constrain them.

  9. Axial acoustic radiation force on a sphere in Gaussian field

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Liu, Xiaozhou Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    Based on the finite series method, the acoustical radiation force resulting from a Gaussian beam incident on a spherical object is investigated analytically. When the position of the particles deviating from the center of the beam, the Gaussian beam is expanded as a spherical function at the center of the particles and the expanded coefficients of the Gaussian beam is calculated. The analytical expression of the acoustic radiation force on spherical particles deviating from the Gaussian beam center is deduced. The acoustic radiation force affected by the acoustic frequency and the offset distance from the Gaussian beam center is investigated. Results have been presented for Gaussian beams with different wavelengths and it has been shown that the interaction of a Gaussian beam with a sphere can result in attractive axial force under specific operational conditions. Results indicate the capability of manipulating and separating spherical spheres based on their mechanical and acoustical properties, the results provided here may provide a theoretical basis for development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  10. Axial focusing of energy from a hypervelocity impact on earth

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Chael, E.P.; Trucano, T.G.; Crawford, D.A.

    1994-12-01

    We have performed computational simulations to determine how energy from a large hypervelocity impact on the Earth`s surface would couple to its interior. Because of the first-order axial symmetry of both the impact energy source and the stress-wave velocity structure of the Earth, a disproportionate amount of energy is dissipated along the axis defined by the impact point and its antipode (point opposite the impact). For a symmetric and homogeneous Earth model, all the impact energy that is radiated as seismic waves into the Earth at a given takeoff angle (ray parameter), independent of azimuthal direction, is refocused (minus attenuation) on the axis of symmetry, regardless of the number of reflections and refractions it has experienced. Material on or near the axis of symmetry experiences more strain cycles with much greater amplitude than elsewhere, and therefore experiences more irreversible heating. The focusing is most intense in the upper mantle, within the asthenosphere, where seismic energy is most effectively converted to heat. For a sufficiently energetic impact, this mechanism might generate enough local heating to create an isostatic instability leading to uplift, possibly resulting in rifting, volcanism, or other rearrangement of the interior dynamics of the planet. These simulations demonstrate how hypervelocity impact energy can be transported to the Earth`s interior, supporting the possibility of a causal link between large impacts on Earth and major internally-driven geophysical processes.

  11. Telescopic Deformation of Stepped Circular Tube Subjected to Axial Crushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dai-Heng; Tanaka, Daishi; Ozaki, Shingo

    In this paper, telescopic deformations of stepped circular tubes are studied by axial compression with finite element method. It is found that three-stepped circular tubes can be considered as a combination of two two-stepped circular tubes, from which the compression load for a three-stepped cylinder can be predicted in approximation from the loads for the two-stepped cylinders. However, the predicted values by this technique are higher than those of the three-step cylinder, because the restraint of the vertical wall in the two-stepped cylinders is larger than that in the three-stepped cylinder. The mechanism of the telescopic deformation of stepped circular tube is mainly composed of bending, rotating, and stretching of the tube wall. However, another mechanism has appeared when the radius difference of the small and the big cylinders is small enough. As far as geometric parameters concerned, the average load of a two-step cylinder goes up as the radius difference ΔR decreases and as the cylinder height H or the thickness t increase. And, the initial load grows with the increase of fillet radius. Further, the average of compressive load is also investigated.

  12. Isom's thickness noise for axial and centrifugal subsonic fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelladi, S.; Kouidri, S.; Rey, R.

    2008-06-01

    The thickness noise predicted by the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (FW&H) equation depends on the normal velocity vn which is very sensitive to the meshing size. Isom showed that in a far field a monopolar source is equivalent to a dipolar source induced by a uniform distribution of the load on the entire moving surface. Consequently, the calculation of the thickness noise becomes completely independent of the normal velocity vn. Its expression, as suggested by Farassat, is for any moving surface. The main objective of this work is to determine a specific expression of Isom's thickness noise in time and frequency domains for axial and centrifugal subsonic fans. The proposed form of the thickness noise enables to highlight the effect of each geometrical parameter of the fan on the overall thickness noise, on the one hand, and presents a fast computational mean and low memory storage capability since the acoustic pressure in the frequency domain is calculated for only one blade, on the other.

  13. Performance optimization for rotors in hover and axial flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, T. R.; Wachspress, D. A.; Kaufman, A. E.; Bliss, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    Performance optimization for rotors in hover and axial flight is a topic of continuing importance to rotorcraft designers. The aim of this Phase 1 effort has been to demonstrate that a linear optimization algorithm could be coupled to an existing influence coefficient hover performance code. This code, dubbed EHPIC (Evaluation of Hover Performance using Influence Coefficients), uses a quasi-linear wake relaxation to solve for the rotor performance. The coupling was accomplished by expanding of the matrix of linearized influence coefficients in EHPIC to accommodate design variables and deriving new coefficients for linearized equations governing perturbations in power and thrust. These coefficients formed the input to a linear optimization analysis, which used the flow tangency conditions on the blade and in the wake to impose equality constraints on the expanded system of equations; user-specified inequality contraints were also employed to bound the changes in the design. It was found that this locally linearized analysis could be invoked to predict a design change that would produce a reduction in the power required by the rotor at constant thrust. Thus, an efficient search for improved versions of the baseline design can be carried out while retaining the accuracy inherent in a free wake/lifting surface performance analysis.

  14. The Definition and Measurement of Axial Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Ennio; Parsons, Wendy Joanne; Marchesoni, Antonio; Olivieri, Ignazio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Cauli, Alberto; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele; Brunese, Luca

    2015-11-01

    This review seeks to update the state of the art of axial psoriatic arthritis (axPsA). The definition and assessment of axPsA can be problematic because no agreement and no definitive data on this topic have been published, resulting in uncertainty as to the best approach to deal with these patients. A few recent scientific reports show new data on the possible coincidence of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and axPsA, as well as on the radiological assessment as measured with the validated instruments for axPsA. Moreover, the role of magnetic resonance imaging has also been evaluated for this intriguing subset. All data confirmed that radiological assessment is a useful tool to detect typical findings of axPsA, while other imaging techniques remain to be validated. Finally, there is no evidence to support treatment of axPsA with traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, while a "leap" to biologic agents is the only treatment after failure with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. PMID:26523055

  15. Multi-axial fiber-optic electric field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, D.; Gibson, R.; Schreeve, B.; Schultz, S.; Selfridge, D.

    2010-03-01

    High powered microwave weapons use electric fields to overload electronics. We developed a non-intrusive sensor using a technology based on slab coupled optical sensing (SCOS). Each sensor detects the electric field component normal to the surface of the slab. By mounting two of these sensors orthogonally to each other, a more complete image of the electrical field can be obtained. One of the major hurdles of creating a multi-axial SCOS is keeping the size of the sensor small. The size is limited by (1) the size of the sensing material and (2) the ability to package the sensor to maintain its structural integrity and orientation. Good sensitivity is attained with SCOS with a length less than 3 mm and the D-fiber platform has a small core which allows for much less bending loss than standard single mode fiber. We have developed a mounting system that is heat resistant and structurally robust to protect the sensor that is extremely small when compared to traditional electric field sensors.

  16. Vertebral sarcoidosis: demonstration of bone involvement by computerized axial tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Dinerstein, S.L.; Kovarsky, J.

    1984-08-01

    A report is given of a rare case of vertebral sarcoidosis with negative conventional spinal x-ray films, yet with typical cystic lesions of the spine found incidentally during abdominal computerized axial tomography (CAT). The patient was a 28-year-old black man, who was admitted for evaluation of a 1 1/2-year history of diffuse myalgias, intermittent fever to 102 F orally, bilateral hilar adenopathy, and leukopenia. A technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed diffuse areas of increased uptake over the sternum, entire vertebral column, and pelvis. Conventional x-ray films of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, and an AP view of the pelvis were all normal. Chest x-ray film revealed only bilateral hilar adenopathy. During the course of an extensive negative evaluation for infection, an abdominal CAT scan was done, showing multiple, small, sclerotic-rimmed cysts at multiple levels of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine. Bone marrow biopsy revealed only changes consistent with anemia of chronic disease. Mediastinal lymph node biopsy revealed noncaseating granulomas. A tentative diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made, and treatment with prednisone, isoniazid and rifampin was begun. Within two weeks of initiation of prednisone therapy, the patient was symptom-free. A repeat technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed only a small residual area of mildly increased uptake over the upper thoracic vertebrae.

  17. Large co-axial pulse tube preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, N.; Caughley, A.; Meier, J.; Nation, M.; Tanchon, J.; Trollier, T.; Ravex, A.

    2014-01-01

    We report that Callaghan Innovation, formally known as Industrial Research Ltd (IRL), has designed and built its largest of three high frequency single-stage co-axial pulse tubes, closely coupled to a metal diaphragm pressure wave generator (PWG). The previous pulse tube achieved 110 W of cooling power @ 77 K, with an electrical input power of 3.1 kW from a 90 cc swept volume PWG. The pulse tubes have all been tuned to operate at 50 Hz, with a mean helium working pressure of 2.5 MPa. Sage pulse tube simulation software was used to model the latest pulse tube and predicted 280 W of cooling power @ 77 K. The nominal 250 W cryocooler was designed to be an intermediate step to up-scale pulse tube technology for our 1000 cc swept-volume PWG, to provide liquefaction of gases and cooling for HTS applications. Details of the modeling, design, development and preliminary experimental results are discussed.

  18. Secondary flows in axial turbines--a review.

    PubMed

    Langston, L S

    2001-05-01

    An important problem that arises in the design and the performance of axial flow turbines is the understanding, analysis, prediction and control of secondary flows. Sieverding has given a review of secondary flow literature, covering up to 1985. In this paper a brief review of pre-1985 work is given, and then a survey of open literature secondary flow investigations since the Sieverding review is presented. Most of the studies reviewed deal with plane or annular cascade flows. Tip clearance effects are not covered. The basic secondary flow picture for a turbine cascade, as measured and verified by a number of investigators is described. Recent work that shows refined secondary flow vortex structures is examined. A flow parameter based on inlet boundary layer properties used to predict horseshoe vortex swirl is presented. Work on secondary flow loss reduction, involving airfoil geometry, endwall fences and endwall contouring is briefly reviewed. A new leading edge bulb geometry that has demonstrated impressive loss reduction is considered. It is concluded that accurate routine prediction of secondary flow losses has not yet been achieved, and must await either a better turbulence model or more experiments to reveal new endwall loss production mechanisms. Lastly, loss is examined from the standpoint of entropy generation. PMID:11460621

  19. Investigation of unsteady flow in axial turbine stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Tomáš; Němec, Martin

    2012-04-01

    The never ending process to increase the efficiency of turbine stages introduced an idea to create an axial turbine stage test rig as part of closed loop transonic wind tunnel at Vyzkumny a zkusebni letecky ustav (VZLU). Studying of unsteady flow field behaviours in turbine stages is nowadays essential in the development process. Therefore, the test rig was designed with focusing on possibility of detailed studying of unsteady flow fields in turbine stages. New methodologies and new instrumentations were developed at VZLU and successfully integrated to gain valuable information from experiments with turbine stages. Two different turbine stages were tested during the facility introduction process. The measurement of these two models demonstrated how flexible the test rig is. One of them was an enlarged model of small gas turbine stage. The other was scaled-down model of stage of intermediate-pressure steam turbine. The external characteristics of both models were acquired during experiments as well as the detailed unsteady flow field measurement. Turbine stages were tested in various regimes in order to check the capabilities of the facility, methodology and instrumentation together. The paper presents results of unsteady flow field investigation in the enlarged turbine stage with unshrouded rotor. The interaction of structures developed in a stator with the rotor flow field is depicted and the influence of turbine load on evolution of secondary flows in rotor is analysed.

  20. Strength and dynamic characteristics analyses of wound composite axial impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jifeng; Olortegui-Yume, Jorge; Müller, Norbert

    2012-03-01

    A low cost, light weight, high performance composite material turbomachinery impeller with a uniquely designed blade patterns is analyzed. Such impellers can economically enable refrigeration plants to use water as a refrigerant (R718). A strength and dynamic characteristics analyses procedure is developed to assess the maximum stresses and natural frequencies of these wound composite axial impellers under operating loading conditions. Numerical simulation using FEM for two-dimensional and three-dimensional impellers was investigated. A commercially available software ANSYS is used for the finite element calculations. Analysis is done for different blade geometries and then suggestions are made for optimum design parameters. In order to avoid operating at resonance, which can make impellers suffer a significant reduction in the design life, the designer must calculate the natural frequency and modal shape of the impeller to analyze the dynamic characteristics. The results show that using composite Kevlar fiber/epoxy matrix enables the impeller to run at high tip speed and withstand the stresses, no critical speed will be matched during start-up and shut-down, and that mass imbalances of the impeller shall not pose a critical problem.

  1. Dynamics of axially localized states in Taylor-Couette flows.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jose M; Marques, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    We present numerical simulations of the flow confined in a wide gap Taylor-Couette system, with a rotating inner cylinder and variable length-to-gap aspect ratio. A complex experimental bifurcation scenario differing from the classical Ruelle-Takens route to chaos has been experimentally reported in this geometry. The wavy vortex flow becomes quasiperiodic due to an axisymmetric very low frequency mode. This mode plays a key role in the dynamics of the system, leading to the occurrence of chaos via a period-doubling scenario. Further increasing the rotation of the inner cylinder results in the appearance of a new flow pattern which is characterized by large amplitude oscillations localized in some of the vortex pairs. The purpose of this paper is to study numerically the dynamics of these axially localized states, paying special attention to the transition to chaos. Frequency analysis from time series simultaneously recorded at several points has been applied in order to identify the flow transitions taking place. It has been found that the very low frequency mode is essential to explain the behavior associated with the different transitions towards chaos including localized states. PMID:26066253

  2. A theory of rotating stall of multistage axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, F. K.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical analysis was made of rotating stall in axial compressors of many stages, finding conditions for a permanent, straight-through traveling disturbance, with the steady compressor characteristic assumed known, and with simple lag processes ascribed to the flows in the inlet, blade passages, and exit regions. For weak disturbances, predicted stall propagation speeds agree well with experimental results. For a locally-parabolic compressor characteristic, an exact nonlinear solution is found and discussed. For deep stall, the stall-zone boundary is most abrupt at the trailing edge, as expected. When a complete characteristic having unstalling and reverse-flow features is adopted, limit cycles governed by a Lienard's equation are found. Analysis of these cycles yields predictions of recovery from rotating stall; a relaxation oscillation is found at some limiting flow coefficient, above which no solution exists. Recovery is apparently independent of lag processes in the blade passages, but instead depends on the lags originating in the inlet and exit flows, and also on the shape of the given characteristic diagram. Small external lags and tall diagrams favor early recovery. Implications for future research are discussed.

