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Sample records for azo dye reactive

  1. 40 CFR 721.9717 - Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye... Substances § 721.9717 Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reactive dye (PMN P-96-238) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9717 - Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye... Substances § 721.9717 Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reactive dye (PMN P-96-238) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9717 - Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye... Substances § 721.9717 Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reactive dye (PMN P-96-238) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9717 - Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye... Substances § 721.9717 Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reactive dye (PMN P-96-238) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9717 - Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye... Substances § 721.9717 Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reactive dye (PMN P-96-238) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  6. Oxidation of Levafix CA reactive azo-dyes in industrial wastewater of textile dyeing by electro-generated Fenton's reagent.

    PubMed

    El-Desoky, Hanaa S; Ghoneim, Mohamed M; El-Sheikh, Ragaa; Zidan, Naglaa M

    2010-03-15

    The indirect electrochemical removal of pollutants from effluents has become an attractive method in recent years. Removal (decolorization and mineralization) of Levafix Blue CA and Levafix Red CA reactive azo-dyes from aqueous media by electro-generated Fenton's reagent (Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2)) using a reticulated vitreous carbon cathode and a platinum gauze anode was optimized. Progress of oxidation (decolorization and mineralization) of the investigated azo-dyes with time of electro-Fenton's reaction was monitored by UV-visible absorbance measurements, Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and HPLC analysis. The results indicated that the electro-Fenton's oxidation system is efficient for treatment of such types of reactive dyes. Oxidation of each of the investigated azo-dyes by electro-generated Fenton's reagent up to complete decolorization and approximately 90-95% mineralization was achieved. Moreover, the optimized electro-Fenton's oxidation was successfully applied for complete decolorization and approximately 85-90% mineralization of both azo-dyes in real industrial wastewater samples collected from textile dyeing house at El-Mahalla El-Kobra, Egypt. PMID:19926217

  7. Application of redox mediators to accelerate the transformation of reactive azo dyes in anaerobic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, F P; Bouwman, R H; Strik, D P; Lettinga, G; Field, J A

    2001-12-20

    Azo dyes are nonspecifically reduced under anaerobic conditions but the slow rates at which reactive azo dyes are converted presents a serious problem for the application of anaerobic technology as a first stage in the complete biodegradation of these compounds. As quinones have been found to catalyze reductive transfers by acting as redox mediators, the application of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid (AQDS) during continuous anaerobic treatment of the reactive azo dye, Reactive Red 2 (RR2), was evaluated. A mixture of volatile fatty acids was used as the electron-donating primary substrate. Batch experiments demonstrated that AQDS could increase the first-order rate constant of RR2 reductive cleavage by one order of magnitude. In the continuous experiment, treatment of RR2 containing synthetic wastewater in a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor yielded low dye removal efficiencies (<30%). Consequently, severe toxicity problems occurred, eventually resulting in almost complete inhibition of the methanogenic activity. Addition of catalytic concentrations of AQDS (19 microM) to the reactor influent caused an immediate increase in the dye removal efficiency and recovery of biological activity. Ultimately, RR2 removal efficiency stabilized at 88%, and higher AQDS loads resulted in higher RR2 removal efficiencies (up to 98% at 155 microM AQDS). Examination of the RR2 decolorizing properties of dye-adapted reactor sludge and of nonadapted reactor seed sludge revealed that RR2 decolorization was principally a biologically driven transfer of reducing equivalents from endogenous and added substrates to the dye. Hydrogen, added in bulk, was clearly the preferred electron donor. Bacteria that couple dye decolorization to hydrogen oxidation were naturally present in seed sludge. However, enrichment was required for the utilization of electrons from volatile fatty acids for dye reduction. The stimulatory effect of AQDS on RR2 decolorization by AQDS

  8. Application of 'waste' wood-shaving bottom ash for adsorption of azo reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Leechart, Piyawan; Nakbanpote, Woranan; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2009-02-01

    The utilization of wood-shaving bottom ash (WBA) for the removal of Red Reactive 141 (RR141), an azo reactive dye, was investigated. WBA/H(2)O and WBA/H(2)SO(4) were made by treating WBA with water and 0.1M H(2)SO(4), respectively, to increase adsorption capacity. Adsorption of RR141 from reactive dye solution (RDS) and reactive dye wastewater (RDW) by WBA/H(2)O and WBA/H(2)SO(4) involved the BET surface area and pore size diameter. Properties of adsorbents, effect of contact time, initial pH of solution, dissolved metals and elution studies indicated that the decolorisation mechanism involved both chemical adsorption and precipitation with calcium ions. In addition, the WBA/H(2)SO(4) surface might contain sulphate-cation complexes that were specific to enhancing dye adsorption from RDW. The adsorption isotherm had a best fit by the Freundlich model. Freundlich parameters showed that WBA/H(2)O used more heterogeneous surface than WBA/H(2)SO(4) and activated carbon for RDW adsorption. A thermodynamic study indicated that RDW adsorption was an endothermic process. The maximum dye adsorption capacities of WBA/H(2)O, WBA/H(2)SO(4) and activated carbon obtained from a Langmuir model at 30 degrees C were 24.3, 29.9, and 41.5mgl(-1), respectively. In addition, WBA/H(2)O and WBA/H(2)SO(4) could reduce colour and high chemical oxygen demand (COD) of real textile wastewater. According to the difficulty in the elution study, it was an environmentally safe disposal of this waste. Therefore, WBA, a waste from combustion of wood shavings, was suitable to be used as an effective adsorbent for azo reactive dye removal. PMID:18436367

  9. Decolourization of azo, heterocyclic and reactive dyes using spent mycelium substrate of Hypsizygus ulmarius.

    PubMed

    Ranjini, R; Padmavathi, T

    2015-09-01

    Cultivation of Hypsizygus ulmarius to generate spent mycelium substrate (SMS) for dye decolourization gave better yield, biological efficiency, fruitwidth and moisture content (145 gm, 33%, 4 cm, 91%) on paddy straw as compared to coconut husk (59 gm, 21%, 3 cm, 90%). Solid-phase decolourization of Congo red (Azo dye) and Methylene blue (Heterocyclic dye) showed that maximum decolourization (3.31), measured as Decolourization Index, occurred at dye concentration of 25 mg l(-1), while in Solochrome black (Reactive dye), it was at 100 mg l(-1) (1.7). Time taken for maximum decolourization was 10 days in Congo red and Solochrome black; 20 days in Methylene blue. Decolourization Index was maximum in Methylene blue (3.1), followed by Congo red (1.9) and Solochrome black (1.2). Liquid-phase decolourization of Methylene blue and Solochrome black showed that maximum decolourization (62.5%) measured as percent decolourization occurred at 25 mg l(-1), while it was at 50 mg l(-1) (36%) for Congo red. Time taken for maximum decolourization for all three dyes was 10 days. During this period, the percent decolourization was maximum in Methylene blue (91.3%), followed by Solochrome black (82.2%) and Congo red (79.7%). Decolourization potential in solid-phase was observed till 100 mg l(-1) and day 25 for all the three dyes, however, in liquid-phase it was observed till 50 mg I(-1) and day 20 for Congo red, 75 mg l(-1) and day 10 for Solochrome black, 100 mg I(-1) and day 20 for Methylene blue. Maximum laccase was produced on day 25 during decolourization of 25 mg I(-1) Congo red, while maximum Manganese peroxidase was noted on day 20 at 50 mg l(-1) Congo red. PMID:26521548

  10. The role of sulphate reduction on the reductive S decolorization of the azo dye reactive orange 14.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, F J; Enriquez, J E; Mendoza-Hernandez, M R; Razo-Flores, E; Field, J A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a broad range of sulphate concentrations (0-10g SO4(-2) L(-1)) on the reduction of an azo dye (reactive orange 14 (RO14)) by an anaerobic sludge. An increase in the sulphate concentration generally stimulated the reduction of RO14 by sludge incubations supplemented with glucose, acetate or propionate as electron donor. Sulphate and azo dye reductions took place simultaneously in all incubations. However, there was a decrease on the rate of decolorization when sulphate was supplied at 10g SO4(-2) L(-1). Abiotic incubations at different sulphide concentrations (0-2.5 g sulphide L(-1)) promoted very poor reduction of RO14. However, addition of riboflavin (20 microM), as a redox mediator, accelerated the reduction of RO14 up to 44-fold compared to a control lacking the catalyst. Our results indicate that sulphate-reduction may significantly contribute to the reduction of azo dyes both by biological mechanisms and by abiotic reductions implicating sulphide as an electron donor. The contribution of abiotic decolorization by sulphide, however, was only significant when a proper redox mediator was included. Our results also revealed that sulphate-reduction can out-compete with azo reduction at high sulphate concentrations leading to a poor decolorising performance when no sufficient reducing capacity is available. PMID:16939099

  11. Decolorization and degradation of xenobiotic azo dye Reactive Yellow-84A and textile effluent by Galactomyces geotrichum.

    PubMed

    Govindwar, Sanjay P; Kurade, Mayur B; Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kabra, Akhil N; Kim, Pil Joo; Waghmode, Tatoba R

    2014-08-01

    Galactomyces geotrichum MTCC 1360 exhibited 86% decolorization of azo dye Reactive Yellow-84A (50mgL(-1)) within 30h at 30°C and pH 7.0 under static condition. Examination of azoreductase, laccase and tyrosinase enzyme activities confirmed their prominent role in Reactive Yellow-84A degradation. Considerable reduction of COD (73%) and TOC (62%) during degradation of the dye was indicative of conversion of complex dye into simple products, which were further analyzed by HPLC, FTIR, GC-MS and HPTLC. The degradation products were identified as 4(5-hydroxy, 4-amino cyclopentane) sulfobenzene and 4(5-hydroxy cyclopentane) sulfobenzene by GC-MS. In addition, when G. geotrichum was applied to decolorize textile effluent, it showed 85% of true color removal (ADMI removal) within 72h, along with a significant reduction in TOC and COD. Phytotoxicity studies revealed the less toxic nature of degraded Reactive Yellow-84A as compared to original dye. PMID:24630455

  12. Mineralization of reactive azo dyes present in simulated textile waste water using down flow microaerophilic fixed film bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Balapure, Kshama; Bhatt, Nikhil; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    The present research emphasizes on degradation of azo dyes from simulated textile wastewater using down flow microaerophilic fixed film reactor. Degradation of simulated textile wastewater (COD 7200mg/L and dye concentration 300mg/L) was studied in a microaerophilic fixed film reactor using pumice stone as a support material under varying hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR). The intense metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterial consortium in the reactor led to 97.5% COD reduction and 99.5% decolorization of simulated wastewater operated under OLR of 7.2kgCODm(3)/d and 24h of HRT. FTIR, (1)H NMR and GC-MS studies revealed the formation of lower molecular weight aliphatic compounds under 24h of HRT, leading to complete mineralization of simulated wastewater. The detection of oxido-reductive enzyme activities suggested the enzymatic reduction of azo bonds prior to mineralization. Toxicity studies indicated that microbial treatment favors detoxification of simulated wastewater. PMID:25459797

  13. Detoxification of azo dyes by bacterial oxidoreductase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Shahid; Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq; Crowley, David E

    2016-08-01

    Azo dyes and their intermediate degradation products are common contaminants of soil and groundwater in developing countries where textile and leather dye products are produced. The toxicity of azo dyes is primarily associated with their molecular structure, substitution groups and reactivity. To avoid contamination of natural resources and to minimize risk to human health, this wastewater requires treatment in an environmentally safe manner. This manuscript critically reviews biological treatment systems and the role of bacterial reductive and oxidative enzymes/processes in the bioremediation of dye-polluted wastewaters. Many studies have shown that a variety of culturable bacteria have efficient enzymatic systems that can carry out complete mineralization of dye chemicals and their metabolites (aromatic compounds) over a wide range of environmental conditions. Complete mineralization of azo dyes generally involves a two-step process requiring initial anaerobic treatment for decolorization, followed by an oxidative process that results in degradation of the toxic intermediates that are formed during the first step. Molecular studies have revealed that the first reductive process can be carried out by two classes of enzymes involving flavin-dependent and flavin-free azoreductases under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions. The second step that is carried out by oxidative enzymes that primarily involves broad specificity peroxidases, laccases and tyrosinases. This review focuses, in particular, on the characterization of these enzymes with respect to their enzyme kinetics and the environmental conditions that are necessary for bioreactor systems to treat azo dyes contained in wastewater. PMID:25665634

  14. Effect of trace metals and electron shuttle on simultaneous reduction of reactive black-5 azo dye and hexavalent chromium in liquid medium by Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Shahid; Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Ahmad, Riaz

    2015-11-01

    This study demonstrates the role of electron shuttles and trace metals in the biotransformation of azo dye reactive black-5 and hexavalent chromium (CrVI) that are released simultaneously in tannery effluent. Previously isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida KI was used for the simultaneous reduction of the dye (100 mg L(-1)) and CrVI (2 mg L(-1)) in a mineral salts medium (MSM). Among various trace metals, only Cu(II) had a stimulating effect on the bacterial-mediated reduction process. Application of electron shuttles such as hydroquinone and uric acid at a low concentration (1mM) had a positive effect on the reduction process and caused simultaneous reduction of 100% dye and 97% CrVI in 12-18 h. Mannitol, EDTA and sodium benzoate at all concentrations (ranging from 1 to 9 mM) showed an inhibitory effect on the reduction of reactive black-5 and CrVI. An inverse linear relationship between the velocity of reaction (V) and the concentration [S] of electron shuttles was observed. The results imply that both types and concentration of an electron shuttle and trace metals can affect the simultaneous reduction of reactive black-5 and CrVI. PMID:25556007

  15. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject...

  20. Comprehensive review and compilation of treatment for azo dyes using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Murali, V; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Hamidin, Nasrul

    2013-03-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent an emerging technology that focuses on power generation and effluent treatment. This review compiles articles related to MFCs using azo dye as the substrate. The significance of the general components in MFCs and systems of MFCs treating azo dye is depicted in this review. In addition, degradation of azo dyes such as Congo red, methyl orange, active brilliant red X-3B, amaranth, reactive blue 221, and acid orange 7 in MFCs are summarized. Further exploration and operational modification are suggested to address the challenges of complete removal of azo dye with maximum power generation in an MFC. In addition, a sequential treatment system with MFCs is suggested for complete mineralization of azo dye. PMID:23581242

  1. Degradation of a textile reactive azo dye by a combined biological-photocatalytic process: Candida tropicalis Jks2 -Tio2/Uv

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the decolorization and degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) azo dye was investigated by biological, photocatalytic (UV/TiO2) and combined processes. Application of Candida tropicalis JKS2 in treatment of the synthetic medium containing RB5 indicated complete decolorization of the dye with 200 mg/L in less than 24 h. Degradation of the aromatic rings, resulting from the destruction of the dye, did not occur during the biological treatment. Mineralization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution was obtained after 80 min by photocatalytic process (in presence of 0.2 g/L TiO2). COD (chemical oxygen demand) was not detectable after complete decolorization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution. However, photocatalytic process was not effective in the removal of the dye at high concentrations (≥200 mg/L). With 200 mg/L concentration, 74.9% of decolorization was achieved after 4 h illumination under photocatalytic process and the absorbance peak in UV region (attributed to aromatic rings) was not completely removed. A two-step treatment process, namely, biological treatment by yeast followed by photocatalytic degradation, was also assessed. In the combined process (with 200 mg/L RB5), absorbance peak in UV region significantly disappeared after 2 h illumination and about 60% COD removal was achieved in the biological step. It is suggested that the combined process is more effective than the biological and photocatalytic treatments in the remediation of aromatic rings. PMID:23369285

  2. Effectiveness of Rice Agricultural Waste, Microbes and Wetland Plants in the Removal of Reactive Black-5 Azo Dye in Microcosm Constructed Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Saba, Beenish; Jabeen, Madeeha; Khalid, Azeem; Aziz, Irfan; Christy, Ann D

    2015-01-01

    Azo dyes are commonly generated as effluent pollutants by dye using industries, causing contamination of surface and ground water. Various strategies are employed to treat such wastewater; however, a multi-faceted treatment strategy could be more effective for complete removal of azo dyes from industrial effluent than any single treatment. In the present study, rice husk material was used as a substratum in two constructed wetlands (CWs) and augmented with microorganisms in the presence of wetland plants to effectively treat dye-polluted water. To evaluate the efficiency of each process the study was divided into three levels, i.e., adsorption of dye onto the substratum, phytoremediation within the CW and then bioremediation along with the previous two processes in the augmented CW. The adsorption process was helpful in removing 50% dye in presence of rice husk while 80% in presence of rice husk biocahr. Augmentation of microorganisms in CW systems has improved dye removal efficiency to 90%. Similarly presence of microorganisms enhanced removal of total nitrogen (68% 0 and Total phosphorus (75%). A significant improvement in plant growth was also observed by measuring plant height, number of leaves and leave area. These findings suggest the use of agricultural waste as part of a CW substratum can provide enhanced removal of textile dyes. PMID:25849115

  3. Degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms and helminths

    SciTech Connect

    Kingthom Chung; Stevens, S.E. Jr. . Dept. of Biology)

    1993-11-01

    The degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms, fungi, and helminths is reviewed. Azo dyes are used in a wide variety of products and can be found in the effluent of most sewage treatment facilities. Substantial quantities of these dyes have been deposited in the environment, particularly in streams and rivers. Azo dyes were shown to affect microbial activities and microbial population sizes in the sediments and in the water columns of aquatic habitats. Only a few aerobic bacteria have been found to reduce azo dyes under aerobic conditions, and little is known about the process. A substantial number of anaerobic bacteria capable of azo dye reduction have been reported. The enzyme responsible for azo dye reduction has been partially purified, and characterization of the enzyme is proceeding. The nematode Ascaris lumbricoides and the cestode Moniezia expanza have been reported to reduce azo dyes anaerobically. Recently the fungus Phanerochaete chrysoporium was reported to mineralize azo dyes via a peroxidation-mediated pathway. A possible degradation pathway for the mineralization of azo dye is proposed and future research needs are discussed.

  4. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted azo metal complex dye. 721... Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... dye (PMN P-94-499) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted azo metal complex dye. 721... Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... dye (PMN P-94-499) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted azo metal complex dye. 721... Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... dye (PMN P-94-499) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted azo metal complex dye. 721... Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... dye (PMN P-94-499) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  8. Modification of azo dyes by lactic acid bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of microorganisms capable of utilizing azo dyes have been an area of significant interest due to their role in the treatment of waste water derived from the textile industry. The ability of L. casei LA1133 and L. paracasei LA0471 to modify the azo dye tartrazine was recently document...

  9. An Interdisciplinary Experiment: Azo-Dye Metabolism by "Staphylococcus Aureus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brocklesby, Kayleigh; Smith, Robert; Sharp, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    An interdisciplinary and engaging practical is detailed which offers great versatility in the study of a qualitative and quantitative metabolism of azo-dyes by "Staphylococcus aureus". This practical has broad scope for adaptation in the number and depth of variables to allow a focused practical experiment or small research project. Azo-dyes are…

  10. SonoFenton degradation of an azo dye, Direct Red.

    PubMed

    Harichandran, G; Prasad, S

    2016-03-01

    The degradation of a reactive azo dye, Direct Red 81 (DR81), by Fenton process and in conjunction with sonolysis (SonoFenton) was studied. The synergistic effect of Fenton process and sonolysis enhanced the degradation of Direct Red 81 in aqueous solutions and the reaction followed the mechanism of hydroxyl radical (HO) oxidation. The influence of the initial substrate concentration, pH and catalyst loading on the rate of decolorisation were studied. The dye decolorisation followed apparent first order kinetics. The optimum conditions for decolorisation were pH=3.0, [Fe(2+)]=0.2 g/l, [H2O2]=5.1×10(-3) mol/l and ultrasonic frequency=120 kHz, 60 W. These conditions yielded 99% decolorisation of DR81 within 75 min. The sonolytic degradation products of DR81 were identified using Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS). The presence of CO3(2-), HCO3(-), Cl(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-) ions in the dye solution did not have a considerable effect on the decolorisation efficiency. This study demonstrates that Fenton and SonoFenton methods can effectively decolorize DR81 dye in waste water. The dye concentration used in this study is higher compared to earlier studies illustrating the effective mineralization by the SonoFenton process. The mechanism of dye degradation is also proposed. PMID:26584996

  11. Universal dark quencher based on "clicked" spectrally distinct azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Hardouin, Julie; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2013-12-01

    The first synthesis of an heterotrifunctional molecular scaffold derived from the popular DABCYL azo dye quencher has been achieved. The sequential derviatization of this trivalent azobenzene derivative with two other nonfluorescent azo dyes (Black Hole Quencher BHQ-1 and BHQ-3) and through effective reactions from the "bioconjugation chemistry" repertoire has led to an universal dark quencher (UDQ). This "clicked" poly azo dye is able to turn off an array of fluorophores covering the UV/NIR (300-750 nm) spectral range. PMID:24215300

  12. Multiwavelength spectrophotometric determination of acidity constants of some azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Maddah, Bozorgmehr; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Rouhani, Shohreh; Haghbeen, Kamaladin; Alizadeh, Kamal

    2008-06-01

    A multiwavelength spectrophotometric titration method was applied to study the acidity constants of some azo dyes in water. The UV-vis absorption spectra of azo dye solutions were recorded in the course of their pH-metric titration with a standard base solution. The protolytic equilibrium constants, spectral profiles, concentration diagrams and also the number of components have been calculated. The quantitative effects of the substituents on the acidity of the studied azo dyes were investigated by the linear free energy relationship (LFER) using Hammet sigma constant (sigma) and field and resonance effects of Kamlet and Taft (f and Re, respectively). PMID:17719268

  13. Multiwavelength spectrophotometric determination of acidity constants of some azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Maddah, Bozorgmehr; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Rouhani, Shohreh; Haghbeen, Kamaladin; Alizadeh, Kamal

    2008-06-01

    A multiwavelength spectrophotometric titration method was applied to study the acidity constants of some azo dyes in water. The UV-vis absorption spectra of azo dye solutions were recorded in the course of their pH-metric titration with a standard base solution. The protolytic equilibrium constants, spectral profiles, concentration diagrams and also the number of components have been calculated. The quantitative effects of the substituents on the acidity of the studied azo dyes were investigated by the linear free energy relationship (LFER) using Hammet sigma constant ( σ) and field and resonance effects of Kamlet and Taft ( f and ℜ, respectively).

  14. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted azo metal...

  15. REMOVAL OF AZO DYES BY THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Engineering Research Laboratory, Office of Research & Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting research designed to develop techniques for predicting the fate of azo dyes in typical wastewater treatment systems which are treating wastewater ...

  16. Photobleaching effect in azo-dye containing epoxy resin films: the potentiality of carbon nanotubes as azo-dye dispensers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Costanzo, Guadalupe; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Azo-dye molecules may suffer from bleaching under certain illumination conditions. When this photoinduced process occurs, it generates an irreversible effect that is characterized by the loss of absorption of the dye molecule. Moreover, the well-known isomerization of azodye molecules does not occur anymore. In this work it is shown how the addition of a small amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) helps to decrease the bleaching effect in a photosensitive guest-host azo-polymer film. Two different systems were fabricated using an epoxy resin as polymer matrix. An azo-dye, Disperse Orange 3, was used as photosensitive material in both systems and MWCNTs were added into one of them. The optical response of the polymeric systems was studied considering the degree of photoinduced birefringence. Photobleaching of the azo-dye was observed in all cases however, the effect is lower for the composite material containing 0.2 wt % MWCNTs. The weak interaction between MWCNTs and dye molecules is less favorable when the material is heated. The optical behavior of the heated composite material suggests that carbon nanotubes can be potentially used as azo dye dispensers. The results are interpreted in terms of the non-covalent interaction between azo-dye molecules and MWCNTs.

  17. Biological waste-water treatment of azo dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaul, G.M.; Dempsey, C.R.; Dostal, K.A.

    1988-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Toxic Substances evaluates existing chemicals under Section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and Premanufacture Notification (PMN) submissions under Section 5 of TSCA. Azo dyes constitute a significant portion of these PMN submissions and specific azo dyes have recently been added to the priority list for considerations in the development of test rules under Section 4. Azo dyes are of concern because some of the dyes, dye precurors, and/or their degradation products such as aromatic amines (which are also dye precurors) have been shown to be, or are suspected to be, carcinogenic. The fate of azo dyes in biological waste-water treatment systems was studied to aid in the review of PMN submissions and to assist in the possible development of test rules. Results from extensive pilot-scale activated-sludge process testing for 18 azo dyes are presented. Results from fate studies of C.I. Disperse Blue 79 in aerobic and anaerobic waste-water treatment will also be presented.

  18. Development of an activated carbon-packed microbial bioelectrochemical system for azo dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Cardenas-Robles, Arely; Martinez, Eduardo; Rendon-Alcantar, Idelfonso; Frontana, Carlos; Gonzalez-Gutierrez, Linda

    2013-01-01

    A microbial bioelectrochemical reactor (BER) was employed for the degradation of azo dyes without the use of an external electron donor, using activated carbon (GAC) as a redox mediator. Contribution of pH values, open circuit potential (OCP), dye concentration and applied current were individually studied. A batch system and an upflow fixed bed bioreactor were built for analyzing the effect of the applied current on biodegradation of the azo dye Reactive Red 272. The presence of GAC (20% w/v) regulated both pH and OCP values in solution and led to a removal efficiency of 98%. Cyclic voltammetry results indicate a dependence of the electron transfer mechanism with the concentration of the azo compound. With these results, a continuous flow reactor operating with J=0.045 mA cm(-2), led to removal rates of 95% (± 3.5%) in a half-residence time of 1 hour. PMID:23128299

  19. The stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their impact on microbial phospholipid fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Shaharoona, Baby; Crowley, David E; Khalid, Azeem; Hussain, Sabir; Arshad, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the stability of structurally different azo dyes in soil and their impact on the microbial community composition by analyzing phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Sterile and non-sterile soils were amended with three azo dyes, including: Direct Red 81, Reactive Black 5 and Acid Yellow 19 at 160mgkg(-1) soil. The results showed that the azo dyes were quite stable and that large amounts of these dyes ranging from 17.3% to 87.5% were recoverable from the sterile and non-sterile soils after 14 days. The maximum amount of dye was recovered in the case of Direct Red 81. PLFA analysis showed that the azo dyes had a significant effect on microbial community structure. PLFA concentrations representing Gram-negative bacteria in dye-amended soil were substantially less as compared to the PLFA concentration of Gram-positive bacteria. Acid Yellow 19 dye had almost similar effects on the PLFA concentrations representing bacteria and fungi. In contrast, Reactive Black 5 had a greater negative effect on fungal PLFA than that on bacterial PLFA, while the opposite was observed in the case of Direct Red 81. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their effects on soil microbial community composition. PMID:26074308

  20. Growth and physiology of Clostridium perfringens wild-type and ΔazoC knockout: an azo dye exposure study.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a strictly anaerobic micro-organism and inhabitant of the human intestine, has been shown to produce the azoreductase enzyme AzoC, an NAD(P)H-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. This enzyme reduces azo dyes to aromatic amines, which are carcinogenic in nature. A significant amount of work has been completed that focuses on the activity of this enzyme; however, few studies have been completed that focus on the physiology of azo dye reduction. Dye reduction studies coupled with C. perfringens growth studies in the presence of ten different azo dyes and in media of varying complexities were completed to compare the growth rates and dye-reducing activity of C. perfringens WT cells, a C. perfringens ΔazoC knockout, and Bifidobacterium infantis, a non-azoreductase-producing control bacterium. The presence of azo dyes significantly increased the generation time of C. perfringens in rich medium, an effect that was not seen in minimal medium. In addition, azo dye reduction studies with the ΔazoC knockout suggested the presence of additional functional azoreductases in this medically important bacterium. Overall, this study addresses a major gap in the literature by providing the first look, to our knowledge, at the complex physiology of C. perfringens upon azo dye exposure and the effect that both azo dyes and the azoreductase enzyme have on growth. PMID:26566621

  1. Detection of azo dyes and aromatic amines in women undergarment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-07-28

    Women are exposed to several chemical additives including azo dyes that exist in textile materials, which are a potential health hazard for consumers. Our objective was to analyze suspected carcinogenic azo dyes and their degradation aromatic amines in women underwear panties using a fast and simple method for quantification. Here, we evaluated 120 different samples of women underwear for their potential release of aromatic amines to the skin. Seventy-four samples yielded low level mixtures of aromatic amines; however eighteen samples were found to produce greater than 200 mg/kg (ppm) of aromatic amines. Azo dyes in these 18 samples were extracted from the fabrics and analyzed by reverse phase thin layer chromatography in tandem with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven azo dyes were identified based on their mass spectral data and the chemical structure of the aromatic amine produced from these samples. We demonstrate that planar chromatography and mass spectrometry can be really helpful in confirming the identity of the azo dyes, offering highly relevant molecular information of the responsible compounds in the fabrics. With the growing concern about the consumer goods, analysis of aromatic amines in garments has become a highly important issue. PMID:27149414

  2. Biosorption of Azo dyes by spent Rhizopus arrhizus biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Neeta A.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, spent Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was used for the removal of six azo dyes from aqueous solutions. The dye removal capacity of the biomass was evaluated by conducting batch tests as a function of contact time, biomass dosage, pH and initial dye concentrations. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted well with the experimental data with correlation coefficients greater than 0.999, suggesting that chemisorptions might be the rate limiting step. The equilibrium sorption data showed good fit to the Langmuir isotherm model. Among the six dyes tested, the maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for fast red A and metanil yellow was found to be 108.8 and 128.5 mg/g, respectively. These encouraging results suggest that dead Rhizopus arrhizus biomass could be a potential biomaterial for the removal of azo dyes from aqueous dye solution.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10633 - Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10633 Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (PMN P-12-276) is subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10633 - Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10633 Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (PMN P-12-276) is subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  10. Photoinduced translational molecular mobility in solid nanostructured azo dye films

    SciTech Connect

    Ezhov, A A; Kozenkov, V M; Magnitskii, Sergey A; Nagorskii, Nikolay M; Panov, Vladimir I

    2011-11-30

    A new mechanism controlling the molecular motion in thin azo-containing films during a photoinduced change in the surface nanorelief is found. It is shown experimentally that exposure of a solid AD-1 azo dye, deposited on a glass substrate, to incoherent linearly polarised light leads to formation of nanostructures with a characteristic size of 200 nm, which are similar to droplets of melt of this dye on the same substrate. It is shown that photoinduced mass transport in a solid AD-1 azo dye film can be explained by the mobility of molecules related to their trans-cis-photoisomerisation, which leads to film softening with subsequent formation of spherical protrusions under surface tension forces.

