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Sample records for azimuthally dependent transport

  1. Polarization Dependent Azimuthal Scattering From Tilted Fibre Bragg Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Robert Bruce

    Polarization sensitive mode coupling characteristics of tilted fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) have been exploited to develop a number of useful devices including fibre polarimeters, gain flattening filters, spectrum analyzers, polarization dependent loss (PDL) compensators, reconfigurable optical add / drop multiplexers (ROADM), as well as interferometric, and surface plasmon based sensors. Recently it was demonstrated that a single grating structure could couple the light guided in a fibre to two azimuthally separated, polarization independent, radiated beams. However the reasons for such behaviour had not been fully explained, precluding the complete understanding, exploitation and optimization of this phenomenon. This thesis explains the mechanisms underlying such behaviour through a thorough analytical examination of an existing equation formulated with the Volume Current Method (VCM), quantifying the degree to which a tilted FBG's radiation field is directionally dependent on the phase matching characteristics of a grating's three-dimensional structure as well as the polarization dependent dipole response of the medium itself. Examination of the equation's parameter space, revealed the possibility of three-beam azimuthal responses as well, and resulted in some guidelines for the design and optimization of these devices. Experimental measurements of the out-tapped field are also provided, clearly confirming these theoretical findings and reporting the fabrication of a three-beam azimuthal response grating for the first time. Drawing upon these advances, an improved polarimeter design is proposed that samples more than four detected beams with only two tilted FBGs, theoretically resulting in average Stokes vector error reductions of roughly 20%, facilitating monitoring at lower signal to noise ratios (SNRs). Finally, this thesis undertakes an analysis and re-derivation of the VCM formulation itself, designed to expand its applicability to FBGs written with ultrafast pulsed lasers, address some of the potentially limiting assumptions identified by Li et al, and provide users with computationally efficient formulae that are as accurate as possible.

  2. Azimuthal Asymmetries for eA/eN Semi-Inclusive DIS and Its Nuclear Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu-Kun

    2016-02-01

    We applied collinear expansion to the semi-inclusive deeply inelastic lepton-nucleon (nucleus) scattering process e + N(A) → e + q + X with both polarized beam and polarized target up to twist-3, and unpolarized process up to twist-4. The differential cross section and azimuthal asymmetries are expressed in terms of gauge invariant twist-3 and twist-4 TMD parton distribution/correlation functions. Measurements of such azimuthal asymmetries provide methods to study different spin and transverse momentum aspects of the partonic structure of nucleon. We further study the nuclear dependence of azimuthal asymmetries and adopt Gaussian ansatz for TMD distribution/correlation functions to estimat the semi-quantitive behaviour of the nuclear dependence. We predict the A-dependence of azimuthal asymmetries which can be tested in the planned EIC’s.

  3. Azimuthal dependence in the gravity field induced by recent and past cryospheric forcings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, David A.; Gasperini, Paolo; Sabadini, Roberto; Boschi, Enzo

    1987-01-01

    Present-day glacial activities and the current variability of the Antarctic ice volume can cause variations in the long-wavelength gravity field as a consequence of transient viscoelastic responses in the mantle. The azimuthal dependence of the secular variations of the gravitational potential are studied and it is found that the nonaxisymmetric contributions are more important for recent glacial retreats than for Pleistocene deglaciation. Changes in land-based ice covering Antarctica can be detected by monitoring satellite orbits and their sensitivity to variations in gravitational harmonic for degree l greater than 3. Resonances in satellite orbits may be useful for detecting these azimuthally-dependent gravity signals.

  4. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu to UU collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloczynski, John; Huang, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Xilin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-07-01

    We study the charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions, as motivated by the search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) and the investigation of related background contributions. In particular we aim to understand how these correlations induced by various proposed effects evolve from collisions with AuAu system to that with UU system. To do that, we quantify the generation of magnetic field in UU collisions at RHIC energy and its azimuthal correlation with the matter geometry using event-by-event simulations. Taking the experimental data for charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu collisions and extrapolating to UU with reasonable assumptions, we examine the resulting correlations to be expected in UU collisions and compare them with recent STAR measurements. Based on such analysis we discuss the viability for explaining the data with a combination of the CME-like and flow-induced contributions.

  5. Azimuthal angular dependence study of the atmospheric muon charge ratio at sea level using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Halil; Bektasoglu, Mehmet

    2012-05-01

    The azimuth dependence of the cosmic muon charge ratio at sea level was estimated using the Geant4 simulation package. Simulations were separately run at 12 azimuth angles ranging from 0° to 330° with 30° increment. Two hundred thousand proton and alpha particles were randomly distributed over the zenith angle range 30° < θ < 40° at each azimuth angle. The kinetic energy spectra of proton and helium nuclei were taken from the balloon-flight measurements. The atmospheric muon charge ratio was calculated at each azimuthal angle for low energy muons with a mean momentum around 0.5 GeV/c. The Geant4 simulation results have been compared with those of the CORSIKA simulation program and with the WILLI measurements. The simulation results reproduce well the measured east-west effect with a non-zero asymmetry AEW = 0.24. This asymmetry in the charge ratio decreases from 0.37 to 0.19 as the momentum increases from 0.22 to 0.70 GeV/c.

  6. TRACING OUTFLOWS AND ACCRETION: A BIMODAL AZIMUTHAL DEPENDENCE OF Mg II ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.

    2012-11-20

    We report a bimodality in the azimuthal angle distribution of gas around galaxies as traced by Mg II absorption: halo gas prefers to exist near the projected galaxy major and minor axes. The bimodality is demonstrated by computing the mean azimuthal angle probability distribution function using 88 spectroscopically confirmed Mg II-absorption-selected galaxies [W{sub r} (2796) {>=} 0.1 A] and 35 spectroscopically confirmed non-absorbing galaxies [W{sub r} (2796) < 0.1 A] imaged with Hubble Space Telescope and Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The azimuthal angle distribution for non-absorbers is flat, indicating no azimuthal preference for gas characterized by W{sub r} (2796) < 0.1 A. We find that blue star-forming galaxies clearly drive the bimodality while red passive galaxies may exhibit an excess along their major axis. These results are consistent with galaxy evolution scenarios where star-forming galaxies accrete new gas, forming new stars and producing winds, while red galaxies exist passively due to reduced gas reservoirs. We further compute an azimuthal angle dependent Mg II absorption covering fraction, which is enhanced by as much as 20%-30% along the major and minor axes. The W{sub r} (2796) distribution for gas along the major axis is likely skewed toward weaker Mg II absorption than for gas along the projected minor axis. These combined results are highly suggestive that the bimodality is driven by gas accreted along the galaxy major axis and outflowing along the galaxy minor axis. Adopting these assumptions, we find that the opening angle of outflows and inflows to be 100 Degree-Sign and 40 Degree-Sign , respectively. We find that the probability of detecting outflows is {approx}60%, implying that winds are more commonly observed.

  7. The azimuthal path of myosin V and its dependence on lever-arm length

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John H.; Beausang, John F.; Sweeney, H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Myosin V (myoV) is a two-headed myosin capable of taking many successive steps along actin per diffusional encounter, enabling it to transport vesicular and ribonucleoprotein cargos in the dense and complex environment within cells. To better understand how myoV navigates along actin, we used polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to examine angular changes of bifunctional rhodamine probes on the lever arms of single myoV molecules in vitro. With a newly developed analysis technique, the rotational motions of the lever arm and the local orientation of each probe relative to the lever arm were estimated from the probe’s measured orientation. This type of analysis could be applied to similar studies on other motor proteins, as well as other proteins with domains that undergo significant rotational motions. The experiments were performed on recombinant constructs of myoV that had either the native-length (six IQ motifs and calmodulins [CaMs]) or truncated (four IQ motifs and CaMs) lever arms. Native-length myoV-6IQ mainly took straight steps along actin, with occasional small azimuthal tilts around the actin filament. Truncated myoV-4IQ showed an increased frequency of azimuthal steps, but the magnitudes of these steps were nearly identical to those of myoV-6IQ. The results show that the azimuthal deflections of myoV on actin are more common for the truncated lever arm, but the range of these deflections is relatively independent of its lever-arm length. PMID:22291144

  8. Azimuthal angle dependence of the Coulomb barrier parameters for the interaction between two deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, M.; Adel, A.

    2011-09-15

    The azimuthal angle ({phi}) dependence of the Coulomb barrier parameters (height V{sub b} and position R{sub b}) are studied in the framework of the double-folding model with the realistic M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction. Different pairs of axially symmetric, deformed nuclei are considered. For the interaction between medium and heavy nuclei, the maximum percentage of {phi} dependence is studied as a function of relative orientations of the interacting nuclei. It appreciably increases as the values of the deformation parameters increase and is sensitive to the hexadecapole deformation. The smallest {phi} variation is found for the relative orientations {theta}{sub P}={theta}{sub T}=90 deg. The {phi} variation of the Coulomb barrier parameters, as calculated in the present paper, is completely different in both magnitude and behavior from those deduced in the widely used proximity approach.

  9. Azimuthal Angle Dependence of HBT Radii in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC-PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niida, Takafumi

    Measurement of Hanbury-Brown and Twiss (HBT) interferometry with respect to the event plane have been performed in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV at PHENIX, which is a unique tool to study the spatial extent of the created matter at final state in heavy ion collisions and the detailed picture of the space-time evolution from the initial state to the final state. The Gaussian source radii was measured for charged pions and kaons with respect to 2nd-order event plane. There was a difference in final eccentricity between both species, which may imply the different freeze-out mechanism by the particle species. The pion source radii was also measured relative to 3rd-order event plane, and the azimuthal angle dependence of the radii was observed, which qualitatively agrees with the recent hydrodynamic calculation and the oscillation may be driven from the triangular flow.

  10. Azimuthal angle- and scanning pitch-dependent colorization of metals by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangbo; Qian, Jing; Bai, Feng; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Chengwei; Fan, Wenzhong; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Quanzhong

    2016-04-01

    We report the modification of optical properties of 304 stainless steel surfaces by femtosecond laser direct writing with different scanning pitches. Regularly arranged ripples with a spatial period of ~700 nm were obtained, rendering vivid structural colors when we illuminated the surface with white light. Diffraction spectra were generated to investigate the spectral properties of the structural colors. Results indicate that the diffraction maximum strongly depends on scanning pitch and azimuthal angle, but that the central wavelength is insensitive to both of them. The reflectance properties were also investigated. This study adds a new parameter, the scanning pitch, to the list of parameters in the production of controllable colorized metal, which may find a range of applications in color display, decoration, and so on.

  11. Anisotropic parton escape is the dominant source of azimuthal anisotropy in transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liang; Edmonds, Terrence; Lin, Zi-Wei; Liu, Feng; Molnar, Denes; Wang, Fuqiang

    2016-02-01

    We trace the development of azimuthal anisotropy (vn, n = 2 , 3) via parton-parton collision history in two transport models. The parton vn is studied as a function of the number of collisions of each parton in Au + Au and d + Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV. It is found that the majority of vn comes from the anisotropic escape probability of partons, with no fundamental difference at low and high transverse momenta. The contribution to vn from hydrodynamic-type collective flow is found to be small. Only when the parton-parton cross-section is set unrealistically large does this contribution start to take over. Our findings challenge the current paradigm emerged from hydrodynamic comparisons to anisotropy data.

  12. The Azimuthal Dependence of Outflows and Accretion Detected Using O VI Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Muzahid, Sowgat; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2015-12-01

    We report a bimodality in the azimuthal angle (Φ) distribution of gas around galaxies traced by O vi absorption. We present the mean Φ probability distribution function of 29 Hubble Space Telescope-imaged O vi absorbing (EW > 0.1 Å) and 24 non-absorbing (EW < 0.1 Å) isolated galaxies (0.08 \\lt z \\lt 0.67) within ˜200 kpc of background quasars. We show that equivalent width (EW) is anti-correlated with impact parameter and O vi covering fraction decreases from 80% within 50 kpc to 33% at 200 kpc. The presence of O vi absorption is azimuthally dependent and occurs between ±10°-20° of the galaxy projected major axis and within ±30° of the projected minor axis. We find higher EWs along the projected minor axis with weaker EWs along the project major axis. Highly inclined galaxies have the lowest covering fractions due to minimized outflow/inflow cross-section geometry. Absorbing galaxies also have bluer colors while non-absorbers have redder colors, suggesting that star formation is a key driver in the O vi detection rate. O vi surrounding blue galaxies exists primarily along the projected minor axis with wide opening angles while O vi surrounding red galaxies exists primarily along the projected major axis with smaller opening angles, which may explain why absorption around red galaxies is less frequently detected. Our results are consistent with a circumgalactic medium (CGM) originating from major axis-fed inflows/recycled gas and from minor axis-driven outflows. Non-detected O vi occurs between Φ = 20°-60°, suggesting that O vi is not mixed throughout the CGM and remains confined within the outflows and the disk-plane. We find low O vi covering fractions within +/- 10^\\circ of the projected major axis, suggesting that cool dense gas resides in a narrow planer geometry surrounded by diffuse O vi gas.

  13. System size dependence of nuclear modification and azimuthal anisotropy of jet quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Somnath; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the system size dependence of jet quenching by analysing transverse momentum spectra of neutral pions in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at \\sqrt{s_{\\textrm {NN}}} =200 GeV for different centralities. The fast partons are assumed to lose energy by radiating gluons as they traverse the plasma and undergo multiple collisions. The energy loss per collision, ɛ, is taken as proportional to E (where E is the energy of the parton), proportional to \\sqrt{E}, or a constant depending on whether the formation time of the gluon is less than the mean path, greater than the mean-free path but less than the path length, or greater than the path length of the partons, respectively. NLO pQCD is used to evaluate pion production by modifying the fragmentation function to account for the energy loss. We reproduce the nuclear modification factor RAA by treating ɛ as the only free parameter, depending on the centrality and the mechanism of energy loss. These values are seen to explain the nuclear modification of prompt photons caused by the energy lost by final state quarks before they fragment into photons. These also reproduce the azimuthal asymmetry of transverse momentum distribution for pions within a factor of 2 and for prompt photons in fair agreement with experimental data.

  14. Azimuth-dependent Auger neutralization of He{sup +} on Ag(111) and (110) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, Diego; Monreal, R. C.; Blanco, J. M.; Esaulov, V. A.

    2007-04-15

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the role played by s and d electrons in Auger neutralization processes of He{sup +} at Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces. We calculate crystal-lattice-site Auger neutralization rates as a function of the perpendicular distance between ions and surfaces. We find that the rate is very insensitive to the lateral position for large values of the perpendicular distance because the contribution of the delocalized s electrons dominates in this case. In contrast, the contribution of d electrons dominates at short perpendicular distances and the strong spatial localization of these electrons causes a similar strong dependence of the Auger rate with lateral position. We perform molecular dynamic simulations of scattered ion trajectories, which, used together with the Auger neutralization rates, allow us to obtain the theoretical ion fraction that we compare with our measurements. This parameter-free theory is able to reproduce the magnitude of the ion survival probability and its dependence with the azimuthal angle of incidence for both surfaces of Ag, thus showing the important role played by localized electrons in Auger neutralization of He.

  15. Azimuthal anisotropies of reconstructed jets in Pb + Pb collisions at √sNN =2.76 TeV in a multiphase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Mao-Wu; Ma, Guo-Liang

    2014-07-01

    Azimuthal anisotropies of reconstructed jets [vnjet(n=2,3)] have been investigated in Pb + Pb collisions at the center of mass energy √sNN =2.76 TeV within a framework of a multiphase transport (AMPT) model. The v2jet is in good agreement with the recent ATLAS data. However, the v3jet shows a smaller magnitude than v2jet, and approaches zero at a larger transverse momentum. It is attributed to the path-length dependence in which the jet energy loss fraction depends on the azimuthal angles with respect to different orders of event planes. The ratio vnjet/εn increases from peripheral to noncentral collisions, and vnjet increases with the initial spatial asymmetry (εn) for a given centrality bin. These behaviors indicate that the vnjet is produced by the strong interactions between jet and the partonic medium with different initial geometry shapes. Therefore, azimuthal anisotropies of reconstructed jet are proposed as a good probe to study the initial spatial fluctuations, which are expected to provide constraints on the path-length dependence of jet quenching models.

  16. Azimuthal inhomogeneity of turbulence structure and its impact on intermittent particle transport in linear magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Kasuya, N.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kosuga, Y.; Arakawa, H.; Yamada, T.; Miwa, Y.; Itoh, K.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation component in the turbulence regime is found to be azimuthally localized at a phase of the global coherent modes in a linear magnetized plasma PANTA. Spatial distribution of squared bicoherence is given in the azimuthal cross section as an indicator of nonlinear energy transfer function from the global coherent mode to the turbulence. Squared bicoherence is strong at a phase where the turbulence amplitude is large. As a result of the turbulence localization, time evolution of radial particle flux becomes bursty. Statistical features such as skewness and kurtosis are strongly modified by the localized turbulence component, although contribution to mean particle flux profile is small.

  17. Radiative transfer in cylindrical threads with incident radiation. II. 2D azimuth-dependent case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouttebroze, P.

    2005-05-01

    A method is proposed for the solution of NLTE radiative transfer equations in long cylinders with an external incident radiation that varies with direction. This method is designed principally for the modelling of elongated structures imbedded in the solar corona (loops, prominence threads). The radiative transfer problem under consideration is a 2D one, since the source functions and absorption coefficients vary with both distance to axis and azimuth. The method is based on the general principles of finite-differences and accelerated Λ-iteration. A Fourier series is used for interpolation in azimuth. The method is applied to a line emitted by a two-level atom with complete frequency redistribution. Convergence properties of the method and influence of the inclination angle on the source function are discussed.

  18. Hadronization scheme dependence of long-range azimuthal harmonics in high energy p + A reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2015-07-01

    We compare the distortion effects of three popular final-state hadronization schemes. We show how hadronization modifies the initial-state gluon correlations in high energy p + A collisions. The three models considered are (1) LPH: local parton-hadron duality, (2) CPR: collinear parton-hadron resonance independent fragmentation, and (3) LUND: color string hadronization. The strong initial-state azimuthal asymmetries are generated using the GLVB model for non-abelian gluon bremsstrahlung, assuming a saturation scale Qsat = 2 GeV. Long-range elliptic and triangular harmonics for the final hadron pairs are compared based on the three hadronization schemes. Our analysis shows that the process of hadronization causes major distortions of the partonic azimuthal harmonics for transverse momenta at least up to pT = 3 GeV. In particular, they appear to be greatly reduced for pT < 1 ÷ 2 GeV.

  19. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Elbakian, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Karyan, G.; Marukyan, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Taroian, S.; Akopov, Z.; Avetisyan, E.; Borissov, A.; Hartig, M.; Holler, Y.; Rostomyan, A.; Schueler, K. P.; Varanda, M.; Ye, Z.; Zihlmann, B.

    2010-03-15

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross-section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studied for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and the deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found.

  20. Multiplicity dependence of two-particle azimuthal correlations in pp collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdanikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, F.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Czopowicz, T. R.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; Erasmo, G. D.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Elwood, B. G.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, M.; Gheata, A.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hippolyte, B.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, P. G.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khan, M. M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, T.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, S.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kompaniets, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lechman, M.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Ma, K.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martınez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazumder, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nasar, M.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Da Silva, A. C. Oliveira; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauch, W.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Santoro, R.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, S.; Sharma, N.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, M.; Song, J.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Spacek, M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Ter Minasyan, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, A.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, S.; Voloshin, K.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wielanek, D.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, S.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present the measurements of particle pair yields per trigger particle obtained from di-hadron azimuthal correlations in pp collisions at = 0 .9, 2.76, and 7 TeV recorded with the ALICE detector. The yields are studied as a function of the charged particle multiplicity. Taken together with the single particle yields the pair yields provide information about parton fragmentation at low transverse momenta, as well as on the contribution of multiple parton interactions to particle production. Data are compared to calculations using the PYTHIA6, PYTHIA8, and PHOJET event generators. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au +Au collisions for energies ranging from √{sN N }=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v32{2 }=⟨cos 3 (ϕ1-ϕ2)⟩ , where ϕ1-ϕ2 is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δ η =η1-η2 . Nonzero v32{2 } is directly related to the previously observed large-Δ η narrow-Δ ϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v32{2 } persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v32{2 } is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v32{2 } for central collisions shows a minimum near √{sN N }=20 GeV .

  2. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations of secondary particles in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okorokov, V.; Parfenov, P.

    2016-02-01

    The P/CP symmetry breaking in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) could be realized via transitions between local fluctuations of gauge fields. Azimuthal correlations which characterize the asymmetry of the emitted charged particles with respect to the reaction plane in non-central nucleus-nucleus collisions are the promising tools for experimental study of local P/CP violation in the strong interactions. The preliminary estimations of correlators within the model of chiral magnetic effect are presented for types of nuclei and collision energies corresponded to RHIC and the LHC beams for two various nuclear densities, namely, for approach of the hard sphere and for the two-component Fermi model. Besides of the correlator estimations for the symmetric collisions, the preliminary results for magnetic field in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions are also shown.

  3. Survival rate of initial azimuthal anisotropy in a multiphase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Liu, Feng; Wang, Fuqiang

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the survival rate of an initial momentum anisotropy (v2ini), not spatial anisotropy, to the final state in a multiphase transport (AMPT) model in Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV. It is found that both the final-state parton and charged hadron v2 show a linear dependence versus v2ini{PP } with respect to the participant plane (PP). It is found that the slope of this linear dependence (referred to as the survival rate) increases with transverse momentum pT, reaching ˜100 % at pT˜2.5 GeV/c for both parton and charged hadron. The survival rate decreases with collision centrality and energy, indicating decreasing survival rate with increasing interactions. It is further found that a v2ini{Rnd } with respect to a random direction does not survive in v2{PP } but in the two-particle cumulant v2{2 } . The dependence of v2{2 } on v2ini{Rnd } is quadratic rather than linear.

  4. Probing Spin Dependent Quark and Gluon Distributions Through Azimuthal and Polarization Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Gary R.; Liuti, Simonetta

    2016-03-01

    Spin and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions - Generalized Parton Distributions, Transverse Momentum Distributions and related distributions - are at the interface between the QCD structure of the hadrons and observable quantities. The distributions are contained as linear superpositions within helicity amplitudes that factorize into universal forms at leading or next to leading order. These amplitudes are probed in high energy leptoproduction processes through angular dependent cross sections and polarization asymmetries. The phenomenological extraction of the amplitudes and the distributions is a challenging task. We will present some models for the distributions in leptoproduction processes, as well as the observables that connect with the quark-nucleon helicity amplitudes for different Deeply Virtual production possibilities.

  5. Detector-selection technique for Monte Carlo transport in azimuthally symmetric geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, T.J.; Tang, J.S.; Parks, C.V.

    1982-01-01

    Many radiation transport problems contain geometric symmetries which are not exploited in obtaining their Monte Carlo solutions. An important class of problems is that in which the geometry is symmetric about an axis. These problems arise in the analyses of a reactor core or shield, spent fuel shipping casks, tanks containing radioactive solutions, radiation transport in the atmosphere (air-over-ground problems), etc. Although amenable to deterministic solution, such problems can often be solved more efficiently and accurately with the Monte Carlo method. For this class of problems, a technique is described in this paper which significantly reduces the variance of the Monte Carlo-calculated effect of interest at point detectors.

  6. Multistation observations of the azimuth, polarization, and frequency dependence of ELF/VLF waves generated by electrojet modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxworth, A. S.; Gołkowski, M.; Cohen, M. B.; Moore, R. C.; Chorsi, H. T.; Gedney, S. D.; Jacobs, R.

    2015-10-01

    Modulated ionospheric heating experiments are performed with the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility in Gakona, Alaska, for the purpose of generating extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) waves. Observations are made at three different azimuths from the heating facility and at distances from 37 km to 99 km. The polarization of the observed waves is analyzed in addition to amplitude as a function of modulation frequency and azimuth. Amplitude and eccentricity are observed to vary with both azimuth and distance from the heating facility. It is found that waves radiated at azimuths northwest of the facility are generated by a combination of modulated Hall and Pedersen currents, while waves observed at other azimuths are dominated by modulated Hall currents. We find no evidence for vertical currents contributing to ground observations of ELF/VLF waves. Observed amplitude peaks near multiples of 2 kHz are shown to result from vertical resonances in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, and variations of the frequency of these resonances can be used to determine the D region ionosphere electron density profile in the vicinity of the HF heater.

  7. The cost of transportation`s oil dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Transportation is critical to the world`s oil dependence problem because of the large share of world oil it consumes and because of its intense dependence on oil. This paper will focus on the economic costs of transportation`s oil dependence.

  8. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p↑+p at √{s }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. F.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p↑+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η >0.5 , and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p +p collisions.

  9. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p^{↑}+p at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, W; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, X; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Ma, L; Ma, R; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, X; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Y F; Yang, Q; Yang, Y; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-12-11

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p^{↑}+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η>0.5, and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p+p collisions. PMID:26705627

  10. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-15

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ?{sub 1}(r)?cos(kz)?cos(?t?l?), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ? matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ?{sub R}, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ? but becomes negligible at higher ?. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ? (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude ?r???v{sub r}/?{sub T}, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ? increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ? values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  11. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ1(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt-lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ωR, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ vr/ωT, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  12. Spin-dependent energy distribution of B-hadrons from polarized top decays considering the azimuthal correlation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi Nejad, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    Basically, the energy distribution of bottom-flavored hadrons produced through polarized top quark decays t (↑) →W+ + b (→Xb), is governed by the unpolarized rate and the polar and the azimuthal correlation functions which are related to the density matrix elements of the decay t (↑) → bW+. Here we present, for the first time, the analytical expressions for the O (αs) radiative corrections to the differential azimuthal decay rates of the partonic process t (↑) → b +W+ in two helicity systems, which are needed to study the azimuthal distribution of the energy spectrum of the hadrons produced in polarized top decays. These spin-momentum correlations between the top quark spin and its decay product momenta will allow the detailed studies of the top decay mechanism. Our predictions of the hadron energy distributions also enable us to deepen our knowledge of the hadronization process and to test the universality and scaling violations of the bottom-flavored meson fragmentation functions.

  13. Azimuthal dependence of pion source radii in Pb+Au collisions at 158A GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Adamova, D.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Agakichiev, G.; Belaga, V.; Fomenko, K.; Panebrattsev, Y.; Petchenova, O.; Shimansky, S.; Yurevich, V.; Andronic, A.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Garabatos, C.; Hering, G.; Holeczek, J.; Maas, A.; Marin, A.; Miskowiec, D.; Rak, J.; Sako, H.

    2008-12-15

    We present results of a two-pion correlation analysis performed with the Pb+Au collision data collected by the upgraded CERES experiment in the fall of 2000. The analysis was done in bins of the reaction centrality and the pion azimuthal emission angle with respect to the reaction plane. The pion source, deduced from the data, is slightly elongated in the direction perpendicular to the reaction plane, similarly as was observed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  14. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Attri, A; Averichev, G S; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, J D; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chatterjee, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A I; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Horvat, S; Huang, T; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jentsch, A; Jia, J; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikoła, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, W; Lin, T; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McKinzie, S; Meehan, K; Mei, J C; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Niida, T; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V A; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Pluta, J; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, A; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, Z; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Singha, S; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solyst, W; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Todoroki, T; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xie, G; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Z; Xu, J; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J B; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2016-03-18

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au+Au collisions for energies ranging from sqrt[s_{NN}]=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v_{3}^{2}{2}=⟨cos3(ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2})⟩, where ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2} is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δη=η_{1}-η_{2}. Nonzero v_{3}^{2}{2} is directly related to the previously observed large-Δη narrow-Δϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v_{3}^{2}{2} persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v_{3}^{2}{2} is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v_{3}^{2}{2} for central collisions shows a minimum near sqrt[s_{NN}]=20  GeV. PMID:27035295

  15. Transverse-rapidity yt dependence of the nonjet azimuth quadrupole from 62- and 200-GeV Au-Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettler, David T.; Prindle, Duncan J.; Trainor, Thomas A.

    2015-06-01

    Previous measurements of a quadrupole component of azimuth correlations denoted by symbol v2 have been interpreted to represent elliptic flow, a hydrodynamic phenomenon conjectured to play a major role in noncentral nucleus-nucleus collisions. v2 measurements provide the main support for conclusions that a "perfect liquid" is formed in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. However, conventional v2 methods based on one-dimensional (1D) azimuth correlations give inconsistent results and may include a jet contribution. In some cases the data trends appear to be inconsistent with hydrodynamic interpretations. In this study we distinguish several components of 2D angular correlations and isolate a nonjet (NJ) azimuth quadrupole denoted by v2{2D} . We establish systematic variations of the NJ quadrupole on yt, centrality, and collision energy. We adopt transverse-rapidity yt as both a velocity measure and a logarithmic alternative to transverse momentum pt. Based on NJ-quadrupole trends, we derive a completely factorized universal parametrization of quantity v2{2D} (yt,b ,√{sN N}) which describes the centrality, yt, and energy dependence. From yt-differential v2(yt) data we isolate a quadrupole spectrum and infer a quadrupole source boost having unexpected properties. NJ quadrupole v2 trends obtained with 2D model fits are remarkably simple. The centrality trend appears to be uncorrelated with a sharp transition in jet-related structure that may indicate rapid change of Au-Au medium properties. The lack of correspondence suggests that the NJ quadrupole may be insensitive to such a medium. Several quadrupole trends have interesting implications for hydro interpretations.

  16. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Semertzidis, Y.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.; STAR Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    Parity (P)-odd domains, corresponding to nontrivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the orbital momentum of the system created in noncentral collisions. To study this effect, we investigate a three-particle mixed-harmonics azimuthal correlator which is a P-even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge-separation effect. We report measurements of this observable using the STAR detector in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at sNN=200 and 62 GeV. The results are presented as a function of collision centrality, particle separation in rapidity, and particle transverse momentum. A signal consistent with several of the theoretical expectations is detected in all four data sets. We compare our results to the predictions of existing event generators and discuss in detail possible contributions from other effects that are not related to P violation.

  17. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the orbital momentum of the system created in non-central collisions. To study this effect, we investigate a three particle mixed harmonics azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho}-even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of this observable using the STAR detector in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 and 62 GeV. The results are presented as a function of collision centrality, particle separation in rapidity, and particle transverse momentum. A signal consistent with several of the theoretical expectations is detected in all four data sets. We compare our results to the predictions of existing event generators, and discuss in detail possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  18. Particle-type dependence of azimuthal anisotropy and nuclearmodification of particle production in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman,R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll,J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay,S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Drosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.K.; et al.

    2003-06-18

    We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v{sub 2} and the binary-collision scaled centrality ratio R{sub CP} for kaons and lambdas ({Lambda} + {bar {Lambda}}) at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. In combination, the v{sub 2} and R{sub CP} particle-type dependencies contradict expectations from partonic energy loss followed by standard fragmentation in vacuum. We establish p{sub T} {approx} 5 GeV/c as the value where the centrality dependent baryon enhancement ends. The K{sub S}{sup 0} and {Lambda} + {bar {Lambda}} v{sub 2} values are consistent with expectations of constituent-quark-number scaling from models of hadron formation by parton coalescence or recombination.

  19. Temperature dependence of fluid transport in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baoxing; Wang, Binglei; Park, Taehyo; Qiao, Yu; Zhou, Qulan; Chen, Xi

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the temperature-dependent nanofluidic transport behavior is critical for developing thermomechanical nanodevices. By using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the thermally responsive transport resistance of liquids in model carbon nanotubes is explored as a function of the nanopore size, the transport rate, and the liquid properties. Both the effective shear stress and the nominal viscosity decrease with the increase of temperature, and the temperature effect is coupled with other non-thermal factors. The molecular-level mechanisms are revealed through the study of the radial density profile and hydrogen bonding of confined liquid molecules. The findings are verified qualitatively with an experiment on nanoporous carbon.

  20. Gravity-dependent transport in industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1994-01-01

    Gravity-dependent transport phenomena in various industrial processes are investigated in order to address a broader range of microgravity phenomena and to develop new applications of microgravity. A number of important topics are identified and analyzed in detail. The present article describes results on coating flow, zeolite growth, and rotating electrochemical system.

  1. Time-dependent modelling of mass-loading, transport, chemistry and magnetic fields in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Radial profiles of plasma flux tube content are often modelled using diffusive plasma transport using an assumed source rate and diffusion coefficient. Such diffusive transport modelling can be combined with neutral-cloud theory to provide time-dependent chemistry in the plasma torus. Independently, and not necessarily self-consistently, the radial profile of the plasma azimuthal velocity can be calculated using the Hill-Pontius equation, for the mathematically separable case where the source and transport regions are spatially distinct. These steady state profiles can be imposed into a magnetospheric model to understand the resulting fields and currents. In a non-steady state where the plasma source rate is varying, and/or the outflowing plasma is not in equilibrium, these solutions do not apply. Hence, important questions concerning time-dependent variability in the jovian and saturnian magnetospheres cannot be adequately addressed using such models. In this paper we present a new approach where we solve the time-dependent equations for diffusive radial transport of both mass and angular momentum coupled with a neutral-plasma chemistry model, thus allowing for time-dependent plasma sources and the motion of radial structures produced by such time-dependence. These time-dependent solutions are coupled to an Euler potential magnetospheric model to calculate time-dependent magnetospheric configurations. We present our modelling methodology and the first results from this coupled model.

  2. Dopamine transporter levels in cocaine dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Newberg, Andrew; Wintering, Nancy; Ploessl, Karl; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Ring-Kurtz, Sarah; Gallop, Robert; Present, Julie

    2008-11-01

    Cocaine use is a significant problem in the US and it is well established that cocaine binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT) in the brain. This study was designed to determine if the DAT levels measured by 99mTc TRODAT SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) brain scans are altered in cocaine dependent subjects and to explore clinical correlates of such alterations. SPECT brain scans were acquired on 21 cocaine dependent subjects and 21 healthy matched controls. There were significantly higher DAT levels in cocaine dependent subjects compared to controls for the anterior putamen (p=0.003; Cohen's d effect size=0.98), posterior putamen (p<0.001; effect size=1.32), and caudate (p=0.003; effect size=0.97). DAT levels in these regions were 10%, 17%, and 8% higher in the cocaine dependent subjects compared to controls. DAT levels were unrelated to craving, severity of cocaine use, or duration of cocaine use, but DAT levels in the caudate and anterior putamen were significantly (p<0.05) negatively correlated with days since last use of cocaine. PMID:18565692

  3. Spin Dependent Transport in Novel Magnetic Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayathilaka, Priyanga Buddhika

    Magnetic oxides have become of interest source for spin transport devices due to their high spin polarization. But the real applications of these oxides remains unsatisfactory up to date, mostly due to the change of properties as a result of nano structuring. Magnetite (Fe3O4) is one such a material. High Curie temperature and the half metallicity of Fe 3O4 make it a good potential candidate for spin transport devices. Studies have shown that the nano structuring Fe3O 4 changes most of it's important properties. This includes high saturation magnetization and drop of conductivity by a few orders of magnitude in Fe 3O4 thin films. In this study, we have successfully grown Fe3O4 by reactive sputtering and studied the effect of transition metal buffer layers on structural, transport, and magnetic properties of Fe3O 4. It is shown that the lattice strain created by different buffer layers has major impacts on the properties of Fe3O4 thin films. Also for the first time, the magnetic force microscopic measurements were carried out in Fe3O4 thin films through Verway transition. MFM data with the magnetization data have confirmed that the magnetization of Fe3O4 thin films rotate slightly out of the plane below the Verway transition. Fe3O4 thin films were also successfully used in fabricating spin valve structures with Chromium and Permalloy. Here, the Fe 3O4 was used to generated the spin polarized electrons through reflection instead of direct spin injection. This is a novel method that can be used to inject spins into materials with different conductivities, where the traditional direct spin injection fails. Also the effect of growth field on Fe3O4 and Fe3O4/Cr/Py spin valves were investigated. In Fe3O4 the growth field induced an uni-axial anisotropy while it creates a well define parallel and anti-parallel states in spin valves. Magneto thermal phenomenon including spin dependent Seebeck effectt, Planar Nernst effectt and Anomalous Nernst effectt were measured in ferromagnetic thin films and spin valves. Spin dependent Seebeck effectt and planar Nernst effectt were directly compared with the charge counterpart anisotropic magneto resistance. All the effects exhibited similar behavior indicating the same origin, namely spin dependent scattering.

  4. 32 CFR 718.3 - Transportation of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transportation of dependents. 718.3 Section 718... PERSONS ACT § 718.3 Transportation of dependents. (a) Whenever a person in active service is officially... and circumstances of the dependents and the destination to which transportation is requested. In...

  5. 32 CFR 718.3 - Transportation of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transportation of dependents. 718.3 Section 718... PERSONS ACT § 718.3 Transportation of dependents. (a) Whenever a person in active service is officially... and circumstances of the dependents and the destination to which transportation is requested. In...

  6. 32 CFR 718.3 - Transportation of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transportation of dependents. 718.3 Section 718... PERSONS ACT § 718.3 Transportation of dependents. (a) Whenever a person in active service is officially... and circumstances of the dependents and the destination to which transportation is requested. In...

  7. Centrality dependence of dihadron correlations and azimuthal anisotropy harmonics in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-05-01

    Measurements from the CMS experiment at the LHC of dihadron correlations for charged particles produced in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV are presented. The results are reported as a function of the particle transverse momenta (pt) and collision centrality over a broad range in relative pseudorapidity [Delta(eta)] and the full range of relative azimuthal angle [Delta(phi)]. The observed two-dimensional correlation structure in Delta(eta) and Delta(phi) is characterised by a narrow peak at (Delta(eta), Delta(phi)) approximately (0, 0) from jet-like correlations and a long-range structure that persists up to at least |Delta(eta)| = 4. An enhancement of the magnitude of the short-range jet peak is observed with increasing centrality, especially for particles of pt around 1-2 GeV/c. The long-range azimuthal dihadron correlations are extensively studied using a Fourier decomposition analysis. The extracted Fourier coefficients are found to factorise into a product of single-particle azimuthal anisotropies up to pt approximately 3-3.5 GeV/c for at least one particle from each pair, except for the second-order harmonics in the most central PbPb events. Various orders of the single-particle azimuthal anisotropy harmonics are extracted for associated particle pt of 1-3 GeV/c, as a function of the trigger particle pt up to 20 GeV/c and over the full centrality range.

  8. Azimuthal anisotropy relative to the participant plane from a multiphase transport model in central p +Au , d +Au , and 3He+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Adare, A.; McGlinchey, D.; Nagle, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    Recent data from p +p and p +Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and d +Au and 3He+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) reveal patterns that—when observed in the collision of heavy nuclei—are commonly interpreted as indicators of a locally equilibrated system in collective motion. The comparison of these data sets, including the forthcoming results from p +Au and p +Al collisions at RHIC, will help to elucidate the geometric dependence of such patterns. It has recently been shown that a multiphase transport model (AMPT) can describe some of these features in LHC data with a parton-parton scattering cross section comparable to that required to describe A +A data. In this paper, we extend these studies by incorporating a full wave-function description of the 3He nucleus to calculate elliptical and triangular anisotropy moments v2 and v3 for p +Au , d +Au , and 3He+Au collisions at the RHIC top energy of 200 GeV. We find reasonable agreement with the measured v2 in d +Au and 3He+Au and v3 in 3He+Au for transverse momentum (pT)≲1 GeV /c , but underestimate these measurements for higher values of pT. We predict a pattern of coefficients (v2,v3) for p +Au , dominated by differences in the number of induced local hot spots (i.e., one, two, or three) arising from intrinsic geometry. Additionally, we examine how this substantial azimuthal anisotropy accrues during each individual evolutionary phase of the collision in the AMPT model. The possibility of a simultaneous description of RHIC- and LHC-energy data, the suite of different geometries, and high multiplicity p +p data is an exciting possibility for understanding the underlying physics in these systems.

  9. 14 CFR 171.313 - Azimuth performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Azimuth performance requirements. 171.313 Section 171.313 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.313 Azimuth performance requirements....

  10. 14 CFR 171.313 - Azimuth performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Azimuth performance requirements. 171.313 Section 171.313 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.313 Azimuth performance requirements....

  11. 14 CFR 171.315 - Azimuth monitor system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Azimuth monitor system requirements. 171.315 Section 171.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.315 Azimuth monitor system...

  12. 14 CFR 171.315 - Azimuth monitor system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Azimuth monitor system requirements. 171.315 Section 171.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.315 Azimuth monitor system...

  13. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument - Part 1: Retrieval of 3-D distributions of NO2 and azimuth-dependent OVOC ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Koenig, T.; Sinreich, R.; Thomson, D.; Volkamer, R.

    2015-06-01

    We present an innovative instrument telescope and describe a retrieval method to probe three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of atmospheric trace gases that are relevant to air pollution and tropospheric chemistry. The University of Colorado (CU) two-dimensional (2-D) multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument measures nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), oxygen dimer (O2-O2, or O4), and water vapor (H2O); nitrous acid (HONO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and iodine monoxide (IO) are among other gases that can in principle be measured. Information about aerosols is derived through coupling with a radiative transfer model (RTM). The 2-D telescope has three modes of operation: mode 1 measures solar scattered photons from any pair of elevation angle (-20° < EA < +90° or zenith; zero is to the horizon) and azimuth angle (-180° < AA < +180°; zero being north); mode 2 measures any set of azimuth angles (AAs) at constant elevation angle (EA) (almucantar scans); and mode 3 tracks the direct solar beam via a separate view port. Vertical profiles of trace gases are measured and used to estimate mixing layer height (MLH). Horizontal distributions are then derived using MLH and parameterization of RTM (Sinreich et al., 2013). NO2 is evaluated at different wavelengths (350, 450, and 560 nm), exploiting the fact that the effective path length varies systematically with wavelength. The area probed is constrained by O4 observations at nearby wavelengths and has a diurnal mean effective radius of 7.0 to 25 km around the instrument location; i.e., up to 1960 km2 can be sampled with high time resolution. The instrument was deployed as part of the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) in Mainz, Germany, from 7 June to 6 July 2013. We present first measurements (modes 1 and 2 only) and describe a four-step retrieval to derive (a) boundary layer vertical profiles and MLH of NO2; (b) near-surface horizontal distributions of NO2; (c) range-resolved NO2 horizontal distribution measurements using an "onion-peeling" approach; and (d) the ratios HCHO to NO2 (RFN), CHOCHO to NO2 (RGN), and CHOCHO to HCHO (RGF) at 14 pre-set azimuth angles distributed over a 360° view. Three-dimensional distribution measurements with 2-D-MAX-DOAS provide an innovative, regional perspective of trace gases as well as their spatial and temporal concentration gradients, and they maximize information to compare near-surface observations with atmospheric models and satellites.

  14. Polar and azimuthal angular dependence of coherent to incoherent scattering differential cross-section ratios of Au at 59.54 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkuş, Tuba; Pirimoğlu Dal, Mevşen; Şahin, Yusuf

    2015-12-01

    Coherent to incoherent differential cross-section ratios of Au have been measured for several polar scattering angles (90°, 100°, 110°, 120° and 130°) and azimuthal angles (30°, 20°, 10°, 0°, -10°, and -20°) at 59.54 keV photon energy by using high purity germanium (HPGe) detector, which has a resolution of 199.6 eV at the 5.9 keV. The samples were excited with 59.54 keV gamma rays emitted from 3.7×109 Bq (100 mCi) Am241 point source. The intensity ratios were corrected due to the photopeak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the target and air. The experimental values obtained in this study were compared with those estimated on the basis of the non-relativistic form factors and relativistic form factors.

  15. On the dependence of the efficiency of a 240 GHz high-power gyrotron on the displacement of the electron beam and on the azimuthal index

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Jelonnek, J.

    2014-01-15

    Two issues in the cavity design for a Megawatt-class, 240 GHz gyrotron are addressed. Those are first, the effect of a misaligned electron beam on the gyrotron efficiency and second, a possible azimuthal instability of the gyrotron. The aforementioned effects are important for any gyrotron operation, but could be more critical in the operation of Megawatt-class gyrotrons at frequencies above 200 GHz, which will be the anticipated requirement of DEMO. The target is to provide some basic trends to be considered during the refinement and optimization of the design. Self-consistent calculations are the base for simulations wherever possible. However, in cases for which self-consistent models were not available, fixed-field results are presented. In those cases, the conservative nature of the results should be kept in mind.

  16. 32 CFR 718.3 - Transportation of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation of dependents. 718.3 Section 718.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MISSING PERSONS ACT § 718.3 Transportation of dependents. (a) Whenever a person in active service is officially reported as dead, injured, (Only when...

  17. Azimuthal-Angle Dependence of Charged-Pion-Interferometry Measurements with Respect to Second- and Third-Order Event Planes in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Charged-pion-interferometry measurements were made with respect to the second- and third-order event plane for Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV. A strong azimuthal-angle dependence of the extracted Gaussian-source radii was observed with respect to both the second- and third-order event planes. The results for the second-order dependence indicate that the initial eccentricity is reduced during the medium evolution, which is consistent with previous results. In contrast, the results for the third-order dependence indicate that the initial triangular shape is significantly reduced and potentially reversed by the end of the medium evolution, and that the third-order oscillations are largely dominated by the dynamical effects from triangular flow.

  18. Azimuthal-angle dependence of charged-pion-interferometry measurements with respect to second- and third-order event planes in Au+Au collisions at √[S(NN)]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E-J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2014-06-01

    Charged-pion-interferometry measurements were made with respect to the second- and third-order event plane for Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200  GeV. A strong azimuthal-angle dependence of the extracted Gaussian-source radii was observed with respect to both the second- and third-order event planes. The results for the second-order dependence indicate that the initial eccentricity is reduced during the medium evolution, which is consistent with previous results. In contrast, the results for the third-order dependence indicate that the initial triangular shape is significantly reduced and potentially reversed by the end of the medium evolution, and that the third-order oscillations are largely dominated by the dynamical effects from triangular flow. PMID:24949761

  19. Time-Dependent Thermal Transport Theory.

    PubMed

    Biele, Robert; D'Agosta, Roberto; Rubio, Angel

    2015-07-31

    Understanding thermal transport in nanoscale systems presents important challenges to both theory and experiment. In particular, the concept of local temperature at the nanoscale appears difficult to justify. Here, we propose a theoretical approach where we replace the temperature gradient with controllable external blackbody radiations. The theory recovers known physical results, for example, the linear relation between the thermal current and the temperature difference of two blackbodies. Furthermore, our theory is not limited to the linear regime and goes beyond accounting for nonlinear effects and transient phenomena. Since the present theory is general and can be adapted to describe both electron and phonon dynamics, it provides a first step toward a unified formalism for investigating thermal and electronic transport. PMID:26274434

  20. The CU 2-dimensional MAX-DOAS instrument - Part 1: Retrieval of NO2 in 3 dimensions and azimuth dependent OVOC ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Koenig, T.; Sinreich, R.; Thomson, D.; Volkamer, R.

    2014-11-01

    We present an innovative instrument telescope, and describe a retrieval method to probe 3-D distributions of atmospheric trace gases that are relevant to air pollution and tropospheric chemistry. The University of Colorado (CU) two dimensional (2-D) Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU 2D-MAX-DOAS) instrument measures nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), oxygen dimer (O2-O2, or O4) and water vapor (H2O); also nitrous acid (HONO), bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO) among other gases can in principle be measured. Information about aerosols is derived through coupling with a radiative transfer model (RTM). The 2-D telescope has 3 modes of operation: (mode 1) measures solar scattered photons from any pair of elevation angle (-20° < EA < +90° or zenith; zero is to the horizon) and azimuth angle (-180° < AA < +180°; zero being North), (mode 2) measures any set of AA at constant EA (almucantar scans); and (mode 3) tracks the direct solar beam via a separate view port. Vertical profiles of trace gases are measured, and used to estimate planetary boundary layer height (PBL). Horizontal distributions are then derived using PBL and parameterization of RTM (Sinreich et al., 2013). NO2 is evaluated at different wavelengths (350, 450, and 560 nm), exploiting the fact that the effective path length varies systematically with wavelength. The area probed is constrained by O4 observations at nearby wavelengths, and has an effective radius of 7.5 to 20 km around the instrument location; i.e., up to 1250 km2 can be sampled near-instantaneously, and with high time resolution. The instrument was deployed as part of the Multi Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) in Mainz, Germany from 7 June to 6 July 2013. We present first measurements (modes 1 and 2 only) and describe a four-step retrieval to derive (a) boundary layer vertical profiles of NO2 and PBL; (b) near-surface horizontal distributions of NO2; (c) range resolved NO2 horizontal distribution measurements using an "onion peeling" approach; and (d) the ratios HCHO-to-NO2 (RFN), CHOCHO-to-NO2 (RGN), and CHOCHO-to-HCHO (RGF) at 14 pre-set azimuth angles distributed over a 360° view. 2D-MAX-DOAS provides an innovative, regional perspective about trace gases, their spatial and temporal concentration gradients, and maximizes information to compare near-surface observations with atmospheric models and satellites.

  1. Spin dependent transport effects in Cu nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillingham, D. M.; Müller, C.; Bland, J. A. C.

    2004-06-01

    In this work we investigate quantum transport in Cu nanowires created by bringing macroscopic Cu wires into and out of contact under an applied magnetic field in air. Here we show that a 70% magnetoconductance effect can be seen in a Cu nanowire in a field of 2 mT at room temperature. We propose that this phenomenon is a consequence of spin filtering due to the adsorption of atmospheric oxygen modifying the electronic band structure and introducing spin split conduction channels. Since bulk Cu is not magnetic it may provide a new perspective for spintronics.

  2. Particle-type dependence of azimuthal anisotropy and nuclear modification of particle production in Au+Au collisions at square root of sNN=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-02-01

    We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v(2) and the binary-collision scaled centrality ratio R(CP) for kaons and lambdas (Lambda+Lambda) at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN)=200 GeV. In combination, the v(2) and R(CP) particle-type dependencies contradict expectations from partonic energy loss followed by standard fragmentation in vacuum. We establish p(T) approximately 5 GeV/c as the value where the centrality dependent baryon enhancement ends. The K(0)(S) and Lambda+Lambda v(2) values are consistent with expectations of constituent-quark-number scaling from models of hadron formation by parton coalescence or recombination. PMID:14995300

  3. Azimuthal Spoke Propagation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Spokes are azimuthally propagating perturbations in the plasma discharge of Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) that travel in the E x B direction and have been observed in many different systems. The propagation of azimuthal spokes are investigated in a 6 kW HET known as the H6 using ultra-fast imaging and azimuthally spaced probes. A spoke surface is a 2-D plot of azimuthal light intensity evolution over time calculated from 87,500 frames/s videos. The spoke velocity has been determined using three methods with similar results: manual fitting of diagonal lines on the spoke surface, linear cross-correlation between azimuthal locations and an approximated dispersion relation. The spoke velocity for three discharge voltages (300, 400 and 450 V) and three anode mass flow rates (14.7, 19.5 and 25.2 mg/s) yielded spoke velocities between 1500 and 2200 m/s across a range of normalized magnetic field settings. The spoke velocity was inversely dependent on magnetic field strength for low B-field settings and asymptoted at B-field higher values. The velocities and frequencies are compared to standard drifts and plasma waves such as E x B drift, electrostatic ion cyclotron, magnetosonic and various drift waves. The empirically approximated dispersion relation yielded a characteristic velocity that matched the ion acoustic speed for 5 eV electrons that exist in the near-anode and near-field plume regions of the discharge channel based on internal measurements. Thruster performance has been linked to operating mode where thrust-to-power is maximized when azimuthal spokes are present so investigating the underlying mechanism of spokes will benefit thruster operation.

  4. Azimuthal Anisotropy of π0 Production in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN=200  GeV: Path-Length Dependence of Jet Quenching and the Role of Initial Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2010-10-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of {pi}{sup 0} production for 1 < p{sub T} < 18 GeV/c for Au+Au collisions at {radical} s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The observed anisotropy shows a gradual decrease for 3 {approx}< p{sub T} {approx}< 7-10 GeV/c, but remains positive beyond 10 GeV/c. The magnitude of this anisotropy is underpredicted, up to at least {approx}10 GeV/c, by current perturbative QCD (PQCD) energy-loss model calculations. An estimate of the increase in anisotropy expected from initial-geometry modification due to gluon saturation effects and fluctuations is insufficient to account for this discrepancy. Calculations that implement a path-length dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data.

  5. Azimuthal anisotropy of π⁰ production in Au+Au collisions at sqrt((s)NN)=200  GeV: path-length dependence of jet quenching and the role of initial geometry.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hanks, J; Han, R; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hegyi, S; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; He, X; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E J; Kim, E; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Okada, K; Oka, M; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; You, Z; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2010-10-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of π⁰ production for 1dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data. PMID:21230825

  6. Azimuthal Anisotropy of {pi}{sup 0} Production in Au+Au Collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV: Path-Length Dependence of Jet Quenching and the Role of Initial Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Bickley, A. A.; Ellinghaus, F.; Glenn, A.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Nagle, J. L.; Rosen, C. A.; Seele, J.; Wysocki, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L.; Aidala, C.; Datta, A.

    2010-10-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of {pi}{sup 0} production for 1dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data.

  7. Azimuthal Anisotropy of π0 Production in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV: Path-Length Dependence of Jet Quenching and the Role of Initial Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'Yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hegyi, S.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; He, X.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; You, Z.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2010-10-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of π0 production for 1dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data.

  8. Azimuthal Anisotropy of pi Production in Au+Au Collisions at s_NN = 200 GeV: Path-length Dependence of Jet-Quenching and the Role of Initial Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of {pi}{sup 0} production for 1 < p{sub T} < 18 GeV/c for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The observed anisotropy shows a gradual decrease for 3 {approx}< p {approx}< 7-10 GeV/c, but remains positive beyond 10 GeV/c. The magnitude of this anisotropy is underpredicted, up to at least {approx}10 GeV/c, by current perturbative QCD (PQCD) energy-loss model calculations. An estimate of the increase in anisotropy expected from initial-geometry modification due to gluon saturation effects and fluctuations is insufficient to account for this discrepancy. Calculations that implement a path-length dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data.