  3. Background density channel generation by axial plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonde, Jeffrey; Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2012-10-01

    The supersonic expansion of a dense plasma into an ambient plasma can be observed in phenomena ranging from coronal mass ejections and protostellar outflows to astrophysical jets. To produce a supersonic plasma jet in a laboratory setting, a laser-produced plasma explodes into an ambient argon plasma (n˜5.10^12cm-3,cs˜6.10^5cm/s,vA˜1.2.10^7cm/s) in the Large Plasma Device at UCLA. This study focuses on the initial formation and evolution of the jet and its effects on the background magnetized plasma. Using a laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic of Ar-II ions at their 611.5nm transition, the jet is seen to perturb the equilibrium population of the target argon ions. A CCD camera with a fast (>=3ns) shutter spatially and temporally resolves images of the fluorescence. Time-lapsed imaging shows an axially aligned channel of depleted fluorescence form near the source and travel with an undiminished speed characteristic of the jet (v/cs˜20) while remaining highly collimated. Langmuir probe measurements show a large ion flux moving in conjunction with the excited argon depletion after traveling more than an ion inertial length.

  4. Fluid dynamics aspects of miniaturized axial-flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kang, Can; Huang, Qifeng; Li, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Rotary blood pump (RBP) is a kind of crucial ventricular assist device (VAD) and its advantages have been evidenced and acknowledged in recent years. Among the factors that influence the operation performance and the durability of various rotary blood pumps, medium property and the flow features in pump's flow passages are conceivably significant. The major concern in this paper is the fluid dynamics aspects of such a kind of miniaturized pump. More specifically, the structural features of axial-flow blood pump and corresponding flow features are analyzed in detail. The narrow flow passage between blade tips and pump casing and the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) zone may exert a negative effect on the shear stress distribution in the blood flow. Numerical techniques are briefly introduced in view of their contribution to facilitating the optimal design of blood pump and the visualization of shear stress distribution and multiphase flow analysis. Additionally, with the development of flow measurement techniques, the high-resolution, effective and non-intrusive flow measurement techniques catering to the measurement of the flows inside rotary blood pumps are highly anticipated. PMID:24211957

  5. Fabrication and Experimental Analysis of Axially Oriented Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Aphale, Ashish N; Mahakalkar, Kapil; Macwan, Isaac G; Mukerji, Ishita; Cox, Paris J; Mahapatra, Manoj; Singh, Prabhakar; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Patra, Prabir K

    2016-03-01

    A novel design of a laboratory built axially rotating collector (ARC) having capability to align electrospun nanofibers have been described. A detailed morphological comparison of such nanofibers orientation and their geometry is done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For comparison various polymeric solutions were electrospun on conventional static collector as well as ARC. The average diameter of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers was found to be 250 nm while polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were found to be within a range of 600-800 nm. Conducting nanoparticles such as graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) mixed with polymer solutions shown to have a significant influence on the overall geometry of these nanofibers and their diameter distribution. It is evident from the SEM analysis that both graphene and MWNTs in polymer solution play a crucial role in achieving a uniform diameter of nanofibers. Lastly, the formation of the aligned nanofibers using ARC has been mathematically modeled and the electromagnetic field governing the process has been simulated. PMID:27455687

  6. An analytical model of axial compressor off-design performance

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, T.R.; Horlock, J.H. . Whittle Lab.)

    1994-07-01

    An analysis is presented of the off-design performance of multistage axial-flow compressors. It is based on an analytical solution, valid for small perturbations in operating conditions from the design point, and provides an insight into the effects of choices made during the compressor design process on performance and off-design stage matching. It is shown that the mean design value of stage loading coefficient ([psi] = [Delta]h[sub 0]/U[sup 2]) has a dominant effect on off-design performance, whereas the stage-wise distribution of stage loading coefficient and the design value of flow coefficient have little influence. The powerful effects of variable stator vanes on stage-matching are also demonstrated and these results are shown to agree well with previous work. The slope of the working line of a gas turbine engine, overlaid on overall compressor characteristics, is shown to have a strong effect on the off-design stage-matching through the compressor. The model is also used to analyze design changes to the compressor geometry and to show how errors in estimates of annulus blockage, decided during the design process, have less effect on compressor performance than has previously been thought.

  7. Axial length in unilateral idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hoseok; Lee, Dae Yeong; Nam, Dong Heun

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the axial length (AXL) in unilateral idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). METHODS This retrospective case-control study was comprised of a consecutive case series of 35 patients with acute unilateral idiopathic CSC, and age- and sex-matched 50 control eyes. AXL of both eyes of unilateral CSC patients and the control eyes were investigated. AXL was measured by ultrasonic biometry, and the adjusted AXL was calculated for CSC eyes as measured AXL plus differences of foveal thickness between CSC and normal fellow eyes in millimeters. The main outcome measures were comparison of AXL between CSC, fellow and control eyes. RESULTS The mean age of 35 CSC patients was 45.5y, and 31 males were included. The adjusted AXL of CSC eyes was 23.52 mm, and the AXL of fellow eyes was 23.46 mm, and of control eyes 23.94 mm. The AXL of both CSC and fellow eyes were significantly shorter than control eyes (CSC vs control, P=0.044; fellow vs control, P=0.026). There was no statistically significant difference in AXL between CSC and fellow eyes. CONCLUSION In unilateral idiopathic CSC, the AXL of CSC and fellow eyes are shorter than that of control eyes. Short AXL may be related with choroidal circulation abnormality in CSC. PMID:27275428

  8. Corrective optics space telescope axial replacement alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, Robert B.; Satter, Michael J.; Kaplan, Michael L.; Martella, Mark A.; Freymiller, Ed D.; Buzzetta, Victor

    1993-10-01

    To facilitate the accurate placement and alignment of the corrective optics space telescope axial replacement (COSTAR) structure, mechanisms, and optics, the COSTAR Alignment System (CAS) has been designed and assembled. It consists of a 20-foot optical bench, support structures for holding and aligning the COSTAR instrument at various stages of assembly, a focal plane target fixture (FPTF) providing an accurate reference to the as-built Hubble Space Telescope (HST) focal plane, two alignment translation stages with interchangeable alignment telescopes and alignment lasers, and a Zygo Mark IV interferometer with a reference sphere custom designed to allow accurate double-pass operation of the COSTAR correction optics. The system is used to align the fixed optical bench (FOB), the track, the deployable optical bench (DOB), the mechanisms, and the optics to ensure that the correction mirrors are all located in the required positions and orientations on-orbit after deployment. In this paper, the layout of the CAS is presented and the various alignment operations are listed along with the relevant alignment requirements. In addition, calibration of the necessary support structure elements and alignment aids is described, including the two-axis translation stages, the latch positions, the FPTF, and the COSTAR-mounted alignment cubes.

  9. Referral Patterns, Diagnosis, and Disease Management of Patients With Axial Spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Sieper, Joachim; Elewaut, Dirk; Deodhar, Atul; Pangan, Aileen L.; Dorr, Alexander P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recognition, diagnosis, and management of axial spondyloarthritis (axial SpA) continue to advance. Objectives The objectives of this study were to compare referrals, diagnosis, and management of axial SpA in Western Europe (WE), North America (US and Canada), and the rest of world (RoW) in academic and community rheumatology practices and to identify areas for further education. Methods Rheumatologists responded online to the MAXIMA (Management of Axial SpA International and Multicentric Approaches) survey. Questions pertained to referral, diagnosis, and management of axial SpA. Results Rheumatologists (N = 809) from 56 countries completed the survey about patients with chronic back pain (≥3 months) starting before age 45 years. Responses from academic and community practice rheumatologists were generally similar. Most referrals were from primary care providers. Symptom duration of 3 years or more at referral was reported more frequently by WE and RoW than US respondents. More WE and RoW than US rheumatologists referred to the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria for axial SpA in clinical practice. Rheumatologists reported prescribing disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for the management of axial SpA. Sulfasalazine was frequently prescribed across regions; methotrexate was more commonly prescribed by US rheumatologists compared with other regions. Conclusions Referral patterns, diagnosis, and disease management for axial SpA were similar among WE, North America, and RoW rheumatologists and in academic/community practices, although more WE and RoW rheumatologists referred to Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria in clinical practice. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were commonly prescribed for axial SpA patients, although it was unclear whether these were prescribed for axial or peripheral symptoms. PMID:25417676

  10. An Assessment of Cumulative Axial and Torsional Fatigue in a Cobalt-Base Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Cumulative fatigue under axial and torsional loading conditions can include both load-order (higMow and low/high) as well as load-type sequence (axial/torsional and torsional/axial) effects. Previously reported experimental studies on a cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188 at 538 C, addressed these effects. These studies characterized the cumulative axial and torsional fatigue behavior under high amplitude followed by low amplitude (Kalluri, S. and Bonacuse, P. J., "Cumulative Axial and Torsional Fatigue: An Investigation of Load-Type Sequance Effects," in Multiaxial Fatigue and Deformation: Testing and Prediction, ASTM STP 1387, S. Kalluri, and P. J. Bonacuse, Eds., American Society for Testing and Materials, West Conshohocken, PA, 2000, pp. 281-301) and low amplitude followed by high amplitude (Bonacuse, P. and Kalluri, S. "Sequenced Axial and Torsional Cumulative Fatigue: Low Amplitude Followed by High Amplitude Loading," Biaxial/Multiaxial Fatigue and Fracture, ESIS Publication 31, A. Carpinteri, M. De Freitas, and A. Spagnoli, Eds., Elsevier, New York, 2003, pp. 165-182) conditions. In both studies, experiments with the following four load-type sequences were performed: (a) axial/axial, (b) torsional/torsional, (c) axial/torsional, and (d) torsional/axial. In this paper, the cumulative axial and torsional fatigue data generated in the two previous studies are combined to generate a comprehensive cumulative fatigue database on both the load-order and load-type sequence effects. This comprehensive database is used to examine applicability of the Palmgren-langer-Miner linear damage rule and a nonlinear damage curve approach for Haynes 188 subjected to the load-order and load-type sequencing described above. Summations of life fractions from the experiments are compared to the predictions from both the linear and nonlinear cumulative fatigue damage approaches. The significance of load-order versus load-type sequence effects for axial and torsional loading conditions

  11. Prediction of secular acceleration of axial rotation of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2009-04-01

    Secular motion of the Earth pole and non-tidal acceleration of its diurnal rotation have obtained rather precise explanation with the help of simple one-point model of the directed transport of fluid masses from a southern hemisphere in northern hemisphere with the general direction, given by geocentric axis OP directed to pole P with coordinates 700N, 10403 E[1]. The another generalized model represents a system of two material points with masses m2 and m1, located on surface of the Earth at poles of geocentric axis OP. Masses are linearly changed in the time with velocities [2]: ṁ2 = 0.179 × 1015kg/yrand ṁ1 = 0.043 × 1015kg/yr. A reduction of fluid masses of the appropriate thin spherical layer of the Earth correspond to secular increasing of masses of model points. The specified model has allowed to explain values of fundamental geodynamic parameters observably and determined during decades: a direction and velocity of drift of a pole of the Earth; value of non-tidal acceleration of axial rotation; to explain a secular variations of coefficients of the second, third, fourth, sixth and eighth zonal harmonics of a geopotential; coefficients of secular changes of a surface of ocean for the last approximately 150 years; a direction of secular drift of a geocenter and other planetary phenomena [3]. The role of the angular momentum of redistributed masses of the Earth in rotation of the Earth appeared not essential at the given stage of researches. On the essence the offered model has semi-empirical character as it bases on values of velocities of change of masses of points and the given position of axis OP. For their determination and estimations the part of the observant data was used, and other parameters were designed under analytical formulas. The obtained results have precisely confirmed competency and affectivity of geodynamic model [4] about existence of secular drift of a liquid core along radial direction OP with velocity about 2.6 cm/yr in the

  12. Compression response of tri-axially braided textile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shunjun

    2007-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with characterizing the compression stiffness and compression strength of 2D tri-axially braided textile composites (2DTBC). Two types of 2DTBC are considered differing only on the resin type, while the textile fiber architecture is kept the same with bias tows at 45 degrees to the axial tows. Experimental, analytical and computational methods are described based on the results generated in this study. Since these composites are manufactured using resin transfer molding, the intended and as manufactured composite samples differ in their microstructure due to consolidation and thermal history effects in the manufacturing cycle. These imperfections are measured and the effect of these imperfections on the compression stiffness and strength are characterized. Since the matrix is a polymer material, the nonuniform thermal history undergone by the polymer at manufacturing (within the composite and in the presence of fibers) renders its properties to be non-homogenous. The effects of these non-homogeneities are captured through the definition of an equivalent in-situ matrix material. A method to characterize the mechanical properties of the in-situ matrix is also described. Fiber tow buckling, fiber tow kinking and matrix microcracking are all observed in the experiments. These failure mechanisms are captured through a computational model that uses the finite element (FE) technique to discretize the structure. The FE equations are solved using the commercial software ABAQUS version 6.5. The fiber tows are modeled as transversely isotropic elastic-plastic solids and the matrix is modeled as an isotropic elastic-plastic solid with and without microcracking damage. Because the 2DTBC is periodic, the question of how many repeat units are necessary to model the compression stiffness and strength are examined. Based on the computational results, the correct representative unit cell for this class of materials is identified. The computational models and

  13. Can Paleointensities be Used to Test the Geocentric Axial Dipole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ted; Heimpel, Moritz; Pesonen, Lauri; Veikkolainen, Toni

    2016-04-01

    The Geocentric Axial Dipole (GAD) model is central to many aspects of geophysics, including plate tectonics and paleoclimate. But its validity is by no means firmly established, particularly for the Precambrian. One test that has met with some success involves the distribution of paleomagnetic inclination angles. It works because any given field morphology has its own distinct probability density function (PDF) against which data compilations can be tested. Here, we investigate a second possible test using published paleointensity data. Once again, any given field morphology has a specific PDF. Likely field models consist of an underlying GAD on which is superimposed modest (±10%) quadrupole and octupole components. Intensity distributions differ from their inclination counterparts in that intensity can have variable bounds. This means that paleointensity PDF's tend to have more complicated shapes than the corresponding inclination PDF's, often with multiple maxima and minima. We use the CALS10k compilation and computational geodynamo models to explore how the paleointensity test performs with observational and modelling data in which the Gauss coefficients are well constrained. To investigate the potential of the paleointensity test for longer geological time intervals, we use the PINT database. The resulting observational models are compared to results from dynamo models that exhibit polarity reversals and excursions. The dynamo models can have modestly non-dipolar field morphologies, depending on heat flow boundary conditions and inner core sizes that model the evolution of the convective state of the core. Compared to the inclination test, the paleointensity test can potentially offer greater discrimination between models. However, non-uniqueness issues and paucity of data, particularly for the Precambrian, may severely limit its effectiveness.