  11. Metabolism of azo dyes: implication for detoxication and activation.

    PubMed

    Levine, W G

    1991-01-01

    Azo dyes are consumed and otherwise utilized in varying quantities in many parts of the world. Such widely used chemicals are of great concern with regard to their potential toxicity and carcinogenic properties. Their metabolism has been studied extensively and is significant for detoxication and metabolic activation. Both oxidative and reductive pathways are involved in these processes. The majority of azo dyes undergo reduction catalyzed by enzymes of the intestinal microorganisms and/or hepatic enzymes including microsomal and soluble enzymes. The selectivity of substrate and enzyme may to a large extent be determined by the oxygen sensitivity of reduction since a normal liver is mainly aerobic in all areas, whereas the microorganisms of the lower bowel exist in an anaerobic environment. However, it should be pointed out that the pO2 of centrilobular cells within the liver is only a fraction that of air, where pO2 = 150 torr. Therefore, an azo dye reduction experiment performed aerobically may not be an accurate predictor of reductive metabolism in all areas of the liver. Many of the azo dyes in common use today have highly charged substituents such as sulfonate. These resist enzymic attack and for the most part are poorly absorbed from the intestinal tract, providing poor access to the liver, the major site of the mixed-function oxidase system. Lipophilic dyes, such as DAB, which are often carcinogenic, readily access oxidative enzymes and are activated by both mixed-function oxidase and conjugating systems. Reduction of the carcinogenic dyes usually leads to loss of carcinogenic activity. By contrast, most of the highly charged water-soluble dyes become mutagenic only after reduction. Even then, most of the fully reduced amines required oxidative metabolic activation. An outstanding example is the potent human bladder carcinogen benzidine, which derives from the reduction of several azo dyes. Many problems regarding mutagenic and carcinogenic activation remain

  12. FATE OF WATER SOLUBLE AZO DYES IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine the partitioning of water soluble azo dyes in the activated sludge process (ASP). Azo dyes are of concern because some of the dyes, dye precursors , and/or their degradation products such as aromatic amines (which are also dye precurso...

  13. Catalyzed degradation of azo dyes under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Ming; Wen, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Phase-pure layered perovskite La(4)Ni(3)O(10) powders were synthesized by a solution combustion approach. It is found that, in the presence of the La(4)Ni(3)O(10) powders, aqueous azo dyes can be degraded catalytically and efficiently under ambient conditions. Neither light nor additional reagents are needed in the catalytic reaction. The dye degradation procedure can be accelerated markedly by magnetic stirring. A systemic series of chemical and electrochemical experiments suggested that the dye degradation proceeds through electron transfers from the dye molecules to the catalyst and then to electron acceptors such as dissolved oxygen. The present catalytic degradation requires no additional reagents or external energy input, which hence provides a potentially low-cost alternative for the remediation of azo-dye effluents. PMID:21049925

  14. Use of highly absorptive azo dyes in photoresist coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping-Hung; Ding, Shuji; Hannigan, T. T.; Eberly, D. E.; Kokinda, Elaine; Dixit, Sunit S.; Mehtsun, Salem; Corso, Anthony J.; Khanna, Dinesh N.

    1997-07-01

    We recently synthesized and studied a number of highly absorptive diketo azo dyes. These materials, existed in the hydrazo tautomeric forms, showed high extinction coefficients, typically (epsilon) approximately equals 25,000 - 39,000 at 365 nm. They also exhibited good solubility in common resist casting solvents such as propylene glycol monoethyl acetate (PGMEA) and ethyl lactate. The thermostability of the materials was investigated. The impact of these diketo azo dyes on i-line resist performance in terms of swing reduction, reflective notching control and lithographic performance is discussed.

  15. Using protein nanofibrils to remove azo dyes from aqueous solution by the coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Morshedi, Dina; Mohammadi, Zeinab; Akbar Boojar, Masoud Mashhadi; Aliakbari, Farhang

    2013-12-01

    The ever-increasing applications of hazardous azo dyes as industrialized coloring agents have led to serious remediation challenges. In this study, proteinaceous nanofibrils were examined as coagulants for decolorization of azo dyes in aqueous solutions. The results provided some insight regarding the mechanism of dye removal. The strength of nanofibrils to remove dyes from solution was evaluated by remediation of acid red 88, Bismarck brown R, direct violet 51, reactive black 5, and Congo red. However, the efficiency of nanofibrils to coagulate with different dyes was variable (60-98%) and dependent on the structures of dyes and the physicochemical conditions of the solutions. Increasing the temperature or ionic strength declined the coagulation time and induced the rate of dye removal. Changing pH had contradictory effects on the dye removal efficiency which was more affected by the chemical structure of the dye rather than the change in stability of the coagulant. The efficiency of nanofibrils to remove dyes was more than that of charcoal, which is considered as one of the most common substances used for azo dye remediation which may be due to its well dispersion in the aqueous solutions, and slower rates of the coagulation than that of the adsorption process. Furthermore, cytotoxicity was not detected after treating cell cultures with the decolorized solutions. Accordingly, by integrating biological and biophysicochemical processes, proteinaceous nanofibrils can be promising candidates for treatment of colored wastewaters. Ease of production, proper and quick dispersion in water, without the production of dangerous dye by-products and derivatives, are some of the main advantages of nanofibrils. PMID:23999142

  16. A comparative study on decolorization of reactive azo and indigoid dyes by free/immobilized pellets of Trametes versicolor and Funalia trogii.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Seval Cing; Yesilada, Ozfer

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate decolorization of Acid Blue 74 and Reactive Blue 198 dyes by free and immobilized white rot fungal pellets in order to confirm the possibility of practical application via repeated-batch cultivation. Decolorization studies were conducted using free pellets (FP), fungal cells immobilized on activated carbon (IFCAC) and pinewood (IFCP), and also fungal cells entrapped in alginate beads (FCEAB). No additional nitrogen and carbon source was used and high decolorization rates were achieved in only dye-contained media without pH adjustment. Acid Blue 74 was decolorized 96 and 94% within 2 hr by Trametes versicolor and Funalia trogii free pellets, respectively. These values were 87 and 84% for Reactive Blue 198, in this respect. Immobilization of fungal cells on pinewood increased the usability of pellets and the average decolorization efficiency of both dyes. The micro environment changed in the presence of pinewood and increased the stability of immobilized pellets. Decolorization was performed rapidly and efficiently. Laccase activity enhanced with availability of pinewood, and high laccase production with F. trogii was obtained. After separation by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), the molecular weight of T versicolor and F. trogii laccase bands was determined 64 and 61 kDa approximately. Green bands were obtained by the activity staining process with laccase substrate (ABTS) after gel renaturation step. PMID:26688979

  17. Laboratory studies of electrochemical treatment of industrial azo dye effluent.

    PubMed

    Vaghela, Sanjay S; Jethva, Ashok D; Mehta, Bhavesh B; Dave, Sunil P; Adimurthy, Subbarayappa; Ramachandraiah, Gadde

    2005-04-15

    Removal of color and reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in an industrial azo dye effluent containing chiefly reactive dyes were investigated under single-pass conditions at a dimensionally stable anode (DSA) in a thin electrochemical flow reactor at different current densities, flow rates, and dilutions. With 50% diluted effluent, decolorization was achieved up to 85-99% at 10-40 mA/ cm2 at 5 mL/min flow rate and 50-88% at 30-40 mA/ cm2 at high (10-15 mL/min) flow rates. The COD reduction was maximum (81%) at 39.9 mA/cm2 or above when solution-electrode contact time (Ct) was as high as 21.7 s/cm2 and decreased as Ct declined at a given current density. Cyclic voltammetric studies suggesting an indirect oxidation of dye molecules over the anode surface were carried out at a glassy carbon electrode. The effect of pH on decolorization and COD reduction was determined. An electrochemical mechanism mediated by OCl- operating in the decolorization and COD reduction processes was suggested. The effluent was further treated with NaOCI. The oxidized products from the treated effluents were isolated and confirmed to be free from chlorine-substituted products by IR spectroscopy. From the apparent pseudo-first-order rate data, the second-order rate coefficients were evaluated to be 2.9 M(-1) s(-1) at 5 mL/ min, 76.2 M(-1) s(-1) at 10 mL/min, and 156.1 M(-1) s(-1) at 15 mL/ min for color removal, and 1.19 M(-1) s(-1) at 5 mL/min, 1.79 M(-1) s(-1) at 10 mL/min, and 3.57 M(-1) s(-1) at 15 mL/min for COD reduction. Field studies were also carried out with a pilot-scale cell at the source of effluent generation of different plants corresponding to the industry. Decolorization was achieved to about 94-99% with azo dye effluents at 0.7-1.0 L/min flow costing around Indian Rupees 0.02-0.04 per liter, and to about 54-75% in other related effluents at 0.3-1.0 L/min flow under single-pass conditions. PMID:15884385

  18. Toxicity assessment and microbial degradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Puvaneswari, N; Muthukrishnan, J; Gunasekaran, P

    2006-08-01

    Toxic effluents containing azo dyes are discharged from various industries and they adversely affect water resources, soil fertility, aquatic organisms and ecosystem integrity. They pose toxicity (lethal effect, genotoxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity) to aquatic organisms (fish, algae, bacteria, etc.) as well as animals. They are not readily degradable under natural conditions and are typically not removed from waste water by conventional waste water treatment systems. Benzidine based dyes have long been recognized as a human urinary bladder carcinogen and tumorigenic in a variety of laboratory animals. Several microorganisms have been found to decolourize, transform and even to completely mineralize azo dyes. A mixed culture of two Pseudomonas strains efficiently degraded mixture of 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CBA) and phenol/cresols. Azoreductases of different microorganisms are useful for the development of biodegradation systems as they catalyze reductive cleavage of azo groups (-N=N-) under mild conditions. In this review, toxic impacts of dyeing factory effluents on plants, fishes, and environment, and plausible bioremediation strategies for removal of azo dyes have been discussed. PMID:16924831

  19. Decolorization of azo dye C.I. Reactive Black 5 by ozonation in aqueous solution: influencing factors, degradation products, reaction pathway and toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing; Dai, Yong; Han, Xiangyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, ozonation treatment of C.I. Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated at various operating parameters. The results showed that the aqueous solution initially containing 200 mg/L RB5 was quickly decolorized at pH 8.0 with an ozone dose of 3.2 g/h. Reaction intermediates with m/z 281, 546, 201, 350, 286 and 222 were elucidated using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, while sulfate ion, nitrate ion and three carboxylic acids (i.e., oxalic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid) were identified by ion exchange chromatography. Thus, the cleavage of the azo bond and the introduction of OH groups in the corresponding positions were proposed as the predominant reaction pathway. The detachment of sulfonic groups was also commonly observed during the ozonation treatment. The proposed degradation mechanism was confirmed by frontier electron density calculations, suggesting the feasibility of predicting the major events in the whole ozonation process with the computational method. Compared with RB5 degradation, the reduction of total organic carbon (TOC) proceeded much more slowly, and approximately 54% TOC was removed after 4 h of ozonation. Acute toxicity tests with Photobacterium phosphoreum showed that the toxicity of reaction solution was firstly increased and then decreased to a negligible level after 160 min. PMID:27054721

  20. Irradiation treatment of azo dye containing wastewater: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2008-03-01

    The radiation-induced decolouration and degradation of aqueous solutions of azo dyes and their model compounds (anilines, phenols, triazines) are reviewed together with practical applications and the experimental methods (pulse radiolysis, steady-state gamma radiolysis, as well as end-product analysis) used for studying the reactions. The proposed mechanisms and the rate coefficients for the reactions of rad OH, e aq- and rad H water radiolysis intermediates with the dye molecules and with model compounds are summarized.

  1. Detoxification of azo dyes in the context of environmental processes.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Deepak; Mishra, Vandana; Sharma, Radhey Shyam

    2016-07-01

    Azo dyes account for >70% of the global industrial demand (∼9 million tons). Owing to their genotoxic/carcinogenic potential, the annual disposal of ∼4,500,000 tons of dyes and/or degraded products is an environmental and socio-economic concern. In comparison to physico-chemical methods, microbe-mediated dye degradation is considered to be low-input, cost-effective and environmentally-safe. However, under different environmental conditions, interactions of chemically diverse dyes with metabolically diverse microbes produce metabolites of varying toxicity. In addition, majority of studies on microbial dye-degradation focus on decolorization with least attention towards detoxification. Therefore, the environmental significance of microbial dye detoxification research of past >3 decades is critically evaluated with reference to dye structure and the possible influence of microbial interactions in different environments. In the absence of ecosystem-based studies, the results of laboratory-based studies on dye degradation, metabolite production and their genotoxic impact on model organisms are used to predict the possible fate and consequences of azo dyes/metabolites in the environment. In such studies, the predominance of fewer numbers of toxicological assays that too at lower levels of biological organization (molecular/cellular/organismic) suggests its limited ecological significance. Based on critical evaluation of these studies the recommendations on inclusion of multilevel approach (assessment at multiple levels of biological organization), multispecies microcosm approach and native species approach in conjunction with identification of dye metabolites have been made for future studies. Such studies will bridge the gap between the fundamental knowledge on dye-microbe-environment interactions and its application to combat dye-induced environmental toxicity. Thus an environmental perspective on dye toxicity in the background of dye structure and effects of

  2. Anaerobic/aerobic treatment of selected azo dyes in wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; Bishop, P.L. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Agha, A.M. . Faculty of Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Azo dyes represent the largest class of dyes in use today. Current environmental concern with these dyes revolves around the potential carcinogenic health risk presented by these dyes or their intermediate biodegradation products when exposed to microflora in the human digestive tract. These dyes may build up in the environment, since many wastewater treatment plants allow these dyes to pass through the system virtually untreated. The initial step in the degradation of these dyes is the cleavage of the Azo bond. This cleavage is often impossible under aerobic conditions, but has been readily demonstrated under anaerobic conditions. The focus of the study was to determine the feasibility of using an anaerobic fluidized-bed reactor to accomplish this cleavage. The effects of typical process variables such as hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent dye concentration levels, and degree of bed fluidization on removal efficiencies were also studied. The four dyes selected for this study were Acid-Orange 7, Acid-Orange 8, Acid-Orange 10, and Acid-Red 14. The effectiveness of using a bench-scale-activated sludge reactor as a sequenced second stage was also examined. Results indicate that nearly complete cleavage of the Azo bond is easily accomplished for each of the four dyes under hydraulic retention times of either 12 or 24 h. Initial results indicate, though, that aromatic amine by-products remain. The sequenced second stage was able to remove the remaining Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) load to acceptable levels. Work is presently underway to determine the face of the anaerobic by-products in the aerobic second stage.

  3. Photocatalytic Degradation of Azo Dyes using Doped Titania Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugasundaram, Prasad

    Photo-catalytic degradation using semiconductor particle as dispersion in aqueous medium has been gaining increased attention over the past several years. Their versatility in application makes them unique along with their easy processing techniques and low cost. Titania semiconductor is one of the most important members of this family. It has been widely used for various applications ranging from environmental to bio-medical. Titanium dioxide has gained importance as an effective photo-catalyst because of its advantages over other semiconductor oxides which include high photo-stability, inexpensive, reusable property, chemical and biological inertness, high reactivity, non-toxicity, corrosion resistance, operation at ambient temperatures and its ability to treat trace level pollutants. Its use as a photocatalyst is primarily because of its band gap of 3.0-3.3 eV which can be effectively activated under ultraviolet radiation (wavelength lambda < 400 nm), which leads to electron jump from valence to conduction band. This project aims at developing electrospun titania fibers doped with copper in order to study and demonstrate photocatalytic activity in the visible light spectrum, resulting in quick formation of holes which are ready to react with water to form -OH radicals. A comparative study of pure titania and copper doped titania for degradation of azo dyes were carried out. SEM, EDAX, XRD were carried out to thoroughly understand the structure of the fibers. The photocatalytic activity measurements for different dyes were noted using Uv-Vis method. The fibers when fully developed will be disposable photocatalytic materials for degrading dyes, Organic pollutants and for bio-medical applications when exposed to visible light.

  4. Enhanced anaerobic fermentation with azo dye as electron acceptor: simultaneous acceleration of organics decomposition and azo decolorization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Zhang, Jingxin; Chen, Shuo; Afzal, Shahzad

    2014-10-01

    Accumulation of hydrogen during anaerobic processes usually results in low decomposition of volatile organic acids (VFAs). On the other hand, hydrogen is a good electron donor for dye reduction, which would help the acetogenic conversion in keeping low hydrogen concentration. The main objective of the study was to accelerate VFA composition through using azo dye as electron acceptor. The results indicated that the azo dye serving as an electron acceptor could avoid H2 accumulation and accelerate anaerobic digestion of VFAs. After adding the azo dye, propionate decreased from 2400.0 to 689.5mg/L and acetate production increased from 180.0 to 519.5mg/L. It meant that the conversion of propionate into acetate was enhanced. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that the abundance of propionate-utilizing acetogens with the presence of azo dye was greater than that in a reference without azo dye. The experiments via using glucose as the substrate further demonstrated that the VFA decomposition and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increased by 319.7mg/L and 23.3% respectively after adding the azo dye. Therefore, adding moderate azo dye might be a way to recover anaerobic system from deterioration due to the accumulation of H2 or VFAs. PMID:25288539

  5. Isolation, development and identification of salt-tolerant bacterial consortium from crude-oil-contaminated soil for degradation of di-azo dye Reactive Blue 220.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vipul R; Bhatt, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was development and characterization of a halophilic bacterial consortium for rapid decolorization and degradation of a wide range of dyes and their mixtures. The 16S rRNA gene analysis of developed halophilic consortium VN.1 showed that the bacterial consortium contained six bacterial strains, which were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens HM480360, Enterobacter aerogenes HM480361, Shewanella sp. HM589853, Arthrobacter nicotianae HM480363, Bacillus beijingensis HM480362 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa JQ659549. Halophilic consortium VN.1 was able to decolorize up to 2,500 mg/L RB220 with >85% chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction under static condition at 30 °C and pH 8.0 in the presence of 7% NaCl. VN.1 also exhibited more than 85% COD reduction with >25 mg/(L h) rate of decolorization in the case of different reactive dye mixtures. We propose the symmetric cleavage of RB220 using Fourier transform infrared, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and confirmed the formation of sodium-4-aminobenzenesulfonate, sodium-6-aminonepthalenesulfonate, and sodiumbenzene/nepthalenesulfonate. Toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of RB220 effluent stimulate the growth of plants as well as the bacterial community responsible for soil fertility. PMID:26177415

  6. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L-1 concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn’t show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic

  7. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L(-1) concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn't show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic

  8. Ultrafast degradation of azo dyes catalyzed by cobalt-based metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, X. D.; Zhu, Z. W.; Liu, G.; Fu, H. M.; Zhang, H. W.; Wang, A. M.; Li, H.; Zhang, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    Reactivity and mass loss are considered mutually exclusive in conventional zero-valent metal (ZVM) technology to treat environmental contaminants. Here, we report the outstanding performance of Co-based metallic glass (MG) in degrading an aqueous solution of azo dye, thus eliminating this trade-off. Ball-milled Co-based MG powders completely degrade Acid Orange II at an ultrafast rate. The surface-area-normalized rate constant of Co-based MG powders was one order of magnitude higher than that of Co-based crystalline counterparts and three orders of magnitude higher than that of the widely studied Fe0 powders. The coordinatively unsaturated local structure in Co-based MG responds to the catalysis for degradation, resulting in very low mass loss. Wide applicability and good reusability were also present. Co-based MG is the most efficient material for azo dye degradation reported thus far, and will promote the practical application of MGs as functional materials.

  9. Non-classical azoreductase secretion in Clostridium perfringens in response to sulfonated azo dye exposure.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a strictly anaerobic microorganism and inhabitant of the human intestine, has been shown to produce an azoreductase enzyme (AzoC), an NADH-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. This enzyme reduces azo dyes into aromatic amines, which can be carcinogenic. A significant amount of work has been completed on the activity of AzoC. Despite this, much is still unknown, including whether azoreduction of these dyes occurs intracellularly or extracellulary. A physiological study of C. perfringens involving the effect of azo dye exposure was completed to answer this question. Through exposure studies, azo dyes were found to cause cytoplasmic protein release, including AzoC, from C. perfringens in dividing and non-dividing cells. Sulfonation (negative charge) of azo dyes proved to be the key to facilitating protein release of AzoC and was found to be azo-dye-concentration-dependent. Additionally, AzoC was found to localize to the Gram-positive periplasmic region. Using a ΔazoC knockout mutant, the presence of additional azoreductases in C. perfringens was suggested. These results support the notion that the azoreduction of these dyes may occur extracellularly for the commensal C. perfringens in the intestine. PMID:25881497

  10. Liquid-Crystal Photoalignment by Super Thin Azo Dye Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xihua; Kozenkov, Vladimir M.; Yeung, Fion Sze-Yan; Xu, Peizhi; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2006-01-01

    A novel liquid crystal (LC) photoalignment method, based on a super thin azo dye molecular layer is proposed. The basic idea of this method is to form a very neat textile knitwear and uniform alignment by azo dye layer without spin coating and rubbing processes. The thickness of the alignment layer is smaller than 3 nm, which is much thinner than traditional PI alignment film. In addition to the advantages of a conventional photoalignment method, the use of super thin layer simplifies the alignment procedure, making possible a high electrooptical performance, good photo-tolerance and thermal stability, better adhesion on indium tin oxide (ITO) surface and compatibility with roll-to-roll process.

  11. Cobalt ferrite nano-composite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method for photo-catalytic degradation of an azo textile dye Reactive Red 4: XRD, FESEM and DRS investigations.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Parhizkar, Janan

    2015-11-01

    Cobalt ferrite nano-composite was prepared by hydrothermal route using cobalt nitrate, iron nitrate and ethylene glycol as chelating agent. The nano-composite was coated on glass by Doctor Blade method and annealed at 300 °C. The structural, optical, and photocatalytic properties have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS). Powder XRD analysis confirmed formation of CoFe2O4 spinel phase. The estimated particle size from FESEM data was 50 nm. The calculated energy band gaps, obtained by Tauc relation from UV-Vis absorption spectra was 1.3 eV. Photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Red 4 as an azo textile was investigated in aqueous solution under irradiation showed 68.0% degradation of the dye within 100 min. The experimental enhanced activity compare to pure Fe2O3 can be ascribed to the formation of composite, which was mainly attributable to the transfer of electron and hole to the surface of composite and hinder the electron hole recombination. PMID:26116997

  12. Biogenic sulphide plays a major role on the riboflavin-mediated decolourisation of azo dyes under sulphate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco J; Enríquez, Javier E; Galindo-Petatán, Eden; Arvayo, Héctor; Razo-Flores, Elías; Field, Jim A

    2007-06-01

    The effect of high concentrations of sulphate on the reductive decolourisation of different azo dyes by anaerobic sludge was studied in batch cultures. Sludge cultures were pre-incubated under sulphate-reducing conditions prior addition of dyes. Little or no effects of sulphate (5-10 g sulphate l(-1)) on the rate of decolourisation of Reactive Orange 14 (RO14), Direct Blue 53 (DB53) and Direct Blue 71 (DB71) were observed when no external redox mediator was provided. However, an increase in sulphate concentration, in the presence of riboflavin (20 microM), enhanced the decolourisation of all dyes. The first-rate constant of decolourisation (k) was increased up to 2-, 3.6- and 2-fold for RO14, DB53 and DB71, respectively, by supplying high sulphate concentrations, compared to the controls lacking sulphate, in the presence of the redox mediator. Sulphate reduction did not take place during the course of azo reductions, but was only evident before dye addition and after complete decolourisation, suggesting azo dyes reduction out-competed sulphate reduction for the available reducing equivalents. The experimental data suggest that reduction of azo dyes by riboflavin, which had been reduced by biogenic sulphide, was the major mechanism implicated during decolourisations, which was corroborated by abiotic incubations. Riboflavin greatly accelerated the abiotic reduction of RO14, so that the k value was increased up to 44-fold compared to the control lacking riboflavin. PMID:17350080

  13. Metabolism of azo dyes by human skin microbiota.

    PubMed

    Stingley, Robin L; Zou, Wen; Heinze, Thomas M; Chen, Huizhong; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2010-01-01

    Reduction of Methyl Red (MR) and Orange II (Or II) by 26 human skin bacterial species was monitored by a rapid spectrophotometric assay. The analysis indicated that skin bacteria, representing the genera Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, Micrococcus, Dermacoccus and Kocuria, were able to reduce MR by 74-100 % in 24 h, with only three species unable to reduce completely the dye in that time. Among the species tested, only Corynebacterium xerosis was unable to reduce Or II to any degree by 24 h, and only Staphylococcus delphini, Staphylococcus sciuri subsp. sciuri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were able to reduce completely this dye within 24 h. MR reduction started with early-exponential growth in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and around late-exponential/early-stationary growth in P. aeruginosa. Reduction of Or II, Ponceau S and Ponceau BS started during late-exponential/early-stationary growth for all three species. Using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analyses, MR metabolites produced by Staph. aureus, Staph. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa were identified as N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and 2-aminobenzoic acid. Searches of available genomic and proteomic data revealed that at least four of the staphylococci in this study, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staph. epidermidis, Staphylococcus cohnii and Staphylococcus saprophyticus, have hypothetical genes with 77, 76, 75 and 74 % sequence identity to azo1 encoding an azoreductase from Staph. aureus and hypothetical proteins with 82, 80, 72 and 74 % identity to Azo1, respectively. In addition, Staphylococcus capitis has a protein with 79 % identity to Azo1. Western analysis detected proteins similar to Azo1 in all the staphylococci tested, except Staph. delphini, Staph. sciuri subsp. sciuri and Staphylococcus auricularis. The data presented in this report will be useful in the risk assessment process for evaluation of public exposure to products containing these dyes

  14. Oxidative degradation of azo dyes using tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuiping; Zhang, Yanwei; Yu, Li; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the catalyzed degradation ability of tourmaline on the dyes methylene blue (MB), rhodamine B (RhB), and congo red (CR) at different pH values. Interestingly, tourmaline strongly adsorbed anionic dyes, but it did not adsorb cationic dyes. When H₂O₂ was introduced into the tourmaline-dye systems, the degradation percentage for CR catalysis by tourmaline was lower than the percentage of adsorption, whereas the opposite was true for MB and RhB systems. Notably, the catalyzed degradation decreased from 100% to 45% for MB, 100% to 15% for RhB and 100% to 25% for CR as the pH increased from 3.0 to 10.0, respectively, which was much greater than the degradation obtained for previously reported materials at pH values ranging from 4.0 to 10.0. Tourmaline catalytically degraded the dyes over a broad range of pH values, which was attributed to tourmaline automatically adjusting the pH of the dye solutions to approximately 5.5 from an initial range of 4.2-10.0. An electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping technique observed peroxyl (ROO·) and alkoxy (RO·) or alkyl (R·) radicals originated from the attack of ·OH radicals and O₂(·-) radicals, indicating that these radicals were involved in the catalyzed degradation of MB. Importantly, four intermediate products of MB at m/z 383, 316, 203 and 181 were observed by LC/MS. PMID:23876254

  15. Abatement of Azo Dye from Wastewater Using Bimetal-Chitosan

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Ghorban; Farjadfard, Sima

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new adsorbent, bimetallic chitosan particle (BCP) that is successfully synthesized and applied to remove the orange II dye from wastewater. The effects of pH, BCP quantity, and contact time are initially verified on the basis of the percentage of orange II removed from the wastewater. Experimental data reveal that the Cu/Mg bimetal and chitosan have a synergistic effect on the adsorption process of the adsorbate, where the dye adsorption by Cu/Mg bimetal, chitosan alone, and bimetal-chitosan is 10, 49, and 99.5%, respectively. The time required for the complete decolorization of orange II by 1 mg/L of BCP is 10 min. The Langmuir model is the best fit for the experimental data, which attains a maximum adsorption capacity of 384.6 mg/g. The consideration of the kinetic behavior indicates that the adsorption of orange II onto the BCP fits best with the pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. Further, the simulated azo dye wastewater can be effectively treated using a relatively low quantity of the adsorbent, 1 mg/L, within a short reaction time of 20 min. Overall, the use of BCP can be considered a promising method for eliminating the azo dye from wastewater effectively. PMID:24348163

  16. Chitosan beads as barriers to the transport of azo dye in soil column.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Nikolaos K; Keenan, Helen

    2010-01-15

    The development of chitosan-based materials as useful adsorbent polymeric matrices is an expanding field in the area of adsorption science. Although chitosan has been successfully used for the removal of dyes from aqueous solutions, no consideration is given to the removal of dyes from contaminated soils. Therefore this study focuses on the potential use of chitosan as an in situ remediation technology. The chitosan beads were used as barriers to the transport of a reactive dye (Reactive Black 5, RB5) in soil column experiments. Batch sorption experiments, kinetic and equilibrium, were performed to estimate the sorption behavior of both chitosan and soil. The chitosan beads were prepared in accordance with published literature and a synthetic soil was prepared by mixing quantities of sand, silt and clay. The synthetic soil was classified according to British Standards. Calcium chloride was used as tracer to define transport rates and other physical experimental parameters. Dye transport reaction parameters were determined by fitting dye breakthrough curves (BTCs) to the HYDRUS-1D version 4.xx software. Fourier Transform-Infra Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to reveal the sorption mechanism. The study showed that chitosan exhibited a high sorption capacity (S(max)=238 mg/g) and pseudo-first sorption rate (k(1)=1.02 h(-1)) coupled with low swelling and increased retardation for the azo dye tested. Thus it has potential as a Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) for containment and remediation of contaminated sites. PMID:19740603

  17. 40 CFR 721.10239 - Trivalent chromium complexes of a substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (generic). 721.10239 Section 721.10239 Protection of Environment... a substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... a substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (PMNs P-09-152 and P-09-153) are subject to...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10239 - Trivalent chromium complexes of a substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (generic). 721.10239 Section 721.10239 Protection of Environment... a substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... a substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (PMNs P-09-152 and P-09-153) are subject to...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10239 - Trivalent chromium complexes of a substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (generic). 721.10239 Section 721.10239 Protection of Environment... a substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... a substituted beta-naphthol amine azo dye (PMNs P-09-152 and P-09-153) are subject to...