  9. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  10. TonB-dependent transporters and their occurrence in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mirus, Oliver; Strauss, Sascha; Nicolaisen, Kerstin; von Haeseler, Arndt; Schleiff, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Background Different iron transport systems evolved in Gram-negative bacteria during evolution. Most of the transport systems depend on outer membrane localized TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs), a periplasma-facing TonB protein and a plasma membrane localized machinery (ExbBD). So far, iron chelators (siderophores), oligosaccharides and polypeptides have been identified as substrates of TBDTs. For iron transport, three uptake systems are defined: the lactoferrin/transferrin binding proteins, the porphyrin-dependent transporters and the siderophore-dependent transporters. However, for cyanobacteria almost nothing is known about possible TonB-dependent uptake systems for iron or other substrates. Results We have screened all publicly available eubacterial genomes for sequences representing (putative) TBDTs. Based on sequence similarity, we identified 195 clusters, where elements of one cluster may possibly recognize similar substrates. For Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 we identified 22 genes as putative TBDTs covering almost all known TBDT subclasses. This is a high number of TBDTs compared to other cyanobacteria. The expression of the 22 putative TBDTs individually depends on the presence of iron, copper or nitrogen. Conclusion We exemplified on TBDTs the power of CLANS-based classification, which demonstrates its importance for future application in systems biology. In addition, the tentative substrate assignment based on characterized proteins will stimulate the research of TBDTs in different species. For cyanobacteria, the atypical dependence of TBDT gene expression on different nutrition points to a yet unknown regulatory mechanism. In addition, we were able to clarify a hypothesis of the absence of TonB in cyanobacteria by the identification of according sequences. PMID:19821963

  11. Random sources for beams with azimuthal intensity variation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-02-01

    The structure of the degree of coherence of wide-sense statistically stationary planar sources radiating far fields with intensity patterns with azimuthal dependence is determined, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. The Fourier series basis is used in decomposing arbitrary far-field intensity for obtaining the azimuthal modes, which are shown to correspond to the spatial frequency components of the source degree of coherence. The far fields with azimuthal structure can be produced experimentally with the help of spatial light modulators. PMID:26907412

  12. Azimuthal Frustration and Bundling in Columnar DNA Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Harreis, H. M.; Likos, C. N.; Löwen, H.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between two stiff parallel DNA molecules is discussed using linear Debye-Hückel screening theory with and without inclusion of the dielectric discontinuity at the DNA surface, taking into account the helical symmetry of DNA. The pair potential furthermore includes the amount and distribution of counterions adsorbed on the DNA surface. The interaction does not only depend on the interaxial separation of two DNA molecules, but also on their azimuthal orientation. The optimal mutual azimuthal angle is a function of the DNA-DNA interaxial separation, which leads to azimuthal frustrations in an aggregate. On the basis of the pair potential, the positional and orientational order in columnar B-DNA assemblies in solution is investigated. Phase diagrams are calculated using lattice sums supplemented with the entropic contributions of the counterions in solution. A variety of positionally and azimuthally ordered phases and bundling transitions is predicted, which strongly depend on the counterion adsorption patterns. PMID:12770870

  13. Post-Golgi anterograde transport requires GARP-dependent endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Tetsuya; Fujita, Morihisa; Nakamura, Shota; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Murakami, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2015-01-01

    The importance of endosome-to–trans-Golgi network (TGN) retrograde transport in the anterograde transport of proteins is unclear. In this study, genome-wide screening of the factors necessary for efficient anterograde protein transport in human haploid cells identified subunits of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, a tethering factor involved in endosome-to-TGN transport. Knockout (KO) of each of the four GARP subunits, VPS51–VPS54, in HEK293 cells caused severely defective anterograde transport of both glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins from the TGN. Overexpression of VAMP4, v-SNARE, in VPS54-KO cells partially restored not only endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport, but also anterograde transport of both GPI-anchored and transmembrane proteins. Further screening for genes whose overexpression normalized the VPS54-KO phenotype identified TMEM87A, encoding an uncharacterized Golgi-resident membrane protein. Overexpression of TMEM87A or its close homologue TMEM87B in VPS54-KO cells partially restored endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport and anterograde transport. Therefore GARP- and VAMP4-dependent endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport is required for recycling of molecules critical for efficient post-Golgi anterograde transport of cell-surface integral membrane proteins. In addition, TMEM87A and TMEM87B are involved in endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport. PMID:26157166

  14. Measurement of the azimuthal angle dependence of inclusive jet yields in Pb+Pb collisions at √(sNN)=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Zivković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    2013-10-11

    Measurements of the variation of inclusive jet suppression as a function of relative azimuthal angle, Δφ, with respect to the elliptic event plane provide insight into the path-length dependence of jet quenching. ATLAS has measured the Δφ dependence of jet yields in 0.14 nb(-1) of √(s(NN))=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC for jet transverse momenta p(T)>45 GeV in different collision centrality bins using an underlying event subtraction procedure that accounts for elliptic flow. The variation of the jet yield with Δφ was characterized by the parameter, v(2)(jet), and the ratio of out-of-plane (Δφ~π/2) to in-plane (Δφ~0) yields. Nonzero v(2)(jet) values were measured in all centrality bins for p(T)<160 GeV. The jet yields are observed to vary by as much as 20% between in-plane and out-of-plane directions. PMID:24160592

  15. Measurement of the Azimuthal Angle Dependence of Inclusive Jet Yields in Pb+Pb Collisions at sNN=2.76TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. 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J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tuna, A. N.; Turala, M.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of the variation of inclusive jet suppression as a function of relative azimuthal angle, Δϕ, with respect to the elliptic event plane provide insight into the path-length dependence of jet quenching. ATLAS has measured the Δϕ dependence of jet yields in 0.14nb-1 of sNN=2.76TeV Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC for jet transverse momenta pT>45GeV in different collision centrality bins using an underlying event subtraction procedure that accounts for elliptic flow. The variation of the jet yield with Δϕ was characterized by the parameter, v2jet, and the ratio of out-of-plane (Δϕ˜π/2) to in-plane (Δϕ˜0) yields. Nonzero v2jet values were measured in all centrality bins for pT<160GeV. The jet yields are observed to vary by as much as 20% between in-plane and out-of-plane directions.

  16. Microfluidic-Enabled Liposomes Elucidate Size-Dependent Transdermal Transport

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, Mariana; Vreeland, Wyatt N.; Quezado, Zenaide; Finkel, Julia C.; DeVoe, Don L.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic synthesis of small and nearly-monodisperse liposomes is used to investigate the size-dependent passive transdermal transport of nanoscale lipid vesicles. While large liposomes with diameters above 105 nm are found to be excluded from deeper skin layers past the stratum corneum, the primary barrier to nanoparticle transport, liposomes with mean diameters between 31–41 nm exhibit significantly enhanced penetration. Furthermore, multicolor fluorescence imaging reveals that the smaller liposomes pass rapidly through the stratum corneum without vesicle rupture. These findings reveal that nanoscale liposomes with well-controlled size and minimal size variance are excellent vehicles for transdermal delivery of functional nanoparticle drugs. PMID:24658111

  17. Microtubule-dependent transport and dynamics of vimentin intermediate filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hookway, Caroline; Ding, Liya; Davidson, Michael W.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Danuser, Gaudenz; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    We studied two aspects of vimentin intermediate filament dynamicstransport of filaments and subunit exchange. We observed transport of long filaments in the periphery of cells using live-cell structured illumination microscopy. We studied filament transport elsewhere in cells using a photoconvertible-vimentin probe and total internal reflection microscopy. We found that filaments were rapidly transported along linear tracks in both anterograde and retrograde directions. Filament transport was microtubule dependent but independent of microtubule polymerization and/or an interaction with the plus endbinding protein APC. We also studied subunit exchange in filaments by long-term imaging after photoconversion. We found that converted vimentin remained in small clusters along the length of filaments rather than redistributing uniformly throughout the network, even in cells that divided after photoconversion. These data show that vimentin filaments do not depolymerize into individual subunits; they recompose by severing and reannealing. Together these results show that vimentin filaments are very dynamic and that their transport is required for network maintenance. PMID:25717187

  18. Substrate-dependent regulation of ascorbate transport in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.X.; Jaworski, E.M.; Kulaga, A.; Dixon, S.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Astrocytes possess a concentrative L-ascorbate (vitamin C) uptake mechanism involving a Na{sup +}-dependent L-ascorbate transporter in the plasma membrane. The present study examined the effects of ascorbate deprivation and supplementation on the activity of the transport system. Initial rates of L-ascorbate uptake were measured by incubating primary cultures of rat astrocytes with L-({sup 14}C)ascorbate for 1 minute at 37C. They observed that the maximal uptake rate, V{sub max}, rapidly (<3 hours) increased when cultured cells were deprived of L-ascorbate. There was no change in the apparent affinity (K{sub m}) of the transport system for ascorbate. V{sub max} returned to normal following addition of L-ascorbate, but not D-isoascorbate, to the medium. The authors conclude that astrocytes adapt ascorbate transport rates to changes in substrate availability. Furthermore, the data suggest that the transport system located in the astroglial plasma membrane regulates intracellular ascorbate concentration, because changes in transport rate may compensate for regional differences and temporal fluctuations in extracellular ascorbate levels.

  19. Chloride transporter KCC2-dependent neuroprotection depends on the N-terminal protein domain.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, A; Semtner, M; Meier, J C

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is a serious issue of neurodegenerative diseases including epilepsy. Downregulation of the chloride transporter KCC2 in the epileptic tissue may not only affect regulation of the polarity of GABAergic synaptic transmission but also neuronal survival. Here, we addressed the mechanisms of KCC2-dependent neuroprotection by assessing truncated and mutated KCC2 variants in different neurotoxicity models. The results identify a threonine- and tyrosine-phosphorylation-resistant KCC2 variant with increased chloride transport activity, but they also identify the KCC2 N-terminal domain (NTD) as the relevant minimal KCC2 protein domain that is sufficient for neuroprotection. As ectopic expression of the KCC2-NTD works independently of full-length KCC2-dependent regulation of Cl(-) transport or structural KCC2 C-terminus-dependent regulation of synaptogenesis, our study may pave the way for a selective neuroprotective therapeutic strategy that will be applicable to a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26043076

  20. Chloride transporter KCC2-dependent neuroprotection depends on the N-terminal protein domain

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, A; Semtner, M; Meier, J C

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is a serious issue of neurodegenerative diseases including epilepsy. Downregulation of the chloride transporter KCC2 in the epileptic tissue may not only affect regulation of the polarity of GABAergic synaptic transmission but also neuronal survival. Here, we addressed the mechanisms of KCC2-dependent neuroprotection by assessing truncated and mutated KCC2 variants in different neurotoxicity models. The results identify a threonine- and tyrosine-phosphorylation-resistant KCC2 variant with increased chloride transport activity, but they also identify the KCC2 N-terminal domain (NTD) as the relevant minimal KCC2 protein domain that is sufficient for neuroprotection. As ectopic expression of the KCC2-NTD works independently of full-length KCC2-dependent regulation of Cl− transport or structural KCC2 C-terminus-dependent regulation of synaptogenesis, our study may pave the way for a selective neuroprotective therapeutic strategy that will be applicable to a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26043076

  1. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  2. Temperature dependent electrical transport of disordered reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Narayanan, T. N.; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Talapatra, Saikat

    2014-06-01

    We report on the simple route for the synthesis of chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using ascorbic acid (a green chemical) as a reducing agent. Temperature-dependent electrical transport properties of rGO thin films have been studied in a wide range (50 K T 400 K) of temperature. Electrical conduction in rGO thin films was displayed in two different temperature regimes. At higher temperatures, Arrhenius-like temperature dependence of resistance was observed indicating a band gap dominating transport behavior. At lower temperatures, the rGO sample showed a conduction mechanism consistent with Mott's two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH). An unsaturated negative magnetoresistance (MR) was observed up to 3 T field. A decrease in negative MR at high temperatures is attributed to the phonon scattering of charge carriers.

  3. Single-electron approach for time-dependent electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvitz, Shmuel

    2015-10-01

    We developed a new approach to electron transport in mesoscopic systems by using a particular single-particle basis. Although this basis generates redundant many-particle amplitudes, it greatly simplifies the treatment. By using our method for transport of non-interacting electrons, we generalize the Landauer formula for transient currents and time-dependent potentials. The result has a very simple form and clear physical interpretation. As an example, we apply it to resonant tunneling through a quantum dot where the tunneling barriers are oscillating in time. We obtain an analytical expression for the time-dependent (ac) resonant current. However, in the adiabatic limit this expression displays the dc current for zero bias (electron pumping).

  4. Strain-modulation of spin-dependent transport in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Zhen-Zhou Hou, Jin; Cheng, Yan-Fu; Li, Guan-Qiang

    2014-10-27

    We investigate strain modulation of the spin-dependent electron transport in a graphene junction using the transfer matrix method. As an analogy to optics, we define the modulation depth in the electron optics domain. Additionally, we discuss the transport properties and show that the modulation depth and the conductance depend on the spin-orbit coupling strength, the strain magnitude, the width of the strained area, and the energy of the incident electron. The conductances of the spin-down and spin-up electrons have opposite and symmetrical variations, which results in the analogous features of their modulation depths. The maximum conditions for both the modulation depth and the electron spin upset rate are also analyzed.

  5. A Time-Dependent, Three-Dimensional Neutron Transport Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Goluoglu, Sedat; Dodds, H.L.

    2001-11-15

    An improved quasi-static method is applied to the time-dependent, three-dimensional neutron transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons. The relevant equations are derived, and the corresponding implementation of the method is presented. The resulting new code, which uses a three-dimensional, discrete ordinates code (TORT) to solve the static fixed-source equations, is tested using transient benchmark problems that are available in the literature. Results obtained with the new time-dependent code, named TDTORT, are in satisfactory agreement with the benchmark problem results.

  6. Engineering interband transport by time-dependent disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Tayebirad, Ghazal; Mannella, Riccardo; Wimberger, Sandro

    2011-09-15

    We show how the evolution of atoms in a tilted lattice can be changed and controlled by phase noise on the lattice. Dependent on the characteristic parameters of the noise, the interband transport can be either suppressed or enhanced, which is of interest for very precise control in experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates. The effect of the noise on the survival probability in the ground band is summarized in a scaling plot, stressing the universality of our results.

  7. Moisture dependence of radon transport in concrete: measurements and modeling.

    PubMed

    Cozmuta, I; van der Graaf, E R; de Meijer, R J

    2003-10-01

    The moisture dependence of the radon-release rate of concrete was measured under well controlled conditions. It was found that the radon-release rate almost linearly increases up to moisture contents of 50 to 60%. At 70 to 80% a maximum was found and for higher moisture contents the radon-release rate decreases very steeply. It is demonstrated that this dependence can be successfully modeled on basis of the multi-phase radon-transport equation in which values for various input parameters (porosity, diffusion coefficient, emanation factor, etc.) were obtained from independent measurements. Furthermore, a concrete structure development model was used to predict at any moment in time the values of input parameters that depend on the evolution of the concrete microstructure. Information on the concrete manufacturing recipe and curing conditions (temperature, relative humidity) was used as input for the concrete structure model. The combined radon transport and concrete structure model supplied sufficient information to assess the influence of relative humidity on the radon source and barrier aspects of concrete. More specifically, the model has been applied to estimate the relative contributions to the radon exhalation rate of a 20-cm-thick concrete slab of radon produced in the concrete slab itself and due to diffusive transport through the slab of radon from soil gas. PMID:13678285

  8. Field dependent spin transport of anisotropic Heisenberg chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, H.

    2016-04-01

    We have addressed the static spin conductivity and spin Drude weight of one-dimensional spin-1/2 anisotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain in the finite magnetic field. We have investigated the behavior of transport properties by means of excitation spectrum in terms of a hard core bosonic representation. The effect of in-plane anisotropy on the spin transport properties has also been studied via the bosonic model by Green's function approach. This anisotropy is considered for exchange constants that couple spin components perpendicular to magnetic field direction. We have found the temperature dependence of the spin conductivity and spin Drude weight in the gapped field induced spin-polarized phase for various magnetic field and anisotropy parameters. Furthermore we have studied the magnetic field dependence of static spin conductivity and Drude weight for various anisotropy parameters. Our results show the regular part of spin conductivity vanishes in isotropic case however Drude weight has a finite non-zero value and the system exhibits ballistic transport properties. We also find the peak in the static spin conductivity factor moves to higher temperature upon increasing the magnetic field at fixed anisotropy. The static spin conductivity is found to be monotonically decreasing with magnetic field due to increase of energy gap in the excitation spectrum. Furthermore we have studied the temperature dependence of spin Drude weight for different magnetic field and various anisotropy parameters.

  9. Cation-dependent nutrient transport in shrimp digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Tamla; Mozo, Julie; Wilson, Jennifer; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2012-02-01

    Purified epithelial brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were produced from the hepatopancreas of the Atlantic White shrimp, Litopeneaus setiferus, using standard methods originally developed for mammalian tissues and previously applied to other crustacean and echinoderm epithelia. These vesicles were used to study the cation dependency of sugar and amino acid transport across luminal membranes of hepatopancreatic epithelial cells. (3)H-D: -glucose uptake by BBMV against transient sugar concentration gradients occurred when either transmembrane sodium or potassium gradients were the only driving forces for sugar accumulation, suggesting the presence of a possible coupled transport system capable of using either cation. (3)H-L: -histidine transport was only stimulated by a transmembrane potassium gradient, while (3)H-L: -leucine uptake was enhanced by either a sodium or potassium gradient. These responses suggest the possible presence of a potassium-dependent transporter that accommodates either amino acid and a sodium-dependent system restricted only to L: -leucine. Uptake of (3)H-L: -leucine was significantly stimulated (P < 0.05) by several metallic cations (e.g., Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Cd(2+), or Co(2+)) at external pH values of 7.0 or 5.0 (internal pH 7.0), suggesting a potential synergistic role of the cations in the transmembrane transfer of amino acids. (3)H-L: -histidine influxes (15 suptakes) were hyperbolic functions of external [zinc] or [manganese], following Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The apparent affinity constant (e.g., K (m)) for manganese was an order of magnitude smaller (K (m) = 0.22 μM Mn) than that for zinc (K (m) = 1.80 μM Zn), while no significant difference (P > 0.05) occurred between their maximal transport velocities (e.g., J (max)). These results suggest that a number of cation-dependent nutrient transport systems occur on the shrimp brush border membrane and aid in the absorption of these important dietary elements. PMID:21983793

  10. Chloride dependent amino acid transport in the human small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Munck, L K

    1995-01-01

    Carriers of beta amino acids and imino acids in the small intestine of rabbits and guinea pigs are chloride dependent, and a cotransport of chloride, sodium, and 2-methyl-aminoisobutyric acid has been shown. This study examines the chloride dependence of amino acid transport in the human small intestine. The steady state tissue uptake of amino acids, given as the ratio between substrate concentration in intracellular and extracellular water after 35 minutes incubation at 37 degrees C, was determined in mucosal biopsy specimens from the duodenum of patients undergoing diagnostic upper endoscopy and compared using one way analysis of variance. Uptake of leucine and alpha-methyl-D-glucoside in the duodenum and the distal ileum did not differ. The accumulation of all substrates was sodium dependent. In the absence of mucosal chloride the uptake of taurine, glycine, and 2-methyl-aminoisobutyric acid was significantly reduced while that of leucine and alpha-methyl-D-glucoside was unaffected and the reduction of beta alanine uptake not statistically significant. Uptake of 2-methyl-aminoisobutyric acid and proline showed mutual inhibition. Leucine did not reduce uptake of the beta amino acids. In conclusion, chloride dependent transport processes for 2-methyl-amino-isobutyric acid, taurine, and glycine are present in the human small intestine. PMID:7883220

  11. Transport of hydrogen in metals with occupancy dependent trap energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, K.; von Toussaint, U.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.

    2014-10-01

    Common diffusion trapping models for modeling hydrogen transport in metals are limited to traps with single de-trapping energies and a saturation occupancy of one. While they are successful in predicting typical mono isotopic ion implantation and thermal degassing experiments, they fail at describing recent experiments on isotope exchange at low temperatures. This paper presents a new modified diffusion trapping model with fill level dependent de-trapping energies that can also explain these new isotope exchange experiments. Density function theory (DFT) calculations predict that even mono vacancies can store between 6 and 12 H atoms with de-trapping energies that depend on the fill level of the mono vacancy. The new fill level dependent diffusion trapping model allows to test these DFT results by bridging the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiment.

  12. Transport of hydrogen in metals with occupancy dependent trap energies

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, K. Toussaint, U. von; Schwarz-Selinger, T.

    2014-10-07

    Common diffusion trapping models for modeling hydrogen transport in metals are limited to traps with single de-trapping energies and a saturation occupancy of one. While they are successful in predicting typical mono isotopic ion implantation and thermal degassing experiments, they fail at describing recent experiments on isotope exchange at low temperatures. This paper presents a new modified diffusion trapping model with fill level dependent de-trapping energies that can also explain these new isotope exchange experiments. Density function theory (DFT) calculations predict that even mono vacancies can store between 6 and 12 H atoms with de-trapping energies that depend on the fill level of the mono vacancy. The new fill level dependent diffusion trapping model allows to test these DFT results by bridging the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiment.

  13. Two dimensional time dependent Riemann solvers for neutron transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Thomas A.; Holloway, James Paul

    2004-12-01

    A two-dimensional Riemann solver is developed for the spherical harmonics approximation to the time dependent neutron transport equation. The eigenstructure of the resulting equations is explored, giving insight into both the spherical harmonics approximation and the Riemann solver. The classic Roe-type Riemann solver used here was developed for one-dimensional problems, but can be used in multidimensional problems by treating each face of a two-dimensional computation cell in a locally one-dimensional way. Several test problems are used to explore the capabilities of both the Riemann solver and the spherical harmonics approximation. The numerical solution for a simple line source problem is compared to the analytic solution to both the P1 equation and the full transport solution. A lattice problem is used to test the method on a more challenging problem.

  14. Two-dimensional time dependent Riemann solvers for neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Thomas A. . E-mail: tabrunn@sandia.gov; Holloway, James Paul

    2005-11-20

    A two-dimensional Riemann solver is developed for the spherical harmonics approximation to the time dependent neutron transport equation. The eigenstructure of the resulting equations is explored, giving insight into both the spherical harmonics approximation and the Riemann solver. The classic Roe-type Riemann solver used here was developed for one-dimensional problems, but can be used in multidimensional problems by treating each face of a two-dimensional computation cell in a locally one-dimensional way. Several test problems are used to explore the capabilities of both the Riemann solver and the spherical harmonics approximation. The numerical solution for a simple line source problem is compared to the analytic solution to both the P{sub 1} equation and the full transport solution. A lattice problem is used to test the method on a more challenging problem.

  15. Conformation dependent electronic transport in a DNA double-helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    We present a tight-binding study of conformation dependent electronic transport properties of DNA double-helix including its helical symmetry. We have studied the changes in the localization properties of DNA as we alter the number of stacked bases within every pitch of the double-helix keeping fixed the total number of nitrogen bases within the DNA molecule. We take three DNA sequences, two of them are periodic and one is random and observe that in all the cases localization length increases as we increase the radius of DNA double-helix i.e., number of nucleobases within a pitch. We have also investigated the effect of backbone energetic on the I-V response of the system and found that in presence of helical symmetry, depending on the interplay of conformal variation and disorder, DNA can be found in either metallic, semiconducting and insulating phases, as observed experimentally.

  16. Anisotropic bias dependent transport property of defective phosphorene layer

    PubMed Central

    Umar Farooq, M.; Hashmi, Arqum; Hong, Jisang

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is receiving great research interests because of its peculiar physical properties. Nonetheless, no systematic studies on the transport properties modified due to defects have been performed. Here, we present the electronic band structure, defect formation energy and bias dependent transport property of various defective systems. We found that the defect formation energy is much less than that in graphene. The defect configuration strongly affects the electronic structure. The band gap vanishes in single vacancy layers, but the band gap reappears in divacancy layers. Interestingly, a single vacancy defect behaves like a p-type impurity for transport property. Unlike the common belief, we observe that the vacancy defect can contribute to greatly increasing the current. Along the zigzag direction, the current in the most stable single vacancy structure was significantly increased as compared with that found in the pristine layer. In addition, the current along the armchair direction was always greater than along the zigzag direction and we observed a strong anisotropic current ratio of armchair to zigzag direction. PMID:26198318

  17. Temperature dependence of atomic transport in ion mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, L.S.; Xia, W.; Poker, D.B.; Fernandes, M.; Tao, K.; Lau, S.S.; Mayer, J.W.

    1988-09-01

    The moving species during ion beam mixing of Si/Ni and Si/Pt bilayers were investigated at temperatures between liquid-nitrogen temperature (LN/sub 2/) and 180 /sup 0/C using imbedded markers and Rutherford backscattering. For Si/Ni samples irradiated with Ar ions, the flux ratio of Si to Ni decreased from 1.6 to 0.2 as the substrate temperature increased from LN/sub 2/ to 180 /sup 0/C. Over this range of substrate temperatures, the individual amount of Si atoms transported was found to remain unchanged; whereas the transport flux of Ni atoms was observed to increase. Similar temperature dependence of the flux ratio was found for the Si/Pt system. The experimental results indicate that the substantial Si motion is due to the temperature-independent part of ion mixing which is associated with collision cascades. The Ni motion is characteristic of radiation-enhanced diffusion which is substrate temperature dependent.

  18. Type IIc SodiumDependent Phosphate Transporter Regulates Calcium Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Segawa, Hiroko; Onitsuka, Akemi; Kuwahata, Masashi; Hanabusa, Etsuyo; Furutani, Junya; Kaneko, Ichiro; Tomoe, Yuka; Aranami, Fumito; Matsumoto, Natsuki; Ito, Mikiko; Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Primary renal inorganic phosphate (Pi) wasting leads to hypophosphatemia, which is associated with skeletal mineralization defects. In humans, mutations in the gene encoding the type IIc sodiumdependent phosphate transporter lead to hereditary hypophophatemic rickets with hypercalciuria, but whether Pi wasting directly causes the bone disorder is unknown. Here, we generated Npt2c-null mice to define the contribution of Npt2c to Pi homeostasis and to bone abnormalities. Homozygous mutants (Npt2c?/?) exhibited hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, and elevated plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels, but they did not develop hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphaturia, renal calcification, rickets, or osteomalacia. The increased levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Npt2c?/? mice compared with age-matched Npt2c+/+ mice may be the result of reduced catabolism, because we observed significantly reduced expression of renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D24-hydroxylase mRNA but no change in 1?-hydroxylase mRNA levels. Enhanced intestinal absorption of calcium (Ca) contributed to the hypercalcemia and increased urinary Ca excretion. Furthermore, plasma levels of the phosphaturic protein fibroblast growth factor 23 were significantly decreased in Npt2c?/? mice. Sodium-dependent Pi co-transport at the renal brush border membrane, however, was not different among Npt2c+/+, Npt2c+/?, and Npt2c?/? mice. In summary, these data suggest that Npt2c maintains normal Ca metabolism, in part by modulating the vitamin D/fibroblast growth factor 23 axis. PMID:19056871

  19. Improvement of Azimuthator Based on Particle Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hailong; Wang, Chunsheng; Yan, Yuming; Liu, Hongchen; Jiang, Binhao

    2015-01-01

    The azimuthator is an important part of plasma optical mass separation. The existing design for an azimuthator is based on the single particle orbit theory and focused on the movement of ions. In this paper, the particle simulation method is adopted to study the behavior of plasma crossing an azimuthator. The results show that electrons are bounded at the entrance of the azimuthator and an axial electric field is produced due to the charge separation. In order to better achieve the function of the azimuthator, a cathode is designed to transmit the electrons and to obtain a quasi-neutral plasma beam.

  20. Seismological Detection of Azimuthal Anisotropy in the Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, K.; Beghein, C.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this research is to determine whether azimuthal anisotropy is present in the transition zone. Mineral physics data demonstrate that wadsleyite, which is likely present in the upper transition zone, is intrinsically anisotropy. However, because the detection of seismic anisotropy at these depths is challenging, its existence in the transition zone is still a matter of debate. It is, nevertheless, an important issue since it can give us insight on the style of convection in the mantle. We apply a singular value decomposition inversion method to global azimuthally anisotropic Love wave phase velocity maps in order to constrain azimuthal anisotropy down to ~1000km depth. We use 70 different modes, fundamental and overtones up to order 5, at periods between 35s and ~175s. This gives us unprecedented sensitivity to elastic parameter G, which describes the azimuthal dependence of vertically polarized shear waves. Our preliminary results show that the best data fit is generally obtained for models that display a non-negligible amount of azimuthal anisotropy in the transition zone. Uncertainties remain regarding the amplitude and the fast direction of the anisotropy, but its presence under continents appears independent of the depth parameterization or the damping applied. Under oceans, the results are less stable with respect to damping and parametrization, and display large parameters trade-offs. This could be due to inconsistencies among the data due to a poorer azimuthal data coverage in those regions. We also tested the influence of the crustal model on the local sensitivity kernels and on the resulting models of azimuthal anisotropy. Our results show that the effect of the crust on parameter G is the strongest in the top 200km, but generally negligible at larger depths.

  1. Scatterometer azimuthal response and wind wave directionality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanangeli, J. P.; Le Calve, O.; Bliven, L.

    1989-01-01

    Azimuthal response of a scatterometer to radiation scattered by the sea surface was studied in a wind-wave tank. The variation of the normalized radar cross section with the azimuth angle is fitted by a three-term series. Results show that the upwind-downwind asymmetry decreases as the wind speed increases. The crosswind modulation depends on the wind velocity. The results show that the evolution of the long-wind-crosswind ratio evolves with wind speed in a manner similar to the evolution of the isotropy of short capillary-gravity waves. The maximum of the isotropy of the short wind waves is obtained for wind velocities close to 4 m/s. For the same value of the velocity, the variations of radar response between long-wind and crosswind directions is minimum. For lower or higher values of wind velocities the directional accuracy of the radar increases, since the wind-wave field tends to align in the wind direction.

  2. Spin-Dependent Transport Phenomena in Ferromagnet/Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geppert, Chad Christopher

    This dissertation examines several aspects of spin-dependent transport phenomena in epitaxially grown ferromagnet/n-GaAs heterostructures. Further maturation of the field of semiconductor-based spintronics is hindered by difficulties in evaluating device performance across materials systems. Using Fe/n-GaAs and Co2MnSi/n-GaAs heterostructures as a test case, the main goal of this work is to demonstrate how such difficulties may be overcome by (1) specifying a more quantitative framework for evaluating transport parameters and (2) the introduction of a new spin-to-charge conversion phenomenon which may be parameterized by bulk semiconductor parameters. In the introductory chapter, this work is placed in the broader context of developing improved methods for the generation, modulation, and detection of spins. The lateral spin-valve geometry is presented as a concrete example of the typical measurement procedures employed. Chapter 2 presents the charge-based transport properties of these samples and establishes the notation and calculation techniques to be employed in subsequent chapters. In particular, we examine in detail the calculation of the electrochemical potential for a given carrier concentration. Chapter 3 provides a full derivation of the equations governing spin-dependent transport in the large polarization regime. This is applied to the case of extracting spin lifetimes and diffusion rates, demonstrating how quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions may be obtained upon properly accounting for both device geometry and material parameters. Further examination of the boundary conditions applicable to the heterojunctions of these samples demonstrates to what extent device performance may be parameterized across materials systems. Chapter 4 presents experimental observations of a new spin-to-charge conversion phenomenon using a non-magnetic probe. In the presence of a large non-equilibrium spin accumulation, the combination of a non-constant density of states and energy-dependent conductivity generates an electromotive force (EMF). It is shown that this signal dephases in the presence of applied and hyperfine fields, scales quadratically with the polarization, and is comparable in magnitude to the spin-splitting. Since this spin-generated EMF depends only on experimentally accessible parameters of the bulk material, its magnitude is used to quantify the injected spin polarization in absolute terms, independent of any assumptions regarding the spin-resistance of the interface. Chapter 5 examines spin-dependent contributions to signals measured in the Hall geometry. In particular, a large scattering asymmetry develops in the presence of hyperfine interactions with dynamically polarized nuclei. A pulsed measurement technique is introduced which allows the polarization of the electron spin system and nuclear spin system to be manipulated independently. Based on these results, a possible mechanism is presented based on inhomogeneities in the nuclear polarization. This motivates a phenomenological model which is compared against experimental data using the modeling techniques of the previous chapters.

  3. Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-02-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  4. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides.

    PubMed

    Dobritzsch, Melanie; Lübken, Tilo; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Blum, Elke; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Dräger, Birgit; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-02-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  5. Strong Surface Orientation Dependent Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanguang; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectrics, which convert waste heat to electricity, offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Research to date has focused on reducing the thermal conductivity relative to the bulk. Si nanowires (NWs) have received exceptional attention due to their low-dimensionality, abundance of availability, and high carrier mobility. From thermal transport point of view, the thermal conductivity of Si NWs strongly depends on the detailed surface structure, such as roughness and surface orientation. Here, direct molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical models are used to investigate the thermal transport in Si NWs with diverse surface orientations. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of Si NWs with different surface orientation can differ by as large as 2.7~4.2 times, which suggests a new route to boost the thermoelectric performance. Using the full spectrum theory, we find that the surface orientation, which alters the distribution of atoms on the surface and determines the degree of phonon coupling between the core and the surface, is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using spectral thermal conductivity, the remarkable difference in the thermal conductivity for different surface orientation is found to only stem from the phonons in the medium frequency range, with minor contribution from low and high frequency phonons. PMID:27113556

  6. Dimensional dependence of phonon transport in freestanding atomic layer systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duckjong; Hwangbo, Yun; Zhu, Lijing; Mag-Isa, Alexander E; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Due to the fast development of nanotechnology, we have the capability of manipulating atomic layer systems such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride and dichalcogenides. The major concern in the 2-dimensional nanostructures is how to preserve their exceptional single-layer properties in 3-dimensional bulk structures. In this study, we report that the extreme phonon transport in graphene is highly affected by the graphitic layer stacking based on experimental investigation of the thermal conduction in few-layer graphene, 1-7 layers thick, suspended over holes of various diameters. We fabricate freestanding axisymmetric graphene structures without any perturbing substrate, and measure the in-plane transport property in terms of thermal conduction by using Raman spectroscopy. From the difference in susceptibility to substrate effect, size effect on hot-spot temperature variation and layer number dependence of thermal conductivity, we show that the graphitic membranes with 2 or more layers have characteristics similar to 3-dimensional graphite, which are very different from those of 2-dimensional graphene membranes. This implies that the scattering of out-of-plane phonons by interlayer atomic coupling could be a key mechanism governing the intrinsic thermal property. PMID:24126813

  7. High temperature dependence of thermal transport in graphene foam.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Sun, Yi; Xiao, Huying; Hu, Xuejiao; Yue, Yanan

    2015-03-13

    In contrast to the decreased thermal property of carbon materials with temperature according to the Umklapp phonon scattering theory, highly porous free-standing graphene foam (GF) exhibits an abnormal characteristic that its thermal property increases with temperature above room temperature. In this work, the temperature dependence of thermal properties of free-standing GF is investigated by using the transient electro-thermal technique. Significant increase for thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity from ∼0.3 to 1.5 W m(-1) K(-1) and ∼4 × 10(-5) to ∼2 × 10(-4) m(2) s(-1) respectively is observed with temperature from 310 K to 440 K for three GF samples. The quantitative analysis based on a physical model for porous media of Schuetz confirms that the thermal conductance across graphene contacts rather than the heat conductance inside graphene dominates thermal transport of our GFs. The thermal expansion effect at an elevated temperature makes the highly porous structure much tighter is responsible for the reduction in thermal contact resistance. Besides, the radiation heat exchange inside the pores of GFs improves the thermal transport at high temperatures. Since free-standing GF has great potential for being used as supercapacitor and battery electrode where the working temperature is always above room temperature, this finding is beneficial for thermal design of GF-based energy applications. PMID:25683178

  8. Strong Surface Orientation Dependent Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanguang; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectrics, which convert waste heat to electricity, offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Research to date has focused on reducing the thermal conductivity relative to the bulk. Si nanowires (NWs) have received exceptional attention due to their low-dimensionality, abundance of availability, and high carrier mobility. From thermal transport point of view, the thermal conductivity of Si NWs strongly depends on the detailed surface structure, such as roughness and surface orientation. Here, direct molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical models are used to investigate the thermal transport in Si NWs with diverse surface orientations. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of Si NWs with different surface orientation can differ by as large as 2.7~4.2 times, which suggests a new route to boost the thermoelectric performance. Using the full spectrum theory, we find that the surface orientation, which alters the distribution of atoms on the surface and determines the degree of phonon coupling between the core and the surface, is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using spectral thermal conductivity, the remarkable difference in the thermal conductivity for different surface orientation is found to only stem from the phonons in the medium frequency range, with minor contribution from low and high frequency phonons. PMID:27113556

  9. Image charge dynamics in time-dependent quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myöhänen, Petri; Tuovinen, Riku; Korhonen, Topi; Stefanucci, Gianluca; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the effects of the electron-electron interaction between a molecular junction and the metallic leads in time-dependent quantum transport. We employ the recently developed embedded Kadanoff-Baym method [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.80.115107 80, 115107 (2009)] and show that the molecule-lead interaction changes substantially the transient and steady-state transport properties. We first show that the mean-field Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation does not capture the polarization effects responsible for the renormalization of the molecular levels neither in nor out of equilibrium. Furthermore, due to the time-local nature of the HF self-energy, there exists a region in parameter space for which the system does not relax after the switch-on of a bias voltage. These and other artifacts of the HF approximation disappear when including correlations at the second-Born or GW levels. Both these approximations contain polarization diagrams, which correctly account for the screening of the charged molecule. We find that by changing the molecule-lead interaction, the ratio between the screening and relaxation time changes, an effect which must be properly taken into account in any realistic time-dependent simulation. Another important finding is that while in equilibrium the molecule-lead interaction is responsible for a reduction of the highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) gap and for a substantial redistribution of the spectral weight between the main spectral peaks and the induced satellite spectrum, in the biased system it can have the opposite effect, i.e., it sharpens the spectral peaks and opens the HOMO-LUMO gap.

  10. Topological States in Partially-PT -Symmetric Azimuthal Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Torner, Lluis

    2015-11-01

    We introduce partially-parity-time (p PT ) -symmetric azimuthal potentials composed from individual PT -symmetric cells located on a ring, where two azimuthal directions are nonequivalent in a sense that in such potential excitations carrying topological dislocations exhibit different dynamics for different directions of energy circulation in the initial field distribution. Such nonconservative ratchetlike structures support rich families of stable vortex solitons in cubic nonlinear media, whose properties depend on the sign of the topological charge due to the nonequivalence of azimuthal directions. In contrast, oppositely charged vortex solitons remain equivalent in similar fully-P T -symmetric potentials. The vortex solitons in the p P T - and P T -symmetric potentials are shown to feature qualitatively different internal current distributions, which are described by different discrete rotation symmetries of the intensity profiles.

  11. Topological States in Partially-PT-Symmetric Azimuthal Potentials.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Konotop, Vladimir V; Torner, Lluis

    2015-11-01

    We introduce partially-parity-time (pPT)-symmetric azimuthal potentials composed from individual PT-symmetric cells located on a ring, where two azimuthal directions are nonequivalent in a sense that in such potential excitations carrying topological dislocations exhibit different dynamics for different directions of energy circulation in the initial field distribution. Such nonconservative ratchetlike structures support rich families of stable vortex solitons in cubic nonlinear media, whose properties depend on the sign of the topological charge due to the nonequivalence of azimuthal directions. In contrast, oppositely charged vortex solitons remain equivalent in similar fully-PT-symmetric potentials. The vortex solitons in the pPT- and PT-symmetric potentials are shown to feature qualitatively different internal current distributions, which are described by different discrete rotation symmetries of the intensity profiles. PMID:26588383

  12. Temperature dependent transport characteristics of graphene/n-Si diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Parui, S.; Ruiter, R.; Zomer, P. J.; Wojtaszek, M.; Wees, B. J. van; Banerjee, T.

    2014-12-28

    Realizing an optimal Schottky interface of graphene on Si is challenging, as the electrical transport strongly depends on the graphene quality and the fabrication processes. Such interfaces are of increasing research interest for integration in diverse electronic devices as they are thermally and chemically stable in all environments, unlike standard metal/semiconductor interfaces. We fabricate such interfaces with n-type Si at ambient conditions and find their electrical characteristics to be highly rectifying, with minimal reverse leakage current (<10{sup −10} A) and rectification of more than 10{sup 6}. We extract Schottky barrier height of 0.69 eV for the exfoliated graphene and 0.83 eV for the CVD graphene devices at room temperature. The temperature dependent electrical characteristics suggest the influence of inhomogeneities at the graphene/n-Si interface. A quantitative analysis of the inhomogeneity in Schottky barrier heights is presented using the potential fluctuation model proposed by Werner and Güttler.

  13. Contaminant transport in soil with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangyao; Fu, Bojie; Zhan, Hongbin; Ma, Ying

    2013-05-01

    Predicting the fate and movement of contaminant in soils and groundwater is essential to assess and reduce the risk of soil contamination and groundwater pollution. Reaction processes of contaminant often decreased monotonously with depth. Time-dependent input sources usually occurred at the inlet of natural or human-made system such as radioactive waste disposal site. This study presented a one-dimensional convection-dispersion equation (CDE) for contaminant transport in soils with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent inlet boundary conditions, and derived its analytical solution. The adsorption coefficient and degradation rate were represented as sigmoidal functions of soil depth. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) and concentration profiles obtained from CDE with depth-dependent and constant reaction coefficients were compared, and a constant effective reaction coefficient, which was calculated by arithmetically averaging the depth-dependent reaction coefficient, was proposed to reflect the lumped depth-dependent reaction effect. With the effective adsorption coefficient and degradation rate, CDE could produce similar BTCs and concentration profiles as those from CDE with depth-dependent reactions in soils with moderate chemical heterogeneity. In contrast, the predicted concentrations of CDE with fitted reaction coefficients at a certain depth departed significantly from those of CDE with depth-dependent reactions. Parametric analysis was performed to illustrate the effects of sinusoidally and exponentially decaying input functions on solute BTCs. The BTCs and concentration profiles obtained from the solutions for finite and semi-infinite domain were compared to investigate the effects of effluent boundary condition. The finite solution produced higher concentrations at the increasing limb of the BTCs and possessed a higher peak concentration than the semi-infinite solution which had a slightly long tail. Furthermore, the finite solution gave a higher concentration in the immediate vicinity of the exit boundary than the semi-infinite solution. The applicability of the proposed model was tested with a field herbicide and tracer leaching experiment in an agricultural area of northeastern Greece. The simulation results indicated that the proposed CDE with depth-dependent reaction coefficients was able to capture the evolution of metolachlor concentration at the upper soil depths. However, the simulation results at deep depths were not satisfactory as the proposed model did not account for preferential flow observed in the field. PMID:23490106

  14. Gymnemic acids inhibit sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Dawid, Corinna; Kottra, Gabor; Daniel, Hannelore; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-06-25

    To evaluate the activity of botanicals used in Chinese Traditional Medicine as hypoglycemic agents for diabetes type II prevention and/or treatment, extracts prepared from 26 medicinal herbs were screened for their inhibitory activity on sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) by using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording of glucose uptake in Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with cRNA for SGLT1. Showing by far the strongest SGLT1 inhibitory effect, the phytochemicals extracted from Gymnema sylvestre (Retz.) Schult were located by means of activity-guided fractionation and identified as 3-O-?-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21-O-2-tigloyl-22-O-2-tigloyl gymnemagenin (1) and 3-O-?-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21-O-2-methylbutyryl-22-O-2-tigloyl gymnemagenin (2) by means of LC-MS/MS, UPLC-TOF/MS, and 1D/2D-NMR experiments. Both saponins exhibited low IC50 values of 5.97 (1) and 0.17 ?M (2), the latter of which was in the same range as found for the high-affinity inhibitor phlorizin (0.21 ?M). As SGLT1 is found in high levels in brush-border membranes of intestinal epithelial cells, these findings demonstrate for the first time the potential of these saponins for inhibiting electrogenic glucose uptake in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24856809

  15. Spin-dependent heat transport and thermal boundary resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Taehee

    In this thesis, thermal conductivity change depending on the magnetic configurations has been studied. In order to make different magnetic configurations, we developed a spin valve structure, which has high MR ratio and low saturation field. The high MR ratio was achieved using Co/Cu multilayer and 21A or 34A thick Cu layer. The low saturation field was obtained by implementing different coercivities of the successive ferromagnetic layers. For this purpose, Co/Cu/Cu tri-layered structure was used with the thicknesses of the Co layers; 15 A and 30 A. For the thermal conductivity measurement, a three-omega method was employed with a thermally isolated microscale rod. We fabricated the microscale rod using optical lithography and MEMS process. Then the rod was wire-bonded to a chip-carver for further electrical measurement. For the thermal conductivity measurement, we built the three-omega measurement system using two lock-in amplifiers and two differential amplifiers. A custom-made electromagnet was added to the system to investigate the impact of magnetic field. We observed titanic thermal conductivity change depending on the magnetic configurations of the Co/Cu/Co multilayer. The thermal conductivity change was closely correlated with that of the electric conductivity in terms of the spin orientation, but the thermal conductivity was much more sensitive than that of the electric conductivity. The relative thermal conductivity change was 50% meanwhile that of electric resistivity change was 8.0%. The difference between the two ratios suggests that the scattering mechanism for charge and heat transport in the Co/Cu/Co multilayer is different. The Lorentz number in Weidemann-Franz law is also spin-dependent. Thermal boundary resistance between metal and dielectrics was also studied in this thesis. The thermal boundary resistance becomes critical for heat transport in a nanoscale because the thermal boundary resistance can potentially determine overall heat transport in thin film structures. A transient theraroreflectance (TTR) technique can be used for measuring the thermal conductivity of thin films in cross-sectional direction. In this study, a pump-probe scheme was employed for the TTR technique. We built an optical pump-probe system by using a nanosecond pulse laser for pumping and a continuous-wave laser for probing. A short-time heating event occured at the surface of a sample by shining a laser pulse on the surface. Then the time-resolved thermoreflectance signals were detected using a photodetector and an oscilloscope. The increased temperature decreases slowly and its thermal decay depends on the thermal properties of a sample. Since the reflectivity is linearly proportional to the temperature, the time-resolved thermoreflectance signals have the information of the thermal properties of a sample. In order to extract the thermal properties of a sample, a thermal analysis was performed by fitting the experimental data with thermal models. We developed 2-layered and 3-layered thermal models using the analogies between thermal conduction and electric conduction and a transmission-line concept. We used two sets of sample structures: Au/SiNx/Si substrate and Au/CoFe/SiNx/Si substrate with various thickness of SiN x layer. Using the pump-probe system, we measured the time-resolved thermoreflectance signals for each sample. Then, the thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance were obtained by fitting the experimental data with the thermal models. The thermal conductivity of SiNx films was measured to be 2.0 W/mK for both structures. In the case of the thermal boundary resistance, it was 0.81x10-5 m 2K/W at the Au/SiNx interface and 0.54x10 -5 m2K/W at the CoFe/SiNx interface, respectively. The difference of the thermal boundary resistance between Au/SiNx and CoFe/SiNx might be came from the different phonon dispersion of Au and CoFe. The thermal conductivity did not depend on the thickness of SiNx films in the thickness range of 50-200nm. However, the thermal boundary resistance at metal/SiNx interfaces will impact overall thermal conduction when the thickness of SiNx thin films is in a nanometer order. For example, apparent thermal conductivity of SiN x film becomes half of the intrinsic thermal conductivity when the thickness decreases to 16nm. Therefore, it is advised that the thermal boundary resistance between metal and dielectrics should be counted in nano-scale electronic devices. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. Thickness dependence of magnetic and transport properties in organic-CoFe discontinuous multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.; Wang, Y. P.; Zhang, X.-G.; Wang, Y.; Zou, Jin; Han, X. F.

    2010-05-01

    Spin-dependent transport measurement in 3-hexadecyl pyrrole (3HDP) with a CoFe layer and the current-in-plane geometry is reported. Transport properties indicate the CoFe layers are discontinuous when their thicknesses are smaller than 6 nm. The temperature dependence of the conductance suggests that the transport mechanism is likely small polaron hopping. The observed positive magnetoresistance ratio at low temperature gives evidence of spin-conserving transport.

  17. Evaluation of Fracture Azimuth by EM Wave and Elastic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Wang, Q.; Liu, C.; Lu, Q.; Zeng, Z.; Liang, W.; Yu, Y.; Ren, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Fracture system plays an important role in the development of underground energy, for example enhanced geothermal system (EGS), oil shale and shale gas, etc. Therefore, it becomes more and more important to detect and evaluate the fracture system. Geophysical prospecting is an useful method to evaluate the characteristics of the subsurface fractures. Currently, micro-seismology, multi-wave seismic exploration, and electromagnetic (EM) survey are reported to be used for the purpose. We are studying a method using both elastic wave and EM wave to detect and evaluate the fracture azimuth in laboratory. First, we build a 3D horizontal transverse isotropy (HTI) model, shown in the figure 1, by dry parallel fractures system, which was constructed by plexiglass plates and papers. Then, we used the ultrasonic system to obtain reflected S-wave data. Depending on the shear wave splitting, we evaluated the fracture azimuth by the algorithm of Pearson correlation coefficient. In addition, we used the full Polarimetric ultra wide band electromagnetic (FP-UWB-EM) wave System, shown in the figure 2, to obtain full polarimetric reflected EM-wave data. Depending on the rotation of the EM wave polarimetry, we evaluated the fracture azimuth by the the ration between maximum amplitude of co-polarimetric EM wave and maximum amplitude of cross-polarimetric EM wave. Finally, we used both EM-wave data and S-wave data to evaluate the fracture azimuth by the method of cross plot and statistical mathematics. To sum up, we found that FP-UWB-EM wave can be used to evaluated the fracture azimuth and is more accurate than ultrasound wave. Also joint evaluation using both data could improve the precision.

  18. On perturbative azimuthal asymmetry at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaeian, A. H.

    2008-10-13

    We investigate the azimuthal asymmetry of partons and photons produced at the initial stage of nuclear collisions at the RHIC energy originating from quark-nucleus collisions. In our approach, the azimuthal asymmetry results from the correlation between color dipole orientation and impact parameter of the collision. The asymmetry is sensitive to the rapid variation of the nuclear density at the nuclear periphery. We either introduce the color-dipole orientation into the improved Born approximation, or model the dipole partial amplitude which satisfies available DIS data. We conclude that the azimuthal asymmetry coming from these mechanisms can be sizable.

  19. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitweg, J.; Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Abbiendi, G.; Anselmo, F.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Brock, I.; Coböken, K.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Paul, E.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Barret, O.; Brook, N. H.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; McFall, J. D.; Piccioni, D.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Sampson, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Burgard, C.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hasell, D.; Hebbel, K.; Johnson, K. F.; Kasemann, M.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lindemann, L.; Löhr, B.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Monteiro, T.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Pelucchi, F.; Petrucci, M. C.; Rohde, M.; Saull, P. R. B.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Sievers, M.; Stonjek, S.; Tassi, E.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Straub, P. B.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P.; Maccarrone, G.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Lee, S. W.; Macdonald, N.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Waugh, R.; Bohnet, I.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Meyer-Larsen, A.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Kçira, D.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Poelz, G.; Zetsche, F.; Goncalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Mallik, U.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Park, I. H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; Glasman, C.; Gonzalez, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Barbi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Riveline, M.; Stairs, D. G.; Wing, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Y.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Brümmer, N.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Schagen, S.; van Sighem, A.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Vossebeld, J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dosselli, U.; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Okrasiński, J. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Wichmann, R.; Williams, D. C.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Simmons, D.; Butterworth, J. M.; Catterall, C. D.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlak, R.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Z˙arnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Gadaj, T.; Deppe, O.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Badgett, W. F.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Foudas, C.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wildschek, T.; Wodarczyk, M.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C.; Cole, J. E.; Frisken, W. R.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2000-05-01

    The distribution of the azimuthal angle for the charged hadrons has been studied in the hadronic centre-of-mass system for neutral current deep inelastic positron-proton scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Measurements of the dependence of the moments of this distribution on the transverse momenta of the charged hadrons are presented. Asymmetries that can be unambiguously attributed to perturbative QCD processes have been observed for the first time.

  20. Analytical solution for one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent coefficients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mathematical models describing contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media are often formulated as an advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent transport coefficients. In this work, a general analytical solution is presented for the linear, one-dimensional advection-di...

  1. PIN-Dependent Auxin Transport: Action, Regulation, and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Adamowski, Maciek; Friml, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Auxin participates in a multitude of developmental processes, as well as responses to environmental cues. Compared with other plant hormones, auxin exhibits a unique property, as it undergoes directional, cell-to-cell transport facilitated by plasma membrane-localized transport proteins. Among them, a prominent role has been ascribed to the PIN family of auxin efflux facilitators. PIN proteins direct polar auxin transport on account of their asymmetric subcellular localizations. In this review, we provide an overview of the multiple developmental roles of PIN proteins, including the atypical endoplasmic reticulum-localized members of the family, and look at the family from an evolutionary perspective. Next, we cover the cell biological and molecular aspects of PIN function, in particular the establishment of their polar subcellular localization. Hormonal and environmental inputs into the regulation of PIN action are summarized as well. PMID:25604445

  2. A Modified Direct-Reading Azimuth Protractor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, William C.; Pugliese, Joseph M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the construction of a direct-reading azimuth protractor (DRAP) used for mapping fracture and joint-surface orientations in underground mines where magnetic disturbances affect typical geologic pocket transit. (SL)

  3. CONCENTRATION DEPENDENT TRANSPORT OF COLLOIDS IN SATURATED POROUS MEDIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of soil column experiments was undertaken to explore the influence of colloid input concentration on the transport and fate of several colloid sizes in three soils. Stable mono-dispersed colloids and porous media that are negatively charged were employed in these studies. Decreasing the col...

  4. Heliostat tilt and azimuth angle charts and the heliostat orientation protractor

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed, M.M.; Al-Rabghi, O.M. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that using cartesian heliostat field coordinates analytical expressions were derived for the heliostat tilt angle s, and heliostat azimuth angle {gamma} (clockwise from south). These expressions are dependent on the field cartesian coordinates of the center of the heliostat and the solar zenith and azimuth angles (clockwise from south), {theta}{sub z} and {Psi}, respectively. Here, cylindrical coordinates are conveniently used to derive the expressions for the heliostat angles s and {gamma}. The expression of {gamma}is used to construct the so-called heliostat orientation protractor. The protractor is a useful tool to determine the instantaneous heliostat azimuth angle as will be illustrated.

  5. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  6. Transverse Spin Azimuthal Asymmetries in SIDIS at COMPASS: Multidimensional Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsamyan, Bakur

    2016-02-01

    COMPASS is a high-energy physics experiment operating at the SPS at CERN. Wide physics program of the experiment comprises study of hadron structure and spectroscopy with high energy muon and hadrons beams. As for the muon-program, one of the important objectives of the COMPASS experiment is the exploration of the transverse spin structure of the nucleon via spin (in)dependent azimuthal asymmetries in single-hadron production in deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons off transversely polarized target. For this purpose a series of measurements were made in COMPASS, using 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and transversely polarized 6LiD (in 2002, 2003 and 2004) and NH3 (in 2007 and 2010) targets. The experimental results obtained by COMPASS for unpolarized target azimuthal asymmetries, Sivers and Collins effects and other azimuthal observables play an important role in the general understanding of the three-dimensional nature of the nucleon. Giving access to the entire twsit-2 set of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions COMPASS data triggers constant theoretical interest and is being widely used in phenomenological analyses and global data fits. In this review main focus is given to the very recent results obtained by the COMPASS collaboration from first ever multi-dimensional extraction of transverse spin asymmetries.