  14. Effectiveness of Adalimumab in Non-radiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cantarini, Luca; Fabbroni, Marta; Talarico, Rosaria; Costa, Luisa; Caso, Francesco; Cuneo, Gian Luca; Frediani, Bruno; Faralli, Gabriele; Vitale, Antonio; Brizi, Maria Giuseppina; Sabadini, Luciano; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of adalimumab (ADA) in a cohort of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA), and the secondary aims were to identify predictive factors of response and evaluate radiological progression. We evaluated 37 patients (male/female: 12/25; mean age 49 ± 14; mean disease duration: 6.3 ± 5.8) with active nr-axSpA (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria), despite the treatment with ≥1 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for at least 3 months, initiating the treatment with ADA 40 mg every other week. Patients were treated for 24 months, and evaluated at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months. Outcome measures included Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index. Radiograph of the spine and sacroiliac joints and magnetic resonance of the sacroiliac joints were performed at baseline and according to the standard of assessment for the disease. The proportion of patients that achieved a BASDAI50 response at 6, 12 and 24 months was 51.3%, 70.3%, and 76.8%, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated with no unexpected adverse events and/or serious adverse events. All patients remained on treatment for 2 years, with a good compliance. We did not identify any predictive factor of response to therapy. Moreover, modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score and Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada scores showed a trend of improvement during the study period. ADA was effective on clinical and radiological outcomes at 2-year follow-up; thus, early treatment with ADA may prevent radiographic damage and be associated with low disease activity or remission. Moreover, data from this cohort study have confirmed safety and tolerability profile of ADA in nr-axSpA in the long term. PMID:26222847

  15. Breaking constraint: axial patterning in Trichechus (Mammalia: Sirenia).

    PubMed

    Buchholtz, Emily A; Wayrynen, Kaisa L; Lin, Iris W

    2014-01-01

    Meristic variation is often limited in serially homologous systems with high internal differentiation and high developmental modularity. The mammalian neck, an extreme example, has a fixed (at seven) count of diversely specialized segments. Imposition of the mammalian cervical constraint has been tentatively linked to the origin of the diaphragm, which is muscularized by cells that migrate from cervical somites during development. With six cervical vertebrae, the genus Trichechus (manatee) has apparently broken this constraint, although the mechanism of constraint escape is unknown. Hypotheses for the developmental origin of Trichechus cervical morphology include cervical rib 7 repatterning, a primaxial/abaxial patterning shift, and local homeosis at the cervical/thoracic boundary. We tested predictions of these hypotheses by documenting vertebral morphology, axial ossification patterns, regionalization of the postcranial skeleton, and the relationship of thoracic ribs to sternal subunits in a large data set of fetal and adult Trichechus and Dugong specimens. These observations forced rejection of all three hypotheses. We propose alternatively that a global slowing of the rate of somitogenesis reduced somite count and disrupted alignment of Hox-generated anatomical markers relative to somite (and vertebral) boundaries throughout the Trichechus column. This hypothesis is consistent with observations of the full range of traditional cervical morphologies in the six cervical vertebrae, conserved postcranial proportions, and column-wide reduction in count relative to its sister taxon, Dugong. It also suggests that the origin of the mammalian cervical constraint lies in patterning, not in count, and that Trichechus and the tree sloths have broken the constraint using different developmental mechanisms. PMID:25339599

  16. Aging in the large CDF axial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Allspach, D.; Ambrose, D.; Binkley, M.; Bromberg, C.; Burkett, K.; Kephart, R.; Madrak, R.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Roser, R.; Wagner, R.L. /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The Central Outer Tracker (COT) is a large axial drift chamber in the Collider Detector at Fermilab operating with a gas mixture that is 50/50 argon/ethane with an admixture of 1.7% isopropanol. In its first two years of operation the COT showed unexpected aging with the worst parts of the chamber experiencing a gain loss of {approx}50% for an accumulated charge of {approx}35 mC/cm. By monitoring the pulse height of hits on good tracks, it was possible to determine the gain as a function of time and location in the chamber. In addition, the currents of the high voltage supplies gave another monitor of chamber gain and its dependence on the charge deposition rate. The aging was worse on the exhaust end of the chamber consistent with polymer buildup as the gas flows through the chamber. The distribution in azimuth suggests that aging is enhanced at lower temperatures, but other factors such as gas flow patterns may be involved. Elemental and molecular analysis of the sense wires found a coating that is mostly carbon and hydrogen with a small amount of oxygen; no silicon or other contaminants were identified. High resolution electron microscope pictures of the wire surface show that the coating is smooth with small sub-micron nodules. In the course of working with the chamber gas system, we discovered a small amount of O{sub 2} is enough to reverse the aging. Operating the chamber with {approx}100 ppm of O{sub 2} reversed almost two years of gain loss in less than 10 days while accumulating {le} 2 mC/cm.

  17. Axial cyclic behavior of the bone-screw interface.

    PubMed

    Inceoğlu, Serkan; Ehlert, Mike; Akbay, Atilla; McLain, Robert F

    2006-11-01

    Screw fixation strength is investigated by using a pullout test. Despite many screw pullout studies, the effects of loading rate on the pullout behavior of pedicle screws are not known. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of loading rate on the pullout stiffness and strength of pedicle screws. Sixty pedicle screws were inserted in foam blocks and pulled out at four different rates: 0.1, 1, 5 and 50 mm/min. Twenty of these 60 screws were cycled non-destructively at four different rates sequentially, i.e., 0.1, 1, 5 and 50 mm/min prior to pullout. Ten additional pedicle screws were inserted in five calf lumbar vertebrae, cycled as in foam group, and pulled out at a rate of either 0.1 or 50 mm/min. The results showed that the stiffness was higher at all rates compared to 0.1 mm/min in foam model but in bone model only 1 and 5 mm/min groups were higher compared to 0.1 mm/min. The pullout strength in 50 mm/min group was higher than that in 0.1 mm/min group in both foam and bone model. The results suggested that loading rate influenced the mechanics of the bone-screw interface. Therefore, a fair comparison between the pullout studies can be achieved under same loading rate conditions. Moreover, the cycling of the pedicle screws in axial direction within a pre-yield region showed an unusual hysteresis curve. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the mechanics of the screw-bone interface. PMID:16458568

  18. Impulsive Wave Propagation within Magmatic Conduits with Axial Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Negri Leiva, R. S.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    We implemented Trefftz's method to simulate wave propagation in a fluid-solid system aimed to represent a magmatic conduit. Assuming axial symmetry, a set of multipoles is used to build a complete system of wave functions for both the solid and the fluid. These functions are solutions of the elastodynamic equations that govern the motions in the fluid and the solid, respectively. The conduit can be closed or open and the exterior elastic domain may be unlimited or with an exterior boundary. In order to find the functions coefficients, boundary conditions (null shear and continuity of pressures and normal velocities) are satisfied in the least squares sense. The impulsive nature of the source is considered using Fourier analysis. Despite the simplicity of the formulation our results display a rich variety of behaviors. In fact, for a uniform infinite cylinder we reproduced the analytical solution. Moreover, this approach allows establishing some important effects of conduit geometry, including changes of sections. Lateral effects and bump resonances are well resolved. We compared our numerical calculations with results obtained from experimental simulations of volcanic explosions in which rapid depressurization induces fragmentation of volcanic rocks. These experiments are performed within a shock-tube apparatus at room temperature and various pressures using Argon (Ar) gas, particles and pumice samples of different porosities, from Popocatepetl volcano. The mechanical system is well characterized and the dynamics of the explosive process is monitored with high precision piezoelectric sensors located at the pipe surface. The combination of analytical and experimental approaches is very useful to understand the seismic wave field of volcanic conduit dynamics.

  19. Echocardiographic Evaluation of the Jarvik 2000 Axial-Flow LVAD

    PubMed Central

    Stainback, Raymond F.; Croitoru, Mihai; Hernandez, Antonieta; Myers, Timothy J.; Wadia, Yasmin; Frazier, O. H.

    2005-01-01

    From April 2000 through September 2001, we studied 11 patients with the Jarvik 2000 —a left ventricular assist device with an axial-flow pump that provides continuous blood flow—to determine the echocardiographic characteristics. All patients underwent complete echocardiographic examination, including outflow-graft flow evaluation 24 hours after implantation and each month thereafter for the duration of support. Data were obtained at each pump setting (8,000–12,000 rpm in 1,000-rpm increments) and with the pump off. Left ventricular dimensions and shortening fraction and the duration of aortic valve systolic opening decreased as pump speed increased. Although the aortic valve remained closed at higher pump speeds, pump outflow-graft flow remained pulsatile, because of the systolic thrust of the assisted ventricle. Systolic dominance of phasic flow was more pronounced at lower pump speeds, due to normalization of the diseased heart's Starling response. When the aortic valve was closed continuously, echocardiographic contrast (indicating blood stasis) was noted in the aortic root. Because of the pump outflow graft's proximity to the chest wall, device output could be measured independently of cardiac contributions. Mean peak outflow-graft flow velocities were 0.75 ± 0.30 m/s (systolic) and 0.41 ± 0.13 m/s (diastolic). When the pump was turned off briefly, there was minimal regurgitation through the device into the left ventricle. This 1st echocardiographic heart function analysis of the Jarvik 2000 confirms that the device unloads the ventricle and increases cardiac output. Cardiac responses to device-speed changes can be evaluated readily with echocardiography in the early and late postoperative period. PMID:16392203

  20. Characterization of mechanical and geometrical properties of a tube with axial and circumferential guided waves.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Cheng-Hung; Yang, Che-Hua

    2011-05-01

    Guided waves propagating in cylindrical tubes are frequently applied for the characterization of material or geometrical properties of tubes. In a tube, guided waves can propagate in the axial direction and called axial guided waves, or in the circumferential direction called circumferential guided waves. Dispersion spectra for the axial and circumferential guided waves share some common behaviors and however exhibit some particular behaviors of their own. This study provides an investigation with theoretical modeling, experimental measurements, and a simplex-based inversion procedure to explore the similarity and difference between the axial guided waves and circumferential guided waves, aiming at providing useful information while axial and circumferential guided waves are applied in the area of material characterization. The sensitivity to the radius curvature for the circumferential guided waves dispersion spectra is a major point that makes circumferential guided waves different from axial guided waves. For the purpose of material characterization, both axial and circumferential guided waves are able to extract an elastic moduli and wall-thickness information from the dispersion spectra, however, radius information can only be extracted from the circumferential guided waves spectra. PMID:21211810

  1. Cumulative Axial and Torsional Fatigue: An Investigation of Load-Type Sequencing Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2000-01-01

    Cumulative fatigue behavior of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188 was investigated at 538 C under various single-step sequences of axial and torsional loading conditions. Initially, fully-reversed, axial and torsional fatigue tests were conducted under strain control at 538 C on thin-walled tubular specimens to establish baseline fatigue life relationships. Subsequently, four sequences (axial/axial, torsional/torsional, axial/torsional, and torsional/axial) of two load-level fatigue tests were conducted to characterize both the load-order (high/low) and load-type sequencing effects. For the two load-level tests, summations of life fractions and the remaining fatigue lives at the second load-level were computed by the Miner's Linear Damage Rule (LDR) and a nonlinear Damage Curve Approach (DCA). In general, for all four cases predictions by LDR were unconservative. Predictions by the DCA were within a factor of two of the experimentally observed fatigue lives for a majority of the cumulative axial and torsional fatigue tests.

  2. Axial Shear Strain Imaging for Differentiating Benign and Malignant Breast Masses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiyan; Rao, Min; Varghese, Tomy; Sommer, Amy; Baker, Sara; Hall, Timothy J; Sisney, Gale A; Burnside, Elizabeth S

    2010-01-01

    Axial strain imaging has been utilized for the characterization of breast masses for over a decade; however, another important feature namely the shear strain distribution around breast masses has only recently been used. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of utilizing in-vivo axial-shear strain imaging for differentiating benign from malignant breast masses. Radiofrequency data was acquired using a VFX 13-5 linear array transducer on 41 patients using a Siemens SONOLINE Antares real-time clinical scanner at the University of Wisconsin Breast Cancer Center. Free-hand palpation using deformations of up to 10% was utilized to generate axial strain and axial-shear strain images using a two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithm from the radiofrequency data loops. Axial-shear strain areas normalized to the lesion size, applied strain and lesion strain contrast was utilized as a feature for differentiating benign from malignant masses. The normalized axial-shear strain area feature estimated on 8 patients with malignant tumors and 33 patients with fibroadenomas was utilized to demonstrate its potential for lesion differentiation. Biopsy results were considered the diagnostic standard for comparison. Our results indicate that the normalized axial-shear strain area is significantly larger for malignant tumors when compared to benign masses such as fibroadenomas. Axial-shear strain pixel values greater than a specified threshold, including only those with correlation coefficient values greater than 0.75, were overlaid on the corresponding B-mode image to aid in diagnosis. A scatter plot of the normalized area feature demonstrates the feasibility of developing a linear classifier to differentiate benign from malignant masses. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve utilizing the normalized axial-shear strain area feature was 0.996, demonstrating the potential of this feature to noninvasively differentiate between benign and malignant breast masses

  3. The Influence of the Diameter Ratio on the Characteristics Diagram of the Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, B.; Pflueger, F.; Weinig, F.

    1948-01-01

    With the further development of axial blowers into highly loaded flow machines, the influence of the diameter ratio upon air output and efficiency gains in significance. Clarification of this matter is important for single-stage axial compressors, and is of still greater importance for multistage ones, and particularly for aircraft power plants. Tests with a single-stage axial blower gave a decrease in the attainable maximum pressure coefficient and optimum efficiency as the diameter ratio increased. The decrease must be ascribed chiefly to the guide surface of the hub and housing between the blades increasing with the diameter ratio.

  4. Axial couplings of heavy hadrons from domain-wall lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    W. Detmold, C.J.D. Lin, S. Meinel

    2011-12-01

    We calculate matrix elements of the axial current for static-light mesons and baryons in lattice QCD with dynamical domain wall fermions. We use partially quenched heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory in a finite volume to extract the axial couplings g{sub 1}, g{sub 2}, and g{sub 3} from the data. These axial couplings allow the prediction of strong decay rates and enter chiral extrapolations of most lattice results in the b sector. Our calculations are performed with two lattice spacings and with pion masses down to 227 MeV.