  20. Azo Dye Biodecolorization Enhanced by Echinodontium taxodii Cultured with Lignin

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jing; Yu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose facilitates the fungal oxidization of recalcitrant organic pollutants through the extracellular ligninolytic enzymes induced by lignin in wood or other plant tissues. However, available information on this phenomenon is insufficient. Free radical chain reactions during lignin metabolism are important in xenobiotic removal. Thus, the effect of lignin on azo dye decolorization in vivo by Echinodontium taxodii was evaluated. In the presence of lignin, optimum decolorization percentages for Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R, Direct Red 5B, Direct Black 38, and Direct Black 22 were 91.75% (control, 65.96%), 76.89% (control, 43.78%), 43.44% (control, 17.02%), and 44.75% (control, 12.16%), respectively, in the submerged cultures. Laccase was the most important enzyme during biodecolorization. Aside from the stimulating of laccase activity, lignin might be degraded by E. taxodii, and then these degraded low-molecular-weight metabolites could act as redox mediators promoting decolorization of azo dyes. The relationship between laccase and lignin degradation was investigated through decolorization tests in vitro with purified enzyme and dozens of aromatics, which can be derivatives of lignin and can function as laccase mediators or inducers. Dyes were decolorized at triple or even higher rates in certain laccase–aromatic systems at chemical concentrations as low as 10 µM. PMID:25285777

  1. Azo dye biodecolorization enhanced by Echinodontium taxodii cultured with lignin.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuling; Shi, Lili; Meng, Jing; Yu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose facilitates the fungal oxidization of recalcitrant organic pollutants through the extracellular ligninolytic enzymes induced by lignin in wood or other plant tissues. However, available information on this phenomenon is insufficient. Free radical chain reactions during lignin metabolism are important in xenobiotic removal. Thus, the effect of lignin on azo dye decolorization in vivo by Echinodontium taxodii was evaluated. In the presence of lignin, optimum decolorization percentages for Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R, Direct Red 5B, Direct Black 38, and Direct Black 22 were 91.75% (control, 65.96%), 76.89% (control, 43.78%), 43.44% (control, 17.02%), and 44.75% (control, 12.16%), respectively, in the submerged cultures. Laccase was the most important enzyme during biodecolorization. Aside from the stimulating of laccase activity, lignin might be degraded by E. taxodii, and then these degraded low-molecular-weight metabolites could act as redox mediators promoting decolorization of azo dyes. The relationship between laccase and lignin degradation was investigated through decolorization tests in vitro with purified enzyme and dozens of aromatics, which can be derivatives of lignin and can function as laccase mediators or inducers. Dyes were decolorized at triple or even higher rates in certain laccase-aromatic systems at chemical concentrations as low as 10 µM. PMID:25285777

  2. Solid-phase extraction and simultaneous determination of trace amounts of sulphonated and azo sulphonated dyes using microemulsion-modified-zeolite and multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Al-Degs, Yahya S; El-Sheikh, Amjad H; Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Walker, Gavin M

    2008-05-30

    A simple and rapid analytical method for the determination of trace levels of five sulphonated and azo sulphonated reactive dyes: Cibacron Reactive Blue 2 (C-Blue, trisulphonated dye), Cibacron Reactive Red 4 (C-Red, tetrasulphonated azo dye), Cibacron Reactive Yellow 2 (C-Yellow, trisulphonated azo dye), Levafix Brilliant Red E-4BA (L-Red, trisulphonated dye), and Levafix Brilliant Blue E-4BA (L-Blue, disulphonated dye) in water is presented. Initially, the dyes were preconcentrated from 250 ml of water samples with solid-phase extraction using natural zeolite sample previously modified with a microemulsion. The modified zeolite exhibited an excellent extraction for the dyes from solution. The parameters that influence quantitative recovery of reactive dyes like amount of extractant, volume of dye solution, pH, ionic strength, and extraction-elution flow rate were varied and optimized. After elution of the adsorbed dyes, the concentration of dyes was determined spectrophotometrically with the aid of principle component regression (PCR) method without separation of dyes. The results obtained from PCR method were comparable to those obtained from HPLC method confirming the effectiveness of the proposed method. With the aid of SPE by M-zeolite, the concentration of dyes could be reproducibly detected over the range 25-200 ppb for C-Yellow and L-Blue and from 50 to 250 ppb for C-Blue, C-Red, and L-Red. The multivariate detection limits of dyes were found to be 15 ppb for C-Yellow and L-Blue and 25 ppb for C-Blue, C-Red, and L-Red dyes. The proposed chemometric method gave recoveries from 85.4 to 115.3% and R.S.D. from 1.0 to 14.5% for determination of the five dyes without any prior separation for solutes. PMID:18585163

  3. Spectral Studies of UV and Solar Photocatalytic Degradation of AZO Dye and Textile Dye Effluents Using Green Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mariselvam, R.; Ranjitsingh, A. J. A.; Mosae Selvakumar, P.; Alarfaj, Abdullah A.; Munusamy, Murugan A.

    2016-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of the chemical dye AZO and dye effluents in different time duration has been investigated using biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Dye industry effluents and AZO dye undergo degradation to form harmless intermediate and colourless products following irradiation by UV and solar light in the presence of green synthesized silver nanoparticles. The degree of degradation was tested under the experimental conditions such as PH, temperature, and absorbance of the dye in UV and solar light was measured. The degradation was higher in the UV light source than in the solar light source. Green synthesized silver nanoparticles in the UV light source were found to expedite the dye degradation process. PMID:27382364

  4. Evaluation of in vitro efficacy for decolorization and degradation of commercial azo dye RB-B by Morganella sp. HK-1 isolated from dye contaminated industrial landfill.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Hilor; Soni, Dhaval; Chauhan, Kishor

    2014-06-01

    Reactive Black-B (RB-B) - one of the multi-sulphonated reactive azo dye - is being used extensively in textile as well as paper industries. Reactive azo dyes comprise of a significant group of synthetic compounds categorized as xenobiotics and its abatement from the environment still remains a challenge. In the present study, a newly isolated indigenous bacterial strain Morganella sp. HK-1 was exploited for its ability to decolorize and degrade RB-B dye. The isolate completely degraded RB-B (20 g L(-1)) within 24h under static conditions. Furthermore, the visible and FTIR spectral analysis established the bio-degradation of RB-B. The degraded metabolites of RB-B by Morganella sp. HK-1 were identified by GC-MS analysis as disodium 3,4,6-triamino-5-hydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonate, 4-aminophenylsulfonylethyl hydrogen sulfate, naphthalene-1-ol, aniline and benzene. Based on this information, a putative pathway of degradation of RB-B by Morganella sp. HK-1 has been proposed. This study is the first report on elucidation of mechanism of bacterial degradation of RB-B dye. Furthermore, phytotoxicity, genotoxicity and aquatic acute toxicity studies of the parent dye and the bio-degraded dye products revealed drastic reduction in the toxicity of metabolites as compared to the parent dye. This implies that the biotreatment of the dye is of non-toxic nature. This study thus indicates the effectiveness of Morganella sp. HK-1 for the treatment of textile effluents containing sulphonated azo dyes. PMID:24480425

  5. Synthesis, characterization and application of new azo dyes derived from uracil for polyester fibre dyeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanbakhsh, Mohamad-reza; Abbasnia, Masoumeh; Sheykhan, Mehdi; Ma'mani, Leila

    2010-08-01

    Some novel uracil derived azo compounds were synthesized by diazotization of substituted aromatic amines, amidine- and guanidine-like amines such as 2-aminopyridine and 2-aminopyrimidine, ortho-hydroxy aniline and ortho-hydroxy naphthyl amines and coupling reaction with 6-amino-1,3-dimethyluracil. Structures of the dyes were fully characterized by spectroscopic techniques (UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, CHN and IR). The dyes were applied to polyester, affording orange-yellow shades and the wash fastness of the dyeings was excellent.

  6. Photoluminescence analysis of self induced planer alignment in azo dye dispersed nematic liquid crystal complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rishi Sood, Srishti Raina, K. K.

    2014-04-24

    We have developed azo dye doped nematic liquid crystal complex for advanced photonic liquid crystal display technology aspects. Disperse orange azo dye self introduced planer alignment in the nematic liquid crystal without any surface anchoring treatment. Planer alignment was characterized by optical polarizing microscopy. The electro-optical switching response of dye disperse planer aligned nematic cell was investigated as a function of applied voltage with the help of photoluminescence spectrophotometer for the tuning of photoluminescence contrast.

  7. Properties and construction of azo-dye reagents for inorganic photometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Pilipenko, A T; Savransky, L I

    1978-08-01

    An approach to constructing new organic reagents (based on azo dyes) for photometric analysis is described. Its essence is the detailed consideration of the electronic structure of the chromophore nuclei of the dyes in the ground and excited states. Knowing the nature of the electron transition, it is possible to construct the organic reagents with optimal properties. The electronic structure of the azo dyes has been analysed in a pi-approximation by an MO LCAO SCF method. PMID:18962298

  8. WASTES FROM MANUFACTURE OF DYES AND PIGMENTS. VOLUME 2. AZO DYES AND PIGMENTS (EXCLUDING BENZIDINE AND ITS CONGENERS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a study of the manufacture of azo dyes and pigments, several solid wastes that could contain hazardous material were identified. These solid wastes included filter cake from clarifying operations, wastewater treatment solids, intermediates on discarded shipping containers, and...

  9. Deciphering effects of functional groups and electron density on azo dyes degradation by graphene loaded TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Bor-Yann; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2015-12-01

    This study tended to decipher the mechanism of photo degradation of azo dyes, which bond was favorable to be broken for application of wastewater decolorization. That is, from chemical structure perspective, the critical substituents to affect electron donor/acceptor for dye degradation would be identified in this research. The model reactive blacks (RB5), reactive blue 171 (RB171) and reactive red 198 (RR198) were degraded by graphene loaded TiO2, indicating how the electron withdrawing and releasing groups affect azo dye degradability. The byproducts and intermediate products were analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC). Furthermore, the radicals involved in the reaction were found by electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR) to confirm the main oxidized species of hydroxyl radicals rather than the light generated positive holes. The finding revealed that the breakages of the bonds were due to the electron density changes around the bonds. This principle can be applicable not only for RB5 degradation, but also for reactive blue 171 (RB171), reactive red 198 (RR198) and some other textile dyes.

  10. Phenylazoindole dyes 3: Determination of azo-hydrazone tautomers of new phenylazoindole dyes in solution and solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babür, Banu; Seferoğlu, Nurgül; Aktan, Ebru; Hökelek, Tuncer; Şahin, Ertan; Seferoğlu, Zeynel

    2015-02-01

    A new two series of phenylazo indole dyes was synthesized and the structures of the dyes were confirmed by UV-vis, FT-IR, HRMS and 1H/13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. Five of these dyes (I, I‧, II‧, III and III‧) were also characterized in solid state by using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies besides other spectroscopic techniques. The geometries of the azo and hydrazone tautomeric forms of the dyes were optimized by using Density Functional Theory (DFT). In addition, the effects of the donor and acceptor groups on the azo and hydrazone forms of the dyes were evaluated experimentally and theoretically. The results indicate that the phenylazoindole dyes derived from 2-phenyl indole as coupling component exist as azo form in solution, gas phase and solid state.

  11. THE MUTAGENICITY OF METALLIZED AND UNMETALLIZED AZO AND FORMAZAN DYES IN THE SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mutagenicity of metallized and unmetallized azo and formazan dyes in the Salmonella mutagenicity
    Laura. C. Edwards', Harold S. Freeman'*, and Larry D. Claxton2

    Abstract
    In previous papers, the synthesis and chemical properties of iron complexed azo and formazan d...

  12. REDUCTION OF AZO DYES WITH ZERO-VALENT IRON. (R827117)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reduction of azo dyes by zero-valent iron metal (Fe0) at pH 7.0 in 10 mM HEPES buffer was studied in aqueous, anaerobic batch systems. Orange II was reduced by cleavage of the azo linkage, as evidenced by the production of sulfanilic acid (a substituted ani...

  13. Study of azo dye decolorization and determination of cathode microorganism profile in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Mert; Eren, Hilal; Catal, Tunc; Bermek, Hakan; Akarsubaşi, Alper Tunga

    2012-09-01

    Five textile azo dyes, as part of an artificial mixture, were treated in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells while simultaneously utilizing acetate for electricity production. Remazol Black, Remazol Brilliant Blue, Remazol Turquoise Blue, Reactive Yellow and Reactive Red at concentrations of 40 or 80 mg L(-1) were decolorized to a similar extent, at averages of 78, 95, 53, 93 and 74%, respectively, in 24 hours. During the process of decolorization, electricity generation from acetate oxidation continued. Power densities obtained in the presence of textile dyes ranged from 347 to 521 mW m(-2) at the current density range of 0.071 - 0.086 mA cm(-2). Microbial community analyses of cathode biofilm exhibited dynamic changes in abundant species following dye decolorization. Upon the addition of the first dye, a major change (63%) in microbial diversity was observed; however, subsequent addition of other dyes did not affect the community profile significantly. Actinobacteria, Aquamicrobium, Mesorhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Thauera, Paracoccus, Achromobacter and Chelatacoccus affiliated phylotypes were the major phylotypes detected. Our results demonstrate that microbial fuel cells could be a promising alternative for treatment of textile wastewaters and an active bacterial community can rapidly be established for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and sustainable electricity generation. PMID:23240212

  14. Decolorization of azo dyes (Direct Blue 151 and Direct Red 31) by moderately alkaliphilic bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Lalnunhlimi, Sylvine; Krishnaswamy, Veenagayathri

    2016-01-01

    Removal of synthetic dyes is one of the main challenges before releasing the wastes discharged by textile industries. Biodegradation of azo dyes by alkaliphilic bacterial consortium is one of the environmental-friendly methods used for the removal of dyes from textile effluents. Hence, this study presents isolation of a bacterial consortium from soil samples of saline environment and its use for the decolorization of azo dyes, Direct Blue 151 (DB 151) and Direct Red 31 (DR 31). The decolorization of azo dyes was studied at various concentrations (100–300 mg/L). The bacterial consortium, when subjected to an application of 200 mg/L of the dyes, decolorized DB 151 and DR 31 by 97.57% and 95.25% respectively, within 5 days. The growth of the bacterial consortium was optimized with pH, temperature, and carbon and nitrogen sources; and decolorization of azo dyes was analyzed. In this study, the decolorization efficiency of mixed dyes was improved with yeast extract and sucrose, which were used as nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively. Such an alkaliphilic bacterial consortium can be used in the removal of azo dyes from contaminated saline environment. PMID:26887225

  15. Ultrafast degradation of azo dyes catalyzed by cobalt-based metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Qin, X D; Zhu, Z W; Liu, G; Fu, H M; Zhang, H W; Wang, A M; Li, H; Zhang, H F

    2015-01-01

    Reactivity and mass loss are considered mutually exclusive in conventional zero-valent metal (ZVM) technology to treat environmental contaminants. Here, we report the outstanding performance of Co-based metallic glass (MG) in degrading an aqueous solution of azo dye, thus eliminating this trade-off. Ball-milled Co-based MG powders completely degrade Acid Orange II at an ultrafast rate. The surface-area-normalized rate constant of Co-based MG powders was one order of magnitude higher than that of Co-based crystalline counterparts and three orders of magnitude higher than that of the widely studied Fe(0) powders. The coordinatively unsaturated local structure in Co-based MG responds to the catalysis for degradation, resulting in very low mass loss. Wide applicability and good reusability were also present. Co-based MG is the most efficient material for azo dye degradation reported thus far, and will promote the practical application of MGs as functional materials. PMID:26656918

  16. Ultrafast degradation of azo dyes catalyzed by cobalt-based metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Qin, X. D.; Zhu, Z. W.; Liu, G.; Fu, H. M.; Zhang, H. W.; Wang, A. M.; Li, H.; Zhang, H. F.

    2015-01-01

    Reactivity and mass loss are considered mutually exclusive in conventional zero-valent metal (ZVM) technology to treat environmental contaminants. Here, we report the outstanding performance of Co-based metallic glass (MG) in degrading an aqueous solution of azo dye, thus eliminating this trade-off. Ball-milled Co-based MG powders completely degrade Acid Orange II at an ultrafast rate. The surface-area-normalized rate constant of Co-based MG powders was one order of magnitude higher than that of Co-based crystalline counterparts and three orders of magnitude higher than that of the widely studied Fe0 powders. The coordinatively unsaturated local structure in Co-based MG responds to the catalysis for degradation, resulting in very low mass loss. Wide applicability and good reusability were also present. Co-based MG is the most efficient material for azo dye degradation reported thus far, and will promote the practical application of MGs as functional materials. PMID:26656918

  17. Azo dye decolorization by Shewanella aquimarina under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianming; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Shiang Fu, Q; Wang, Guanghui

    2012-06-01

    Decolorization of azo dyes under saline conditions was studied with Shewanella aquimarina, which demonstrated good growth at up to 7% NaCl. No inhibition on acid red 27 (AR27) decolorization was caused by 1-3% NaCl. Additionally, 14.5% AR27 (0.2mM) could still be removed in 12h in the presence of 10% NaCl. The relationship between specific decolorization rate and AR27 concentration followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K(m)=0.34 mM, V(max)=6.44 μmol mg cell(-1) h(-1)). Lactate and formate were efficient electron donors for AR27 decolorization. The initial decolorization rate was in direct proportion to biomass concentration (0.18-0.72 g l(-1)). Compared to NaCl, slighter inhibitive effects were found with Na(2)SO(4) whereas more severe inhibition was caused by NaNO(3). Lower NaCl concentration stimulated azoreductase, laccase and NADH-DCIP reductase activities of cell extracts. AR27 decolorization products were found to be aromatic amines, which were less phytotoxic than the untreated dye. PMID:22449986

  18. Photo-stimulated phase and anchoring transitions of chiral azo-dye doped nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sudarshan; Kang, Shin-Woong

    2013-12-16

    We report concurring phase and anchoring transitions of chiral azo-dye doped nematic liquid crystals. The transitions are induced by photo-stimulation and stable against light and thermal treatments. Photochromic trans- to cis-isomerization of azo-dye induces an augmented dipole moment and strong dipole-dipole interaction of the cis-isomers, resulting in the formation of nano-sized dye-aggregates. Consequent phase separation of the aggregates of a chiral azo-dye induces phase transition from a chiral to nonchiral nematic phase. In addition, the deposition of dye-aggregates at the surfaces brings about anchoring transition of LC molecules. The stability and irreversibility of the transition, together with no need of pretreatments for LC alignment, provide fascinating opportunity for liquid crystal device applications. PMID:24514707

  19. A spectral approach to determine location and orientation of azo dyes within surfactant aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karukstis, Kerry K.; Litz, Jonathan P.; Garber, Matthew B.; Angell, Laura M.; Korir, George K.

    2010-04-01

    The UV-vis absorption properties of azo dyes are known to exhibit a variation with the polarity and acidity of the dye environment. The spectral properties of a series of anionic azo dyes were characterized to further probe the interaction of these dyes with two types of surfactant aggregates: (1) the spherical micelles formed in aqueous solution by alkyltrimethylammonium bromide (C nTAB) surfactants with n = 10-16 and (2) the unilamellar vesicles spontaneously formed in water from binary mixtures of the oppositely-charged double-tailed surfactants cationic didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) and anionic sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT or AOT). The observed dye spectra reflect the solvatochromic behavior of the dyes and suggest the location and orientation of the dye within the surfactant aggregates. Deconvolution of the overall spectra into sums of Gaussian curves more readily displays any contributions of tautomeric forms of the azo dyes resulting from intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The rich variation in UV/vis absorption properties of these anionic azo dyes supports their use as sensitive tools to explore the nanostructures of surfactant aggregates.

  20. Role of brown-rot fungi in the bioremoval of azo dyes under different conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naeem; Hameed, Abdul; Ahmed, Safia

    2010-01-01

    The present study is vital to the understanding of bioremediation of structurally different azo dyes by some unusual Brown-rot fungi. Bioremoval of each dye (20 mg l-1) was tested in two different culture media under static and shaking conditions by taking inocula from different fungi. Fungal strains showed varying dyes removal abilities, though considerable high in case of Acid Red (AR) 151(di-azo) as compared to Orange (Or) II (mono-azo). With an exception of Aspergillus tereus SA3, all the fungal isolates showed higher removal of dyes in SDB. Under static condition, the maximum decolorizing fungal strains were; Aspergillus flavus SA2 (67%) and Alternaria spp. SA4 (57%) in AR 151, while Penicillium spp. (34 and 33 %) in Orange II, in SDB and STE, respectively. Bioremoval of dyes was considerably increased when experiments were shifted from static to shaking mode. It was specifically increased (%) in; AR 151 (255) with Penicillium spp., Or II with A. flavus SA2 (112) and Alternaria spp. (111). The primary mechanism of dyes removal proved to be fungal biosorption. However, reduction of dyes (onto fungal) with formation of their products (α. naphthol, sulphalinic acid and aniline) furthermore revealed that dyes (specifically azo) were actually biodegraded. PMID:24031570

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF THERMOSPRAY LCMS: QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF SULFONATED AZO DYES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermospray mass spectra (TSMS) has been used to obtain mass spectra of several di- and tetra- sulfonated azo dyes. Commercial dye preparations were dissolved in various mobile phases and injected into the TSMS system. Mobile phases investigated included pure water and varying co...

  2. SORPTION AND TOXICITY OF AZO AND TRIPHENYLMETHANE DYES TO AQUATIC MICROBIAL POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity and sorption of five azo and triphenylmethane dyes to freshwater microbiota were determined to assessment, in part, the risks that these dyes may pose to the aquatic environment. The toxicities of Basic Violet 1, Basic Violet 2, Basic Violet 3, Basic Green 4 and Tropaeol...

  3. Dielectric characteristic of photoinduced isomerization in azo-dye doped polymeric matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Duanbin; Deng Li

    2006-05-01

    The dielectric permittivities and losses of poly(methyl methacrylate) doped with different concentrations of azo dye are investigated under the irradiation of 532 nm light for the first time. The dielectric permittivities increase with the concentration of chromophores increasing, and the dielectric relaxation is mainly influenced by the doped azo-dye chromophores. Given the dye concentration, the dielectric permittivities depend on the pump power of 532 nm light. With the increase of pumping light power, the low frequency dielectric losses increase while the high frequency dielectric losses decrease. The results are explained based on the photoinduced isomerization of chromophores and the interaction between the chromophores and polymer matrices.

  4. Ozonation of azo dyes (Orange II and Acid Red 27) in saline media.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alessandra C; Pic, Jean Stephane; Sant'Anna, Geraldo L; Dezotti, Marcia

    2009-09-30

    Ozonation of two azo dyes was investigated in a monitored bench scale bubble column reactor (8.5-L), varying liquid media salt content (0, 1, 40 and 100 g L(-1), NaCl). In experiments with Orange II pH was varied (5, 7.5 and 9) but ozonation of Acid Red 27 was performed at pH 7.5. Ozone self-decomposition rate-constant increased with salt concentration. Color removal was very effective and fast achieved under all experimental conditions. For the two azo dyes tested, more than 98% of color intensity was removed in 30-min ozonation assays. However, only partial mineralization of azo dyes (45%-Orange II; 20%-Acid Red 27) was attained in such experiments. The degree of mineralization (TOC removal) was negatively affected by salt concentration. Biodegradation assays conducted by respirometry revealed the inhibitory effect of dye degradation products formed during ozonation. PMID:19443113

  5. Electrolysis within anaerobic bioreactors stimulates breakdown of toxic products from azo dye treatment.

    PubMed

    Gavazza, Sávia; Guzman, Juan J L; Angenent, Largus T

    2015-04-01

    Azo dyes are the most widely used coloring agents in the textile industry, but are difficult to treat. When textile effluents are discharged into waterways, azo dyes and their degradation products are known to be environmentally toxic. An electrochemical system consisting of a graphite-plate anode and a stainless-steel mesh cathode was placed into a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor to evaluate the removal of an azo dye (Direct Black 22) from synthetic textile wastewater. At applied potentials of 2.5 and 3.0 V when water electrolysis occurs, no improvement in azo dye removal efficiency was observed compared to the control reactor (an integrated system with electrodes but without an applied potential). However, applying such electric potentials produces oxygen via electrolysis and promoted the aerobic degradation of aromatic amines, which are toxic, intermediate products of anaerobic azo dye degradation. The removal of these amines indicates a decrease in overall toxicity of the effluent from a single-stage anaerobic bioreactor, which warrants further optimization in anaerobic digestion. PMID:25750156

  6. Degradation of Azo Dyes by Trametes villosa Laccase over Long Periods of Oxidative Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zille, Andrea; Górnacka, Barbara; Rehorek, Astrid; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2005-01-01

    Trametes villosa laccase was used for direct azo dye degradation, and the reaction products that accumulated after 72 h of incubation were analyzed. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis showed the formation of phenolic compounds during the dye oxidation process as well as a large amount of polymerized products that retain azo group integrity. The amino-phenol reactions were also investigated by 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance and LC-MS analysis, and the polymerization character of laccase was shown. This study highlights the fact that laccases polymerize the reaction products obtained during long-term batch decolorization processes with azo dyes. These polymerized products provide unacceptable color levels in effluents, limiting the application of laccases as bioremediation agents. PMID:16269701

  7. Excellent capability in degrading azo dyes by MgZn-based metallic glass powders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Hui; Chen, Ming-Wei; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Inoue, Akihisa; Perepezko, John H.

    2012-01-01

    The lack of new functional applications for metallic glasses hampers further development of these fascinating materials. In this letter, we report for the first time that the MgZn-based metallic glass powders have excellent functional ability in degrading azo dyes which are typical organic water pollutants. Their azo dye degradation efficiency is about 1000 times higher than that of commercial crystalline Fe powders, and 20 times higher than the Mg-Zn alloy crystalline counterparts. The high Zn content in the amorphous Mg-based alloy enables a greater corrosion resistance in water and higher reaction efficiency with azo dye compared to crystalline Mg. Even under complex environmental conditions, the MgZn-based metallic glass powders retain high reaction efficiency. Our work opens up a new opportunity for functional applications of metallic glasses. PMID:22639726

  8. Methods for the analysis of azo dyes employed in food industry--A review.

    PubMed

    Yamjala, Karthik; Nainar, Meyyanathan Subramania; Ramisetti, Nageswara Rao

    2016-02-01

    A wide variety of azo dyes are generally added for coloring food products not only to make them visually aesthetic but also to reinstate the original appearance lost during the production process. However, many countries in the world have banned the use of most of the azo dyes in food and their usage is highly regulated by domestic and export food supplies. The regulatory authorities and food analysts adopt highly sensitive and selective analytical methods for monitoring as well as assuring the quality and safety of food products. The present manuscript presents a comprehensive review of various analytical techniques used in the analysis of azo dyes employed in food industries of different parts of the world. A brief description on the use of different extraction methods such as liquid-liquid, solid phase and membrane extraction has also been presented. PMID:26304415

  9. Molecular Interactions in Monolayers οf Azo Dye/Liquid Crystal Mixtures at Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, D.; Płóciennik, A.; Inglot, K.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text PDF A study of azo dye/liquid crystal mixtures in monolayers formed at an air-water interface (the Langmuir films) and at a solid surface (the Langmuir-Blodgett films) has been performed. Five azo dyes with various molecular structure and the liquid crystal 4-octyl-4' cyanobiphenyl (8CB) have been used. The dyes have been added to the liquid crystal at various molar fractions. Surface pressure and surface potential versus mean molecular area isotherms for the Langmuir films have been recorded and information about intermolecular interactions at the air-water interface has been obtained. On the basis of electronic absorption measurements for the Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films the conclusions about the ability of dyes molecules to form self aggregates at the interfaces have been drawn. The influence of the dye molecular structure and its concentration on aggregates' geometry has been found.