  7. Azimuthally sensitive femtoscopy in event-by-event hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BoŻek, Piotr

    2014-04-01

    I analyze the pion femtoscopy correlations in noncentral Au-Au and Pb-Pb collisions. The azimuthally sensitive Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) method is used to extract the interferometry radii depending on the azimuthal angle with respect to the second- and third-order event plane. The results are in semiquantitative agreement with the STAR collaboration data on the HBT radii with respect to the second-order reaction plane, with the preliminary PHENIX collaboration data on the HBT radii with respect to the third-order reaction plane in Au-Au collisions at 200 GeV, and with the preliminary ALICE collaboration data for the HBT radii with respect to the second-order event plane for Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV.

  8. A cylinder-to-sphere Fourier view factor model for azimuthal asymmetry studies in cylindrical hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorla, J.; Poggi, F.; Paillard, D.

    2002-01-01

    This work addresses the analytical calculation of the irradiation coming from a cylindrical surface to a spherical one. This exact solution of the x-ray transport equation allows one to connect the emitted and the received fluxes, expanded as Fourier modes, by coefficients called Fourier view factors. Such a calculation is well suited to a symmetry study in the Laser Megajoule configuration [P.-A. Holstein, M. André, M. Casanova et al., C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris 1, 693 (2000)] where a cylindrical hohlraum and a spherical capsule are irradiated. Indeed, this 60 quad laser system induces an azimuthal asymmetry of the hohlraum lighting depending on the laser focal spot size. Thus, the Fourier view factors allow one to express the modes of the capsule irradiation as functions of the elliptic spot dimensions.

  9. Temperature-dependent charge transport in copper indium diselenide nanocrystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Christopher J.; Akhavan, Vahid A.; Panthani, Matthew G.; Goodfellow, Brian W.; Korgel, Brian A.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2012-04-01

    This manuscript reports the temperature dependence of majority carrier transport in p-type films of copper indium diselenide (CuInSe2) nanocrystals. Charge transport parameters, such as the carrier concentration and the electrical conductivity as well as the charge transport mechanisms have been characterized through measurements of electrical capacitance and electrical current as a function of applied voltage bias and temperature. At low temperatures, below 181 K, the temperature dependence of the conductivity is consistent with a variable range hopping mechanism for transport, while at higher temperatures, above 181 K, the transport mechanism shifts to nearest neighbor hopping. Charge transport measurements were also studied under AM1.5 illumination to show how energetic barriers for charge transport are reduced under solar cell-like operating conditions.

  10. Doping Dependent Thermopower of PbTe from Boltzmann Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, David J

    2010-01-01

    The thermopower of PbTe as a function of temperature and doping level is reported based on Boltzmann transport calculations using the first principles relativistic electronic structure as obtained with the Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation. The results are discussed in relation to experimental data. For p-type material there is an enhancement at high-doping levels due to the onset of an increased density of states starting {approx}0.2 eV below the valence band edge. This leads to agreement between the calculated thermopower and recent results on PbTe with heavy Tl doping.

  11. Spin Dependent Transport Properties of Metallic and Semiconducting Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.

    Present computing and communication devices rely on two different classes of technologies; information processing devices are based on electrical charge transport in semiconducting materials while information storage devices are based on orientation of electron spins in magnetic materials. A realization of a hybrid-type device that is based on charge as well as spin properties of electrons would perform both of these actions thereby enhancing computation power to many folds and reducing power consumptions. This dissertation focuses on the fabrication of such spin-devices based on metallic and semiconducting nanostructures which can utilize spin as well as charge properties of electrons. A simplified design of the spin-device consists of a spin injector, a semiconducting or metallic channel, and a spin detector. The channel is the carrier of the spin signal from the injector to the detector and therefore plays a crucial role in the manipulation of spin properties in the device. In this work, nanostructures like nanowires and nanostripes are used to function the channel in the spin-device. Methods like electrospinning, hydrothermal, and wet chemical were used to synthesize nanowires while physical vapor deposition followed by heat treatment in controlled environment was used to synthesis nanostripes. Spin-devices fabrication of the synthesized nanostructures were carried out by electron beam lithography process. The details of synthesis of nanostructures, device fabrication procedures and measurement techniques will be discussed in the thesis. We have successfully fabricated the spin-devices of tellurium nanowire, indium nanostripe, and indium oxide nanostripe and studied their spin transport properties for the first time. These spin-devices show large spin relaxation length compared to normal metals like copper and offer potentials for the future technologies. Further, Heusler alloys nanowires like nanowires of Co 2FeAl were synthesized and studied for electrical transport properties since such systems are halfmetallic in nature and promise the possibilities of spin injection and detection. The study was extended to dilute magnetic semiconducting nanowire system of Cd1-xMnxTe which possess both magnetic and semiconducting properties. In summary, the studies made in this thesis will offer a new understanding of spin transport behavior for future technology.

  12. Bias and temperature dependence of hot electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jisang

    2002-03-01

    We present a qualitative model study of energy and temperature dependence of hot electron magnetotransport. In this model calculations, strong spin dependent inelastic scattering strength of hot electrons and spin mixing due to thermal spin waves have been taken into account. In addition, spatial inhomogeneity of Schottky barrier height has been considered. This calculations display that the magnetocurrent accords with the recent experimental data qualitatively at room temperature if we include the spin mixing effect with hot electron spin polarization although the experimental observation is not quite cleat to interpret.

  13. Novel membrane transporter OCTN1 mediates multispecific, bidirectional, and pH-dependent transport of organic cations.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, H; Tamai, I; Nezu, J; Sakamoto, K; Oku, A; Shimane, M; Sai, Y; Tsuji, A

    1999-05-01

    In the present study, functional characteristics of organic cation transporter (OCTN)1, which was cloned as the pH-dependent tetraethylammonium (TEA) transporter when expressed in mammalian human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells, were further investigated using Xenopus oocytes as well as HEK293 cells as gene expression systems. When OCTN1-derived complementary RNA was injected into Xenopus oocytes, pH-dependent transport of [14C]TEA was observed as the same in HEK293 cells. In contrast, a replacement of sodium ions with potassium ions in the surrounding medium did not cause any change in [14C]TEA uptake in Xenopus oocytes expressed with OCTN1. In addition, when OCTN1 was expressed in HEK293 cells, efflux of TEA from the cells was pH dependent, with an accelerated rate at acidic external medium pH. Accordingly, membrane potential or sodium ions are suggested to have no influence on [14C]TEA transport and the transport activity of OCTN1 is directly affected by pH itself. Furthermore, addition of the unlabeled TEA in external medium enhanced the efflux of preloaded [14C]TEA. These observations suggest that OCTN1 is a pH-dependent and bidirectional TEA transporter. OCTN1-mediated [14C]TEA uptake was inhibited by various organic cations such as cimetidine, procainamide, pyrilamine, quinidine, quinine, and verapamil. In addition, uptakes of cationic compounds such as [3H]pyrilamine, [3H]quinidine, and [3H]verapamil and zwitterionic L-[3H]carnitine were increased by expression of OCTN1 in Xenopus oocytes. Accordingly, OCTN1 was functionally demonstrated to be a multispecific and pH-dependent organic cation transporter, which presumably functions as a proton/organic cation antiporter at the renal apical membrane and other tissues. PMID:10215651

  14. 32 CFR 718.3 - Transportation of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., next of kin, or other person entitled to receive custody of the effects in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section; or, upon application by such dependent, next of kin, heir or... interested persons. The net proceeds received from such sale shall be transmitted to the owner, next of...

  15. Directional transport is mediated by a Dynein-dependent step in an RNA localization pathway.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, James A; Kreiling, Jill A; Powrie, Erin A; Wood, Timothy R; Mowry, Kimberly L

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic RNA localization is a key biological strategy for establishing polarity in a variety of organisms and cell types. However, the mechanisms that control directionality during asymmetric RNA transport are not yet clear. To gain insight into this crucial process, we have analyzed the molecular machinery directing polarized transport of RNA to the vegetal cortex in Xenopus oocytes. Using a novel approach to measure directionality of mRNA transport in live oocytes, we observe discrete domains of unidirectional and bidirectional transport that are required for vegetal RNA transport. While kinesin-1 appears to promote bidirectional transport along a microtubule array with mixed polarity, dynein acts first to direct unidirectional transport of RNA towards the vegetal cortex. Thus, vegetal RNA transport occurs through a multistep pathway with a dynein-dependent directional cue. This provides a new framework for understanding the mechanistic basis of cell and developmental polarity. PMID:23637574

  16. Expression of a rat renal sodium-dependent dicarboxylate transporter in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Steffgen, J; Kienle, S; Scheyerl, F; Franz, H E

    1994-01-01

    Microinjection of mRNA isolated from rat kidney cortex into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in the expression of a Na(+)-dependent dicarboxylate transporter, as detected by uptake measurements with [14C]succinate as substrate. The expressed transporter showed an S-shaped Na(+)-dependence with half-maximal activation at 19-21 mM Na+ and a Hill coefficient between 2 and 3. Endogenous succinate uptake was not Na(+)-dependent. Na(+)-stimulated succinate uptake in mRNA-injected oocytes exhibited a maximum at pH 7.5, whereas endogenous Na(+)-independent transporter was fastest at pH 8.5. The expressed dicarboxylate transporter also differed from the endogenous transporter in its sensitivity to citrate as well as dicarboxylates in trans and cis configurations. The expressed transporter resembled the renal basolateral transporter, especially with respect to affinity for succinate (Km 28 microM), activation by Na+, pH-dependence and substrate specificity. After injection of size-fractionated mRNA, succinate uptake was expressed by mRNA of 2-3 kb. Our results suggest expression of the basolateral Na(+)-dependent dicarboxylate transporter after injection of mRNA from rat kidney into Xenopus oocytes. PMID:8280108

  17. Stacking dependence of carrier transport properties in multilayered black phosphorous.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, A; Audiffred, M; Heine, T; Niehaus, T A

    2016-02-24

    We present the effect of different stacking orders on carrier transport properties of multi-layer black phosphorous. We consider three different stacking orders AAA, ABA and ACA, with increasing number of layers (from 2 to 6 layers). We employ a hierarchical approach in density functional theory (DFT), with structural simulations performed with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the bandstructure, carrier effective masses and optical properties evaluated with the meta-generalized gradient approximation (MGGA). The carrier transmission in the various black phosphorous sheets was carried out with the non-equilibrium green's function (NEGF) approach. The results show that ACA stacking has the highest electron and hole transmission probabilities. The results show tunability for a wide range of band-gaps, carrier effective masses and transmission with a great promise for lattice engineering (stacking order and layers) in black phosphorous. PMID:26809017

  18. Stacking dependence of carrier transport properties in multilayered black phosphorous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, A.; Audiffred, M.; Heine, T.; Niehaus, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the effect of different stacking orders on carrier transport properties of multi-layer black phosphorous. We consider three different stacking orders AAA, ABA and ACA, with increasing number of layers (from 2 to 6 layers). We employ a hierarchical approach in density functional theory (DFT), with structural simulations performed with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the bandstructure, carrier effective masses and optical properties evaluated with the meta-generalized gradient approximation (MGGA). The carrier transmission in the various black phosphorous sheets was carried out with the non-equilibrium green’s function (NEGF) approach. The results show that ACA stacking has the highest electron and hole transmission probabilities. The results show tunability for a wide range of band-gaps, carrier effective masses and transmission with a great promise for lattice engineering (stacking order and layers) in black phosphorous.

  19. Healthy places, active transport and path dependence: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Melissa; Mateo-Babiano, Derlie; Minnery, John

    2014-12-01

    Children walking to school, people cycling to the shops or work and neighbours chatting in the street, these are some of the gauges of an active and healthy community that can be achieved through utilising good design principles. But are these principles being applied in urban developments or are policy-makers following a 'path dependent' trajectory that severely limits the best practice outcomes sought? This review examines current research on path dependence to determine how this concept advances our understanding of barriers to change in the built environment, active transport and healthy communities. An online database search of scholarly bibliographic records identified 22 relevant articles for a critical review of studies that evaluated path dependence in the urban and built environment literature with a focus on transport, urban planning and health. A thematic analysis of the articles showed that different types of path dependence have contributed to the dominance of policies and designs supporting car-based transport to the detriment of public transport and active transport modes, leading to sub-optimal development patterns becoming 'locked-in'. However, the outcomes for active transport and physical activity are not all dire, and path dependence theory does provide some guidance on changing policy to achieve better outcomes. This review suggests that path dependence is one of the best theoretical frameworks to help health promoters understand barriers to change and can provide insights into developing future successful public health interventions. Future studies could focus further on active transport, local neighbourhood development and physical activity. PMID:25481484

  20. Spin-dependent coherent transport of two-dimensional excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durnev, M. V.; Glazov, M. M.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a theory of interference contributions to the two-dimensional exciton diffusion coefficient. The theory takes into account four spin states of the heavy-hole exciton. The interplay of the single-particle (electron and hole) spin splittings with the electron-hole exchange interaction gives rise to either localization or antilocalization behavior of excitons, depending on the system parameters. Possible experimental manifestations of exciton interference are discussed.

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy measurements by STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Li

    2014-06-01

    The recent study of centrality and transverse momentum (pT) dependence of inclusive charged hardron elliptic anisotropy (v2) at midrapidity (|η|<1.0) in Au+Au collision at √{sNN}=7.7,11.5,19.6,27, and 39 GeV in STAR Beam Energy Scan program is presented. We show that the observed increase of inclusive v2 is mainly due to the average pT increase with energy. In Au+Au 200 GeV collisions, the triangular anisotropy (v3) measurements highly depend on measurement methods; v3 is strongly dependent on Δη. The difference between two- and four-particle cumulants v2{2} and v2{4} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collision at √{sNN}=62.4 and 200 GeV is used to explore flow fluctuations. Furthermore, by exploiting the symmetry of average flow in pseudorapidity η about midrapidity, the Δη-dependent and independent components are separated using v2{2} and v2{4}.

  2. Computation of synthetic seismograms for stratified azimuthally anisotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, S.; Frazer, L.N. )

    1990-06-10

    The authors outline a method of computing synthetic seismograms for stratified, azimuthally anisotropic, viscoelastic earth models. This method is an extended form of the Kennett algorithm that is efficient for multioffsett vertical seismic profiling. The model consists of a stack of homogeneous plane layers. In each layer, the 6 {times} 6 system matrix A is diagonalized numerically; this permits treatment of triclinic materials, i.e., those with the lowest possible symmetry. Jacobi iteration is an efficient way to diagonalize A because the entries of A change little from one wavenumber to the next. When the material properties are frequency dependent, the wavenumber loops are inside the frequency loop, and the computation is slow even on a supercomputer. When the material parameters are frequency independent, it is better to make frequency the deepest loop, with diagonalization of A outside the loop, in which case vectorization gives a relatively rapid computation. Temporal wraparound is avoided by making use of complex frequencies, and spatial aliasing is avoided by using a generalized Filon's method to evaluate both the wavenumber integrals. Various methods of generating anisotropic elastic constants from microlayers, cracks, and fractures and joints are discussed. Example computations are given for azimuthally isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic (AA) earth models. Comparison of computations using single and double wavenumber integrations for a realistic AA model shows that single wavenumber integration often gives incorrect answers especially at near offsets. Errors due to use of a single wavenumber integration are explained heuristically by use of wave front diagrams for point and line sources.

  3. Azimuthal-spin-wave-mode-driven vortex-core reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-01-14

    We studied, by micromagnetic numerical calculations, asymmetric vortex-core reversals driven by the m = −1 and m = +1 azimuthal spin-wave modes' excitations in soft magnetic circular nano-disks. We addressed the similarities and differences between the asymmetric core reversals in terms of the temporal evolutions of the correlated core-motion speed, locally concentrated perpendicular gyrofield, and magnetization dip near the original vortex core. The criterion for the core reversals was found to be the magnetization dip that must reach the out-of-plane magnetization component, m{sub z} = −p, with the initial polarization p, where p = +1 (−1) for the upward (downward) core magnetization. The core-motion speed and the associated perpendicular gyrofield, variable and controllable with static perpendicular field, H{sub z}, applied perpendicularly to the disk plane, must reach their threshold values to meet the ultimate core-reversal criterion. Also, we determined the H{sub z} strength and direction dependence of the core-switching time and threshold exciting field strength required for the core reversals, whose parameters are essential in the application aspect. This work offers deeper insights into the azimuthal spin-wave-driven core-reversal dynamics as well as an efficient means of controlling the azimuthal-modes-driven core reversals.

  4. Azimuthal-spin-wave-mode-driven vortex-core reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-01-01

    We studied, by micromagnetic numerical calculations, asymmetric vortex-core reversals driven by the m = -1 and m = +1 azimuthal spin-wave modes' excitations in soft magnetic circular nano-disks. We addressed the similarities and differences between the asymmetric core reversals in terms of the temporal evolutions of the correlated core-motion speed, locally concentrated perpendicular gyrofield, and magnetization dip near the original vortex core. The criterion for the core reversals was found to be the magnetization dip that must reach the out-of-plane magnetization component, mz = -p, with the initial polarization p, where p = +1 (-1) for the upward (downward) core magnetization. The core-motion speed and the associated perpendicular gyrofield, variable and controllable with static perpendicular field, Hz, applied perpendicularly to the disk plane, must reach their threshold values to meet the ultimate core-reversal criterion. Also, we determined the Hz strength and direction dependence of the core-switching time and threshold exciting field strength required for the core reversals, whose parameters are essential in the application aspect. This work offers deeper insights into the azimuthal spin-wave-driven core-reversal dynamics as well as an efficient means of controlling the azimuthal-modes-driven core reversals.

  5. Rossby wave Green's functions in an azimuthal wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Duba, C. T.; Hu, Q.

    2016-05-01

    Green's functions for Rossby waves in an azimuthal wind are obtained, in which the stream-function $\\psi$ depends on $r$, $\\phi$ and $t$, where $r$ is cylindrical radius and $\\phi$ is the azimuthal angle in the $\\beta$-plane relative to the easterly direction, in which the $x$-axis points east and the $y$-axis points north. The Rossby wave Green's function with no wind is obtained using Fourier transform methods, and is related to the previously known Green's function obtained for this case, which has a different but equivalent form to the Green's function obtained in the present paper. We emphasize the role of the wave eikonal solution, which plays an important role in the form of the solution. The corresponding Green's function for a rotating wind with azimuthal wind velocity ${\\bf u}=\\Omega r{\\bf e}_\\phi$ ($\\Omega=$const.) is also obtained by Fourier methods, in which the advective rotation operator in position space is transformed to a rotation operator in ${\\bf k}$ transform space. The finite Rossby deformation radius is included in the analysis. The physical characteristics of the Green's functions are delineated and applications are discussed. In the limit as $\\Omega\\to 0$, the rotating wind Green's function reduces to the Rossby wave Green function with no wind.

  6. The spin-dependent transport properties of zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons and new device design.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yun; Wang, Xia; Tao, Wei; Zhu, Si-Cong; Yao, Kai-Lun

    2016-01-01

    By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we studied the electronic and transport properties of zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons in different magnetic configurations. We designed the device based on zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbon and studied the spin-dependent transport properties, whose current-voltage curves show obvious spin-polarization and conductance plateaus. The interesting transport behaviours can be explained by the transport spectra under different magnetic configurations, which basically depends on the symmetry matching of the electrodes' bandstructures. Simultaneously, spin Seebeck effect is also found in the device. Thus, according to the transport behaviours, zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons can be used as a dual spin filter diode, a molecule signal converter and a spin caloritronics device, which indicates that α-graphyne is a promising candidate for the future application in spintronics. PMID:27180808

  7. The spin-dependent transport properties of zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons and new device design

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yun; Wang, Xia; Tao, Wei; Zhu, Si-Cong; Yao, Kai-Lun

    2016-01-01

    By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we studied the electronic and transport properties of zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons in different magnetic configurations. We designed the device based on zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbon and studied the spin-dependent transport properties, whose current-voltage curves show obvious spin-polarization and conductance plateaus. The interesting transport behaviours can be explained by the transport spectra under different magnetic configurations, which basically depends on the symmetry matching of the electrodes’ bandstructures. Simultaneously, spin Seebeck effect is also found in the device. Thus, according to the transport behaviours, zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons can be used as a dual spin filter diode, a molecule signal converter and a spin caloritronics device, which indicates that α-graphyne is a promising candidate for the future application in spintronics. PMID:27180808

  8. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  9. Time-dependent thermoelectric transport for nanoscale thermal machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daré, A.-M.; Lombardo, P.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze an electronic nanoscale thermal machine driven by time-dependent environment: besides bias and gate voltage variations, we consider also the less prevailing time modulation of the couplings between leads and dot. We provide energy and heat current expressions in such situations, as well as expressions for the power exchanged between the dot+leads system and its outside. Calculations are made in the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function framework. We apply these results to design a cyclic refrigerator, circumventing the ambiguity of defining energy flows between subsystems in the case of strong coupling. For fast lead-dot coupling modulation, we observe transient currents which cannot be ascribed to charge tunneling.

  10. Diameter dependence of the transport properties of antimony telluride nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zuev, Yuri M; Lee, Jin Seok; Galloy, Clément; Park, Hongkun; Kim, Philip

    2010-08-11

    We report measurements of electronic, thermoelectric, and galvanomagnetic properties of individual single crystal antimony telluride (Sb(2)Te(3)) nanowires with diameters in the range of 20-100 nm. Temperature-dependent resistivity and thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements indicate hole dominant diffusive thermoelectric generation with an enhancement of the TEP for smaller diameter wires up to 110 microV/K at T = 300 K. We measure the magnetoresistance in magnetic fields both parallel and perpendicular to the nanowire [110] axis, where strong anisotropic positive magnetoresistance behavior was observed. PMID:20698617

  11. Spin-dependent tunneling transport in a lateral magnetic diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Shi, Ying

    2012-09-01

    Based on the gate-tunable two-dimensional electron gas, we have constructed laterally a double-barrier resonant tunneling structure by employing a peculiar triple-gate configuration, namely a ferromagnetic gate sandwiched closely by a pair of Schottky gates. Because of the in-plane stray field of ferromagnetic gate, the resulting bound spin state in well gives rise to the remarkable resonant spin polarization following the spin-dependent resonant tunneling regime. Importantly, by aligning the bound spin state through surface gate-voltage configuration, this resonant spin polarization can be externally manipulated, showing the desirable features for the spin-logic device applications.

  12. Deterministic methods for time-dependent stochastic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Randal S

    2009-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving the time-dependent survival probability equation in general (lD/2D/3D) geometries using the multi group SNmethod. Although this equation was first formulated by Bell in the early 1960's, it has only been applied to stationary systems (for other than idealized point models) until recently, and detailed descriptions of numerical solution techniques are lacking in the literature. This paper presents such a description and applies it to a dynamic system representative of a figurative criticality accident scenario.

  13. Strain dependence of the heat transport properties of graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Pei Shan Emmeline; Loh, Kian Ping; Gan, Chee Kwan

    2012-12-14

    Using a combination of accurate density-functional theory and a nonequilibrium Green's function method, we calculate the ballistic thermal conductance characteristics of tensile-strained armchair (AGNR) and zigzag (ZGNR) edge graphene nanoribbons, with widths between 3 and 50 Å. The optimized lateral lattice constants for AGNRs of different widths display a three-family behavior when the ribbons are grouped according to N modulo 3, where N represents the number of carbon atoms across the width of the ribbon. Two lowest-frequency out-of-plane acoustic modes play a decisive role in increasing the thermal conductance of AGNR-N at low temperatures. At high temperatures the effect of tensile strain is to reduce the thermal conductance of AGNR-N and ZGNR-N. These results could be explained by the changes in force constants in the in-plane and out-of-plane directions with the application of strain. This fundamental atomistic understanding of the heat transport in graphene nanoribbons paves a way to effect changes in their thermal properties via strain at various temperatures. PMID:23149343

  14. Size-dependent predilections of cardiogenic embolic transport.

    PubMed

    Carr, Ian A; Nemoto, Naohiko; Schwartz, Robert S; Shadden, Shawn C

    2013-09-01

    While it is intuitively clear that aortic anatomy and embolus size could be important determinants for cardiogenic embolic stroke risk and stroke location, few data exist confirming or characterizing this hypothesis. The objective of this study is to use medical imaging and computational modeling to better understand if aortic anatomy and embolus size influence predilections for cardiogenic embolic transport and right vs. left hemisphere propensity. Anatomically accurate models of the human aorta and branch arteries to the head were reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) angiography of 10 patients. Blood flow was modeled by the Navier-Stokes equations using a well-validated flow solver with physiologic inflow and boundary conditions. Embolic particulate was released from the aortic root and tracked through the common carotid and vertebral arteries for a range of particle sizes. Cardiogenic emboli reaching the carotid and vertebral arteries appeared to have a strong size-destination relationship that varied markedly from expectations based on blood distribution. Observed trends were robust to modeling parameters. A patient's aortic anatomy appeared to significantly influence the probability a cardiogenic particle becomes embolic to the head. Right hemisphere propensity appeared dominant for cardiogenic emboli, which has been confirmed clinically. The predilections discovered through this modeling could represent an important mechanism underlying cardiogenic embolic stroke etiology. PMID:23792681

  15. Time-dependent recycling modeling with edge plasma transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigarov, A.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Rognlien, T.; Taverniers, S.; Hollmann, E.

    2013-10-01

    First,we discuss extensions to Macroblob approach which allow to simulate more accurately dynamics of ELMs, pedestal and edge transport with UEDGE code. Second,we present UEDGE modeling results for H mode discharge with infrequent ELMs and large pedestal losses on DIII-D. In modeled sequence of ELMs this discharge attains a dynamic equilibrium. Temporal evolution of pedestal plasma profiles, spectral line emission, and surface temperature matching experimental data over ELM cycle is discussed. Analysis of dynamic gas balance highlights important role of material surfaces. We quantified the wall outgassing between ELMs as 3X the NBI fueling and the recycling coefficient as 0.8 for wall pumping via macroblob-wall interactions. Third,we also present results from multiphysics version of UEDGE with built-in, reduced, 1-D wall models and analyze the role of various PMI processes. Progress in framework-coupled UEDGE/WALLPSI code is discussed. Finally, implicit coupling schemes are important feature of multiphysics codes and we report on the results of parametric analysis of convergence and performance for Picard and Newton iterations in a system of coupled deterministic-stochastic ODE and proposed modifications enhancing convergence.

  16. Shape dependent heat transport through green synthesized gold nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Jisha; Thomas, Lincy; Kumar, B. Rajesh; Kurian, Achamma; George, Sajan D.

    2015-08-01

    Nanofluids hold promise as a more efficient coolant for thermoelectric devices. Despite the capability of tailoring the thermo physical properties of nanofluids, by tuning the particle parameters such as shape, size and concentration, the toxicity of chemicals used for the preparation of nanoparticles is a serious concern. Green synthesis of nanoparticles is emerging as an alternative to the conventional chemical and physical methods for the preparation of nanoparticles. In this work, the results of the preparation of gold nanoparticles using plant extracts as reducing agents are presented. The green synthesis route employed for the present study provides particles of similar size, but the shape of the particles is found to vary depending upon the source of the natural reducing agents. The thermal diffusivity values of the gold nanofluid measured using laser based dual beam thermal lens technique elucidate the role of shape and concentration of the green synthesized nanoparticles on the effective thermal diffusivity values of the nanofluids.

  17. Azimuthal modulation of C-band scatterometer {sigma}{sup 0} over southern ocean sea ice

    SciTech Connect

    Early, D.S.; Long, D.G.

    1997-09-01

    In a continuing evaluation of the ERS-1 C-band scatterometer as a tool for studying polar sea ice, the authors evaluate the azimuthal modulation characteristics of Antarctic sea ice. ERS-1 AMI scatterometer mode data sets from several study regions dispersed in the Antarctic seasonal sea ice pack are evaluated for azimuthal modulation. When appropriate, the incidence angle dependence is estimated and removed in a study region before determining whether azimuthal modulation is present in the data. Other comparisons are made using the fore and aft beam measurement difference. The results show that over the ice pack, azimuthal modulation is less than 1 dB at the scale of observation of the ERS-1 C-band scatterometer.

  18. Structural Insights into the Transport Mechanism of the Human Sodium-dependent Lysophosphatidylcholine Transporter MFSD2A.

    PubMed

    Quek, Debra Q Y; Nguyen, Long N; Fan, Hao; Silver, David L

    2016-04-29

    Major facilitator superfamily domain containing 2A (MFSD2A) was recently characterized as a sodium-dependent lysophosphatidylcholine transporter expressed at the blood-brain barrier endothelium. It is the primary route for importation of docosohexaenoic acid and other long-chain fatty acids into fetal and adult brain and is essential for mouse and human brain growth and function. Remarkably, MFSD2A is the first identified major facilitator superfamily member that uniquely transports lipids, implying that MFSD2A harbors unique structural features and transport mechanism. Here, we present three three-dimensional structural models of human MFSD2A derived by homology modeling using MelB- and LacY-based crystal structures and refined by biochemical analysis. All models revealed 12 transmembrane helices and connecting loops and represented the partially outward-open, outward-partially occluded, and inward-open states of the transport cycle. In addition to a conserved sodium-binding site, three unique structural features were identified as follows: a phosphate headgroup binding site, a hydrophobic cleft to accommodate a hydrophobic hydrocarbon tail, and three sets of ionic locks that stabilize the outward-open conformation. Ligand docking studies and biochemical assays identified Lys-436 as a key residue for transport. It is seen forming a salt bridge with the negative charge on the phosphate headgroup. Importantly, MFSD2A transported structurally related acylcarnitines but not a lysolipid without a negative charge, demonstrating the necessity of a negatively charged headgroup interaction with Lys-436 for transport. These findings support a novel transport mechanism by which lysophosphatidylcholines are "flipped" within the transporter cavity by pivoting about Lys-436 leading to net transport from the outer to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. PMID:26945070

  19. Functional characterization of a Na+-dependent dicarboxylate transporter from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Christopher; Fitzgerald, Gabriel A; Wang, Da-Neng; Mindell, Joseph A

    2014-06-01

    The SLC13 transporter family, whose members play key physiological roles in the regulation of fatty acid synthesis, adiposity, insulin resistance, and other processes, catalyzes the transport of Krebs cycle intermediates and sulfate across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. SLC13 transporters are part of the divalent anion:Na(+) symporter (DASS) family that includes several well-characterized bacterial members. Despite sharing significant sequence similarity, the functional characteristics of DASS family members differ with regard to their substrate and coupling ion dependence. The publication of a high resolution structure of dimer VcINDY, a bacterial DASS family member, provides crucial structural insight into this transporter family. However, marrying this structural insight to the current functional understanding of this family also demands a comprehensive analysis of the transporter's functional properties. To this end, we purified VcINDY, reconstituted it into liposomes, and determined its basic functional characteristics. Our data demonstrate that VcINDY is a high affinity, Na(+)-dependent transporter with a preference for C4- and C5-dicarboxylates. Transport of the model substrate, succinate, is highly pH dependent, consistent with VcINDY strongly preferring the substrate's dianionic form. VcINDY transport is electrogenic with succinate coupled to the transport of three or more Na(+) ions. In contrast to succinate, citrate, bound in the VcINDY crystal structure (in an inward-facing conformation), seems to interact only weakly with the transporter in vitro. These transport properties together provide a functional framework for future experimental and computational examinations of the VcINDY transport mechanism. PMID:24821967

  20. Role of different scattering mechanisms on the temperature dependence of transport in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Suman; Amin, Kazi Rafsanjani; Modak, Ranjan; Singh, Amandeep; Mukerjee, Subroto; Bid, Aveek

    2015-01-01

    Detailed experimental and theoretical studies of the temperature dependence of the effect of different scattering mechanisms on electrical transport properties of graphene devices are presented. We find that for high mobility devices the transport properties are mainly governed by completely screened short range impurity scattering. On the other hand, for the low mobility devices transport properties are determined by both types of scattering potentials - long range due to ionized impurities and short range due to completely screened charged impurities. The results could be explained in the framework of Boltzmann transport equations involving the two independent scattering mechanisms. PMID:26608479

  1. Azimuthally forced flames in an annular combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Nicholas; Dawson, James; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2015-11-01

    Thermoacoustic instabilities are more likely to occur in lean burn combustion systems, making their adoption both difficult and costly. At present, our knowledge of such phenomena is insufficient to produce an inherently stable combustor by design, and therefore an improved understanding of these instabilities has become the focus of a significant research effort. Recent experimental and numerical studies have demonstrated that the symmetry of annular chambers permit a range of self-excited azimuthal modes to be generated in annular geometry, which can make the study of isolated modes difficult. While acoustic forcing is common in single flame experiments, no equivalent for forced azimuthal modes in an annular chamber have been demonstrated. The present investigation focuses on the novel application of acoustic forcing to a laboratory scale annular combustor, in order to generate azimuthal standing wave modes at a prescribed frequency and amplitude. The results focus on the ability of the method to isolate the mode of oscillation using experimental pressure and high speed OH* measurements. The successful excitation of azimuthal modes demonstrated represents an important step towards improving our fundamental understanding of this phenomena in practically relevant geometry.

  2. Seismic azimuthal anisotropy beneath the Pakistan Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvol, Eric A.; Ni, James F.; Hearn, Thomas M.; Roecker, Steve

    1994-07-01

    Teleseismics S, SKS, and SKKS data, collected from a temporary broadband array across the Himalayan front in Pakistan, are analyzed for shear-wave splitting parameters. The SKS and SKKS phases have ray paths originating from both the South Pacific and Colombia which have azimuths approximately 40 deg apart with respect to the Pakistan array. If significant seismic azimuthal anisotropy is present we should observe splitting associated with one of these ray paths. No evidence was seen for any shear-wave splitting beneath any of the stations in the array. Teleseismic S waves were also used in order to provide better azimuthal coverage for the shear-wave splitting measurements. We were able to correct for any source-side anisotropy when needed. No receiver-side splitting was observed in any of the S wave data. The lack of shear-wave splitting beneath the Pakistan array indicates that there is no appreciable large-scale azimuthal anisotropy beneath this part of the Himalayas. Therefore, if there is any significant strain in the upper mantle beneath this area, it must either be vertically oriented, or, if horizontal, vertically vary in such a way that the integrated effect on S wave splitting is null.

  3. Insulin stimulates glucose transport via protein kinase G type I alpha-dependent pathway in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2014-03-28

    Podocyte resistance to the actions of insulin on glucose transport could contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic podocytopathy (DP) via disturbances in cyclic-dependent protein kinase signaling. To determine whether cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is involved in the insulin regulation of glucose transport, we measured insulin-dependent glucose uptake into cultured rat podocytes under conditions of modified PKG activity using pharmacological (PKG activator or inhibitor) and biochemical (siRNA PKGIα, siRNA insulin receptor β) means. Our findings indicate the participation of PKG in insulin-stimulated transport and provide new insights into how PKG may trigger the resistance of glucose transport to insulin in DP. PMID:24602613

  4. Applicability of the position-dependent diffusion approach to localized transport through disordered waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Pauf; Yamilov, Alexey G.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we show analytically and numerically that the localized regime of wave transport can be modeled as position-dependent diffusion with a diffusion coefficient that retains the memory of the source location. The dependence on the source diminishes when absorption is introduced.

  5. Surface harmonics method equations for solving the time-dependent neutron transport problems and their verification

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Finite-difference time-dependent equations of Surface Harmonics method have been obtained for plane geometry. Verification of these equations has been carried out by calculations of tasks from 'Benchmark Problem Book ANL-7416'. The capacity and efficiency of the Surface Harmonics method have been demonstrated by solution of the time-dependent neutron transport equation in diffusion approximation. The results of studies showed that implementation of Surface Harmonics method for full-scale calculations will lead to a significant progress in the efficient solution of the time-dependent neutron transport problems in nuclear reactors. (authors)

  6. Proline transport in Leishmania donovani amastigotes: dependence on pH gradients and membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Glaser, T A; Mukkada, A J

    1992-03-01

    Amastigotes of Leishmania donovani develop and multiply within the acidic phagolysosomes of mammalian macrophages. Isolated amastigotes are acidophilic; they catabolize substrates and synthesize macromolecules optimally at pH 5.5. Substrate transport in amastigotes has not been characterized. Here we show that amastigotes exhibit an uphill transport of proline (active transport) with an acid pH optimum (pH 5.5). It is dependent upon metabolic energy and is driven by proton motive force. Agents which selectively disturb the component forces of proton motive force, such as carbonyl cyanide chlorophenylhydrazone, nigericin and valinomycin, inhibit proline transport. Transport is sensitive to dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and insensitive to ouabain, demonstrating the involvement of a proton ATPase in the maintenance of proton motive force. It is suggested that the plasma membrane pH gradient probably makes the greatest contribution to proton motive force that drives substrate transport in the amastigote stage. PMID:1533014

  7. A NEW MONTE CARLO METHOD FOR TIME-DEPENDENT NEUTRINO RADIATION TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; O'Connor, Evan; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.; Loeffler, Frank; Schnetter, Erik

    2012-08-20

    Monte Carlo approaches to radiation transport have several attractive properties such as simplicity of implementation, high accuracy, and good parallel scaling. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods can handle complicated geometries and are relatively easy to extend to multiple spatial dimensions, which makes them potentially interesting in modeling complex multi-dimensional astrophysical phenomena such as core-collapse supernovae. The aim of this paper is to explore Monte Carlo methods for modeling neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae. We generalize the Implicit Monte Carlo photon transport scheme of Fleck and Cummings and gray discrete-diffusion scheme of Densmore et al. to energy-, time-, and velocity-dependent neutrino transport. Using our 1D spherically-symmetric implementation, we show that, similar to the photon transport case, the implicit scheme enables significantly larger timesteps compared with explicit time discretization, without sacrificing accuracy, while the discrete-diffusion method leads to significant speed-ups at high optical depth. Our results suggest that a combination of spectral, velocity-dependent, Implicit Monte Carlo and discrete-diffusion Monte Carlo methods represents a robust approach for use in neutrino transport calculations in core-collapse supernovae. Our velocity-dependent scheme can easily be adapted to photon transport.

  8. The PTS(Ntr) system globally regulates ATP-dependent transporters in Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Prell, J; Mulley, G; Haufe, F; White, J P; Williams, A; Karunakaran, R; Downie, J A; Poole, P S

    2012-04-01

    Mutation of ptsP encoding EI(Ntr) of the PTS(Ntr) system in Rhizobium leguminosarum strain Rlv3841 caused a pleiotropic phenotype as observed with many bacteria. The mutant formed dry colonies and grew poorly on organic nitrogen or dicarboxylates. Most strikingly the ptsP mutant had low activity of a broad range of ATP-dependent ABC transporters. This lack of activation, which occurred post-translationally, may explain many of the pleiotropic effects. In contrast proton-coupled transport systems were not inhibited in a ptsP mutant. Regulation by PtsP also involves two copies of ptsN that code for EIIA(Ntr) , resulting in a phosphorylation cascade. As in Escherichia coli, the Rlv3841 PTS(Ntr) system also regulates K(+) homeostasis by transcriptional activation of the high-affinity ATP-dependent K(+) transporter KdpABC. This involves direct interaction of a two-component sensor regulator pair KdpDE with unphosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) . Critically, ptsP mutants, which cannot phosphorylate PtsN1 or PtsN2, had a fully activated KdpABC transporter. This is the opposite pattern from that observed with ABC transporters which apparently require phosphorylation of PtsN. These results suggest that ATP-dependent transport might be regulated via PTS(Ntr) responding to the cellular energy charge. ABC transport may be inactivated at low energy charge, conserving ATP for essential processes including K(+) homeostasis. PMID:22340847

  9. Azimuthal temperature modulations of Saturn's A ring caused by self-gravity wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Ryuji; Spilker, Linda; Turner, Neal

    2014-01-01

    The physical temperatures of the Saturn's A ring measured by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) show quadrupole azimuthal modulations besides temperature drops in Saturn's shadow. These azimuthal modulations are likely to be caused by self-gravity wakes. In this paper, we develop a new thermal model in which wakes are modeled as elliptical cylinders ignoring inter-wake particles. All the heat fluxes are calculated explicitly taking into account inter-wake shadowing and heating. We apply our model to azimuthal scans of the A ring obtained by CIRS. It is found that the azimuthal modulation of the ring temperature is primarily caused by the azimuthal variation of the geometric filling factor of the ring seen from the Sun. The thermal inertia estimated from the eclipse data (data only inside and near Saturn's shadow) of the low phase scans is ˜10 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2. With this value of the thermal inertia, the amplitude of the azimuthal temperature modulation is overestimated in our model as compared with those observed. This is likely to be because our model ignores inter-wake particles. The bolometric reflectance of wakes is estimated to be 0.35-0.40 although lower values are required to reproduce temperatures at low solar phase angles. This apparent phase dependence of the reflectance indicates that roughness on the wake surfaces is necessary.

  10. Acoustic Efficiency of Azimuthal Modes in Jet Noise Using Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    The link between azimuthal modes in jet turbulence and in the acoustic sound field has been examined in cold, round jets. Chevron nozzles, however, impart an azimuthal structure on the jet with a shape dependent on the number, length and penetration angle of the chevrons. Two particular chevron nozzles, with 3 and 4 primary chevrons respectively, and a round baseline nozzle are compared at both cold and hot jet conditions to determine how chevrons impact the modal structure of the flow and how that change relates to the sound field. The results show that, although the chevrons have a large impact on the azimuthal shape of the mean axial velocity, the impact of chevrons on the azimuthal structure of the fluctuating axial velocity is small at the cold jet condition and smaller still at the hot jet condition. This is supported by results in the azimuthal structure of the sound field, which also shows little difference in between the two chevron nozzles and the baseline nozzle in the distribution of energy across the azimuthal modes measured.

  11. ATP-dependent transport of vinblastine in vesicles from human multidrug-resistant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horio, M.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I. )

    1988-05-01

    Resistance of human cancer cells to multiple cytotoxic hydrophobic agents (multidrug resistance) is due to overexpression of the MDR1 gene, whose product is the plasma membrane P-glycoprotein. Plasma membrane vesicles partially purified from multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells, but not from drug-sensitive cells, accumulate ({sup 3}H)vinblastine in an ATP-dependent manner. This transport is osmotically sensitive, with an apparent K{sub m} of 38 {mu}M for ATP and of {approx} 2 {mu}M for vinblastine. The nonhydrolyzable analog adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate does not substitute for ATP but is a competitive inhibitor of ATP for the transport process. Vanadate, and ATPase inhibitor, is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of transport. These results indicate that hydrolysis of ATP is probably required for active transport vinblastine. Several other drugs to which multidrug-resistant cell lines are resistant inhibit transport, with relative potencies as follows: vincristine > actinomycin D > daunomycin > colchicine = puromycin. Verapamil and quinidine, which reverse the multidrug-resistance phenotype, are good inhibitors of the transport process. These results confirm that multidrug-resistant cells express an energy-dependent plasma membrane transporter for hydrophobic drugs, and establish a system for the detailed biochemical analysis of this transport process.

  12. PGR5-PGRL1-Dependent Cyclic Electron Transport Modulates Linear Electron Transport Rate in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Suorsa, Marjaana; Rossi, Fabio; Tadini, Luca; Labs, Mathias; Colombo, Monica; Jahns, Peter; Kater, Martin M; Leister, Dario; Finazzi, Giovanni; Aro, Eva-Mari; Barbato, Roberto; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Plants need tight regulation of photosynthetic electron transport for survival and growth under environmental and metabolic conditions. For this purpose, the linear electron transport (LET) pathway is supplemented by a number of alternative electron transfer pathways and valves. In Arabidopsis, cyclic electron transport (CET) around photosystem I (PSI), which recycles electrons from ferrodoxin to plastoquinone, is the most investigated alternative route. However, the interdependence of LET and CET and the relative importance of CET remain unclear, largely due to the difficulties in precise assessment of the contribution of CET in the presence of LET, which dominates electron flow under physiological conditions. We therefore generated Arabidopsis mutants with a minimal water-splitting activity, and thus a low rate of LET, by combining knockout mutations in PsbO1, PsbP2, PsbQ1, PsbQ2, and PsbR loci. The resulting Δ5 mutant is viable, although mature leaves contain only ∼20% of wild-type naturally less abundant PsbO2 protein. Δ5 plants compensate for the reduction in LET by increasing the rate of CET, and inducing a strong non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) response during dark-to-light transitions. To identify the molecular origin of such a high-capacity CET, we constructed three sextuple mutants lacking the qE component of NPQ (Δ5 npq4-1), NDH-mediated CET (Δ5 crr4-3), or PGR5-PGRL1-mediated CET (Δ5 pgr5). Their analysis revealed that PGR5-PGRL1-mediated CET plays a major role in ΔpH formation and induction of NPQ in C3 plants. Moreover, while pgr5 dies at the seedling stage under fluctuating light conditions, Δ5 pgr5 plants are able to survive, which underlines the importance of PGR5 in modulating the intersystem electron transfer. PMID:26687812

  13. Linear Approximation SAR Azimuth Processing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindquist, R. B.; Masnaghetti, R. K.; Belland, E.; Hance, H. V.; Weis, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    A segmented linear approximation of the quadratic phase function that is used to focus the synthetic antenna of a SAR was studied. Ideal focusing, using a quadratic varying phase focusing function during the time radar target histories are gathered, requires a large number of complex multiplications. These can be largely eliminated by using linear approximation techniques. The result is a reduced processor size and chip count relative to ideally focussed processing and a correspondingly increased feasibility for spaceworthy implementation. A preliminary design and sizing for a spaceworthy linear approximation SAR azimuth processor meeting requirements similar to those of the SEASAT-A SAR was developed. The study resulted in a design with approximately 1500 IC's, 1.2 cubic feet of volume, and 350 watts of power for a single look, 4000 range cell azimuth processor with 25 meters resolution.

  14. Azimuthal Doppler Effect in Optical Vortex Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Toda, Yasunori; Morisaki, Tomohiro; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortices (OV) are a set of solutions of the paraxial Helmholtz equation in the cylindrical coordinates, and its wave front has a spiral shape. Since the Doppler shift is caused by the phase change by the movement in a wave field, the observer in the OV, which has the three-dimensional structured wave front, feels a three-dimensional Doppler effect. Since the multi-dimensional Doppler components are mixed into a single Doppler spectrum, development of a decomposition method is required. We performed a modified saturated absorption spectroscopy to separate the components. The OV and plane wave are used as a probe beam and pump beam, respectively. Although the plane-wave pump laser cancels the z-direction Doppler shift, the azimuthal Doppler shift remains in the saturated dip. The spatial variation of the dip width gives the information of the azimuthal Doppler shift. The some results of optical vortex spectroscopy will be presented.

  15. Temperature dependence of antenna excitation transport in native photosystem I particles. [Electronic energy transport (EET)

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, P.A.; Struve, W.S. )

    1991-05-16

    The temperature dependence of polarized photobleaching dynamics was investigated through 680-nm pump-probe experiments in the Chl a antenna of native photosystem 1 particles (Chl/P700 {approximately} 200) from spinach. The anisotropic decay time is lengthened by an order of magnitude (from {approximately}7 to {approximately}62 ps) when the temperature is reduced from 290 to 38 K; most of this increase occurs between 65 and 38 K. The occurrence of this transition temperature in the tens of kelvin reflects the participation of protein phonons in antenna EET. The isotopic decay kinetics are considerably less temperature sensitive, indicating that the anisotropic and isotropic decays stem from different energy-transfer processes with contrasting temperature dependence. The 38 K photobleaching spectrum at 5 ps exhibits considerably more weighting in the lower energy Chl a spectral forms than the room-temperature spectrum, suggesting that rapid spectral equilibration occurs in the photosystem 1 antenna. In light of the phonon frequency and electron-phonon coupling parameters determined in independent PSI-200 spectral hole-burning experiments, the quantitative temperature dependence int he anisotropic decay times is consistent with a theory for phonon-assisted EET in which the pertinent phonons are independent modes localized about the donor and acceptor chromophores.

  16. Diameter-dependent electronic transport properties of Au-catalyst/Ge-nanowire Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, S Thomas; Leonard, Francois; Swartzentruber, Brian S; Talin, A Alee

    2008-01-01

    We present electronic transport measurements in individual Au-catalyst/Ge-nanowire interfaces demonstrating the presence of a Schottky barrier. Surprisingly, the small-bias conductance density increases with decreasing diameter. Theoretical calculations suggest that this effect arises because electron-hole recombination in the depletion region is the dominant charge transport mechanism, with a diameter dependence of both the depletion width and the electron-hole recombination time. The recombination time is dominated by surface contributions and depends linearly on the nanowire diameter.

  17. Rayleigh wave azimuthally anisotropic phase velocity maps beneath western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xuewei; Eaton, David W.; Gu, Yu Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    The lithospheric evolution of western Laurentia spans several billion years of Earth history and provides an exceptional opportunity for investigating continental deformation during Archean and Proterozoic assembly of the craton and subsequent Phanerozoic orogenic processes along its western margin. In this study we present fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave azimuthal anisotropy in the period range 20-150 s for western Laurentia and the southern Canadian Cordillera. The surface wave phase velocity maps offer new constraints on the depth distribution of seismic anisotropy in this region. At short periods (20-25 s), strong anisotropy with an orogen-parallel fast direction is evident in the Cordillera and neighboring foreland belt, suggesting pervasive ductile deformation in the lower crust during Laramide orogenesis. At periods of 70 s and higher, a zone of low-to-null azimuthal anisotropy is evident in the southern part of the Cordillera. This apparent null region is interpreted to reflect complex asthenospheric flow due to the combined effects of the Juan de Fuca slab window, lithospheric delamination, and small-scale edge-driven convection. Depth-variant azimuthal anisotropy is evident beneath the cratonic part of the study region. The dominant direction of fast wave propagation in the southeastern part of the craton changes from N-S at periods of <120 s to NE-SW at 150 s period. This depth dependence is inferred to arise from different origins of the observed anisotropy, with "frozen" anisotropy within cratonic lithosphere underlain by flow-driven anisotropy in the asthenosphere. The frozen N-S trending fabrics in the middle to lower cratonic lithosphere most likely reflect processes of Paleoproterozoic assembly of western Laurentia.

  18. Membrane localization and pH-dependent transport of a newly cloned organic cation transporter (PMAT) in kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Li; Engel, Karen; Zhou, Mingyan; Wang, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a novel membrane transporter recently cloned and characterized in our laboratory. We previously demonstrated that PMAT functions as a polyspecific organic cation transporter and efficiently transports many organic cations such as monoamine neurotransmitters and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). In this study, we explored the role of PMAT in the renal handling of organic cations. Using a polyclonal antibody generated toward the NH2-terminal 66 amino acid residues of human PMAT, we showed that the PMAT protein (~55 kDa) is expressed in the human kidney and is primarily targeted to the apical membranes when expressed in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Using MDCK cells stably expressing human PMAT, we showed that PMAT-mediated MPP+ uptake is strongly dependent on extracellular pH. Lowering extracellular pH from 7.4 to 6.6 greatly stimulated PMAT-mediated MPP+ uptake, whereas elevating extracellular pH to 8.2 abolished transporter activity. Kinetic analysis revealed that the apparent Vmax at pH 6.6 is about fourfold higher than that at pH 7.4, whereas the apparent Km values were not statistically different at these two conditions. Under acidic conditions (pH 6.6), the proton ionophore, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluormethoxyphenylhydrazone, drastically reduced PMAT-mediated MPP+ uptake, suggesting that the stimulatory effect of proton may be due to transporter coupling with a proton gradient. Taken together, our data suggest that PMAT is expressed on the apical membranes of renal epithelial cells and may use luminal proton gradient to drive organic cation reabsorption in the kidney. PMID:17018840

  19. Size-dependent control of colloid transport via solute gradients in dead-end channels.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangwoo; Um, Eujin; Sabass, Benedikt; Ault, Jesse T; Rahimi, Mohammad; Warren, Patrick B; Stone, Howard A

    2016-01-12

    Transport of colloids in dead-end channels is involved in widespread applications including drug delivery and underground oil and gas recovery. In such geometries, Brownian motion may be considered as the sole mechanism that enables transport of colloidal particles into or out of the channels, but it is, unfortunately, an extremely inefficient transport mechanism for microscale particles. Here, we explore the possibility of diffusiophoresis as a means to control the colloid transport in dead-end channels by introducing a solute gradient. We demonstrate that the transport of colloidal particles into the dead-end channels can be either enhanced or completely prevented via diffusiophoresis. In addition, we show that size-dependent diffusiophoretic transport of particles can be achieved by considering a finite Debye layer thickness effect, which is commonly ignored. A combination of diffusiophoresis and Brownian motion leads to a strong size-dependent focusing effect such that the larger particles tend to concentrate more and reside deeper in the channel. Our findings have implications for all manners of controlled release processes, especially for site-specific delivery systems where localized targeting of particles with minimal dispersion to the nontarget area is essential. PMID:26715753

  20. Analytical solution of a convection-dispersion model with time-dependent transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Sposito, Garrison

    1989-12-01

    Mathematical studies of solute transport in porous media have often utilized "equivalent" models of the transport process to remove undesired variability in the transport coefficients at the space and time scales of direct interest. Both deterministic and stochastic approaches in this genre produce an "effective" convection-dispersion equation with time-dependent coefficients. This type of equation in one spatial dimension is investigated mathematically in the present paper. A closed-form solution of the solute transport equation is derived for a semi-infinite spatial domain with arbitrary initial and boundary flux conditions. It is shown that the solution reduces to well-known results for special forms of the time-dependent coefficients. In general, however, a Volterra integral equation of the second kind must be solved to evaluate the analytical solution of the transport equation. We present a stable and convergent numerical scheme, utilizing a trapezoidal quadrature rule, for the solution of the Volterra equation. The method of solution developed should be applicable to a broad variety of solute transport problems, including particularly those in heterogeneous porous media.

  1. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    T. Downar

    2009-03-31

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system.