  5. Effect of axial load on mode shapes and frequencies of beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of axial load on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of uniform beams and of a cantilevered beam with a concentrated mass at the tip is presented. Characteristic equations which yield the frequencies and mode shape functions for the various cases are given. The solutions to these equations are presented by a series of graphs so that frequency as a function of axial load can readily be determined. The effect of axial load on the mode shapes are also depicted by another series of graphs.

  6. Critical combinations of shear and direct axial stress for curved rectangular panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schildcrout, Murry; Stein, Manuel

    1949-01-01

    A solution is presented for the problem of the buckling of curved rectangular panels subjected to combined shear and direct axial stress. Charts giving theoretical critical combinations of shear and direct axial stress are presented for panels having five different length-width ratios. Because the actual critical compressive stress of rectangular panels having substantial curvature is known to be much lower than the theoretical value, a semiempirical method of analysis of curved panels subjected to combined shear and direct axial stress is presented for use in design. (author

  7. Axial segregation of horizontally vibrated binary granular mixtures in an offset-Christmas tree channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhateja, Ashish; Sharma, Ishan; Singh, Jayant K.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate segregation in a horizontally vibrated binary granular mixture in a closed offset-Christmas tree channel. The segregation phenomenon occurs in two steps: vertical sorting followed by axial segregation. In the first step, sorting occurs via Brazil-nut effect or reverse Brazil-nut effect depending on the particles' size and density ratios. The two layers thus formed then separate axially towards opposite-ends of the channel with the top layer always moving towards root of the Christmas tree. We discuss the segregation mechanism responsible for axial segregation.

  8. A data acquisition and control program for axial-torsional fatigue testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    A computer program was developed for data acquisition and control of axial-torsional fatigue experiments. The multitasked, interrupt-driven program was written in Pascal and Assembly. This program is capable of dual-channel control and six-channel data acquisition. It can be utilized to perform inphase and out-of-phase axial-torsional isothermal fatigue or deformation experiments. The program was successfully used to conduct inphase axial-torsional fatigue experiments on 304 stainless steel at room temperature and on Hastelloy X at 800 C. The details of the software and some of the results generated to date are presented.

  9. Axial current generation by P-odd domains in QCD matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Yin, Yi; Lin, Shu

    2015-06-23

    The dynamics of topological domains which break parity (P) and charge-parity (CP) symmetry of QCD are studied. We derive in a general setting that those local domains will generate an axial current and quantify the strength of the induced axial current. Thus, our findings are verified in a top-down holographic model. The relation between the real time dynamics of those local domains and the chiral magnetic field is also elucidated. We finally argue that such an induced axial current would be phenomenologically important in a heavy-ion collisions experiment.

  10. Axial-thrust responses due to a gas turbine's rotor blade distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebele-Alawa, B. T.

    2010-11-01

    The axial thrust imposed on the shaft of a gas turbine depends upon its rotor blade inlet inclination to the turbine's axial direction: this inclination can change due to the distortions resulting from fouling, aging, tip rubbing, erosion, thermal-fatigue cracks, and corrosion. Relevant influential parameters for an operational gas turbine were measured. Theoretical predictions for the behavior of the same turbine were obtained from computer simulations. The results of both measurements and theoretical predictions were compared and showed qualitative correspondence. The rotor blade profile distortions result in significant increases in the axial thrust on the compressor, which adversely affects the gas turbine's thermodynamic performance, reliability, and operational life.

  11. Understanding differences between healthy swallows and penetration-aspiration swallows via compressive sensing of tri-axial swallowing accelerometry signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejdić, Ervin; Dudik, Joshua M.; Kurosu, Atsuko; Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L.

    2014-05-01

    Swallowing accelerometry is a promising tool for non-invasive assessment of swallowing difficulties. A recent contribution showed that swallowing accelerometry signals for healthy swallows and swallows indicating laryn- geal penetration or tracheal aspiration have different time-frequency structures, which may be problematic for compressive sensing schemes based on time-frequency dictionaries. In this paper, we examined the effects of dif- ferent swallows on the accuracy of a compressive sensing scheme based on modulated discrete prolate spheroidal sequences. We utilized tri-axial swallowing accelerometry signals recorded from four patients during routinely schedule videofluoroscopy exams. In particular, we considered 77 swallows approximately equally distributed between healthy swallows and swallows presenting with some penetration/aspiration. Our results indicated that the swallow type does not affect the accuracy of a considered compressive sensing scheme. Also, the results con- firmed previous findings that each individual axis contributes different information. Our findings are important for further developments of a device which is to be used for long-term monitoring of swallowing difficulties.

  12. Internal flows and force matrices in axial flow inducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    1994-01-01

    Axial flow inducers such as those used in high speed rocket engine turbopumps are subject to complex internal flows and fluid-induced lateral and rotordynamic forces. An investigation of these internal flows was conducted using boundary layer flow visualization on the blades, hub and housing of unshrouded and shrouded inducers. Results showed that the blade boundary layer flows have strong radial components at off-design conditions and remain attached to the blade surface at all flow coefficients tested. The origin of upstream swirling backflow was found to be at the discharge plane of the inducer. In addition, flow reversal was observed at the suction side blade tip near the leading edge in a shrouded inducer. Re-entry of the hub boundary layer flow, a downstream backflow, into the blade passage area was observed at flow coefficients below design. For unshrouded inducers the radially outward flow near the blade tip mixed with the leakage flow to form the upstream backflow. The lateral and rotordynamic forces acting on an inducer due to an imposed whirl motion was also investigated at various flow coefficients. It was found that the rotordynamic force data at various whirl frequency ratios does not allow a normal quadratic fit; consequently the conventional inertial, stiffness and damping coefficients cannot be obtained and a definite whirl ratio describing the instability region does not result. Application of an actuator disk theory proved to be inaccurate in estimating the rotordynamic tangential force in a non-whirling inducer. The effect of upstream and downstream flow distortions on the rotordynamic and lateral forces on an inducer were studied. It was found that at flow coefficients below design, large lateral forces occurred in the presence of a downstream asymmetry. Results of inlet distortion experiments show that a strong inlet shear causes a significant increase in the lateral force. Cavitation was found to have important consequences for fluid

  13. Refinement of non-synchronous vibrations prediction in axial compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drolet, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Non-Synchronous Vibrations (NSV), along with classical flutter, are part of the Flow-Induced Vibrations (FIV) family observed in turbomachineries. FIV are typically caused by the interaction of the unsteady aerodynamic loading on a structure and the structure itself and can be generally classified into two categories, which are Forced Responses and Fluid-Elastic Instabilities. The latter regroups NSV and classical flutter. A number of NSV cases have been reported in the industry, in the front stages of axial compressors, and are typically known to cause high-cycle fatigue damages. However, the physical mechanism underlying NSV is not yet fully understood and universally accepted. Previous studies have suggested that the tip clearance flow oscillations, which are more likely to occur at large tip clearances and high aerodynamic blade loading, could explain NSV. It was also suggested that NSV could arise from the impingement of the tip clearance flow leakage on the blade pressure side and that the study of the dynamics of impinging jets could explain NSV. A model to predict the critical speed at which NSV are likely to occur was derived, based on the resonant impinging jet analogy. The model was statistically verified and experimentally demonstrated. Although the proposed model provides a very good approximation of the critical NSV speed, it was found very sensitive to what was defined as the "instability convection coefficient" (k). It was found from experiments that the proposed NSV model can only yield accurate predictions of the critical NSV speed if the k parameter is known. This work investigates NSV based on the proposed model and the resonant impinging jet analogy, mainly using CFD, to improve the critical NSV speed predictions. The results showed that the k parameter is influenced by both the tip clearance size and operating temperature. However, the dominant effect appears to come from the tip clearance size while the effect of temperature on k can be

  14. Atomization of water jets and sheets in axial and swirling airflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Axial and swirling airflows were used to break up water jets and sheets into sprays of droplets to determine the overall effects of orifice diameter, weight flow of air, and the use of an air swirler on fineness of atomization as characterized by mean drop size. A scanning radiometer was used to determine the mean drop diameter of each spray. Swirling airflows were produced with an axial combustor, 70 deg blake angle, air swirling. Water jets were injected axially upstream, axially downstream and cross stream into the airflow. In addition, pressure atomizing fuel nozzles which produced a sheet and ligament type of breakup were investigated. Increasing the weight flow rate of air or the use of an air swirling markedly reduced the spray mean drop size.

  15. Circularly polarised printed antenna with wide axial-ratio bandwidth using strip dipoles and slots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, K.

    1983-10-01

    A circularly polarised series-fed printed-array antenna having a wide axial-ratio bandwidth (for an axial ratio of less than 3 dB) is realised by combining strip dipoles with slots. To form a free-space dipole, i.e. a complementary radiator to a slot, the strip dipole is constructed by modifying the strip radiator of a circularly polarised antenna. Several experiments verify that the strip dipole behaves like a free-space dipole. A design procedure of the circularly polarised printed antenna with a wide axial-ratio bandwidth is described. On the basis of the design procedure, two types of the array antenna having different strip-dipole spacings are made and measured at S-band. An axial-ratio bandwidth of about 27 percent is obtained for the three sets of the radiators, although the actual gain is less than 0 dBi because the impedance matching is neglected.

  16. Method of characteristics for three-dimensional axially symmetrical supersonic flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R

    1947-01-01

    An approximation method for three-dimensional axially symmetrical supersonic flows is developed; it is based on the characteristics theory (represented partly graphically, partly analytically). Thereafter this method is applied to the construction of rotationally symmetrical nozzles. (author)

  17. Axial Vibration Characteristics Considering a Moving Pick-Up Unit for the Flexible Optical Disk System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jun Hyeon; Rhim, Yoon Chul

    2011-09-01

    The axial vibration characteristics of the flexible optical disk are investigated experimentally considering the pick-up window and the geometry of a moving pick-up. The axial runout of the disk is measured by using a laser displacement sensor along the four perpendicular radial directions. Measurements are conducted with respect to the shapes of pick-up faces, which have different radius of curvatures, as well as to the positions of the moving pick-up. A flat stabilizer with damping orifices is used in the experiment and the disk is rotated at 8,000, 10,000, and 12,000 rpm. The axial runouts and the displacements of the disk are measured for 6 different shaped pick-ups. The smallest axial runout of 10 µm, which is well manageable for the current optical disk drive technology, is obtained when we use the curved pick-up with curvatures of 400 mm in the direction of disk rotation.

  18. Magnetic properties of FeCo laminates subjected to axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgut, Z.; Horwath, J. C.; Huang, M. Q.; Fingers, R. T.

    2003-05-01

    While manufacturing the stator/rotor assemblies of the aircraft power components, increased power losses are typically pronounced due to an imposed axial load onto the stack of magnetic laminates to increase the rigidity of the stack. An axial loader to enable core loss measurements to be made while the laminate stack is subjected to an axial load has been designed. The apparatus and multilayered slotted interface plates, allowing for the toroidal windings and simultaneous load application were used to evaluate the effect of compression up to 27.5 MPa on magnetic properties of commercially available Fe-Co based Hiperco® 50, Hiperco® 50 HS, and Hiperco® 27 alloys. For each composition, we tested two sets of samples: (1) completely insulated and (2) uninsulated. We report the increased losses due to an axial load and discuss the origin of these increased losses in terms of constant size anisotropy for completely insulated laminates.

  19. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor-fuel-module construction. [LWBR

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, G.K.; DiGuiseppe, C.P.

    1982-10-28

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wherein the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements.

  20. Principal Effects of Axial Load on Moment-Distribution Analysis of Rigid Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Benjamin Wylie

    1935-01-01

    This thesis presents the method of moment distribution modified to include the effect of axial load upon the bending moments. This modification makes it possible to analyze accurately complex structures, such as rigid fuselage trusses, that heretofore had to be analyzed by approximate formulas and empirical rules. The method is simple enough to be practicable even for complex structures, and it gives a means of analysis for continuous beams that is simpler than the extended three-moment equation now in common use. When the effect of axial load is included, it is found that the basic principles of moment distribution remain unchanged, the only difference being that the factors used, instead of being constants for a given member, become functions of the axial load. Formulas have been developed for these factors, and curves plotted so that their applications requires no more work than moment distribution without axial load. Simple problems have been included to illustrate the use of the curves.

  1. The Role of Computed Axial Tomography in the Study of the Child with Minimal Brain Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, J. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    It was concluded that computed axial tomography of the brain is not a necessary screening procedure in the evaluation of the child with minimal brain dysfunction or learning disabilities unless there is evidence of a focal neurologic deficit. (Author)

  2. Melt Motion Due to Peltier Marking During Bridgman Crystal Growth with an Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, C. C.; Walker, John S.; Szofran, Frank R.; Motakef, Shariar

    2000-01-01

    This paper treats a liquid-metal flow inside an electrically insulating cylinder with electrically conducting solids above and below the liquid region. There is a uniform axial magnetic field, and there is an electric current through the liquid and both solids. Since the lower liquid-solid interface is concave into the solid and since the liquid is a better electrical conductor than the adjacent solid, the electric current is locally concentrated near the centerline. The return to a uniform current distribution involves a radial electric current which interacts with the axial magnetic field to drive an azimuthal flow. The axial variation of the centrifugal force due to the azimuthal velocity drives a meridional circulation with radial and axial velocities. This problem models the effects of Peltier marking during the vertical Bridgman growth of semiconductor crystals with an externally applied magnetic field, where the meridional circulation due to the Peltier Current may produce important mixing in the molten semiconductor.

  3. Controllable rectification of the axial expansion in the thermally driven artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Donghua; Zhang, Xingyi; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, You-He

    2015-09-01

    At present, the concept of artificial muscle twisted by polymers or fibers has become a hot issue in the field of intelligent material research according to its distinguishing advantages, e.g., high energy density, large-stroke, non-hysteresis, and inexpensive. The axial thermal expansion coefficient is an important parameter which can affect its demanding applications. In this letter, a device with high accuracy capacitive sensor is constructed to measure the axial thermal expansion coefficient of the twisted carbon fibers and yarns of Kevlar, and a theoretical model based on the thermal elasticity and the geometrical features of the twisted structure are also presented to predict the axial expansion coefficient. It is found that the calculated results take good agreements with the experimental data. According to the present experiment and analyses, a method to control the axial thermal expansion coefficient of artificial muscle is proposed. Moreover, the mechanism of this kind of thermally driven artificial muscle is discussed.