  10. Spontaneous photoinduced patterning of azo-dye polymer films: the facts

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, Christophe

    2007-08-15

    We describe the spontaneous photoinduced patterning of azo-dye polymer films. We have observed that the illumination of an azo-dye polymer film by a uniform single laser beam with normal incidence leads to a self-structurization process that results in the formation of well-ordered submicrometer-sized structures whose organization depends on the light polarization direction. A modulation depth as high as 100 nm can be achieved. The influence of several experimental parameters on the structure formation is studied. Results are discussed and confronted to different models and phenomena already investigated in the literature. A physical origin to this peculiar photopatterning process is proposed.

  11. Influence of peripheral substituents on the optical properties of heterocyclic azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkowska-Zielinska, B.; Skowronski, L.; Kozlowski, T.; Smokal, V.; Kysil, A.; Biitseva, A.; Krupka, O.

    2015-11-01

    Optical properties, such as the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function and the optical energy band gap, of new heterocyclic azo dyes thin films were investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry combined with transmittance measurements. The topography of studied compounds was also examined by atomic force microscopy. It was found that the optical properties of the azo dyes materials strongly depend on the type of substitution in the azobenzene moiety, namely leads to a change in the value of refractive index, as well as bathochromic shifts of the absorption structure.

  12. Optical orientation of azo dye molecules in a thin solid film upon nonlinear excitation by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yongseok, Jung; Kozenkov, V M; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Nagorskiy, Nikolay M

    2006-11-30

    The orientation of molecules in an amorphous pure azo dye film upon nonlinear excitation is detected for the first time. The simultaneous increase and decrease in the film transmission by a factor of 2.5 for orthogonal polarisations of probe radiation indicated the appearance of orientation order in the film caused by the reorientation of azo dye molecules. Due to a high photostability of the AD-1 azo dye demonstrated in single-photon experiments and a high efficiency of nonlinear orientation obtained in experiments with femtosecond pulses, this dye can be widely used in three-dimensional nanophotonic devices such as photonic crystals, optical computers, and optical memory. (letters)

  13. Rapid decolorization of azo dye methyl orange in aqueous solution by nanoscale zerovalent iron particles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Guo, Yanhui; Wang, Jianji; Fan, Maohong

    2009-07-30

    Azo dyes are recalcitrant and refractory pollutants that constitute a significant burden on the environment. The report here is focused on the decolorization treatment of water soluble azo dye methyl orange (MO) by chemically synthesized nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles. Experimental variables such as initial dye concentration, iron dosage, solution pH and temperature were studied systematically. Batch experiments suggest that the decolorization efficiency was enhanced with the increase of NZVI dosage and reaction temperature, but decreased with increasing initial dye concentration and initial solution pH. Further studies indicated that existence of inorganic salt (Na(2)SO(4)) could inhibit the decolorization of MO. Kinetic analyses based on the experimental data elucidated that the decolorization process followed a first order exponential decay kinetics model. The activation energy was determined to be 35.9 kJ/mol. PMID:19128873

  14. Degradation of sulphonated azo dye Red HE7B by Bacillus sp. and elucidation of degradative pathways.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Jyoti Kumar; Paul, Sangeeta; Dureja, Prem; Annapurna, K; Padaria, Jasdeep C; Gopal, Madhuban

    2014-08-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading the sulfonated azo dye Red HE7B were isolated from textile mill effluent contaminated soil. The most efficient isolate was identified as Bacillus sp. Azo1 and the isolate could successfully decolorize up to 89% of the dye. The decolorized cultural extract analyzed by HPLC confirmed degradation. Enzymatic analysis showed twofold and fourfold increase in the activity of azoreductase and laccase enzymes, respectively, indicating involvement of both reductive and oxidative enzymes in biodegradation of Red HE7B. Degraded products which were identified by GC/MS analysis included various metabolites like 8-nitroso 1-naphthol, 2-diazonium naphthalene. Mono azo dye intermediate was initially generated from the parent molecule. This mono azo dye was further degraded by the organism, into additional products, depending on the site of cleavage of R-N=N-R molecule. Based on the degradation products identified, three different pathways have been proposed. The mechanism of degradation in two of these pathways is different from that of the previously reported pathway for azo dye degradation. This is the first report of a microbial isolate following multiple pathways for azo dye degradation. Azo dye Red HE7B was observed to be phytotoxic, leading to decrease in root development, shoot length and seedling fresh weight. However, after biotreatment the resulting degradation products were non-phytotoxic. PMID:24682261

  15. INFLUENCE OF EXPERIMENTAL CONDITIONS ON THE LIQUID SECONDARY ION MASS SPECTRA OF SULFONATED AZO DYES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two monosulfonated and eight disulfonated azo dyes of varying relative molecular mass were examined by liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (LSIMS). he effects of matrix, concentration, primary beam energy, and mode of operation were addressed in order to optimize sample ioniza...

  16. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SULFONATED AZO DYES USING LIQUID SECONDARY ION MASS SPECTROMETRY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight monosulfonated and disulfonated azo dyes were analyzed using liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry, in the negative ion mode, under low-energy conditions (110-150 eV). any structurally characteristic fragment ions were obtained, several of which ha...

  17. DEVELOPING AZO AND FORMAZAN DYES BASED ON ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS: SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    In previous papers, the synthesis and chemical properties of iron-complexed azo and formazan dyes were reported. In this regard, it was shown that in certain cases iron could be substituted for the traditionally used metals, chromium and cobalt, without having an adve...

  18. COLLISIONAL ACTIVATION MASS SPECTRA OF M-. IONS OF AZO DYES CONTAINING 2-NAPHTHOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collisionally activated decomposition mass spectra of M- ions of azo dyes are presented. he compounds are of general structure Ar(l)-N=N-Ar(2), where Ar(l) is substituted phenyl and Ar(2) is 2-naphthol. Characteristic fragment ions observed include m/z 157, which corresponds to t...

  19. TREATABILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE AZO DYES BY THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Toxic Substances (OTS) evaluates submissions to the Premanufacture Notification process under section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act. Azo dyes constitute a significant portion of these submissions. OTS is concerned...

  20. Optical properties of Azo Dye (1-Phenylazo-2-Naphthol) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, M. S.; El-Mallah, H. M.; Mansour, A. N.

    2009-11-01

    Thin Films of Azo Dye (1-Phenylazo-2-Naphthol) have been prepared by thermal evaporation technique onto quartz substrates held at about 300 K during the deposition process with different thicknesses range 625-880 nm. X-ray diffraction and the differential thermal analysis showed that the Azo Dye sample is crystalline nature and thermal stable in temperature range from room temperature to 100 circC. The optical constants (the refractive index n, the absorption index k and the absorption coefficient α) were calculated for Azo Dye (1-Phenylazo-2-Naphthol) thin films by using spectrophotometer measurements of the transmittance and reflectance at normal incidence in the spectral range 400-2200 nm. The obtained values of both n and k were found to be independent of the film thicknesses. The refractive index has anomalous behavior in the wavelength range 400-1000 nm besides a high energy transition at 2.385 eV. The optical parameters (the dispersion energy Ed, the oscillation energy Eo, the room temperature optical dielectric constant \\varepsilonl, the lattice dielectric constant \\varepsilonL, the high frequency dielectric constant \\varepsilon∞ and the ratio of carrier concentration to the effective mass N/mast) were calculated. The allowed optical transition responsible for optical absorption was found to be direct transition with optical energy gap of 1.5 eV for Azo Dye sample. The band tail obeys Urbach's empirical relation. in here

  1. Parallel Combinatorial Synthesis of Azo Dyes: A Combinatorial Experiment Suitable for Undergraduate Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gung, Benjamin W.; Taylor, Richard T.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment in the parallel synthesis of azo dyes that demonstrates the concepts of structure-activity relationships and chemical diversity with vivid colors is described. It is seen that this experiment is suitable for the second-semester organic chemistry laboratory and also for the one-semester organic laboratory.

  2. Study of bio-degradation and bio-decolourization of azo dye by Enterobacter sp. SXCR.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Shiv Shankar; Aikat, Kaustav

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the decolourization potential of textile dyes by a relatively newly identified bacteria species, Enterobacter sp. SXCR which was isolated from the petroleum polluted soil samples. The bacterial strain was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The effects of operational conditions like initial dye concentration, pH, and temperature were optimized to develop an economically feasible decolourization process. The isolate was able to decolourize sulphonated azo dye (Congo red) over a wide range (0.1-1 gl(-1)), pH 5-9, and temperature 22-40 degrees C in static condition. Anaerobic condition with minimal salt medium supplemented with 2 gl(-1) glucose, pH 7 and 34 degrees C were considered to be the optimum decolourizing condition. The bacterial isolate SXCR showed a strong ability to decolourize dye (0.2 gl(-1)) within 93 h. The biodegradation was monitored by UV-vis, fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Furthermore, the involvement of azoreductase in the decolourization process was identified in this strain. Cells of Enterobacter cloacae were immobilized by entrapment in calcium-alginate beads. Immobilized bacterial cells were able to reduced azo bonds enzymatically and used as a biocatalyst for decolourization of azo dye Congo red. Michaelis-Menten kinetics was used to describe the correlation between the decolourization rate and the dye concentration. PMID:24645479

  3. Some heterocyclic azo dyes derived from thiazolyl derivatives; synthesis; substituent effects and solvatochromic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanbakhsh, M. R.; Mohammadi, A.; Abbasnia, M.

    2010-12-01

    A series of azo disperse dyes were synthesized by coupling reaction of N, N-diethylaniline, 2-anilinoethanol and N-phenyl-2,2'-iminodiethanol with diazotized aminothiazolyl derivatives as diazo components. These dyes have been prepared in good yields, and were characterized by UV-Vis, FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopic techniques. The effects of solvent polarity and various pH on dyes in the visible absorption spectra were evaluated. All dyes exhibit an excellent correlation coefficient ( r > 0.92) for the linear solvation energy relationship with π* values calculated by Kamlet et al. The influence of the pH on the dyes with electron-donating group implied that these dyes exist in acid-base equilibrium in acidic environment. The effect of substituents of both coupler and diazo component on the color of dyes was investigated as well.

  4. Application of the central composite design to study the flocculation of an anionic azo dye using quaternized cellulose nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Patrick James; Tanvir, Aafia; Tam, Kam Chiu

    2015-11-20

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) grafted with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride (GTMAC), containing quaternary ammonium contents of 0.44 (QCNF-1), 1.47 (QCNF-2), and 2.28 (QCNF-3) meqg(-1), were evaluated as flocculants for the removal of Reactive Orange 16, an anionic azo dye, from aqueous solution. A rotatable and orthogonal central composite design was used to examine the performance of QCNFs under a range of experimental conditions. Removal efficiencies at the centre point of the design space were found to be 236.9±7.8, 254.2±3.8, and 264.6±2.8mgg(-1) for QCNF-1, QCNF-2 and QCNF-3, respectively. The highest removal efficiency, 295.1mgg(-1), was observed when using QCNF-3 at a low monovalent salt concentration. The QCNF reported herein provides a sustainable and biodegradable alternative to traditional synthetic flocculants for the decolorization of dye-containing effluents. PMID:26344258

  5. New 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes. Part I: Synthesis, characterization and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe

    2012-02-01

    Four new 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes were synthesized via condensation of 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole with azo-coupled o-vanillin precursors. The prepared dyes were characterized by IR, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analyses. Thermal properties of the prepared dyes were examined by thermogravimetric analysis. Results indicated that the framework of the dyes was stable up to 225 °C. Also, the influence of various factors including time and mixed DMSO/EtOH solution on UV-vis spectra of the dyes were investigated.

  6. Novel push-pull heterocyclic azo disperse dyes containing piperazine moiety: Synthesis, spectral properties, antioxidant activity and dyeing performance on polyester fibers.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Asadollah; Khalili, Behzad; Tahavor, Marzieh

    2015-11-01

    Six novel push-pull azo disperse dyes were synthesized via classical azo coupling reaction using 2-amino-thiazolyl derivatives as the diazo components and 1-(4-bromobenzyl)-4-phenylpiperazine as a key coupling intermediate. The structures of the dyes and synthesized intermediate were confirmed by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and UV-vis analyses. The solvatochromic behavior of the dyes was studied in a set of 10 solvents of different polarity and considerable results were obtained. The prepared heterocyclic azo dyes were applied for dyeing polyester fibers and their dyeing properties were studied. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Investigation of antioxidant activity of compounds was carried out by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) method. The synthesized dyes exhibited significant antioxidant activities. PMID:26112103

  7. Influence of Methyl Substituents on Azo-Dye Photoalignment in Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulich, V. S.; Murawski, An. A.; Muravsky, Al. A.; Agabekov, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    Photoalignment of azo dyes derived from salicylic acid in thin films (80-200 nm) was studied upon irradiation with polarized light (λmax = 457 nm). It is shown that different trends of molecular reorientation, i.e., in the layer plane or orthogonal to it, are observed depending on the position of the methyl substituent in the dye structure. A new distribution parameter Z that allows the portion of molecules reoriented in the layer plane during exposure to be determined is introduced. The novel azo dye potassium 3,7-bis[1-(4-hydroxy-3-carboxylate)phenylazo]-5,5'-dioxodibenzothiophene was synthesized. Its molecules are photoaligned in the layer plane upon irradiation with polarized light.

  8. Synthesis and anion recognition studies of novel bis (4-hydroxycoumarin) methane azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitsiri, Amorn; Tongkhan, Sukanya; Radchatawedchakoon, Widchaya; Sakee, Uthai

    2016-03-01

    Four new bis (4-hydroxycoumarin) methane azo dyes were synthesized by the condensation of 4-hydroxycoumarin with four different azo salicylaldehydes and their structures were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HRMS. Anion binding ability in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions with tetrabutylammonium (TBA) salts (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, AcO- and H2PO4-) was investigated by the naked eye, as well as UV-visible spectroscopy. The sensor shows selective recognition towards fluoride and acetate. The binding affinity of the sensors with fluoride and acetate was calculated using UV-visible spectroscopic technique.

  9. Photoreversible optical data recording in films of amorphous azo dye-containing polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, A N; Uraev, D V; Shibaev, Valerii P; Kostromin, S G

    2002-02-28

    The photoreversible properties of films of amorphous azo-containing polymers (AAPs) are studied theoretically and experimentally. The control of the sign of a photoinduced addition {Delta}n{sup ind} to the refractive index of the polymer by changing polarisation of the incident light is demonstrated. A theoretical model of photoinduced processes in AAP films is proposed, which takes into account the orientation diffusion of trans-isomers of azo dyes, and simplified analytic approaches describing the photoorientation dynamics in AAPs are considered. The theoretical results are in good agreement with our experimental data. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  10. Energy-efficient photodegradation of azo dyes with TiO(2) nanoparticles based on photoisomerization and alternate UV-visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Chen, Da; Lv, Xiaojun; Wang, Ying; Chang, Haixin; Li, Jinghong

    2010-02-01

    Herein, we demonstrated a UV-vis light alternate photocatalysis (UVLAP) strategy in the photodegradation of azo dyes. The UVLAP of azo dyes over TiO(2) catalysts exhibited significantly higher energy efficiency than the conventional UV process by 40%, which was attributed to the photoisomerization of azo dyes and the resulting diversity of dyes' cis and trans states in interfacial properties, including conductance and spatial effects. This UVLAP strategy could contribute to the energy-saving photodegradation of azo dyes and other pollutants with photoisomerization properties and facilitate the practical application of TiO(2) in the environmental remediation. PMID:20039724

  11. Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activity and spectrophotometric and dyeing properties of some novel azo disperse dyes based on naphthalimides.

    PubMed

    Shaki, Hanieh; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel disperse dyes containing azo group were synthesized through a diazotization and coupling process. The 4-amino-N-2-aminomethylpyridine-1,8-naphthalimide was diazotized by nitrosylsulphuric acid and coupled with various aromatic amines such as N,N-diethylaniline, N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and 2-methylindole. Chemical structures of the synthesized dyes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13) C NMR), elemental analysis, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy. The spectrophotometric data of all dyes were evaluated in various solvents with different polarity. Eventually, the dyes were applied on polyamide fabrics in order to investigate their dyeing properties. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light, and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Moreover, the color gamut of the synthesized dyes was measured on polyamide fabrics. Results indicated that some of the synthesized dyes were able to dye polyamide fabrics with deep shades. They had very good wash and rubbing fastness degrees and moderate-to-good light fastness on polyamide fabrics. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized dyes were evaluated in soluble state and on the dyed fabrics. The results indicated that dye 2 containing N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline as coupler had the highest activity against all the bacteria and fungi used. PMID:25967675

  12. Are Phragmites australis enzymes involved in the degradation of the textile azo dye acid orange 7?

    PubMed

    Carias, Cátia C; Novais, Júlio M; Martins-Dias, Susete

    2008-01-01

    The role of antioxidant and detoxification enzymes of Phragmites australis, in the degradation of an azo dye, acid orange 7 (AO7), was studied. Activities of several enzymes involved in plant protection against stress were assayed through the activity characterization of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidases (POD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APOX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), obtained from P. australis crude extracts of leaves, stems and roots. A sub-surface vertical flow constructed wetland, planted with P. australis was used to test the plants response to the AO7 exposure at two different concentrations (130 and 700 mg l(-1)). An activity increase was detected for an AO7 concentration of 130 mg l(-1) for most enzymes studied (SOD, CAT and APOX), especially in leaves, suggesting a response of the reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes to the chemical stress imposed. GST activity increase in this situation can also be interpreted as an activation of the detoxification pathway and subsequent AO7 conjugation. A totally different behaviour was observed for AO7 at 700 mg l(-1). An evident decrease in activity was observed for SOD, CAT, APOX and GST, probably due to enzymatic inhibition by AO7. Contrarily, DHAR activity augmented drastically in this situation. POD activity was not greatly affected during trial. Altogether these results suggest that P. australis effectively uses the ascorbate-glutathione pathway for the detoxification of AO7. PMID:17336060

  13. Impact of Photo-Induced Surface Adsorption of Azo-Dyes on the Liquid Crystal Anchoring Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statman, David

    2013-03-01

    Using optical techniques, we measured the anchoring conditions of azo-dye doped nematic liquid crystals on rubbed polyimide surfaces. Linearly polarized light induces the formation of a second easy axis on the polymer surface oriented toward the polarization direction of the pump laser beam. This additional easy axis is the result of photo-induced adsorption of the cis isomer of the azo dye. An effective easy axis is the weighted average of the original easy axis and this new easy axis.

  14. Fastest non-ionic azo dyes and transfer of their thermal isomerisation kinetics into liquid-crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Castro, M Cidália R; Coelho, Paulo; Raposo, M Manuela M; Velasco, Dolores

    2016-04-14

    Push-pull bithienylpyrrole-based azo dyes exhibit thermal isomerisation rates as fast as 1.4 μs in acetonitrile at 298 K becoming, thus, the fastest neutral azo dyes reported so far. These remarkably low relaxation times can be transferred into liquid-crystalline matrices enabling light-triggered oscillations in the optical density of the final material up to 11 kHz under ambient conditions. PMID:26990527

  15. Emerging adsorptive removal of azo dye by metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Ayati, Ali; Shahrak, Mahdi Niknam; Tanhaei, Bahareh; Sillanpää, Mika

    2016-10-01

    Adsorptive removal of toxic compounds using advanced porous materials is one of the most attractive approaches. In recent years, the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a subset of advanced porous nano-structured materials, due to their unique characteristics are showing great promise for better adsorption/separation of various water contaminants. Given the importance of azo dye removal, as an important class of pollutants, this paper aims to review and summarize the recently published research on the effectiveness of various MOFs adsorbents under different physico-chemical process parameters in dyes adsorption. The effect of pH, the adsorption mechanism and the applicability of various adsorption kinetic and thermodynamic models are briefly discussed. Most of the results observed showed that the adsorption kinetic and isotherm of azo dyes onto the MOFs mostly followed the pseudo-second order and Langmuir models respectively. Also, the optimum pH value for the removal of majority of azo dyes by MOFs was observed to be in the range of ∼5-7. PMID:27355417

  16. Biodegradation of textile azo-dyes byPhanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Capalash, N; Sharma, P

    1992-05-01

    Of 18 commercially used textile dyes, eight were degraded by the white rot fungus,Phanerochaete chrysosporium, by 40 to 73% based on decrease of colour. Both the lignin-degrading enzyme system ofP. chrysosporium and adsorption to its cell mass were involved in the degradation of the diazo dye, Reactofix Gold Yellow. Degradation was best achieved by adding the dye to the medium and then inoculating with pre-grown mycelium; inoculation with spores resulted mainly in dye adsorption. PMID:24425485

  17. Dyeing of Polyester with Disperse Dyes: Part 2. Synthesis and Dyeing Characteristics of Some Azo Disperse Dyes for Polyester Fabrics.

    PubMed

    Al-Etaibi, Alya M; Alnassar, Huda S; El-Apasery, Morsy Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to utilize carrier for accelerating the rate of dyeing not only to enhance dyeing of polyester fabrics dyed with disperse dyes 3a,b, but also to save energy. Both the color strength expressed as dye uptake and the fastness properties of the dyed fabrics were evaluated. PMID:27367659

  18. Adsorption studies of cationic, anionic and azo-dyes via monodispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Saharan, Priya; Kumar, Arun; Mehta, S K; Mor, Suman; Umar, Ahmad

    2013-05-01

    The present paper reports the applicability of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as an adsorbent for the removal of three dyes viz. Acridine orange (cationic dye), Comassie Brilliant Blue R-250 (anionic dye) and Congo red (azo dye) from their aqueous solution. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via simple chemical precipitation method using CTAB, as surfactant. The as-prepared nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their morphological, structural and optical properties by using transmission electron microscopy X-ray diffraction and UV-visible spectroscopic measurements. The dye removal efficiency of Fe3O4 NPs have been determined by investigating several factors such as effect of pH, amount of adsorbent dose and effect of contact time on different dye concentrations. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms have also been studied to explain the interaction of dyes. The experimental data indicate that the adsorption rate follows pseudo- second-order kinetics for the removal of all the three dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles and the adsorbed dyes were desorbed. The identities of recovered nanoparticles as well as the three dyes have been found, as same and were reused. PMID:23858837

  19. Synthesis and photo-induced birefringence of pyrazoline substituted azo-dyes in PMMA films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ming; Xin Yang, Qing; Lu, Ran; Yun Pan, Ling; Chong Xue, Peng; Zhao, YingYing

    2003-12-01

    Three push-pull type azo dyes, 4 '-{[(2-hydroxylethyl)methyl]amino}-4-nitroazobenzene (compound I), 1-[4-(4 '-nitrophenyl)-azophenyl]-3,5-biphenyl-2-pyrazoline (compound II) and 1-[4-(4 '-nitrophenyl)-azophenyl]-3-(3 '-trifluoromethyl)-phenyl-5-phenyl-2-pyrazoline (compound III) were synthesized. The cis- trans isomerization process and polarized photoinduced birefringence of those azo dyes doped PMMA films were investigated. It was found that the rise and relaxation process of birefringence signals were fit with biexponential functions and the molecular structures have effects on their photo-induced birefringence. This suggests that the three films have similar storage speed when the laser intensity is high enough. Compound III, which has the biggest substituent, has the largest long-term storage ability and can even keep 90% of its saturated birefringence.

  20. Performance of microbial fuel cell coupled constructed wetland system for decolorization of azo dye and bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhou; Song, Hai-Liang; Cang, Ning; Li, Xian-Ning

    2013-09-01

    A microbial fuel cell coupled constructed wetland (planted with Ipomoea aquatica) system (planted CW-MFC) was used for azo dye decolorization. Electricity was simultaneously produced during the co-metabolism process of glucose and azo dye. A non-planted and an open-circuit system were established as reference to study the roles of plants and electrodes in azo dye decolorization and electricity production processes, respectively. The results indicated that plants grown in cathode enhanced the cathode potential and slightly promoted dye decolorization efficiency. The electrodes promoted the dye decolorization efficiency in the anode. The planted CW-MFC system achieved the highest decolorization rate of about 91.24% and a voltage output of about 610 mV. The connection of external circuit promoted the growth of electrogenic bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens and Beta Proteobacteria, and inhibited the growth of Archaea in anode. PMID:23867535

  1. Dark spatial solitons in bulk azo-dye-doped polymer using photoinduced molecular reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Shaoping; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2004-08-16

    We report the generation of dark spatial solitons in bulk Disperse Red 1 doped poly(methyl methacrylate) using photoinduced reorientation of azo-dye molecules. Planar solitions are formed when illuminated with a continuous-wave laser at intensities of the order of hundreds of miliwatts per square centimeter. The width of the soliton saturates to a minimum value at high intensity; and when the width of the initial dark notch is reduced, the equilibrium minimum width is unchanged.

  2. Fluorescence energy transfer in quantum dot/azo dye complexes in polymer track membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromova, Yulia A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in complexes of semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with molecules of heterocyclic azo dyes, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol, formed at high quantum dot concentration in the polymer pore track membranes were studied by steady-state and transient PL spectroscopy. The effect of interaction between the complexes and free quantum dots on the efficiency of the fluorescence energy transfer and quantum dot luminescence quenching was found and discussed.

  3. Preparation of Dis-Azo Dyes Derived from p-Aminophenol and Their Fastness Properties for Synthetic Polymer-Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otutu, J. O.; Okoro, D.; Ossai, E. K.

    The preparation and properties of a series of dis-azo dyes derived from p-aminophenol is described. The influence on colour, dyeing fastness properties of the dyes on synthetic polymer-fibres is reported. Most of the dyes synthesized afford better light fastness and better wet (wash, perspiration) fastness on PET than on nylon 6 fabric. The structure of each compound was confirmed by using infrared, UV-VIS and elemental analysis.

  4. Kinetics of photoinduced ordering in azo-dye films: Two-state and diffusion models

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2009-07-15

    We theoretically study the kinetics of photoinduced ordering in azo-dye photoaligning layers and present the results of modeling performed using two different phenomenological approaches. A phenomenological two-state model is deduced from the master equation for the one-particle distribution functions of an ensemble of two-level molecular systems by specifying the angular redistribution probabilities and by expressing the order parameter correlation functions in terms of the order parameter tensor. Using an alternative approach that describes light-induced reorientation of azo-dye molecules in terms of a rotational Brownian motion, we formulate the two-dimensional diffusion model as the free energy Fokker-Planck equation simplified for the limiting regime of purely in-plane reorientation. The models are employed to interpret the irradiation time dependence of the absorption order parameters defined in terms of the principal extinction (absorption) coefficients. Using the exact solution to the light transmission problem for a biaxially anisotropic absorbing layer, these coefficients are extracted from the absorbance-vs-incidence angle curves measured at different irradiation doses for the probe light linearly polarized parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence. It is found that, in the azo-dye films, the transient photoinduced structures are biaxially anisotropic whereas the photosteady and the initial states are uniaxial.

  5. Photorefractivity and holographic applications of azo-dye doped PMMA recording materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Vinh P.; Manivannan, Gurusamy; Lessard, Roger A.

    1995-09-01

    Azo-dye doped polymer (ADP) systems have been the focus of many research groups for realizing various holographic applications for the past twenty years due to their remarkable optical properties such as grainless media, real-time capabilities, dynamic polarization holographic recording, etc. In this paper, we are reporting the photorefractivity of azo-dye doped Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films. Under actinic lighting (lambda equals 488 nm), real-time dynamic phase holograms resulting from a local change in refractive index, with reasonable high diffraction efficiency, have been recorded and a maximum of 10% has been achieved. The diffraction efficiency obtained is higher than the similar earlier reported systems. The real-time kinetics of photoreversibility (bleaching and evolution) of azo dyes in PMMA matrices has also been studied. Some interesting applications in optical processing have been realized, exploiting the special properties of ADP systems such as complete auto- reversibility, high rise and erase times, absence of memory effect, and uniform write/read/erase (WRE) cycles.