  2. Accurate Prediction of Ligand Affinities for a Proton-Dependent Oligopeptide Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Samsudin, Firdaus; Parker, Joanne L.; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Membrane transporters are critical modulators of drug pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. One example is the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter PepT1, also known as SLC15A1, which is responsible for the uptake of the β-lactam antibiotics and various peptide-based prodrugs. In this study, we modeled the binding of various peptides to a bacterial homolog, PepTSt, and evaluated a range of computational methods for predicting the free energy of binding. Our results show that a hybrid approach (endpoint methods to classify peptides into good and poor binders and a theoretically exact method for refinement) is able to accurately predict affinities, which we validated using proteoliposome transport assays. Applying the method to a homology model of PepT1 suggests that the approach requires a high-quality structure to be accurate. Our study provides a blueprint for extending these computational methodologies to other pharmaceutically important transporter families. PMID:27028887

  3. Azimuthally polarized cathodoluminescence from InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Brenny, B. J. M.; Osorio, C. I.; Polman, A.; Dam, D. van; Gómez Rivas, J.

    2015-11-16

    We determine the angle and polarization dependent emission from 1.75 µm and 2.50 µm long InP nanowires by using cathodoluminescence polarimetry. We excite the vertical wires using a 5 keV electron beam, and find that the 880 nm bandgap emission shows azimuthally polarized rings, with the number of rings depending on the wire height. The data agree well with a model in which spontaneous emission from the wire emitted into the far field interferes with emission reflected off the substrate. From the model, the depth range from which the emission is generated is found to be up to 400 nm below the top surface of the wires, well beyond the extent of the primary electron cloud. This enables a probe of the carrier diffusion length in the InP nanowires.

  4. An asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian algorithm for the time-dependent anisotropic heat transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, Luis; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Hauck, Cory D.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a Lagrangian numerical algorithm for a time-dependent, anisotropic temperature transport equation in magnetized plasmas in the large guide field regime. The approach is based on an analytical integral formal solution of the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field) transport equation with sources, and it is able to accommodate both local and non-local parallel heat flux closures. The numerical implementation is based on an operator-split formulation, with two straightforward steps: a perpendicular transport step (including sources), and a Lagrangian (field-line integral) parallel transport step. Algorithmically, the first step is amenable to the use of modern iterative methods, while the second step has a fixed cost per degree of freedom (and is therefore scalable). Accuracy-wise, the approach is free from the numerical pollution introduced by the discrete parallel transport term when the perpendicular to parallel transport coefficient ratio X /X becomes arbitrarily small, and is shown to capture the correct limiting solution when ε = X⊥L2/X1L2 → 0 (with L∥∙ L⊥ , the parallel and perpendicular diffusion length scales, respectively). Therefore, the approach is asymptotic-preserving. We demonstrate the capabilities of the scheme with several numerical experiments with varying magnetic field complexity in two dimensions, including the case of transport across a magnetic island.

  5. Charge dependence of neoclassical and turbulent transport of light impurities on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. S.; Garzotti, L.; Casson, F. J.; Dickinson, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Patel, A.; Roach, C. M.; Summers, H. P.; Tanabe, H.; Valovič, M.; the MAST Team

    2015-09-01

    Carbon and nitrogen impurity transport coefficients are determined from gas puff experiments carried out during repeat L-mode discharges on the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and compared against a previous analysis of helium impurity transport on MAST. The impurity density profiles are measured on the low-field side of the plasma, therefore this paper focuses on light impurities where the impact of poloidal asymmetries on impurity transport is predicted to be negligible. A weak screening of carbon and nitrogen is found in the plasma core, whereas the helium density profile is peaked over the entire plasma radius. Both carbon and nitrogen experience a diffusivity of the order of 10 m2s-1 and a strong inward convective velocity of ˜40 m s-1 near the plasma edge, and a region of outward convective velocity at mid-radius. The measured impurity transport coefficients are consistent with neoclassical Banana-Plateau predictions within ρ ≤slant 0.4 . Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the carbon and helium particle flux at two flux surfaces, ρ =0.6 and ρ =0.7 , suggest that trapped electron modes are responsible for the anomalous impurity transport observed in the outer regions of the plasma. The model, combining neoclassical transport with quasi-linear turbulence, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the impurity transport coefficients and the impurity charge dependence.

  6. Spin- and valley-dependent miniband structure and transport in silicene superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missault, N.; Vasilopoulos, P.; Peeters, F. M.; Van Duppen, B.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate silicene superlattices in the presence of a tunable barrier potential U , an exchange field M , and a perpendicular electric field Ez. The resulting miniband structure depends on the spin and valley indices and on the fields M and Ez. These fields determine the minigaps and also affect the additional Dirac points brought about by the periodic potential U . In addition, we consider diffusive transport and assess its dependence on the spin and valley indices as well as on temperature. The corresponding spin and valley polarizations strongly depend on the potential U and can be made almost 100% at very low temperatures at particular values of the Fermi energy.

  7. Immunocytochemical evidence of Tulp1-dependent outer segment protein transport pathways in photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Gregory H; Watson, Rao F; Pauer, Gayle J T; Bollinger, Kathryn; Hagstrom, Stephanie A

    2011-11-01

    Tulp1 is a protein of unknown function exclusive to rod and cone photoreceptor cells. Mutations in the gene cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in humans and photoreceptor degeneration in mice. In tulp1-/- mice, rod and cone opsins are mislocalized, and rhodopsin-bearing extracellular vesicles accumulate around the inner segment, indicating that Tulp1 is involved in protein transport from the inner segment to the outer segment. To investigate this further, we sought to define which outer segment transport pathways are Tulp1-dependent. We used immunohistochemistry to examine the localization of outer segment proteins in tulp1-/- photoreceptors, prior to retinal degeneration. We also surveyed the condition of inner segment organelles and rhodopsin transport machinery proteins. Herein, we show that guanylate cyclase 1 and guanylate cyclase activating proteins 1 and 2 are mislocalized in the absence of Tulp1. Furthermore, arrestin does not translocate to the outer segment in response to light stimulation. Additionally, data from the tulp1-/- retina adds to the understanding of peripheral membrane protein transport, indicating that rhodopsin kinase and transducin do not co-transport in rhodopsin carrier vesicles and phosphodiesterase does not co-transport in guanylate cyclase carrier vesicles. These data implicate Tulp1 in the transport of selective integral membrane outer segment proteins and their associated proteins, specifically, the opsin and guanylate cyclase carrier pathways. The exact role of Tulp1 in outer segment protein transport remains elusive. However, without Tulp1, two rhodopsin transport machinery proteins exhibit abnormal distribution, Rab8 and Rab11, suggesting a role for Tulp1 in vesicular docking and fusion at the plasma membrane near the connecting cilium. PMID:21867699

  8. Electroosmotic transport in polyelectrolyte-grafted nanochannels with pH-dependent charge density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-05-01

    "Smart" polyelectrolyte-grafted or "soft" nanochannels with pH-responsiveness have shown great promise for applications like manipulation of ion transport, ion sensing and selection, current rectification, and many more. In this paper, we develop a theory to study the electroosmotic transport in a polyelectrolyte-grafted (or soft) nanochannel with pH-dependent charge density. In one of our recent studies, we have identified that explicit consideration of hydrogen ion concentration is mandatory for appropriately describing the electrostatics of such systems and the resulting monomer concentration must obey a non-unique, cubic distribution. Here, we use this electrostatic calculation to study the corresponding electroosmotic transport. We establish that the effect of pH in the electroosmotic transport in polyelectrolyte-grafted nanochannels introduces two separate issues: first is the consideration of the hydrogen and hydroxyl ion concentrations in describing the electroosmotic body force, and second is the consideration of the appropriate drag force that bears the signature of this cubic monomeric distribution. Our results indicate that the strength of the electroosmotic velocity for the pH-dependent case is always smaller than that for the pH-independent case, with the extent of this difference being a function of the system parameters. Such nature of the electroosmotic transport will be extremely significant in suppressing the electroosmotic flow strength with implications in large number applications such as capillary electrophoresis induced separation, electric field mediated DNA elongation, electrophoretic DNA nanopore sequencing, and many more.

  9. Stage-Dependent Axon Transport of Proteasomes Contributes to Axon Development.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Meng-Tsung; Guo, Chin-Lin; Liou, Angela Y; Chang, Ting-Ya; Ng, Ming-Chong; Florea, Bogdan I; Overkleeft, Herman S; Wu, Yen-Lin; Liao, Jung-Chi; Cheng, Pei-Lin

    2015-11-23

    Axon extension at the growing tip requires elevated local protein supply, with a capability sustainable over long axons in varying environments. The exact mechanisms, however, remain elusive. Here we report that axon-promoting factors elicited a retrograde transport-dependent removal of proteasomes from nascent axon terminals, thereby increasing protein stability at axon tips. Such an effect occurred through phosphorylation of a dynein-interacting proteasome adaptor protein Ecm29. During the transition from immature neurites to nascent axons in cultured hippocampal neurons, live-cell imaging revealed a significant increase of the retrograde axonal transport of fluorescently labeled 20S proteasomes. This retrograde proteasome transport depended on neuron stage and increased with axon lengths. Blockade of retrograde transport caused accumulation of proteasomes, reduction of axon growth, and attenuation of growth-associated Par6 at the axon tip of newly polarized neurons. Our results delineate a regulatory mechanism that controls proteasome abundance via preferential transport required for axon development in newborn neurons. PMID:26609957

  10. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivity in silicon nanostructured materials studied by the Boltzmann transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Giuseppe; Esfarjani, Keivan; Strubbe, David A.; Broido, David; Kolpak, Alexie M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured materials exhibit low thermal conductivity because of the additional scattering due to phonon-boundary interactions. As these interactions are highly sensitive to the mean free path (MFP) of phonons, MFP distributions in nanostructures can be dramatically distorted relative to bulk. Here we calculate the MFP distribution in periodic nanoporous Si for different temperatures, using the recently developed MFP-dependent Boltzmann transport equation. After analyzing the relative contribution of each phonon branch to thermal transport in nanoporous Si, we find that at room temperature optical phonons contribute 17 % to heat transport, compared to 5 % in bulk Si. Interestingly, we observe a constant thermal conductivity over the range 200 K transport of acoustic phonons with long intrinsic MFP and the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Our findings, which are in qualitative agreement with the temperature trend of thermal conductivities measured in nanoporous Si-based systems, shed light on the origin of the reduction of thermal conductivity in nanostructured materials and demonstrate the necessity of multiscale heat transport engineering, in which the bulk material and geometry are optimized concurrently.

  11. Proton-dependent glutamine uptake by aphid bacteriocyte amino acid transporter ApGLNT1.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Wilson, Alex C C; Luetje, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Aphids house large populations of the gammaproteobacterial symbiont Buchnera aphidicola in specialized bacteriocyte cells. The combined biosynthetic capability of the holobiont (Acyrthosiphon pisum and Buchnera) is sufficient for biosynthesis of all twenty protein coding amino acids, including amino acids that animals alone cannot synthesize; and that are present at low concentrations in A. pisum's plant phloem sap diet. Collaborative holobiont amino acid biosynthesis depends on glutamine import into bacteriocytes, which serves as a nitrogen-rich amino donor for biosynthesis of other amino acids. Recently, we characterized A. pisum glutamine transporter 1 (ApGLNT1), a member of the amino acid/auxin permease family, as the dominant bacteriocyte plasma membrane glutamine transporter. Here we show ApGLNT1 to be structurally and functionally related to mammalian proton-dependent amino acid transporters (PATs 1-4). Using functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, combined with two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology we demonstrate that ApGLNT1 is electrogenic and that glutamine induces large inward currents. ApGLNT1 glutamine induced currents are dependent on external glutamine concentration, proton (H+) gradient across the membrane, and membrane potential. Based on these transport properties, ApGLNT1-mediated glutamine uptake into A. pisum bacteriocytes can be regulated by changes in either proton gradients across the plasma membrane or membrane potential. PMID:26028424

  12. Energy dependence of jet transport parameter and parton saturation in quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wang Xinnian

    2008-02-15

    We study the evolution and saturation of the gluon distribution function in the quark-gluon plasma as probed by a propagating parton and its effect on the computation of jet quenching or transport parameter q-circumflex. For thermal partons, the saturation scale Q{sub s}{sup 2} is found to be proportional to the Debye screening mass {mu}{sub D}{sup 2}. For hard probes, evolution at small x=Q{sub s}{sup 2}/6ET leads to jet energy dependence of q-circumflex. We study this dependence both for a conformal gauge theory in weak and strong coupling limit and for (pure gluon) QCD. The energy dependence can be used to extract the shear viscosity {eta} of the medium, since {eta} can be related to the transport parameter for thermal partons in a transport description. We also derive upper bounds on the transport parameter for both energetic and thermal partons. The latter leads to a lower bound on the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio which is consistent with the conjectured lower bound {eta}/s{>=}1/4{pi}. We also discuss the implications of these results on the study of jet quenching at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the bulk properties of the dense matter.

  13. Axial and azimuthal spin-wave eigenmodes in rolled-up permalloy stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balhorn, Felix; Jeni, Simon; Hansen, Wolfgang; Heitmann, Detlef; Mendach, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    We experimentally realized rolled-up permalloy stripes to form three-dimensional ring-like ferromagnetic structures. By means of microwave absorption spectroscopy, we find multiple resonances occurring above a demagnetization field threshold which depends on the ring's axial width. Our experimental data can be well modeled by assuming both axial and azimuthal spin-wave confinement.

  14. Sodium Dependent Multivitamin Transporter (SMVT): A Potential Target for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge, etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22420308

  15. Measurement of plasma current dependent changes in impurity transport and comparison with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Candy, J.

    2012-05-15

    Measured impurity transport coefficients are found to demonstrate a strong dependence on plasma current in the core of Alcator C-Mod. These measurements are compared directly with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an attempt to both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the measured impurity transport. Discharges constituting a scan of plasma current from 0.6 to 1.2 MA were performed during the 2010 run campaign. The impurity transport from these discharges was determined using a novel set of spectroscopic diagnostics available on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic suite allowed for the effective constraint of impurity transport coefficient profiles inside of r/a = 0.6. A decrease in the measured impurity diffusivity and inward convection is found with increased plasma current. Global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations were performed using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] for all discharges in the experimental scan and are found to reproduce the experimental trends, while demonstrating good quantitative agreement with measurement. A more comprehensive quantitative comparison was performed on the 0.8 MA discharge of the current scan which demonstrates that simultaneous agreement between experiment and simulation in both the impurity particle transport and ion heat transport channels is attainable within experimental uncertainties.

  16. Time-dependent 2-D modeling of edge plasma transport with high intermittency due to blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2012-07-15

    The results on time-dependent 2-D fluid modeling of edge plasmas with non-diffusive intermittent transport across the magnetic field (termed cross-field) based on the novel macro-blob approach are presented. The capability of this approach to simulate the long temporal evolution ({approx}0.1 s) of the background plasma and simultaneously the fast spatiotemporal dynamics of blobs ({approx}10{sup -4} s) is demonstrated. An analysis of a periodic sequence of many macro-blobs (PSMB) is given showing that the resulting plasma attains a dynamic equilibrium. Plasma properties in the dynamic equilibrium are discussed. In PSMB modeling, the effect of macro-blob generation frequency on edge plasma parameters is studied. Comparison between PSMB modeling and experimental profile data is given. The calculations are performed for the same plasma discharge using two different models for anomalous cross-field transport: time-average convection and PSMB. Parametric analysis of edge plasma variation with transport coefficients in these models is presented. The capability of the models to accurately simulate enhanced transport due to blobs is compared. Impurity dynamics in edge plasma with macro-blobs is also studied showing strong impact of macro-blob on profiles of impurity charge states caused by enhanced outward transport of high-charge states and simultaneous inward transport of low-charge states towards the core. Macro-blobs cause enhancement of sputtering rates, increase radiation and impurity concentration in plasma, and change erosion/deposition patterns.

  17. Measurement of plasma current dependent changes in impurity transport and comparison with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Candy, J.

    2012-05-01

    Measured impurity transport coefficients are found to demonstrate a strong dependence on plasma current in the core of Alcator C-Mod. These measurements are compared directly with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an attempt to both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the measured impurity transport. Discharges constituting a scan of plasma current from 0.6 to 1.2 MA were performed during the 2010 run campaign. The impurity transport from these discharges was determined using a novel set of spectroscopic diagnostics available on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic suite allowed for the effective constraint of impurity transport coefficient profiles inside of r/a = 0.6. A decrease in the measured impurity diffusivity and inward convection is found with increased plasma current. Global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations were performed using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] for all discharges in the experimental scan and are found to reproduce the experimental trends, while demonstrating good quantitative agreement with measurement. A more comprehensive quantitative comparison was performed on the 0.8 MA discharge of the current scan which demonstrates that simultaneous agreement between experiment and simulation in both the impurity particle transport and ion heat transport channels is attainable within experimental uncertainties.

  18. Using an electronic compass to determine telemetry azimuths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, R.R., Jr.; Scalf, J.D.; Jamison, B.E.; Lutz, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers typically collect azimuths from known locations to estimate locations of radiomarked animals. Mobile, vehicle-mounted telemetry receiving systems frequently are used to gather azimuth data. Use of mobile systems typically involves estimating the vehicle's orientation to grid north (vehicle azimuth), recording an azimuth to the transmitter relative to the vehicle azimuth from a fixed rosette around the antenna mast (relative azimuth), and subsequently calculating an azimuth to the transmitter (animal azimuth). We incorporated electronic compasses into standard null-peak antenna systems by mounting the compass sensors atop the antenna masts and evaluated the precision of this configuration. This system increased efficiency by eliminating vehicle orientation and calculations to determine animal azimuths and produced estimates of precision (azimuth SD=2.6 deg., SE=0.16 deg.) similar to systems that required orienting the mobile system to grid north. Using an electronic compass increased efficiency without sacrificing precision and should produce more accurate estimates of locations when marked animals are moving or when vehicle orientation is problematic.

  19. High-Throughput Screening Assay for Inhibitors of TonB-Dependent Iron Transport.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mathew; Jordan, Lorne D; Shipelskiy, Yan; Newton, Salete M; Klebba, Phillip E

    2016-03-01

    The TonB-dependent Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein FepA actively transports the siderophore ferric enterobactin (FeEnt) into the periplasm. We developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that observes FeEnt uptake through FepA in living Escherichia coli, by monitoring fluorescence quenching that occurs upon binding of FeEnt, and then unquenching as the bacteria deplete it from solution by transport. We optimized the labeling and spectroscopic methods to screen for inhibitors of TonB-dependent iron uptake through the outer membrane. The assay works like a molecular switch that is on in the presence of TonB activity and off in its absence. It functions in 96-well microtiter plates, in a variety of conditions, with Z factors of 0.8-1.0. TonB-dependent iron transport is energy dependent, and the inhibitory effects of the metabolic inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2,4-dinitrophenol, azide, cyanide, and arsenate on FeEnt uptake were readily detected by the assay. Because iron acquisition is a determinant of bacterial pathogenesis, HTS with this method may identify inhibitors that block TonB function and constitute novel therapeutics against infectious disease caused by Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26518031

  20. Concentration dependence of the transport energy level for charge carriers in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelerich, J. O.; Huemmer, D.; Weseloh, M.; Baranovskii, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    The concept of the transport energy (TE) has proven to be one of the most powerful theoretical approaches to describe charge transport in organic semiconductors. In the recent paper L. Li, G. Meller, and H. Kosina [Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 013307 (2008)] have studied the effect of the partially filled localized states on the position of the TE level. We show that the position of the TE is essentially different to the one suggested by L. Li, G. Meller, and H. Kosina [Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 013307 (2008)] We further modify the standard TE approach taking into account the percolation nature of the transport path. Our calculations show that the TE becomes dependent on the concentration of charge carriers n at much higher n values than those, at which the carrier mobility already strongly depends on n. Hence the calculations of the concentration-dependent carrier mobility cannot be performed within the approach, in which only the concentration dependence of the TE is taken into account.

  1. Beam energy dependence of azimuthal anisotropy at RHIC-PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, A.

    2012-05-15

    Recent PHENIX measurements of the elliptic ({upsilon}{sub 2}) and hexadecapole ({upsilon}{sub 4}) Fourier flow coefficients for charged hadrons as a function of transverse momentum (p{sub T}), collision centrality and particle species are presented and compared with results from the PHOBOS and STAR Collaborations respectively. The status of extensions to future PHENIX measurements at lower beam energies is also discussed.

  2. Radial and Azimuthal Polarizer Using a One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal with a Patterned Liquid Crystal Defect Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagashira, Kenji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kubo, Hitoshi; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2010-06-01

    We propose a radial and azimuthal polarizer (RAP) using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PhC) with a patterned liquid crystal defect layer. A concentrically aligned liquid crystal defect layer in the 1D PhC causes the defect modes to be polarized azimuthally or radially, depending on the wavelength. Switching between these two polarizations is achieved by controlling the incident light wavelength.

  3. Protein kinase C-dependent regulation of human hepatic drug transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Mayati, Abdullah; Le Vee, Marc; Moreau, Amélie; Jouan, Elodie; Bucher, Simon; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-12-15

    Hepatic drug transporters are now recognized as major actors of hepatobiliary elimination of drugs. Characterization of their regulatory pathways is therefore an important issue. In this context, the present study was designed to analyze the potential regulation of human hepatic transporter expression by protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Treatment by the reference PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) for 48h was shown to decrease mRNA expression of various sinusoidal transporters, including OATP1B1, OATP2B1, NTCP, OCT1 and MRP3, but to increase that of OATP1B3, whereas mRNA expression of canalicular transporters was transiently enhanced (MDR1), decreased (BSEP and MRP2) or unchanged (BCRP) in human hepatoma HepaRG cells. The profile of hepatic transporter mRNA expression changes in PMA-treated HepaRG cells was correlated to that found in PMA-exposed primary human hepatocytes and was similarly observed in response to the PKC-activating marketed drug ingenol mebutate. It was associated with concomitant repression of OATP1B1 and OATP2B1 protein expression and reduction of OATP, OCT1, NTCP and MRP2 activity. The use of chemical PKC inhibitors further suggested a contribution of novel PKCs isoforms to PMA-mediated regulations of transporter mRNA expression. PMA was finally shown to cause epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in HepaRG cells and exposure to various additional EMT inducers, i.e., hepatocyte growth factor, tumor growth factor-β1 or the HNF4α inhibitor BI6015, led to transporter expression alterations highly correlated to those triggered by PMA. Taken together, these data highlight PKC-dependent regulation of human hepatic drug transporter expression, which may be closely linked to EMT triggered by PKC activation. PMID:26462574

  4. Grey transport acceleration method for time-dependent radiative transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, E.

    1988-10-01

    A new iterative method for solving hte time-dependent multifrequency radiative transfer equations is described. The method is applicable to semi-implicit time discretizations that generate a linear steady-state multifrequency transport problem with pseudo-scattering within each time step. The standard ''lambda'' iteration method is shown to often converge slowly for such problems, and the new grey transport acceleration (GTA) method, based on accelerating the lambda method by employing a grey, or frequency-independent transport equation, is developed. The GTA method is shown, theoretically by an iterative Fourier analysis, and experimentally by numerical calculations, to converge significantly faster than the lambda method. In addition, the GTA method is conceptually simple to implement for general differencing schemes, on either Eulerian or Lagrangian meshes. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  5. Asymptotic Analysis of Time-Dependent Neutron Transport Coupled with Isotopic Depletion and Radioactive Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2006-09-27

    We describe an asymptotic analysis of the coupled nonlinear system of equations describing time-dependent three-dimensional monoenergetic neutron transport and isotopic depletion and radioactive decay. The classic asymptotic diffusion scaling of Larsen and Keller [1], along with a consistent small scaling of the terms describing the radioactive decay of isotopes, is applied to this coupled nonlinear system of equations in a medium of specified initial isotopic composition. The analysis demonstrates that to leading order the neutron transport equation limits to the standard time-dependent neutron diffusion equation with macroscopic cross sections whose number densities are determined by the standard system of ordinary differential equations, the so-called Bateman equations, describing the temporal evolution of the nuclide number densities.

  6. Vibrationally dependent electron-electron interactions in resonant electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpenbeck, A.; Härtle, R.; Bockstedte, M.; Thoss, M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the role of electronic-vibrational coupling in resonant electron transport through single-molecule junctions, taking into account that the corresponding coupling strengths may depend on the charge and excitation state of the molecular bridge. Within an effective-model Hamiltonian approach for a molecule with multiple electronic states, this requires to extend the commonly used model and include vibrationally dependent electron-electron interaction. We use Born-Markov master equation methods and consider selected models to exemplify the effect of the additional interaction on the transport characteristics of a single-molecule junction. In particular, we show that it has a significant influence on local cooling and heating mechanisms, it may result in negative differential resistance, and it may cause pronounced asymmetries in the conductance map of a single-molecule junction.

  7. Time-dependent density functional theory quantum transport simulation in non-orthogonal basis

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Yan Ho; Xie, Hang; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, Guan Hua; Zheng, Xiao

    2013-12-14

    Basing on the earlier works on the hierarchical equations of motion for quantum transport, we present in this paper a first principles scheme for time-dependent quantum transport by combining time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and Keldysh's non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. This scheme is beyond the wide band limit approximation and is directly applicable to the case of non-orthogonal basis without the need of basis transformation. The overlap between the basis in the lead and the device region is treated properly by including it in the self-energy and it can be shown that this approach is equivalent to a lead-device orthogonalization. This scheme has been implemented at both TDDFT and density functional tight-binding level. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate our method and comparison with wide band limit approximation is made. Finally, the sparsity of the matrices and computational complexity of this method are analyzed.

  8. Using time-dependent density functional theory in real time for calculating electronic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffhauser, Philipp; Kümmel, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We present a scheme for calculating electronic transport within the propagation approach to time-dependent density functional theory. Our scheme is based on solving the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations on grids in real space and real time for a finite system. We use absorbing and antiabsorbing boundaries for simulating the coupling to a source and a drain. The boundaries are designed to minimize the effects of quantum-mechanical reflections and electrical polarization build-up, which are the major obstacles when calculating transport by applying an external bias to a finite system. We show that the scheme can readily be applied to real molecules by calculating the current through a conjugated molecule as a function of time. By comparing to literature results for the conjugated molecule and to analytic results for a one-dimensional model system we demonstrate the reliability of the concept.

  9. Deformed flux tubes produce azimuthal anisotropy in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirner, H. J.; Reygers, K.; Kopeliovich, B. Z.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the azimuthal anisotropy v2 of particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the maximum entropy approach. This necessitates two new phenomenological input parameters δ and λ2 compared with integrated multiplicity distributions. The parameter δ describes the deformation of a flux tube and can be theoretically calculated in a bag model with a bag constant which depends on the density of surrounding flux tubes. The parameter λ2 defines the anisotropy of the particle distribution in momentum space and can be connected to δ via the uncertainty relation. In this framework we compute the anisotropy v2 as a function of centrality, transverse momentum, and rapidity in qualitative agreement with Large Hadron Collider data.

  10. Azimuthal anisotropy: Transition from hydrodynamic flow to jet suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Roy A.; Taranenko, A.; Wei, R.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alexander, J. M.; Jia, J.; Pak, R.; Rischke, Dirk H.; Teaney, D.; Dusling, K.

    2010-09-01

    Measured second and fourth azimuthal anisotropy coefficients v2,4(Npart,pT) are scaled with the initial eccentricity ɛ2,4(Npart) of the collision zone and studied as a function of the number of participants Npart and the transverse momenta pT. Scaling violations are observed for pT≲3 GeV/c, consistent with a pT2 dependence of viscous corrections and a linear increase of the relaxation time with pT. These empirical viscous corrections to flow and the thermal distribution function at freeze-out constrain estimates of the specific viscosity and the freeze-out temperature for two different models for the initial collision geometry. The apparent viscous corrections exhibit a sharp maximum for pT≳3 GeV/c, suggesting a breakdown of the hydrodynamic ansatz and the onset of a change from flow-driven to suppression-driven anisotropy.

  11. Binaural Sound Localizer for Azimuthal Movement Detection Based on Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keonwook; Choi, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Sound localization can be realized by utilizing the physics of acoustics in various methods. This paper investigates a novel detection architecture for the azimuthal movement of sound source based on the interaural level difference (ILD) between two receivers. One of the microphones in the system is surrounded by barriers of various heights in order to cast the direction dependent diffraction of the incoming signal. The gradient analysis of the ILD between the structured and unstructured microphone demonstrates the rotation directions as clockwise, counter clockwise, and no rotation of the sound source. Acoustic experiments with different types of sound source over a wide range of target movements show that the average true positive and false positive rates are 67% and 16%, respectively. Spectral analysis demonstrates that the low frequency delivers decreased true and false positive rates and the high frequency presents increases of both rates, overall. PMID:23112617

  12. pH-dependent transport of metals through a reactive porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigiobbe, V.; Bryant, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Here we present a study on the effect of pH-dependent adsorption and hydrodynamic dispersion on metal transport through a reactive porous medium with hydrophilic surface. We investigate how the migration of a certain fraction of a metal can be facilitated by its competitive adsorption with protons. We performed laboratory experiments using a chromatographic column filled with silica beads coated with hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and flooded initially with an acidic solution (pH 3) and then with an alkaline solution (pH > 7) containing either sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, strontium, or barium cations. Concentrations were chosen for which nonclassical transport is predicted. Highly resolved breakthrough curves measured with inline ion chromatography allowed us to observe in all cases the formation of a fast wave/pulse traveling at the interstitial fluid velocity and a retarded front. Classical theory of reactive transport through porous media predicts the formation of only the retarded front and assumes that hydrodynamic dispersion only smooths it without introducing an additional wave. Therefore, the fast wave is a notable exception to this theory. The mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is due to the interplay between hydrodynamic dispersion and pH-dependent adsorption. Hydrodynamic dispersion broadens the metal concentration front at the inlet of the column and creates a mixing zone where the high-pH solution containing the metal mixes with the low-pH solution initially present in the system. The resulting pH of the mixing zone spans a range where both the adsorption and the retardation of the metal are negligible. This leads to the formation of a metal plume, which then separates from the retarded front traveling at the interstitial fluid velocity as an isolated pulse. This fast transport phenomenon operates independently of other modes of rapid transport, such as colloid-facilitated transport and flow in fractures. A one-dimensional reactive transport model for an incompressible fluid was developed combining surface complexation with mass conservation equations for a solute and the acidity (difference between the total proton and the hydroxide concentrations). In all cases, the model agrees with the measurements capturing the underlying physics of the overall transport behavior and it shows the identity of the cation affects the behavior quantitatively but not qualitatively. This indicates that the formation of the fast pulse is a general transport phenomenon. Its potential effects are on the performance of subsurface engineering infrastructures for pollutant containment, the mobilization of metal contaminants by brine acidified upon contact with CO2 during geologic carbon storage, and the chromatographic separation processes in industrial applications.

  13. Temperature dependent spin transport properties of platinum inferred from spin Hall magnetoresistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2014-06-16

    We study the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet/platinum hybrid structures via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance measurements. Our experiments show a decrease of the SMR magnitude with decreasing temperature. Using the sensitivity of the SMR to the spin transport properties of the normal metal, we interpret our data in terms of a decrease of the spin Hall angle in platinum from 0.11 at room temperature to 0.075 at 10 K, while the spin diffusion length and the spin mixing conductance of the ferrimagnetic insulator/normal metal interface remain almost constant.

  14. Temperature dependent spin transport properties of platinum inferred from spin Hall magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Sibylle; Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2014-06-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet/platinum hybrid structures via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance measurements. Our experiments show a decrease of the SMR magnitude with decreasing temperature. Using the sensitivity of the SMR to the spin transport properties of the normal metal, we interpret our data in terms of a decrease of the spin Hall angle in platinum from 0.11 at room temperature to 0.075 at 10 K, while the spin diffusion length and the spin mixing conductance of the ferrimagnetic insulator/normal metal interface remain almost constant.

  15. Aquaporin-4–dependent K+ and water transport modeled in brain extracellular space following neuroexcitation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Byung-Ju; Zhang, Hua; Binder, Devin K.

    2013-01-01

    Potassium (K+) ions released into brain extracellular space (ECS) during neuroexcitation are efficiently taken up by astrocytes. Deletion of astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in mice alters neuroexcitation by reducing ECS [K+] accumulation and slowing K+ reuptake. These effects could involve AQP4-dependent: (a) K+ permeability, (b) resting ECS volume, (c) ECS contraction during K+ reuptake, and (d) diffusion-limited water/K+ transport coupling. To investigate the role of these mechanisms, we compared experimental data to predictions of a model of K+ and water uptake into astrocytes after neuronal release of K+ into the ECS. The model computed the kinetics of ECS [K+] and volume, with input parameters including initial ECS volume, astrocyte K+ conductance and water permeability, and diffusion in astrocyte cytoplasm. Numerical methods were developed to compute transport and diffusion for a nonstationary astrocyte–ECS interface. The modeling showed that mechanisms b–d, together, can predict experimentally observed impairment in K+ reuptake from the ECS in AQP4 deficiency, as well as altered K+ accumulation in the ECS after neuroexcitation, provided that astrocyte water permeability is sufficiently reduced in AQP4 deficiency and that solute diffusion in astrocyte cytoplasm is sufficiently low. The modeling thus provides a potential explanation for AQP4-dependent K+/water coupling in the ECS without requiring AQP4-dependent astrocyte K+ permeability. Our model links the physical and ion/water transport properties of brain cells with the dynamics of neuroexcitation, and supports the conclusion that reduced AQP4-dependent water transport is responsible for defective neuroexcitation in AQP4 deficiency. PMID:23277478

  16. Substrate-mediated remodeling of methionine transport by multiple ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms in yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Menant, Alexandra; Barbey, Régine; Thomas, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Plasma membrane transport of single amino-acid methionine in yeast is shown to be mediated by at least seven different permeases whose activities are transcriptionaly and post-transcriptionaly regulated by different ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms. Upon high extracellular methionine exposure, three methionine-permease genes are repressed while four others are induced. SCFMet30, SCFGrr1 and Rsp5 ubiquitin ligases are the key actors of the ubiquitin-dependent remodeling of methionine transport. In addition to regulating the activity of Met4, the SCFMet30 ubiquitin ligase is shown to convey an intracellular signal to a membrane initiated signaling pathway by controlling the nuclear concentration of the Stp1 transcription factor. By coupling intra- and extracellular metabolite sensing, SCFMet30 thus allows yeast cells to accurately adjust the intermediary sulfur metabolism to the growth conditions. The multiple ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms that function in methionine transport regulation further exemplify the pervasive role of ubiquitin in the adaptation of single-cell organisms to environmental modifications. PMID:16977312

  17. Time-Dependent DIII-D Heat Transport Simulations Using Neural-Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, J. M.; Smith, S. P.; Meneghini, O.; Luna, C. J.

    2014-10-01

    The neural network transport model BRAINFUSE has been developed to produce transport fluxes based on local parameters. The BRAIN-FUSE model has been integrated into the transport modeling framework ONETWO in order to develop time dependent solutions and has been validated by artificially varying the input neutral beam power and comparing the output to DIII-D scans. These efforts have led to the development of a time-dependent workflow within the OMFIT integrated modeling framework. The new work flow can evolve the electron and ion temperatures as a function of time dependent sources and equilibria. The effects of different engineering parameters can be explored and optimized in support of DIII-D operations. The efficiency of this workflow enables planning plasma operations of next-day experiments, as will be required for ITER. Work supported in part by the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Sciences and the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-94ER54235 & DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  18. Temperature-dependent electrical transport in ferroelectric organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudari, Amrit; Guha, Suchismita

    2015-03-01

    Ferroelectric dielectrics, permitting access to nearly an order of magnitude range of polarization with temperature as the tuning parameter, offer a great test-bed to monitor the changes in interfacial transport in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) as the polarization strength is tuned. Temperature-dependent transport studies have been carried out from pentacene and other organic semiconductor-based OFETs using the ferroelectric copolymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFe) as a gate insulating layer. By fits to an Arrhenius-type dependence of the charge carrier mobility as a function of temperature, the activation energy in the ferroelectric phase is found to increase as the thickness of the PVDF-TrFe layer increases. For thicknesses of the dielectric layer above 100 nm, the activation energy is found to be greater than 150 meV, which greatly reduces in the paraelectric phase of the dielectric. The weak temperature-dependence of the charge carrier mobility in the ferroelectric phase of PVDF-TrFe may be attributed to a polarization fluctuation driven transport. The threshold voltage decreases upon increasing temperatures with a large change above the ferroelectric to paraelectric phase transition temperature. This work was supported by National Science Foundation under Grant No. ECCS-1305642.

  19. N-Glycosylation is required for Na{sup +}-dependent vitamin C transporter functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Veedamali S. Marchant, Jonathan S.; Reidling, Jack C.; Said, Hamid M.

    2008-09-12

    The human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters (hSVCT1 and hSVCT2) mediate cellular uptake of ascorbic acid. Both these transporters contain potential sites for N-glycosylation in their extracellular domains (Asn-138, Asn-144 [hSVCT1]; Asn-188, Asn-196 [hSVCT2]), however the role of N-glycosylation in transporter function is unexplored. On the basis of the result that tunicamycin decreased {sup 14}C-ascorbic acid uptake in HepG2 cells, we systematically ablated all consensus N-glycosylation sites in hSVCT1 and hSVCT2 to resolve any effects on ascorbic acid uptake, transporter expression and targeting. We show that removal of individual N-glycosylation sites significantly impairs protein expression and consequently ascorbic acid uptake for hSVCT1 mutants (N138Q is retained intracellularly) and for hSVCT2 mutants (all of which reach the cell surface). N-Glycosylation is therefore essential for vitamin C transporter functionality.

  20. Modeling ballistic effects in frequency-dependent transient thermal transport using diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maassen, Jesse; Lundstrom, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Understanding ballistic phonon transport effects in transient thermoreflectance experiments and explaining the observed deviations from classical theory remains a challenge. Diffusion equations are simple and computationally efficient but are widely believed to break down when the characteristic length scale is similar or less than the phonon mean-free-path. Building on our prior work, we demonstrate how well-known diffusion equations, namely, the hyperbolic heat equation and the Cattaneo equation, can be used to model ballistic phonon effects in frequency-dependent periodic steady-state thermal transport. Our analytical solutions are found to compare excellently to rigorous numerical results of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation. The correct physical boundary conditions can be different from those traditionally used and are paramount for accurately capturing ballistic effects. To illustrate the technique, we consider a simple model problem using two different, commonly used heating conditions. We demonstrate how this framework can easily handle detailed material properties, by considering the case of bulk silicon using a full phonon dispersion and mean-free-path distribution. This physically transparent approach provides clear insights into the nonequilibrium physics of quasi-ballistic phonon transport and its impact on thermal transport properties.

  1. Genome-wide Analysis of AP-3–dependent Protein Transport in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Vikram C.; Daboussi, Lydia; Lorenz, Todd C.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved adaptor protein-3 (AP-3) complex mediates cargo-selective transport to lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles. To identify proteins that function in AP-3–mediated transport, we performed a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for defects in the vacuolar maturation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a cargo of the AP-3 pathway. Forty-nine gene deletion strains were identified that accumulated precursor ALP, many with established defects in vacuolar protein transport. Maturation of a vacuolar membrane protein delivered via a separate, clathrin-dependent pathway, was affected in all strains except those with deletions of YCK3, encoding a vacuolar type I casein kinase; SVP26, encoding an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) export receptor for ALP; and AP-3 subunit genes. Subcellular fractionation and fluorescence microscopy revealed ALP transport defects in yck3Δ cells. Characterization of svp26Δ cells revealed a role for Svp26p in ER export of only a subset of type II membrane proteins. Finally, ALP maturation kinetics in vac8Δ and vac17Δ cells suggests that vacuole inheritance is important for rapid generation of proteolytically active vacuolar compartments in daughter cells. We propose that the cargo-selective nature of the AP-3 pathway in yeast is achieved by AP-3 and Yck3p functioning in concert with machinery shared by other vacuolar transport pathways. PMID:19116312

  2. Density-Functional Approximation for the Spin Dependent Quantum Transport in Magnetic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyunt, Khine

    2010-01-01

    In quasi-classical theoretical framework, the transport of electrons and holes in semiconductor devices is treated with the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) or quantum-mechanical energy band theory—viz., the effective mass approximation and the random phase approximation. On the other hand, in the mesoscopic, nanoelectronic devices, for three- and lower- dimensional structures with nanometer scaling, the wave properties, spin, charge and the interactions between spin and charge of electrons are fully utilized such as in artificial mini-Brillouin zones, quantum size effects, Coulomb blockade of single-electron tunneling and spin-polarized giant magnetoresistance (GMR) tunneling. The complexity associated with the classical quantum-mechanical formalism in the study of transport in magnetic nanostructures can be avoided by applying the so-called, Hohenberg-Kohn's density functional theory. Because of the limitations of quasi-classical theory, it is more appropriate to treat the magneto-transport problem in nanostructures by using quantum many-body theory. The starting point of the quantum trans-port theory is to take an external field as a perturbation for the many-particle system in equilibrium. This leads to a linear response and gives corresponding transport coefficients. One useful application of the Green's function techniques in quantum magneto-transport is to convert a homogeneous differential equation into an integral equation, viz., as in the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We have applied it to scattering of nanostructural defects (impurities) in the electron gas (metal) as many-body effect's model and derived an expression for its residual resistivity. Calculations of magnetic impurities in noble-metal hosts are in good agreement with the previously published results.

  3. Substrate-Dependent Ligand Inhibition of the Human Organic Cation Transporter OCT2

    PubMed Central

    Belzer, Mathew; Morales, Mark; Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Mash, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    Organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) mediates the initial step in renal secretion of organic cations: uptake from the blood, across the basolateral membrane, and into the renal proximal tubule cells. Because of its potential as a target for unwanted drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considerable attention has been directed toward understanding the basis of OCT2 selectivity. These studies typically assess selectivity based on ligand inhibition profiles for OCT2-mediated transport of a probe substrate. However, little attention has been given to the potential influence of the substrate on the profile of ligand inhibition. Here we compared the IC50 values obtained for a set of structurally distinct inhibitors against OCT2-mediated transport of three structurally distinct substrates: 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP); metformin; and a novel fluorescent substrate, N,N,N-trimethyl-2-[methyl(7-nitrobenzo[c][l,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)amino]ethanaminium iodide (NBD-MTMA). The median IC50 value for inhibition of MPP transport was 9-fold higher than that for inhibition of metformin transport. Similarly, the median IC50 value for inhibition of MPP transport was 5-fold higher than that for NBD-MTMA transport. However, this was not a systematic difference in inhibitory efficacy; the ratio of IC50 values, MPP versus NBD-MTMA, ranged from 88-fold (ipratropium) to 0.3-fold (metformin). These data show that 1) the choice of OCT2 substrate significantly influences both quantitative and qualitative inhibitory interactions with cationic drugs; and 2) ligand interactions with OCT2 are not restricted to competition for a common ligand binding site, consistent with a binding surface characterized by multiple, possibly overlapping interaction sites. Development of predictive models of DDIs with OCT2 must take into account the substrate dependence of ligand interaction with this protein. PMID:23709117

  4. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions And Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Detwiler, Russell

    2014-06-30

    Matrix diffusion and adsorption within a rock matrix are widely regarded as important mechanisms for retarding the transport of radionuclides and other solutes in fractured rock (e.g., Neretnieks, 1980; Tang et al., 1981; Maloszewski and Zuber, 1985; Novakowski and Lapcevic, 1994; Jardine et al., 1999; Zhou and Xie, 2003; Reimus et al., 2003a,b). When remediation options are being evaluated for old sources of contamination, where a large fraction of contaminants reside within the rock matrix, slow diffusion out of the matrix greatly increases the difficulty and timeframe of remediation. Estimating the rates of solute exchange between fractures and the adjacent rock matrix is a critical factor in quantifying immobilization and/or remobilization of DOE-relevant contaminants within the subsurface. In principle, the most rigorous approach to modeling solute transport with fracture-matrix interaction would be based on local-scale coupled advection-diffusion/dispersion equations for the rock matrix and in discrete fractures that comprise the fracture network (Discrete Fracture Network and Matrix approach, hereinafter referred to as DFNM approach), fully resolving aperture variability in fractures and matrix property heterogeneity. However, such approaches are computationally demanding, and thus, many predictive models rely upon simplified models. These models typically idealize fracture rock masses as a single fracture or system of parallel fractures interacting with slabs of porous matrix or as a mobile-immobile or multi-rate mass transfer system. These idealizations provide tractable approaches for interpreting tracer tests and predicting contaminant mobility, but rely upon a fitted effective matrix diffusivity or mass-transfer coefficients. However, because these fitted parameters are based upon simplified conceptual models, their effectiveness at predicting long-term transport processes remains uncertain. Evidence of scale dependence of effective matrix diffusion coefficients obtained from tracer tests highlights this point and suggests that the underlying mechanisms and relationship between rock and fracture properties are not fully understood in large complex fracture networks. In this project, we developed a high-resolution DFN model of solute transport in fracture networks to explore and quantify the mechanisms that control transport in complex fracture networks and how these may give rise to observed scale-dependent matrix diffusion coefficients. Results demonstrate that small scale heterogeneity in the flow field caused by local aperture variability within individual fractures can lead to long-tailed breakthrough curves indicative of matrix diffusion, even in the absence of interactions with the fracture matrix. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial scale dependence of these processes highlights the inability of short-term tracer tests to estimate transport parameters that will control long-term fate and transport of contaminants in fractured aquifers.

  5. Capsaicinoids regulate airway anion transporters through Rho kinase- and cyclic AMP-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Yoshitaka; Morise, Masahiro; Ito, Yasushi; Mizutani, Takefumi; Matsuno, Tadakatsu; Ito, Satoru; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Sato, Mitsuo; Kondo, Masashi; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the effects of capsaicinoids on airway anion transporters, we recorded and analyzed transepithelial currents in human airway epithelial Calu-3 cells. Application of capsaicin (100 μM) attenuated vectorial anion transport, estimated as short-circuit currents (I(SC)), before and after stimulation by forskolin (10 μM) with concomitant reduction of cytosolic cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(SC) was also observed in the response to 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM, a cell-permeable cAMP analog) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (1 mM, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases). The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(SC) was attributed to suppression of bumetanide (an inhibitor of the basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2 Cl(-) cotransporter 1)- and 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (an inhibitor of basolateral HCO(3)(-)-dependent anion transporters)-sensitive components, which reflect anion uptake via basolateral cAMP-dependent anion transporters. In contrast, capsaicin potentiated apical Cl(-) conductance, which reflects conductivity through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, a cAMP-regulated Cl(-) channel. All these paradoxical effects of capsaicin were mimicked by capsazepine. Forskolin application also increased phosphorylated myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, and the phosphorylation was prevented by capsaicin and capsazepine, suggesting that these capsaicinoids assume aspects of Rho kinase inhibitors. We also found that the increments in apical Cl(-) conductance were caused by conventional Rho kinase inhibitors, Y-27632 (20 μM) and HA-1077 (20 μM), with selective inhibition of basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2 Cl(-) cotransporter 1. Collectively, capsaicinoids inhibit cAMP-mediated anion transport through down-regulation of basolateral anion uptake, paradoxically accompanied by up-regulation of apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-mediated anion conductance. The latter is mediated by inhibition of Rho-kinase, which is believed to interact with actin cytoskeleton. PMID:21474433

  6. Functional implications and ubiquitin-dependent degradation of the peptide transporter Ptr2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Ken; Moriya, Atsuto; Uemura, Satoshi; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2014-11-01

    The peptide transporter Ptr2 plays a central role in di- or tripeptide import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although PTR2 transcription has been extensively analyzed in terms of upregulation by the Ubr1-Cup9 circuit, the structural and functional information for this transporter is limited. Here we identified 14 amino acid residues required for peptide import through Ptr2 based on the crystallographic information of Streptococcus thermophilus peptide transporter PepTst and based on the conservation of primary sequences among the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs). Expression of Ptr2 carrying one of the 14 mutations of which the corresponding residues of PepTst are involved in peptide recognition, salt bridge interaction, or peptide translocation failed to enable ptr2Δtrp1 cell growth in alanyl-tryptophan (Ala-Trp) medium. We observed that Ptr2 underwent rapid degradation after cycloheximide treatment (half-life, approximately 1 h), and this degradation depended on Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase. The ubiquitination of Ptr2 most likely occurs at the N-terminal lysines 16, 27, and 34. Simultaneous substitution of arginine for the three lysines fully prevented Ptr2 degradation. Ptr2 mutants of the presumed peptide-binding site (E92Q, R93K, K205R, W362L, and E480D) exhibited severe defects in peptide import and were subjected to Rsp5-dependent degradation when cells were moved to Ala-Trp medium, whereas, similar to what occurs in the wild-type Ptr2, mutant proteins of the intracellular gate were upregulated. These results suggest that Ptr2 undergoes quality control and the defects in peptide binding and the concomitant conformational change render Ptr2 subject to efficient ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. PMID:25172766

  7. Functional Implications and Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation of the Peptide Transporter Ptr2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Ken; Moriya, Atsuto; Uemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The peptide transporter Ptr2 plays a central role in di- or tripeptide import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although PTR2 transcription has been extensively analyzed in terms of upregulation by the Ubr1-Cup9 circuit, the structural and functional information for this transporter is limited. Here we identified 14 amino acid residues required for peptide import through Ptr2 based on the crystallographic information of Streptococcus thermophilus peptide transporter PepTst and based on the conservation of primary sequences among the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs). Expression of Ptr2 carrying one of the 14 mutations of which the corresponding residues of PepTst are involved in peptide recognition, salt bridge interaction, or peptide translocation failed to enable ptr2Δtrp1 cell growth in alanyl-tryptophan (Ala-Trp) medium. We observed that Ptr2 underwent rapid degradation after cycloheximide treatment (half-life, approximately 1 h), and this degradation depended on Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase. The ubiquitination of Ptr2 most likely occurs at the N-terminal lysines 16, 27, and 34. Simultaneous substitution of arginine for the three lysines fully prevented Ptr2 degradation. Ptr2 mutants of the presumed peptide-binding site (E92Q, R93K, K205R, W362L, and E480D) exhibited severe defects in peptide import and were subjected to Rsp5-dependent degradation when cells were moved to Ala-Trp medium, whereas, similar to what occurs in the wild-type Ptr2, mutant proteins of the intracellular gate were upregulated. These results suggest that Ptr2 undergoes quality control and the defects in peptide binding and the concomitant conformational change render Ptr2 subject to efficient ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. PMID:25172766

  8. Angular dependent study on spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzanian, S. M.; Shokri, A. A.; Mikaili Agah, K.; Elahi, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate theoretically the effects of Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (DSOC) on the spin-dependent current and shot noise through II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor/nonmagnetic semiconductor (DMS/NMS) barrier structures. The calculation of transmission probability is based on an effective mass quantum-mechanical approach in the presence of an external magnetic field applied along the growth direction of the junction and also applied voltage. We also study the dependence of spin-dependent properties on external magnetic field and relative angle between the magnetizations of two DMS layers in CdTe/CdMnTe heterostructures by including the DSOC effect. The results show that the DSOC has great different influence on transport properties of electrons with spin up and spin down in the considered system and this aspect may be utilized in designing new spintronics devices.

  9. The molecular mechanism of ion-dependent gating in secondary transporters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Noskov, Sergei Yu

    2013-10-01

    LeuT-like fold Na-dependent secondary active transporters form a large family of integral membrane proteins that transport various substrates against their concentration gradient across lipid membranes, using the free energy stored in the downhill concentration gradient of sodium ions. These transporters play an active role in synaptic transmission, the delivery of key nutrients, and the maintenance of osmotic pressure inside the cell. It is generally believed that binding of an ion and/or a substrate drives the conformational dynamics of the transporter. However, the exact mechanism for converting ion binding into useful work has yet to be established. Using a multi-dimensional path sampling (string-method) followed by all-atom free energy simulations, we established the principal thermodynamic and kinetic components governing the ion-dependent conformational dynamics of a LeuT-like fold transporter, the sodium/benzyl-hydantoin symporter Mhp1, for an entire conformational cycle. We found that inward-facing and outward-facing states of Mhp1 display nearly the same free energies with an ion absent from the Na2 site conserved across the LeuT-like fold transporters. The barrier separating an apo-state from inward-facing or outward-facing states of the transporter is very low, suggesting stochastic gating in the absence of ion/substrate bound. In contrast, the binding of a Na2 ion shifts the free energy stabilizing the outward-facing state and promoting substrate binding. Our results indicate that ion binding to the Na2 site may also play a key role in the intracellular thin gate dynamics modulation by altering its interactions with the transmembrane helix 5 (TM5). The Potential of Mean Force (PMF) computations for a substrate entrance displays two energy minima that correspond to the locations of the main binding site S1 and proposed allosteric S2 binding site. However, it was found that substrate's binds to the site S1 ∼5 kcal/mol more favorable than that to the site S2 for all studied bound combinations of ions and a substrate. PMID:24204233

  10. Fully energy-dependent HZETRN (a galactic cosmic-ray transport code)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; John, Sarah; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    For extended manned space missions, the radiation shielding design requires efficient and accurate cosmic-ray transport codes that can handle the physics processes in detail. The Langley Research Center galactic cosmic-ray transport code (HZETRN) is currently under development for such design use. The cross sections for the production of secondary nucleons in the existing HZETRN code are energy dependent only for nucleon collisions. The approximation of energy-independent, heavy-ion fragmentation cross section is now removed by implementing a mathematically simplified energy-dependent stepping formalism for heavy ions. The cross section at each computational grid is obtained by linear interpolation from a few tabulated data to minimize computing time. Test runs were made for galactic cosmic-ray transport through a liquid hydrogen shield and a water shield at solar minimum. The results show no appreciable change in total fluxes or computing time compared with energy-independent calculations. Differences in high LET (linear energy transfer) spectra are noted, however, because of the large variation in cross sections at the low-energy region. The high LET components are significantly higher in the new code and have important implications on biological risk estimates for heavy-ion exposure.

  11. Time-dependent Radial Transport of Electron Distributions Due to ECCD in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Prater, R.; Petty, C. C.

    2007-11-01

    The radial transport modeling capability in the CQL3D bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck collisional-rf quasilinear code[1] has been greatly improved and the self-consistent time-dependent toroidal electric field added, making the code truly a ``Fokker-Planck-Transport'' code. The time-dependent, coupled 3D Fokker-Planck equation and the Ampere-Faraday Law equation are solved for the electron distribution, f( u,θu,ρ,t ), and the toroidal loop voltage, Vloop( ρ,t ). A fully 3D, time-implicit solution of the FP equation using sparse-matrix methods[2] is coupled to a new iterative toroidal electric field solve. The DIII-D ECH experiment is in an intermediate driven regime with τtransport τslowing[3] for the EC driven electrons. Results will be reported for time-evolution of radial profiles of current density, fast electrons, and toroidal loop voltage due to EC heating and current drive in DIII-D. [1] R.W. Harvey and M.G. McCoy, IAEA TCM on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, 1992; USDOC NTIS No. 93002962. [2] Y. Peysson et al., Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas, 15th Topical Conference, Moran, Wyoming (2003). [3] R.W. Harvey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 205001 (2002).