  4. 3. Axial view of Bridge Number 324.99 from midspan, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Axial view of Bridge Number 324.99 from mid-span, view to north-northeast, 135mm lens. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 324.99, Milepost 324.99, Shasta Springs, Siskiyou County, CA

  5. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, William BJ J

    2016-01-01

    A technical basis for peak reactivity boiling water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) methods was recently generated, and the technical basis for extended BWR BUC is now being developed. In this paper, a number of effects related to extended BWR BUC are analyzed, including three major operational effects in BWRs: the coolant density axial distribution, the use of control blades during operation, and the axial burnup profile. Specifically, uniform axial moderator density profiles are analyzed and compared to previous results and an additional temporal fidelity study combing moderator density profiles for three different fuel assemblies is presented. Realistic control blade histories and cask criticality results are compared to previously generated constructed control blade histories. Finally, a preliminary study of the axial burnup profile is provided.

  6. Selective suppression of high order axial modes of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Pao, K. F.; Fan, C. T.; Chang, T. H.; Chiu, C. C.; Chu, K. R.

    2007-09-15

    Selective suppression of high order axial modes of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) is investigated in theory and in experiment. The gyro-BWO interaction is much more efficient in a down-tapered interaction structure, while it is also more susceptible to the problem of axial mode competition in such a structure. Because higher order axial modes (at a higher oscillation frequency) penetrate deeper into the interaction structure, application of distributed wall loss at the downstream end of the interaction structure is shown to be effective for selective suppression of these modes with minor effects on the efficiency of the desired fundamental axial mode. A stable gyro-BWO operating in a single mode throughout the entire beam pulse is demonstrated on the basis of this principle. Theoretical and experimental results are found to be in good agreement.

  7. Chemical potential of water from measurements of optic axial angle of zeolites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donald, Eberlein G.; Christ, C.L.

    1968-01-01

    Values of the uncorrected optic axial angle (2H??) of a crystal of the calcium zeolite stellerite (CaAl2Si7O 18 ?? 7H2O) immersed in calcium chloride solutions of known activity of water (aw) are directly proportional to log aw. A general relationship between the chemical potential of water in the crystal and the optic axial angle is obeyed.

  8. Effect of flow maldistribution and axial conduction on compact microchannel heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwhan; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-03-01

    When a compact microchannel heat exchanger is operated at cryogenic environments, it has potential problems of axial conduction and flow maldistribution. To analyze these detrimental effects, the heat exchanger model that includes both axial conduction and flow maldistribution effect is developed in consideration of the microchannel heat exchanger geometry. A dimensionless axial conduction parameter (λ) is used to describe the axial conduction effect, and the coefficient of variation (CoV) is introduced to quantify the flow maldistribution condition. The effectiveness of heat exchanger is calculated according to the various values of the axial conduction parameter and the CoV. The analysis results show that the heat exchanger effectiveness is insensitive when λ is less than 0.005, and effectiveness is degraded with the large value of CoV. Three microchannel heat exchangers are fabricated with printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) technology for validation purpose of the heat exchanger model. The first heat exchanger is a conventional heat exchanger, the second heat exchanger has the modified cross section to eliminate axial conduction effect, and the third heat exchanger has the modified cross section and the cross link in parallel channel to mitigate flow maldistribution effect. These heat exchangers are tested in cryogenic single-phase, and two-phase environments. The third heat exchanger shows the ideal thermal characteristic, while the other two heat exchangers experience some performance degradation due to axial conduction or flow maldistribution. The impact of axial conduction and flow maldistribution effects are verified by the simulation results and compared with the experimental results.

  9. Effects of shaft supporting structure on performance test of axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Liu, S. L.; Li, M. X.; Zheng, S. Y.

    2016-05-01

    CFD numerical simulation combined with theoretical analysis are used to research and discuss the obstructing effect, caused by the supporting structure of torsion meter and connecting shaft, on the outlet airflow of axial-flow fan in type-C ducted inlet device. The relations between axial flow fan's total pressure efficiency and flow rate are studied when the distance between supporting structure and outlet section is different, which may provide a reference for the proper design of the performance test device.

  10. Radiative corrections to the nucleon axial vector coupling constant in the chiral soliton quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Duck, I. )

    1993-04-01

    Second-order radiative corrections to the nucleon axial vector coupling constant from gluon, pion, and sigma meson exchange are calculated in the chiral soliton quark model. Many apparent processes are found not to contribute. The soliton is elastically decoupled from meson radiative corrections which are dominated by a gluon exchange contribution equivalent to a gluonic hybrid component of the nucleon. A 30% radiative reduction of the axial coupling strength is indicated.

  11. Thermal Analysis of Axially Grooved Heat Pipes. [under zero-g condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The liquid viscous drag and the evaporator film coefficient were determined analytically for a heat pipe with axial rectangular grooves under zero-g conditions. The liquid pressure drop and the evaporator film coefficient for an axially grooved heat pipe were found to be expressed by the functions of the meniscus angle, which makes it possible to predict its performance analytically. The performance near its capillary pumping limit is influenced by the contact angle.

  12. Nature of Axial Tail Instability and Bubble-Blob Formation in Near-Earth Plasma Sheet*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Raeder, J.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Previous global MHD simulations of substorm events have identified the dynamic presence of an axial tail instability with dawn-dusk symmetry in the near-Earth plasma sheet as a major cause of the initial loss of MHD equilibrium on closed field lines prior to the subsequent magnetic reconnection and substorm expansion onset processes [Raeder et al. 2010; Siscoe et al. 2009]. In this work, energy principle analysis indicates that a two-dimensional thin current sheet configuration in the magnetotail is typically stable to the axial mode within the framework of ideal MHD model. Linear resistive MHD calculations find axial tail instabilities on closed field lines in the generalized Harris sheet configurations. The properties of these instabilities are similar to the axial tail modes observed in the global MHD simulations. The axial tail mode is unstable in regimes of low Lundquist number and regions with small normal component of magnetic field. Mode growth and structure show both similarities and differences in comparison to the linear resistive tearing mode of a one-dimensional Harris sheet. Unlike the conventional tearing mode of Harris sheet, the linear axial tail instability does not involve any reconnection process. Instead, the nature of the mode is dominantly an interchange or slippage process among neighboring flux tubes as facilitated by dissipations such as resistivity. The formation of bubble-blob pairs in pressure and entropy distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet is shown to be a natural component as well as consequence of this axial instability process. *Supported by NSF grants AGS-0902360 and PHY-0821899. REFERENCES: Raeder, J., P. Zhu, Y. Ge, and G. Siscoe (2010), Open Geospace General Circulation Model simulation of a substorm: Axial tail instability and ballooning mode preceding substorm onset, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A00I16, doi:10.1029/2010JA015876. Siscoe, G. L., M. M. Kuznetsova, and J. Raeder (2009), Search for an onset mechanism that

  13. Investigation of Structural Dynamics in a 2-Meter Square Solar Sail Model Including Axial Load Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, D. B.; Virgin, L. N.; Belvin, W. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a parameter study of the effect of boom axial loading on the global dynamics of a 2-meter solar sail scale model. The experimental model used is meant for building expertise in finite element analysis and experimental execution, not as a predecessor to any planned flight mission or particular design concept. The results here are to demonstrate the ability to predict and measure structural dynamics and mode shapes in the presence of axial loading.

  14. Axial-vector dominance predictions in quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, J. E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.

    2016-03-01

    The axial form factor plays a crucial role in quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering, but the error of the theoretical cross section due to uncertainties of GA remains to be established. Conversely, the extraction of GA from the neutrino nucleus cross section suffers from large systematic errors due to nuclear model dependencies, while the use of single-parameter dipole fits underestimates the errors and prevents an identification of the relevant kinematics for this determination. We propose to use a generalized axial-vector-meson dominance in conjunction with large-Nc and high-energy QCD constraints to model the nucleon axial form factor, as well as the half-width rule as an a priori uncertainty estimate. The minimal hadronic ansatz comprises the sum of two monopoles corresponding to the lightest axial-vector mesons being coupled to the axial current. The parameters of the resulting axial form factor are the masses and widths of the two axial mesons as obtained from the averaged Particle Data Group values. By applying the half-width rule in a Monte Carlo simulation, a distribution of theoretical predictions can then be generated for the neutrino-nucleus quasielastic cross section. We test the model by applying it to the (νμ,μ ) quasielastic cross section from 12 for the kinematics of the MiniBooNE experiment. The resulting predictions have no free parameters. We find that the relativistic Fermi gas model globally reproduces the experimental data, giving χ2/# bins=0.81 . A Q2-dependent error analysis of the neutrino data shows that the uncertainties in the axial form factor GA(Q2) are comparable to the ones induced by the a priori half-width rule. We identify the most sensitive region to be in the range 0.2 ≲Q2≲0.6 GeV2 .

  15. Interaction of axial and oblique astigmatism in theoretical and physical eye models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Thibos, Larry N

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between oblique and axial astigmatism was investigated analytically (generalized Coddington's equations) and numerically (ray tracing) for a theoretical eye model with a single refracting surface. A linear vector-summation rule for power vector descriptions of axial and oblique astigmatism was found to account for their interaction over the central 90° diameter of the visual field. This linear summation rule was further validated experimentally using a physical eye model measured with a laboratory scanning aberrometer. We then used the linear summation rule to evaluate the relative contributions of axial and oblique astigmatism to the total astigmatism measured across the central visual field. In the central visual field, axial astigmatism dominates because the oblique astigmatism is negligible near the optical axis. At intermediate eccentricities, axial and oblique astigmatism may have equal magnitude but orthogonal axes, which nullifies total astigmatism at two locations in the visual field. At more peripheral locations, oblique astigmatism dominates axial astigmatism, and the axes of total astigmatism become radially oriented, which is a trait of oblique astigmatism. When eccentricity is specified relative to a foveal line-of-sight that is displaced from the eye's optical axis, asymmetries in the visual field map of total astigmatism can be used to locate the optical axis empirically and to estimate the relative contributions of axial and oblique astigmatism at any retinal location, including the fovea. We anticipate the linear summation rule will benefit many topics in vision science (e.g., peripheral correction, emmetropization, meridional amblyopia) by providing improved understanding of how axial and oblique astigmatism interact to produce net astigmatism. PMID:27607493

  16. Localized axial Green's function method for the convection-diffusion equations in arbitrary domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wanho; Kim, Do Wan

    2014-10-01

    A localized axial Green's function method (LAGM) is proposed for the convection-diffusion equation. The axial Green's function method (AGM) enables us to calculate the numerical solution of a multi-dimensional problem using only one-dimensional Green's functions for the axially split differential operators. This AGM has been developed not only for the elliptic boundary value problems but also for the steady Stokes flows, however, this paper is concerned with the localization of the AGM. This localization of the method is needed for practical purpose when computing the axial Green's function, specifically for the convection-diffusion equation on a line segment that we call the local axial line. Although our focus is mainly on the convection-dominated cases in arbitrary domains, this method can solve other cases in a unified way. Numerical results show that, despite irregular types of discretization on an arbitrary domain, we can calculate the numerical solutions using the LAGM without loss of accuracy even in cases of large convection. In particular, it is also shown that randomly distributed axial lines are available in our LAGM and complicated domains are not a burden.

  17. Recommendations for Addressing Axial Burnup in the PWR Burnup Credit Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-10-23

    This report presents studies performed to support the development of a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial-burnup distribution in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The effect of the axial-burnup distribution on reactivity and proposed approaches for addressing the axial-burnup distribution are briefly reviewed. A publicly available database of profiles is examined in detail to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, assess its adequacy for PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. A statistical evaluation of the k{sub eff} values associated with the profiles in the axial-burnup-profile database was performed, and the most reactive (bounding) profiles were identified as statistical outliers. The impact of these bounding profiles on k{sub eff} is quantified for a high-density burnup credit cask. Analyses are also presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of loading assemblies with axial-burnup profiles that are not bounded by the database. The report concludes with a discussion on the issues for consideration and recommendations for addressing axial burnup in criticality safety analyses using burnup credit for dry cask storage and transportation.

  18. Axial Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia Is Caused by C21orf2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Fujita, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Toru; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Albalwi, Mohammed A.; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lim, Gye-Yeon; Isidor, Bertrand; David, Albert; Rustad, Cecilie F.; Merckoll, Else; Westvik, Jostein; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Kou, Ikuyo; Nakajima, Masahiro; Ohashi, Hirohumi; Smithson, Sarah; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Axial spondylometaphyseal dysplasia (axial SMD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by dysplasia of axial skeleton and retinal dystrophy. We conducted whole exome sequencing and identified C21orf2 (chromosome 21 open reading frame 2) as a disease gene for axial SMD. C21orf2 mutations have been recently found to cause isolated retinal degeneration and Jeune syndrome. We found a total of five biallelic C21orf2 mutations in six families out of nine: three missense and two splicing mutations in patients with various ethnic backgrounds. The pathogenic effects of the splicing (splice-site and branch-point) mutations were confirmed on RNA level, which showed complex patterns of abnormal splicing. C21orf2 mutations presented with a wide range of skeletal phenotypes, including cupped and flared anterior ends of ribs, lacy ilia and metaphyseal dysplasia of proximal femora. Analysis of patients without C21orf2 mutation indicated genetic heterogeneity of axial SMD. Functional data in chondrocyte suggest C21orf2 is implicated in cartilage differentiation. C21orf2 protein was localized to the connecting cilium of the cone and rod photoreceptors, confirming its significance in retinal function. Our study indicates that axial SMD is a member of a unique group of ciliopathy affecting skeleton and retina. PMID:26974433

  19. Stabilizing effects of ankle bracing under a combination of inversion and axial compression loading.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Harukazu; Yasuda, Kazunori; Beynnon, Bruce D; Renstrom, Per A

    2006-04-01

    The combined effects of bracing, axial compression and inversion rotation on the ankle-subtalar complexes were evaluated. Ex vivo tests under the load-controlled condition were performed on six cadaver ankle specimens using a six degree-of-freedom fixture. Inversion rotation was measured while subjecting the ankle-subtalar complex to a 2.5 N-m inversion moment and a combination of the testing variables (brace type, no brace, 178 N axial compression load, no compression load, 0 degrees and 20 degrees of plantar flexion) for a total of 16 tests per specimen. Three commercially available braces (two semirigid types and one lace up type) were evaluated. An axial compression load significantly decreased ankle-subtalar motion in unbraced ankles for the tested inversion moment. The contribution of bracing to stabilization of the ankle was smaller in the axial loading condition than in the no axial loading condition. The semirigid braces had greater stabilizing effects in response to the inversion moment than the lace up brace. Stabilizing effects of bracing were significantly greater in 20 degrees of plantar flexion than in 0 degrees of plantar flexion. The most common mechanism for an ankle sprain injury is inversion rotation on a weight-bearing ankle. Therefore, we should not overestimate stabilizing effects of bracing from evaluations of bracing without axial compression loading. PMID:15959767

  20. Conformational effects of peripheral substituents and axial ligands in sterically crowded porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Nurco, D.J.; Smith, K.M.; Fajer, J.