  6. Process and kinetics of azo dye decolourization in bioelectrochemical systems: effect of several key factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hou-Yun; He, Chuan-Shu; Li, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the influence of several key factors on the process and kinetics of azo dye decolourization in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), including cathode potential, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of catholyte and biofilm formed on the cathode. The results show that azo dye methyl orange (MO) decolourization in the BES could be well described with the pseudo first-order kinetics. The MO decolourization efficiency increased from 0 to 94.90 ± 0.01% and correspondingly the reaction rate constant increased from 0 to 0.503 ± 0.001 h(-1) with the decrease in cathodic electrode potential from -0.2 to -0.8 V vs Ag/AgCl. On the contrary, DO concentration of the catholyte had a negative impact on MO decolourization in the BES. When DO concentration increased from zero to 5.80 mg L(-1), the MO decolourization efficiency decreased from 87.19 ± 4.73% to 27.77 ± 0.06% and correspondingly the reaction rate constant reduced from 0.207 ± 0.042 to 0.033 ± 0.007 h(-1). Additionally, the results suggest that the biofilm formed on the cathode could led to an adverse rather than a positive effect on azo dye decolourization in the BES in terms of efficiency and kinetics. PMID:27270398

  7. Density functional theory study of new azo dyes with different π-spacers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri Novir, Samaneh; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid

    2015-05-01

    Some of new azo-based metal-free dyes with different π-conjugation spacers, such as carbazole, fluorene, pyrrole, thiophene, furan and thiazole, have been investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations. Theoretical calculations allow us to quantify factors such as light harvesting efficiency (LHE), electron injection driving force (ΔGinject) and the weight of the LUMO orbital on the carboxylic group (QLUMO) related to the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc), and to evaluate both charge recombination between the semiconductor conduction band electrons and the oxidized dyes and/or electrolyte, and also the shift of the conduction band of the semiconductor as a result of the adsorption of the dyes onto the semiconductor surface, associated with the open-circuit photovoltage (Voc). According to the results, we could predict that how the π-conjugation spacers influence the Jsc as well as the Voc of DSSCs. Among these dyes, the carbazole and fluorene-based dyes (dyes 1 and 2) show the highest LHE, ΔGinject, QLUMO, and the slowest recombination rate. Consequently, the obtained results show that the carbazole and fluorene-based dyes could have the better Jsc and Voc compared to the other dyes.

  8. pI-Control in Comparative Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (CoFGE) using amphoteric azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Hanneken, Marina; Šlais, Karel; König, Simone

    2015-06-01

    Amphoteric azo dyes were used for internal control of pI values in Comparative two-dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (CoFGE) [1]. The 2D-gel images of separated Escherichia coli proteins as well as those of colored amphoteric dyes separated by isoelectric focussing are presented. The latter were used to correct for variation in the first electrophoretic dimension and further improve protein coordinate assignment in 2D-gel electrophoresis. Data tables are supplied to demonstrate pI-value calibration and the effect on the assignment of protein spot coordinates. PMID:26217748

  9. pI-Control in Comparative Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (CoFGE) using amphoteric azo dyes

    PubMed Central

    Hanneken, Marina; Šlais, Karel; König, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Amphoteric azo dyes were used for internal control of pI values in Comparative two-dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (CoFGE) [1]. The 2D-gel images of separated Escherichia coli proteins as well as those of colored amphoteric dyes separated by isoelectric focussing are presented. The latter were used to correct for variation in the first electrophoretic dimension and further improve protein coordinate assignment in 2D-gel electrophoresis. Data tables are supplied to demonstrate pI-value calibration and the effect on the assignment of protein spot coordinates. PMID:26217748

  10. Functional behavior of bio-electrochemical treatment system with increasing azo dye concentrations: Synergistic interactions of biocatalyst and electrode assembly.

    PubMed

    Sreelatha, S; Velvizhi, G; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of dye bearing wastewater through biological machinery is particularly challenging due to its recalcitrant and inhibitory nature. In this study, functional behavior and treatment efficiency of bio-electrochemical treatment (BET) system was evaluated with increasing azo dye concentrations (100, 200, 300 and 500mg dye/l). Maximum dye removal was observed at 300mg dye/l (75%) followed by 200mg dye/l (65%), 100mg dye/l (62%) and 500mg dye/l (58%). Concurrent increment in dye load resulted in enhanced azo reductase and dehydrogenase activities respectively (300mg dye/l: 39.6U; 4.96μg/ml). Derivatives of cyclic voltammograms also supported the involvement of various membrane bound redox shuttlers, viz., cytochrome-c, cytochrome-bc1 and flavoproteins during the electron transfer. Bacterial respiration during BET operation utilized various electron acceptors such as electrodes and dye intermediates with simultaneous bioelectricity generation. This study illustrates the synergistic interaction of biocatalyst with electrode assembly for efficient treatment of azo dye wastewater. PMID:27067459

  11. Simultaneous determination of three azo dyes in food product by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiandong; Wang, Jinfeng; Li, Mingfeng; Li, Junqing; Li, Qihong; Quan, Qinbo; Chen, Jinquan

    2016-07-01

    Color is an important property for food evaluation. Synthetic azo dyes are usually used in food product to obtain better appearance because of their stability and low cost. However, such dyes should be strictly controlled because of their potential threat to human health. A simple, rapid and sensitive method has been developed to determine orange II, allura red, and para red simultaneously by ion mobility spectrometry. The three dyes could be separated at the same time and the migration time of orange II, allura red, and para red are 12.070±0.010, 8.180±0.015, and 11.037±0.016ms, respectively. The effects of different parameters, such as pH, solvent, percentage of water, were investigated to establish the optimal condition. The detection limits were 0.1, 0.05, and 0.2μg/mL for orange II, allura red, and para red, respectively. The recoveries of the three azo dyes from jellies were all higher than 81%. The developed method is fast and accurate for the detection of the three synthetic dyes. PMID:27235999

  12. ESTIMATION OF IONIZATION CONSTANTS OF AZO DYES AND RELATED AROMATIC AMINES: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ionization constants for 214 dye molecules were calculated from molecular structures using the chemical reactivity models developed in SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry). hese models used fundamental chemical structure theory to predict chemical reactivities ...

  13. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye by a newly isolated bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila BS1.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sana; Malik, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    The textile and dye industries are considered as one of the major sources of environmental pollution. The present study was conducted to investigate the degradation of the azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB 5) using a bacterium isolated from soil samples collected around a textile industry. The bacterial strain BS1 capable of degrading RB 5 was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas entomophila on the basis of 16S rDNA sequencing. The effects of different parameters on the degradation of RB 5 were studied to find out the optimal conditions required for maximum degradation, which was 93% after 120 h of incubation. Static conditions with pH in the range of 5-9 and a temperature of 37 °C were found to be optimum for degrading RB 5. Enzyme assays demonstrated that P. entomophila possessed azoreductase, which played an important role in degradation. The enzyme was dependent on flavin mononucleotide and NADH for its activity. Furthermore, a possible degradation pathway of the dye was proposed through gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis, which revealed that the metabolic products were naphthalene-1,2-diamine and 4-(methylsulfonyl) aniline. Thus the ability of this indigenous bacterial isolate for simultaneous decolorization and degradation of the azo dye signifies its potential application for treatment of industrial wastewaters containing azo dyes. PMID:26911309

  14. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by an aerobic bacterial consortium using a rotating biological contactor.

    PubMed

    Abraham, T Emilia; Senan, Resmi C; Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, Jegan J; Poulose, T P; Thomas, P P

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of an azo dye mixture by an aerobic bacterial consortium was studied in a rotating biological reactor. Laterite pebbles of particle size 850 microm to 1.44 mm were fixed on gramophone records using an epoxy resin on which the developed consortium was immobilized. Rate of degradation, BOD, biomass determination, enzymes involved, and fish bioassay were studied. The RBC has a high efficiency for dye degradation even at high dye concentrations (100 microg/mL) and high flow rate (36 L/h) at alkaline pH and salinity conditions normally encountered in the textile effluents. Bioassays (LD-50) using Thilapia fish in treated effluent showed that the percentage mortality was zero over a period of 96 h, whereas the mortality was 100% in untreated dye water within 26 h. Fish bioassay confirms that the effluent from RBC can be discharged safely to the environment. PMID:12892505

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and electrochemical studies on thiazolyl azo based disperse dyes bearing coumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkütük, Müjgan; İpek, Ezgi; Aydıner, Burcu; Mamaş, Serhat; Seferoğlu, Zeynel

    2016-03-01

    In this study, seven novel thiazolyl azo disperse dyes (6a-g) were synthesized and fully characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and mass spectral techniques. The electronic absorption spectra of the dyes in solvents of different polarities cover a λmax range of 404-512 nm. The absorption properties of the dyes changed drastically upon acidification. This was due to the protonation of the nitrogen in the thiazole ring, which in turn increased the donor-acceptor interplay of the π system in the dyes, and therefore increased the absorption properties of the prepared dyes. Thermal analysis showed that these dyes are thermal stable up to 269 °C. Additionally, the electrochemical behavior of the dyes (6a-g) were investigated using cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric techniques, in the presence of 0.10 M tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate, in dimethylsulfoxide, at a glassy carbon electrode. The number of transferred electrons, and the diffusion coefficient were determined by electrochemical methods. The results showed that, for all the dyes, one oxidation peak and two reduction peaks were observed.

  16. Experimental data for synthesis of bi-metalized chitosan particle for attenuating of an azo dye from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hajivandi, Abdollah; Farjadfard, Sima; Ramavandi, Bahman; Akbarzadeh, Samad

    2016-06-01

    In this data article, we introduce data acquired from new adsorbent, bi-metalized chitosan particle that is successfully synthesized and applied to remove the orange II dye, an azo dye, from textile wastewater. The adsorbent was meso- and macro-porous material with BET surface area of 12.69 m(2)/g and pHzpc 6.6. The simulated textile-wastewater can be significantly treated using a relatively low quantity of the adsorbent. Overall, the use of bi-metalized chitosan particle can be considered a promising method for eliminating the azo dye from wastewater effectively. Accordingly, these data will be useful for decolorizing of azo dyes from textile wastewater. PMID:26955651

  17. Experimental data for synthesis of bi-metalized chitosan particle for attenuating of an azo dye from wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Hajivandi, Abdollah; Farjadfard, Sima; Ramavandi, Bahman; Akbarzadeh, Samad

    2016-01-01

    In this data article, we introduce data acquired from new adsorbent, bi-metalized chitosan particle that is successfully synthesized and applied to remove the orange II dye, an azo dye, from textile wastewater. The adsorbent was meso- and macro-porous material with BET surface area of 12.69 m2/g and pHzpc 6.6. The simulated textile-wastewater can be significantly treated using a relatively low quantity of the adsorbent. Overall, the use of bi-metalized chitosan particle can be considered a promising method for eliminating the azo dye from wastewater effectively. Accordingly, these data will be useful for decolorizing of azo dyes from textile wastewater. PMID:26955651

  18. Revealing characteristics of mixed consortia for azo dye decolorization: Lotka-Volterra model and game theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Yann

    2007-10-22

    This study provides a novel explanation to put forward, in Lotka-Volterra competition model and game theory, interspecific competition in bioaugmentation using constructed mixed consortia for azo dye decolorization. As mixed cultures are regularly used in industrial dye-laden wastewater treatment, understanding species competition of mixed consortia is apparently of great importance to azo dye decolorization. In aerobic growth conditions, Escherichia coli DH5alpha owned a growth advantage to out-compete Pseudomonas luteola due to preferential growth rate of DH5alpha. However, in static decolorization conditions DH5alpha surrendered some proportion of its advantage (i.e., a decrease in its competitive power for metabolite stimulation) to enhance color removal of P. luteola for total coexistence. In aerobic growth, DH5alpha had its growth advantage to exclude P. luteola for dominance (i.e, conflict strategy) according to competitive exclusion principle. In static decolorization conditions, as the removal of a common dye threat was crucial to both species for survival, both species selected cooperation strategy through metabolite stimulation of DH5alpha to enhance effective decolorization of P. luteola for long-term sustainable management. This analysis of game theory clearly unlocked unsolved mysteries in previous studies. PMID:17499918

  19. Synthesis of magnetic biocomposite for efficient adsorption of azo dye from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Sivashankar, R; Sathya, A B; Krishnakumar, Uma; Sivasubramanian, V

    2015-11-01

    A novel magnetic biocomposite was synthesized using metal chlorides and aquatic macrophytes by co-precipitation method. The resulting product, magnetic biocomposite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The adsorption performance of the magnetic biocomposite was tested with removal of Metanil Yellow dye from aqueous solution. The effect of influencing parameters such as initial dye concentration, solution pH and agitation were investigated. The equilibrium isotherm was well described by the Langmuir model with the with maximum adsorption capacity of 90.91mg/g. Adsorption kinetics experiments were carried out and the data were well fitted by a pseudo-second-order equation. The results revealed that the magnetic biocomposite could efficiently adsorb the azo dyes from aqueous solution, and the spent adsorbents could be recovered completely by magnetic separation process. Therefore, the prepared magnetic biocomposite could thus be used as promising adsorbent for the removal of azo dyes from polluted water. PMID:25957848

  20. Differential gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus exposed to Orange II and Sudan III azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongmiao; Xu, Joshua; Kweon, Oh-Gew; Zou, Wen; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2015-05-01

    We previously demonstrated the effects of azo dyes and their reduction metabolites on bacterial cell growth and cell viability. In this report, the effects of Orange II and Sudan III on gene expression profiling in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1556 were analyzed using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR technology. Upon exposure to 6 μg/ml Orange II for 18 h, 21 genes were found to be differently expressed. Among them, 8 and 13 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve stress response caused by drug metabolism, oxidation, and alkaline shock indicating that S. aureus could adapt to Orange II exposure through a balance between up and down regulated gene expression. Whereas, after exposure to 6 μg/ml Sudan III for 18 h, 57 genes were differentially expressed. In which, 51 genes were up-regulated and 6 were down-regulated. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve in cell wall/membrane biogenesis and biosynthesis, nutrient uptake, transport and metabolite, and stress response, suggesting that Sudan III damages the bacterial cell wall or/and membrane due to binding of the dye. Further analysis indicated that all differentially expressed genes encoded membrane proteins were up-regulated and most of them serve as transporters. The result suggested that these genes might contribute to survival, persistence and growth in the presence of Sudan III. Only one gene msrA, which plays an important role in oxidative stress resistance, was found to be down-regulated after exposure to both Orange II and Sudan III. The present results suggested that both these two azo dyes can cause stress in S. aureus and the response of the bacterium to the stress is mainly related to characteristics of the azo dyes. PMID:25720844

  1. An improved method for removal of azo dye orange II from textile effluent using albumin as sorbent.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Tadashi; Jara, Alícia M T; Batista, Anabelle C L; Franco, Luciana O; Barbosa Lima, Marcos A; Benachour, Mohand; Alves da Silva, Carlos A; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2012-01-01

    Azo dyes are generally resistant to biodegradation due to their complex structures. Acid orange II is one of the most widely used dyes in the textile industry. The influence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in different concentrations, pH, and time of contact on Orange II was investigated using kinetics and adsorption-isotherm experiments. The results showed that the maximum colour removed from dye/albumin was 99.50% and that a stable dye-protein complex had been formed at pH 3.5 and in a proportion of 1:3 (v/v), respectively. The synthetic effluent did not show toxicity to the microcrustacean Artemia salina, and showed a CL₅₀ equal to 97 µg/mL to azo dye orange II. Additionally, the methodology was effective in removing the maximum of orange II using BSA by adsorption at pH 3.5 which mainly attracted ions to the azo dye during the adsorption process. This suggests that this form of treatment is economical and easy to use which potentially could lead to bovine serum albumin being used as a sorbent for azo dyes. PMID:23201641

  2. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Congo red) using modified Y zeolite as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kondru, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chand, Shri

    2009-07-15

    The present study explores the degradation of azo dye (Congo red) by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation using Fe exchanged commercial Y zeolite as a catalyst. The effects of various operating parameters like temperature, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalyst loading on the removal of dye, color and COD from an aqueous solution were studied at atmospheric pressure. The percent removals of dye, color and COD at optimum pH(0) 7, 90 degrees C using 0.6 ml H(2)O(2)/350 ml solution and 1g/l catalyst was 97% (in 4h), 100% (in 45 min) and 58% (in 4h), respectively. The % dye removal has been found to be less in comparison to % color removal at all conditions, e.g. dye removal in 45 min and at above conditions was 82%, whereas the color removal was 100%. The results indicate that the Fe exchanged Y zeolite is a promising catalyst for dye removal. Fe exchanged catalyst is characterized using XRD, SEM/EDAX, surface area analyzer and FTIR. Though the dye, color and COD removals were maximum at pH(0) 2 but as the leaching of Fe from the catalyst was more in acidic pH range, pH(0) 7 was taken as operating pH due to almost comparable removals as of pH(0) 2 and no leaching of Fe ions. PMID:19135790

  3. Probing horseradish peroxidase catalyzed degradation of azo dye from tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Preethi, Sadhanandam; Anumary, Ayyappan; Ashokkumar, Meiyazhagan; Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy

    2013-01-01

    Biocatalysis based effluent treatment has outclassed the presently favored physico-chemical treatments due to nil sludge production and monetary savings. Azo dyes are commonly employed in the leather industry and pose a great threat to the environment. Here, we show the degradation of C. I. Acid blue 113 using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) assisted with H2O2 as a co-substrate. It was observed that 0.08 U HRP can degrade 3 mL of 30 mg/L dye up to 80% within 45 min with the assistance of 14 μL of H2O2 at pH 6.6 and 30°C. The feasibility of using the immobilized HRP for dye degradation was also examined and the results show up to 76% dye degradation under similar conditions to that of free HRP with the exception of longer contact time of 240 min. Recycling studies reveal that the immobilized HRP can be recycled up to 3 times for dye degradation. Kinetics drawn for the free HRP catalyzed reaction marked a lower K m and higher V max values, which denotes a proper and faster affinity of the enzyme towards the dye, when compared to the immobilized HRP. The applicability of HRP for treating the actual tannery dye-house wastewater was also demonstrated. PMID:23961406

  4. Metabolism of azo dyes by Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 and effects of various factors on decolorization.

    PubMed

    Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Takenaka, Shinji; Kuntiya, Ampin; Klayraung, Srikarnjana; Murakami, Shuichiro; Aoki, Kenji

    2007-03-01

    Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 was isolated from soil of a dairy wastewater treatment plant and selected as the most active azo dye degrader of 19 isolates. Growing cells and freely suspended cells of this strain completely degraded methyl orange, thereby decolorizing the medium. The strain stoichiometrically converted methyl orange to N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, which were identified by HPLC, GC, and GC-MS analyses. The enzyme activity responsible for the cleavage of the azo bond of methyl orange was localized to the cytoplasm of cells grown on modified MRS medium containing methyl orange. The effect of sugars, oligosaccharides, organic acids, metal ions, pHs, oxygen and temperatures on methyl orange decolorization by freely suspended cells was investigated. The optimal conditions for the decolorization of methyl orange by the Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 are incubation at 35 degrees C and pH 6 with sucrose provided as the energy source. PMID:17254626

  5. [Adverse reaction to the azo dye Pigment Red 170 in a tattoo].

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, Iris; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Jarisch, Reinhart

    2004-12-01

    A 30-year old white male presented with sharply demarcated pruritic lesions in a black and red tattoo on his wrist. The strongly infiltrated and slightly scaly eruptions started four months after tattoo application and were notably restricted to the red-colored areas. Symptoms got worse after UV exposure. Patch testing and photo patch testing with the used azo dye Pigment Red 170 (C.I. 12475) was negative. Histology revealed lichenoid dermatitis without signs of a granulomatous reaction. The verification of allergic sensitization in hypersensitivity reactions to tattoos by patch testing may be difficult due to the poor penetration into the skin of the applied azo pigments. Intradermal testing may be more sensitive but bears the risk of long lasting skin reactions. PMID:16285314

  6. Effect of temperature on the photoalignment of azo dyes in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulich, V. S.; Murauski, An. A.; Muravsky, Al. A.; Agabekov, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    The temperature dependences of the induced dichroic ratios (DRs) of azo dyes after their photoalignment in thin films 80 to 200 nm thick are studied. It is found that the DR values of layers containing dyes of the benzeneazodiphenyl series fall from 6.0 to 1.6 as the temperature rises from 60 to 130°C, respectively. A reduction in induced DR as the temperature rises (from 20 to 100°C) is also observed for the thin films of the dyes of benzeneazo-5,5'-dioxodibenzothiophene group. The absence of induced DR after irradiation with polarized light at 100°C indicates there is no alignment of molecules at this temperature.

  7. Cold Pad-Batch dyeing method for cotton fabric dyeing with reactive dyes using ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Zeeshan; Memon, Muhammad Hanif; Khatri, Awais; Tanwari, Anwaruddin

    2011-11-01

    Reactive dyes are vastly used in dyeing and printing of cotton fibre. These dyes have a distinctive reactive nature due to active groups which form covalent bonds with -OH groups of cotton through substitution and/or addition mechanism. Among many methods used for dyeing cotton with reactive dyes, the Cold Pad Batch (CPB) method is relatively more environment friendly due to high dye fixation and non requirement of thermal energy. The dyed fabric production rate is low due to requirement of at least twelve hours batching time for dye fixation. The proposed CPB method for dyeing cotton involves ultrasonic energy resulting into a one third decrease in batching time. The dyeing of cotton fibre was carried out with CI reactive red 195 and CI reactive black 5 by conventional and ultrasonic (US) method. The study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy not only shortens the batching time but the alkalis concentrations can considerably be reduced. In this case, the colour strength (K/S) and dye fixation (%F) also enhances without any adverse effect on colour fastness of the dyed fabric. The appearance of dyed fibre surface using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed relative straightening of fibre convolutions and significant swelling of the fibre upon ultrasonic application. The total colour difference values ΔE (CMC) for the proposed method, were found within close proximity to the conventionally dyed sample. PMID:21550289

  8. Evaluation of an azo and two anthraquinone dyes for allergic potential.

    PubMed

    Sailstad, D M; Tepper, J S; Doerfler, D L; Qasim, M; Selgrade, M K

    1994-11-01

    Two dye mixtures and the individual component dyes were evaluated for the potential to induce contact or pulmonary hypersensitivity. These dye mixtures were suspect because of anecdotal reports of both pulmonary and contact hypersensitivity in assembly workers, and because the component dyes were structurally related to dyes known to be contact sensitizers. One mixture consisted of disperse blue 3 (DB3) and disperse red 11 (DR11), which are anthraquinones, and the other mixture contained DR11 and solvent red 1 (SR1), an azo dye. Contact hypersensitivity was examined using the local lymph node assay (LLNA) and a modified mouse ear swelling test (MEST). Both the MEST and the LLNA indicated that SR1 has weak contact-sensitizing potential. None of the other individual dye compounds or the two mixtures were identified as contact sensitizers by either method. To evaluate the mixtures as potential pulmonary allergens, guinea pigs were repeatedly exposed by inhalation (300 mg/m3, 6 hr/day) 5 days/week, for 1 week. Weekly exposures were repeated three times with 2 weeks of nonexposure time in between. Guinea pigs were then challenged through the jugular vein using a dye-dimethylsulfoxide mixture. During the challenge, breathing mechanics (dynamic compliance and resistance) were measured in mechanically ventilated animals. Changes in these measurements, indicative of bronchoconstriction, were not observed in animals exposed to either dye mixture, nor were antibodies detected in the sera of exposed animals using individual dye-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In conclusion, two methods indicate that SR1 may have contact-sensitizing potential.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7867908

  9. Synthesis, biological activity and dyeing performance of some novel azo disperse dyes incorporating pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines for dyeing of polyester fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Ahmed Z.; Aboul-Fetouh, Mahmoud S.; Nassar, Hesham S.

    2012-02-01

    Several novel pyrazolopyrimidine azo compounds were achieved from diazotization of 4-aminoacetanilide and coupling with malononitrile and then refluxed with hydrazine hydrate to furnish 3,5-diamino-4-(4-acetamidophenylazo)-1H-pyrazole. The later compound was diazotized and coupled with substituted α-cyanocinnamate, α-cyanocinnamonitrile, 2-cyano-3-ethoxyacrylic acid ethyl ester, chalcones and ethylacetoacetate to produce novel dyestuffs. Structures of the dyes were fully characterized by using FT-IR, 1H NMR, mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The dyes were applied to polyester fiber, affording satisfactory results and showed biological activity towards various microorganisms.

  10. Adsorption of azo dyes from aqueous solution by the hybrid MOFs/GO.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Shi, Zhennan; Zhu, Hongyang; Hong, Wei; Xie, Fengwei; Sun, Keke

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a hybrid of chromium(III) terephthalate metal organic framework (MIL-101) and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized and its performance in the removal of azo dyes (Amaranth, Sunset Yellow, and Carmine) from water was evaluated. The adsorption for azo dyes on MIL-101/GO was compared with that of MIL-101, and it was found that the addition of GO enhanced the stability of MIL-101 in water and increased the adsorption capacity. The maximum adsorption capacities of MIL-101/GO were 111.01 mg g(-1) for Amaranth, 81.28 mg g(-1) for Sunset Yellow, and 77.61 mg g(-1) for Carmine. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated, showing that the adsorption fits the Freundlich isotherm and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The recyclability of MIL-101/GO was shown by the regeneration by acetone. The high adsorption capability and excellent reusability make MIL-101/GO a competent adsorbent for the removal dyes from aqueous solution. PMID:27054746

  11. Statistical optimization of synthetic azo dye (orange II) degradation by azoreductase from Pseudomonas oleovorans PAMD_1.

    PubMed

    Aranganathan, V; Kanimozhi, A M; Palvannan, T

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas oleovorans PAMD_1 produced an intracellular azoreductase as the more prominent enzyme that reduces the azo bridge during the azo dye decolorization process. In order to optimize the expression of azoreductase, statistically based experiments were applied. Eleven significant factors were screened on decolorization activity using Plackett-Burman design. Dye, NADH, glucose, and peptone were identified as having highest positive influence on the decolorization activity. Central composite design of response surface methodology was employed for the concerted effect of these four factors on decolorization activity. This method showed that the optimum medium containing dye (200 mg L(-1)), NADH (1.14 mM), glucose (2.07 g L(-1)), and peptone (6.44 g L(-1)) for the decolorization of Orange II up to 87% in 48 hr. The applied methodology was validated through the adequacy and accuracy of the overall experiments, and the results proved that the applied methods were most effective. Further, the enzyme was purified ninefold with 16% yield by anion-exchange chromatography and a specific activity of 26 U mg(-1). The purified enzyme with a molecular mass of 29,000 Da gave a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel, and the degradation products sulfanilic acid and 1-amino-2-napthol of Orange II by azoreductase were analyzed by using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer and hish-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). PMID:23768111

  12. Integration of photocatalysis and biological treatment for azo dye removal--application to AR183.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Derradji; Fourcade, Florence; Brosillon, Stephan; Nacef, Saci; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2011-04-01

    The feasibility of coupling photocatalysis with biological treatment to treat effluents containing azo dyes was examined in this work. With this aim, the degradation of Acid Red 183 was investigated. The very low biodegradability of AR183 was confirmed beforehand by measuring the biological oxygen demand (BOD5). Photocatalysis experiments were carried out in a closed-loop step photoreactor. The reactor walls were covered by TiO2 catalyst coated on non-woven paper, and the effluent flowed over the photocatalyst as a thin falling film. The removal of the dye was 82.7% after 4 h, and a quasi-complete decolorization (98.5%) was obtained for 10 h of irradiation (initial concentration 100 mg L(-1)). The decrease in concentration followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, with a constant k of 0.47 h(-1). Mineralization and oxidation yields were 80% and 75%, respectively, after 10 h of pretreatment. Therefore, even if target compound oxidation occurs (COD removal), indicating a modification to the chemical structure, the concomitant high mineralization was not in favour of subsequent microbial growth. The BOD5 measurement confirmed the non-biodegradability of the irradiated solution, which remained toxic since the EC50 decreased from 35 to 3 mg L(-1). The proposed integrated process appeared, therefore, to be not relevant for the treatment of AR183. However, this result should be confirmed for other azo dyes. PMID:21877531

  13. Process and kinetics of azo dye decolourization in bioelectrochemical systems: effect of several key factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hou-Yun; He, Chuan-Shu; Li, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the influence of several key factors on the process and kinetics of azo dye decolourization in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), including cathode potential, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of catholyte and biofilm formed on the cathode. The results show that azo dye methyl orange (MO) decolourization in the BES could be well described with the pseudo first-order kinetics. The MO decolourization efficiency increased from 0 to 94.90 ± 0.01% and correspondingly the reaction rate constant increased from 0 to 0.503 ± 0.001 h−1 with the decrease in cathodic electrode potential from −0.2 to −0.8 V vs Ag/AgCl. On the contrary, DO concentration of the catholyte had a negative impact on MO decolourization in the BES. When DO concentration increased from zero to 5.80 mg L−1, the MO decolourization efficiency decreased from 87.19 ± 4.73% to 27.77 ± 0.06% and correspondingly the reaction rate constant reduced from 0.207 ± 0.042 to 0.033 ± 0.007 h−1. Additionally, the results suggest that the biofilm formed on the cathode could led to an adverse rather than a positive effect on azo dye decolourization in the BES in terms of efficiency and kinetics. PMID:27270398

  14. Transflective spatial filter based on azo-dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal films

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.-H.; Fuh, Andy Y.-G.

    2005-07-04

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of exploiting the photoisomerization effect in azo-dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (DDCLC) films with a concomitant decline of the phase transition temperature from the cholesteric to an isotropic phase (T{sub Ch-I}) as a spatial filter. The fabrication depends on the fact that the various intensities of the diffracted orders are responsible for the various degrees of transparency associated with the photoisomerized DDCLC film. High- and low-pass images in the Fourier optical signal process can be simultaneously observed via reflected and transmitted signals, respectively. A simulation is also performed, and the results are consistent closely with experimental data.