  12. Structure and mechanism of a bacterial sodium-dependent dicarboxylate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Mancusso, Romina; Gregorio, G. Glenn; Liu, Qun; Wang, Da-Neng

    2013-01-01

    In human cells, cytosolic citrate is a major precursor for the synthesis of fatty acids, triacylglycerols, cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein. Cytosolic citrate further regulates the cell’s energy balance by activating the fatty acid synthesis pathway while down-regulating both the glycolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation pathways (Supplementary Fig. 1) 1–4. The rate of fatty acid synthesis in liver and adipose cells, the two major tissue types for such synthesis, correlates directly with the concentration of citrate in the cytosol 2–5. The cytosolic citrate concentration partially depends on direct import across the plasma membrane via the Na+-dependent citrate transporter (NaCT) 6,7. Mutations of the homologous fly gene (INDY, I’m Not Dead Yet) result in reduced fat storage through calorie restriction 8. More recently, NaCT-knockout mice have been found to have increased hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis, higher lipid oxidation and energy expenditure, and reduced lipogenesis, which taken together protect the mice from obesity and insulin resistance 9. To understand the transport mechanism of NaCT/INDY proteins, here we report the 3.2 Å crystal structure of a bacterial INDY homolog. One citrate molecule and one sodium ion are bound per protein, and their binding sites are defined by conserved amino acid motifs, forming the structural basis for understanding the transporters’ specificity. Comparison of the structures of the two symmetrical halves of the transporter suggests conformational changes that propel substrate translocation. PMID:23086149

  13. Dissecting in vivo steady-state dynamics of karyopherin-dependent nuclear transport

    PubMed Central

    Lolodi, Ogheneochukome; Yamazaki, Hiroya; Otsuka, Shotaro; Kumeta, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Shige H.

    2016-01-01

    Karyopherin-dependent molecular transport through the nuclear pore complex is maintained by constant recycling pathways of karyopherins coupled with the Ran-dependent cargo catch-and-release mechanism. Although many studies have revealed the bidirectional dynamics of karyopherins, the entire kinetics of the steady-state dynamics of karyopherin and cargo is still not fully understood. In this study, we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescence loss in photobleaching on live cells to provide convincing in vivo proof that karyopherin-mediated nucleocytoplasmic transport of cargoes is bidirectional. Continuous photobleaching of the cytoplasm of live cells expressing NLS cargoes led to progressive decrease of nuclear fluorescence signals. In addition, experimentally obtained kinetic parameters of karyopherin complexes were used to establish a kinetic model to explain the entire cargo import and export transport cycles facilitated by importin β. The results strongly indicate that constant shuttling of karyopherins, either free or bound to cargo, ensures proper balancing of nucleocytoplasmic distribution of cargoes and establishes effective regulation of cargo dynamics by RanGTP. PMID:26538027

  14. Surface Charge- and Space-Dependent Transport of Proteins in Crowded Environments of Nanotailored Posts

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Retterer, Scott T; Siuti, Piro; Iyer, Sukanya; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The reaction and diffusion of molecules across barriers and through crowded environments is integral to biological system function and to separation technologies. Ordered, microfabricated post arrays are a promising route to creating synthetic barriers with controlled chemical and physical characteristics. They can be used to create crowded environments, to mimic aspects of cellular membranes, and to serve as engineered replacements of polymer-based separation media. Here, the translational diffusion of fluorescein isothiocyante and various forms of green fluorescent protein (GFP), including 'supercharged' variants, are examined in a silicon-based post array environment. The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is combined with analytical approximations and numerical simulations to assess the relative effects of reaction and diffusion on molecular transport, respectively. FRAP experiments were conducted for 64 different cases where the molecular species, the density of the posts, and the chemical surface charge of the posts were varied. In all cases, the dense packing of the posts hindered the diffusive transport of the fluorescent species. The supercharged GFPs strongly interacted with oppositely charged surfaces. With similar molecular and surface charges, transport is primarily limited by hindered diffusion. For conventional, enhanced GFP in a positively charged surface environment, transport was limited by the coupled action of hindered diffusion and surface interaction with the posts. Quantification of the size-, space-, time-, and charge-dependent translational diffusion in the post array environments can provide insight into natural processes and guide the design and development of selective membrane systems.

  15. Proton Gradients and Proton-Dependent Transport Processes in the Chloroplast

    PubMed Central

    Höhner, Ricarda; Aboukila, Ali; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Venema, Kees

    2016-01-01

    Proton gradients are fundamental to chloroplast function. Across thylakoid membranes, the light induced -proton gradient is essential for ATP synthesis. As a result of proton pumping into the thylakoid lumen, an alkaline stromal pH develops, which is required for full activation of pH-dependent Calvin Benson cycle enzymes. This implies that a pH gradient between the cytosol (pH 7) and the stroma (pH 8) is established upon illumination. To maintain this pH gradient chloroplasts actively extrude protons. More than 30 years ago it was already established that these proton fluxes are electrically counterbalanced by Mg2+, K+, or Cl- fluxes, but only recently the first transport systems that regulate the pH gradient were identified. Notably several (Na+,K+)/H+ antiporter systems where identified, that play a role in pH gradient regulation, ion homeostasis, osmoregulation, or coupling of secondary active transport. The established pH gradients are important to drive uptake of essential ions and solutes, but not many transporters involved have been identified to date. In this mini review we summarize the current status in the field and the open questions that need to be addressed in order to understand how pH gradients are maintained, how this is interconnected with other transport processes and what this means for chloroplast function. PMID:26973667

  16. Proton Gradients and Proton-Dependent Transport Processes in the Chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Höhner, Ricarda; Aboukila, Ali; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Venema, Kees

    2016-01-01

    Proton gradients are fundamental to chloroplast function. Across thylakoid membranes, the light induced -proton gradient is essential for ATP synthesis. As a result of proton pumping into the thylakoid lumen, an alkaline stromal pH develops, which is required for full activation of pH-dependent Calvin Benson cycle enzymes. This implies that a pH gradient between the cytosol (pH 7) and the stroma (pH 8) is established upon illumination. To maintain this pH gradient chloroplasts actively extrude protons. More than 30 years ago it was already established that these proton fluxes are electrically counterbalanced by Mg(2+), K(+), or Cl(-) fluxes, but only recently the first transport systems that regulate the pH gradient were identified. Notably several (Na(+),K(+))/H(+) antiporter systems where identified, that play a role in pH gradient regulation, ion homeostasis, osmoregulation, or coupling of secondary active transport. The established pH gradients are important to drive uptake of essential ions and solutes, but not many transporters involved have been identified to date. In this mini review we summarize the current status in the field and the open questions that need to be addressed in order to understand how pH gradients are maintained, how this is interconnected with other transport processes and what this means for chloroplast function. PMID:26973667

  17. Transition to magnetorotational turbulence in Taylor-Couette flow with imposed azimuthal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, A.; Willis, A. P.; Hollerbach, R.; Avila, M.

    2015-09-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is thought to be a powerful source of turbulence and momentum transport in astrophysical accretion discs, but obtaining observational evidence of its operation is challenging. Recently, laboratory experiments of Taylor-Couette flow with externally imposed axial and azimuthal magnetic fields have revealed the kinematic and dynamic properties of the MRI close to the instability onset. While good agreement was found with linear stability analyses, little is known about the transition to turbulence and transport properties of the MRI. We here report on a numerical investigation of the MRI with an imposed azimuthal magnetic field. We show that the laminar Taylor-Couette flow becomes unstable to a wave rotating in the azimuthal direction and standing in the axial direction via a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. Subsequently, the flow features a catastrophic transition to spatio-temporal defects which is mediated by a subcritical subharmonic Hopf bifurcation. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the PROMISE experiment and dramatically extend their realizable parameter range. We find that as the Reynolds number increases defects accumulate and grow into turbulence, yet the momentum transport scales weakly.

  18. Controlling spin-dependent localization and directed transport in a bipartite lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yunrong; Lu, Gengbiao; Kong, Chao; Hai, Wenhua

    2016-04-01

    We study coherent control of spin-dependent dynamical localization (DL) and directed transport (DT) of a spin-orbit-coupled single atom held in a driven optical bipartite lattice. Under the high-frequency limit and nearest-neighbor tight-binding approximation, we find a new decoupling mechanism between states with the same (different) spins, which leads to two sets of analytical solutions describing DL and DT with (without) spin flipping. The analytical results are numerically confirmed, and perfect agreements are found. Extending the research to a system of spin-orbit-coupled single atoms, the spin current and quantum information transport with controllable propagation speed and distance are investigated. The results can be experimentally tested in the current setups and may be useful in quantum information processing.

  19. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect. PMID:25933746

  20. Auxin transport-dependent, stage-specific dynamics of leaf vein formation.

    PubMed

    Sawchuk, Megan G; Donner, Tyler J; Scarpella, Enrico

    2008-05-01

    For centuries, the formation of vein patterns in the leaf has intrigued biologists, mathematicians and philosophers. In leaf development, files of vein-forming procambial cells emerge from seemingly homogeneous subepidermal tissue through the selection of anatomically inconspicuous preprocambial cells. Although the molecular details underlying the orderly differentiation of veins in the leaf remain elusive, gradually restricted transport paths of the plant hormone auxin have long been implicated in defining sites of vein formation. Several recent advances now appear to converge on a more precise definition of the role of auxin flow at different stages of vascular development. The picture that emerges is that of vein formation as a self-organizing, reiterative, auxin transport-dependent process. PMID:19513220

  1. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  2. Numerical solution of the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    This study presents three numerical algorithms to solve the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics. The algorithms have been developed taking into account delayed neutrons and they have been implemented into the novel MCART code, which solves the neutron transport equation for two-dimensional geometry and an arbitrary number of energy groups. The MCART code uses regular mesh for the representation of the spatial domain, it models up-scattering, and takes advantage of OPENMP and OPENGL algorithms for parallel computing and plotting, respectively. The code has been benchmarked with the multiplication factor results of a Boiling Water Reactor, with the analytical results for a prompt jump transient in an infinite medium, and with PARTISN and TDTORT results for cross section and source transients. The numerical simulations have shown that only two numerical algorithms are stable for small time steps.

  3. Concentration dependence of thermodynamic, transport and surface properties in Ag-Cu liquid alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, I. S.; Koirala, I.; Singh, B. P.; Adhikari, D.

    2014-09-01

    Thermodynamic, transport and surface properties of Ag-Cu liquid alloys have been investigated on the basis of a simple statistical model. The free energy of mixing, heat of mixing and entropy of mixing have been computed to understand the thermodynamic properties of Ag-Cu alloys in liquid state at 1,423 K. The concentration-concentration fluctuations in the long wavelength limit and the chemical short range order parameter have been determined to comprehend the microscopic and structural information of the alloy. The viscosity and surface tension of the alloy have been evaluated to analyze the transport and surface properties. The theoretical analysis reveals that the energy parameter is temperature dependent, and that Ag-Cu liquid alloy is a weakly interacting-phase separating system.

  4. Application of the multigrid amplitude function method for time-dependent transport equation using MOC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujita, K.; Endo, T.; Yamamoto, A.

    2013-07-01

    An efficient numerical method for time-dependent transport equation, the mutigrid amplitude function (MAF) method, is proposed. The method of characteristics (MOC) is being widely used for reactor analysis thanks to the advances of numerical algorithms and computer hardware. However, efficient kinetic calculation method for MOC is still desirable since it requires significant computation time. Various efficient numerical methods for solving the space-dependent kinetic equation, e.g., the improved quasi-static (IQS) and the frequency transform methods, have been developed so far mainly for diffusion calculation. These calculation methods are known as effective numerical methods and they offer a way for faster computation. However, they have not been applied to the kinetic calculation method using MOC as the authors' knowledge. Thus, the MAF method is applied to the kinetic calculation using MOC aiming to reduce computation time. The MAF method is a unified numerical framework of conventional kinetic calculation methods, e.g., the IQS, the frequency transform, and the theta methods. Although the MAF method is originally developed for the space-dependent kinetic calculation based on the diffusion theory, it is extended to transport theory in the present study. The accuracy and computational time are evaluated though the TWIGL benchmark problem. The calculation results show the effectiveness of the MAF method. (authors)

  5. Allyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Actin-Dependent Intracellular Transport in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Øverby, Anders; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2015-01-01

    Volatile allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) derives from the biodegradation of the glucosinolate sinigrin and has been associated with growth inhibition in several plants, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this feature remain scarcely investigated in plants. In this study, we present evidence of an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport in A. thaliana. A transgenic line of A. thaliana expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged actin filaments was used to show attenuation of actin filament movement by AITC. This appeared gradually in a time- and dose-dependent manner and resulted in actin filaments appearing close to static. Further, we employed four transgenic lines with YFP-fusion proteins labeling the Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), vacuoles and peroxisomes to demonstrate an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport of or, in these structures, consistent with the decline in actin filament movement. Furthermore, the morphologies of actin filaments, ER and vacuoles appeared aberrant following AITC-exposure. However, AITC-treated seedlings of all transgenic lines tested displayed morphologies and intracellular movements similar to that of the corresponding untreated and control-treated plants, following overnight incubation in an AITC-absent environment, indicating that AITC-induced decline in actin-related movements is a reversible process. These findings provide novel insights into the cellular events in plant cells following exposure to AITC, which may further expose clues to the physiological significance of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. PMID:26690132

  6. Allyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Actin-Dependent Intracellular Transport in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Øverby, Anders; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2015-01-01

    Volatile allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) derives from the biodegradation of the glucosinolate sinigrin and has been associated with growth inhibition in several plants, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this feature remain scarcely investigated in plants. In this study, we present evidence of an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport in A. thaliana. A transgenic line of A. thaliana expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged actin filaments was used to show attenuation of actin filament movement by AITC. This appeared gradually in a time- and dose-dependent manner and resulted in actin filaments appearing close to static. Further, we employed four transgenic lines with YFP-fusion proteins labeling the Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), vacuoles and peroxisomes to demonstrate an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport of or, in these structures, consistent with the decline in actin filament movement. Furthermore, the morphologies of actin filaments, ER and vacuoles appeared aberrant following AITC-exposure. However, AITC-treated seedlings of all transgenic lines tested displayed morphologies and intracellular movements similar to that of the corresponding untreated and control-treated plants, following overnight incubation in an AITC-absent environment, indicating that AITC-induced decline in actin-related movements is a reversible process. These findings provide novel insights into the cellular events in plant cells following exposure to AITC, which may further expose clues to the physiological significance of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. PMID:26690132

  7. Saturation Dependence of Transport in Porous Media Predicted by Percolation and Effective Medium Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Hunt, Allen G.; Skinner, Thomas E.; Ewing, Robert P.

    2015-02-01

    Accurate prediction of the saturation dependence of different modes of transport in porous media, such as those due to conductivity, air permeability, and diffusion, is of broad interest in engineering and natural resources management. Most current predictions use a "bundle of capillary tubes" concept, which, despite its widespread use, is a severely distorted idealization of natural porous media. In contrast, percolation theory provides a reliable and powerful means to model interconnectivity of disordered networks and porous materials. In this study, we invoke scaling concepts from percolation theory and effective medium theory to predict the saturation dependence of modes of transport — hydraulic and electrical conductivity, air permeability, and gas diffusion — in two disturbed soils. Universal scaling from percolation theory predicts the saturation dependence of air permeability and gas diffusion accurately, even when the percolation threshold for airflow is estimated from the porosity. We also find that the non-universal scaling obtained from the critical path analysis (CPA) of percolation theory can make excellent predictions of hydraulic and electrical conductivity under partially saturated conditions.

  8. Overexpression of the Auxin Binding PROTEIN1 Modulates PIN-Dependent Auxin Transport in Tobacco Cells

    PubMed Central

    Čovanová, Milada; Sauer, Michael; Rychtář, Jan; Friml, Jiří; Petrášek, Jan; Zažímalová, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Background Auxin binding protein 1 (ABP1) is a putative auxin receptor and its function is indispensable for plant growth and development. ABP1 has been shown to be involved in auxin-dependent regulation of cell division and expansion, in plasma-membrane-related processes such as changes in transmembrane potential, and in the regulation of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. However, the ABP1-regulated downstream pathway remains elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings Using auxin transport assays and quantitative analysis of cellular morphology we show that ABP1 regulates auxin efflux from tobacco BY-2 cells. The overexpression of ABP1can counterbalance increased auxin efflux and auxin starvation phenotypes caused by the overexpression of PIN auxin efflux carrier. Relevant mechanism involves the ABP1-controlled vesicle trafficking processes, including positive regulation of endocytosis of PIN auxin efflux carriers, as indicated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and pharmacological manipulations. Conclusions/Significance The findings indicate the involvement of ABP1 in control of rate of auxin transport across plasma membrane emphasizing the role of ABP1 in regulation of PIN activity at the plasma membrane, and highlighting the relevance of ABP1 for the formation of developmentally important, PIN-dependent auxin gradients. PMID:23894588

  9. 14 CFR 171.313 - Azimuth performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Azimuth performance requirements. 171.313....313 Azimuth performance requirements. This section prescribes the performance requirements for the... exceed ±10 feet. 4 The system control motion noise must not exceed 0.1 degree. 5 The airborne...

  10. Variable-range hopping transport: crossovers from temperature dependence to electric field dependence in disordered carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheah, Chun Y.; Kaiser, Alan B.

    2014-04-01

    Variable-range hopping (VRH) is an important conduction mechanism in disordered conductors. One example of such a disordered conductor is reduced graphene oxide in which VRH dominates the temperature dependence of electronic conduction. Electronic transport is generally by electric field-assisted, thermally-driven VRH, following the theory of Mott, and Pollak and Riess. However, with the increase of electric field and decrease of temperature, we identify a surprisingly smooth crossover to solely field-driven VRH described by the theory of Shklovskii. We give the analytic expression for the crossover field E_C as a function of temperature and coefficients from thermally-driven and field-driven VRH. Besides reduced graphene oxide, we show in this work that our crossover scenario can also account for the experimentally measured conductivity data of three-dimensional (3D) carbon networks as well as that of quasi-1D highly-doped conducting polymers, illustrating the wide validity of our proposed physical scenario. Our crossover scenario has the advantage of combining two distinct regimes of VRH conduction yet remaining within the currently established theoretical framework.

  11. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Hollmann, E. M.; Rognlien, T. D.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E.

    2014-06-15

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  12. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Rognlien, T. D.; Hollmann, E. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, Ezekial A

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  13. PIP Water Transport and Its pH Dependence Are Regulated by Tetramer Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Jozefkowicz, Cintia; Sigaut, Lorena; Scochera, Florencia; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Amodeo, Gabriela; González Flecha, F Luis; Alleva, Karina

    2016-03-29

    Many plasma membrane channels form oligomeric assemblies, and heterooligomerization has been described as a distinctive feature of some protein families. In the particular case of plant plasma membrane aquaporins (PIPs), PIP1 and PIP2 monomers interact to form heterotetramers. However, the biological properties of the different heterotetrameric configurations formed by PIP1 and PIP2 subunits have not been addressed yet. Upon coexpression of tandem PIP2-PIP1 dimers in Xenopus oocytes, we can address, for the first time to our knowledge, the functional properties of single heterotetrameric species having 2:2 stoichiometry. We have also coexpressed PIP2-PIP1 dimers with PIP1 and PIP2 monomers to experimentally investigate the localization and biological activity of each tetrameric assembly. Our results show that PIP2-PIP1 heterotetramers can assemble with 3:1, 1:3, or 2:2 stoichiometry, depending on PIP1 and PIP2 relative expression in the cell. All PIP2-PIP1 heterotetrameric species localize at the plasma membrane and present the same water transport capacity. Furthermore, the contribution of any heterotetrameric assembly to the total water transport through the plasma membrane doubles the contribution of PIP2 homotetramers. Our results also indicate that plasma membrane water transport can be modulated by the coexistence of different tetrameric species and by intracellular pH. Moreover, all the tetrameric species present similar cooperativity behavior for proton sensing. These findings throw light on the functional properties of PIP tetramers, showing that they have flexible stoichiometry dependent on the quantity of PIP1 and PIP2 molecules available. This represents, to our knowledge, a novel regulatory mechanism to adjust water transport across the plasma membrane. PMID:27028641

  14. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Rognlien, T. D.; Hollmann, E. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E.

    2014-06-01

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  15. Pinholes and temperature-dependent transport properties of MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, J.; Teixeira, J. M.; Araujo, J. P.; Sousa, J. B.; Wisniowski, P.; Freitas, P. P.

    2008-07-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with thin crystalline MgO(001) barriers displaying large tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) and low resistance-area product (RA) will likely be used as the next generation sensors in read heads of ultrahigh-density hard drives. However, the thin insulating barrier may result in the presence of metallic pinholes joining the two electrodes. Here we study the transport properties of thin MgO-based low resistance MTJs (barrier thickness t=7.5Å ), deposited by magnetron sputtering, with RA values of ˜40Ωμm2 , reaching TMR values of ˜60-75% at room temperature. We performed temperature-dependent (300-20 K) resistance (R) measurements and observed different behaviors for different magnetic states: positive dR/dT for the parallel (P) state, attributed to the presence of pinholes in the barrier, but a mixed character in the antiparallel (AP) state, with dR/dT changing from negative to positive with decreasing temperature. This indicates an interesting competition between tunneling and metallic transport in the studied samples. To explain this transport behavior, we developed a simple model with the two conducting channels, tunnel and metallic, in parallel. The model assumes a linear variation of the electrical resistance with temperature for both conducting channels and its dependence on the MTJ magnetic state (P and AP). The modeled results show that the sign of dR/dT does not give an indication of the dominant conductance mechanism and that the crossover temperature at which dR/dT changes sign depends strongly on the linear electrical resistance-temperature coefficients. We performed fits to our experimental R(T) data, using the proposed model, and observed that such fits reproduced the data quite well, illustrating the validity of the model.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Expresses a Novel Ph-Dependent Divalent Cation Transporter Belonging to the Nramp Family

    PubMed Central

    Agranoff, Daniel; Monahan, Irene M.; Mangan, Joseph A.; Butcher, Philip D.; Krishna, Sanjeev

    1999-01-01

    Mammalian natural resistance–associated macrophage protein (Nramp) homologues are important determinants of susceptibility to infection by diverse intracellular pathogens including mycobacteria. Eukaryotic Nramp homologues transport divalent cations such as Fe2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis (bacillus Calmette-Guérin [BCG]) also encode an Nramp homologue (Mramp). RNA encoding Mramp induces ∼20-fold increases in 65Zn2+ and 55Fe2+ uptake when injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes. Transport is dependent on acidic extracellular pH and is maximal between pH 5.5 and 6.5. Mramp-mediated 65Zn2+ and 55Fe2+ transport is abolished by an excess of Mn2+ and Cu2+, confirming that Mramp interacts with a broad range of divalent transition metal cations. Using semiquantitative reverse transcription PCR, we show that Mramp mRNA levels in M. tuberculosis are upregulated in response to increases in ambient Fe2+ and Cu2+ between <1 and 5 μM concentrations and that this upregulation occurs in parallel with mRNA for y39, a putative metal-transporting P-type ATPase. Using a quantitative ratiometric PCR technique, we demonstrate a fourfold decrease in Mramp/y39 mRNA ratios from organisms grown in 5–70 μM Cu2+. M. bovis BCG cultured axenically and within THP-1 cells also expresses mRNA encoding Mramp. Mramp exemplifies a novel prokaryotic class of metal ion transporter. Within phagosomes, Mramp and Nramp1 may compete for the same divalent cations, with implications for intracellular survival of mycobacteria. PMID:10477555

  17. Regulation of glomerulotubular balance. III. Implication of cytosolic calcium in flow-dependent proximal tubule transport.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhaopeng; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Weinstein, Alan M; Wang, Tong

    2015-04-15

    In the proximal tubule, axial flow (drag on brush-border microvilli) stimulates Na(+) and HCO3 (-) reabsorption by modulating both Na/H exchanger 3 (NHE3) and H-ATPase activity, a process critical to glomerulotubular balance. We have also demonstrated that blocking the angiotensin II receptor decreases baseline transport, but preserves the flow effect; dopamine leaves baseline fluxes intact, but abrogates the flow effect. In the current work, we provide evidence implicating cytosolic calcium in flow-dependent transport. Mouse proximal tubules were microperfused in vitro at perfusion rates of 5 and 20 nl/min, and reabsorption of fluid (Jv) and HCO3 (-) (JHCO3) were measured. We examined the effect of high luminal Ca(2+) (5 mM), 0 mM Ca(2+), the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), and the Ca-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin. In control tubules, increasing perfusion rate from 5 to 20 nl/min increased Jv by 62% and JHCO3 by 104%. With respect to Na(+) reabsorption, high luminal Ca(2+) decreased transport at low flow, but preserved the flow-induced increase; low luminal Ca(2+) had little impact; both BAPTA and 2-APB had no effect on baseline flux, but abrogated the flow effect; thapsigargin decreased baseline flow, leaving the flow effect intact. With respect to HCO3 (-) reabsorption, high luminal Ca(2+) decreased transport at low flow and mildly diminished the flow-induced increase; low luminal Ca(2+) had little impact; both BAPTA and 2-APB had no effect on baseline flux, but abrogated the flow effect. These data implicate IP3 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling as a critical step in transduction of microvillous drag to modulate Na(+) and HCO3 (-) transport. PMID:25651568

  18. Oxygen and carbon dioxide transport in time-dependent blood flow past fiber rectangular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.; Fujioka, Hideki; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Grotberg, James B.

    2009-03-01

    The influence of time-dependent flows on oxygen and carbon dioxide transport for blood flow past fiber arrays arranged in in-line and staggered configurations was computationally investigated as a model for an artificial lung. Both a pulsatile flow, which mimics the flow leaving the right heart and passing through a compliance chamber before entering the artificial lung, and a right ventricular flow, which mimics flow leaving the right heart and directly entering the artificial lung, were considered in addition to a steady flow. The pulsatile flow was modeled as a sinusoidal perturbation superimposed on a steady flow while the right ventricular flow was modeled to accurately depict the period of flow acceleration (increasing flow) and deceleration (decreasing flow) during systole followed by zero flow during diastole. It was observed that the pulsatile flow yielded similar gas transport as compared to the steady flow, while the right ventricular flow resulted in smaller gas transport, with the decrease increasing with Re. The pressure drop across the fiber array (a measure of the resistance), work (an indicator of the work required of the right heart), and shear stress (a measure of potential blood cell activation and damage) are lowest for steady flow, followed by pulsatile flow, and then right ventricular flow. The pressure drop, work, shear stress, and Sherwood numbers (a measure of the gas transport efficiency) decrease with increasing porosity and are smaller for AR <1 as compared to AR >1 (AR is the distance between fibers in the flow direction/distance between fibers in direction perpendicular to flow), although for small porosities the Sherwood numbers are of similar magnitude. In general, for any fiber array geometry, high pressure drop, work, and shear stresses correlate with high Sherwood numbers, and low pressure drop, work, and shear stresses correlate with low Sherwood numbers creating a need for a compromise between pressure drop/work/shear stresses and gas transport.

  19. Spin Dependent Transport in Si/SiGe Few-Electron Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Christie

    2008-03-01

    Si/SiGe quantum dots are of interest for quantum information processing due in large part to the existence of spin zero isotopes of both Si and Ge. We present the results of transport measurements and integrated charge sensing in silicon double and single quantum dots.[1,2] We observe two effects arising from spin dependent transport in a double quantum dot. First, and as expected, for one direction of current flow we observe spin blockade -- the canonical example of spin-to-charge conversion in transport. In addition, when current flow is reversed, we observe a second effect: strong tails of current extend from the sharp triangular regions in which current conventionally is observed. The presence of these tails is explained by a combination of long spin relaxation times and preferential loading of an excited spin state. We also present charge-sensing measurements of single and double quantum dots using an integrated quantum point contact. The charge sensor signal from single electron tunneling is well correlated with conventional transport through the system. When the tunnel barriers are large and transport through the dot is not measurable, charge sensing remains a viable means to track charge transitions and is used to confirm individual-electron occupation in a single quantum dot. Work performed in collaboration with Nakul Shaji, Madhu Thalakulam, Levente J. Klein, H. Luo, Hua Qin, R. H. Blick, D. E. Savage, M. G. Lagally, A. J. Rimberg, R. Joynt, M. Friesen, S. N. Coppersmith, M. A. Eriksson. Work supported by ARO, LPS, NSF and DOE. (1) Shaji, N. et al. e-print arXiv:0708.0794 (2) Simmons, C. B. et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 213103 (2007).

  20. Selective sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 inhibitors block glucose absorption and impair glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide release.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, Robert L; Greenway, Frank L; Chen, Lihong; Liu, Yaping; Breed, Sharon L; Andrews, Susan M; Wald, Jeffrey A; Walker, Ann; Smith, Chari D

    2015-06-01

    GSK-1614235 and KGA-2727 are potent, selective inhibitors of the SGLT1 sodium-dependent glucose transporter. Nonclinical (KGA-2727) and clinical (GSK-1614235) trials assessed translation of SGLT1 inhibitor effects from rats to normal human physiology. In rats, KGA-2727 (0.1 mg/kg) or vehicle was given before oral administration of 3-O-methyl-α-d-glucopyranose (3-O-methylglucose, 3-OMG) containing 3-[3H]OMG tracer. Tracer absorption and distribution were assessed from plasma, urine, and fecal samples. SGLT1 inhibition reduced urine 3-OMG recovery and increased fecal excretion. SGLT1 inhibitor effects on plasma glucose, insulin, gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations were also measured during a standard meal. Incremental glucose, insulin, and GIP concentrations were decreased, indicating downregulation of β-cell and K cell secretion. Minimal effects were observed in the secretion of the L cell product, GLP-1. With the use of a three-way, crossover design, 12 healthy human subjects received placebo or 20 mg GSK-1614235 immediately before or after a meal. Five minutes into the meal, 3-OMG was ingested. Postmeal dosing had little impact, yet premeal dosing delayed and reduced 3-OMG absorption, with an AUC0-10 of 231±31 vs. 446±31 μg·h(-1)·ml(-1), for placebo. Recovery of tracer in urine was 1.2±0.7 g for premeal dosing and 2.2±0.1 g for placebo. Incremental concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, and GIP were reduced for 2 h with premeal GSK-1614235. Total GLP-1 concentrations were significantly increased, and a trend for increased peptide YY (PYY) was noted. SGLT1 inhibitors block intestinal glucose absorption and reduce GIP secretion in rats and humans, suggesting SGLT1 glucose transport is critical for GIP release. Conversely, GLP-1 and PYY secretion are enhanced by SGLT1 inhibition in humans. PMID:25767259

  1. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  2. Azimuthal multiple-beam interference effects with combinations of vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ignacio; Davis, Jeffrey A; Womble-Dahl, Taylor; Cottrell, Don M

    2015-05-15

    We create a series of vortex beams consisting of positive and negative topological charges and develop a geometry where they interfere creating azimuthal multiple-beam interference effects. Usually the combination of two beams with opposite charges creates an azimuthal two-beam interference effect where the intensity varies sinusoidally with azimuthal angle. We combine several of these beams to create patterns where the interference becomes more sharply defined in the azimuthal direction and where destructive interference eliminates some of the intensity peaks. The process is complicated by the fact that the radii of the different vortex beams depend on the topological charge and the focal length of the Fourier lens. We generate a series of patterns where the different charges are focused with different focal lengths such that their radii agree. However to encode these, we encode patterns from the lower charges that have been Fresnel diffracted to the plane of the highest charge. These complicated patterns are encoded onto a liquid crystal display (LCD). Experimental results agree well with theory. PMID:26393734

  3. Azimuthal anchoring energy at the interface between a nematic liquid crystal and a PTFE substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, E.; Faetti, S.; Nobili, M.

    2003-06-01

    The azimuthal anchoring energy of the nematic liquid crystal 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenil (5CB) on a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (teflon, PTFE) film is measured for the first time. The PTFE film is deposed using the Wittmann and Smith technique which consists on rubbing a bar of this polymer against a glass substrate at a controlled temperature and pressure. Measurements of the azimuthal anchoring energy are made with a reflectometric technique which provides high accuracy and sensitivity. The dependence of the azimuthal anchoring energy on temperature and on the rubbing pressure is investigated. The extrapolation length remains virtually constant in the whole temperature range of the nematic phase except for an increase of 25% close to the clearing temperature. The azimuthal anchoring energy is somewhat strong and increases with increasing the deposition pressure of PTFE. The observation of a relevant pre-transitional anisotropy of the reflection coefficients in the isotropic phase proves that the surface interactions favor an excess of orientational order. Ageing of the anchoring energy and gliding of the easy axis are experimentally observed. Both these phenomena suggest the presence of an anisotropic adsorbed layer of nematic molecules on the PTFE film.

  4. Low frequency azimuthal stability of the ionization region of the Hall thruster discharge. II. Global analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, D.; Ahedo, E.

    2015-10-15

    The linear stability of the Hall thruster discharge is analysed against axial-azimuthal perturbations in the low frequency range using a time-dependent 2D code of the discharge. This azimuthal stability analysis is spatially global, as opposed to the more common local stability analyses, already afforded previously (D. Escobar and E. Ahedo, Phys. Plasmas 21(4), 043505 (2014)). The study covers both axial and axial-azimuthal oscillations, known as breathing mode and spoke, respectively. The influence on the spoke instability of different operation parameters such as discharge voltage, mass flow, and thruster size is assessed by means of different parametric variations and compared against experimental results. Additionally, simplified models are used to unveil and characterize the mechanisms driving the spoke. The results indicate that the spoke is linked to azimuthal oscillations of the ionization process and to the Bohm condition in the transition to the anode sheath. Finally, results obtained from local and global stability analyses are compared in order to explain the discrepancies between both methods.

  5. Minimum audible movement angle as a function of the azimuth and elevation of the source.

    PubMed

    Strybel, T Z; Manligas, C L; Perrott, D R

    1992-06-01

    In the future auditory directional cues may enhance situational awareness in cockpits with head-coupled displays. This benefit would depend, however, on the pilot's ability to detect the direction of moving sounds at different locations in space. The present investigation examined this ability. Auditory motion acuity was measured by the minimum audible movement angle (MAMA): the minimum angle of travel required for detection of the direction of sound movement. Five experienced listeners were instructed to indicate the direction of travel of a sound source (broadband noise at 50 dBA) that moved at a velocity of 20 deg/s. Nine azimuth positions were tested at 0 deg elevation. Five elevations were then tested at 0 deg azimuth. Finally two azimuth positions were tested at an elevation of 80 deg. The position of the source did not significantly affect the MAMA for azimuth locations between +40 and -40 deg and elevations below 80 deg. Within this area the MAMA ranged between 1 and 2 deg. Outside this area the MAMA increased to 3 to 10 deg. PMID:1634240

  6. Constraining Data Mining with Physical Models: Voltage- and Oxygen Pressure-Dependent Transport in Multiferroic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Belianinov, Alexei; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Chu, Ying-Hao; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-10-14

    Development of new generation electronic devices necessitates understanding and controlling the electronic transport in ferroic, magnetic, and optical materials, which is hampered by two factors. First, the complications of working at the nanoscale, where interfaces, grain boundaries, defects, and so forth, dictate the macroscopic characteristics. Second, the convolution of the response signals stemming from the fact that several physical processes may be activated simultaneously. Here, we present a method of solving these challenges via a combination of atomic force microscopy and data mining analysis techniques. Rational selection of the latter allows application of physical constraints and enables direct interpretation of the statistically significant behaviors in the framework of the chosen physical model, thus distilling physical meaning out of raw data. We demonstrate our approach with an example of deconvolution of complex transport behavior in a bismuth ferrite-cobalt ferrite nanocomposite in ambient and ultrahigh vacuum environments. Measured signal is apportioned into four electronic transport patterns, showing different dependence on partial oxygen and water vapor pressure. These patterns are described in terms of Ohmic conductance and Schottky emission models in the light of surface electrochemistry. Furthermore, deep data analysis allows extraction of local dopant concentrations and barrier heights empowering our understanding of the underlying dynamic mechanisms of resistive switching. PMID:26312554

  7. Characterization of ATP-dependent proton transport in medullary bone-derived microsomes.

    PubMed

    Sundquist, K

    1993-01-01

    Proton transport in microsomal vesicles derived from medullary bone of laying hens was observed to be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner with fusidic acid, 7-chloro-4-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diatzole (NBD-Cl), duramycin and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). The IC50 values were 570 microM, 4.5 microM, 10 micrograms/ml and 32 microM for fusidic acid, NBD-Cl, duramycin and DCCD, respectively. 14C-DCCD labeled a single protein band of 15-17 kDa from bone-derived microsomes in SDS-electrophoresis. A protein of this size is a proton-conducting subunit of the vacuolar ATPases. Further, the proton transport was found to be electrogenic, thus it generates the membrane potential across the vesicle membrane. The generation of membrane potential was inhibited using 100 nM bafilomycin A1, which in low concentrations is a specific inhibitor of vacuolar ATPases. The presence of Cl- was essential for maximal proton transport activity. These results confirm the electrogenicity and extend the characterization of the osteoclastic H(+)-ATPase. PMID:8384039

  8. Charge-dependent transport switching of single molecular ions in a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    PubMed

    Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Kisley, Lydia; Mansur, Andrea P; Chen, Jixin; de Leon, Al; Advincula, Rigoberto C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-07-22

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ∼ 10(-9) cm(2)/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers. PMID:24960617

  9. Charge-Dependent Transport Switching of Single Molecular Ions in a Weak Polyelectrolyte Multilayer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ? 109 cm2/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers. PMID:24960617

  10. Long-range azimuthal correlations in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    In this study, we show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest partonparton cross-section of ? = 1.5 3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Yeast Mn2+ transporter, Smf1p, is regulated by ubiquitin-dependent vacuolar protein sorting.

    PubMed Central

    Eguez, Lorena; Chung, Young-Sook; Kuchibhatla, Ajay; Paidhungat, Madan; Garrett, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Conditional cdc1(Ts) mutants of S. cerevisiae arrest with a phenotype similar to that exhibited by Mn(2+)-depleted cells. Sequence similarity between Cdc1p and a class of Mn(2+)-dependent phosphoesterases, as well as the observation that conditional cdc1(Ts) growth can be ameliorated by Mn(2+) supplement, suggests that Cdc1p activity is sensitive to intracellular Mn(2+) levels. This article identifies several previously uncharacterized cdc1(Ts) suppressors as class E vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutants and shows that these, as well as other vps mutants, accumulate high levels of intracellular Mn(2+). Yeast VPS genes play a role in delivery of membrane transporters to the vacuole for degradation, and we show that the vps mutants accumulate elevated levels of the high-affinity Mn(2+) transporter Smf1p. cdc1(Ts) conditional growth is also alleviated by mutations, including doa4 and ubc4, that compromise protein ubiquitination, and these ubiquitination defects are associated with Smf1p accumulation. Epistasis studies show that these suppressors require functional Smf1p to alleviate the cdc1(Ts) growth defect, whereas Smf1p is dispensable for cdc1(Ts) suppression by a mutation (cos16/per1) that does not influence intracellular Mn(2+) levels. Because Smf1p is ubiquitinated in vivo, we propose that Smf1p is targeted to the vacuole for degradation by ubiquitination-dependent protein sorting. PMID:15166140

  12. Biogenesis of the crystalloid organelle in Plasmodium involves microtubule-dependent vesicle transport and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Sadia; Tremp, Annie Z.; Dessens, Johannes T.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites possess unique subcellular structures and organelles. One of these is the crystalloid, a multivesicular organelle that forms during the parasite’s development in vector mosquitoes. The formation and function of these organelles remain poorly understood. A family of six conserved and modular proteins named LCCL-lectin adhesive-like proteins (LAPs), which have essential roles in sporozoite transmission, localise to the crystalloids. In this study we analyse crystalloid formation using transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites expressing GFP-tagged LAP3. We show that deletion of the LCCL domain from LAP3 causes retarded crystalloid development, while knockout of LAP3 prevents formation of the organelle. Our data reveal that the process of crystalloid formation involves active relocation of endoplasmic reticulum-derived vesicles to common assembly points via microtubule-dependent transport. Inhibition of microtubule-dependent cargo transport disrupts this process and replicates the LCCL domain deletion mutant phenotype in wildtype parasites. These findings provide the first clear insight into crystalloid biogenesis, demonstrating a fundamental role for the LAP family in this process, and identifying the crystalloid and its formation as potential targets for malaria transmission control. PMID:25900212

  13. Large Conductance Switching in a Single-Molecule Device through Room Temperature Spin-Dependent Transport.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Cerdá, Jorge I; Acís-Castillo, Zulema; Li, Haipeng; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Hihath, Josh; Ruiz, Eliseo; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2016-01-13

    Controlling the spin of electrons in nanoscale electronic devices is one of the most promising topics aiming at developing devices with rapid and high density information storage capabilities. The interface magnetism or spinterface resulting from the interaction between a magnetic molecule and a metal surface, or vice versa, has become a key ingredient in creating nanoscale molecular devices with novel functionalities. Here, we present a single-molecule wire that displays large (>10000%) conductance switching by controlling the spin-dependent transport under ambient conditions (room temperature in a liquid cell). The molecular wire is built by trapping individual spin crossover Fe(II) complexes between one Au electrode and one ferromagnetic Ni electrode in an organic liquid medium. Large changes in the single-molecule conductance (>100-fold) are measured when the electrons flow from the Au electrode to either an α-up or a β-down spin-polarized Ni electrode. Our calculations show that the current flowing through such an interface appears to be strongly spin-polarized, thus resulting in the observed switching of the single-molecule wire conductance. The observation of such a high spin-dependent conductance switching in a single-molecule wire opens up a new door for the design and control of spin-polarized transport in nanoscale molecular devices at room temperature. PMID:26675052

  14. Transport of Solutes in Hyporheic Zones with Temperature-Dependent Reversible Sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, M.; Cardenas, M. B.; Zheng, L.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most important processes impacting the mobility of heavy metals in rivers and their hyporheic zones is reversible sorption to sediment. Reversible sorption has been shown to be a temperature dependent process, however the impact of this variability on heavy metal fate and transport, as well as environmental metal concentrations, has not received much attention. In this study we used zinc as an example heavy metal. Previous studies of the impact of temperature on the sorption of zinc on a goethite substrate show a change in partitioning coefficient and thus retardation factor of 10 to over 60 percent with a temperature change from 10 to 25*C, depending on concentration of dissolved zinc in the water. This relationship was extrapolated to estimate the change in reversible sorption of zinc on silicate sand. This change was then utilized within a finite-element model coupling hyporheic fluid flow in porous media with heat transfer and solute transport with reversible sorption to explore the ways in which variations in surface water temperature over varying timescales can drive changes in both zinc sorption and dissolved zinc fluxes at the bedform scale. These linked processes are of fundamental importance when considering the number of different ways in which surface water temperatures can be varied through both human and non-human activities.

  15. Spin- and valley-dependent transport properties for metal-silicene-metal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pan; Zhou, Ma; Liu, Guang; Liu, Yiman; Long, Meng-Qiu; Zhou, Guanghui

    2015-09-01

    Detailed knowledge relating to the interactions between silicene and normal metal is crucial to understanding silicene growth on metal surfaces and metal/silicene interfaces in nanoelectronic devices. In this work, we study the valley- and spin-dependent transport properties of a metal/silicene/metal junction (MSM) with end and side metal-silicene contacts, respectively, where the central silicene sheet is simultaneously in proximity to a ferromagnet and a perpendicular electric field. By connecting the wave amplitudes obeying the lattice Schrödinger equation for the interfaces within the tight-binding model, the tunable conductance of both end-contacted (EC) and side contacted (SC) MSM junctions have been calculated. The current through MSM junctions is spin and valley polarized due to the coupling between valley and spin degrees of freedom, and the conductance and polarization show oscillating behavior as a function of the length of the silicene sheet. In particular, we find that the full spin and valley polarized conductance can be achieved by introducing proper electric and exchange fields. Further, the conductance is heavily dependent on the hopping integrals of simple metal, silicene and metal/silicene interfaces for EC junctions, and as long as the hopping integrals satisfy certain condition (with suitable incident energy) there is no difference in the transport between EC and SC junctions. The findings here may be meaningful in understanding the nature of metal/silicene interfaces.

  16. Bias Dependence of Spin Transport in Epitaxial Ferromagnet-Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakovic, A. F.; Schultz, B. D.; Strand, J.; Adelmann, C.; Palmstrom, C. J.; Crowell, P. A.

    2003-03-01

    We have performed electroluminescence polarization (ELP) measurements on MBE grown ferromagnet-semiconductor heterostructures in order to establish the bias voltage and magnetic field dependence of spin transport from Fe into the semiconductor heterostructure. Al_xGa_1-xAs/GaAs/ Al_xGa_1-xAs quantum wells embedded in the depletion region of a n-i-p diode are used as spin-detectors. Electrons are injected through a ? -doped Schottky barrier. Doping profiles are used to control both the width of the barrier and the carrier concentration in the drift region between the barrier and the spin detector. The effect of band structure profiles on the transport properties will be discussed. The maximum amplitude of the ELP signal is between 4 % and 11 % and closely tracks the out-of-plane magnetization of the Fe electrode. Measurements of the bias dependence at 5.0 T and 10 K show a characteristic peak in the ELP signal at low bias voltages (1.7 V - 2.0 V applied between the ferromagnet and the p-layer), and a slow decrease at higher bias. Photoluminescence and differential magnetoabsorption indicate background contributions that are smaller than the ELP signal in all cases. This work was supported by ONR, DARPA/ONR, NSF/MRSEC and a 3M Fellowship (AFI).

  17. The serotonin transporter gene and risk for alcohol dependence: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    McHugh, R Kathryn; Hofmann, Stefan G; Asnaani, Anu; Sawyer, Alice T; Otto, Michael W

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies have implicated a relationship between particular allelic variations of the serotonin transporter gene (5HTTLPR) and alcohol dependence. To provide a current estimate of the strength of this association, particularly in light of inconsistent results for 5HTTLPR, we conducted a meta-analytic review of the association between 5HTTLPR and a clinical diagnosis of alcohol dependence. Of 145 studies initially identified, 22 (including 8050 participants) met inclusion criteria. Results indicated that there was a significant albeit modest association between alcohol dependence diagnosis and the presence of at least 1 short allele (OR=1.15, 95% CI=1.01, 1.30, p<.05). Slightly more robust results were observed for participants who were homogeneous for the short allele (OR=1.21, 95% CI=1.02, 1.44, p<.05). These results were unrelated to sex and race/ethnicity of participants; however, the effect size was moderated by study sample size and publication year. Additionally, the fail-safe N analysis indicated potential publication bias. Therefore, although our review indicates that there is a significant association between 5HTTLPR and alcohol dependence diagnosis, this result should be interpreted with caution. PMID:20060655

  18. PET imaging of the serotonin transporter and 5HT1A receptor in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Diana; Slifstein, Mark; Gil, Roberto; Hwang, Dah-Ren; Huang, Yiyun; Perez, Audrey; Frankle, W. Gordon; Laruelle, Marc; Krystal, John; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2009-01-01

    Background Rodent models as well as studies in humans have suggested alterations in serotonin (5HT) innervation and transmission in early onset genetically determined or type II alcoholism. This study examines two indices of serotonergic transmission, 5HT transporter levels and 5-HT1A availability, in vivo, in type II alcoholism. This is the first report of combined tracers for pre and post-synaptic serotonergic transmission in the same alcoholic subjects and the first study of 5HT1A receptors in alcoholism. Method Fourteen alcohol dependent subjects were scanned (11 with both tracers, 1 with [11C]DASB only and two with [11C]WAY100635 only). Twelve healthy controls (HC) subjects were scanned with [11C]DASB and another 13 were scanned with [11C]WAY100635. Binding Potential (BPp, mL/cm3) and the specific to nonspecific partition coefficient (BPND, unitless) were derived for both tracers using 2 tissue compartment model and compared to HC across different brain regions. Relationships to severity of alcoholism were assessed. Results No significant differences were observed in regional BPp or BPND between patients and controls in any of the regions examined. No significant relationships were observed between regional 5HT transporter availability, 5-HT1A availability, and disease severity with the exception of a significant negative correlation between SERT and years of dependence in amygdala and insula. Conclusion This study did not find alterations in measures of 5-HT1A or 5HT transporter levels in patients with type II alcoholism. PMID:18962444

  19. Crystal Phase- and Orientation-Dependent Electrical Transport Properties of InAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mengqi; Tang, Zhiqiang; Li, Xing; Ning, Zhiyuan; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Wei, Xianlong; Chen, Qing

    2016-04-13

    We report a systematic study on the correlation of the electrical transport properties with the crystal phase and orientation of single-crystal InAs nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. A new method is developed to allow the same InAs NW to be used for both the electrical measurements and transmission electron microscopy characterization. We find both the crystal phase, wurtzite (WZ) or zinc-blende (ZB), and the orientation of the InAs NWs remarkably affect the electronic properties of the field-effect transistors based on these NWs, such as the threshold voltage (VT), ON-OFF ratio, subthreshold swing (SS) and effective barrier height at the off-state (ΦOFF). The SS increases while VT, ON-OFF ratio, and ΦOFF decrease one by one in the sequence of WZ ⟨0001⟩, ZB ⟨131⟩, ZB ⟨332⟩, ZB ⟨121⟩, and ZB ⟨011⟩. The WZ InAs NWs have obvious smaller field-effect mobility, conductivities, and electron concentration at VBG = 0 V than the ZB InAs NWs, while these parameters are not sensitive to the orientation of the ZB InAs NWs. We also find the diameter ranging from 12 to 33 nm shows much less effect than the crystal phase and orientation on the electrical transport properties of the InAs NWs. The good ohmic contact between InAs NWs and metal remains regardless of the variation of the crystal phase and orientation through temperature-dependent measurements. Our work deepens the understanding of the structure-dependent electrical transport properties of InAs NWs and provides a potential way to tailor the device properties by controlling the crystal phase and orientation of the NWs. PMID:27002386

  20. Induction of Mrp3 and Mrp4 transporters during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is dependent on Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksunes, Lauren M. Slitt, Angela L. Maher, Jonathan M. Augustine, Lisa M. Goedken, Michael J. Chan, Jefferson Y. Cherrington, Nathan J. Klaassen, Curtis D. Manautou, Jose E.

    2008-01-01

    The transcription factor NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mediates detoxification and antioxidant gene transcription following electrophile exposure and oxidative stress. Mice deficient in Nrf2 (Nrf2-null) are highly susceptible to acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity and exhibit lower basal and inducible expression of cytoprotective genes, including NADPH quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutamate cysteine ligase (catalytic subunit, or Gclc). Administration of toxic APAP doses to C57BL/6J mice generates electrophilic stress and subsequently increases levels of hepatic Nqo1, Gclc and the efflux multidrug resistance-associated protein transporters 1-4 (Mrp1-4). It was hypothesized that induction of hepatic Mrp1-4 expression following APAP is Nrf2 dependent. Plasma and livers from wild-type (WT) and Nrf2-null mice were collected 4, 24 and 48 h after APAP. As expected, hepatotoxicity was greater in Nrf2-null compared to WT mice. Gene and protein expression of Mrp1-4 and the Nrf2 targets, Nqo1 and Gclc, was measured. Induction of Nqo1 and Gclc mRNA and protein after APAP was dependent on Nrf2 expression. Similarly, APAP treatment increased hepatic Mrp3 and Mrp4 mRNA and protein in WT, but not Nrf2-null mice. Mrp1 was induced in both genotypes after APAP, suggesting that elevated expression of this transporter was independent of Nrf2. Mrp2 was not induced in either genotype at the mRNA or protein levels. These results show that Nrf2 mediates induction of Mrp3 and Mrp4 after APAP but does not affect Mrp1 or Mrp2. Thus coordinated regulation of detoxification enzymes and transporters by Nrf2 during APAP hepatotoxicity is a mechanism by which hepatocytes may limit intracellular accumulation of potentially toxic chemicals.