    1997-12-31

    Crystallographic results for peripherally substituted porphyrins illustrate effects of steric crowding, axial ligation and {pi}-{pi} interactions on the structures of metalloporphyrins that begin to resemble the architectures found for porphyrinic prosthetic groups and chromophores in vivo. (1) Metalloporphyrins with multiple peripheral substituents can adopt planar, saddled, ruffled or {open_quotes}wavy{close_quotes} conformations that persist upon axial ligation of the metal. (2) In porphyrins with substituents at all peripheral positions, the substituents form pockets that force the axial ligands to align in specific orientations relative to each other and to the axes defined by the porphyrin estrogens. (3) The enforced alignment of the axial ligands caused by the substituent pocket prevents aromatic ligands from rotating around the coordination axis with intriguing consequences: the axial ligands can be forced to tip off axis because of steric crowding by adjacent molecules in the crystal lattice. (4) In porphyrins with meso substituents only, the axial ligands are free to rotate but {pi}-{pi} interactions and collacial stacking between adjacent molecules in the crystal also induce off-axis ligand tilts.

  1. Discovery of the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, B.; Nooner, S. L.; Butterfield, D. A.; Lilley, M. D.; Clague, D. A.; Caress, D. W.; Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    A new lava flow was discovered on the seafloor at Axial Seamount during an expedition in late July on R/V Atlantis with ROV Jason to conduct time-series monitoring and sampling. Major changes in depth, lava morphology, and the burial of pre-existing markers, monuments, and instruments made it clear that the new lava had not been there during the previous visit in August 2010. Pre-existing high-resolution bathymetry in the area aided in recognizing that the seafloor had changed significantly. The 2011 lava appears to have been erupted along the upper south rift, in a similar location to the 1998 eruption. The 2011 lava appears to be constrained by pre-existing topography to the east, but flowed at least 2 km downslope to the west, where it fills pre-existing channels and basins, and came with 170 m of the ASHES vent field near the SW caldera wall. The morphology of the 2011 lava is pillowed near the thin margins of the flows, and lobate elsewhere. The thin margins are the only places where the 2011 lava appears black, shiny, and new. Elsewhere where the lava is thicker it is covered by an orange/tan "eruption mat" (also observed after the 1998 eruption) that appears to be hydrothermal in origin, and is probably associated with cooling of the flow. In such places the 2011 lava looks deceptively "old". No collapse features were observed in the 2011 lavas, in marked contrast to the 1998 lava flow. This suggests that the 2011 eruption was longer-lived and larger in volume, consistent with the longer flow lengths. A fuller view of the extent of the 2011 lava flows will be provided by a coordinated re-survey collected with the MBARI mapping AUV on the heels of our Atlantis cruise. Hydrothermal venting on the 2011 lava flow was limited to isolated snow-blower vents and pre-existing vent sites, but we likely did not find all the sources of new venting in our limited dive time, based on the extremely poor visibility near the seafloor. CTD casts showed near bottom plumes up

  2. Galaxias australes con núcleo doble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, G.; Díaz, R.; Carranza, G.

    Se estudia una muestra de galaxias australes con núcleo doble a partir de una búsqueda extensiva en la literatura. Se analizan las características morfológicas, fotométricas y espectroscópicas de la muestra. Para algunas galaxias se han realizado observaciones con el espectrógrafo multifunción (EMF) de la Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre a partir de las cuales se determinaron parámetros cinemáticos.

  3. Axial interactions in the mixed-valent CuA active site and role of the axial methionine in electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Li; Hadt, Ryan G.; Marshall, Nicholas M.; Wilson, Tiffany D.; Lu, Yi; Solomon, Edward I.

    2013-01-01

    Within Cu-containing electron transfer active sites, the role of the axial ligand in type 1 sites is well defined, yet its role in the binuclear mixed-valent CuA sites is less clear. Recently, the mutation of the axial Met to Leu in a CuA site engineered into azurin (CuA Az) was found to have a limited effect on E0 relative to this mutation in blue copper (BC). Detailed low-temperature absorption and magnetic circular dichroism, resonance Raman, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on CuA Az (WT) and its M123X (X = Q, L, H) axial ligand variants indicated stronger axial ligation in M123L/H. Spectroscopically validated density functional theory calculations show that the smaller ΔE0 is attributed to H2O coordination to the Cu center in the M123L mutant in CuA but not in the equivalent BC variant. The comparable stabilization energy of the oxidized over the reduced state in CuA and BC (CuA ∼ 180 mV; BC ∼ 250 mV) indicates that the S(Met) influences E0 similarly in both. Electron delocalization over two Cu centers in CuA was found to minimize the Jahn–Teller distortion induced by the axial Met ligand and lower the inner-sphere reorganization energy. The Cu–S(Met) bond in oxidized CuA is weak (5.2 kcal/mol) but energetically similar to that of BC, which demonstrates that the protein matrix also serves an entatic role in keeping the Met bound to the active site to tune down E0 while maintaining a low reorganization energy required for rapid electron transfer under physiological conditions. PMID:23964128

  4. Ocular Axial Length and Its Associations in Chinese: The Beijing Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guo; Wang, Ya Xing; Zheng, Zhi Yun; Yang, Hua; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the normative data of ocular axial length and its associations in Chinese. Method The population-based Beijing Eye Study 2011 is a cross-sectional study performed in Greater Beijing. The study included 3468 individuals (1963 (56.6%) women) with a mean age of 64.6±9.8 years (range: 50–93 years). A detailed ophthalmic and medical examination was performed. Axial length was measured by optical low-coherence reflectometry. Results Axial length measurements were available for 3159 (91.1%) study participants. Mean axial length was 23.25±1.14 mm (range: 18.96–30.88 mm). In multivariate analysis, axial length was significantly associated with the systemic parameters of higher age (P<0.001), higher body height (P = 0.003), higher level of education (P<0.001) and urban region of habitation (P<0.001), and with the ocular parameters of thicker central cornea (P = 0.001), higher corneal curvature radius (P<0.001), deeper anterior chamber (P<0.001), thicker lens (P<0.001), more myopic refractive error (P<0.001), larger pupil diameter (P = 0.018), and higher best corrected visual acuity (P<0.001). It was additionally and negatively associated with the lens vault (P<0.001). In highly myopic eyes, axial length was significantly associated with lower level of education (P = 0.008), more myopic refractive error (P<0.001), and lower best corrected visual acuity (P = 0.034). Conclusions Mean ocular axial length in the older adult population of Greater Beijing (23.25±1.14 mm) was similar to the value measured in other urban populations and was higher than in a rural Central Indian population. The association between axial length and older age may potentially be associated with a survival artifact. The association between axial length and body height agrees with the general association between anthropomorphic measures and eye globe size. The association with the level of education and urban region of habitation confirms with previous

  5. Evolution of the axial system in craniates: morphology and function of the perivertebral musculature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The axial musculoskeletal system represents the plesiomorphic locomotor engine of the vertebrate body, playing a central role in locomotion. In craniates, the evolution of the postcranial skeleton is characterized by two major transformations. First, the axial skeleton became increasingly functionally and morphologically regionalized. Second, the axial-based locomotion plesiomorphic for craniates became progressively appendage-based with the evolution of extremities in tetrapods. These changes, together with the transition to land, caused increased complexity in the planes in which axial movements occur and moments act on the body and were accompanied by profound changes in axial muscle function. To increase our understanding of the evolutionary transformations of the structure and function of the perivertebral musculature, this review integrates recent anatomical and physiological data (e.g., muscle fiber types, activation patterns) with gross-anatomical and kinematic findings for pivotal craniate taxa. This information is mapped onto a phylogenetic hypothesis to infer the putative character set of the last common ancestor of the respective taxa and to conjecture patterns of locomotor and muscular evolution. The increasing anatomical and functional complexity in the muscular arrangement during craniate evolution is associated with changes in fiber angulation and fiber-type distribution, i.e., increasing obliqueness in fiber orientation and segregation of fatigue-resistant fibers in deeper muscle regions. The loss of superficial fatigue-resistant fibers may be related to the profound gross anatomical reorganization of the axial musculature during the tetrapod evolution. The plesiomorphic function of the axial musculature -mobilization- is retained in all craniates. Along with the evolution of limbs and the subsequent transition to land, axial muscles additionally function to globally stabilize the trunk against inertial and extrinsic limb muscle forces as well as

  6. Axial form factors of the octet baryons in a covariant quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, G.; Tsushima, K.

    2016-07-01

    We study the weak interaction axial form factors of the octet baryons, within the covariant spectator quark model, focusing on the dependence of four-momentum transfer squared, Q2. In our model the axial form factors GA(Q2) (axial-vector form factor) and GP(Q2) (induced pseudoscalar form factor) are calculated based on the constituent quark axial form factors and the octet baryon wave functions. The quark axial current is parametrized by the two constituent quark form factors, the axial-vector form factor gAq(Q2), and the induced pseudoscalar form factor gPq(Q2). The baryon wave functions are composed of a dominant S -state and a P -state mixture for the relative angular momentum of the quarks. First, we study in detail the nucleon case. We assume that the quark axial-vector form factor gAq(Q2) has the same function form as that of the quark electromagnetic isovector form factor. The remaining parameters of the model, the P -state mixture and the Q2 dependence of gPq(Q2), are determined by a fit to the nucleon axial form factor data obtained by lattice QCD simulations with large pion masses. In this lattice QCD regime the meson cloud effects are small, and the physics associated with the valence quarks can be better calibrated. Once the valence quark model is calibrated, we extend the model to the physical regime and use the low Q2 experimental data to estimate the meson cloud contributions for GA(Q2) and GP(Q2). Using the calibrated quark axial form factors and the generalization of the nucleon wave function for the other octet baryon members, we make predictions for all the possible weak interaction axial form factors GA(Q2) and GP(Q2) of the octet baryons. The results are compared with the corresponding experimental data for GA(0 ) and with the estimates of baryon-meson models based on S U (6 ) symmetry.

  7. Parallax error in long-axial field-of-view PET scanners—a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Karp, Joel S.; Werner, Matt; Surti, Suleman

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the design and construction of a PET scanner with a very long axial extent. One critical design challenge is the impact of the long axial extent on the scanner spatial resolution properties. In this work, we characterize the effect of parallax error in PET system designs having an axial field-of-view (FOV) of 198 cm (total-body PET scanner) using fully-3D Monte Carlo simulations. Two different scintillation materials were studied: LSO and LaBr3. The crystal size in both cases was 4  ×  4  ×  20 mm3. Several different depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding techniques were investigated to characterize the improvement in spatial resolution when using a DOI capable detector. To measure spatial resolution we simulated point sources in a warm background in the center of the imaging FOV, where the effects of axial parallax are largest, and at several positions radially offset from the center. Using a line-of-response based ordered-subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm we found that the axial resolution in an LSO scanner degrades from 4.8 mm to 5.7 mm (full width at half max) at the center of the imaging FOV when extending the axial acceptance angle (α) from  ±12° (corresponding to an axial FOV of 18 cm) to the maximum of  ±67°—a similar result was obtained with LaBr3, in which the axial resolution degraded from 5.3 mm to 6.1 mm. For comparison we also measured the degradation due to radial parallax error in the transverse imaging FOV; the transverse resolution, averaging radial and tangential directions, of an LSO scanner was degraded from 4.9 mm to 7.7 mm, for a measurement at the center of the scanner compared to a measurement with a radial offset of 23 cm. Simulations of a DOI detector design improved the spatial resolution in all dimensions. The axial resolution in the LSO-based scanner, with α  =  ± 67°, was improved from 5.7 mm to 5.0 mm by

  8. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF AXIAL FIBRILS, OUTER ENVELOPE, AND CELL DIVISION OF CERTAIN ORAL SPIROCHETES

    PubMed Central

    Listgarten, M. A.; Socransky, S. S.

    1964-01-01

    Listgarten, M. A. (Harvard School of Dental Medicine and Forsyth Dental Center, Boston, Mass.), and S. S. Socransky. Electron microscopy of axial fibrils, outer envelope, and cell division of certain oral spirochetes. J. Bacteriol. 88:1087–1103. 1964.—The ultrastructure of axial fibrils and outer envelopes of a number of oral spirochetes was studied in thin sections and by negative contrast. The axial fibrils measured 150 to 200 A in diameter. Only one end of each fibril was inserted subterminally into the protoplasmic cylinder by means of a 400 A wide disc. The free ends of fibrils inserted near one end of the cylinder extended toward, and overlapped in close apposition, the free ends of fibrils inserted at the other end. In thin sections, some axial fibrils showed a substructure, suggestive of a dense central core. The outer envelopes of most spirochetes appeared to consist of 80 A wide polygonal structural subunits. However, in one large spirochete, the outer envelope demonstrated a “pin-striped” pattern. Cell division in a pure culture of Treponema microdentium was studied by negative contrast. Results suggested that this organism divides by transverse fission, the outer envelope being last to divide. During the course of division, new axial fibrils appeared to originate on either side of the point of constriction of the protoplasmic cylinder. Flagellalike extensions which were found in rapidly dividing organisms were due to protruding axial fibrils, and appeared to be the result of cell division. Some evidence is presented to support the concept of a homologous origin for axial fibrils and flagella. Images PMID:14219024

  9. Measurements for the JASPER Program Axial Shield Re-measurement Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Spencer, R.R.; Hunter, H.T.; Hull, J.L.; Shono, A.

    1993-03-01

    With one modification, this series of measurements is a repeat of several of the mockups that were investigated during the Axial Shield Experiment performed earlier for the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER) program at the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF). For these re-runs, slabs of lithiated paraffin, 10.16 cm thick and 152.4 cm on an edge, were placed between the spectrum modifier and the axial shield and directly behind the axial shield. Each of the slabs contained a void area that corresponded in dimension and location,to the surface area of the seven hexagons in the axial shield plus the boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) collar that surrounded them. The lithiated paraffin was made part of the mockup to reduce the neutron contributions to the detector from those neutrons passing through the concrete surrounding the hexagon assemblies. The slabs were present in all of the mockups except one, for which the lithiated paraffin following the axial shield was removed. Spectral and integral flux measurements were made behind the axial shield for six B{sub 4}C homogeneous-type assembly containing: (1) the B{sub 4}C rod bundle assembly; (2) the B{sub 4}C central blockage type; (4) the B{sub 4}C central sodium type; and (4) another B{sub 4}C homogeneous-type assembly. The neutron source was the Tower Shielding Reactor II (TSR-II) modified to give a flux typical of that incident on the axial shielding in a Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR).