  15. Rapid degradation of azo dye methyl orange using hollow cobalt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sha, Yingying; Mathew, Iswarya; Cui, Qingzhou; Clay, Molly; Gao, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoqi Jackie; Gu, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and efficient method for methyl orange degradation using hollow cobalt (Co) nanoparticles is reported. Hollow Co nanoparticles were fabricated by a galvanic replacement reaction using aluminum (Al) nanoparticles as the template material. The methyl orange degradation characteristics were investigated by measuring the time dependent UV-Vis absorption of the dye solution, which showed a very fast degradation rate under acidic conditions. At an initial methyl orange concentration of 100 mg/L (pH = 2.5) and Co nanoparticle dosage of 0.5 g/L, the azo dye degradation efficiency reached up to 99% within 4 min, and the degradation constant rate was up to 2.444 min(-1), which is the highest value among other studies. A comparison of the decolorization rates at similar conditions with several other azo dyes, including Congo red, Amaranth, and Orange G, showed that the dye with a simpler structure and lower molecular mass decolorized considerably faster than the ones having a more complicated structure (higher molecular mass). The methyl orange degradation was also conducted using hollow nickel (Ni) nanoparticles and commercially available solid spherical Co and Ni nanoparticles. The results showed that Co-based nanoparticles outperformed Ni-based nanoparticles, with the hollow Co nanoparticles exhibiting the fastest degradation rate. Using the hollow Co nanoparticles is a very promising approach for the remediation of methyl orange dye containing wastewater due to the fast degradation rate and high degradation efficiency. In addition, these hollow Co nanoparticles are easily recycled because of their magnetic property. PMID:26498101

  16. FRET efficiency in surface complexes of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with azo-dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annas, Kirill I.; Gromova, Yuliya A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    Photoinduced dissociation of surface complexes of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with azo-dye 1-(2- pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) was investigated. It was shown that the Förster resonance energy transfer contributes in the complexes photodissociation rate, which depends on resonance condition between electronic levels of donor (quantum dots) and acceptor (azo-dye) and donor photoluminescent quantum yield. It has allowed to estimate energy transfer efficiency in the complexes and disclosed a new nonradiative channel that has minor contribution in the deactivation of excited states of quantum dots in the complexes.

  17. Decolourization of azo dyes by a newly isolated Klebsiella sp. strain Y3, and effects of various factors on biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Daizong; Li, Guofang; Zhao, Min; Han, Song

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we isolated and characterized a new strain of Klebsiella sp. Y3, which was capable of decolourizing azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The effects of physico-chemical parameters on the Methyl Red degradation by the strain were determined. The results indicated that strain Y3 exhibited a good decolourization ability in the range of pH from 4 to 9, temperature from 30 °C to 42 °C and salinity from 1% to 4%. A broad spectrum of azo dyes with different structures could be decolourized by the strain. The isolate decolourized Methyl Red, Congo Red, Orange I and Methyl Orange by almost 100% (100 mg/L) in 48 h. The culture exhibited an ability to decolourize repeated additions of dye, showing that the strain could be used for multiple cycles of biodegradation. Azo dyes at high concentrations could be tolerated and degraded by Y3. An almost complete mineralization of Methyl Red and Congo Red at the concentration of 800 mg/L was observed within 48 h. The high degradation potential of this bacterium supports its use in the treatment of industrial wastewater containing azo dyes. PMID:26019533

  18. Reductive-degradation of carcinogenic azo dyes using Anacardium occidentale testa derived silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Atchudan, Raji; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan; Lee, Yong Rok

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, reductive-degradation of azo dyes such as congo red (CR) and methyl orange (MO) was manifested using Anacardium occidentale testa derived silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a catalyst. The formation of highly stable AgNPs were visually confirmed by the appearance of yellow color and further substantiated by the existence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak around 425nm. The effect of A. occidentale concentration, reaction time and pH in the formations of AgNPs was corroborated by UV-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic results proved that phytoconstituents of A. occidentale testa acts as a capping agent and thereby protects the AgNPs from aggregation. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs was validated from the XRD patterns. The average size of synthesized AgNPs was 25nm, with distorted spherical shape was ascribed from the high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HR-TEM) images. Due to the high stability of the as-synthesized AgNPs, they were utilized for the degradation of carcinogenic azo dyes such as CR and MO using NaBH4 and its catalytic activity was studied via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results proved that extraordinary catalytic activity of synthesized AgNPs towards the reductive-degradation of both CR and MO. PMID:27479841

  19. Microbial dynamics during azo dye degradation in a UASB reactor supplied with yeast extract.

    PubMed

    Silva, S Q; Silva, D C; Lanna, M C S; Baeta, B E L; Aquino, S F

    2014-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the microbial dynamics during the anaerobic treatment of the azo dye blue HRFL in bench scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor operated at ambient temperature. Sludge samples were collected under distinct operational phases, when the reactor were stable (low variation of color removal), to assess the effect of glucose and yeast extract as source of carbon and redox mediators, respectively. Reactors performance was evaluated based on COD (chemical oxygen demand) and color removal. The microbial dynamics were investigated by PCR-DGGE (Polimerase Chain Reaction - Denaturing Gradient of Gel Electrophoresis) technique by comparing the 16S rDNA profiles among samples. The results suggest that the composition of microorganisms changed from the beginning to the end of the reactor operation, probably in response to the presence of azo dye and/or its degradation byproducts. Despite the highest efficiency of color removal was observed in the presence of 500 mg/L of yeast extract (up to 93%), there were no differences regarding the microbial profiles that could indicate a microbial selection by the yeast extract addition. On the other hand Methosarcina barkeri was detected only in the end of operation when the best efficiencies on color removal occurred. Nevertheless the biomass selection observed in the last stages of UASB operation is probably a result of the washout of the sludge in response of accumulation of aromatic amines which led to tolerant and very active biomass that contributed to high efficiencies on color removal. PMID:25763018

  20. Decolorization of azo dyes with Enterobacter agglomerans immobilized in different supports by using fluidized bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Moutaouakkil, Adnane; Zeroual, Youssef; Dzayri, Fatima Zohra; Talbi, Mohamed; Lee, Kangmin; Blaghen, Mohamed

    2004-02-01

    Immobilized cells of Enterobacter agglomerans, able to reduce azo dyes enzymatically, were used as a biocatalyst for the decolorization of synthetic medium containing the toxic azo dye methyl red (MR). This bacterial strain exhibits high ability to completely decolorize 100 mg/L of MR after only 6 h of incubation under aerobic conditions. Cells of E. agglomerans were immobilized in calcium alginate, polyacylamide, cooper beech, and vermiculite, and were used for the decolorization of MR from synthetic water by using a fluidized bed bioreactor. The highest specific decolorization rate was obtained when E. agglomerans was entrapped in calcium alginate beads and was of about 3.04 mg MR/g cell/h with a 50% conversion time ( t(1/2)) of about 1.6 h. Moreover, immobilized cells in calcium alginate continuously decolorized MR even after seven repeated experiments without significant loss of activity, while polyacrylamide-, cooper beech-, and vermiculite-immobilized cells retained only 62, 15, and 13% of their original activity, respectively. PMID:15057480

  1. Microbial dynamics during azo dye degradation in a UASB reactor supplied with yeast extract

    PubMed Central

    Silva, S.Q.; Silva, D.C.; Lanna, M.C.S.; Baeta, B.E.L.; Aquino, S.F.

    2014-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the microbial dynamics during the anaerobic treatment of the azo dye blue HRFL in bench scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor operated at ambient temperature. Sludge samples were collected under distinct operational phases, when the reactor were stable (low variation of color removal), to assess the effect of glucose and yeast extract as source of carbon and redox mediators, respectively. Reactors performance was evaluated based on COD (chemical oxygen demand) and color removal. The microbial dynamics were investigated by PCR-DGGE (Polimerase Chain Reaction - Denaturing Gradient of Gel Electrophoresis) technique by comparing the 16S rDNA profiles among samples. The results suggest that the composition of microorganisms changed from the beginning to the end of the reactor operation, probably in response to the presence of azo dye and/or its degradation byproducts. Despite the highest efficiency of color removal was observed in the presence of 500 mg/L of yeast extract (up to 93%), there were no differences regarding the microbial profiles that could indicate a microbial selection by the yeast extract addition. On the other hand Methosarcina barkeri was detected only in the end of operation when the best efficiencies on color removal occurred. Nevertheless the biomass selection observed in the last stages of UASB operation is probably a result of the washout of the sludge in response of accumulation of aromatic amines which led to tolerant and very active biomass that contributed to high efficiencies on color removal. PMID:25763018

  2. Synthesis and characterization of Fe (III) complex of an azo dye derived from (2-amino-5-chlorophenyl) phenyl methanone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mini, S.; Meena, S. S.; Bhatt, Pramod; Sadasivan, V.; Vidya, V. G.

    2013-06-01

    The synthesis of Fe (III) complex with an azo dye derived from (2-Amino-5-Chlorophenyl) phenyl methanone is presented. The newly prepared ligand and complex are characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Visible and Mössbauer spectral studies, Molar conductance, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The thermal stability of the complex is determined from the thermo gravimetric analysis.

  3. Degradation of azo dyes by the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, J T; Gold, M H; Renganathan, V

    1992-08-01

    Under nitrogen-limiting, secondary metabolic conditions, the white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium extensively mineralized the specifically 14C-ring-labeled azo dyes 4-phenylazophenol, 4-phenylazo-2-methoxyphenol, Disperse Yellow 3 [2-(4'-acetamidophenylazo)-4-methylphenol], 4-phenylazoaniline, N,N-dimethyl-4-phenylazoaniline, Disperse Orange 3 [4-(4'-nitrophenylazo)-aniline], and Solvent Yellow 14 (1-phenylazo-2-naphthol). Twelve days after addition to cultures, the dyes had been mineralized 23.1 to 48.1%. Aromatic rings with substituents such as hydroxyl, amino, acetamido, or nitro functions were mineralized to a greater extent than unsubstituted rings. Most of the dyes were degraded extensively only under nitrogen-limiting, ligninolytic conditions. However, 4-phenylazo-[U-14C]phenol and 4-phenylazo-[U-14C]2-methoxyphenol were mineralized to a lesser extent under nitrogen-sufficient, nonligninolytic conditions as well. These results suggest that P. chrysosporium has potential applications for the cleanup of textile mill effluents and for the bioremediation of dye-contaminated soil. PMID:1514787

  4. Degradation of azo dyes by the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Spadaro, J T; Gold, M H; Renganathan, V

    1992-01-01

    Under nitrogen-limiting, secondary metabolic conditions, the white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium extensively mineralized the specifically 14C-ring-labeled azo dyes 4-phenylazophenol, 4-phenylazo-2-methoxyphenol, Disperse Yellow 3 [2-(4'-acetamidophenylazo)-4-methylphenol], 4-phenylazoaniline, N,N-dimethyl-4-phenylazoaniline, Disperse Orange 3 [4-(4'-nitrophenylazo)-aniline], and Solvent Yellow 14 (1-phenylazo-2-naphthol). Twelve days after addition to cultures, the dyes had been mineralized 23.1 to 48.1%. Aromatic rings with substituents such as hydroxyl, amino, acetamido, or nitro functions were mineralized to a greater extent than unsubstituted rings. Most of the dyes were degraded extensively only under nitrogen-limiting, ligninolytic conditions. However, 4-phenylazo-[U-14C]phenol and 4-phenylazo-[U-14C]2-methoxyphenol were mineralized to a lesser extent under nitrogen-sufficient, nonligninolytic conditions as well. These results suggest that P. chrysosporium has potential applications for the cleanup of textile mill effluents and for the bioremediation of dye-contaminated soil. PMID:1514787

  5. Iron nanoparticles decoration onto three-dimensional graphene for rapid and efficient degradation of azo dye.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cheng, Yilin; Kong, Tao; Cheng, Guosheng

    2015-12-15

    Porous three-dimensional graphene (3DG) prepared by chemical vapor deposition, was utilized as a matrix to support nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles. The strategies to manipulate the morphology, distribution and size of nZVI particles on the 3DG support were demonstrated. The immobilized nZVI particles with a size of 100 nm and dense deposition were achieved. A 94.5% of orange IV azo dye was removed in 60 min using nZVI particles immobilized 3DG (3DG-Fe), whereas only 70.9% was removed by free Fe nanoparticles in aqueous solution. Meanwhile, a reaction rate with orange IV of 3DG-Fe was approximately 5-fold faster than that of free Fe nanoparticles. The effects of 3DG-Fe dosage, dye concentration, reaction pH and temperature on dye degradation were also addressed. Those results imply that both lowering pH and increasing temperature led to higher reaction efficiency and rate. The kinetic data reveal that the degradation process of orange IV dye, modeled by the pseudo-first-order kinetics, might involve adsorption and redox reaction with an activation energy of 39.2 kJ/mol. PMID:26091894

  6. Degradation of azo dyes by the lignin-degrading fungus Phaerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Spadaro, J.T.; Gold, M.H.; Renganathan, V. )

    1992-08-01

    Under nitrogen-limiting, secondary metabolic conditions, the white rat basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium extensively mineralized the specifically [sup 14]C-ring-labeled azo dyes 4-phenylazophenol, 4-phenylazo-2-methoxyphenol, Disperse Yellow 3 [2-(4[prime]-acetamidophenylaso)-4-methylphenol], 4-phenylazoaniline, N,N-dimethyl-4-phenylazoaniline, Disperse Orange 3 [4-(4[prime]-nitrophenylazo)-aniline], and Solvent Yellow 14 (1-phenylazo-2-naphthol). Twelve days after addition to cultures, the dyes had been mineralized 23.1 to 48.1%. Aromatic rings with substituents such as hydroxyl, amino, acetamido, or nitro functions were mineralized to a greater extent than unsubstituted rings. Most of the dyes were degraded extensively only under nitrogen-limiting, ligninolytic conditions. However, 4-phenylazo-[U-[sup 14]C] phenol and 4-phenylazo-[U-[sup 14]C] 2-methoxyphenol were mineralized to a lesser extent under nitrogen-sufficient, nonligninolytic conditions as well. These results suggest that P. chrysosporium has potential applications for the cleanup of textile mill effluents and for the bioremediation of dye-contaminated soil.

  7. Synthesis of MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles for azo dye degradation by catalytic ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Manivel, Arumugam; Lee, Gang-Juan; Chen, Chin-Yi; Chen, Jing-Heng; Ma, Shih-Hsin; Horng, Tzzy-Leng; Wu, Jerry J.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of one-dimensional MoO{sub 3} nanostructures using hydrothermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. • Sonochemical synthesized MoO{sub 3} presents the best efficiency for the dye removal by catalytic ozonation. • Efficient environmental remediation process. - Abstract: One-dimensional molybdenum trioxide nanostructures were prepared in three different approaches, including thermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. The physicochemical properties of the obtained MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles were investigated by diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Among the methods as investigated, sonochemical synthesis gave well-dispersed fine MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles compared with the other approaches. All the synthesized MoO{sub 3} nanostructures were examined for the catalytic ozonation to degrade azo dye in aqueous environment. Different performances were obtained for the catalyst prepared in different methods and the catalytic efficiencies were found to be the order of sonochemical, microwave, and then thermal methods. The sonochemical MoO{sub 3} catalyst allowed the total dye removal within 20 min and its good performance was justified according to their higher surface area with higher number of active sites that provide effective dye interaction for better degradation.

  8. Yeast extract promotes decolorization of azo dyes by stimulating azoreductase activity in Shewanella sp. strain IFN4.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Negm, Fayek; Khalid, Azeem; Shaharoona, Baby; Hussain, Sabir; Mahmood Nadeem, Sajid; Crowley, David E

    2016-02-01

    Biological treatment of azo dyes commonly requires a combined anaerobic-aerobic process in which initial decolorization is achieved by reductive cleavage of azo bonds on the parent molecule. The present study was conducted to examine the relative importance of co-substrates for driving reductive decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella sp. strain IFN4 using whole cells and enzyme assays. Results showed that the dye decolorization by strain IFN4 was faster in medium containing 1gL(-1) yeast extract (YE) as compared to nine other co-substrates. Moreover, only YE stimulated azoreductase activity (increased from 1.32 to 4.19U/mg protein). Increasing the level of YE up to 8gL(-)(1) resulted into 81% decolorization of the dye in 1h along with an increase in azoreductase activity up to 6.16U/mg protein. Among the components of YE, only riboflavin stimulated the decolorization process as well as enzyme activity. Moreover, strain IFN4 demonstrated flavin reductase activity, and a significant correlation (r(2)=0.98) between flavin reduction and dye reduction by this strain emphasized the involvement of flavin compounds in the decolorization process. The results of this study show that YE serves both as a source of reducing equivalents and an electron shuttle for catalyzing dye reduction. PMID:26454074

  9. Bladder cancer in crack testers applying azo dye-based sprays to metal bodies.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Kopps, Silke; Prager, Hans-Martin; Mende, Stephan v; Thiel, Ralf; Jungmann, Olaf; Zumbe, Jürgen; Bolt, Hermann M; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Selinski, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer may be produced by azo dyes due to the presence of carcinogenic aromatic amines. Nine cases of suspected occupational bladder cancer that were exposed to different crack test sprays in metal-related jobs were examined. A detailed occupational history was taken and, if possible, the N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) status was determined. The first exposure to crack test sprays ranged from 1957 to 1986. Age at first exposure was between 14 and 33 yr. Age at first diagnosis of bladder cancer varied from 35 to 64 yr. Latency periods were between 17 and 45 yr. The maximal reported exposure period was 29 yr. Four of six genotyped cases were slow NAT2 acetylators. The handling of the crack test spray included spraying the red dye-containing matter on the metal body and washing off the spray with a rag. Thus, workers were exposed by dermal contact as well as by inhalation. The crack test spray, which makes the cracks visible after washing off the red testing spray compounds and applying an additional white spray, contained dyes such as solvent red 19 (Sudan red 7B, N-ethyl-1[[4-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]-2-naphthylamine) or a mixture of p-phenylazoaniline-N-ethyl-2-naphthylamine and p-phenylazoaniline-N-ethyl-1-naphthylamine. The aromatic amine 2-naphthylamine is classified as human carcinogen by IARC and the national authorities and has been banned in many countries since the mid 1950s. Bladder cancer patients with metal-related jobs need to be explicitly asked about the use of crack test sprays. PMID:22686317

  10. In-situ formation and immobilization of biogenic nanopalladium into anaerobic granular sludge enhances azo dyes degradation.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiangchun; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Hengduo

    2015-07-01

    Azo dyes are toxic and recalcitrant wastewater pollutants. An innovative technology based on biogenic nanopalladium (Bio-Pd) supported anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) was developed for azo dyes reduction. In-situ formation of Bio-Pd in the AGS was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The Pd associated AGS (Pd-AGS) showed enhanced decolorization rates to the three azo dyes of Congo Red, Evans Blue and Orange II, with the degradation kinetic constants increased by 2.3-10 fold compared to the control AGS in the presence of electron donor formate. Impacts of different electron donors on Orange II decolorization were further investigated. Results showed that formic acid, formate, acetate, glucose, ethanol and lactate could serve as electron and hydrogen donors to stimulate Orange II decolorization by the Pd-AGS, and their activities followed the order: formic acid > formate > ethanol > glucose > lactate > acetate. Most of the Bio-Pd was bound with microbes in the AGS with a small fraction in the extracellular polymer substances (EPS). Transmission Electronic Microscopy analysis revealed that the Bio-Pd formed in the periplasmic space, cytoplasm and on the cell walls of bacteria. This study provides a new concept for azo dye reduction, which couples sludge microbial degradation ability with Bio-Pd catalytic ability via in-situ formation and immobilization of Bio-Pd into AGS, and offers an alternative for the current azo dye treatment technology. PMID:25912251

  11. Investigation of the azo-hydrazone tautomeric equilibrium in an azo dye involving the naphthalene moiety by UV-vis spectroscopy and quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, Arslan; Eren, Bilge; Eren, Erdal

    2013-10-01

    Photophysical properties of the azo-hydrazone tautomerism of Eriochrome Blue Black B (1-(1-hydroxy-2-naphthylazo)-2-naphthol-4-sulphonic acid) in DMF, MeCN and water were investigated using UV-visible spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The optimized molecular structure parameters, relative energies, mole fractions, electronic absorption spectra and HOMO-LUMO energies for possible stable tautomeric forms of EBB were theoretically calculated by using hybrid density functional theory, (B3LYP) methods with 6-31G(d) basis set level and polarizable continuum model (PCM) for solvation effect. The effects of varying pH-, dye concentration-, solvent-, temperature-, and time-dependences on the UV-vis spectra of Eriochrome Blue Black B were also investigated experimentally. The calculations showed that the dye exhibited acid-base, azo-hydrazone and aggregate equilibria in DMF solution, while the most probably preferred form in MeCN solution was azo form. Thermodynamic parameters of dimerization reaction in DMF solution proved that entropy was the driving force of this reaction.

  12. Photocatalytic degradation of an azo textile dye (C.I. Reactive Red 195 (3BF)) in aqueous solution over copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Rezvani, Zoya

    2015-08-01

    The degradation of C.I. Reactive Red 195 (3BF) in aqueous solution using copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method was studied. Structural, optical and morphological properties of nanocomposite coatings were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The nanoparticles exhibit a particle size of 31 nm, showing a good nanoscale crystalline morphology. The photocatalytic activity of copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass was studied by performing the photocatalytic degradation of 3BF at different irradiation time. The effect of irradiation time on the degradation of 3BF was studied and the results showed that more than 85% of the 3BF was degraded in 45 min of irradiation. The pseudo-first-order kinetic models were used and the rate constants were evaluated with pseudo first order rate constants of 4.10 × 10-2 min-1. The main advantage of the photocatalyst coated on glass overcomes the difficulties in separation and recycle of photocatalyst suspensions.

  13. Photocatalytic degradation of an azo textile dye (C.I. Reactive Red 195 (3BF)) in aqueous solution over copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Rezvani, Zoya

    2015-08-01

    The degradation of C.I. Reactive Red 195 (3BF) in aqueous solution using copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method was studied. Structural, optical and morphological properties of nanocomposite coatings were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The nanoparticles exhibit a particle size of 31 nm, showing a good nanoscale crystalline morphology. The photocatalytic activity of copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass was studied by performing the photocatalytic degradation of 3BF at different irradiation time. The effect of irradiation time on the degradation of 3BF was studied and the results showed that more than 85% of the 3BF was degraded in 45 min of irradiation. The pseudo-first-order kinetic models were used and the rate constants were evaluated with pseudo first order rate constants of 4.10 × 10(-2) min(-1). The main advantage of the photocatalyst coated on glass overcomes the difficulties in separation and recycle of photocatalyst suspensions. PMID:25840025

  14. High-throughput determination of Sudan Azo-dyes within powdered chili pepper by paper spray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Domenico; Di Donna, Leonardo; Mazzotti, Fabio; Policicchio, Barbara; Sindona, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    A high-throughput mass spectrometric method is presented for the simultaneous detection of Sudan I, II, III, IV and Para-Red azo-dyes in foodstuff. The method is based on the use of paper spray mass spectrometry (MS) and deuterium-labeled internal standards on a triple-quadrupole instrument. A detailed assay of each azo-dye was performed by the isotope dilution method, through the precursor ion scan approach, using deuterium-labeled internal standards. The gas-phase breakdown pattern of each labeled and unlabeled analogue displays the naphthoic moiety as a common fragment. Sudan dyes can be determined above the threshold of 1 ppm. Paper spray allows for a wide range of analytes and samples to be investigated by MS in the open air and without sample preparation and bypassing chromatography. PMID:23674278

  15. Active manganese oxide: a novel adsorbent for treatment of wastewater containing azo dye.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Dutta, B K; Apak, R

    2009-01-01

    A new variety of active manganese oxide was prepared, characterized, and tested for its potential of adsorbing Congo Red, a dis-azo dye, from aqueous solutions. Both equilibrium and kinetics were investigated over different values of process parameters such as temperature (25-45 degrees C), adsorbent loading (0.4-0.6%), initial dye concentration (50-500 mg/L), presence of salts (sodium sulphate, 500 mg/L) and the oxygen content (MnO(x), x=1.2, 1.33 and 2) of the adsorbent. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Langmuir adsorption capacity of the sorbent (x=1.33) for Congo Red was 38.6 mg/g at room temperature which is substantially higher than those for commercial manganese dioxide, red mud, coir pith, activated carbon, and fly ash. The kinetic data were best interpreted using a pseudo-second order model. The results show that the active manganese oxide used in this work removes the dye by reversible adsorption and has the potential for practical use for remediation of textile industry effluents. PMID:19955624

  16. Enzyme-mediated bacterial biodegradation of an azo dye (C.I. Acid blue 113): reuse of treated dye wastewater in post-tanning operations.

    PubMed

    Senthilvelan, T; Kanagaraj, J; Panda, R C

    2014-11-01

    "Dyeing" is a common practice used to color the hides during the post-tanning operations in leather processing generating plenty of wastewater. The waste stream containing dye as pollutant is severely harmful to living beings. An azo dye (C.I. Acid Blue 113) has been biodegraded effectively by bacterial culture mediated with azoreductase enzyme to reduce the pollution load in the present investigation. The maximum rate of dye degradation was found to be 96 ± 4 and 92 ± 4 % for the initial concentrations of 100 and 200 mg/l, respectively. The enzyme activity was measured using NADH as a substrate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis was confirmed that the transformation of azo linkage could be transformed into N2 or NH3 or incorporated into complete biomass. Breaking down of dye molecules to various metabolites (such as aniline, naphthalene-1,4-diamine, 3-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 8-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 5,8-diaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was confirmed by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC-MS) and mass (electrospray ionization (ESI)) spectra analysis. The treated wastewater could be reused for dyeing operation in the leather processing, and the properties of produced leather were evaluated by conventional methods that revealed to have improved dye penetration into the grain layer of experimental leather sample and resulted in high levelness of dyeing, which helps to obtain the desired smoothness and soft leather properties. PMID:25163883

  17. Synthesis and characterization of Mg-based amorphous alloys and their use for decolorization of Azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M.; Wang, W. H.

    2014-06-01

    Mg-based alloys are light weight and have wide range of applications in the automotive industry. These alloys are widely used because of their very attractive physical and mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. The properties and applications can be further improved by changing the nature of materials from crystalline to amorphous. In this study, melt spun ribbons (MSRs) of Mg70Zn25Ca5 Mg68Zn27Ca5 alloys were prepared by melt spinning technique by using 3-4N pure metals. Characterization of the samples was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and energy dispersive x-ray analyzer (EDAX). Microstructural investigations were conducted by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as optical and stereo scan microscopy techniques. DSC results showed multistage crystallization. Activation energy was found to be 225 kJ/mol by Kissinger method indicating good thermal stability against crystallization. XRD, DSC, SEM and EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy) results are agreed very well. In order to study decolorization, the MSRs of Mg70Zn25Ca5 Mg68Zn27Ca5 alloys were treated repeatedly with various azo dyes at room temperature. In order to compare the results, MSRs of amorphous Zr- and Ni-based metallic glasses were also treated. Reaction of MSRs with azo dyes results in their decolorization in a few hours. Decolorization of azo dyes takes place by introducing amorphous MSRs which results in breaking the -N=N- bonds that exist in dye contents. It is concluded that Mg-based alloys are useful for paint and dye industries and will be beneficial to control water pollution. Comparison of results showed that Mg-based alloys are more efficient than Zr- and Ni-based amorphous alloys for decolorization of azo dyes.

  18. Optical Poling of Phenyl-Silica Hybrid Thin Films Doped with Azo-Dye Chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaoka, Kenji; Matsuoka, Nobuaki; Si, Jinhai; Mitsuyu, Tsuneo; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    1999-09-01

    Azo-dye doped phenly group substituted silica films were prepared by a sol-gel method from a solution of triethoxyphenlysilane (TEPh), tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and 4-[N-ethyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)]amino-4‧-nitro-azobenzene (DR1). The films were optically poled by the coherent superposition of 1064 nm and 532 nm beams from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Second-order susceptibility χeff of a DR1 doped phenyl group substituted film induced by the optical poling was approximately four times as large as that of the phenyl-free film. The phenyl group in the silica matrix was found to be effective for increasing the second-order nonlinearity and increasing the thermal stability.

  19. Pulsed laser induced birefringence switching in a biopolymer matrix containing azo-dye molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Ziemienczuk, Marta; Miniewicz, Andrzej

    2011-07-01

    All optical switching has been studied using the Optical Kerr Effect (OKE) configuration in a biopolymer matrix containing an azo-dye: the Disperse Orange 3 (DO3). The biopolymer system consisted of a deoxyribonucleic acid blended with cationic surfactant molecule cetyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride is suitable for optical quality thin film fabrication. The excitation beams inducing birefringence were delivered from a continuous wave laser at 532 nm and another nanosecond pulsed Nd: YAG laser. The birefringence was instantaneously monitored under crossed polarizer system by a weak non-absorbed light from a cw He-Ne laser working at 632.8 nm. Fast all optical switching process (in the range of microseconds) and excellent reversibility have been observed.