  1. Allelic association of a dopamine transporter gene polymorphism with antisocial behaviour in heroin-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Garofano, Luciano; Pellegrini, Caterina; Bosari, Silvano; Zaimovic, Amir; Moi, Gabriele; Avanzini, Paola; Talarico, Enrica; Gardini, Federica; Donnini, Claudia

    2005-09-01

    Polymorphism of a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in the 3' untranslated region of exon 15 of the SLC6A3 gene, coding for the dopamine transporter (DAT), was analysed to test whether length variation contributes to differences in the individual susceptibility to aggressive - criminal behaviour and liability to heroin dependence. The repeat number of the DAT polymorphism was assessed in 125 healthy subjects and 104 heroin-dependent subjects (including 52 addicted individuals with violent behaviour and criminal records). There was no significant difference in the frequencies of genotypes and alleles between heroin-dependent subjects and control subjects. On the contrary, there was a significant difference between offenders and non-offenders, p = 0.004 and p = 0.002, respectively, among heroin-dependent subjects. No association was found between DAT polymorphism and history of suicide. Buss - Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI) mean total scores were significantly higher in heroin addicts than in controls (p < 0.001) and in antisocial - violent heroin addicts in comparison with addicted individuals without antisocial behaviour (p < 0.005). The regression analysis of BDHI subscales, performed to provide an estimate of the magnitude of any potential effect on the risk of aggressiveness associated with the variants in DAT VNTR, showed that the presence of the 9 - 9 genotype significantly increases the risk of irritability and direct aggressiveness more than six and 10 times with respect to the 9 - 10 genotype. Our findings suggest that the 9-repeat allele of the DAT polymorphism confers increased susceptibility to antisocial - violent behaviour and aggressiveness, rather than drug dependence per se in heroin-dependent males. PMID:16109590

  2. A nitrogen-dependent switch in the high affinity ammonium transport in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Straub, Daniel; Ludewig, Uwe; Neuhäuser, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium transporters (AMTs) are crucial for the high affinity primary uptake and translocation of ammonium in plants. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the genomic set of AMT-type ammonium transporters comprises eight members. Only four genes were abundantly expressed in young seedlings, both in roots and shoots. While the expression of all AMTs in the shoot was not affected by the nitrogen availability, the dominating MtAMT1;1 gene was repressed by nitrogen in roots, despite that cellular nitrogen concentrations were far above deficiency levels. A contrasting de-repression by nitrogen was observed for MtAMT1;4 and MtAMT2;1, which were both expressed at intermediate level. Weak expression was found for MtAMT1;2 and MtAMT2;3, while the other AMTs were not detected in young seedlings. When expressed from their endogenous promoters, translational fusion proteins of MtAMT1;1 and MtAMT2;1 with green fluorescent protein were co-localized in the plasma membrane of rhizodermal cells, but also detected in cortical root layers. Both transporter proteins similarly functionally complemented a yeast strain that is deficient in high affinity ammonium transport, both at acidic and neutral pH. The uptake into yeast mediated by these transporters saturated with Km AMT1;1 = 89 µM and Km AMT2;1 = 123 µM, respectively. When expressed in oocytes, MtAMT1;1 mediated much larger (15)N-ammonium uptake than MtAMT2;1, but NH4 (+) currents were only recorded for MtAMT1;1. These currents saturated with a voltage-dependent Km = 90 µM at -80 mV. The cellular localization and regulation of the AMTs suggests that MtAMT1;1 encodes the major high affinity ammonium transporter gene in low nitrogen grown young M. truncatula roots and despite the similar localization and substrate affinity, MtAMT2;1 appears functionally distinct and more important at higher nitrogen supply. PMID:25164101

  3. Sodium dependency of active chloride transport across isolated fish skin (Gillichthys mirabilis).

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, W S

    1981-01-01

    1. The effects of thiocyanate, ouabain, ion-substituted Ringer solution and electrochemical gradients on Na+ and Cl- transport were examined using the isolated skin of the marine teleost, Gillichthys mirabilis. 2. Bilateral replacement of Na+ with choline in the bathing solutions reduces net Cl- flux by 93%, indicating that active Cl- transport by the skin is Na-dependent. 3. Thiocyanate inhibits short-circuit current with an ED50 of 6.4 x 10(-4)M, and, at 10(-2)M, decreases Cl-efflux, influx, net flux and short-circuit current by 68, 33, 74 and 81%, respectively. 4. Ouabain (10(-5)M) reduces Cl- efflux and net flux by 56 and 86%, respectively, indicating that the Cl- transport requires Na,K-ATPase. 5. Subsequent addition of thiocyanate to ouabain-treated skin reduces Cl- efflux, net flux and short-circuit current, suggesting that the two agents operate at different sites involved in Cl- transport. 6. Unilateral substitution of gluconate for Cl- on the serosal side does not affect Cl- influx, indicating that Cl- passive transport is via Fickean diffusion, not Cl-Cl exchange diffusion. 7. The addition of NaCl to the mucosal side, which mimics the in vivo sea-water condition, increases Cl- influx and transepithelial potential and decreases tissue resistance. The net flux (secretion) of Cl- with hypertonic saline on the mucosal side (0.51 +/- 0.06 muequiv/cm2 . hr) demonstrates that the skin could secrete Cl- in vivo. 8. Na+ fluxes across the skin are passive, as the observed flux ration (efflux/influx) is similar to that predicted by the Ussing-Teorell equation under both closed- and open-circuit conditions. 9. The permeability ratio (PNa:PCl) in approximately 5.4:1.0, indicating that the skin is more permeable to Na+, and that at least part of the serosa-positive transepithelial potential may be a Na+ diffusion potential. 10. The results suggest that Cl- secretion by Gillichthys skin is secondary active transport involving Na,K-ATPase and serosal Na+. PMID:7320911

  4. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

  5. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore » Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  6. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore »Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  7. The Dependence of H-mode Energy Confinement and Transport on Collisionality in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Gerhardt, S.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.

    2012-11-28

    Understanding the dependence of confi nement on collisionality in tokamaks is important for the design of next-step devices, which will operate at collisionalities at least one order of magnitude lower than in present generation. A wide range of collisionality has been obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by employing two different wall conditioning techniques, one with boronization and between-shot helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC+B), and one using lithium evaporation (Li EVAP). Previous studies of HeGDC+B plasmas indicated a strong and favorable dependence of normalized con nement on collisionality. Discharges with lithium conditioning discussed in the present study gen- erally achieved lower collisionality, extending the accessible range of collisionality by almost an order of unity. While the confinement dependences on dimensional, engineering variables of the HeGDC+B and Li EVAP datasets differed, collisionality was found to unify the trends, with the lower collisionality lithium conditioned discharges extending the trend of increasing normalized confi nement time with decreasing collisionality when other dimension less variables were held as fi xed as possible. This increase of confi nement with decreasing collisionality was driven by a large reduction in electron transport in the outer region of the plasma. This result is consistent with gyrokinetic calculations that show microtearing and Electron Temperature Gradient modes to be more stable for the lower collisionality discharges. Ion transport, near neoclassical at high collisionality, became more anomalous at lower collisionality, possibly due to the growth of hybrid TEM/KBM modes in the outer regions of the plasma

  8. The Dependence of H-mode Energy Confinement and Transport on Collisionality in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Gerhardt, S.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.

    2012-11-27

    Understanding the dependence of confi nement on collisionality in tokamaks is important for the design of next-step devices, which will operate at collisionalities at least one order of magnitude lower than in present generation. A wide range of collisionality has been obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by employing two different wall conditioning techniques, one with boronization and between-shot helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC+B), and one using lithium evaporation (Li EVAP). Previous studies of HeGDC+B plasmas indicated a strong and favorable dependence of normalized con nement on collisionality. Discharges with lithium conditioning discussed in the present study gen- erally achieved lower collisionality, extending the accessible range of collisionality by almost an order of unity. While the confinement dependences on dimensional, engineering variables of the HeGDC+B and Li EVAP datasets differed, collisionality was found to unify the trends, with the lower collisionality lithium conditioned discharges extending the trend of increasing normalized confi nement time with decreasing collisionality when other dimension less variables were held as fi xed as possible. This increase of confi nement with decreasing collisionality was driven by a large reduction in electron transport in the outer region of the plasma. This result is consistent with gyrokinetic calculations that show microtearing and Electron Temperature Gradient modes to be more stable for the lower collisionality discharges. Ion transport, near neoclassical at high collisionality, became more anomalous at lower collisionality, possibly due to the growth of hybrid TEM/KBM modes in the outer regions of the plasma.

  9. Glucose deprivation increases monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expression and MCT1-dependent tumor cell migration.

    PubMed

    De Saedeleer, C J; Porporato, P E; Copetti, T; Pérez-Escuredo, J; Payen, V L; Brisson, L; Feron, O; Sonveaux, P

    2014-07-31

    The glycolytic end-product lactate is a pleiotropic tumor growth-promoting factor. Its activities primarily depend on its uptake, a process facilitated by the lactate-proton symporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1). Therefore, targeting the transporter or its chaperon protein CD147/basigin, itself involved in the aggressive malignant phenotype, is an attractive therapeutic option for cancer, but basic information is still lacking regarding the regulation of the expression, interaction and activities of both proteins. In this study, we found that glucose deprivation dose-dependently upregulates MCT1 and CD147 protein expression and their interaction in oxidative tumor cells. While this posttranslational induction could be recapitulated using glycolysis inhibition, hypoxia, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) inhibitor rotenone or hydrogen peroxide, it was blocked with alternative oxidative substrates and specific antioxidants, pointing out at a mitochondrial control. Indeed, we found that the stabilization of MCT1 and CD147 proteins upon glucose removal depends on mitochondrial impairment and the associated generation of reactive oxygen species. When glucose was a limited resource (a situation occurring naturally or during the treatment of many tumors), MCT1-CD147 heterocomplexes accumulated, including in cell protrusions of the plasma membrane. It endowed oxidative tumor cells with increased migratory capacities towards glucose. Migration increased in cells overexpressing MCT1 and CD147, but it was inhibited in glucose-starved cells provided with an alternative oxidative fuel, treated with an antioxidant, lacking MCT1 expression, or submitted to pharmacological MCT1 inhibition. While our study identifies the mitochondrion as a glucose sensor promoting tumor cell migration, MCT1 is also revealed as a transducer of this response, providing a new rationale for the use of MCT1 inhibitors in cancer. PMID:24166504

  10. Multi-Regge kinematics and azimuthal angle observables for inclusive four-jet production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporale, F.; Celiberto, F. G.; Chachamis, G.; Vera, A. Sabio

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate differential cross sections for production of four jets in multi-Regge kinematics at a hadron collider. The main focus lies on the azimuthal angle dependences. As in previous studies, the ratios of correlation functions of products of cosines of azimuthal angle differences among the tagged jets offer us the cleanest quantities to compare with the experimental data. The calculations are based on the jet production from a single BFKL ladder with a convolution of three BFKL Green functions where we always have two forward/backward jets tagged in the final state. We also demand the tagging of two further jets in more central regions of the detectors with a relative separation in rapidity from each other, plus the inclusive production of an arbitrary number of mini-jets. We show that dependences on the transverse momenta and rapidity of the two central jets can be a distinct signal of the onset of BFKL dynamics.

  11. Hyperbolic theory for pH-dependent adsorption in reactive transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigiobbe, V.; Hesse, M. A.; Bryant, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    We use the hyperbolic theory of conservation laws to analyze the transport of strontium (Sr2+) through a porous medium with surface complexation. An hydrophilic iron-oxide surface was considered where Sr2+ and hydrogen (H+) compete for the same site leading to competitive adsorption described by an pH-dependent Langmuir isotherm. Despite the importance of pH-dependent adsorption in environmental applications, the basic structure of the displacement has received little attention. In reactive transport problems with pH-dependent adsorption, one of the conservation laws is for the total hydrogen (cHtot = cH+-cOH-) in the system, also called the acidity. The presence of this equation gives rise to additional nonlinearity in the problems that distinguishes them from other competitive sorption problems where hydrogen is not involved. We analyze a 1D reactive transport model with an incompressible fluid containing H+, Sr2+, sodium (Na+), and chlorine (Cl-) flowing through a reactive porous media made of goethite. Under the assumption of overall charge balance and of only advection for Na+ and Cl-, the mathematical problem reduces to a strictly hyperbolic 3x3 system of partial dierential equations (PDEs) for cHtot, Sr2+ (cSr2+), and effective anions (ca = cCl--cNa+) which are coupled by the adsorption isotherms for H+ and Sr2+ and have the non-linearity in the accumulation terms. One characteristic field is linearly degenerate while the other two are non-genuinely nonlinear due to inflection loci in both isotherms. We derived the complete set of analytical solutions to the Riemann problem (constant initial and injected states) and described the characteristic waves that may arise, concluding that only nine combinations of a contact discontinuity with rarefactions, shocks, shock-rarefactions are possible. The composite shock-rarefaction waves arise from the inflection loci in the isotherms and are absent in classic competitive Langmuir sorption. The inflection loci divide the composition space into two distinct high and low pH regions with distinct composition paths. The existence of a detached branch of the Hugoniot-locus is essential to the construction of composite waves that form when the left and right states are in distinct regions of the composition space. Highly resolved numerical solutions at large Peclet numbers show excellent agreement with the analytical solutions in the hyperbolic limit except under certain conditions when a pulse of Sr2+ and one of H+ arise ahead of the cor- responding retarded front and travel at the average fluid velocity. These conditions define the necessary conditions for the occurrence of the non-classical reactive transport which is not limited to only the Sr2+ front as observed in the earlier works [1,2] but it involves also the H+ front. These results raise important questions regarding the prediction of the migration of toxic compounds in the subsurface and pose also theoretical questions about the convergence of the vanishing diffusion solution to the hyperbolic limit, the stability of shock layers in reactive transport, and the role of the Riemann problem as an intermediate asymptotic solution for a wider range of problems. 1. Prigiobbe, V., Hesse, M., Bryant, S. L. (2012) Transport Porous Med 93 127-145. 2. Prigiobbe, V., Hesse, M., Bryant, S. L. (2012) accepted for publication in Geophys Res. Lett.

  12. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  13. Reduced striatal dopamine transporter density associated with working memory deficits in opioid-dependent male subjects: a SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Sung; Ho, Pei-Shen; Yen, Che-Hung; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Kuo, Shin-Chang; Huang, Chang-Chih; Chen, Chun-Yen; Shih, Mei-Chen; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Research on the effects of repeated opioid use on striatal dopamine transporters has yielded inconsistent results, possibly confounded by a history of methamphetamine or methadone exposure in opioid-dependent individuals. Previous studies have shown that striatal dopamine transporter density is positively correlated with the cognitive performance of healthy volunteers. This study aimed to investigate changes in striatal dopamine transporter density and their functional significance in opioid-dependent individuals. Single-photon emission computed tomography with [(99m) Tc]TRODAT-1 as a ligand was used to measure striatal dopamine transporter levels in 20 opioid-dependent individuals and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Opioid-dependent individuals had no history of methamphetamine or methadone use. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) was performed to assess neurocognitive function. We found that compared with healthy controls, opioid-dependent individuals showed a significant reduction in striatal dopamine transporter density. They also showed poorer performance on the WCST in terms of the trials administered, total errors, perseverative responses, perseverative errors, and non-perseverative errors. Striatal dopamine transporter levels negatively correlated with non-perseverative errors not only in opioid-dependent individuals but also in healthy controls. These findings suggest that in human, repeated opioid exposure reduces striatal dopamine transporter density, which can be associated with non-perseverative errors. Non-perseverative errors may be one of the more sensitive parameters in WCST to identify working memory deficits associated with striatal dopamine transporter reduction. Moreover, we suggest that whether opioid-associated neurotoxicity is reversible depends on the brain region. PMID:25439653

  14. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Adam J.; Lee, John C.

    2016-02-01

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  15. Structural phase-dependent hole localization and transport in bismuth vanadate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Kyoung E.; Hwang, Gyeong S.

    2013-05-01

    We present theoretical evidence for the phase dependence of hole localization and transport in bismuth vanadate (BiVO4). Our hybrid density-functional theory calculations predict that, in the tetragonal phase [tetragonal scheelite BiVO4 (ts-BiVO4)], an excess hole tends to localize around a BiO8 polyhedron with strong lattice distortion, whereas, in the monoclinic phase [monoclinic scheelite BiVO4 (ms-BiVO4)], it spreads over many lattice sites. The phase-dependent behavior is likely related to the higher structural stability of ms-BiVO4 than ts-BiVO4, which may suppress hole-induced lattice distortions. Our study also demonstrates that the relatively weakly localized hole in ms-BiVO4 undergoes faster diffusion compared to the case of ts-BiVO4, irrespective of the fact that the degrees of localization and mobility vary depending on the choice of exchange-correlation functional. The mobility difference may provide an explanation for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of ms-BiVO4 over ts-BiVO4 for water oxidation, considering that the increased mobility would lead to an increase in the hole current to the catalyst surface.

  16. The amino terminus of tau inhibits kinesin-dependent axonal transport: implications for filament toxicity.

    PubMed

    LaPointe, Nichole E; Morfini, Gerardo; Pigino, Gustavo; Gaisina, Irina N; Kozikowski, Alan P; Binder, Lester I; Brady, Scott T

    2009-02-01

    The neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies is characterized by filamentous deposits of the microtubule-associated protein tau, but the relationship between tau polymerization and neurotoxicity is unknown. Here, we examined effects of filamentous tau on fast axonal transport (FAT) using isolated squid axoplasm. Monomeric and filamentous forms of recombinant human tau were perfused in axoplasm, and their effects on kinesin- and dynein-dependent FAT rates were evaluated by video microscopy. Although perfusion of monomeric tau at physiological concentrations showed no effect, tau filaments at the same concentrations selectively inhibited anterograde (kinesin-dependent) FAT, triggering the release of conventional kinesin from axoplasmic vesicles. Pharmacological experiments indicated that the effect of tau filaments on FAT is mediated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activities. Moreover, deletion analysis suggested that these effects depend on a conserved 18-amino-acid sequence at the amino terminus of tau. Interestingly, monomeric tau isoforms lacking the C-terminal half of the molecule (including the microtubule binding region) recapitulated the effects of full-length filamentous tau. Our results suggest that pathological tau aggregation contributes to neurodegeneration by altering a regulatory pathway for FAT. PMID:18798283

  17. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 107 cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 1011 cm-2. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  18. Pressure dependence of the large polaron transport in anatase TiO2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaćimović, Jaćim; Vaju, Cristian; Berger, Helmuth; Magrez, Arnaud; Cerovski, Viktor; Žikić, Radomir; Gaál, Richard; Forró, László

    2012-02-01

    Anatase is a TiO2 polymorph which is a 3.2 eV gap semiconductor interesting for several applications, including catalysis, photocatalysis, and, especially, dye-sensitized solar cells. Surprisingly, transparent single crystals of anatase grown in our laboratory show a metallic resistivity above 60 K which origin is a shallow donor level created by oxygen vacancies. The high value of the resistivity and its T^3 temperature dependence are the result of the polaronic nature of the charge carriers which is supported by the Seebeck coefficient (S). The application of hydrostatic pressure fails to close the donor level and to extend the conducting state to the entire temperature range. Instead, we have found a non-monotonic variation of the low temperature activation energy with applied pressure which is ascribed to the change of polaron's mobility. Thermo-electric power exhibits an unconventional temperature and pressure dependence shedding an additional light on the conductivity mechanism in this compound. The pressure dependence of S is governed by the transport of the large entropy associated with the polaron formation.

  19. Transmembrane glucose transport in skeletal muscle of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Bonadonna, R C; Del Prato, S; Saccomani, M P; Bonora, E; Gulli, G; Ferrannini, E; Bier, D; Cobelli, C; DeFronzo, R A

    1993-01-01

    Insulin resistance for glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle is a key feature in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Which cellular effectors of glucose metabolism are involved is still unknown. We investigated whether transmembrane glucose transport in vivo is impaired in skeletal muscle in nonobese NIDDM patients. We performed euglycemic insulin clamp studies in combination with the forearm balance technique (brachial artery and deep forearm vein catheterization) in six nonobese NIDDM patients and five age- and weight-matched controls. Unlabeled D-mannitol (a nontransportable molecule) and radioactive 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (the reference molecular probe to assess glucose transport activity) were simultaneously injected into the brachial artery, and the washout curves were measured in the deep venous effluent blood. In vivo transmembrane transport of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose in forearm muscle was determined by computerized analysis of the washout curves. At similar steady-state plasma concentrations of insulin (approximately 500 pmol/liter) and glucose (approximately 5.15 mmol/liter), transmembrane inward transport of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose in skeletal muscle was markedly reduced in the NIDDM patients (6.5 x 10(-2) +/- 0.56 x 10(-2).min-1) compared with controls (12.5 x 10(-2) +/- 1.5 x 10(-2).min-1, P < 0.005). Mean glucose uptake was also reduced in the diabetics both at the whole body level (9.25 +/- 1.84 vs. 28.3 +/- 2.44 mumol/min per kg, P < 0.02) and in the forearm tissues (5.84 +/- 1.51 vs. 37.5 +/- 7.95 mumol/min per kg, P < 0.02). When the latter rates were extrapolated to the whole body level, skeletal muscle accounted for approximately 80% of the defect in insulin action seen in NIDDM patients. We conclude that transmembrane glucose transport, when assessed in vivo in skeletal muscle, is insensitive to insulin in nonobese NIDDM patients, and plays a major role in determining whole body insulin resistance. Images PMID:8326013

  20. Forward-backward correlations between multiplicities in windows separated in azimuth and rapidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vechernin, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    The forward-backward (FB) charged particle multiplicity correlations between windows separated in rapidity and azimuth are analyzed using a model that treats strings as independent identical emitters. Both the short-range (SR) contribution, originating from the correlation between multiplicities produced from a single source, and the long-range (LR) contribution, originating from the fluctuation in the number of sources, are taken into account. The dependencies of the FB correlation coefficient, b, on the windows' rapidity and azimuthal acceptance and the gaps between these windows are studied and compared with the preliminary data of ALICE. The analysis of these dependencies effectively separates the contributions of two above mechanisms. It is also demonstrated that traditional definitions of FB correlation coefficient b have a strong nonlinear dependence on the acceptance of windows. Suitable alternative observables for the future FB correlation studies are proposed. The connection between b and the two-particle correlation function, C2, is traced, as well as its connection to the untriggered di-hadron correlation analysis. Using a model independent analysis, it is shown that measurement of the FB multiplicity correlations between two small windows separated in rapidity and azimuth fully determines the two-particle correlation function C2, even if the particle distribution in rapidity is not uniform.

  1. Azimuthal diffusion of the large-scale circulation of turbulent Rayleight-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaozhou; van Gils, Dennis P. M.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Ahlers, Guenter

    2015-11-01

    We present measurements of the azimuthal orientation θ0 (t) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) of turbulent Rayleight-Bénard convection. The sample was a cylinder with height and diameter equal to 1.12 m. We used compressed SF6 gas at pressures up to 19 bars as the fluid. The measurements covered the Rayleigh-number range 1012 <= Ra <=1014 at a Prandtl number Pr ~= 0 . 80 . We found that the preferred orientation of the LSC upflow was aligned to the West, consistent with Earth's Coriolis force. The LSC azimuthal dynamics was diffusive, driven by the small-scale turbulent fluctuations. For Ra <=1013 the Reynolds number Reθ˙ based on the azimuthal diffusivity had a Ra dependence similar to that seen for 109 <= Ra <=1011 and Pr = 4 . 38 . The Pr dependence Reθ˙ ~Prα with α ~= - 1 . 2 was the same as that found for the Reynolds number based on the root-mean-square fluctuation velocity in the interior bulk flow. For Ra = Ra1* ~= 2 ×1013 Reθ˙ showed the ultimate-state transition and for Ra >= Ra2* ~= 8 ×1013 it had a Ra dependence with an exponent of 0 . 40 +/- 0 . 02 . Supported by the Max Planck Society, the Volkswagenstiftung, the DFD Sonderforschungsbereich SFB963, and NSF Grant DMR11-58514.

  2. Optimization of Azimuthal Uniformity in NIF Polar-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craxton, R. S.; Radha, P. B.; Davis, A. K.; Froula, D. H.; Hohenberger, M.; McKenty, P. W.; Michel, D. T.; Olson, P. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    The primary method for optimizing polar-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is beam repointing in the polar direction, leading to designs that are uniform in two-dimensional, azimuthally symmetric hydrodynamic simulations. However, in some cases, azimuthal variations in the deposited energy can affect the implosion uniformity and may be observable in self-emission images. Azimuthal uniformity has been investigated using the hydrodynamics code SAGE, which includes three-dimensional ray tracing. Optimal azimuthal adjustments to the beam pointings have been developed for the ongoing LLE polar-drive campaign on the NIF. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter upregulation is associated with necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Mount Patrick, Sarah K.; Dobrenen, Holly J.; Khailova, Ludmila; Correa, Hernan; Dvorak, Bohuslav

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency of premature infants. Previously, we showed that luminal bile acids (BAs) are increased and correlated with disease development and that the apical sodium-dependent BA transporter (ASBT), which transports BAs from the ileal lumen into enterocytes, is upregulated in rats with NEC. We hypothesized that intraenterocyte, rather than luminal, BAs are associated with NEC and that upregulation of ASBT may be a mechanism by which this occurs. Neonatal rats with or without the ASBT inhibitor SC-435, mice in which ASBT was knocked out, and mice that overproduce BAs were subjected to the NEC protocol. Disease development, ASBT, and the farnesoid X receptor protein, along with luminal and intraenterocyte BA levels, were assessed. In addition, ileal sections from premature infants with and without NEC were examined for ASBT via immunohistology and real-time PCR. When BAs were not transported into enterocytes (rats given SC-435 and ASBT knockout mice), severity and incidence of NEC were reduced. In contrast, in mice that overproduce BAs, ASBT was elevated, intraenterocyte BAs were increased, and disease development was increased. ASBT staining was more intense on the apical membrane of ileal enterocytes from premature infants with NEC than premature infants with non-NEC diagnoses. In addition, ASBT mRNA levels were significantly higher in infants with NEC. These data show that accumulation of intraenterocyte BAs contributes to disease development, elevated ASBT increases disease severity in experimental models of NEC, and ASBT is elevated in human NEC. These data confirm that BAs and upregulation of ASBT play a crucial role in NEC pathogenesis and suggest that inhibition of ASBT could be utilized as a therapeutic modality against this disease. PMID:20616306

  4. Stoichiometry dependent electron transport and gas sensing properties of indium oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gali, Pradeep; Sapkota, Gopal; Syllaios, A J; Littler, Chris; Philipose, U

    2013-06-01

    The effect of stoichiometry of single crystalline In2O3 nanowires on electrical transport and gas sensing was investigated. The nanowires were synthesized by vapor phase transport and had diameters ranging from 80 to 100 nm and lengths between 10 and 20 μm, with a growth direction of [001]. Transport measurements revealed n-type conduction, attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies in the crystal lattice. As-grown In2O3 nanowires were shown to have a carrier concentration of ≈5 × 10(17) cm(-3), while nanowires that were annealed in wet O2 showed a reduced carrier concentration of less than 10(16) cm(-3). Temperature dependent conductivity measurements on the as-grown nanowires and analysis of the thermally activated Arrhenius conduction for the temperature range of 77-350 K yielded an activation energy of 0.12 eV. This is explained on the basis of carrier exchange that occurs between the surface states and the bulk of the nanowire, resulting in a depleted surface layer of thickness of the order of the Debye length (LD), estimated to be about 3-4 nm for the as-grown nanowires and about 10 times higher for the more stoichiometric nanowires. Significant changes in the electrical conductance of individual In2O3 nanowires were also observed within several seconds of exposure to NH3 and O2 gas molecules at room temperature, thus demonstrating the potential use of In2O3 nanowires as efficient miniaturized chemical sensors. The sensing mechanism is dominated by the nanowire channel conductance, and a simple energy band diagram is used to explain the change in conductivity when gas molecules adsorbed on the nanowire surface influence its electrical properties. Less stoichiometric nanowires were found to be more sensitive to oxidizing gases while more stoichiometric nanowires showed significantly enhanced response to reducing gases. PMID:23644899

  5. Prandtl-Number Dependence of Heat Transport in Laminar Horizontal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga; Wagner, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We report the Prandtl-number (Pr) and Rayleigh-number (Ra) dependencies of the Reynolds number (Re) and mean convective heat transport, measured by the Nusselt number (Nu), in horizontal convection (HC) systems, where the heat supply and removal are provided exclusively through a lower horizontal surface of a fluid layer. For laminar HC, we find that Re ˜Ra2 /5Pr-4 /5 , Nu ˜Ra1 /5Pr1 /10 with a transition to Re ˜Ra1 /2Pr-1, Nu ˜Ra1 /4Pr0 for large Pr. The results are based on direct numerical simulations for Ra from 3 ×108 to 5 ×1010 and Pr from 0.05 to 50 and are explained by applying the Grossmann-Lohse approach [J. Fluid Mech. 407, 27 (2000)] transferred from the case of Rayleigh-Bénard convection to the case of laminar HC.

  6. Study of the temperature dependent transport properties in nanocrystalline lithium lanthanum titanate for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhilash, K. P.; Christopher Selvin, P.; Nalini, B.; Somasundaram, K.; Sivaraj, P.; Chandra Bose, A.

    2016-04-01

    The nano-crystalline Li0.5La0.5TiO3 (LLTO) was prepared as an electrolyte material for lithium-ion batteries by the sol-gel method. The prepared LLTO material is characterized by structural, morphological and electrical characterizations. The LLTO shows the cubic perovskite structure with superlattice formation. The uniform distribution of LLTO particles has been analyzed by the SEM and TEM analysis of the sample. Impedance measurements at various temperatures were carried out and the temperature dependent conductivity of as prepared LLTO nanopowders at different temperatures from room temperature to 448 K has been analyzed. The transport mechanism has been analyzed using the dielectric and modulus analysis of the sample. Maximum grain conductivity of the order of 10-3 S cm-1 has been obtained for the sample at higher temperatures.

  7. Time-Dependent Perpendicular Transport in Goldreich-Sridhar MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraschetti, F.

    2014-12-01

    We derive analytically the time-dependent perpendicular diffusion coefficient of a charged particle in the anisotropic turbulence conjectured by Goldreich-Sridhar for time-scales smaller than the correlation time of the magnetic turbulence, as seen by the particle, where the quasi-linear theory is not valid. MHD fluctuations are assumed to be axi-symmetric. The perpendicular transport is assumed to be governed by the guiding-center motion. In a weak turbulence, we find that the separate contributions of the magnetic field line-random walk and the gradient/curvature drift away from the local field line become comparable at small spatial scales. The method applies to processes compatible with a significant departure of charged particles from field lines in the solar wind turbulence, such as longitudinal spread of SEP observed at 1 AU.

  8. Spin-dependent thermoelectronic transport of a single molecule magnet Mn(dmit){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Zhongbo; Wei, Xinyuan; Yang, Zhongqin; An, Yipeng

    2014-05-28

    We investigate spin-dependent thermoelectronic transport properties of a single molecule magnet Mn(dmit){sub 2} sandwiched between two Au electrodes using first-principles density functional theory combined with nonequilibrium Green's function method. By applying a temperature difference between the two Au electrodes, spin-up and spin-down currents flowing in opposite directions can be induced due to asymmetric distribution of the spin-up and spin-down transmission spectra around the Fermi level. A pure spin current and 100% spin polarization are achieved by tuning back-gate voltage to the system. The spin caloritronics of the molecule with a perpendicular conformation is also explored, where the spin-down current is blocked strongly. These results suggest that Mn(dmit){sub 2} is a promising material for spin caloritronic applications.

  9. The spin-dependent transport of Co-encapsulated Si nanotubes contacted with Cu electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yan-Dong; Yan, Xiao-Hong; Xiao, Yang

    2014-02-10

    Unlike carbon nanotubes, silicon ones are hard to form. However, they could be stabilized by metal-encapsulation. Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the spin-dependent electronic transport of Co-encapsulated Si nanotubes, which are contacted with Cu electrodes. For the finite tubes, as the tube-length increases, the transmission changes from spin-unpolarized to spin-polarized. Further analysis shows that, not only the screening of electrodes on Co's magnetism but also the spin-asymmetric Co-Co interactions are the physical mechanisms. As Cu and Si are the fundamental elements in semiconductor industry, our results may throw light on the development of silicon-based spintronic devices.

  10. Anisotropic magnetism and spin-dependent transport in Co nanoparticle embedded ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. Y.; Zeng, Y. J.; Pereira, L. M. C.; Batuk, D.; Hadermann, J.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Ye, Z. Z.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.; Van Bael, M. J.; Van Haesendonck, C.

    2013-07-01

    Oriented Co nanoparticles were obtained by Co ion implantation in crystalline ZnO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of elliptically shaped Co precipitates with nanometer size, which are embedded in the ZnO thin films, resulting in anisotropic magnetic behavior. The low-temperature resistance of the Co-implanted ZnO thin films follows the Efros-Shklovskii type variable-range-hopping. Large negative magnetoresistance (MR) exceeding 10% is observed in a magnetic field of 1 T at 2.5 K and the negative MR survives up to 250 K (0.3%). The negative MR reveals hysteresis as well as anisotropy that correlate well with the magnetic properties, clearly demonstrating the presence of spin-dependent transport.

  11. Temperature dependent dielectric properties and ion transportation in solid polymer electrolyte for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengwa, R. J.; Dhatarwal, Priyanka; Choudhary, Shobhna

    2016-05-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) film consisted of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blend matrix with lithium tetrafluroborate (LiBF4) as dopant ionic salt and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as plasticizer has been prepared by solution casting method followed by melt pressing. Dielectric properties and ionic conductivity of the SPE film at different temperatures have been determined by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. It has been observed that the dc ionic conductivity of the SPE film increases with increase of temperature and also the decrease of relaxation time. The temperature dependent relaxation time and ionic conductivity values of the electrolyte are governed by the Arrhenius relation. Correlation observed between dc conductivity and relaxation time confirms that ion transportation occurs with polymer chain segmental dynamics through hopping mechanism. The room temperature ionic conductivity is found to be 4 × 10-6 S cm-1 which suggests the suitability of the SPE film for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  12. Temperature-dependent charge injection and transport in pentacene thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Shin, Hyunji; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, Jaehoon; Choi, Jong Sun

    2015-11-01

    The electrical characteristics of p-channel pentacene thin-film transistors (TFTs) were analyzed at different operating temperatures ranging from 253 to 353 K. An improvement in the drain current and field-effect mobility of the pentacene TFTs is observed with increasing temperature. From the Arrhenius plots of field-effect mobility extracted at various temperatures, a lower activation energy of 99.34 meV was obtained when the device is operating in the saturation region. Such observation is ascribed to the thermally activated hole transport through the pentacene grain boundaries. On the other hand, it was found that the Au/pentacene contact significantly affects the TFTs electrical characteristics in the linear region, which resulted in a higher activation energy. The activation energy based on the linear field-effect mobility, which increased from 344.61 to 444.70 meV with decreasing temperature, implies the charge-injection-limited electrical behavior of pentacene TFTs at low temperatures. The thermally induced electrical characteristic variations in pentacene TFTs can thus be studied through the temperature dependence of the charge injection and transport processes.

  13. Temperature Dependent Low Frequency Optical and DC Transport Near a Metal Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlman, R. S.; Epstein, A. J.; Tanner, D. B.; Ihas, G. G.; Ishiguro, T.; Kaneko, H.; Min, Y. G.; MacDiarmid, A. G.

    1996-03-01

    We report measurements of the temperature dependent far infrared (10-100 cm-1) reflectance and milliKelvin transport of highly conducting polyaniline doped with d,1-camphorsulfonic acid (PAN-CSA) and polypyrrole doped with hexafluorophosphate (PPy-PF_6). With decreasing T (to ~ 200 K), the reflectance initially increases for ω > 20 cm-1 and decreases at lower frequencies. As T is further decreased, there is a continuous reduction in the reflection. There is no indication of a gap opening at low temperatures in contrast to earlier reports for PPy-PF_6.^1 These results will be discussed along with mK magnetotransport measurements for ``metallic'' PAN-CSA samples that have a negative magnetoresistance similar to metallic PPy-PF6 ^2 and other nonmetallic samples, indicating the importance of weak localization channels for transport in highly conducting polymers. ^*Supported in part by NIST ATP 1993-01-0149 and NSF DMR-9403894. ^1K. Lee, et al., Synth. Met. 68, 287 (1995). ^2J. C. Clark, et al., Synth. Met. 69, 215 (1995).

  14. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; Vegge, Tejs; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as amore » function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.« less

  15. SPM Imaging of Frequency-Dependent Electrical Transport through Carbon Nanotube Networks in Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Shin, Junshoo; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Guillorn, Michael A.; Geohegan, David B.

    2004-03-01

    Frequency-dependent electrical transport in the conducting networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) within an insulating poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix was studied by Scanning Impedance Microscopy (SIM). SIM amplitude images reveal the networks of biased SWNTs and SWNT bundles embedded in the polymer and characterize the conducting pathways between planar electrode structures. The conductance of the composite is shown to be limited by a small number of bundle-bundle and bundle-contact junctions. For high frequencies, the SIM phase distribution along the networks is governed by the capacitive interaction between the nanotubes and the substrate and was in agreement with a transmission line model. For low frequencies, the potential distribution along the network can be determined after accounting for tip-surface capacitance variations at specific locations such as near electrodes. These approaches constitute a direct method to characterize and understand transport through percolation networks formed by nanotube bundles in polymers, or more generally, nanorods in various matrices. This research was sponsored in part by a Eugene P. Wigner Fellowship (SVK) and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Additional funding provided by NASA-Langley Research Center.

  16. Explanation for the √E -dependent mobilities of charge transport in molecularly doped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, David H.

    1995-07-01

    Although disorder is widely believed to be the primary distinguishing feature governing the transport of photoinjected charges in molecularly doped polymers, disorder theory has yet to convincingly explain why the linearity of the log of the mobility with the square root of the applied field persists over such a wide range. In this article a theory for high-field hopping transport in strongly disordered materials is developed which combines the elements of a continuous time random walk with existing variable-range hopping techniques. A self-consistent integral equation is derived from which the distribution of site energies for those sites which characterize the percolation pathways is determined. The theory is applied to an energetically disordered system and the mobility is calculated for the Miller-Abrahams form of the jump rate. It is shown that if the site energies belong to a Gaussian distribution, the logarithm of the mobility rises nearly linearly with √E for electric fields spanning almost two decades. The slope is temperature dependent, and agrees with the Poole-Frenkel law.

  17. Beyond the Lorentzian Model in Quantum Transport: Energy-Dependent Resonance Broadening in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenfei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    In quantum transport calculations, transmission functions of molecular junctions, as well as spectral functions of metal-organic interfaces, often feature peaks originating from molecular resonances. These resonance peaks are often assumed to be Lorentzian, with an energy-independent broadening function Γ. However, in the general case, the wide-band-limit breaks down, and the Lorentzian approximation is no longer valid. Here, we develop a new energy-dependent broadening function Γ (E) , based on diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices within a non-equilbrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. As defined, Γ (E) can describe resonances of non-Lorentzian nature and can be decomposed into components associated with the left and right leads, respectively; and it is particularly useful in understanding transport properties in terms of molecular orbitals in asymmetric junctions. We compute this quantity via an ab initio NEGF approach based on density functional theory and illustrate its utility with several junctions of experimental relevance, including recent work on rectification in Au-graphite junctions. This work is supported by the DOE, and computational resources are provided by NERSC.

  18. Temperature Dependent Electrical Transport Properties of Ni-Cr and Co-Cr Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Thakore, B. Y.; Khambholja, S. G.; Bhatt, N. K.; Jani, A. R.; Suthar, P. H.; Gajjar, P. N.

    2011-12-12

    The temperature dependent electrical transport properties viz. electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of Ni{sub 10}Cr{sub 90} and Co{sub 20}Cr{sub 80} alloys are computed at various temperatures. The electrical resistivity has been calculated according to Faber-Ziman model combined with Ashcroft-Langreth partial structure factors. In the present work, to include the ion-electron interaction, we have used a well tested local model potential. For exchange-correlation effects, five different forms of local field correction functions due to Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru and Utsumi (IU), Farid et al (F) and Sarkar et al (S) are used. The present results due to S function are in good agreement with the experimental data as compared to results obtained using other four functions. The S functions satisfy compressibility sum rule in long wave length limit more accurately as compared to T, IU and F functions, which may be responsible for better agreement of results, obtained using S function. Also, present result confirms the validity of present approach in determining the transport properties of alloys like Ni-Cr and Co-Cr.

  19. Temperature Dependent Electrical Transport Properties of Ni-Cr and Co-Cr Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakore, B. Y.; Suthar, P. H.; Khambholja, S. G.; Gajjar, P. N.; Bhatt, N. K.; Jani, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    The temperature dependent electrical transport properties viz. electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of Ni10Cr90 and Co20Cr80 alloys are computed at various temperatures. The electrical resistivity has been calculated according to Faber-Ziman model combined with Ashcroft-Langreth partial structure factors. In the present work, to include the ion-electron interaction, we have used a well tested local model potential. For exchange-correlation effects, five different forms of local field correction functions due to Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru and Utsumi (IU), Farid et al (F) and Sarkar et al (S) are used. The present results due to S function are in good agreement with the experimental data as compared to results obtained using other four functions. The S functions satisfy compressibility sum rule in long wave length limit more accurately as compared to T, IU and F functions, which may be responsible for better agreement of results, obtained using S function. Also, present result confirms the validity of present approach in determining the transport properties of alloys like Ni-Cr and Co-Cr.

  20. Na/sup +/-dependent transport of /sup 14/C-L-lysine across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Crandall, E.D.

    1986-03-01

    Transepithelial transport of the basic amino acid L-lysine has been studied utilizing the isolated intact bullfrog lung mounted in the Ussing chamber. Lungs were excised from doubly pithed bullfrogs and sandwiched between two hemichambers. /sup 14/C-(U)-L-lysine was added to the upstream reservoir of amphibian Ringer solution, while the tissue was short-circuited. Two lungs from the same animal were used simultaneously to determine the two opposite unidirectional fluxes. Downstream and upstream radioactivities were assayed and used to estimate the apparent permeability (P) of the labeled lysine. Results indicate that the apparent P of /sup 14/C-L-lysine measured in the alveolar (M) to the pleural (S) direction is 19.06 (+- 2.84) x 10/sup -7/ cm/s and P in the S to M direction is 3.29 (+- 0.02) x 10/sup -7/ cm/s. When the 100 mM NaCl in the bath was replaced by 110 mM choline chloride, the flux of /sup 14/C-L-lysine from the alveolar to the pleural side decreased to the same value as that in the opposite direction. The flux from the pleural to the alveolar direction in the absence of Na/sup +/ did not change. These results suggest that the alveolar epithelium exhibits Na/sup +/-dependent amino acid (L-lysine) transport in the M->S, but not in the S->M, direction.

  1. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  2. Theoretical studies of spin-dependent electrical transport through carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krompiewski, S.

    2006-11-01

    Spin-dependent coherent quantum transport through carbon nanotubes (CNT) is studied theoretically within a tight-binding model and the Green function partitioning technique. End-contacted metal/nanotube/metal systems are modelled and next studied in the magnetic context, i.e. either with ferromagnetic electrodes or in external magnetic fields. The former case shows that quite a substantial giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect occurs (±20%) for disorder-free CNTs. Anderson-disorder averaged GMR, in turn, is positive and reduced down to several per cent in the vicinity of the charge neutrality point. In parallel magnetic fields, characteristic Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations are revealed with pronounced features due to a combined effect of: length-to-perimeter ratio, unintentional electrode-induced doping, Zeeman splitting and energy-level broadening. In particular, a CNT is predicted to lose its ability to serve as a magneto-electrical switch when its length and perimeter become comparable. In the case of perpendicular geometry, there are conductance oscillations approaching asymptotically the upper theoretical limit to the conductance, 4e2/h. Moreover in the ballistic transport regime, initially the conductance increases only slightly with the magnetic field or remains nearly constant because spin up- and spin down-contributions to the total magnetoresistance partially compensate each other.

  3. Nitrogen-dependent posttranscriptional regulation of the ammonium transporter AtAMT1;1.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lixing; Loqué, Dominique; Ye, Fanghua; Frommer, Wolf B; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2007-02-01

    Ammonium transporter (AMT) proteins of the AMT family mediate the transport of ammonium across plasma membranes. To investigate whether AMTs are regulated at the posttranscriptional level, a gene construct consisting of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter driving the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AMT1;1 gene was introduced into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Ectopic expression of AtAMT1;1 in transgenic tobacco lines led to high transcript levels and protein levels at the plasma membrane and translated into an approximately 30% increase in root uptake capacity for 15N-labeled ammonium in hydroponically grown transgenic plants. When ammonium was supplied as the major nitrogen (N) form but at limiting amounts to soil-grown plants, transgenic lines overexpressing AtAMT1;1 did not show enhanced growth or N acquisition relative to wild-type plants. Surprisingly, steady-state transcript levels of AtAMT1;1 accumulated to higher levels in N-deficient roots and shoots of transgenic tobacco plants in spite of expression being controlled by the constitutive 35S promoter. Moreover, steady-state transcript levels were decreased after addition of ammonium or nitrate in N-deficient roots, suggesting a role for N availability in regulating AtAMT1;1 transcript abundance. Nitrogen deficiency-dependent accumulation of AtAMT1;1 mRNA was also observed in 35S:AtAMT1;1-transformed Arabidopsis shoots but not in roots. Evidence for a regulatory role of the 3'-untranslated region of AtAMT1;1 alone in N-dependent transcript accumulation was not found. However, transcript levels of AtAMT1;3 did not accumulate in a N-dependent manner, even though the same T-DNA insertion line atamt1;1-1 was used for 35S:AtAMT1;3 expression. These results show that the accumulation of AtAMT1;1 transcripts is regulated in a N- and organ-dependent manner and suggest mRNA turnover as an additional mechanism for the regulation of AtAMT1;1 in response to the N nutritional status of plants. PMID:17172286

  4. Association between low-activity serotonin transporter genotype and heroin dependence: behavioral and personality correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Garofano, L; Santoro, G; Bosari, S; Pellegrini, C; Zaimovic, A; Moi, G; Bussandri, M; Moi, A; Brambilla, F; Donnini, C

    2004-04-01

    In previous studies, serotonin (5-HT) system disturbance was found involved in a variety of behavioral disorders, psychopathologies, and substance use disorders. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the human serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) was recently identified and the presence of the short (S) allele found to be associated with a lower level of expression of the gene, lower levels of 5-HT uptake, type 2 alcoholism, violence and suicidal behavior. In the present study, 101 heroin addicts (males, West European, Caucasians) and 101 healthy control subjects matched for race and gender, with no history of substance use disorder, have been genotyped. Aggressiveness levels were measured in both heroin addicts and controls utilizing Buss-Durkee-Hostility-Inventory (BDHI). Data about suicide attempt and violent criminal behavior in subject history have been collected. The short-short (SS) genotype frequency was significantly higher among heroin dependent individuals compared with control subjects (P = 0.025). The odds ratio for the SS genotype versus the long-long (LL) genotype frequency was 0.69, 95% Cl (0.49-0.97), when heroin addicts were compared with healthy controls. The SS genotype frequency was significantly higher among violent heroin dependent individuals compared with addicted individuals without aggressive behavior (P = 0.02). BDHI mean total scores and suspiciousness and negativism subscales scores were significantly higher in SS individuals, in comparison with LL subjects, among heroin addicts. No association was found between SS genotype and suicide history. Our data suggest that a decreased expression of the gene encoding the 5-HTT transporter, due to "S" promoter polymorphism, may be associated with an increased risk for substance use disorders, particularly in the subjects with more consistent aggressiveness and impulsiveness. PMID:15048645

  5. Understanding pseudorapidity dependence of elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions using a transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasim, Md.; Esha, Roli; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2016-04-01

    A systematic study of the pseudorapidity dependence of elliptic flow parameter using transport models (e.g., a multiphase transport model, AMPT, and ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics, UrQMD) has been presented. We have observed that while at mid-pseudorapidity the elliptic flow measured using the event-plane method differs significantly from that measured by actual reaction plane method, both the event-plane and reaction-plane methods give the same elliptic flow for far forward and backward pseudorapidity. This indicates that the magnitude of measured v2 around midrapidity strongly depends on the analysis method. Therefore, one should use the same procedure (as used in data analysis) in model calculations while comparing model results and experimental data. We find the shape of v2(η ) measured by the PHOBOS experiment is not reproduced by using actual v2 (i.e., measured with respect to the reaction plane) from AMPT and UrQMD models. The shape and magnitude of measured v2(η ) can be explained by the AMPT model with string-melting mode only if one uses the same procedure as used in data analysis. Magnitude of elliptic flow can be reproduced for all pseudorapidity range by taking the parton-parton interaction cross section to be 3 mb at √{sN N}=62.4 and 200 GeV. This implies that the partonic interactions are necessary to reproduce data at √{sN N}=62.4 and 200 GeV and the strength of partonic interactions at far forward and backward rapidity is as strong as at midrapidity. Both UrQMD and AMPT with default mode fail to explain the data.

  6. Hepatic taurine transport: a Na/sup +/-dependent carrier on the basolateral plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bucuvalas, J.C.; Goodrich, A.L.; Suchy, F.J.

    1987-09-01

    Highly purified rat basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles were used examine the mechanism and the driving forces for hepatic uptake of the ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. An inwardly directed 100 mM NaCl gradient stimulated the initial rate of taurine uptake and energized a transient twofold accumulation of taurine above equilibrium (overshoot). In contrast, uptake was slower and no overshoot was detected in the presence of a KCl gradient. A negative intravesicular electrical potential generated by the presence of permeant anions or an outwardly directed K/sup +/ gradient with valinomycin increased Na/sup +/-stimulated taurine uptake. External Cl/sup -/ stimulated Na/sup +/-dependent taurine uptake independent of effects on the transmembrane electrical potential difference. Na/sup +/-dependent taurine uptake showed a sigmoidal dependence on extravesicular Na/sup +/ concentration, suggesting multiple Na/sup +/ ions are involved in the translocation of each taurine molecule. Na/sup +/-dependent taurine uptake demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a maximum velocity of 0.537 nmol x mg protein/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/ and an apparent K/sub m/ of 174 ..mu..M. (/sup 3/H)taurine uptake was inhibited by the presence of excess unlabeled taurine, ..beta..-alanine, or hypotaurine but not by L-glutamine or L-alanine. In summary, using basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles, the authors have shown that hepatic uptake of taurine occurs by a carrier-mediated, secondary active transport process specific for ..beta..-amino acids. Uptake is electrogenic, stimulated by external Cl/sup -/, and requires multiple Na/sup +/ ions for the translocation of each taurine molecule.

  7. Hepatic taurine transport: a Na+-dependent carrier on the basolateral plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Bucuvalas, J C; Goodrich, A L; Suchy, F J

    1987-09-01

    Highly purified rat basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles were used to examine the mechanism and the driving forces for hepatic uptake of the beta-amino acid, taurine. An inwardly directed 100 mM NaCl gradient stimulated the initial rate of taurine uptake and energized a transient twofold accumulation of taurine above equilibrium ("overshoot"). In contrast, uptake was slower and no overshoot was detected in the presence of a KCl gradient. A negative intravesicular electrical potential generated by the presence of permeant anions or an outwardly directed K+ gradient with valinomycin increased Na+-stimulated taurine uptake. External Cl- stimulated Na+-dependent taurine uptake independent of effects on the transmembrane electrical potential difference. Na+-dependent taurine uptake showed a sigmoidal dependence on extravesicular Na+ concentration, suggesting multiple Na+ ions are involved in the translocation of each taurine molecule. Na+-dependent taurine uptake demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a maximum velocity of 0.537 nmol.mg protein-1.min-1 and an apparent Km of 174 microM. [3H]taurine uptake was inhibited by the presence of excess unlabeled taurine, beta-alanine, or hypotaurine but not by L-glutamine or L-alanine. In summary, using basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles, we have shown that hepatic uptake of taurine occurs by a carrier-mediated, secondary active transport process specific for beta-amino acids. Uptake is electrogenic, stimulated by external Cl-, and requires multiple Na+ ions for the translocation of each taurine molecule. PMID:3631271

  8. Azimuthal anisotropy: Transition from hydrodynamic flow to jet suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, R.; PHENIX Collaboration, et al.

    2010-11-09

    Measured second and fourth azimuthal anisotropy coefficients v{sub 2,4}(N{sub part},p{sub T}) are scaled with the initial eccentricity {var_epsilon}{sub 2,4}(N{sub part}) of the collision zone and studied as a function of the number of participants N{sub part} and the transverse momenta p{sub T}. Scaling violations are observed for p{sub T} {le} 3 GeV/c, consistent with a p{sub T}{sup 2} dependence of viscous corrections and a linear increase of the relaxation time with p{sub T}. These empirical viscous corrections to flow and the thermal distribution function at freeze-out constrain estimates of the specific viscosity and the freeze-out temperature for two different models for the initial collision geometry. The apparent viscous corrections exhibit a sharp maximum for p{sub T} {ge} 3 GeV/c, suggesting a breakdown of the hydrodynamic ansatz and the onset of a change from flow-driven to suppression-driven anisotropy.

  9. Novel ATP-dependent calcium transport component from rat liver plasma membranes. The transporter and the previously reported (Ca2+-Mg2+)-ATPase are different proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, S H

    1985-07-01

    An ATP-dependent calcium transport component from rat liver plasma membranes was solubilized by cholate and reconstituted into egg lecithin vesicles by a cholate dialysis procedure. The uptake of Ca2+ into the reconstituted vesicles was ATP-dependent and the trapped Ca2+ could be released by A23187. Nucleotides, including ADP, UTP, GTP, CTP, GDP, AMP, and adenyl-5'-yl beta, gamma-imidophosphate, and p-nitrophenylphosphate did not substitute for ATP. The concentration of ATP required for half-maximal stimulation of Ca2+ uptake into the reconstituted vesicles was 6.2 microM. Magnesium was required for calcium uptake. Inhibitors of mitochondrial calcium-sequestering activities, i.e. oligomycin, sodium azide, ruthenium red, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, and valinomycin did not affect the uptake of Ca2+ into the vesicles. In addition, strophanthidin and p-chloromercuribenzoate did not affect the transport. Calcium transport, however, was inhibited by vanadate in a concentration-dependent fashion with a K0.5 of 10 microM. A calcium-stimulated, vanadate-inhibitable phosphoprotein was demonstrated in the reconstituted vesicles with an apparent molecular weight of 118,000 +/- 1,300. These properties of Ca2+ transport by vesicles reconstituted from liver plasma membranes suggest that this ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport component is different from the high affinity (Ca2+-Mg2+)-ATPase found in the same membrane preparation (Lotersztajn, S., Hanoune, J. and Pecker, F. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 11209-11215; Lin, S.-H., and Fain, J.N. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 3016-3020). When the entire reconstituted vesicle population was treated with ATP and 45Ca in a buffer containing oxalate, the vesicles with Ca2+ transport activity could be separated from other vesicles by centrifugation in a density gradient and the ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport component was purified approximately 9-fold. This indicates that transport-specific fractionation may be used to isolate the ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport component from liver plasma membrane. PMID:2409077

  10. Misorientation-angle-dependent electrical transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Perello, David J.; Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundaries in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have unique atomic defect structures and band dispersion relations that depend on the inter-domain misorientation angle. Here, we explore misorientation angle-dependent electrical transport at grain boundaries in monolayer MoS2 by correlating the atomic defect structures of measured devices analysed with transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that grain boundaries are primarily composed of 5-7 dislocation cores with periodicity and additional complex defects formed at high angles, obeying the classical low-angle theory for angles <22. The inter-domain mobility is minimized for angles <9 and increases nonlinearly by two orders of magnitude before saturating at ~16 cm2 V-1 s-1 around misorientation angle~20. This trend is explained via grain-boundary electrostatic barriers estimated from density functional calculations and experimental tunnelling barrier heights, which are ~0.5 eV at low angles and ~0.15 eV at high angles (>=20).

  11. Misorientation-angle-dependent electrical transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Perello, David J; Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundaries in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have unique atomic defect structures and band dispersion relations that depend on the inter-domain misorientation angle. Here, we explore misorientation angle-dependent electrical transport at grain boundaries in monolayer MoS2 by correlating the atomic defect structures of measured devices analysed with transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that grain boundaries are primarily composed of 5-7 dislocation cores with periodicity and additional complex defects formed at high angles, obeying the classical low-angle theory for angles <22. The inter-domain mobility is minimized for angles <9 and increases nonlinearly by two orders of magnitude before saturating at ?16?cm(2)?V(-1)?s(-1) around misorientation angle?20. This trend is explained via grain-boundary electrostatic barriers estimated from density functional calculations and experimental tunnelling barrier heights, which are ?0.5?eV at low angles and ?0.15?eV at high angles (?20). PMID:26813605

  12. Misorientation-angle-dependent electrical transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Perello, David J.; Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundaries in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have unique atomic defect structures and band dispersion relations that depend on the inter-domain misorientation angle. Here, we explore misorientation angle-dependent electrical transport at grain boundaries in monolayer MoS2 by correlating the atomic defect structures of measured devices analysed with transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that grain boundaries are primarily composed of 5–7 dislocation cores with periodicity and additional complex defects formed at high angles, obeying the classical low-angle theory for angles <22°. The inter-domain mobility is minimized for angles <9° and increases nonlinearly by two orders of magnitude before saturating at ∼16 cm2 V−1 s−1 around misorientation angle≈20°. This trend is explained via grain-boundary electrostatic barriers estimated from density functional calculations and experimental tunnelling barrier heights, which are ≈0.5 eV at low angles and ≈0.15 eV at high angles (≥20°). PMID:26813605

  13. Effect of temperature-dependent electrical conductivity on transport processes in magnetosolidmechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, G. T.; Arnas, O. A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of temperature-dependent electrical conductivity on transport processes for a solid block is analyzed on the basis of a one-dimensional steady-state model under specified thermal boundary conditions. Assumptions are that the solid has an infinitely segmented electrode configuration, the magnetic field (By) may be resolved into a constant applied field and an induced field, the gradient of the electrochemical potential is equal to the electrostatic potential, a constant potential difference is applied externally across each pair of opposite electrodes, and all material properties except electrical conductivity are constant. Conductivity is expressed in normalized form in terms of a baseline conductivity and a constant for the material. The application of the assumptions of the model to the general phenomenological relations yields the governing equations. Solution of these equations gives the distribution of temperature, electric current density, and magnetic field strength along the length of the solid. It is shown that significant differences exist between the case for constant electrical conductivity and the case where electrical conductivity is temperature dependent.