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE AXIAL GAP VS FIBERBOARD MOISTURE CONTENT IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-09-30

    The fiberboard assembly within a 9975 shipping package contains a modest amount of moisture, which can migrate to the cooler regions of the package when an internal heat load is present. Typically, this leads to increased moisture levels in the bottom fiberboard layers, along with elevated chloride levels which can leach from the fiberboard. Concerns have been raised that this condition could lead to corrosion of the stainless steel drum. It has been postulated that checking the axial gap at the top of the package against the current 1 inch maximum criterion provides a sufficient indication regarding the integrity of the fiberboard and drum. This report estimates the increase in axial gap that might be expected for a given moisture increase in the bottom fiberboard layers, and the likelihood that the increase will create a nonconforming condition that will lead to identification of the moisture increase. Using data relating the fiberboard moisture content with the degree of compaction under load, the present analysis indicates that the axial gap will increase by 0.282 inch as the bottom fiberboard layers approach the saturation point. This increase will cause approximately 58% of packages with otherwise nominal package component dimensions to fail the axial gap criterion, based on a survey of axial gap values recorded in K-Area surveillance activities. As the moisture content increases above saturation, the predicted increase in axial gap jumps to 0.405 inch, which would result in 92% or more of all packages failing the axial gap criterion. The data and analysis described in this report are specific to cane fiberboard. While it is expected that softwood fiberboard will behave similarly, such behavior has not yet been demonstrated.

  11. In vitro pulsatility analysis of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H

    2013-03-01

    Recently, continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) have supplanted older, pulsatile-flow pumps, for treating patients with advanced heart failure. Despite the excellent results of the newer generation devices, the effects of long-term loss of pulsatility remain unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the ability of both axial and centrifugal continuous-flow pumps to intrinsically modify pulsatility when placed under physiologically diverse conditions. Four VADs, two axial- and two centrifugal-flow, were evaluated on a mock circulatory flow system. Each VAD was operated at a constant impeller speed over three hypothetical cardiac conditions: normo-tensive, hypertensive, and hypotensive. Pulsatility index (PI) was compared for each device under each condition. Centrifugal-flow devices had a higher PI than that of axial-flow pumps. Under normo-tension, flow PI was 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.50 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Under hypertension, flow PI was 1.90 ± 0.16 and 4.21 ± 0.29 for the axial and centrifugal pumps, respectively (p = 0.01). Under hypotension, PI was 0.73 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p = 0.13). All tested CF-VADs were capable of maintaining some pulsatile-flow when connected in parallel with our mock ventricle. We conclude that centrifugal-flow devices outperform the axial pumps from the basis of PI under tested conditions. PMID:24231821

  12. Analysis and calibration of stage axial vibration for synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Li, Chen; Liu, Zhenzhong

    2015-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography (SR nano-CT) is a powerful analysis tool and can be used to perform chemical identification, mapping, or speciation of carbon and other elements together with X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) imaging. In practical applications, there are often challenges for SR nano-CT due to the misaligned geometry caused by the sample stage axial vibration. It occurs quite frequently because of experimental constraints from the mechanical error of manufacturing and assembly and the thermal expansion during the time-consuming scanning. The axial vibration will lead to the structure overlap among neighboring layers and degrade imaging results by imposing artifacts into the nano-CT images. It becomes worse for samples with complicated axial structure. In this work, we analyze the influence of axial vibration on nano-CT image by partial derivative. Then, an axial vibration calibration method for SR nano-CT is developed and investigated. It is based on the cross correlation of plane integral curves of the sample at different view angles. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with the full-field transmission X-ray microscope nano-CT setup at the beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results demonstrate that the presented method can handle the stage axial vibration. It can work for random axial vibration and needs neither calibration phantom nor additional calibration scanning. It will be helpful for the development and application of synchrotron radiation nano-CT systems. PMID:26265032

  13. InterCon Travel Health: Case B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truman, Gregory E.; Pachamanova, Dessislava A.; Goldstein, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    InterCon provides services to health insurers of foreign tourists who travel to the United States and Canada. Management wants to implement a new information system that will deal with several operational problems, but it is having difficulty securing the capital resources to fund the system's development. After an initial failure, the chief…

  14. Tip clearance flow interaction with circumferential groove casing treatment in a transonic axial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Mark Hamilton

    Experimental and computational studies were conducted to study the role of the tip leakage flow in axial compressor stall and the relationship between the tip clearance flow flow field and surge margin extension from circumferential groove casing treatment. The CFD results were used to identify the existence of an interface between the approach ow and the tip-leakage flow. The experiments used a surface streaking visualization method to identify the time-averaged location of this interface as a line of zero axial shear stress at the casing. The axial position of this line, denoted xzs, moved upstream with decreasing ow coefficient in both the experiments and computations. The line was consistently located at the rotor leading edge plane at the stalling flow coefficient, regardless of in flow boundary condition. These results were successfully modeled using a control volume approach that balanced the reverse axial momentum ux of the tip-leakage flow with the momentum flux of the approach fluid. Non-uniform tip clearance measurements demonstrated that movement of the interface upstream of the rotor leading edge plane leads to the generation of short length scale rotating disturbances. Therefore, stall was interpreted as a critical point in the momentum flux balance of the approach ow and the reverse axial momentum flux of the tip-leakage flow. Experimental measurements of surge margin extension from seven CGCT configurations with a fixed groove geometry demonstrated that the contribution of individual grooves in a multi-groove casing to surge margin extension is an (a) additive and (b) linear function of the smooth wall tip clearance axial momentum ux at the location of a each groove. Extending the axial momentum model to include the in uence of a CGCT showed that circumferential grooves reduce the tip leakage flow axial momentum through radial transport. The equivalent force due to a circumferential groove was demonstrated to be related to the smooth wall tip

  15. An investigation of inconsistent projections and artefacts in multi-pinhole SPECT with axially aligned pinholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kench, P. L.; Lin, J.; Gregoire, M. C.; Meikle, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Multiple pinholes are advantageous for maximizing the use of the available field of view (FOV) of compact small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detectors. However, when the pinholes are aligned axially to optimize imaging of extended objects, such as rodents, multiplexing of the pinhole projections can give rise to inconsistent data which leads to 'ghost point' artefacts in the reconstructed volume. A novel four pinhole collimator with a baffle was designed and implemented to eliminate these inconsistent projections. Simulation and physical phantom studies were performed to investigate artefacts from axially aligned pinholes and the efficacy of the baffle in removing inconsistent data and, thus, reducing reconstruction artefacts. SPECT was performed using a Defrise phantom to investigate the impact of collimator design on FOV utilization and axial blurring effects. Multiple pinhole SPECT acquired with a baffle had fewer artefacts and improved quantitative accuracy when compared to SPECT acquired without a baffle. The use of four pinholes positioned in a square maximized the available FOV, increased acquisition sensitivity and reduced axial blurring effects. These findings support the use of a baffle to eliminate inconsistent projection data arising from axially aligned pinholes and improve small animal SPECT reconstructions.

  16. Hydraulic Performance Comparison for Axial Flow Impeller and Mixed Flow Impeller with Same Specific Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhongyong; Ni, Yongyan; Yuan, Jianping; Ji, Pei

    2015-12-01

    An axial flow impeller and a mixed flow impeller with same specific speed were experimentally investigated, and the suction performance was studied with the help of CFD simulations. The results show that the axial impeller is roughly better than the mixed flow one. Especially under the design condition and a low flow rate condition range near the designed one, the axial flow impeller is more stable and therefore more suitable to be used in a water jet propulsion, while under these conditions the mixed flow impeller displays significant discrepancies. On the other hand, though its efficiency at the best efficiency point is lower than that of the axial flow one, the mixed flow impeller has a larger range of high efficiency conditions and is more convenient to be controlled to satisfy the irrigation and drainage systems that ought to be adjusted to varied flow rate conditions under a fixed head. In addition, the numerical investigation at the rated point shows that the axial impeller has a much better suction performance than the mixed flow impeller, which contradicts with the experience knowledge and therefore details need to be further studied.

  17. Comparison of ISO Standard and TKR Patient Axial Force Profiles during the Stance Phase of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Hannah J.; Ngai, Valentina; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical endurance testing of total knee replacements (TKRs) is performed using International Organization for Standardization (ISO) load and motion protocols. The standards are based on data from normal subjects and may not sufficiently mimic in vivo implant conditions. In this study, a mathematical model was used to calculate the axial force profile of 30 TKR patients with two current implant types, 22 with NexGen and eight with Miller-Galante II Cruciate-Retaining TKRs, and statistically compare the axial force specified by the ISO standard to the TKR patients. Significant differences were found between the axial forces of both groups of TKR patients and the ISO standard at local maxima and minima points in the first half of stance. The force impulse (area under the axial force curve, representing cumulative loading) was smaller for the ISO standard than the TKR patients, but only for those with NexGen implants. Waveform analysis using the coefficient of multiple correlation showed that the ISO and TKR patient axial force profiles were similar. The combined effect of ISO standard compressive load and motion differences from TKR patients could explain some of the differences between the wear scars on retrieved tibial components and those tested in total joint simulators. PMID:22558837

  18. Sensitiveness of axial magnetic field on electron acceleration by a radially polarized laser pulse in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghotra, Harjit Singh; Kant, Niti

    2015-12-01

    We examine the electron acceleration by a radially polarized (RP) laser pulse in vacuum under influence of an intense axial magnetic field. The electron while interaction with a RP laser pulse gets accelerated with high energy gain. The attained energy gain further enhanced up-to the order of GeV with an intense RP laser pulse. We observe a significant enhancement in energy gain in the presence of an intense axial magnetic field in the direction of propagation of laser pulse. The presence of axial magnetic field improves the strength of v → × B → force which supports the retaining of betatron resonance for longer durations. This improves the electron acceleration with an enhanced energy gain up to 5.2 GeV. It is noticed that the axial magnetic field is sensitive to electron acceleration, small change in magnetic field leads to enhance electron energy gain significantly. Our results also show relatively smaller scattering of the electrons in the presence of axial magnetic field.

  19. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  20. Angular Velocity Affects Trunk Muscle Strength and EMG Activation during Isokinetic Axial Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jian-Zhong; Liu, Xia; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate trunk muscle strength and EMG activation during isokinetic axial rotation at different angular velocities. Method. Twenty-four healthy young men performed isokinetic axial rotation in right and left directions at 30, 60, and 120 degrees per second angular velocity. Simultaneously, surface EMG was recorded on external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and latissimus dorsi (LD) bilaterally. Results. In each direction, with the increase of angular velocity, peak torque decreased, whereas peak power increased. During isokinetic axial rotation, contralateral EO as well as ipsilateral IO and LD acted as primary agonists, whereas, ipsilateral EO as well as contralateral IO and LD acted as primary antagonistic muscles. For each primary agonist, the root mean square values decreased with the increase of angular velocity. Antagonist coactiviation was observed at each velocity; however, it appears to be higher with the increase of angular velocity. Conclusion. Our results suggest that velocity of rotation has great impact on the axial rotation torque and EMG activity. An inverse relationship of angular velocity was suggested with the axial rotation torque as well as root mean square value of individual trunk muscle. In addition, higher velocity is associated with higher coactivation of antagonist, leading to a decrease in torque with the increase of velocity. PMID:24804227

  1. Finite Element Analysis Of An Axially Moving Beam, Part I: Time Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stylianou, M.; Tabarrok, B.

    1994-12-01

    Axially moving materials arise in problems associated with spacecraft antennas, pipes conveying fluid and telescopic robotic manipulators. Axially moving beams are a special class of axially moving materials, in which the axially moving material is modelled as a slender beam and the mechanism of elastic deformation is transverse bending. The mass of this system is not constant and the general analytical solution to the equation of motion is not known. In this study, numerical solutions are obtained using finite element analysis. However, instead of following the obvious (but cumbersome) approach of using fixed-size elements and increasing their number, in a step-wise fashion, as mass elements enter the domain of interest, a more elegant approach is followed wherein the number of elements is fixed, while the sizes of the elements change with time. To this end, a variable-domain beam finite element the size of which is a prescribed function of time is formulated in Part I. The accuracy of this variable-domain beam element is demonstrated through the time-integration of equations of motion using various extrusion profiles. The effects of wall flexibility, tip mass, and high frequency axial motion perturbations to the transverse response of the flexible extendible beam are also examined.

  2. Prevalence of Personality Disorders using two diagnostic systems in psychiatric outpatients in Shanghai, China: A comparison of uni-axial and multi-axial formulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Good, Mary-Jo D.; Good, Byron J.; Chow, Annabelle; Dai, Yunfei; Yu, Junhan; Zhang, Haiyin; Xiao, Zeping

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare multi-axial (DSM-IV) with uni-axial diagnostic system (CCMD-3, Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders) as diagnostic methods to determine the prevalence of personality disorders (PDs) in Chinese psychiatric outpatients. Method 3,075 outpatients were randomly sampled from clinical settings in China. CCMD-3 PDs were evaluated as per routine psychiatric practice. DSM-IV PDs were assessed using both self-reported questionnaire and structured clinical interview. Results The prevalence estimate for any type of PD in the total sample is 31.93% as reflected in the DSM-IV. This figure is nearly 110 times as large as the prevalence estimate for the CCMD-3. Only 9 outpatients were diagnosed with PD based on the CCMD-3. Amongst the 10 forms of DSM-IV PDs, avoidant (8.1%), obsessive-compulsive (7.6%), paranoid (6.0%), and borderline (5.8%) PDs were the most prevalent sub-types. This study found that PDs are commonly associated with the following: (i) the younger aged; (ii) single marital status; (iii) those who were not raised by their parents; (iv) introverted personalities; (v) first-time seekers of psycho-counseling treatment; and (vi) patients with co-morbid mood or anxiety disorders. Conclusions PDs are easily overlooked when the diagnosis is made based on the CCMD-3 uni-axial diagnostic system. However it was found that personality pathology is common in the Chinese psychiatric community when using the DSM-IV classification system. Existing evidence suggest, at least indirectly, that there are important benefits of moving towards a multi-axial diagnostic approach in psychiatric practice. PMID:22160097

  3. conF and conJ contribute to conidia germination and stress response in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Sarikaya Bayram, Özlem; Bayram, Özgür; Braus, Gerhard H

    2013-07-01

    Light induces various responses in fungi including formation of asexual and sexual reproductive structures. The formation of conidia in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans is regulated by red and blue light receptors. Expression of conidia associated con genes, which are widely spread in the fungal kingdom, increases upon exposure to light. We have characterized the light-inducible conF and conJ genes of A. nidulans which are homologs of con-6 and con-10 of Neurospora crassa. con genes are expressed during conidia formation in asexual development. Five minutes light exposure are sufficient to induce conF or conJ expression in vegetative mycelia. Similar to N. crassa there were no significant phenotypes of single con mutations. A double conF and conJ deletion resulted in significantly increased cellular amounts of glycerol or erythritol. This leads to a delayed germination phenotype combined with increased resistance against desiccation. These defects were rescued by complementation of the double mutant strain with either conF or conJ. This suggests that fungal con genes exhibit redundant functions in controlling conidia germination and adjusting cellular levels of substances which protect conidia against dryness. PMID:23644150

  4. Discovery and enantiocontrol of axially chiral urazoles via organocatalytic tyrosine click reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-Wei; Xu, Jin-Hui; Cheng, Dao-Juan; Shi, Chuan; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Tan, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Axially chiral compounds play an important role in areas such as asymmetric catalysis. The tyrosine click-like reaction is an efficient approach for synthesis of urazoles with potential applications in pharmaceutical and asymmetric catalysis. Here we discover a class of urazole with axial chirality by restricted rotation around an N–Ar bond. By using bifunctional organocatalyst, we successfully develop an organocatalytic asymmetric tyrosine click-like reaction in high yields with excellent enantioselectivity under mild reaction conditions. The excellent remote enantiocontrol of the strategy originates from the efficient discrimination of the two reactive sites in the triazoledione and transferring the stereochemical information of the catalyst into the axial chirality of urazoles at the remote position far from the reactive site. PMID:26864510

  5. Simultaneous Optical Measurements of Axial and Tangential Steady-State Blade Deflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, Anatole P.; Dhadwal, Harbans S.