  20. Nanomechanical actuation of a silicon cantilever using an azo dye, self-assembled monolayer.

    PubMed

    Rastegar, A Joseph; Vosgueritchian, Michael; Doll, Joseph C; Mallon, Joseph R; Pruitt, Beth L

    2013-06-11

    The emerging fields of nanomotors and optomechanics are based on the harnessing of light to generate force. However, our ability to detect small surface stresses is limited by temperature drift, environmental noise, and low-frequency flicker electronic noise. To address these limitations, we functionalized microfabricated silicon cantilevers with an azo dye, silane-based self-assembled monolayer and modulated the surface stress by exciting the optical switch with a 405-nm laser. Atomic force microscopy, contact angle analysis, ellipsometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy verified successful assembly of molecules on the cantilever. Ultraviolet and visible spectra demonstrate optical switching of the synthesized molecule in solution. By turning the laser on and off at a specific rate (e.g., 1 Hz), the cantilever deflection can be measured via Fourier techniques, thus separating the signal of interest from the noise. This technique empowers the design of highly sensitive surface stress measurements. PMID:23663108

  1. Optical phase conjugation in azo-dye doped chiral liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinski, Pawel; Miniewicz, Andrzej

    2012-10-15

    We report on optical phase conjugation phenomenon observed in chiral nematic liquid crystal showing band gap type Bragg reflection. The phase conjugate to the signal beam is observable only in the small temperature interval when the Bragg condition is fulfilled and only for circularly polarized light. The optical phase conjugation signals were observed at low cw laser light intensities (<100 mW/cm{sup 2}, {lambda} = 532 nm). Estimated value of third order optical susceptibility {chi}{sup (3)} = 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} m{sup 2}/V{sup 2} is attributed to enhancement due to photoisomerisation of azo-dye (disperse red 1) inducing molecular reorientation process of liquid crystal molecules.

  2. Holographic gratings recorded in poly(lactic acid)/azo-dye films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambiasso, Javier; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    Diffraction gratings were recorded in biodegradable polymer films of poly(lactic acid) doped with the photoisomerisable azo-dye (Disperse Orange 3). It is shown that the diffraction efficiency of the recorded grating can be improved by 220% via an all-optical treatment. This all-optical treatment consists of a pre-irradiation of the sample with the writing laser beam at high power during a short period of time, preventing damage of the material, followed by a much longer inscription at relatively low power. Furthermore, it is shown that the addition of a small amount of 0.05 wt% of multi-walled carbon nanotubes to the photoresponsive polymer increases the maximum diffraction efficiency as well as the remanent efficiency by 20%. Finally, this last photoresponsive nano-composite is also sensitive to the pre-irradiation treatment.

  3. Electrochemical degradation of reactive dye in the presence of water jet cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoning; Jia, Jinping; Wang, Yalin

    2010-03-01

    Degradation of a reactive dye, Brilliant Red X-3B, induced by electrolysis coupled with water jet cavitation was studied. The experiment was performed in 4.5L of aqueous solution containing X-3B concentrations ranging from 40 to 120mg/L by applying Ti-IrO(2) as anode and graphite as cathode. The water jet cavitation process decreased the diffusion layer thickness and consequently increased the current density. Compared to water jet cavitation and electrolysis alone, the combination of the two methods enhanced X-3B removal and showed a synergistic effect. The azo bond of the dye molecule was broken down and the naphthalene ring was transformed to multi-substituted benzene during the combined process. The dye degradation rate increased with increasing concentration. Acidic conditions (e.g., pH 1) favored the decolorization of the reactive dye. The use of TiO(2) coated with IrO(2) as anode and graphite as cathode showed the best performance for the dye removal efficiency, compared to other electrode pairs. Addition of SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-), and especially Cl(-) ions into solution significantly enhanced the degradation. However, CO(3)(2-) inhibited the dye decolorization. PMID:19945899

  4. The accelerating effect and mechanism of a newly functional bio-carrier modified by redox mediators for the azo dyes decolorization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbo; Kang, Li; Lian, Jing; Yang, Jingliang; Yan, Bin; Li, Zaixing; Liu, Chun; Yue, Lin

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a functional bio-carrier modified by redox meditors was developed as a redox mediator for application in azo dye decolorization processes. Its accelerating effect and mechanism for azo dyes decolorization were also examined. The decolorization rates of 10 azo dyes were enhanced about 1.5-3 fold by the functional bio-carrier modified with disperse turquoise blue S-GL, and the ORP value during the acid red GR decolorization process was changed to a more negative value of 20-25 mV. Non-dissolved redox mediator on the functional bio-carrier played a similar role as NADH during the azo dyes decolorization process. At the same time, the functional bio-carrier exhibited good reusability and the combinational technology of the redox mediator and bio-carrier was a great improvement of the redox mediator application and represents a new bio-treatment concept. PMID:20490625

  5. Aerobic degradation of a mixture of azo dyes in a packed bed reactor having bacteria-coated laterite pebbles.

    PubMed

    Senan, Resmi C; Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, J Jegan; Abraham, T Emilia

    2003-01-01

    A microbial consortium capable of aerobic degradation of a mixture of azo dyes consisting of two isolated strains (RRL,TVM) and one known strain of Pseudomonas putida (MTCC 1194) was immobilized on laterite stones. The amount of bacterial biomass attached to the laterite stones was 8.64 g per 100 g of the stone on a dry weight basis. The packed bed reactor was filled with these stones and had a total capacity of 850 mL and a void volume of 210 mL. The feed consisted of an equal mixture of seven azo dyes both in water as well as in a simulated textile effluent, at a pH of 9.0 and a salinity of 900 mg/L. The dye concentrations of influent were 25, 50, and 100 microg/mL. The residence time was varied between 0.78 and 6.23 h. It was found that at the lowest residence time 23.55, 45.73, and 79.95 microg of dye was degraded per hour at an initial dye concentration of 25, 50, and 100 microg, respectively. The pH was reduced from 9.0 to 7.0. Simulated textile effluent containing 50 microg/mL dye was degraded by 61.7%. Analysis of degradation products by TLC and HPLC showed that the dye mixture was degraded to nontoxic smaller molecules. The bacteria-coated pebbles were stable, there was no washout even after 2 months, and the reactor was found to be suitable for the aerobic degradation of azo dyes. PMID:12675610

  6. All optical controlled photonic integrated circuits using azo dye functionized sol-gel material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xianjun

    The main focus of this dissertation is development and characterization of all-optical controllable azo dye functionized sol gel material, demonstrating a PIC fabrication technique on glass substrate using such material, and exploration and feasibility demonstration of three PIC functional devices namely optical variable attenuator, optical switches, and optical tunable filters using the material. The realization of all the devices in this dissertation are based on one material: dye functionalized sol-gel material. A photochromic sol-gel material functionalized with azo dye was synthesized and characterized. It possesses a photochromic characteristic under the control of green laser beam illumination. The material characteristics suggest the possibility of a new promising material platform candidate for the fabrication of alloptical controlled photonic integrated circuits. As the first potential application of the dye functionalized sol-gel material, an alloptical variable attenuator was designed and demonstrated. The optical variable attenuation is achieved in Mach-Zehnder interferometric configuration through all-optical modulation of sol-gel waveguide phase shifters. A 2 x 2 optical switch based on multimode interference (MMI) waveguide structure is proposed in the dissertation. The schematic configuration of the optical switch consists of a cascade of two identical MMIs with two all-optical controlled phase shifters realized by using the photochromic sol-gel material. The cross or bar switch state of the optical switch is determined by the phase difference between the two sol-gel waveguide phase shifters. An all-optical tunable filter is designed and its feasibility demonstrated by using the sol-gel photochromic material. Except for the phase change demonstrated on sol-gel waveguide phase shifters, dynamic gratings were observed on sol-gel film when exposed to two interference beams. This reveals the possibility of realizing Bragg grating-based tunable filters

  7. Evaluating the effectiveness of marine actinobacterial extract and its mediated titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the degradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Priyaragini, S; Veena, S; Swetha, D; Karthik, L; Kumar, G; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2014-04-01

    Aim of the present study was to synthesize titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) from marine actinobacteria and to develop an eco-friendly azo-dye degradation method. A total of five actinobacterial isolates were isolated from Chennai marine sediments, Tamilnadu, India and analyzed for the synthesis of TiO2 NPs using titanium hydroxide. Among these, the isolate PSV 3 showed positive results for the synthesis of TiO2 NPs, which was confirmed by UV analysis. Further characterization of the synthesized TiO2 NPs was done using XRD, AFM and FT-IR analysis. Actinobacterial crude extract and synthesized TiO2 NPs was found efficient in degrading azo dye such as Acid Red 79 (AR-79) and Acid Red 80 (AR-80). Degradation percentage was found to be 81% for AR-79, 83% for AR-80 using actinobacterial crude extract and 84% for AR-79, 85% for AR-80 using TiO2 NPs. Immobilized actinobacterial cells showed 88% for AR-79 and 81% for AR-80, dye degrading capacity. Degraded components were characterized by FT-IR and GC-MS analysis. The phytotoxicity test with 500 μg/mL of untreated dye showed remarkable phenotypic as well as cellular damage to Tagetes erecta plant. Comparatively no such damage was observed on plants by degraded dye components. In biotoxicity assay, treated dyes showed less toxic effect as compared to the untreated dyes. PMID:25079407

  8. Selective recognition and discrimination of water-soluble azo dyes by a seven-channel molecularly imprinted polymer sensor array.

    PubMed

    Long, Zerong; Lu, Yi; Zhang, Mingliang; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2014-10-01

    A seven-channel molecularly imprinted polymer sensor array was prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and nitrogen physisorption studies. The results revealed that the imprinted polymers have distinct-binding affinities from those of structurally similar azo dyes. Analysis of the UV-Vis spectral response patterns of the seven dye analytes against the imprinted polymer array suggested that the different selectivity patterns of the array were closely connected to the imprinting process. To evaluate the effectiveness of the array format, the binding of a series of analytes was individually measured for each of the seven polymers, made with different templates (including one control polymer synthesized without the use of a template). The response patterns of the array to the selected azo dyes were processed by canonical discriminant analysis. The results showed that the molecularly imprinted array was able to discriminate each analyte with 100% accuracy. Moreover, the azo dyes in two real samples, spiked chrysoidin in smoked bean curd extract and Fanta lime soda (containing tartrazine), were successfully classified by the array. PMID:25099151

  9. Red Emitting Coumarin-Azo Dyes : Synthesis, Characterization, Linear and Non-linear Optical Properties-Experimental and Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Tathe, Abhinav B; Sekar, Nagaiyan

    2016-07-01

    The coumarin molecules with 7-(N,N-diethylamino) substitution and aryl azo (Ar-N=N-) at 3-position were synthesized, by reacting diazonium salt of substituted amines and 7-(N, N-diethylamino)-4-hydroxy coumarin under basic conditions. They were found to be fluorescent despite the presence of azo group. The azo group rotation was blocked by complexing with -BF2, so as to get a red shift in absorption. The azo molecules show charge transfer, whereas BF2-complexes do not. The dipole moment ratios between the ground and excited states calculated suggest highly polar excited state and an intra-molecular charge transfer at the excited state in the case of azo dyes. The NLO properties were calculated by solvatochromic method and computationally. Second order hyperpolarizability was found to be 46 to 1083 times more than urea. DFT and TDTDF calculations were performed to understand the electronic properties of the molecules at the ground as well as excited states. PMID:27155862

  10. Accelerated azo dye removal by biocathode formation in single-chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, You-Zhao; Wang, Ai-Jie; Liu, Wen-Zong; Kong, De-Yong; Tan, Wen-Bo; Liu, Chong

    2013-10-01

    Biocatalyzed electrolysis systems (BES) have been the topic of a great deal of research. However, the biocathodes formed in single-chamber BES without extra inocula have not previously been researched. Along with the formation of biocathodes, the polarization current increased to 1.76 mA from 0.35 mA of abio-cathodes at -1.2 V (vs. SCE). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results also indicated that the charge transfer resistance (Rct) was decreased to 148.9 Ω, less than 1978 Ω of the abio-cathodes cleared. The performance of the biocathodes was tested for azo dye decolorization, and the dye removal efficiency was 13.3±3.2% higher than abio-cathodes with a 0.5 V direct current (DC) power supply. These aspects demonstrate that biocathode accelerates the rate of electrode reaction in BES and comparing with noble metal catalysts, biocathodes have low toxicity or non-toxic and reproducible properties, which can be widely applied in bioelectrochemical field in the future. PMID:23948224

  11. Sonoenzymatic decolourization of an azo dye employing immobilized horse radish peroxidase (HRP): a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Malani, Ritesh S; Khanna, Swati; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2013-07-15

    For degradation of biorefractory pollutants, enzymatic treatments and sonochemical treatments have shown high potential. A combined technique of sono-enzymatic treatment is of special interest as it has shown enhancement effect than the individual techniques. This work has attempted to give a mechanistic insight into the interaction of sonochemical and enzymatic treatments using immobilized horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme on the decolourization of acid red dye (an azo dye). In order to segregate the effect of ultrasound and cavitation, experiments were conducted at elevated static pressure. The kinetic parameters of HRP, viz. Vmax and Km were marginally affected by immobilization. There was a minor change in pH optima and temperature optima for immobilized HRP (6.5, 25°C) from free HRP (7.0, 20-25°C). Though the specific activity of free enzyme (0.272U/mg) was found to be higher than the immobilized enzyme (0.104U/mg), immobilized enzyme exhibited higher stability (up to 3 cycles) and degradation potential than free enzyme in all experiments. The results revealed that the coupling of sonication and enzymatic treatment at high pressure in presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) yielded the highest decolourization of acid red (61.2%). However, the total decolourization achieved with combined technique was lesser than the sum of individual techniques, indicating negative synergy between the sonochemical and enzymatic techniques. PMID:23708258

  12. Fe3O4@Nico-Ag magnetically recyclable nanocatalyst for azo dyes reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtan, U.; Amir, Md.; Baykal, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we report the successful synthesis of Fe3O4@Nico-Ag nanocomposite as magnetically recyclable nanocatalyst (MRCs) via reflux process at 80 °C for 5 h followed by reduction of Ag+. FeCl3·6H2O, FeCl2·4H2O, AgNO3 as starting reactants and nicotinic acid as linker. The structure, morphology, thermal behaviour and magnetic properties of the product were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX), thermal gravimetry (TG) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), respectively. The catalytic activity of product for various azo dyes such as methylene blue (MB), methyl orange (MO), Rhodamine B (RhB) and eosin Y (EY) and their double mixtures were studied. It was found that Fe3O4@Nico-Ag MRCs is an efficient catalyst and can also rapidly separated from the reaction medium using magnet without considerable loss in its catalytic activity and used several times. Fe3O4@Nico-Ag MRCs has potential for the treatment of industrial dye pollutants.

  13. Wet oxidation of an azo dye: Lumped kinetics in batch and mixed flow reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Donlagic, J.; Levec, J.

    1999-12-01

    Oxidation of a dilute aqueous solution of a model azo dye pollutant (Orange II) was studied in batch and continuous well-mixed (CSTR) reactors. Both reactors operate at 200--250 C, and total pressures up to 50 bar and at oxygen partial pressure from 10 to 30 bar. The model pollutant concentrations were in a range between 100 and 1,000 mg/L, which may be found in industrial wastewaters. The dye oxidation undergoes parallel-consecutive reaction pathways, in which it first decomposes thermally and oxidatively to aromatic intermediates and via organic acids to the final product carbon dioxide. To develop a kinetic equation capable of predicting organic carbon reduction, all organic species present in solution were lumped by total organic carbon (TOC). The lumped oxidation rate in batch reactor exhibited second-order behavior, whereas in the CSTR is was found linearly proportional to its TOC concentration. The lump behavior in batch reactor was dominated by the refractory low molecular mass aliphatic acids formed during the oxidation.

  14. The sonochemical degradation of azobenzene and related azo dyes: Rate enhancements via Fenton's reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, J.M.; Destaillats, H.; Hung, H.M.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    2000-01-20

    The sonochemical degradation of aqueous solutions of azobenzene and related azo dyes (methyl orange, o-methyl red, and p-methyl red) was performed at 500 kHz and 50 W, under air, O{sub 2}, or Ar saturation at 288 K. Reaction products and intermediates were identified by HPLC-ES-MS. Total organic carbon (TOC) was also determined as a function of reaction time. The authors propose a reaction mechanism based on the observed species and the extent and rate of TOC depletion. The effects of the dye structures and of the background gas on the sonochemical bleaching rates were also investigated. The reaction rates for o-methyl red were approximately 30--40% faster than those for the other compounds. Saturating with Ar instead of air or O{sub 2} increased the pseudo first-order rate constants for the degradation by 10%. The acceleration of the sonochemical bleaching and the mineralization process upon addition of Fe(II) was also investigated in Ar-saturated methyl orange solutions. A 3-fold increase in the reaction rate was observed at optimal Fe(II) concentrations. This kinetic effect is quantitatively accounted for by a simple kinetic model based on the reaction of Fe(II) with sonochemically produced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (Fenton's reaction). This latter effect illustrates a simple way of achieving a substantial improvement in the efficiency of sonochemical degradation reactions.

  15. Effect of unmodulated laser light on the nanostructure of a thin solid AD-1 azo dye film

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovkin, A M; Ezhov, A A; Kozenkov, V M; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Nagorskiy, Nikolay M; Panov, Vladimir I

    2010-06-23

    Exposure to light uniform in intensity and polarisation causes marked changes in the surface topography of a thin (320 nm) nanostructured AD-1 low molecular weight azo dye film. Linearly polarised incoherent light with a wavelength of 470 nm and intensity of 1 mW cm{sup -2} produces numerous teardrop-shaped hillocks of the order of 200 nm in radius over most of the film surface. (letters)

  16. A highly efficient single chambered up-flow membrane-less microbial fuel cell for treatment of azo dye Acid Orange 7-containing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Thung, Wei-Eng; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Ridwan, Fahmi; Oon, Yoong-Ling; Oon, Yoong-Sin; Lehl, Harvinder Kaur

    2015-12-01

    Single chambered up-flow membrane-less microbial fuel cell (UFML MFC) was developed to study the feasibility of the bioreactor for decolorization of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and electricity generation simultaneously. The performance of UFML MFC was evaluated in terms of voltage output, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal efficiency by varying the concentration of AO7 in synthetic wastewater. The results shown the voltage generation and COD removal efficiency decreased as the initial AO7 concentration increased; this indicates there is electron competition between anode and azo dye. Furthermore, there was a phenomenon of further decolorization at cathode region which indicates the oxygen and azo dye are both compete as electron acceptor. Based on the UV-visible spectra analysis, the breakdown of the azo bond and naphthalene compound in AO7 were confirmed. These findings show the capability of integrated UFML MFC in azo dye wastewater treatment and simultaneous electricity generation. PMID:26342340

  17. Molecular exciton theory calculations based on experimental results for Solophenyl red 3BL azo dye-surfactants interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Ali; Zeini-Isfahani, Asghar; Habibi, Mohammad Hossein

    2006-05-01

    The influence of anionic surfactant: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cationic surfactants: cetyltrimethylammonium bormides (C 16TAB) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) on the electronic spectrum of Solophenyl red 3BL azo dye (C.I. Direct 80) in aqueous solution was studied by means of UV-vis spectroscopy. Since, Solophenyl red 3BL azo dye was an anionic soluble dye, therefore, did not observed any interaction between SDS and 3BL dye. On the other hand, in the case of C 16TAB, aggregation was reflected by a hyosochromic shift of the main absorption band and dye H-aggregation was responsible for the short wavelength absorption band. Also, UV-vis spectra showed that micelle formation occurs for C 16TAB surfactant in 3BL dye aqueous solution in lower concentration in comparison with C 16TAB in aqueous solution lonely. Micelle formation was indicated by a red shift of the whole spectra with respect to monomer location. The importance of hydrophobic interactions was revealed by the dependence of aggregation on the cationic surfactant structure. Further results showed that dye H-aggregation was occurred under the cationic surfactant CPC as well, but in this case micelle formation could not occur. Addition of CPC surfactant into the J-aggregate dye solution in highly acidic aqueous solution was also caused completely disaggregating of dimer molecules, which may be related to occuring an acid-base reaction between them. Applicability of the molecular exciton (Kasha) theory in order to interpret of aggregation results and to estimate dimer structure of 3BL dye under C 16TAB and CPC surfactants addition was very poor and the calculated data based on this model showed that this simple point-dipole model could not describe our experimental results.

  18. Carcinogenicity of azo dyes: Acid Black 52 and Yellow 3 in hamsters and rats. Volume 2. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Plankenhorn, L.J.

    1983-09-30

    This document is an appendix to a study concerning the carcinogenicity of the azo dyes acid-black-52 and yellow-3 in male and female hamsters and rats and contains individual histopathology studies of both dyes. Histopathological features were reported in tabular form for the skin, mammary gland, muscle, salivary gland, mandibular lymph node, sciatic nerve, thymus, larynx, thyroid, parathyroid, trachea, bronchus, esophagus, adrenal, stomach, duodenum, jejunem, ileum, cecum, colon, rectum, mesenteric lymph node, lung, liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidney, heart, urinary bladder, seminal vesicle, prostate, testis, cerebrum, cerebellum, pituitary, sternabrae, femur, bone marrow, and nasal cavity.

  19. Fish erythrocytes as biomarkers for the toxicity of sublethal doses of an azo dye, Basic Violet-1 (CI: 42535).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Kaur, Arvinder

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate poikilocytosis in Labeo rohita (an important food fish) as an early indicator of stress due to an azo dye, Basic Violet-1 (CI: 42535). This dye was observed to be very toxic to test fish (96 h LC50 as0.45 mg/L dye). Fish were given short-term (96 h) and subchronic (150 days) exposures to the dye, and poikilocytosis was recorded under light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Light microscopy helped in identification of micronuclei along with irregularities, notches, blebs, lobes, crenation, clumps, chains, spherocytes, vacuolation, and necrosis in erythrocytes. However, SEM indicated shrinkage, oozing of cytoplasm, and several new abnormal shapes including marginal foldings, discocytes, keratocytes, dacrocytes, degmacytes, acanthocytes, echinocytes, protuberances, stomatocytes, drepanocytes, holes in the membrane, stippling/spicules, crescent-shaped cells, triangular cells, and pentagonal cells. Earlier studies speculated changes in the membrane to be responsible for clumping and chaining of erythrocytes, whereas the present SEM study clearly indicates that oozing out of cytoplasm is also responsible for the formation of chains and clumps. This study also shows that erythrocytes exhibit pathological symptoms before the appearance of other external symptoms such as abnormal behavior or mortality of fish. There was a dose- and duration-dependent increase; therefore, poikilocytosis, especially echinocytes, spherocytes, and clumps, can act as a biomarker for the stress caused by azo dyes. PMID:25434363

  20. Colour removal from aqueous solutions of metal-complex azo dyes using bacterial cells of Shewanella strain J18 143.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie; Guthrie, James Thomas

    2010-06-01

    The decoloration treatment of textile dye effluents through biodegradation, using bacterial cells, has been studied as a possible means of solving some of the problems that are associated with the pollution of water sources by colorants. In this paper, the use of whole bacterial cells of Shewanella J18 143 for the reduction of aqueous solutions of selected mono-azo, metal-complex dyes, namely Irgalan Grey GLN, Irgalan Black RBLN and Irgalan Blue 3GL, was investigated. The effects of temperature, pH and dye concentration on colour removal were also investigated and shown to be important. The operative conditions for the removal of colour were 30 degrees C, at pH 6.8, with a final dye concentration of 0.12 g/L in the colour reduction system. This study provides an extension to the application of Shewanella strain J18 143 bacterial cells in the decoloration of textile wastewaters. PMID:20167478

  1. Batchwise dyeing of bamboo cellulose fabric with reactive dye using ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Larik, Safdar Ali; Khatri, Awais; Ali, Shamshad; Kim, Seong Hun

    2015-05-01

    Bamboo is a regenerated cellulose fiber usually dyed with reactive dyes. This paper presents results of the batchwise dyeing of bamboo fabric with reactive dyes by ultrasonic (US) and conventional (CN) dyeing methods. The study was focused at comparing the two methods for dyeing results, chemicals, temperature and time, and effluent quality. Two widely used dyes, CI Reactive Black 5 (bis-sulphatoethylsulphone) and CI Reactive Red 147 (difluorochloropyrimidine) were used in the study. The US dyeing method produced around 5-6% higher color yield (K/S) in comparison to the CN dyeing method. A significant savings in terms of fixation temperature (10°C) and time (15 min), and amounts of salt (10 g/L) and alkali (0.5-1% on mass of fiber) was realized. Moreover, the dyeing effluent showed considerable reductions in the total dissolved solids content (minimum around 29%) and in the chemical oxygen demand (minimum around 13%) for the US dyebath in comparison to the CN dyebath. The analysis of colorfastness tests demonstrated similar results by US and CN dyeing methods. A microscopic examination on the field emission scanning electron microscope revealed that the US energy did not alter the surface morphology of the bamboo fibers. It was concluded that the US dyeing of bamboo fabric produces better dyeing results and is a more economical and environmentally sustainable method as compared to CN dyeing method. PMID:25575805

  2. Differential expression of peroxidase and ABC transporter as the key regulatory components for degradation of azo dyes by Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Samta; Kumar, Karunesh; Prasad, Manoj; Singh, R P

    2014-12-01

    Fungal species are potential dye decomposers since these secrete spectra of extracellular enzymes involved in catabolism. However, cellular mechanisms underlying azo dye catalysis and detoxification are incompletely understood and obscure. A potential strain designated as Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3 demonstrated broad-spectrum catabolic ability of different azo dyes. A forward suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of P. oxalicum SAR-3 constructed in presence and absence of azo dye Acid Red 183 resulted in identification of 183 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) which were functionally classified into 12 functional categories. A number of novel genes that affect specifically organic azo dye degradation were discovered. Although the ABC transporters and peroxidases emerged as prominent hot spot for azo dye detoxification, we also identified a number of proteins that are more proximally related to stress-responsive gene expression. Majority of the ESTs (29.5%) were grouped as hypothetical/unknown indicating the presence of putatively novel genes. Analysis of few ESTs through quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed their possible role in AR183 degradation. The ESTs identified in the SSH library provide a novel insight on the transcripts that are expressed in P. oxalicum strain SAR-3 in response to AR183. PMID:25270890

  3. Dyeing of Jute with Reactive Dyes: Optimisation of the Process Variables and Assessment of Colourfastness Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, A. K.; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Guha Roy, T. K.

    2012-08-01

    This paper deals with the studies on the effect of dye concentration, electrolyte (common salt) concentration, dyeing time, dyeing temperature, soda ash concentration, pH of the dye solution and material to liquor ratio (MLR) on colour strength and other colour parameters after being dyed of jute fabrics with reactive dyes, namely, Turquoise blue, Lemon Yellow, Red CN colours. The dye absorption increases with increase in electrolyte (common salt) concentration, dyeing time, dyeing temperature, soda ash concentration, pH and decreases with increase of MLR. Colour fastness to wash, light and rubbing for the dyed samples has been studied and reported. It is observed that reactive dye gives overall good colour fastness to both washing and rubbing. But the light fastness has been found to be moderate only, due to the UV-light initiated fading of jute fibre itself change of the colour substrate, ie, undyed material. This colour fastness has been significantly resolved by post treatment with 1 % benzotriazole.

  4. Genotoxic and carcinogenic products arising from reductive transformations of the azo dye, Disperse Yellow 7.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Vimal K; Shirin, Salma; Aman, Ahmed M; de Solla, Shane R; Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Langlois, Valerie S

    2016-03-01

    Selected aromatic azo and benzidine based dyes are priority compounds under the Government of Canada's Chemical Management Plan (CMP) for environmental risk assessments. Organic compounds undergo chemical and biological transformations when they interact with environmental matrices and biotic species; identifying the transformation products is thus a critical component of the risk assessment process. Here, we used zero valent iron (ZVI) to initiate the reduction of the diazo compound dye Disperse Yellow 7 (DY 7). Using state-of-the-art accurate mass Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-QToF-MS), four transformation products were conclusively identified, while a fifth product was tentatively ascertained. The conclusively established transformation products included p-phenylenediamine (p-PDA, a known genotoxin), 4-aminoazobenzene (4-AAB, a category 2 carcinogen) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP, a category 1 human carcinogen). 4-ABP is thought to form via a benzidine rearrangement; this is the first report of DY 7 undergoing a benzidine rearrangement. Given the importance of reduction processes in the metabolism of organic contaminants by aquatic species, we used LC-MS/MS to analyze sediment samples that had been generated previously upon exposure of Western clawed frogs (Silurana tropicalis) to DY 7 (at exposure levels where cellular stress was observed in S. tropicalis). We found p-PDA, 4-AAB, and 4-ABP were present in all exposures, but not in any of the sediment controls, demonstrating that upon release of DY 7 to the aquatic environment, sediment dwelling organisms will metabolize DY 7 to generate known (and suspected) human carcinogens, including through a previously unreported in vivo benzidine rearrangement to produce 4-ABP. PMID:26735719

  5. Effect of viscosity, basicity and organic content of composite flocculant on the decolorization performance and mechanism for reactive dyeing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfang; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan

    2011-01-01

    A coagulation/flocculation process using the composite flocculant polyaluminum chloride-epichlorohydrin dimethylamine (PAC-EPI-DMA) was employed for the treatment of an anionic azo dye (Reactive Brilliant Red K-2BP dye). The effect of viscosity (eta), basicity (B = [OH]/[Al]) and organic content (W(P)) on the flocculation performance as well as the mechanism of PAC-EPI-DMA flocculant were investigated. The eta was the key factor affecting the dye removal efficiency of PAC-EPI-DMA. PAC-EPI-DMA with an intermediate eta (2400 mPa x sec) gave higher decolorization efficiency by adsorption bridging and charge neutralization due to the co-effect of PAC and EPI-DMA polymers. The W(P) of the composite flocculant was a minor important factor for the flocculation. The adsorption bridging of PAC-EPI-DMA with eta of 300 or 4300 mPa x sec played an important role with the increase of W(P), whereas the charge neutralization of them was weaker with the increase of W(P). There was interaction between W(P) and B on the removal of reactive dye. The composite flocculant with intermediate viscosity and organic content was effective for the treatment of reactive dyeing wastewater, which could achieve high reactive dye removal efficiency with low organic dosage. PMID:22432257

  6. Ruthenium Doped ZnO Semiconductor: Synthesis, Characterization and Photodegradation of Azo Dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranganayagam, K. R.; Senthilkumaar, S.; Ganapathi Subramaniam, N.; Kang, T. Wang

    2013-04-01

    Ruthenium doped zinc oxide was synthesized by a simple sol-gel method via ultrasonication. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and UV-visible spectroscopy techniques and tested for the feasibility as a heterogeneous photocatalyst. The photocatalytic activity of Ru doped ZnO was tested using an azo dye, congo red (CR) in an aqueous solution, as a model compound. For comparison, the photocatalytic activity of pure ZnO was also performed. The parameters studied include the effect of initial CR concentration, photocatalyst weight and charge transfer phenomenon. The observed reaction mechanism was rationalized based on the elementary chemical reaction occurring in the irradiated heterogeneous reaction mixture. Total mineralization of CR was observed for both pure and Ru doped ZnO system. However, the photocatalytic activity of Ru doped ZnO was found to be higher than that of a pure ZnO.