  14. A State Representation Approach for Atomistic Time-Dependent Transport Calculations in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelovich, Tamar; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-03-01

    A new method for simulating electron dynamics in open quantum systems out of equilibrium, motivated by the intuitive and practical nature of the damped Liouville von-Neumann equation approach of Sánchez et al. [J. Chem Phys, 124, 214708 (2006)], is presented. The new approach is based on a transformation of the Hamiltonian matrix from an atomistic to a state representation of the molecular junction. This allows us to define the bias voltage across the system uniquely while maintaining a proper thermal distribution within the lead models. Furthermore, it allows us to investigate time-dependent effects in non-linear and multi-lead configurations. We investigate the degree of conservation of exact conditions such as the N-representability of the density matrix and suggest ways to remedy the violation of Pauli's exclusion principle. We believe that the new approach offers a practical and physically sound route for performing atomistic time-dependent transport calculations in realistic models of molecular electronics junctions.

  15. Pseudorapidity dependence of short-range correlations from a multi-phase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei-Juan, Wang; Gang, Chen; Guo-Liang, Ma; Yuan-Fang, Wu

    2016-03-01

    Using a multi-phase transport model (AMPT) that includes both initial partonic and hadronic interactions, we study neighboring bin multiplicity correlations as a function of pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at . It is observed that for Au+Au collisions, the short-range correlations of final particles have a trough at central pseudorapidity, while for AuAu collisions, the short-range correlations of final particles have a peak at central pseudorapidity. Our findings indicate that the pseudorapidity dependence of short-range correlations should contain some new physical information, and are not a simple result of the pseudorapidity distribution of final particles. The AMPT results with and without hadronic scattering are compared. It is found that hadron scattering can only increase the short-range correlations to some level, but is not responsible for the different correlation shapes for different energies. Further study shows that the different pseudorapidity dependence of short-range correlations are mainly due to partonic evolution and the following hadronization scheme. Supported by GBL31512, Major State Basic Research Devolopment Program of China (2014CB845402), NSFC (11475149, 11175232, 11375251, 11421505, 11221504)

  16. PPAR? activation promotes macrophage reverse cholesterol transport through an LXR-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Tohyama, Junichiro; Naik, Snehal U; Tanigawa, Hiroyuki; Jaye, Michael; MacPhee, Colin; Billheimer, Jeffrey T; Rader, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Objective Peroxisome proliferator-activate receptor? (PPAR?) activation has been shown in vitro to increase macrophage cholesterol efflux, the initial step in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). However, it remains unclear whether PPAR? activation promotes macrophage RCT in vivo. Methods and Results We demonstrated that a specific potent PPAR? agonist GW7647 inhibited atherosclerosis and promoted macrophage RCT in hypercholesterolemic mice expressing the human apoA-I gene. We compared the effect of GW7647 on RCT in human apoA-I transgenic (hA-ITg) mice with wild-type (WT) mice and showed that the PPAR? agonist promoted RCT in hA-ITg mice to a much greater extent than in WT mice, indicating that human apoA-I expression is important for PPAR?-induced RCT. We further investigated the dependence of the macrophage PPAR?-LXR pathway on the promotion of RCT by GW7647. Primary murine macrophages lacking PPAR? or LXR abolished the ability of GW7647 to promote RCT in hA-ITg mice. In concert, the PPAR? agonist promoted cholesterol efflux and ABCA1/ABCG1 expression in primary macrophages and this was also by the PPAR?-LXR pathway. Conclusion Our observations demonstrate that a potent PPAR? agonist promotes macrophage RCT in vivo in a manner that is enhanced by human apoA-I expression and dependent on both macrophage PPAR? and LXR expression. PMID:21441141

  17. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Scale Dependent Transport Phenomena and Bioactivity in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, J. D.; Codd, S. L.; Romanenko, K. V.; Hornemann, J. A.; Brosten, T. R.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) provides the ability to obtain data on the pore scale via imaging and the sample scale by bulk measurement, allowing for connection between microscale dynamics and macroscale transport phenomena. This has led to MRM techniques becoming a preeminent method for characterization of dynamics in porous media. A significant question in modeling transport in porous media is definition of the porous media structure as homogeneous (ordered) or heterogeneous (disordered)[1]. One means of defining the 'complexity' of a porous media is based on the dynamics of the system[2]. The ability of MRM to measure the time dependent statistics of the dynamics [3,4,5] provides quantification of the pre-asymptotic dynamics. The transition from preasymptotic to Gaussian transport consistent with models of homogeneous porous media is clearly visualized. Biological activity in porous media, such as microbial growth, typically manifests itself as biofilms or colonies of microbes that adhere to surfaces and are surrounded by a hydrogel of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). The biofilm growth introduces complexity into the system structure in generation of physical pore blocking, trapping within the EPS gel, elastic interfaces due to the EPS and generation of channels in which faster flow occur. The hierarchy of length and time scales and multiple physical processes which are introduced by the biofilm growth impacts the porous media transport as reflected in the change in dynamics [6]. The transition can be modeled using statistical mechanical approaches based on continuous time random walk (CTRW) processes that generate fractional differential equations[7]. The bioactivity alters the structure of the porous media from homogeneous to heterogeneous resulting in the transition from a Gaussian to a non Gaussian subdiffusive dispersion process. References 1. M. Quintard and S. Whitaker, Transport in ordered and disordered porous media: Volume averaged equations, closure problems and comparison with experiment. Chemical Engineering Science, 48(14): 2537-2564 (1993). 2. N. Goldenfeld and L.P. Kadanoff, Simple lessons from complexity. Science, 284: 87-89 (1999). 3. J.D. Seymour and P.T. Callaghan, Generalized approach to NMR analysis of flow and dispersion in porous medium. AIChE Journal, 43: 2096-2111 (1997). 4. S.L. Codd, B. Manz, J.D. Seymour, and P.T. Callaghan, Taylor dispersion and molecular displacements in poiseuille flow. Physical Review E, 60(4): R3491-R3494 (1999). 5. P.T. Callaghan, Principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy. New York: Oxford University Press (1991). 6. G.K. Batchelor, Developments in microhydrodynamics, in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, W.T. Koiter, Editor. North-Holland: Amsterdam. p. 33-55 (1976). 7. J.D. Seymour, J.P. Gage, S.L. Codd, and R. Gerlach, Anomalous fluid transport in porous media induced by biofilm growth. Physical Review Letters, 93: 198103 (2004).

  18. Communication: Methane dissociation on Ni(111) surface: Importance of azimuth and surface impact site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiangjian; Zhang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Dong H.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the role of reactant ro-vibrational degrees of freedom (DOFs) in reaction dynamics of polyatomic molecular dissociation on metal surfaces is of great importance to explore the complex chemical reaction mechanism. Here, we present an expensive quantum dynamics study of the dissociative chemisorption of CH4 on a rigid Ni(111) surface by developing an accurate nine-dimensional quantum dynamical model including the DOF of azimuth. Based on a highly accurate fifteen-dimensional potential energy surface built from first principles, our simulations elucidate that the dissociation probability of CH4 has the strong dependence on azimuth and surface impact site. Some improvements are suggested to obtain the accurate dissociation probability from quantum dynamics simulations.

  19. Communication: Methane dissociation on Ni(111) surface: Importance of azimuth and surface impact site.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiangjian; Zhang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Dong H

    2016-03-14

    Understanding the role of reactant ro-vibrational degrees of freedom (DOFs) in reaction dynamics of polyatomic molecular dissociation on metal surfaces is of great importance to explore the complex chemical reaction mechanism. Here, we present an expensive quantum dynamics study of the dissociative chemisorption of CH4 on a rigid Ni(111) surface by developing an accurate nine-dimensional quantum dynamical model including the DOF of azimuth. Based on a highly accurate fifteen-dimensional potential energy surface built from first principles, our simulations elucidate that the dissociation probability of CH4 has the strong dependence on azimuth and surface impact site. Some improvements are suggested to obtain the accurate dissociation probability from quantum dynamics simulations. PMID:26979673

  20. Measurement of azimuthal hadron asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off unpolarised nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joerg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Orlov, I.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rychter, A.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szableski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2014-09-01

    Spin-averaged asymmetries in the azimuthal distributions of positive and negative hadrons produced in deep inelastic scattering were measured using the CERN SPS longitudinally polarised muon beam at 160 GeV/c and a 6LiD target. The amplitudes of the three azimuthal modulations cos⁡ϕh, cos⁡2ϕh and sin⁡ϕh were obtained binning the data separately in each of the relevant kinematic variables x, z or pTh and binning in a three-dimensional grid of these three variables. The amplitudes of the cos⁡ϕh and cos⁡2ϕh modulations show strong kinematic dependencies both for positive and negative hadrons.

  1. Radial and azimuthal dynamics of the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copper, Matthew

    The moon Io orbits Jupiter emitting neutral particles from its volcanic surface. This emission is ionized and forms the Io plasma torus around Jupiter. The variation of conditions at Io and Jupiter lead to variations in the content of the plasma in the torus. Volcanoes on Io's surface erupt and change the rate of neutral input. Hot electrons (30--100 eV), whose abundances vary in azimuth, create highly ionized species. Radial variation in subcorotation velocities, velocities less than that of the motion of the dipole magnetic field, creates shears while maintaining coherent radial structure in the torus. Poorly understood changes in plasma density circulate through the torus creating the anomalous System IV behavior that has a period slightly longer than the rotation of Jupiter's magnetic field. This thesis summarizes the research that has produced a two-dimensional physical chemistry model, tested several existing theories about subcorotation velocities, System IV variation, and hot electrons, and adopted new methods of Io plasma torus analysis. In an attempt to understand important dynamics, the thesis modeled differing scenarios such as an initialized two-peak structure, a subcorotation profile dictated by mass loading and ionospheric conductivity, and a critical combination of two populations of hot electrons that accurately mimics the observed System IV phenomenon. This model was also used to solve the inverse problem of determining the best fit for the model parameters, neutral source input rate and radial transport rate, using observations of density, temperature, and composition. In addition the thesis shows the need for multi-dimensional modeling and the results from its groundbreaking two-dimensional model.

  2. Temperature dependence of transport anisotropy of planar-type graphite nanostructures fabricated by focused ion beam.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Gunasekaran; Kim, Sang-Jae

    2011-01-01

    We report in this paper on the observation of temperature-dependent anisotropic transport behavior for planar-type nanostructures (in-plane and out-of-plane) fabricated on a thin graphite layer using a three-dimensional focused-ion-beam (FIB) etching technique. The transport characteristics were studied for several in-plane areas with sizes of 6 x 6 microm2, 6 x 4 microm2 and 6 x 2 microm2 planar-type structures/patterns and out-of-plane structures with the dimensions of 2 x 1 x 0.3 microm3. Both in-plane (rho(a)) and out-of-plane (rho(c)) resistivities are measured for these structures and the ratio of resistivity anisotropy is determined. The observed values of anisotropy ratio rho(c)/rho(a) were approximately 12.5 at 300 K and approximately 54 at 25 K. The room temperature value of rho(c)/rho(a) varies by a few orders from the values of previously reported anisotropy results of bulk pyrolytic graphite. However, the value of resistivity anisotropy increases with decreasing temperature, which is an identical behavior to bulk pyrolytic graphite. From current (I)-voltage (V) characteristics, we observed an ohmic behavior at 300 K for both low- and high-current biasing. This behavior turns into nonlinear characteristics when the temperature goes down. As these fabricated structures consist of multiple elementary junctions along the c-axis, nonlinear I-V characteristics result. The impurity assisted interlayer hopping conduction and thermal excitation of carriers play a key role in this effect. PMID:21446443

  3. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli inhibits ileal sodium-dependent bile acid transporter ASBT.

    PubMed

    Annaba, Fadi; Sarwar, Zaheer; Gill, Ravinder K; Ghosh, Amit; Saksena, Seema; Borthakur, Alip; Hecht, Gail A; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Alrefai, Waddah A

    2012-05-15

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) is responsible for the absorption of bile acids from the intestine. A decrease in ASBT function and expression has been implicated in diarrhea associated with intestinal inflammation. Whether infection with pathogenic microorganisms such as the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) affect ASBT activity is not known. EPEC is a food-borne enteric pathogen that translocates bacterial effector molecules via type three secretion system (TTSS) into host cells and is a major cause of infantile diarrhea. We investigated the effects of EPEC infection on ileal ASBT function utilizing human intestinal Caco2 cells and HEK-293 cells stably transfected with ASBT-V5 fusion protein (2BT cells). ASBT activity was significantly inhibited following 60 min infection with EPEC but not with nonpathogenic E. coli. Mutations in bacterial escN, espA, espB, and espD, the genes encoding for the elements of bacterial TTSS, ablated EPEC inhibitory effect on ASBT function. Furthermore, mutation in the bacterial BFP gene encoding for bundle-forming pili abrogated the inhibition of ASBT by EPEC, indicating the essential role for bacterial aggregation and the early attachment. The inhibition by EPEC was associated with a significant decrease in the V(max) of the transporter and a reduction in the level of ASBT on the plasma membrane. The inhibition of ASBT by EPEC was blocked in the presence of protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors. Our studies provide novel evidence for the alterations in the activity of ASBT by EPEC infection and suggest a possible effect for EPEC in influencing intestinal bile acid homeostasis. PMID:22403793

  4. Understanding the dependence of transport parameters on carrier concentration within a Gaussian density of states in molecular organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Kumar, P; Rani, V; Ray, N; Ghosh, S

    2016-06-15

    We study charge transport in molecular organic semiconductors using two terminal and three terminal field effect transistor devices. Using phthalocyanines as examples, we achieve unification of carrier mobility between the different configurations in a Gaussian density of states. We find that the current density-voltage characteristics for two terminal devices can be understood by introducing a concentration dependence of the carrier mobility, as described by Oelerich et al (2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 226403, 2010 Appl. Phys. Lett. 97 143302). Studying the evolution of the activation energy with the carrier density, we find results consistent with a percolation picture and a density dependent transport energy. PMID:27160656

  5. Open Quantum Transport and Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenewski, Justin; Zhao, Yanxiang; Chen, Hanning

    Sub-nanometer electronic devices are notoriously difficult to simulate, with the most widely adopted transport schemes predicting currents that diverge from experiment by several orders of magnitude. This deviation arises from numerous factors, including the inability of these methods to accommodate dynamic processes such as charge reorganization. A promising alternative entails the direct propagation of an electronic structure calculation, as exemplified by real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). Unfortunately this framework is inherently that of a closed system, and modifications must be made to handle incoming and outgoing particle fluxes. To this end, we establish a formal correspondence between the quantum master equation for an open, many-particle system and its description in terms of RT-TDDFT and non-Hermitian boundary potentials. By dynamically constraining the particle density within the boundary regions corresponding to the device leads, a simulation may be selectively converged to the non-equilibrium steady state associated with a given electrostatic bias. Our numerical tests demonstrate that this algorithm is both highly stable and readily integrated into existing electronic structure frameworks

  6. [Ruthenium red inhibits energy-dependent and passive Ca2+ transport in permeabilized smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Shinlova, O P; Kosterin, S A; Veklich, T A

    1996-08-01

    The effects of ruthenium red, pH, and sodium ions on active and passive Ca2+ transport were studied in digitonin-treated (0.1 mg/ml) suspension of myometrial cells using radiolabeled 45Ca2+. The inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation ruthenium red (10 microM) suppressed active accumulation of the cation in permeabilized myocytes by 78-85%. Ruthenium red-sensitive Ca2+ accumulation significantly (10-fold, mean) exceeds ruthenium red-resistant Mg2+, ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation assayed in the absence of oxalate and inhibited by 50 nM tapsigargin (blocker of endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump). Acidification of incubation medium (pH 8.0-6.0, Tris-malcate/KOH buffer) inhibits ruthenium red-sensitive active Ca2+ accumulation in permeabilized myocytes and passive release of this cation in the dilution medium after blockage of mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation by ruthenium red. Partial isotonic substitution of KCl (135-95 mM) with NaCl (15-55 mM) in incubation medium did not affect the initial rate of active ruthenium red-sensitive Ca2+ accumulation and the kinetics of passive Ca2+ release from permeabilized cells after blockade of active Ca2+ accumulation by ruthenium red. Mechanism of Ca2+ exchange in myometrial mitochondria is discussed. PMID:8962918

  7. Phonon-dependent transport through a serially coupled double quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Bagheri, Tagani; H. Rahimpour, Soleimani

    2014-05-01

    Using Keldysh nonequilibrium Green function formalism and mapping a many-body electron—phonon interaction onto a one body problem, the electron transport through a serially coupled double quantum dot system is analyzed. The influence of the electron—phonon interaction, temperature, detuning, and interdot tunneling on the transmission coefficient and current is studied. Our results show that the electron—phonon interaction results in the appearance of the side peaks in the transmission coefficient, whose height is strongly dependent on the phonon temperature. We have also found that the inequality of the electron—phonon interaction strength in two dots gives rise to an asymmetry in the current—voltage characteristic. In addition, the temperature difference between the phonon and electron subsystems results in the reduction of the saturated current and the destruction of the step-like behavior of the current. It is also observed that the detuning can improve the magnitude of the current by compensating the mismatch of the quantum dots energy levels induced by the electron—phonon interaction.

  8. Prandtl-Number Dependence of Heat Transport in Laminar Horizontal Convection.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Olga; Wagner, Sebastian

    2016-01-15

    We report the Prandtl-number (Pr) and Rayleigh-number (Ra) dependencies of the Reynolds number (Re) and mean convective heat transport, measured by the Nusselt number (Nu), in horizontal convection (HC) systems, where the heat supply and removal are provided exclusively through a lower horizontal surface of a fluid layer. For laminar HC, we find that Re∼Ra^{2/5}Pr^{-4/5}, Nu∼Ra^{1/5}Pr^{1/10} with a transition to Re∼Ra^{1/2}Pr^{-1}, Nu∼Ra^{1/4}Pr^{0} for large Pr. The results are based on direct numerical simulations for Ra from 3×10^{8} to 5×10^{10} and Pr from 0.05 to 50 and are explained by applying the Grossmann-Lohse approach [J. Fluid Mech. 407, 27 (2000)] transferred from the case of Rayleigh-Bénard convection to the case of laminar HC. PMID:26824542

  9. Temperature and force dependence of nanoscale electron transport via the Cu protein azurin.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjie; Sepunaru, Lior; Amdursky, Nadav; Cohen, Sidney R; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2012-12-21

    Solid-state electron transport (ETp) via a monolayer of immobilized azurin (Az) was examined by conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), as a function of both temperature (248-373K) and applied tip force (6-15 nN). At low forces, ETp via holo-Az (with Cu(2+)) is temperature-independent, but thermally activated via the Cu-depleted form of Az, apo-Az. While this observation agrees with those of macroscopic-scale measurements, we find that for holo-Az the mechanism of ETp at high temperatures changes upon an increase in the force applied by the tip to the proteins; namely, above 310 K and forces >6 nN ETp becomes thermally activated. This is in contrast to apo-Az, where increasing applied force causes only small monotonic increases in currents due to decreased electrode separation. The distinct ETp temperature dependence of holo- and apo-Az is assigned to a difference in structural response to pressure between the two protein forms. An important implication of these CP-AFM results (of measurements over a significant temperature range) is that for reliable ETp measurements on flexible macromolecules, such as proteins, the pressure applied during the measurements should be controlled or at least monitored. PMID:23136937

  10. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanism of Nucleotide-Dependent Activation of the KtrAB K+ Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Szollosi, Andras; Vieira-Pires, Ricardo S.; Teixeira-Duarte, Celso M.; Rocha, Rita; Morais-Cabral, João H.

    2016-01-01

    KtrAB belongs to the Trk/Ktr/HKT superfamily of monovalent cation (K+ and Na+) transport proteins that closely resemble K+ channels. These proteins underlie a plethora of cellular functions that are crucial for environmental adaptation in plants, fungi, archaea, and bacteria. The activation mechanism of the Trk/Ktr/HKT proteins remains unknown. It has been shown that ATP stimulates the activity of KtrAB while ADP does not. Here, we present X-ray structural information on the KtrAB complex with bound ADP. A comparison with the KtrAB-ATP structure reveals conformational changes in the ring and in the membrane protein. In combination with a biochemical and functional analysis, we uncover how ligand-dependent changes in the KtrA ring are propagated to the KtrB membrane protein and conclude that, despite their structural similarity, the activation mechanism of KtrAB is markedly different from the activation mechanism of K+ channels. PMID:26771197

  11. Size and Charge Dependence of Ion Transport in Human Nail Plate.

    PubMed

    Baswan, Sudhir M; Li, S Kevin; LaCount, Terri D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2016-03-01

    The electrical properties of human nail plate are poorly characterized yet are a key determinate of the potential to treat nail diseases, such as onychomycosis, using iontophoresis. To address this deficiency, molar conductivities of 17 electrolytes comprising 12 ionic species were determined in hydrated human nail plate in vitro. Cation transport numbers across the nail for 11 of these electrolytes were determined by the electromotive force method. Effective ionic mobilities and diffusivities at infinite dilution for all ionic species were determined by regression analysis. The ratios of diffusivities in nail to those in solution were found to correlate inversely with the hydrodynamic radii of the ions according to a power law relationship having an exponent of -1.75 ± 0.27, a substantially steeper size dependence than observed for similar experiments in skin. Effective diffusivities of cations in nail were 3-fold higher than those of comparably sized anions. These results reflect the strong size and charge selectivity of the nail plate for ionic conduction and diffusion. The analysis implies that efficient transungual iontophoretic delivery of ionized drugs having radii upward of 5 Å (molecular weight, ca. ≥340 Da) will require chemical or mechanical alteration of the nail plate. PMID:26886342

  12. State Representation Approach for Atomistic Time-Dependent Transport Calculations in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Zelovich, Tamar; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-08-12

    We propose a new method for simulating electron dynamics in open quantum systems out of equilibrium, using a finite atomistic model. The proposed method is motivated by the intuitive and practical nature of the driven Liouville-von-Neumann equation approach of Sánchez et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 214708] and Subotnik et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 144105]. A key ingredient of our approach is a transformation of the Hamiltonian matrix from an atomistic to a state representation of the molecular junction. This allows us to uniquely define the bias voltage across the system while maintaining a proper thermal electronic distribution within the finite lead models. Furthermore, it allows us to investigate complex molecular junctions, including multilead configurations. A heuristic derivation of our working equation leads to explicit expressions for the damping and driving terms, which serve as appropriate electron sources and sinks that effectively "open" the finite model system. Although the method does not forbid it, in practice we find neither violation of Pauli's exclusion principles nor deviation from density matrix positivity throughout our numerical simulations of various tight-binding model systems. We believe that the new approach offers a practical and physically sound route for performing atomistic time-dependent transport calculations in realistic molecular junction models. PMID:26588268

  13. MGS MAG/ER Data Analysis Using a Time and Magnetic Field Dependent Electron Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Mitchell, David L.; Nagy, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of that project was to examine certain details about the dayside electron environment at Mars as seen by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) magnetometer/electron reflectometer (MAG/ER) instrument. Specifically, we stated that we would use the Khazanov and Liemohn (K&L) kinetic electron transport model to analyze features in the observations. This code includes a non-uniform magnetic field and time-dependence in the result (different from most other models of this type). It was originally developed for electron motion along field lines in the Earth's magnetosphere (between conjugate ionospheres), and is thus quite appropriate for application to the Mars magnetic field scenario. Numerous code developments were implemented and the Mars version of the K&L model is fully operational. Initial results from this code have focused on the examination of MGS MAG/ER observations in the crustal field region when it is on the dayside. After several presentations at scientific meetings, this study culminated in a JGR publication last year.

  14. Spatial and temporal features of density-dependent contaminant transport: Experimental investigation and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoia, Andrea; Latrille, Christelle; Beccantini, Alberto; Cartadale, Alain

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the spatial and temporal features of variable-density contaminant plumes migration in porous materials. Our analysis is supported by novel experimental results concerning concentration profiles inside a vertical column setup that has been conceived at CEA to this aim. The experimental method relies on X-ray spectrometry, which allows determining solute profiles as a function of time at several positions along the column. The salient outcomes of the measurements are elucidated, with focus on miscible fluids in homogeneous saturated media. The role of the injected solution molarity is evidenced. As molarity increases, the solutes plume transport progressively deviates from the usual Fickian behavior, and pollutants distribution becomes skewed in the direction dictated by gravity. By resorting to a finite elements approach, we numerically solve the nonlinear equations that rule the pollutants migration: a good agreement is found between the simulated profiles and the experimental data. At high molarity, a strong dependence on initial conditions is found. Finally, we qualitatively explore the (unstable) interfacial dynamics between the dense contaminant plume and the lighter resident fluid that saturates the column, and detail its evolution for finite-duration contaminant injections.

  15. Numerical Study of Spin-Dependent Transport Through a Magnetic Quantum Wire with Lattice Vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2016-03-01

    The impact of lattice vacancy on the spin dependent transport properties of a magnetic-quantum wire (MQW) has been investigated. A simple tight binding Hamiltonian to describe the model is used, where the quantum wire is attached to two semi-infinite one-dimensional non-magnetic electrodes. Based on the Landauer-Buttiker formalism all the calculations are performed numerically which describe two-terminal conductance. The results suggest that in presence of vacancy the transmission reduces and vacancy creates quasilocalized states around zero energy (E f = 0). In order to investigate spin-filtering effect of (MQW), the degree of polarization in the presence and absences of vacancy has been studied. Also it is found that the effect of vacancy decreases when the size of MQW increases. The results show that a magnetic quantum wire can be used as a spin filter. The application of the predicted results may be useful in designing molecular spin-polarized transistors in the future.

  16. Mapping the Azimuth in the Brain through Many Channels or Just Two Populations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2003-03-01

    At the moment two neuronal algorithms as used by the auditory system are known(Physics Today, October 2002, pp. 13-14.) to map a sound source's azimuth in the brain by means of interaural time differences (ITDs). The Jeffress procedure (1948), which until recently was thought to be universal, assumes that a peak response occurs at those neurons where the neuronal delay offsets the acoustic delay between the two ears. These neurons then encode the position, a multi-channel coding since for a different direction other neurons take over. In small animals such as the gerbil the interaural distance is too small to resolve the azimuth through a neuronal peak response. Recently it was found(Physics Today, October 2002, pp. 13-14.) that a stimulus ITD is encoded instead by the amount of population activity depending monotonically on the azimuth angle. We present a theory (C. Leibold & J.L. van Hemmen, manuscript in preparation.) comprising both extremes and all that is in between, and explain how the corresponding, temporally amazingly precise (μs) neuronal interplay of excitation and inhibition arises during ontogeny.

  17. Azimuthal Directivity of Fan Tones Containing Multiple Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Nallasamy, M.

    1997-01-01

    The directivity of fan tone noise is generally measured and plotted in the sideline or flyover plane and it is assumed that this curve is the same for all azimuthal angles. When two or more circumferential (m-order) modes of the same tone are present in the fan duct, an interference pattern develops in the azimuthal direction both in the duct and in the farfield. In this investigation two m-order modes of similar power were generated in a large low speed fan. Farfield measurements and a finite element propagation code both show substantial variations in the azimuthal direction. Induct mode measurement were made and used as input to the code. Although these tests may represent a worst case scenario, the validity of the current practice of assuming axisymmetry should be questioned.

  18. Mapping Phase Velocities and Azimuthal Anisotropy of Rayleigh Waves in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Detrick, R. S.

    2002-05-01

    Using Rayleigh wave data recorded at both the HOTSPOT and the ICEMELT experiments in Iceland, we have applied the two-plane wave inversion technique and obtained phase velocities and azimuthal anisotropy from period 20 s to 100 s. The most striking feature is that the slow anomalies are generally confined beneath the Icelandic rift zones but not correlate with the plume center on the surface. Azimuthal anisotropy appears to be frequency dependent and also shows strong lateral variations especially between the western Iceland, the rift zones, and the eastern Iceland, as suggested by shear-wave splitting measurements. It is well known that tradeoffs exist between isotropic and anisotropic heterogeneity. We conducted resolution tests to estimate how robust the observed features of phase velocities and anisotropy are. Synthetic phase and amplitude data of Rayleigh waves were calculated from a typical phase velocity model that has low velocities beneath the Icelandic rift zones. Azimuthal anisotropy that uniformly distributes in the area or varies laterally by tectonic province was also included in the input models. The pattern of isotropic phase velocities with fast anomalies in the western and eastern Iceland and the slow in the rift zones is well recovered in both isotropic and anisotropic inversions. The azimuthal anisotropy larger than 1% in the input models can be largely retrieved. However, the amount of anisotropy when varying by tectonic province is not negligible in anisotropic solutions even for isotropic input models. Therefore, we suggest inverting synthetic data from the observed isotropic phase velocity models in order to detect whether the observed anisotropy reflects the real structure or the tradeoff with isotropic heterogeneity.

  19. A Barley Efflux Transporter Operates in a Na+-Dependent Manner, as Revealed by a Multidisciplinary Platform.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Yagnesh; Rongala, Jay; Luang, Sukanya; Singh, Abhishek; Shadiac, Nadim; Hayes, Julie; Sutton, Tim; Gilliham, Matthew; Tyerman, Stephen D; McPhee, Gordon; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Kirby, Nigel M; Lee, Jung-Goo; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Hrmova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and survival depend upon the activity of membrane transporters that control the movement and distribution of solutes into, around, and out of plants. Although many plant transporters are known, their intrinsic properties make them difficult to study. In barley (Hordeum vulgare), the root anion-permeable transporter Bot1 plays a key role in tolerance to high soil boron, facilitating the efflux of borate from cells. However, its three-dimensional structure is unavailable and the molecular basis of its permeation function is unknown. Using an integrative platform of computational, biophysical, and biochemical tools as well as molecular biology, electrophysiology, and bioinformatics, we provide insight into the origin of transport function of Bot1. An atomistic model, supported by atomic force microscopy measurements, reveals that the protein folds into 13 transmembrane-spanning and five cytoplasmic α-helices. We predict a trimeric assembly of Bot1 and the presence of a Na(+) ion binding site, located in the proximity of a pore that conducts anions. Patch-clamp electrophysiology of Bot1 detects Na(+)-dependent polyvalent anion transport in a Nernstian manner with channel-like characteristics. Using alanine scanning, molecular dynamics simulations, and transport measurements, we show that conductance by Bot1 is abolished by removal of the Na(+) ion binding site. Our data enhance the understanding of the permeation functions of Bot1. PMID:26672067

  20. A Barley Efflux Transporter Operates in a Na+-Dependent Manner, as Revealed by a Multidisciplinary Platform[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Yagnesh; Rongala, Jay; Luang, Sukanya; Shadiac, Nadim; Sutton, Tim; Tyerman, Stephen D.; McPhee, Gordon; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Lee, Jung-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and survival depend upon the activity of membrane transporters that control the movement and distribution of solutes into, around, and out of plants. Although many plant transporters are known, their intrinsic properties make them difficult to study. In barley (Hordeum vulgare), the root anion-permeable transporter Bot1 plays a key role in tolerance to high soil boron, facilitating the efflux of borate from cells. However, its three-dimensional structure is unavailable and the molecular basis of its permeation function is unknown. Using an integrative platform of computational, biophysical, and biochemical tools as well as molecular biology, electrophysiology, and bioinformatics, we provide insight into the origin of transport function of Bot1. An atomistic model, supported by atomic force microscopy measurements, reveals that the protein folds into 13 transmembrane-spanning and five cytoplasmic α-helices. We predict a trimeric assembly of Bot1 and the presence of a Na+ ion binding site, located in the proximity of a pore that conducts anions. Patch-clamp electrophysiology of Bot1 detects Na+-dependent polyvalent anion transport in a Nernstian manner with channel-like characteristics. Using alanine scanning, molecular dynamics simulations, and transport measurements, we show that conductance by Bot1 is abolished by removal of the Na+ ion binding site. Our data enhance the understanding of the permeation functions of Bot1. PMID:26672067

  1. Naturally occurring and forced azimuthal modes in a turbulent jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.; Reshotko, Eli

    1991-01-01

    Naturally occurring instability modes in an axisymmetric jet are studied utilizing the modal frequency spectrum method. In the early evolution of the jet the axisymmetric mode was predominant, with the azimuthal modes growing quickly but dominating only after the end of the potential core. The growth of the azimuthal modes is seen nearer to the nozzle exit for the jet in the laminar boundary layer case than for the turbulent. Based on the results from these naturally occurring jet instability mode tests, target modes for efficient excitation were determined and two cases of excitation were examined.

  2. The Role of Sodium-Dependent Glucose Transporter 1 and Glucose Transporter 2 in the Absorption of Cyanidin-3-O-β-Glucoside in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Tang-Bin; Feng, Dan; Song, Gang; Li, Hua-Wen; Tang, Huan-Wen; Ling, Wen-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanins have multiple biological activities of benefit to human health. While a few studies have been conducted to evaluate the bioavailability of anthocyanins, the mechanisms of their absorption mechanism remain ill-defined. In the present study, we investigated the absorption mechanism of cyanidin-3-O-β-glucoside (Cy-3-G) in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Cy-3-G transport was assessed by measuring the absorptive and efflux direction. Inhibition studies were conducted using the pharmacological agents, phloridzin, an inhibitor of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), or phloretin, an inhibitor of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2). The results showed that phloridzin and phloretin significantly inhibited the absorption of Cy-3-G. In addition, Caco-2 cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for SGLT1 or GLUT2 showed significantly decreased Cy-3-G absorption. These siRNA transfected cells also showed a significantly decreased rate of transport of Cy-3-G compared with the control group. These findings suggest that Cy-3-G absorption is dependent on the activities of SGLT1 and GLUT2 in the small intestine and that SGLT1 and GLUT2 could be a limiting step for the bioavailability of Cy-3-G. PMID:25314643

  3. The role of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 and glucose transporter 2 in the absorption of cyanidin-3-o-β-glucoside in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tang-Bin; Feng, Dan; Song, Gang; Li, Hua-Wen; Tang, Huan-Wen; Ling, Wen-Hua

    2014-10-01

    Anthocyanins have multiple biological activities of benefit to human health. While a few studies have been conducted to evaluate the bioavailability of anthocyanins, the mechanisms of their absorption mechanism remain ill-defined. In the present study, we investigated the absorption mechanism of cyanidin-3-O-β-glucoside (Cy-3-G) in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Cy-3-G transport was assessed by measuring the absorptive and efflux direction. Inhibition studies were conducted using the pharmacological agents, phloridzin, an inhibitor of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), or phloretin, an inhibitor of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2). The results showed that phloridzin and phloretin significantly inhibited the absorption of Cy-3-G. In addition, Caco-2 cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for SGLT1 or GLUT2 showed significantly decreased Cy-3-G absorption. These siRNA transfected cells also showed a significantly decreased rate of transport of Cy-3-G compared with the control group. These findings suggest that Cy-3-G absorption is dependent on the activities of SGLT1 and GLUT2 in the small intestine and that SGLT1 and GLUT2 could be a limiting step for the bioavailability of Cy-3-G. PMID:25314643

  4. Computational Models for Drug Inhibition of the Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid re-absorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, as well as a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested and their Ki values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or non-potent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  5. Computational models for drug inhibition of the human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid reabsorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, and a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested, and their K(i) values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or nonpotent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  6. Lactation stage-dependent expression of transporters in rat whole mammary gland and primary mammary epithelial organoids.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Samuel E; Alcorn, Jane

    2010-04-01

    Since solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play pivotal roles in the transport of both nutrients and drugs into breast milk, drug-nutrient transport interactions at the lactating mammary gland are possible. Our purpose was to characterize lactation stage-dependent changes in transporter expression in rat mammary gland and isolated mammary epithelial organoids (MEO) to provide additional insight for the safe use of maternal medications during breastfeeding. We used quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess the temporal expression patterns of SLC and ABC transporters in rat mammary gland and isolated MEO at different stages of lactation. In whole mammary gland five distinct patterns of expression emerged relative to late gestation: (i) decreasing throughout lactation (Mdr1a, Mdr1b, Mrp1, Octn2, Ent2, Ent3, Ncbt2, Mtx1); (ii) prominent increase in early lactation, which may remain elevated or decline with advancing lactation (Octn1, Cnt2, Cnt3, Ent1, Pept1, Pept2); (iii) constant but decreasing later in lactation (Octn3, Dmt1); (iv) increasing until mid-to-late lactation (Oct1, Cnt1); and (v) prominent increase late in lactation (Ncbt1). In isolated MEO (an enriched source of mammary epithelial cells) major differences in expression patterns were noted for Octn3, Ncbt1, and Mtx1, but otherwise were reasonably similar with the whole mammary gland. In conclusion our study augments existing data on transporter expression in the lactating mammary gland. These data should facilitate investigations into lactation-stage dependent changes in drug or nutrient milk-to-serum concentration ratios, the potential for drug- or disease-transporter interactions, and mechanistic studies of transporter function in the lactating mammary gland. PMID:19702690

  7. Surface harmonics method for two-dimensional time-dependent neutron transport problems of square-lattice nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    Time-dependent equations of the Surface Harmonics Method (SHM) have been derived from the time-dependent neutron transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons for solving the two-dimensional time-dependent problems. These equations have been realized in the SUHAM-TD code. The TWIGL benchmark problem has been used for verification of the SUHAM-TD code. The results of the study showed that computational costs required to achieve necessary accuracy of the solution can be an order of magnitude less than with the use of the conventional finite difference method (FDM). (authors)

  8. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    In this study, we show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of σ = 1.5 – 3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  9. Seed filling in domesticated maize and rice depends on SWEET-mediated hexose transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrate import into seeds directly determines seed size and must have been increased through domestication. However, evidence for domestication of sugar translocation and the identity of seed filling transporters remained elusive. Maize ZmSWEET4c, as opposed to its sucrose-transporting homologs...

  10. Control of Arabidopsis meristem development by thioredoxin-dependent regulation of intercellular transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell-to-cell transport in plants occurs through cytoplasmic channels called “plasmodesmata” and is regulated by developmental and environmental factors. Callose deposition modulates plasmodesmal transport in vivo, but little is known about the mechanisms that regulate this process. Here we report a ...

  11. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Lucy C.J.; Hawksworth, Gabrielle M.; Weaver, Richard J.

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD{sub 7.0}) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC{sub 50} values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein.

  12. Coherent quantum transport in disordered systems: II. Temperature dependence of carrier diffusion coefficients from the time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xinxin; Zhao, Yi; Cao, Jianshu

    2014-04-01

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method for carrier quantum dynamics (Zhong and Zhao 2013 J. Chem. Phys. 138 014111), a truncated version of the stochastic Schrödinger equation/wavefunction approach that approximately satisfies the detailed balance principle and scales well with the size of the system, is applied to investigate the carrier transport in one-dimensional systems including both the static and dynamic disorders on site energies. The predicted diffusion coefficients with respect to temperature successfully bridge from band-like to hopping-type transport. As demonstrated in paper I (Moix et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 085010), the static disorder tends to localize the carrier, whereas the dynamic disorder induces carrier dynamics. For the weak dynamic disorder, the diffusion coefficients are temperature-independent (band-like property) at low temperatures, which is consistent with the prediction from the Redfield equation, and a linear dependence of the coefficient on temperature (hopping-type property) only appears at high temperatures. In the intermediate regime of dynamic disorder, the transition from band-like to hopping-type transport can be easily observed at relatively low temperatures as the static disorder increases. When the dynamic disorder becomes strong, the carrier motion can follow the hopping-type mechanism even without static disorder. Furthermore, it is found that the memory time of dynamic disorder is an important factor in controlling the transition from the band-like to hopping-type motions.

  13. Azimuthal decorrelation of forward jets in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sabio Vera, Agustin; Schwennsen, Florian

    2008-01-01

    We study the azimuthal angle decorrelation of forward jets in deep inelastic scattering. We make predictions for this observable at HERA describing the high energy limit of the relevant scattering amplitudes with quasi-multi-Regge kinematics together with a collinearly-improved evolution kernel for multiparton emissions.

  14. Laser resonator supporting a nondiffracting, azimuthally polarized mode.

    PubMed

    Muys, Peter

    2012-07-01

    We analyze the lowest-order mode supported by a laser resonator containing an intra-cavity transmissive axicon using the Fox-Li iteration algorithm. Two configurations were considered. By proper choice of the cavity dimensions, the lowest-order mode is nondiffracting and azimuthally polarized. The mode pattern at the output coupler is a Bessel function of the first order. PMID:22743476

  15. 14 CFR 171.313 - Azimuth performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171... the coverage sector, the radiation from the scanning beam antenna must be of such a nature that.... EC15SE91.015 (5) Antenna far field pattern in the vertical plane. The azimuth antenna free space...

  16. 14 CFR 171.313 - Azimuth performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171... the coverage sector, the radiation from the scanning beam antenna must be of such a nature that.... EC15SE91.015 (5) Antenna far field pattern in the vertical plane. The azimuth antenna free space...

  17. Azimuthal correlations and alignment of particles in gamma families

    SciTech Connect

    Yuldashbaev, T. S. Chudakov, V. M.; Nuritdinov, Kh.

    2008-11-15

    Azimuthal angular correlations and the alignment of photons are studied in gamma families recorded by the Pamir Collaboration in a carbon x-ray emulsion chamber. The present interpretation of these experimental data is based on a model of semihard parton scattering in nucleon-nucleus collisions and on arguments favoring the production of exotic beam strings and heavy leading resonances undergoing quasicoplanar decays.

  18. Azimuthally acoustic logging tool to evaluate cementing quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junqiang; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Men, Baiyong; Wang, Ruijia; Wu, Jinping

    2014-08-01

    An azimuthally sensitive acoustic bond tool (AABT) uses a phased arc array transmitter that can provide directionally focused radiation. The acoustic sonde consists of a phased arc array transmitter and two monopole receivers, the spaces from the transmitter being 0.91 m and 1.52 m, respectively. The transmitter includes eight transducer sub-units. By controlling the high-voltage firing signal phase for each transmitter, the radiation energy of the phased arc array transducer can be focused in a single direction. Compared with conventional monopole and dipole transmitters, the new transmitter provides cement quality evaluation with azimuthal sensitivity, which is not possible with conventional cement bond log/variable density log tools. Laboratory measurements indicate that the directivity curves for the phased arc array and those computed theoretically are consistent and show good agreement. We acquire measurements from a laboratory cistern and from the field to validate the reliability and applicability of the AABT. Results indicate that the AABT accurately evaluates the azimuthal cement quality of case-cement interfaces by imaging the amplitude of the first-arrival wave. This tool visualizes the size, position and orientation of channeling and holes. In the case of good case-cement bonding, the AABT also evaluates the azimuthal cementing quality of the cement formation interface by imaging the amplitude of formation waves.

  19. Radial and Azimuthal Oscillations in Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harim; Moon, Yong-Jae; Nakariakov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    We present the first observational detection of radial and azimuthal oscillations in full halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs). We analyse nine HCMEs well-observed by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) from February to June, 2011. Using the LASCO C3 running difference images, we estimated the instantaneous apparent speeds of the HCMEs in different radial directions from the solar disk centre. We find that the development of all these HCMEs is accompanied with quasi-periodic variations of the instantaneous radial velocity with the periods ranging from 24 to 48 minutes. The amplitudes of the instant speed variations reach about a half of the projected speeds. The amplitudes are found to anti-correlate with the periods and correlate with the HCME speed, indicating the nonlinear nature of the process. The oscillations have a clear azimuthal structure in the heliocentric polar coordinate system. The oscillations in seven events are found to be associated with distinct azimuthal wave modes with the azimuthal wave number m=1 for six events and m=2 for one event. The polarisation of the oscillations in these seven HCMEs is broadly consistent with those of their position angles with the mean difference of 42.5 degree. The oscillations may be connected with natural oscillations of the plasmoids around a dynamical equilibrium, or self-oscillatory processes, e.g. the periodic shedding of Alfvénic vortices. Our results indicate the need for advanced theory of oscillatory processes in CMEs.

  20. Leptin Affects System A Amino Acid Transport Activity in the Human Placenta: Evidence for STAT3 Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    von Versen-Höynck, F.; Rajakumar, A.; Parrott, M.S.; Powers, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Amino acids are important nutrients during fetal development, and the activity of placental amino acid transporters is crucial in the regulation of fetal growth. Leptin, an adipocyte- and placenta-derived hormone, has been proposed to act as a peripheral signal in reproduction in humans. Leptin is elevated during pregnancy and elevated further in pathologic pregnancies such as preeclampsia. However, the role of leptin in placental function has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that leptin plays a role in the regulation of placental amino acid transport by activation of the JAK-STAT pathway. Methods: Placental amino acid transport, specifically system A transport was studied in placental villous fragments using the amino acid analog, methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB). Specific inhibitors of the JAK-STAT signal transduction pathway were used to further elucidate their role in leptin-mediated effects on amino acid transport activity. Western blotting was performed to identify STAT3 phosphorylation as a measure of leptin receptor activation. Results: Leptin significantly increased system A amino acid transporter activity by 22-42% after 1 h of incubation. Leptin activated JAK-STAT signaling pathway as evidenced by STAT3 phosphorylation, and inhibition of STAT3 or JAK2 resulted in 36-45% reduction in system A amino acid transporter activity. Furthermore, blocking endogenously produced leptin also decreased system A transport by 45% comparable to STAT3 inhibition. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that leptin stimulates system A by JAK-STAT dependent pathway in placental villous fragments. Our findings support the autocrine/paracrine role of leptin in regulating amino acid transport in the human placenta. PMID:19203792

  1. Temperature-dependent effects of cholesterol on sodium transport through lipid membranes by an ionizable mobile carrier.

    PubMed

    Wehrli, S; Ramirez, C; Kraus, J L; Castaing, M

    1992-06-30

    Temperature-jump relaxation experiments on Na+ transport by (221)C10-cryptand were carried out in order to study the influence of cholesterol and its temperature-dependence on ion transport through thin lipid membranes. The experiments were performed on large, negatively charged unilamellar vesicles (LUV) prepared from mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, phosphatidic acid and cholesterol (mole fractions 0-0.43), at various temperatures and carrier concentrations. The initial rates of Na+ transport and the apparent rate constants of its translocation by (221)C10 increased with the carrier concentration and the temperature. The incorporation of cholesterol into the membranes significantly reduced the carrier concentration- and temperature-dependence of these two parameters. The apparent energy required to activate the transport decreased significantly with increasing carrier concentrations at any given cholesterol molar fraction, and increased significantly with the cholesterol molar fraction at any given carrier concentration. Our interpretation of the action of cholesterol on this transport system is based on the assumption that the binding cavity of cryptands is likely to be located towards the aqueous side of the dipole layer. The results are discussed in terms of the structural, physico-chemical and electrical characteristics of carriers and complexes, and of the interactions occurring between an ionizable mobile carrier and the membrane. PMID:1504075

  2. Steady-state and time-dependent modelling of parallel transport in the scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havl?kov, E.; Fundamenski, W.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A. H.; Zagrski, R.; Seidl, J.; Hor?ek, J.

    2011-06-01

    The one-dimensional fluid code SOLF1D has been used for modelling of plasma transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) along magnetic field lines, both in steady state and under transient conditions that arise due to plasma turbulence. The presented work summarizes results of SOLF1D with attention given to transient parallel transport which reveals two distinct time scales due to the transport mechanisms of convection and diffusion. Time-dependent modelling combined with the effect of ballooning shows propagation of particles along the magnetic field line with Mach number up to M ? 1 and supersonic transport when plasma-neutral interactions are not present. Asymmetric heat and particle fluxes are analysed for a case with poloidally asymmetric radial outflow (ballooning) and for a radial outflow with parallel momentum (rotation). In addition, parallel damping of the density and electron temperature calculated in SOLF1D is compared with the approximative model used in the turbulence code ESEL both for steady-state and turbulent SOL. Dynamics of the parallel transport are investigated for a simple transient event simulating the propagation of particles and energy to the targets from a blob passing across the flux tube at the outboard midplane and for more complex time-dependent data provided by ESEL.

  3. Sequence relationships between integral inner membrane proteins of binding protein-dependent transport systems: evolution by recurrent gene duplications.

    PubMed Central

    Saurin, W.; Dassa, E.

    1994-01-01

    Periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport systems are composed of a periplasmic substrate-binding protein, a set of 2 (sometimes 1) very hydrophobic integral membrane proteins, and 1 (sometimes 2) hydrophilic peripheral membrane protein that binds and hydrolyzes ATP. These systems are members of the superfamily of ABC transporters. We performed a molecular phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of 70 hydrophobic membrane proteins of these transport systems in order to investigate their evolutionary history. Proteins were grouped into 8 clusters. Within each cluster, protein sequences displayed significant similarities, suggesting that they derive from a common ancestor. Most clusters contained proteins from systems transporting analogous substrates such as monosaccharides, oligopeptides, or hydrophobic amino acids, but this was not a general rule. Proteins from diverse bacteria are found within each cluster, suggesting that the ancestors of current clusters were present before the divergence of bacterial groups. The phylogenetic trees computed for hydrophobic membrane proteins of these permeases are similar to those described for the periplasmic substrate-binding proteins. This result suggests that the genetic regions encoding binding protein-dependent permeases evolved as whole units. Based on the results of the classification of the proteins and on the reconstructed phylogenetic trees, we propose an evolutionary scheme for periplasmic permeases. According to this model, it is probable that these transport systems derive from an ancestral system having only 1 hydrophobic membrane protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8003968

  4. Cloning and molecular characterization of the ontogeny of a rat ileal sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Shneider, B L; Dawson, P A; Christie, D M; Hardikar, W; Wong, M H; Suchy, F J

    1995-01-01

    Sodium-dependent bile acid transport in the rat ileum is abruptly expressed at weaning. Degenerate oligonucleotides, based on amino acid sequence identities between the rat liver and hamster ileal transporters, were used to amplify a rat ileal probe. A 1.2-kb cDNA clone, which contains the full coding region (348 amino acids, 38 kD), was isolated by hybridization screening. In vitro translation yielded a 38-kD protein which glycosylated to 48 kD. Sodium-dependent uptake of taurocholate was observed in oocytes injected with cRNA. Northern blot analysis revealed a 5.0-kb mRNA in ileum, kidney, and cecum. A 48-kD protein was detected in ileal brush border membranes and localized to the apical border of villus ileal enterocytes. mRNA and protein expression, which were negligible before weaning, increased dramatically at weaning. Nuclear transcription rates for the transporter increased 15-fold between postnatal days 7 and 28. The apparent molecular weight of the transporter also increased between days 19 and 28. In summary, the developmental regulation of the rat ileal sodium-dependent bile acid cotransporter is characterized by transcriptionally regulated increases in mRNA and protein levels at the time of weaning with changes in apparent molecular weight of the protein after weaning. Images PMID:7860756

  5. Charge transport perpendicular to the high mobility plane in organic crystals: Bandlike temperature dependence maintained despite hundredfold anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blülle, B.; Troisi, A.; Häusermann, R.; Batlogg, B.

    2016-01-01

    Charge carrier mobility in van der Waals bonded organic crystals is strongly dependent on the transfer integral between neighboring molecules, and therefore the anisotropy of charge transport is determined by the molecular arrangement within the crystal lattice. Here we report on temperature dependent transport measurements along all three principal crystal directions of the same rubrene single crystals of high purity. Hole mobilities are obtained from the carrier transit time measured with high-frequency admittance spectroscopy perpendicular to the molecular layers (μc) and from the transfer characteristics of two field-effect transistor (FET) structures oriented perpendicularly to each other in the layers (μa and μb). While the measurements of the field-effect channels confirm the previously reported high mobility and anisotropy within the a b plane, we find the mobility perpendicular to the molecular layers in the same crystals to be lower by about two orders of magnitude (μc˜0.2 cm2/Vs at 300 K ). Although the bandwidth is vanishingly small along the c direction and the transport cannot be coherent, we find μc to increase upon cooling. We show that the delocalization within the high mobility a b plane prevents the formation of small polarons and leads to the observed "bandlike" temperature dependence also in the direction perpendicular to the molecular layers, despite the incoherent transport mechanism.

  6. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  7. A two-dimensional, time-dependent model of suspended sediment transport and bed reworking for continental shelves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, C.K.; Wiberg, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional, time-dependent solution to the transport equation is formulated to account for advection and diffusion of sediment suspended in the bottom boundary layer of continental shelves. This model utilizes a semi-implicit, upwind-differencing scheme to solve the advection-diffusion equation across a two-dimensional transect that is configured so that one dimension is the vertical, and the other is a horizontal dimension usually aligned perpendicular to shelf bathymetry. The model calculates suspended sediment concentration and flux; and requires as input wave properties, current velocities, sediment size distributions, and hydrodynamic sediment properties. From the calculated two-dimensional suspended sediment fluxes, we quantify the redistribution of shelf sediment, bed erosion, and deposition for several sediment sizes during resuspension events. The two-dimensional, time-dependent approach directly accounts for cross-shelf gradients in bed shear stress and sediment properties, as well as transport that occurs before steady-state suspended sediment concentrations have been attained. By including the vertical dimension in the calculations, we avoid depth-averaging suspended sediment concentrations and fluxes, and directly account for differences in transport rates and directions for fine and coarse sediment in the bottom boundary layer. A flux condition is used as the bottom boundary condition for the transport equation in order to capture time-dependence of the suspended sediment field. Model calculations demonstrate the significance of both time-dependent and spatial terms on transport and depositional patterns on continental shelves. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sodium-dependent net urea transport in rat initial inner medullary collecting ducts.