    1999-01-01

    Currently, the majority of fiber-optic blade instrumentation is being designed and manufactured by aircraft-engine companies for their own use. The most commonly employed probe for optical blade deflection measurements is the spot probe. One of its characteristics is that the incident spot on a blade is not fixed relative to the blade, but changes depending on the blade deformation associated with centrifugal and aerodynamic loading. While there are geometrically more complicated optical probe designs in use by different engine companies, this paper offers an alternate solution derived from a probe-mount design feature that allows one to change the probe axial position until the incident spot contacts either a leading or a trailing edge. By tracing the axial position of either blade edge one is essentially extending the deflection measurement to two dimensions, axial and tangential. The blade deflection measurements were obtained during a wind tunnel test of a fan prototype.

  6. A study of casing treatment stall margin improvement phenomena. [for axial compressor rotor blade tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, D. C., Jr.; Wisler, D. C.; Hilvers, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a program of experimental and analytical research in casing treatments over axial compressor rotor blade tips are presented. Circumferential groove, axial-skewed slot and blade angle slot treatments were tested at low speeds. With the circumferential groove treatment the stalling flow was reduced 5.8% at negligible efficiency sacrifice. The axial-skewed slot treatment improved the stalling flow by 15.3%; 1.8 points in peak efficiency were sacrificed. The blade angle slot treatment improved the stalling flow by 15.0%; 1.4 points in peak efficiency were sacrificed. The favorable stalling flow situations correlated well with observations of higher-than-normal surface pressures on the rotor blade pressure surfaces in the tip region, and with increased maximum diffusions on the suction surfaces. Annulus wall pressure gradients, especially in the 50 to 75% chord region, are also increased and blade surface pressure loadings are shifted toward the trailing edge for treated configurations.

  7. Equilibrium and Steady State of Dense Z-Pinches Superposing a Small Amount of Axial Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Mitsuhiro; Miyamoto, Tetsu

    2016-07-01

    The pressure equilibrium and steady state of z-pinches trapping a small amount of axial magnetic flux are studied. The Bennett relation and the Pease-Braginskii-current are modified, taking into account the superposed axial field. The line energy density decreases in the modified Bennett relation, but the decrease is only of the order ɛ2, where ɛ = (the axial field strength at the axis)/(the azimuthal field strength at the plasma periphery) ≪ 1. On the other hand, the current in the steady state can increase without being limited by the Pease-Braginskii-current. Hence, the radiation collapse is prevented. The decrease of line energy density in the modified Bennett relation is almost canceled in the steady state.

  8. Self-Organization of Zr(IV) Porphyrinoids on Graphene Oxide Surfaces by Axial Metal Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Jurow, Matthew; Manichev, Viacheslav; Pabon, Cesar; Hageman, Brian; Matolina, Yuliya; Drain, Charles Michael

    2013-01-01

    The protruding oxophilic central metal ion of ZrIV porphyrinoids facilitates axial coordination to the oxygen bearing functional groups on graphene oxide (GO) surfaces to result in new supramolecular photonic materials with high dye loading especially on edges and large defects. The reaction proceeds at room temperature with GO dispersed in tetrahydrofuran and GO films on glass. Since the ZrIV serves as a conduit, the photophysical properties of the dye sensitized GO derive from both the axially bound chromophores and the GO substrate. Self-organization of metalloporphyrinoids on GO mediated by axial coordination of group (IV) metal ions allows for direct sensitization of graphene and graphenic materials without requiring covalent chemistries with poorly conducting linkers. PMID:24007316

  9. Effect of Axial Loading on Quench Performance in Nb3Sn Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, G.; Bordini, B.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Lizarazo, J.; Lietzke, A.F.; McInturff, A.D.; Sabbi, G.L.; DiMarco, J.D.; Tartaglia, M.; Vedrice, P.; Ferracin, P.

    2008-06-01

    A series of tests has been performed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) with the goal of assessing the influence of coil axial pre-load on Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet training. The tests involved two subscale Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets: SQ02, a quadrupole magnet fabricated as part of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP), and SD01, a dipole magnet developed in collaboration between CEA/Saclay and LBNL. Both magnets used similar Nb{sub 3}Sn flat racetrack coils from LBNL Subscale Magnet Program, and implemented an axial support system composed of stainless steel end-plates and aluminum rods. The system was designed to withstand full longitudinal electro-magnetic forces and provide controllable preloads. Quench performances, training, and quench locations have been recorded in various axial loading conditions. Test results are reported.

  10. The Thirring interaction in the two-dimensional axial-current-pseudoscalar derivative coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, L.V. . E-mail: armflavio@if.uff.br

    2006-12-15

    We reexamine the two-dimensional model of massive fermions interacting with a massless pseudoscalar field via axial-current derivative coupling. The hidden Thirring interaction in the axial-derivative coupling model is exhibited compactly by performing a canonical field transformation on the Bose field algebra and the model is mapped into the Thirring model with an additional vector-current-scalar derivative interaction (Schroer-Thirring model). The Fermi field operator is rewritten in terms of the Mandelstam soliton operator coupled to a free massless scalar field. The charge sectors of the axial-derivative model are mapped into the charge sectors of the massive Thirring model. The complete bosonized version of the model is presented. The bosonized composite operators of the quantum Hamiltonian are obtained as the leading operators in the Wilson short distance expansions.

  11. Axial force and efficiency tests of fixed center variable speed belt drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of how the axial force varies with the centerline force at different speed ratios, speeds, and loads, and how the drive's transmission efficiency is affected by these related forces is described. The tests, intended to provide a preliminary performance and controls characterization for a variable speed belt drive continuously variable transmission (CVT), consisted of the design and construction of an experimental test rig geometrically similar to the CVT, and operation of that rig at selected speed ratios and power levels. Data are presented which show: how axial forces exerted on the driver and driven sheaves vary with the centerline force at constant values of speed ratio, speed, and output power; how the transmission efficiency varies with centerline force and how it is also a function of the V belt coefficient; and the axial forces on both sheaves as normalized functions of the traction coefficient.

  12. The shape of the F-region irregularities which produce satellite scintillations Evidence for axial asymmetry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorcroft, D. R.; Arima, K. S.

    1972-01-01

    Correlation analysis of three-station observations of satellite amplitude scintillations, recorded at London, Canada during the summer of 1968, have been interpreted to give information on the height, size and shape of the ionospheric irregularities. The irregularities had a mean height of 390 km, and when interpreted in terms of the usual axially-symmetric, field-aligned model, had a mean axial ratio of 6.5, and a mean dimension transverse to the magnetic field of 0.7 km. None of these parameters showed any systematic trend with geomagnetic latitude. The data for one of the passes analyzed were inconsistent with axial symmetry, and when examined in terms of a more general model, 3 of 9 passes showed evidence of irregularities which were elongated both along and transverse to the earth's magnetic field, the elongation transverse to the field tending to lie in a north-south direction.

  13. Axial vane-type swirler performance characteristics. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, G. F.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of an axial vane-type swirler was investigated to aid in computer modeling of gas turbine combustor flowfields and in evaluation of turbulence models for swirling confined jet flow. The swirler studied is annular with a hub-to-swirler diameter ratio of 0.25 and ten adjustable vanes of pitch-to-chord ratio 0.68. Measurements of time-mean axial, radial, and tangential velocities were made at the swirler exit plane using a five-hole pitot probe technique with computer data reduction. Nondimensionalized velocities from both radial and azimuthal traverses are tabulated and plotted for a range of swirl vane angles phi from 0 to 70 degrees. A study was done of idealized exit-plane velocity profiles relating the swirl numbers S and S' to the ratio of maximum swirl and axial velocities for each idealized case, and comparing the idealized swirl numbers with ones calculated from measured profiles.

  14. An inverse problem design method for branched and unbranched axially symmetrical ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. D.; Yang, T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper concerns the potential flow design of axially symmetrical ducts of both circular and annular cross section with or without wall suction or blowing slots. The objective of the work was to develop a method by which such ducts could be designed with directly prescribed wall pressure variation. Previous axially symmetrical design methods applied only to circular cross sectional ducts and required that the pressure distribution be prescribed along the duct centerline and not along the duct wall. The present method uses an inverse problem approach which extends the method of Stanitz to the axially symmetrical case, and an approximation is used to account for the stagnation point in branched duct designs. Two examples of successful designs of diffusers with suction slots are presented.

  15. A proposal for a new definition of the axial rotation angle of the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tadashi; Ishida, Akimasa; Cao, Lili; Morita, Sadao

    2008-02-01

    The Euler/Cardan angles are commonly used to define the motions of the upper arm with respect to the trunk. This definition, however, has a problem in that the angles of both the horizontal flexion/extension and the axial rotation of the shoulder joint become unstable at the gimbal-lock positions. In this paper, a new definition of the axial rotation angle was proposed. The proposed angle was stable over the entire range of the shoulder motion. With the new definition, the neutral position of the axial rotation agreed with that in the conventional anatomy. The advantage of the new definition was demonstrated by measuring actual complex motions of the shoulder with a three-dimensional motion capture system. PMID:17070702

  16. Photoacoustic microscopy with an enhanced axial resolution of 5.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Yong; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The axial resolution of photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can be enhanced by reducing the speed of sound within the imaging region of interest. This principle was demonstrated on a previously-reported PAM system, which utilized a 125 MHz ultrasonic transducer for signal detection and the Wiener deconvolution for signal processing. With sound slowed by silicone oil immersion, we have achieved a finest axial resolution of 5.8 μm for PAM, as validated by phantom experiments. The axial resolution was also enhanced in vivo when mouse ears injected with silicone oil were imaged. After injection of silicone oil, the blood vessels were resolved more clearly. When tissue-compatible low-speed liquids become available, this approach may find applications in PAM as well as in other imaging modalities, such as photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound imaging.

  17. Axial seal system for a gas turbine steam-cooled rotor

    DOEpatents

    Mashey, Thomas Charles

    2002-01-01

    An axial seal assembly is provided at the interface between adjacent wheels and spacers of a gas turbine rotor and disposed about tubes passing through openings in the rotor adjacent the rotor rim and carrying a thermal medium. Each seal assembly includes a support bushing for supporting a land of the thermal medium carrying tube, an axially registering seat bushing disposed in the opposed opening and a frustoconical seal between the seal bushing and seat. The seal bushing includes a radial flange having an annular recess for retaining the outer diameter edge of the seal, while the seat bushing has an axially facing annular surface forming a seat for engagement by the inner diameter edge of the seal.

  18. Analyses of transverse vibrations of axially pretensioned viscoelastic nanobeams with small size and surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Pang, Miao; Fan, Lifeng

    2016-07-01

    The general governing equation for transverse vibration of an axially pretensioned viscoelastic nanobeam embedded in elastic substrate medium is formulated on the basis of the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory and the Kelvin model. The factors of structural damping, initial axial tension, surrounding medium, small size, surface elasticity and residual surface tension are incorporated in the formulation. The explicit expression is obtained for the vibrational frequency of a simply supported nanobeam. The impacts of these factors on the properties of transverse vibration of the nanobeam are discussed. It is demonstrated that the dependences of natural frequency on the structural damping, surrounding medium, small size, surface elasticity and residual surface tension are significant, whereas the effect of initial axial tension on the natural frequency is limited. In addition, it can be concluded that the energy dissipation of transverse vibration of the viscoelastic nanobeam is related to the small size effect and structural damping.

  19. Electromagnetic design analysis and performance improvement of axial field permanent magnet generator for small wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Tae-Uk

    2012-04-01

    Axial field permanent magnet (AFPM) generators are widely applied for the small wind turbine. The output power of conventional AFPM generator, AFER-NS (Axial Field External Rotor-Non Slotted) generator, is limited by the large reluctance by the long air-gap flux paths. In this paper, the novel structure of AFPM generator, AFIR-S (Axial Field Inner Rotor-Slotted) generator, is suggested to improve the output characteristics. The electromagnetic design analysis and the design improvement of the suggested AFIR-S generator are studied. Firstly, the electromagnetic design analysis was done to increase the power density. Secondly, the design optimizations of the rotor pole-arc ratio and skew angle to increase the output power and to reduce the cogging torque. Finally, the output performances of AFER-NS and AFIR-S generator are compared with each other.

  20. Model independent extraction of the axial mass parameter in CCQE anti neutrino-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebe, Heather

    2013-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation studies depend on a consistent value for the axial mass. For this reason, a model-independent extraction of this parameter from quasielastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering data is vital. While most studies employ a model-dependent extraction using the dipole model of the axial form factor, we present a model-independent description using the z expansion of the axial form factor. Quasielastic antineutrino scattering data on C-12 from the MiniBooNE experiment are analyzed using this model-independent description. The value found, mA = 0 .85-0 . 06 + 0 . 13 +/- 0 . 13 GeV, differs significantly from the value utilized by the MiniBooNE Collaboration, mA = 1 . 35 GeV. Advisor: Dr. Gil Paz Wayne State Univerity.