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, T; Lea, J P; Tumlin, J A; Sands, J M

    1994-01-01

    We reported that feeding rats 8% protein for 3 wk induces net urea transport and morphologic changes in initial inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCDs) which are not present in rats fed 18% protein. In this study, we measured net urea transport in microperfused initial IMCDs from rats fed 8% protein for > or = 3 wk and tested the effect of inhibiting Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity and found that adding 1 mM ouabain to the bath reversibly inhibited net urea transport from 14 +/- 3 to 6 +/- 2 pmol/mm per min (P < 0.01), and that replacing potassium (with sodium) in the bath reversibly inhibited net urea transport from 18 +/- 3 to 5 +/- 0 pmol/mm per min (P < 0.01). Replacing perfusate sodium with N-methyl-D-glucamine reversibly inhibited net urea transport from 12 +/- 2 to 0 +/- 1 pmol/mm per min (P < 0.01), whereas replacing bath sodium had no significant effect on net urea transport. Adding 10 nM vasopressin to the bath exerted no significant effect on net urea transport. Finally, we measured Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity in initial and terminal IMCDs from rats fed 18% or 8% protein and found no significant difference in either subsegment. Thus, net urea transport in initial IMCDs from rats fed 8% protein for > or = 3 wk requires sodium in the lumen, is reduced by inhibiting Na+/K(+)-ATPase, and is unchanged by vasopressin or phloretin. These results suggest that net urea transport may occur via a novel, secondary active, sodium-urea cotransporter. PMID:7929827

  9. Breaking symmetry in propagation of radially and azimuthally polarized high power laser pulses in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Naveen; Zhidkov, Alexei; Nakanii, Nobuhiko; Masuda, Shinichi; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2016-03-01

    Propagation of relativistically intense azimuthally or radially polarized laser pulses (RPP) is demonstrated, via 3D particle-in-cell simulations, to be unstable in uniform underdense plasma. Strong breaking of the pulse symmetry occurs for RPP with power exceeding the critical one for self-focusing in transversely uniform plasma with an increment, Γ, close to the well-known Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability depending on the acceleration, α, and the modulated density gradient length, L, as Γ≈(α/L) 1 /2 . In deeper plasma channels, the instability vanishes. Electron self-injection in the pulse wake and resulting acceleration is explored.

  10. Systematic Azimuth Quadrupole and Minijet Trends from Two-Particle Correlations in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettler, David

    Heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) produce a tremendous amount of data but new techniques are necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the physics behind these collisions. We present measurements from the STAR detector of both pt-integral and pt-differential azimuth two-particle correlations on azimuth (phi) and pseudorapidity (eta) for unidentified hadrons in Au-Au collisions at a center of mass energy = 62 and 200 GeV. The azimuth correlations can be fit to extract a quadrupole component--related to conventional v2 measures--and a same-side peak. The azimuth quadrupole component is distinguished from eta-localized same-side correlations by taking advantage of the full 2D eta and phi dependence. Both pt-integral and pt-differential results are presented as functions of Au-Au centrality. We observe simple universal energy and centrality trends for the pt-integral quadrupole component. pt-differential results can be transformed to reveal quadrupole pt spectra that are nearly independent of centrality. A parametrization of the pt-differential quadrupole shows a simple pt dependence that can be factorized from the centrality and collision energy dependence above 0.75 GeV/c. Angular correlations contain jet-like structure with most-probable hadron momentum 1 GeV/c. For better comparison to RHIC data we analyze the energy scale dependence of fragmentation functions from e+-e - collisions on rapidity y. We find that replotting fragmentation functions on a normalized rapidity variable results in a compact form precisely represented by the beta distribution, its two parameters varying slowly and simply with parton energy scale Q. The resulting parameterization enables extrapolation of fragmentation functions to low Q in order to describe fragment distributions at low transverse momentum ptin heavy ion collisions at RHIC. We convert minimum-bias jet-like angular correlations to single-particle hadron yields and compare them with parton fragment yields inferred from differential spectrum analysis (spectrum hard components). We find that jet-like correlations in central 200 GeV Au-Au collisions correspond quantitatively to pQCD predictions, and the jet-correlated hadron yield comprises one third of the Au-Au final state in central collisions.

  11. Measurement of hadron azimuthal distributions in deep inelastic muon proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; de Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S.; Brück, H.; Calen, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Conrad, J.; Coughlan, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Edwards, M.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Flauger, W.; Foster, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Gayler, J.; Geddes, N.; Grafström, P.; Grard, F.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Jaffre, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jancso, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kellner, G.; Korbel, V.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pavel, N.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Peschel, H.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pönsgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Scheer, M.; Sandacz, A.; Schlagböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schröder, T.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thénard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; de La Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.

    1987-09-01

    A study of the distribution of the azimuthal angle ϕ of charged hadrons in deep inelastic μ- p scattering is presented. The dependence of the moments of this distribution on the Feynman x variable and the momentum transverse to the virtual photon indicates that non-zero moments arise mainly from the effects of the intrinsic K T of the struck quark with < K {/T 2}>>≳(0.44 GeV)2, and to a lesser extent from QCD processes. No significant variation with Q 2 or W 2 is observed.

  12. CLIP-170-dependent capture of membrane organelles by microtubules initiates minus-end directed transport

    PubMed Central

    Lomakin, Alexis J.; Semenova, Irina; Zaliapin, Ilya; Kraikivski, Pavel; Nadezhdina, Elena; Slepchenko, Boris M.; Akhmanova, Anna; Rodionov, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cytoplasmic microtubules (MTs) continuously grow and shorten at free plus ends. During mitosis, this dynamic behavior allows MTs to capture chromosomes to initiate their movement to the spindle poles, however, the role of MT dynamics in capturing organelles for transport in interphase cells has not been demonstrated. Here we used Xenopus melanophores to test the hypothesis that MT dynamics significantly contribute to the efficiency of MT minus-end directed transport of membrane organelles. We demonstrated that initiation of transport of membrane-bounded melanosomes (pigment granules) to the cell center involves their capture by MT plus ends, and that inhibition of MT dynamics or loss of the MT plus-end tracking protein CLIP-170 from MT tips dramatically inhibits pigment aggregation. We conclude that MT dynamics are required for the initiation of MT transport of membrane organelles in interphase cells, and that +TIPs such as CLIP-170 play an important role in this process. PMID:19758557

  13. *Iron accumulation in bronchial epithelial cells is dependent on concurrent sodium transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airway epithelial cells prevent damaging effects of extracellular iron by taking up the metal and sequestering it within intracellular ferritin. Epithelial iron transport is associated with transcellular movement of other cations including changes in the expression or activity of...

  14. Kinetics of bidirectional H+ and substrate transport by the proton-dependent amino acid symporter PAT1.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Martin; Mertl, Manuela; Dietz, Veronika; Boll, Michael; Kottra, Gabor; Daniel, Hannelore

    2005-03-15

    PAT1 is a recently identified member of the PAT family of proton/amino acid co-transporters with predominant expression in the plasma membrane of enterocytes and in lysosomal membranes of neurons. Previous studies in Xenopus oocytes expressing PAT1 established proton/substrate co-transport associated with positive inward currents for a variety of small neutral amino acids. Here we provide a detailed analysis of the transport mode of the murine PAT1 in oocytes using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique to measure steady-state and pre-steady-state currents. The GPC (giant patch clamp) technique and efflux studies were employed to characterize the reversed transport mode. Kinetic parameters [K(m) (Michaelis constant) and I(max) (maximum current)] for transport of various substrates revealed a dependence on membrane potential: hyperpolarization increases the substrate affinity and maximal transport velocity. Proton affinity for interaction with PAT1 is almost 100 nM, corresponding to a pH of 7.0 and is independent of substrate. Kinetic analysis revealed that binding of proton most likely occurs before substrate binding and that the proton and substrate are translocated in a simultaneous step. No evidence for a substrate-uncoupled proton shunt was observed. As shown by efflux studies and current measurements by the GPC technique, PAT1 allows bidirectional amino acid transport. Surprisingly, PAT1 exhibits no pre-steady-state currents in the absence of substrate, even at low temperatures, and therefore PAT1 takes an exceptional position among the ion-coupled co-transporters. PMID:15504109

  15. Seismic azimuthal anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere from broadband surface wave analysis of OBS array records at 60 Ma seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, A.; Kawakatsu, H.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Sugioka, H.; Ito, A.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed seismic ambient noise and teleseismic waveforms of nine broadband ocean bottom seismometers deployed at a 60 Ma seafloor in the southeastward of Tahiti island, the South Pacific, by the Tomographic Investigation by seafloor ARray Experiment for the Society hotspot project. We first obtained one-dimensional shear wave velocity model beneath the array from average phase velocities of Rayleigh waves at a broadband period range of 5-200 s. The obtained model shows a large velocity reduction at depths between 40 and 80 km, where the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary might exist. We then estimated shear wave azimuthal anisotropy at depths of 20-100 km by measuring azimuthal dependence of phase velocities of Rayleigh waves. The obtained model shows peak-to-peak intensity of the azimuthal anisotropy of 2%-4% with the fastest azimuth of NW-SE direction both in the lithosphere and asthenosphere. This result suggests that the ancient flow frozen in the lithosphere is not perpendicular to the strike of the ancient mid-ocean ridge but is roughly parallel to the ancient plate motion at depths of 20-60 km. The fastest azimuths in the current asthenosphere are subparallel to current plate motion at depths of 60-100 km. Additional shear wave splitting analysis revealed possible perturbations of flow in the mantle by the hot spot activities and implied the presence of azimuthal anisotropy in the asthenosphere down to a depth of 190-210 km.

  16. Range ambiguity suppression for multiple-input, multiple-output synthetic aperture radar system using azimuth phase coding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Robert; Deng, Yunkai; Wang, Wei; Luo, Xiulian

    2014-01-01

    For synthetic aperture radar (SAR), range ambiguity causes a great deterioration in imaging performance. To suppress range ambiguity, the azimuth phase coding (APC) technique stands out for its effectiveness with a low implementation complexity among the available approaches. With proper phase modulation and demodulation, the position of an ambiguous signal is shifted in Doppler spectrum and then part of the ambiguity can be filtered out by an azimuth filter. However, since the suppression performance heavily depends on the system oversampling rate, the APC technique cannot achieve the same suppression performance for a multichannel SAR system compared with a single-channel SAR system. A method to suppress the range ambiguity for multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) SAR system based on APC technique is presented. By taking advantage of more phase centers of the MIMO SAR, a proper azimuth beamformer weight vector can be computed to null out the ambiguity position in the azimuth frequency domain and reconstruct the useful signal; thus most of the ambiguity components can be significantly suppressed. Finally, the simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Adaptation of epithelial sodium-dependent phosphate transport in jejunum and kidney of hens to variations in dietary phosphorus intake.

    PubMed

    Huber, K; Hempel, R; Rodehutscord, M

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the homeostatic response of jejunal and renal epithelia regarding the inorganic phosphate (P(i)) transport capacities to variations in dietary total phosphorus (tP) supply in hens. Adaptive processes were determined by quantitative measures of intake and excretion, P(i) transport studies across brush border membranes, and semiquantitative detection of sodium-dependent phosphate transporters (NaPi II) based on mRNA expression in the jejunum and kidney. Twelve hens (4/group) were adapted to 3 tP feeding levels in a pair-fed manner (60 g/d): low P diet with 0.073% tP, medium P diet with 0.204% tP, and high P diet with 0.343% tP. Excretion was measured during the last 5 d of a 16-d feeding period. After slaughtering, jejunal mucosa and renal cortex were removed. Tissues were used for (32)P uptake studies in brush-border membrane vesicles by rapid filtration technique and NaPi II mRNA expression studies by northern analyses. Plasma P(i) concentrations were additionally measured. The NaPi II transporter mRNA could specifically be detected in chicken jejunum and kidney. Functional parameters of Na(+)-dependent P(i) transport indicated that these transporters were involved in chicken P(i) transport across the apical membranes of jejunal and renal epithelia. Increased tP intake resulted in an increased overall tP excretion. Correlating individual data from all animals by linear regression highlighted that the adaptive decrease of renal P(i) transport capacity and NaPi IIa mRNA expression was associated with an increase in plasma P(i) levels and resulted in a higher tP excretion. Jejunal P(i) transport capacity and NaPi IIb mRNA expression did not react to variations in dietary tP supply. In conclusion, the homeostatic response was mainly based on the adaptive capacity of the kidney in hens. PMID:17032833

  18. Field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip simultaneously exposed to transport current and perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Cun; He, An; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-12-01

    We present an exact analytical approach for arbitrary field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip with transport current. The sheet current and flux-density profiles are derived by solving the integral equations, which agree with experiments quite well. For small transport current, the approximate explicit expressions of sheet current, flux-density and penetration depth for the Kim model are derived based on the mean value theorem for integration. We also extend the results to the field-dependent critical state of superconducting strip in the simultaneous presence of applied field and transport current. The sheet current distributions calculated by the Kim model agree with experiments better than that by the Bean model. Moreover, the lines in the Ia-Ba plane for the Kim model are not monotonic, which is quite different from that the Bean model. The results reveal that the maximum transport current in thin superconducting strip will decrease with increasing applied field which vanishes for the Bean model. The results of this paper are useful to calculate ac susceptibility and ac loss.

  19. Field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip simultaneously exposed to transport current and perpendicular magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Cun; He, An; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-12-15

    We present an exact analytical approach for arbitrary field-dependent critical state of high-T{sub c} superconducting strip with transport current. The sheet current and flux-density profiles are derived by solving the integral equations, which agree with experiments quite well. For small transport current, the approximate explicit expressions of sheet current, flux-density and penetration depth for the Kim model are derived based on the mean value theorem for integration. We also extend the results to the field-dependent critical state of superconducting strip in the simultaneous presence of applied field and transport current. The sheet current distributions calculated by the Kim model agree with experiments better than that by the Bean model. Moreover, the lines in the I{sub a}-B{sub a} plane for the Kim model are not monotonic, which is quite different from that the Bean model. The results reveal that the maximum transport current in thin superconducting strip will decrease with increasing applied field which vanishes for the Bean model. The results of this paper are useful to calculate ac susceptibility and ac loss.

  20. Current-direction dependence of the transport properties in single-crystalline face-centered-cubic cobalt films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Liang, J. H.; Chen, B. L.; Li, J. X.; Ma, D. H.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2015-07-01

    Face-centered-cubic cobalt films are epitaxially grown on insulating LaAlO3(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Transport measurements are conducted in different current directions relative to the crystal axes. We find that the temperature dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio strongly depends on the current direction. However, the anomalous Hall effect shows isotropic behavior independent of the current direction. Our results demonstrate the interplay between the current direction and the crystalline lattice in single-crystalline ferromagnetic films. A phenomenological analysis is presented to interpret the experimental data.

  1. Constraining Upper Mantle Azimuthal Anisotropy With Free Oscillation Data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghein, C.; Resovsky, J. S.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the potential of Earth's free oscillations coupled modes as a tool to constrain large-scale seismic anisotropy in the transition zone and in the bulk of the lower mantle. While the presence of seismic anisotropy is widely documented in the uppermost and the lowermost mantle, its observation at intermediate depths remains a formidable challenge. We show that several coupled modes of oscillations are sensitive to radial and azimuthal anisotropy throughout the mantle. In particular, modes of the type 0Sl-0T(l+1) have high sensitivity to shear-wave radial anisotropy and to six elastic parameters describing azimuthal anisotropy in the 200 km-1000 km depth range. The use of such data enables us thus to extend the sensitivity of traditionally used fundamental mode surface waves to depths corresponding to the transition zone and the top of the lower mantle. In addition, these modes have the potential to provide new and unique constraints on several elastic parameters to which surface waves are not sensitive. We attempted to fit degree two splitting measurements of 0Sl-0T(l+1) coupled modes using previously published isotropic and transversely isotropic mantle models, but we could not explain the entire signal. We then explored the model space with a forward modeling approach and determined that, after correction for the effect of the crust and mantle radial anisotropy, the remaining signal can be explained by the presence of azimuthal anisotropy in the upper mantle. When we allow the azimuthal anisotropy to go below 400 km depth, the data fit is slightly better and the model space search leads to better-resolved model than when we force the anisotropy to lie in the top 400 km of the mantle. Its depth extent and distribution are, however, still not well constrained by the data due to parameter tradeoffs and a limited coupled mode data set. It is thus clear that mode coupling measurements have the potential to constrain upper-mantle azimuthal anisotropy. However, for future studies we will need to obtain new coupled mode splitting data and to perform joint analyses with fundamental mode and overtone surface-waves. This will reduce parameter tradeoffs and improve our constraints on the individual elastic parameters and on the depth location of the azimuthal anisotropy.

  2. Regulation of Nitrate Transport in Citrus Rootstocks Depending on Nitrogen Availability

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo, Miguel; Camañes, Gemma; Flors, Víctor; Primo-Millo, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we reported that in Citrus plants, nitrate influx through the plasmalemma of roots cells follows a biphasic pattern, suggesting the existence of at least two different uptake systems, a high and low affinity transport system (HATS and LATS, respectively). Here, we describe a novel inducible high affinity transport system (iHATS). This new nitrate transport system has a high capacity to uptake nitrate in two different Citrus rootstocks (Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer citrange). The iHATS was saturable, showing higher affinity than constitutive high affinity transport system (cHATS) to the substrate NO3−. The Vmax for this saturable component iHATS was higher than cHATS, reaching similar values in both rootstocks. Additionally, we studied the regulation of root NO3− uptake mediated by both HATS (iHATS and cHATS) and LATS. In both rootstocks, cHATS is constitutive and independent of N-status. Concerning the regulation of iHATS, this system is upregulated by NO3− and down-regulated by the N status and by NO3− itself when plants are exposed to it for a longer period of time. LATS in Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer citrange rootstocks is repressed by the N-status. The use of various metabolic uncouplers or inhibitors indicated that NO3− net uptake mediated by iHATS and LATS was an active transport system in both rootstocks. PMID:19516998

  3. Anomalous diameter dependence of thermal transport in ultra-narrow Si nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Karamitaheri, Hossein; Neophytou, Neophytos; Kosina, Hans

    2014-01-14

    We present atomistic valence force field calculations of thermal transport in Si nanowires of diameters from 12 nm down to 1 nm. We show that as the diameter is reduced, the phonon density-of-states and transmission function acquire a finite value at low frequency, in contrast to approaching zero as in the bulk material. It turns out that this effect results in what Ziman described as the “problem of long longitudinal waves” [J. M. Ziman, Electrons and Phonons: The Theory of Transport Phenomena in Solids (Clarendon, Oxford, 1962)], which states that the thermal conductivity of a material increases as its length is increased due to the vanishing scattering for long-wavelength phonons. We show that this thermal transport improvement also appears in nanowires as their diameter is decreased below D = 5 nm (not only as the length increases), originating from the increase in the density of the long wavevector modes. The observation is present under ballistic transport conditions, and further enhanced with the introduction of phonon-phonon scattering. Because of this, in such ultra-narrow nanowires, as the diameter is reduced, phonon transport is dominated more and more by lower energy phonons with longer mean-free paths. We show that ∼80% of the heat is carried by phonons with energies less than 5 meV, most with mean-free paths of several hundreds of nanometers.

  4. Anomalous diameter dependence of thermal transport in ultra-narrow Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitaheri, Hossein; Neophytou, Neophytos; Kosina, Hans

    2014-01-01

    We present atomistic valence force field calculations of thermal transport in Si nanowires of diameters from 12 nm down to 1 nm. We show that as the diameter is reduced, the phonon density-of-states and transmission function acquire a finite value at low frequency, in contrast to approaching zero as in the bulk material. It turns out that this effect results in what Ziman described as the "problem of long longitudinal waves" [J. M. Ziman, Electrons and Phonons: The Theory of Transport Phenomena in Solids (Clarendon, Oxford, 1962)], which states that the thermal conductivity of a material increases as its length is increased due to the vanishing scattering for long-wavelength phonons. We show that this thermal transport improvement also appears in nanowires as their diameter is decreased below D = 5 nm (not only as the length increases), originating from the increase in the density of the long wavevector modes. The observation is present under ballistic transport conditions, and further enhanced with the introduction of phonon-phonon scattering. Because of this, in such ultra-narrow nanowires, as the diameter is reduced, phonon transport is dominated more and more by lower energy phonons with longer mean-free paths. We show that ˜80% of the heat is carried by phonons with energies less than 5 meV, most with mean-free paths of several hundreds of nanometers.

  5. The immediate wound-induced oxidative burst of Saccharina latissima depends on light via photosynthetic electron transport.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Ruth E; Amsler, Margaret O; Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R; Amsler, Charles D

    2015-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by an oxidative burst are an important component of the wound response in algae, vascular plants, and animals. In all taxa, ROS production is usually attributed solely to a defense-related enzyme like NADPH-oxidase (Nox). However, here we show that the initial, wound-induced oxidative burst of the kelp Saccharina latissima depends on light and photosynthetic electron transport. We measured oxygen evolution and ROS production at different light levels and in the presence of a photosynthetic inhibitor, and we used spin trapping and electron paramagnetic resonance as an orthogonal method. Using an in vivo chemical probe, we provide data suggesting that wound-induced ROS production in two distantly related and geographically isolated species of Antarctic macroalgae may be light dependent as well. We propose that electron transport chains are an important and as yet unaddressed component of the wound response, not just for photosynthetic organisms, but for animals via mitochondria as well. This component may have been obscured by the historic use of diphenylene iodonium, which inhibits not only Noxes but also photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport as well. Finally, we anticipate physiological and/or ecological consequences of the light dependence of macroalgal wound-induced ROS since pathogens and grazers do not disappear in the dark. PMID:26986660

  6. Automobile dependence in cities: An international comparison of urban transport and land use patterns with implications for sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Kenworthy, J.R.; Laube, F.B.

    1996-07-01

    Cities around the world are subject to increasing levels of environmental impact from dependence on the automobile. In the highly auto-dependent cities of the US and Australia, this is manifested in problems such as urban sprawl and its destruction of prime farming land and natural landscapes, photochemical smog that can be primarily attributed to auto emissions. On top of the more local impacts of the automobile, the global dimension should not be forgotten. Perhaps the two most pressing issues in this regard are the oil problem and the greenhouse problem. A comparison of global cities over the period 1980 to 1990 reveals large differences in automobile dependence with implications for the future sustainability of cities in different countries. This study explores some of the underlying land use, transport, and economic reasons for these different transport patterns. It briefly reviews what the sustainability agenda means for transport and land use patterns in cities and suggests a suite of targets or goals for sustainability by which cities might measure their current directions and plans.

  7. Bidirectional FcRn-dependent IgG transport in a polarized human intestinal epithelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Bonny L.; Badizadegan, Kamran; Wu, Zhen; Ahouse, Jeremy C.; Zhu, Xiaoping; Simister, Neil E.; Blumberg, Richard S.; Lencer, Wayne I.

    1999-01-01

    The MHC class I–related Fc receptor, FcRn, mediates the intestinal absorption of maternal IgG in neonatal rodents and the transplacental transport of maternal IgG in humans by receptor-mediated transcytosis. In mice and rats, expression of FcRn in intestinal epithelial cells is limited to the suckling period. We have recently observed, however, clear expression of FcRn in the adult human intestine, suggesting a function for FcRn in intestinal IgG transport beyond neonatal life in humans. We tested this hypothesis using the polarized human intestinal T84 cell line as a model epithelium. Immunocytochemical data show that FcRn is present in T84 cells in a punctate apical pattern similar to that found in human small intestinal enterocytes. Solute flux studies show that FcRn transports IgG across T84 monolayers by receptor-mediated transcytosis. Transport is bidirectional, specific for FcRn, and dependent upon endosomal acidification. These data define a novel bidirectional mechanism of IgG transport across epithelial barriers that predicts an important effect of FcRn on IgG function in immune surveillance and host defense at mucosal surfaces. PMID:10510331

  8. Transport of a passive tracer in time-dependent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    SciTech Connect

    Camassa, R.; Wiggins, S.

    1990-01-01

    The transport of a passive tracer in a Rayleigh-Benard cell is considered, when the convection rolls are subject to oscillatory instability. We propose a mechanism for the roll to roll transport and introduce formulae for quantifying the spreading of the tracer, which are valid for as long as the molecular diffusivity can be neglected. A criterion for weighing the effects of diffusivity is discussed, and we provide some example by numerically simulating the flow in presence of molecular diffusivity. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Na+-dependent and Na+-independent betaine transport across the apical membrane of rat renal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Cano, Mercedes; Calonge, Mara L; Ilundin, Anunciacin A

    2015-10-01

    The low renal excretion of betaine indicates that the kidney efficiently reabsorbs the betaine filtered by the glomeruli but the mechanisms involved in such a process have been scarcely investigated. We have detected concentrative and non-concentrative betaine transport activity in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from rat renal cortex and medulla. The concentrative system is the Sodium/Imino-acid Transporter 1 (SIT1) because it is Na+- and Cl--dependent, electrogenic and is inhibited by an anti-SIT1 antibody. Its apparent affinity constant for betaine, Kt, is 1.10.5 mM and its maximal transport velocity, Vmax, 0.50.1 nmol betaine/mg protein/s. Inhibitors of the Na+/Cl-/betaine uptake are L-proline (75%) and cold betaine, L-carnitine and choline (40-60%). Neither creatine, TEA, taurine, ?-alanine, GABA nor glycine significantly inhibited Na+/Cl-/betaine uptake. The non-concentrative betaine transport system is Na+- and H+-independent, electroneutral, with a Kt for betaine of 477 ?M and a Vmax of 7.81 pmol betaine/mg protein/s. Its transport activity is nearly abolished by betaine, followed by L-carnitine (70-80%) and proline (40-50%), but a difference from the Na+/Cl-/betaine transport is that it is inhibited by TEA (approx. 50%) and unaffected by choline. The underlying carrier functions as an antiporter linking betaine entry into the BBMV with the efflux of either L-carnitine or betaine, an exchange unaffected by the anti-SIT1 antibody. As far as we know this is the first work reporting that betaine crosses the apical membrane of rat renal epithelium by SIT1 and by a Na+- and H+-independent transport system. PMID:26028423

  10. An asymptotic-preserving semi-Lagrangian algorithm for the time-dependent anisotropic heat transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, L.; del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Hauck, C. D.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a semi-Lagrangian numerical algorithm for a time-dependent, anisotropic temperature transport equation in magnetized plasmas in regimes with negligible variation of the magnitude of the magnetic field B along field lines. The approach is based on a formal integral solution of the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field) transport equation with sources. While this study focuses on a Braginskii (local) heat flux closure, the approach is able to accommodate nonlocal parallel heat flux closures as well. The numerical implementation is based on an operator-split formulation, with two straightforward steps: a perpendicular transport step (including sources), and a Lagrangian (field-line integral) parallel transport step. Algorithmically, the first step is amenable to the use of modern iterative methods, while the second step has a fixed cost per degree of freedom (and is therefore algorithmically scalable). Accuracy-wise, the approach is free from the numerical pollution introduced by the discrete parallel transport term when the perpendicular to parallel transport coefficient ratio χ⊥/χ∥ becomes arbitrarily small, and is shown to capture the correct limiting solution when ɛ=χ⊥L∥2/χ∥L⊥2 →0 (with L∥, L⊥ the parallel and perpendicular diffusion length scales, respectively). Therefore, the approach is asymptotic-preserving. We demonstrate the performance of the scheme with several numerical experiments with varying magnetic field complexity in two dimensions, including the case of heat transport across a magnetic island in cylindrical geometry in the presence of a large guide field.

  11. Sodium-dependent transport of neutral amino acids by whole cells and membrane vesicles of Streptococcus bovis, a ruminal bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B; Strobel, H J; Driessen, A J; Konings, W N

    1988-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1 cells were able to transport serine, threonine, or alanine, but only when they were incubated in sodium buffers. If glucose-energized cells were washed in potassium phosphate and suspended in potassium phosphate buffer, there was no detectable uptake. Cells deenergized with 2-deoxyglucose and incubated in sodium phosphate buffer were still able to transport serine, and this result indicated that the chemical sodium gradient was capable of driving transport. However, when the deenergized cells were treated with valinomycin and diluted into sodium phosphate to create both an artificial membrane potential and a chemical sodium gradient, rates of serine uptake were fivefold greater than in cells having only a sodium gradient. If deenergized cells were preloaded with sodium (no membrane potential or sodium gradient), there was little serine transport. Nigericin and monensin, ionophores capable of reversing sodium gradients across membranes, strongly inhibited sodium-dependent uptake of the three amino acids. Membrane vesicles loaded with potassium and diluted into either lithium or choline chloride were unable to transport serine, but rapid uptake was evident if sodium chloride was added to the assay mixture. Serine transport had an extremely poor affinity for sodium, and more than 30 mM was needed for half-maximal rates of uptake. Serine transport was inhibited by an excess of threonine, but an excess of alanine had little effect. Results indicated that S. bovis had separate sodium symport systems for serine or threonine and alanine, and either the membrane potential or chemical sodium gradient could drive uptake. PMID:3136141

  12. Azimuthal Decorrelation of Jets Widely Separated in Rapidity

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Alvarez, G.; Alves, G.A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E.W.; Aronson, S.H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R.E.; Baarmand, M.M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S.B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N.I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Butler, J.M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chen, L.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B.C.; Christenson, J.H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.R.; Cobau, W.G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W.E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O.I.; De, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S.R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M.K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H.E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G.E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K.C.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A.N.; Geld, T.; Genik, R.J. II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C.E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J.F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gomez, B.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L.T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Green, D.R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gu, W.X.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J.A.; Guida, J.M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y.E.; Hadley, N.J.

    1996-07-01

    This study reports the first measurement of the azimuthal decorrelation between jets with pseudorapidity separation up to five units. The data were accumulated using the D0 detector during the 1992{endash}1993 collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}{ital s}=1.8 TeV. These results are compared to next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD predictions and to two leading-log approximations (LLA) where the leading-log terms are resummed to all orders in {alpha}{sub {ital S}}. The final state jets as predicted by NLO QCD show less azimuthal decorrelation than the data. The parton showering LLA Monte Carlo HERWIG describes the data well; an analytical LLA prediction based on Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov resummation shows more decorrelation than the data. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Jet azimuthal decorrelation studies with the D-zero detector

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, S.

    1996-10-01

    Experimental results on the measurement of the azimuthal decorrelation between jets with pseudorapidity separation up to five units are presented. The data were taken at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during the 1992-1993 collider run with the D{null} detector using {ital p{anti p}} collisions at center-of-mass energy {radical}{ital s} = 1.8 TeV. These results are compared to next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD predictions and to two leading-log approximations (LLA) where the leading terms are resummed to all orders in {alpha}{sub s}. The final state jets as predicted by NLO QCD show less azimuthal decorrelation than the data. The parton showering LLA Monte Carlo HERWIG describes the data well; an analytical LLA calculation based on Balitsky-Faclin-Kuraev-Lipatov resummation predicts more decorrelation than is present in the data.

  14. Synthetic aperture radar range - Azimuth ambiguity design and constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlis, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Problems concerning the design of a system for mapping a planetary surface with a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are considered. Given an ambiguity level, resolution, and swath width, the problems are related to the determination of optimum antenna apertures and the most suitable pulse repetition frequency (PRF). From the set of normalized azimuth ambiguity ratio curves, the designer can arrive at the azimuth antenna length, and from the sets of normalized range ambiguity ratio curves, he can arrive at the range aperture length or pulse repetition frequency. A procedure based on this design method is shown in an example. The normalized curves provide results for a SAR using a uniformly or cosine weighted rectangular antenna aperture.

  15. Replacement of the Green Bank Telescope azimuth track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert; Symmes, Arthur; Egan, Dennis

    2008-07-01

    The azimuth track of the Green Bank Telescope did not perform as designed. Relative movement of components was noted during construction; in addition, fretting of the base plate and wear plate faying surfaces, fatigue cracking of the wear plates, fatigue failure of wear plate fasteners, and deterioration of the cementitous grout layer occurred at a rapid pace during the first few years of operation. After extensive failure analysis, a new system of components was designed and fabricated, and installation of the components was performed during 2007 (Symmes, Anderson, and Egan, "Improving the service life of the 100m Green Bank Telescope azimuth track", SPIE 7012-121). The highlights and lessons learned during the fabrication and installation phases are described herein. This information will benefit any organization performing a similar replacement, and may be helpful in new installations as well.

  16. Maximizing Solar Energy Capture Through Multi-Azimuth PV Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    By orienting photovoltaic (PV) arrays in multiple directions, significantly greater energy capture can be realized in high latitude locations. Conventional wisdom dictates orienting PV panels south (in the northern hemisphere), but multi-azimuth arrays can confer several advantages during the summer months: - Nearly even power production over a large part of the day (20+ hours) - Reduced issues with power quality in grid interactive systems - Support higher loads in independent, off-grid systems - Reduced energy storage (battery) requirements in off-grid systems This poster will present two multi-azimuth systems, one a grid-interactive system deployed at Summit Station, Greenland; the second an independent, off-grid system supporting a science project near Toolik Field Station, Alaska.

  17. Azimuthal asymmetry of the coherent backscattering cone: Theoretical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Liu, Li

    2009-11-01

    The azimuthal asymmetry of the polarized backscattering cone and the intimately related polarization opposition effect (POE) are corollaries of the theory of coherent backscattering (CB) valid in the asymptotic limit of very small particle packing density. In this paper we use numerically exact solutions of the Maxwell equations to study the evolution of these and other manifestations of CB as the packing density in a multiparticle group increases from zero to values typical of actual particle suspensions and particulate surfaces. Our results reveal a remarkable robustness of virtually all effects predicted by the low-density concept of CB and allow us to conclude that the azimuthal asymmetry and POE observed in the laboratory for densely packed discrete random media are indeed caused by CB.

  18. Azimuthal anisotropy at Valhall: The Helmholtz equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, AuréLien; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Singh, Satish; Roux, Philippe; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Barkved, Olav. I.

    2013-06-01

    We used 6 h of continuous vertical records from 2320 sensors of the Valhall Life of Fields Seismic network to compute 2,690,040 cross-correlation functions between the full set of sensor pair combinations. We applied the "Helmholtz tomography" approach combined with the ambient noise correlation method to track the wave front across the network with every station considered as a virtual source. The gradient of the interpolated phase travel time gives us an estimate of the local phase speed and of the direction of wave propagation. By combining the individual measurements for every station, we estimated the distribution of Scholte's wave phase speeds with respect to azimuth. The observed cosine pattern indicates the presence of azimuthal anisotropy. The elliptic shape of the fast anisotropy direction is consistent with results of previous shear wave splitting studies and reflects the strong seafloor subsidence due to the hydrocarbon reservoir depletion at depth and is in good agreement with geomechanical modeling.

  19. AtCCX3 is an Arabidopsis endomembrane H(+)-dependent K(+) transporter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Arabidopsis ("Arabidopsis thaliana") cation calcium exchangers (CCXs) were recently identified as a subfamily of cation transporters; however, no plant "CCXs" have been functionally characterized. Here, we show that Arabidopsis AtCCX3 (At3g14070) and AtCCX4 (At1g54115) can suppress yeast mutants...

  20. Transport activity-dependent intracellular sorting of the yeast general amino acid permease.

    PubMed

    Cain, Natalie E; Kaiser, Chris A

    2011-06-01

    Intracellular trafficking of the general amino acid permease, Gap1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by amino acid abundance. When amino acids are scarce Gap1p is sorted to the plasma membrane, whereas when amino acids are abundant Gap1p is sorted from the trans-Golgi through the multivesicular endosome (MVE) and to the vacuole. Here we test the hypothesis that Gap1p itself is the sensor of amino acid abundance by examining the trafficking of Gap1p mutants with altered substrate specificity and transport activity. We show that trafficking of mutant Gap1p(A297V), which does not transport basic amino acids, is also not regulated by these amino acids. Furthermore, we have identified a catalytically inactive mutant that does not respond to complex amino acid mixtures and constitutively sorts Gap1p to the plasma membrane. Previously we showed that amino acids govern the propensity of Gap1p to recycle from the MVE to the plasma membrane. Here we propose that in the presence of substrate the steady-state conformation of Gap1p shifts to a state that is unable to be recycled from the MVE. These results indicate a parsimonious regulatory mechanism by which Gap1p senses its transport substrates to set an appropriate level of transporter activity at the cell surface. PMID:21471002

  1. Coupled Factors Influencing Concentration Dependent Colloid Transport and Retention in Saturated Porous Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The coupled influence of input suspension concentration (Ci), ionic strength (IS) and hydrodynamics on the transport and retention of 1.1 'm carboxyl modified latex colloids in saturated quartz sand (150 'm) was investigated. Results from batch experiments and interaction energy calculations indica...

  2. A KINETIC MODEL FOR CELL DENSITY DEPENDENT BACTERIAL TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic transport model with the ability to account for variations in cell density of the aqueous and solid phases was developed for bacteria in porous media. Sorption kinetics in the advective-dispersive-sorptive equation was described by assuming that adsorption was proportio...

  3. Drosophila Vision Depends on Carcinine Uptake by an Organic Cation Transporter.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ratna; Luan, Zhuo; Guo, Peiyi; Li, Hong-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Recycling of neurotransmitters is essential for sustained neuronal signaling, yet recycling pathways for various transmitters, including histamine, remain poorly understood. In the first visual ganglion (lamina) of Drosophila, photoreceptor-released histamine is taken up into perisynaptic glia, converted to carcinine, and delivered back to the photoreceptor for histamine regeneration. Here, we identify an organic cation transporter, CarT (carcinine transporter), that transports carcinine into photoreceptors during histamine recycling. CarT mediated in vitro uptake of carcinine. Deletion of the CarT gene caused an accumulation of carcinine in laminar glia accompanied by a reduction in histamine, resulting in abolished photoreceptor signal transmission and blindness in behavioral assays. These defects were rescued by expression of CarT cDNA in photoreceptors, and they were reproduced by photoreceptor-specific CarT knockdown. Our findings suggest a common role for the conserved family of CarT-like transporters in maintaining histamine homeostasis in both mammalian and fly brains. PMID:26923590

  4. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U +U and Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2 } and v2{4 }, for charged hadrons from U +U collisions at √{sNN }=193 GeV and Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV . Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2 } on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U +U collisions. We also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  5. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  6. Collective flow and azimuthally differential pion femtoscopy with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loggins, Vera

    Since 2009, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has been conducting experiments in pp, Pb-Pb, as well as p-Pb collisions with the center of mass energy ranging sqrt{{s}_{NN}}=0.9-5.05 TeV. In this thesis, both, estimates of background correlations in anisotropic flow, v_1-v_5, measurements in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt{{s}_{NN}}=2.76 TeV, and azimuthally differential pion femtoscopy of Pb-Pb collisions are reported. Two particle azimuthal correlations are statistically the most precise method of measuring anisotropic flow. The main drawback of this method is its sensitivity to the non-flow correlations, which unlike real flow, do not have geometrical origin. Non-flow contribution can be estimated from two particle azimuthal correlations using pp data. Measurements of the non-flow contribution using the uQ method and Scalar Product (SP) method are reported for pp collisions at sqrt{{s}_{NN}}=2.76 TeV and sqrt{{s}_{NN}}=7 TeV for the first through fifth harmonics. Femtoscopy of non-central heavy-ion collisions provides access to information on the geometry of the effective pion-emitting source. In particular, its shape can be studied by measuring femtoscopic radii as a function of the emission angle relative to the collision plane of symmetry. The first measurements of azimuthally differential femtoscopy in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt{{s}_{NN}}=2.76 TeV are reported and compared to results from RHIC experiments at lower energies. Oscillations of the extracted radii versus the emission angle are measured, and R_{side} and R_{out} oscillations are found to be out of phase. The relative amplitude of the R_{side} oscillations decreases in more central collisions, however always remains positive. This indicates that the source is out-of-plane extended, similar to that observed at RHIC energies. Results are compared to existing hydrodynamical and transport model calculations.

  7. Azimuthal clumping instabilities in a Z-pinch wire array

    SciTech Connect

    Strickler, Trevor; Lau, Y.Y.; Gilgenbach, R.M.; Cuneo, M.E.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    2005-05-15

    A simple model is constructed to evaluate the temporal evolution of azimuthal clumping instabilities in a cylindrical array of current-carrying wires. An analytic scaling law is derived, which shows that randomly seeded perturbations evolve at the rate of the fastest unstable mode, almost from the start. This instability is entirely analogous to the Jeans instability in a self-gravitating disk, where the mutual attraction of gravity is replaced by the mutual attraction among the current-carrying wires.

  8. Propagation along azimuthally magnetized ferrite-loaded circular waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. S.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the modal dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic waves traveling along the azimuthally magnetized ferrite-loaded coaxial transmission line and the ferrite-loaded wire. The modal dispersion curves are used to determine the pass and stop bands of normal propagation. Boundary-value problems were solved with Bolle-Heller functions. The dispersion characteristics of transverse electric modes are presented as plots of the normalized propagation constant vs the normalized frequency.

  9. Azimuthal structures of produced particles in heavy-ion interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vokal, S. Orlova, G. I.; Lehocka, S.

    2009-02-15

    The angular structures of particles produced in {sup 208}Pb at 158 A GeV/c and {sup 197}Au at 11.6 A GeV/c induced interactions with Ag(Br) nuclei in emulsion detector have been investigated. Nonstatistical well-ordered ring-like structures of produced particles in azimuthal plane of a collision have been found, and their parameters have been determined.

  10. Stratification of Azimuthal Anisotropy in the North American Craton (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, B. A.; Yuan, H.; Ford, H. A.; Fischer, K. M.; Abt, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present the results of a tomographic study of azimuthal anisotropy using jointly long period teleseismic waveforms and SKS splitting measurements, which reveals the presence of two distinct lithospheric layers throughout the stable part of the North American continent. The top layer is thick (~150 km) under the oldest, Archean core and tapers out on the Paleozoic borders. Its thickness variations are consistent with those inferred for a highly depleted Archean lithospheric layer from thermo-barometric analysis of xenoliths. It is thickest in ancient collision zones (e.g. Trans-Hudson orogen) and thins out under the mid-continental rift zone. The orientation of azimuthal anisotropy in layer 1 follows that of ancient suture zones. In the bottom lithospheric layer, azimuthal anisotropy aligns consistently in a north-south direction, ruling out a possible formation by underplating of a giant plume. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is relatively flat (180-240km), consistent with predictions from geodynamical modeling of a thermal conductive root that subsequently formed around the depleted chemical layer. Below the LAB, anisotropy aligns with absolute plate motion, confirming previous work (Marone and Romanowicz, 2007). Our findings tie together seismological, geochemical and geodynamical studies of the cratonic lithosphere in north America. They also reconcile results of seismic tomography and other geophysical studies with recent receiver function studies, which detect structural boundaries under cratons at depths that better correspond to the sharp mid-lithospheric boundary than to the more gradual LAB. In particular, Sp receiver functions under the north American craton detect a sharp mid-lithospheric boundary that, in general, correlates in depth with that found from changes in the direction of azimuthal anisotropy.

  11. AN AZIMUTHAL ASYMMETRY IN THE LkHα 330 DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Isella, Andrea; Carpenter, John M.; Ricci, Luca; Pérez, Laura M.; Andrews, Sean; Rosenfeld, Katherine

    2013-09-20

    Theory predicts that giant planets and low mass stellar companions shape circumstellar disks by opening annular gaps in the gas and dust spatial distribution. For more than a decade it has been debated whether this is the dominant process that leads to the formation of transitional disks. In this paper, we present millimeter-wave interferometric observations of the transitional disk around the young intermediate mass star LkHα 330. These observations reveal a lopsided ring in the 1.3 mm dust thermal emission characterized by a radius of about 100 AU and an azimuthal intensity variation of a factor of two. By comparing the observations with a Gaussian parametric model, we find that the observed asymmetry is consistent with a circular arc, that extends azimuthally by about 90° and emits about 1/3 of the total continuum flux at 1.3 mm. Hydrodynamic simulations show that this structure is similar to the azimuthal asymmetries in the disk surface density that might be produced by the dynamical interaction with unseen low mass companions orbiting within 70 AU from the central star. We argue that such asymmetries might lead to azimuthal variations in the millimeter-wave dust opacity and in the dust temperature, which will also affect the millimeter-wave continuum emission. Alternative explanations for the observed asymmetry that do not require the presence of companions cannot be ruled out with the existing data. Further observations of both the dust and molecular gas emission are required to derive firm conclusions on the origin of the asymmetry observed in the LkHα 330 disk.

  12. Azimuthal asymmetry in the risetime of the surface detector signals of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J. C.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gallo, F.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Strafella, F.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The azimuthal asymmetry in the risetime of signals in Auger surface detector stations is a source of information on shower development. The azimuthal asymmetry is due to a combination of the longitudinal evolution of the shower and geometrical effects related to the angles of incidence of the particles into the detectors. The magnitude of the effect depends upon the zenith angle and state of development of the shower and thus provides a novel observable, (sec θ )max , sensitive to the mass composition of cosmic rays above 3 ×1018 eV . By comparing measurements with predictions from shower simulations, we find for both of our adopted models of hadronic physics (QGSJETII-04 and EPOS-LHC) an indication that the mean cosmic-ray mass increases slowly with energy, as has been inferred from other studies. However, the mass estimates are dependent on the shower model and on the range of distance from the shower core selected. Thus the method has uncovered further deficiencies in our understanding of shower modeling that must be resolved before the mass composition can be inferred from (sec θ )max.

  13. Azimuthal asymmetry in the risetime of the surface detector signals of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aab, Alexander

    2016-04-07

    The azimuthal asymmetry in the risetime of signals in Auger surface detector stations is a source of information on shower development. The azimuthal asymmetry is due to a combination of the longitudinal evolution of the shower and geometrical effects related to the angles of incidence of the particles into the detectors. The magnitude of the effect depends upon the zenith angle and state of development of the shower and thus provides a novel observable, (secθ)max, sensitive to the mass composition of cosmic rays above 3 x 1018 eV. By comparing measurements with predictions from shower simulations, we find for bothmore » of our adopted models of hadronic physics (QGSJETII-04 and EPOS-LHC) an indication that the mean cosmic-ray mass increases slowly with energy, as has been inferred from other studies. However, the mass estimates are dependent on the shower model and on the range of distance from the shower core selected. Furthermore, the method has uncovered further deficiencies in our understanding of shower modelling that must be resolved before the mass composition can be inferred from (secθ)max.« less

  14. AN AZIMUTHAL DYNAMO WAVE IN SPHERICAL SHELL CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Elizabeth; Käpylä, Petri J.; Mantere, Maarit J.; Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-10

    We report the discovery of an azimuthal dynamo wave of a low-order (m = 1) mode in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent convection in spherical shells. Such waves are predicted by mean-field dynamo theory and have been obtained previously in mean-field models. An azimuthal dynamo wave has been proposed as a possible explanation for the persistent drifts of spots observed on several rapidly rotating stars, as revealed through photometry and Doppler imaging. However, this has been judged unlikely because evidence for such waves from DNS has been lacking. Here we present DNS of large-scale magnetic fields showing a retrograde m = 1 mode. Its pattern speed is nearly independent of latitude and does not reflect the speed of the differential rotation at any depth. The extrema of magnetic m = 1 structures coincide reasonably well with the maxima of m = 2 structures of the temperature. These results provide direct support for the observed drifts being due to an azimuthal dynamo wave.

  15. Crack azimuths on Europa: The G1 lineament sequence revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarid, A.R.; Greenberg, R.; Hoppa, G.V.; Brown, D.M., Jr.; Geissler, P.

    2005-01-01

    The tectonic sequence in the anti-jovian area covered by regional mapping images from Galileo's orbit E15 is determined from a study of cross-cutting relationships among lineament features. The sequence is used to test earlier results from orbit G1, based on lower resolution images, which appeared to display a progressive change in azimuthal orientation over about 90?? in a clockwise sense. Such a progression is consistent with expected stress variations that would accompany plausible non-synchronous rotation. The more recent data provide a more complete record than the G1 data did. We find that to fit the sequence into a continual clockwise change of orientation would require at least 1000?? (> 5 cycles) of azimuthal rotation. If due to non-synchronous rotation of Europa, this result implies that we are seeing back further into the tectonic record than the G1 results had suggested. The three sets of orientations found by Geissler et al. now appear to have been spaced out over several cycles, not during a fraction of one cycle. While our more complete sequence of lineament formation is consistent with non-synchronous rotation, a statistical test shows that it cannot be construed as independent evidence. Other lines of evidence do support non-synchronous rotation, but azimuths of crack sequences do not show it, probably because only a couple of cracks form in a given region in any given non-synchronous rotation period. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modification of the azimuth control system in the LLMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binhua; Yang, Lei; Chen, Linfei; Mao, Wei

    2000-10-01

    A new control system of the azimuth transmission mechanism used in the Lower Latitude Meridian Circle (LLMC) is described in this paper. Because the original azimuth transmission mechanism causes too much vibration during the transposition of the horizontal axis of the instrument, we decided to modify the original system by two ways. One is to modify the lift mechanism and the azimuth transmission mechanism. The other is to replace the original stepper motors with a new type of stepper motor. According to the requirement of the new motor and its sine subdivided microstep driver, the original control system has been modified. The new system has an expansion output board and a new control program compared with the original one. The hardware architecture of the new system is described. The program in the single chip microcontroller is written in ASM, which is composed of 10 subroutines. The program in a host PC is written in C++. The methods using in controlling motors and skills in designing these programs are discussed. Two sketch flow charts of the control program are presented in the paper. Modification of the lift mechanism is also introduced. All this works make the vibration very slight.

  17. An ATP-dependent L-carnitine transporter in Listeria monocytogenes Scott A is involved in osmoprotection.

    PubMed Central

    Verheul, A; Rombouts, F M; Beumer, R R; Abee, T

    1995-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive, psychotrophic, food-borne pathogen which is able to grow in osmotically stressful environments. Carnitine (beta-hydroxy-L-tau-N-trimethyl aminobutyrate) can contribute significantly to growth of L. monocytogenes at high osmolarity (R. R. Beumer, M. C. te Giffel, L. J. Cox, F. M. Rombouts, and T. Abee, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 60:1359-1363, 1994). Transport of L-[N-methyl-14C]carnitine in L. monocytogenes was shown to be energy dependent. Analysis of cell extracts revealed that L-carnitine was not further metabolized, which supplies evidence for its role as an osmoprotectant in L. monocytogenes. Uptake of L-carnitine proceeds in the absence of a proton motive force and is strongly inhibited in the presence of the phosphate analogs vanadate and arsenate. The L-carnitine permease is therefore most likely driven by ATP. Kinetic analysis of L-carnitine transport in glucose-energized cells revealed the presence of a high-affinity uptake system with a Km of 10 microM and a maximum rate of transport (Vmax) of 48 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1. L-[14C]carnitine transport in L. monocytogenes is significantly inhibited by a 10-fold excess of unlabelled L-carnitine, acetylcarnitine, and tau-butyrobetaine, whereas L-proline and betaine display, even at a 100-fold excess, only a weak inhibitory effect. In conclusion, an ATP-dependent L-carnitine transport system in L. monocytogenes is described, and its possible roles in cold adaptation and intracellular growth in mammalian cells are discussed. PMID:7768820

  18. Bicarbonate-dependent chloride transport drives fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jiajie; Liao, Jie; Huang, Junwei; Robert, Renaud; Palmer, Melissa L; Fahrenkrug, Scott C; O'Grady, Scott M; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-01-01

    Anion and fluid secretion are both defective in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, the transport mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, Cl− and HCO3− secretion was measured using genetically matched CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient and CFTR-expressing cell lines derived from the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. Forskolin stimulated the short-circuit current (Isc) across voltage-clamped monolayers, and also increased the equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) calculated under open-circuit conditions. Isc was equivalent to the HCO3− net flux measured using the pH-stat technique, whereas Ieq was the sum of the Cl− and HCO3− net fluxes. Ieq and HCO3− fluxes were increased by bafilomycin and ZnCl2, suggesting that some secreted HCO3− is neutralized by parallel electrogenic H+ secretion. Ieq and fluid secretion were dependent on the presence of both Na+ and HCO3−. The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide abolished forskolin stimulation of Ieq and HCO3− secretion, suggesting that HCO3− transport under these conditions requires catalysed synthesis of carbonic acid. Cl− was the predominant anion in secretions under all conditions studied and thus drives most of the fluid transport. Nevertheless, 50–70% of Cl− and fluid transport was bumetanide-insensitive, suggesting basolateral Cl− loading by a sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1)-independent mechanism. Imposing a transepithelial HCO3− gradient across basolaterally permeabilized Calu-3 cells sustained a forskolin-stimulated current, which was sensitive to CFTR inhibitors and drastically reduced in CFTR-deficient cells. Net HCO3− secretion was increased by bilateral Cl− removal and therefore did not require apical Cl−/HCO3− exchange. The results suggest a model in which most HCO3− is recycled basolaterally by exchange with Cl−, and the resulting HCO3−-dependent Cl− transport provides an osmotic driving force for fluid secretion. PMID:22777674

  19. Salicylic Acid Transport in Ricinus communis Involves a pH-Dependent Carrier System in Addition to Diffusion1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Rocher, Françoise; Chollet, Jean-François; Legros, Sandrine; Jousse, Cyril; Lemoine, Rémi; Faucher, Mireille; Bush, Daniel R.; Bonnemain, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Despite its important functions in plant physiology and defense, the membrane transport mechanism of salicylic acid (SA) is poorly documented due to the general assumption that SA is taken up by plant cells via the ion trap mechanism. Using Ricinus communis seedlings and modeling tools (ACD LogD and Vega ZZ softwares), we show that phloem accumulation of SA and hydroxylated analogs is completely uncorrelated with the physicochemical parameters suitable for diffusion (number of hydrogen bond donors, polar surface area, and, especially, LogD values at apoplastic pHs and Δ LogD between apoplast and phloem sap pH values). These and other data (such as accumulation in phloem sap of the poorly permeant dissociated form of monohalogen derivatives from apoplast and inhibition of SA transport by the thiol reagent p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid [pCMBS]) lead to the following conclusions. As in intestinal cells, SA transport in Ricinus involves a pH-dependent carrier system sensitive to pCMBS; this carrier can translocate monohalogen analogs in the anionic form; the efficiency of phloem transport of hydroxylated benzoic acid derivatives is tightly dependent on the position of the hydroxyl group on the aromatic ring (SA corresponds to the optimal position) but moderately affected by halogen addition in position 5, which is known to increase plant defense. Furthermore, combining time-course experiments and pCMBS used as a tool, we give information about the localization of the SA carrier. SA uptake by epidermal cells (i.e. the step preceding the symplastic transport to veins) insensitive to pCMBS occurs via the ion-trap mechanism, whereas apoplastic vein loading involves a carrier-mediated mechanism (which is targeted by pCMBS) in addition to diffusion. PMID:19493970