  7. Magnetically Recyclable Fe3O4@His@Cu Nanocatalyst for Degradation of Azo Dyes.

    PubMed

    Kurtan, U; Amir, Md; Baykal, A; Sözeri, H; Toprak, M S

    2016-03-01

    Fe3O4@His@Cu magnetic recyclable nanocatalyst (MRCs) was synthesized by reflux method using L-histidine as linker. The composition, structure and magnetic property of the product were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). Powder XRD, FT-IR and EDAX results confirmed that the as-synthesized products has Fe3O4 with spinel structure and Cu nanoparticles with moderate crystallinity without any other impurities. The surface of the Fe3O4@His nanocomposite was covered by tiny Cu nanoparticles. We examine the catalytic activity of Fe3O4@His@Cu MRCs for the degradation of two azo dyes, methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) as well as their mixture. The reusability of the nanocatalyst was good and sustained even after 3 cycles. Therefore this innovated Fe3O4@His@Cu MRCs has a potential to be used for purification of waste water. PMID:27455668

  8. Decolorization of azo dye Orange G by aluminum powder enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei Qiang; Wei, Xiao Qin; Song, Zhi Jun; Jin, Mi Cong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the decolorization of azo dye Orange G (OG) in aqueous solution by aluminum powder enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation (AlP-UI) was investigated. The effects of various operating operational parameters such as the initial pH, initial OG concentration, AlP dosage, ultrasound power and added hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration were studied. The results showed that the decolorization rate was enhanced when the aqueous OG was irradiated simultaneously by ultrasound in the AlP-acid systems. The decolorization rate decreased with the increase of both initial pH values of 2.0-4.0 and OG initial concentrations of 10-80mg/L, increased with the ultrasound power enhancing from 500 to 900W. An optimum value was reached at 2.0g/L of the AlP dosage in the range of 0.5-2.5g/L. The decolorization rate enhanced significantly by the addition of hydrogen peroxide in the range of 10-100mM to AlP-UI system reached an optimum value of 0.1491min(-1). The decolorization of OG appears to involve primarily oxidative steps, the cleavage of NN bond, which were verificated by the intermediate products of OG under the optimal tested degradation system, aniline and 1-amino-2-naphthol-6,8-disulfonate detected by the LC-MS. PMID:25132495

  9. Can nitro groups really anchor onto TiO2? Case study of dye-to-TiO2 adsorption using azo dyes with NO2 substituents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2016-07-28

    The nitro group has recently been suggested as a new type of anchor for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and has shown promising optoelectronic properties. Considering the excellent electron withdrawing ability of the nitro group and wider materials selection brought about by this substituent, it is helpful to evaluate the interfacial structures and photophysics of more organic dyes where NO2 poses as the dye-to-TiO2 anchor. A computational study on a family of azo dyes bearing a nitro group is presented, where the effect of certain side groups on their optical properties is examined. Both isolated dye molecules and dye/TiO2 nanocomposites are studied via density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory, with complementary experimental UV/vis absorption spectroscopy and photovoltaic device testing. Results demonstrate that these nitro-containing dyes prefer a monodentate anchoring mode on a TiO2 cluster. These nitro dyes reveal weak, but non-negligible, adsorption onto TiO2; yet, very low photovoltaic performance once incorporated into a DSSC device. This poor delivery of nitro groups as DSSC anchors is ostensibly inconsistent with previous findings; but is rationalized via the "auxiliary anchor" concept. PMID:27356762

  10. A review of the genotoxicity of food, drug and cosmetic colours and other azo, triphenylmethane and xanthene dyes.

    PubMed

    Combes, R D; Haveland-Smith, R B

    1982-03-01

    The genetic toxicology of the major dyestuffs used in foods, drugs and cosmetics has been reviewed. Published data for azo, triphenylmethane and xanthene dyes from short-term assays for muta-carcinogenicity have been summarized and discussed according to usage, current and previous worldwide legislative status. Certain other synthetic food dyes, commercial mixtures, natural and polymeric colourants as well as a section on aminoazobenzene and its derivatives have been included. Genotoxicity has been discussed with reference to structural chemistry, levels of exposure, absorption and metabolism and to epidemiological information. The extent of agreement between data from different tests and correlations with animal cancer assays have been considered. Synthetic dyes from the 3 major structural classes exhibit genotoxicity, whilst only 2 natural colours have proved active. Activity may be due to the presence of certain functional groups, notably nitro- and amino-substituents which are metabolized to ultimate electrophiles that may be stabilized by electronic interaction with aryl rings. Metabolic processes such as azo-reduction may be activating or detoxifying. the low but significant correlation between animal carcinogenicity and short-term test data may be increased with further screening, especially involving chromosome assays. It is suggested that a human cancer hazard may exist where significant quantities of finished benzidine dye samples are handled. Such risks from exposures to other colours and the possibility of human germ-line mutation induction by dyestuffs cannot be meaningfully assessed. PMID:7043261

  11. Degradation process analysis of the azo dyes by catalytic wet air oxidation with catalyst CuO/γ-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Hua, Li; Ma, Hongrui; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Three azo dyes (Methyl Orange, Direct Brown and Direct Green) were treated by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with the catalysts CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) prepared by consecutive impregnation. The relationship of decolorization extent, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal extent and total organic carbon (TOC) in dye solution were investigated. The results indicated that the CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalyst had excellent catalytic activity in treating azo dyes. Almost 99% of color and 70% of TOC were removed in 2h. The high removal extent of color and TOC indicated that the CWAO obtained perfect decomposition for pollutants. The degradation pathway of azo dyes was analyzed by UV-Vis, FTIR and MS. According to the examined results, the hydroxyl ((·)OH) radicals induced strong oxidizing effects in the target solution and destroyed the chromophoric groups of azo-benzene conjugated of the molecular structure. Considering characteristics of the dye structure, the azo bond (-N=N-) would first be attacked by the hydroxyl radical and other free radicals. With the continuous oxidization and the long reaction time at high temperature, these intermediates could be oxidized to the final oxidation products, such as water and carbon dioxide. PMID:22795071

  12. Ultrastructural and Metabolic Determinants of Resistance to Azo-dye and Susceptibility to Nitrosamine Carcinogenesis of the Guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, G. M.; Sohal, R. S.; Argus, M. F.; Arcos, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    During diethylnitrosamine (DEN) administration, a distinctive difference was observed between rats and guinea-pigs in the sequence of ultrastructural changes in the hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In DEN-induced hepatic tumour cells in the guinea-pig there was extensive proliferation of the rough ER, while the smooth ER was quite sparse; in the premalignant liver the opposite was noted. This is in contrast to the rat, in which administration of either DEN or 3′-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (3′-Me-DAB) brings about, in both premalignant and malignant hepatic tissue, proliferation of the smooth ER and sparsity of the rough ER. Yet, as in the rat, the number of ribosomes on the outer surface of the guinea-pig liver rough ER is greatly reduced and this is paralleled by a 49% decrease of the RNA/protein ratio as early as 4 weeks of nitrosamine administration. The decrease of RNA/protein ratio and ultrastructurally observed loss of ribosomes from the ER, following nitrosamine administration, correlate with a decrease of photometric response of microsomal suspensions to the sulphydryl probe, p-chloromercuribenzoate. While azo-dye-reductase activity is higher in untreated rats than in untreated guinea-pigs, feeding 3′-Me-DAB for 6 weeks brings about a 76% decrease in the rat, but no significant decrease in the guinea-pig, which is refractory to azo-dye carcinogenesis. Thus, the ability of the liver to inactivate the dye is greatly decreased in the rat, but not in the guinea-pig, as administration progresses toward the threshold dose for tumorigenesis. On the other hand, constitutive levels of nitrosamine dealkylase are identical in the 2 species and remain essentially unchanged following administration of DEN for 10 weeks. Inasmuch as nitrosamine dealkylation represents activating metabolism, this provides a rationale for the comparable susceptibility of the rat and guinea-pig to DEN carcinogenesis. Of the 2 enzymes in the 2 species, it is only azo-dye

  13. Spectroscopic and theoretical study of the "azo"-dye E124 in condensate phase: evidence of a dominant hydrazo form.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Mariana R; Stephani, Rodrigo; Dos Santos, Hélio F; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando C

    2010-01-14

    Spectroscopic techniques, including Raman, IR, UV/vis, and NMR were used to characterize the samples of the azo dye Ponceau 4R (also known as E124, New Coccine; Cochineal Red; C.I. no. 16255; Food Red No. 102), which is 1,3-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 7-hydroxy-8-[(4-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl) azo] trisodium salt in aqueous solution and solid state. In addition, first principle calculations were carried out for the azo (OH) and hydrazo (NH) tautomers in order to assist in the assignment of the experimental data. The two intense bands observed in the UV/vis spectrum, centered at 332 and 507 nm, can be compared to the calculated values at 296 and 474 nm for azo and 315 and 500 nm for hydrazo isomer, with the latter in closer agreement to the experiment. The Raman spectrum is quite sensitive to tautomeric equilibrium; in solid state and aqueous solution, three bands were observed around 1574, 1515, and 1364 cm(-1), assigned to mixed modes including deltaNH + betaCH + nuCC, deltaNH + nuC horizontal lineO + nuC horizontal lineN + betaCH and nuCC vibrations, respectively. These assignments are predicted only for the NH species centered at 1606, 1554, and 1375 cm(-1). The calculated Raman spectrum for the azo (OH) tautomer showed two strong bands at 1468 (nuN = N + deltaOH) and 1324 cm(-1) (nuCC + nuC-N), which were not obtained experimentally. The (13)C NMR spectrum showed a very characteristic peak at 192 ppm assigned to the carbon bound to oxygen in the naphthol ring; the predicted values were 165 ppm for OH and 187 for NH isomer, supporting once again the predominance of NH species in solution. Therefore, all of the experimental and theoretical results strongly suggest the food dye Ponceau 4R or E124 has a major contribution of the hydrazo structure instead of the azo form as the most abundant in condensate phase. PMID:19852449

  14. Sensitization to reactive textile dyes in patients with contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Manzini, B M; Motolese, A; Conti, A; Ferdani, G; Seidenari, S

    1996-03-01

    Reactive dyes are used especially for colouring natural fibres (cotton, silk and wool) that are widely used in Western countries, particularly Italy, in the production of clothes. The aim of our study was to investigate sensitization to the most commonly used reactive textile dyes in patients undergoing patch tests, and to assess the clinical relevance of contact sensitization to these dyes. 1813 consecutive patients underwent patch tests with the GIRDCA standard series and an additional textile series of 12 reactive dyes. 18 of these patients were sensitized to reactive dyes (0.99%) (4 only to reactive dyes). The dyes most frequently responsible for positive patch tests were Red Cibacron CR and Violet Remazol 5R (respectively, 8 and 5 positivities). In 5 cases only was a history of intolerance to particular garments given; of 4 patch tests performed with pieces of garment, 2 were positive. In 1 occupationally-exposed patient, airborne contact dermatitis was suspected. Owing to the lack of up-to-date patch test series, some cases of allergic contact dermatitis from textile dyes are probably misdiagnosed: new colouring agents are continuously introduced to the market, so that a close relationship with textile industry is necessary to improve our diagnostic tools. PMID:8833459

  15. Decolorization and biogas production by an anaerobic consortium: effect of different azo dyes and quinoid redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, L H; Valdez-Espinoza, R; García-Reyes, R B; Olivo-Alanis, D; Garza-González, M T; Meza-Escalante, E R; Gortáres-Moroyoqui, P

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of azo dyes and quinoid compounds on an anaerobic consortium was evaluated during a decolorization process and biogas production. In addition, the impact of quinoid compounds such as lawsone (LAW) and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) on the rate of decolorization of Direct Blue 71 (DB71) was assessed. The anaerobic consortium was not completely inhibited under all tested dye concentrations (0.1-2 mmol l(-1)), evidenced by an active decolorization process and biogas production. The presence of quinoid compounds at different concentrations (4, 8, and 12 mmol l(-1)) also inhibited biogas production compared to the control incubated without the quinoid compounds. In summary, the anaerobic consortium was affected to a greater extent by increasing the quantity of azo dyes or quinoid compounds. Nevertheless, at a lower concentration (1 mmol l(-1)) of quinoid compounds, the anaerobic consortium effectively decolorized 2 mmol l(-1) of DB71, increasing up to 5.2- and 20.4-fold the rate of decolorization with AQDS and LAW, respectively, compared to the control lacking quinoid compounds. PMID:26287839

  16. Reactive Fluorescent Dyes For Urethane Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Cuddihy, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Molecules of fluorescent dyes chemically bound in urethane conformal-coating materials to enable nondestructive detection of flaws in coats through inspection under ultraviolet light, according to proposal. Dye-bonding technique prevents outgassing of dyes, making coating materials suitable for use where flaw-free coats must be assured in instrumentation or other applications in which contamination by outgassing must be minimized.

  17. Properties of the metallochromic dyes Arsenazo III, Antipyrylazo III and Azo1 in frog skeletal muscle fibres at rest.

    PubMed

    Baylor, S M; Hollingworth, S; Hui, C S; Quinta-Ferreira, M E

    1986-08-01

    Intact single twitch fibres from frog muscle were isolated and mounted in a normal Ringer solution (16 degrees C) on an optical bench apparatus for measuring fibre absorbance as a function of the wave-length and polarization of the incident light. Fibre absorbance was measured in resting fibres both in the absence and in the presence of one of three metallochromic dyes: Arsenazo III, Antipyrylazo III and Azo1. In the absence of dye, the fibre intrinsic absorbance, Ai(lambda), measured as a function of wave-length, lambda, was well described by the equation: Ai(lambda) = Ai(lambda long) (lambda long/lambda)X, where lambda long is a reference wave-length selected to lie beyond the absorbance band of the dyes and X is the exponential index. For wave-lengths between 480 and 810 nm, the average value of X was 1.1 for 0 deg polarized light (electric vector parallel to the fibre axis) and 1.3 for 90 deg polarized light (electric vector perpendicular to the fibre axis). The intrinsic absorbance at 0 deg, Ai,0(lambda), was somewhat larger than the intrinsic absorbance at 90 deg, Ai,90(lambda); for example, on average (n = 6), Ai,0 (810 nm) was 0.22, whereas Ai,90 (810 nm) was 0.016. Following dye injection, dye-related absorbance was estimated from the measured total fibre absorbance by subtracting the component attributable to the intrinsic absorbance; additionally, for comparison with in vitro calibrations as a function of wave-length, myoplasmic dye absorbance was corrected for the steady change in dye-concentration with time that was attributable to dye diffusion. In fibres injected with either Arsenazo III or Antipyrylazo III, the dye-related absorbance measured with 0 deg light, A0(lambda), was found to be significantly greater than that measured with 90 deg light, A90(lambda), indicating the presence of a resting 'dichroic' signal, A0(lambda)-A90(lambda), attributable to bound and oriented dye molecules. On average, the lower limit estimated for the percentage of

  18. Efficient treatment of azo dye containing wastewater in a hybrid acidogenic bioreactor stimulated by biocatalyzed electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Cheng; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Wang, Shu-Sen; Cui, Dan; Han, Jing-Long; Hu, Ya-Ping; Su, Shi-Gang; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel scaled-up hybrid acidogenic bioreactor (HAB) was designed and adopted to evaluate the performance of azo dye (acid red G, ARG) containing wastewater treatment. Principally, HAB is an acidogenic bioreactor coupled with a biocatalyzed electrolysis module. The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and ARG loading rate on the performance of HAB were investigated. In addition, the influent was switched from synthetic wastewater to domestic wastewater to examine the key parameters for the application of HAB. The results showed that the introduction of the biocatalyzed electrolysis module could enhance anoxic decolorization and COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal. The combined process of HAB-CASS presented superior performance compared to a control system without biocatalyzed electrolysis (AB-CASS). When the influent was switched to domestic wastewater, with an environment having more balanced nutrients and diverse organic matters, the ARG, COD and nitrogen removal efficiencies of HAB-CASS were further improved, reaching 73.3%±2.5%, 86.2%±3.8% and 93.5%±1.6% at HRT of 6 hr, respectively, which were much higher than those of AB-CASS (61.1%±4.7%, 75.4%±5.0% and 82.1%±2.1%, respectively). Moreover, larger TCV/TV (total cathode volume/total volume) for HAB led to higher current and ARG removal. The ARG removal efficiency and current at TCV/TV of 0.15 were 39.2%±3.7% and 28.30±1.48 mA, respectively. They were significantly increased to 62.1%±2.0% and 34.55±0.83 mA at TCV/TV of 0.25. These results show that HAB system could be used to effectively treat real wastewater. PMID:26899658

  19. Solvatochromism, spectral properties and antimicrobial activities of new azo-azomethine dyes with N2S2O2 donor set of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Pass, Maryam; Rezaeian, Khatereh; Talei, Gholamreza

    2014-08-01

    Six new azo-azomethine dyes, H2Ln (n = 1-6), with N2S2O2 donor set of atoms have been prepared via condensation reaction of 1,10-diaza-4,7-dithiadecane, I, with substituted azo-coupled salicylaldehyde. The dyes were characterized by IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analysis. The solvatochromic behavior of the dyes was also probed by studying their UV-Vis spectra in four pure organic solvents of different polarities and a meaningful correlation was observed. Furthermore, all prepared dyes were assayed for their antibacterial and antifungal activities by disc diffusion method. The results indicated that all prepared dyes show good inhibition against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus cereus and did not show any antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli as compared to standard drugs.

  20. New 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes. Part II: synthesis, characterization, electrochemical properties and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe; Bayat, Atena; Babaei, Ali; Sohrabi, Masoud

    2012-11-01

    A new series of monoiminated 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes have been synthesized via condensation reaction of 4-amino-3-methyl-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole with various substituted azo-coupled salicylaldehyde. The dyes have been characterized by using FT-IR, UV-Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analysis. The electrochemical behavior of the dyes has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry in DMSO at five different scan rates. Solvatochromic behavior of the dyes has been also investigated in four organic solvents with different polarities. Furthermore, the (1)H chemical shielding of the dyes were studied by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method at the level of density functional theory (DFT). PMID:22902931

  1. Adsorption of azo dyes using peanut hull and orange peel: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Graziele Elisandra; Duarte, Marta Maria Menezes Bezerra; Campos, Natália Ferreira; da Rocha, Otidene Rossiter Sá; da Silva, Valdinete Lins

    2014-01-01

    This work proposes the use of agro-industrial wastes, specifically peanut hull (HP) and orange peel (OP), as adsorbents for dyes, such as Remazol Golden Yellow RNL-150% (RYG), Gray Reactive BF-2R (RG) and Reactive Turquoise Q-G125 (RT). Characterization by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller indicates that the adsorbents are mesoporous, with pHzpc values of 5.0 for HP and 4.0 for OP. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy identified carbonyl and sulphonic groups. The initial pH of the best-adsorbing solution of the three colours was 2.0. Increasing the concentration of the adsorbent promoted an increase in the percentage of removal until saturation of the adsorbent. In a factorial design, the largest value of q was obtained with 0.25 g of the adsorbent, with a particle size of < 0.4 mm and a stirring speed of 300 rpm. Such conditions were used in kinetic studies and studies of adsorption equilibrium. The evolution kinetics were rapid in the first few minutes, and after 180 min the system reached equilibrium. The kinetic model that best fit the experimental data to a 95% confidence level for the F test was the pseudo-second-order model for RYG/HP, RG/OP and RT/OP. There was no significant difference between the kinetic models as evaluated by the F test for RYG/OP, RG/HP and RT/HP. The experimental results indicated favourable dye adsorption characteristics for the adsorbents studied. The results of the F test showed that for RYG and RG, there was no significant difference between the two evaluated models. This study suggests that HP and OP are viable alternatives for the treatment of effluents containing RYG, RG and RT dyes. PMID:24701942

  2. Decolorization and detoxification of Synozol red HF-6BN azo dye, by Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation the fungi, Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. were employed for decolorization of Synozol red HF-6BN. Decolorization study showed that Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. were able to decolorize 88% and 96% Synozol red 6BN, respectively, in 24 days. It was also studied that 86% and 90% Synozol red containing of dye effluent was decolorized by Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. after 28 days of incubation at room temperature. A fungal-based protein with relative molecular mass of 70 kDa was partially purified and examined for enzymatic characteristics. The enzyme exhibited highest activity at temperature ranging from 40-50°C and at pH=6.0. The enzyme activity was enhanced in the presence of metal cations. High performance liquid chromatography analysis confirmed that these fungal strains are capable to degrade Synozol red dye into metabolites. No zones of inhibition on agar plates and growth of Vigna radiata in the presence of dye extracted sample, indicated that the fungal degraded dye metabolites are nontoxic to beneficial micro-flora and plant growth. Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. have promising potential in color removal from textile wastewater-containing azo dyes. PMID:23369298

  3. Decolorization and detoxification of sulfonated azo dye C.I. Remazol Red and textile effluent by isolated Lysinibacillus sp. RGS.

    PubMed

    Saratale, Rijuta G; Gandhi, Soniya S; Purankar, Madhavi V; Kurade, Mayur B; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Oh, Sang Eun; Saratale, Ganesh D

    2013-06-01

    A novel bacterium was isolated from the soil of Ichalkaranji textile industrial area. Through 16S rRNA sequence matching and morphological observation it was identified as Lysinibacillus sp. RGS. This strain has ability to decolorize various industrial dyes among which, it showed complete decolorization and degradation of toxic sulfonated azo dye C.I. Remazol Red (at 30°C, pH 7.0, under static condition) with higher chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction (92%) within 6 h of incubation. Various parameters like agitation, pH, temperature and initial dye concentrations were optimized to develop faster decolorization process. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of Lysinibacillus sp. RGS. Induction in oxidoreductive enzymes presumably indicates involvement of these enzymes in the decolorization/degradation process. Analytical studies of the extracted metabolites confirmed the significant degradation of Remazol Red into various metabolites. The phytotoxicity assay (with respect to plants Phaseolus mungo and Sorghum vulgare) revealed that the degradation of Remazol Red produced nontoxic metabolites. Finally Lysinibacillus sp. RGS was applied to decolorize mixture of dyes and actual industrial effluent showing 87% and 72% decolorization (in terms of decrease in ADMI value) with 69% and 62% COD reduction within 48 h and 96 h, respectively. The foregoing result increases the applicability of the strain for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants. PMID:23321576

  4. Biodecolorization of azo dye Remazol orange by Pseudomonas aeruginosa BCH and toxicity (oxidative stress) reduction in Allium cepa root cells.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Shekhar B; Surwase, Shripad N; Kalyani, Dayanand C; Gurav, Ranjit G; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2012-11-01

    In this report a textile azo dye Remazol orange was degraded and detoxified by bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa BCH in plain distilled water. This bacterial decolorization performance was found to be pH and temperature dependent with maximum decolorization observed at pH 8 and temperature 30 °C. Bacterium tolerated higher dye concentrations up to 400 mg l(-1). Effect of initial cell mass showed that higher cell mass concentration can accelerate decolorization process with maximum of 92 % decolorization observed at 2.5 g l(-1) cell mass within 6.5 h. Effect of various metal ions showed Mn has inducing effect whereas Zn strongly inhibited the decolorization process at 5 mM concentration. Analysis of biodegradation products carried out with UV-vis spectroscopy, HPTLC and FTIR confirmed the decolorization and degradation of Remazol orange. Possible route for the degradation of dye was proposed based on GC-MS analysis. During toxicological scrutiny in Allium cepa root cells, induction in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and inhibition of catalase (CAT) along with raised levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in dye treated samples were detected which conclusively indicated the generation of oxidative stress. Less toxic nature of the dye degraded products was observed after bacterial treatment. PMID:22948606

  5. Photo-assisted hetero-fenton decolorization of azo dye from contaminated water by Fe-Si mixed oxide nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Rasoulifard, M H; Monfared, H Hosseini; Masoudian, S

    2011-10-01

    An aerogel of silica gel dopeyd with 2.86 wt% Fe was prepared by an alkoxide sol-gel method and using tetraethyl orthosilicate as a precursor material. The synthesized aerogel was calcined at 500 degress C to produce nanoparticle solids, and was characterized by XRD, FT-IR and SEM. The nanosized iron-silica gel mixed oxide was tested in the photooxidation of the azo dye Acid Red 14 (AR 14) using 30% aqueous hydrogen peroxide as oxidant and UV light. The 2.86 wt% Fe-loaded SiO2 showed very good efficiency in the decolorization of AR 14. The effects of various parameters including solution pH, catalyst, oxidant and initial dye concentrations on photodegradation were investigated and the optimum conditions were determined. The catalyst was resistant to leaching and could be recycled several times without appreciable loss of activity. PMID:22329154

  6. Potential of the aquatic fern Azolla filiculoides in biodegradation of an azo dye: modeling of experimental results by artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Khataee, A R; Movafeghi, A; Vafaei, F; Lisar, S Y Salehi; Zarei, M

    2013-01-01

    The potential of an aquatic fern, Azolla filiculoides, in phytoremediation of a mono azo dye solution, C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92), was studied. The effects of operational parameters such as reaction time, initial dye concentration, fern fresh weight, pH, temperature and reusability of the fern on biodegradation efficiency were investigated. The intermediate compounds produced by biodegradation process were analyzed using GC-MS analysis. An artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to predict the biodegradation efficiency. The findings indicated that ANN provides reasonable predictive performance (R2 = 0.961). The effects of AB92 solutions (10 and 20 mg L(-1)) on growth, chlorophylls and carotenoids content, activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase and formation of malondialdehyde were analyzed. AB92 generally showed inhibitory effects on the growth. Moreover, photosynthetic pigments in the fronds significantly decreased in the treatments. An increase was detected for lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity, suggesting that AB92 caused reactive oxygen species production in Azolla fronds, which were scavenged by induced activities of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23819271

  7. Remediation of textile azo dye acid red 114 by hairy roots of Ipomoea carnea Jacq. and assessment of degraded dye toxicity with human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pamela; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, N S

    2016-07-01

    Bioremediation has proven to be the most desirable and cost effective method to counter textile dye pollution. Hairy roots (HRs) of Ipomoea carnea J. were tested for decolourization of 25 textile azo dyes, out of which >90% decolourization was observed in 15 dyes. A diazo dye, Acid Red 114 was decolourized to >98% and hence, was chosen as the model dye. A significant increase in the activities of oxidoreductive enzymes was observed during decolourization of AR114. The phytodegradation of AR114 was confirmed by HPLC, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The possible metabolites were identified by GCMS as 4- aminobenzene sulfonic acid 2-methylaniline and 4- aminophenyl 4-ethyl benzene sulfonate and a probable pathway for the biodegradation of AR114 has been proposed. The nontoxic nature of the metabolites and toxicity of AR114 was confirmed by cytotoxicity tests on human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). When HaCaT cells were treated separately with 150 μg mL(-1) of AR114 and metabolites, MTT assay showed 50% and ≈100% viability respectively. Furthermore, flow cytometry data showed that, as compared to control, the cells in G2-M and death phase increased by 2.4 and 3.6 folds respectively on treatment with AR114 but remained unaltered in cells treated with metabolites. PMID:26971029

  8. Degradation of a model azo dye in submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC).

    PubMed

    Baêta, B E L; Luna, H J; Sanson, A L; Silva, S Q; Aquino, S F

    2013-10-15

    This work investigated the anaerobic degradation of the model azo dye Remazol Yellow Gold RNL in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) and two submerged anaerobic membrane (SAMBR) bioreactors, one of which (SAMBR-1) was operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC) in its interior. The reactors were operated at 35 °C with a hydraulic retention time of 24 h in three operational phases, aimed to assess the effect of external sources of carbon (glucose) or redox mediator (yeast extract) on the removal or color and organic matter. The results showed that removal efficiencies of COD (73-94%) and color (90-94%) were higher for SAMBR-1 when compared to SAMBR-2 (operated without PAC) and UASB reactors. In addition, the presence of PAC in SAMBR-1 increased reactor stability, thereby leading to a lower accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The microfiltration membrane was responsible for an additional removal of ~50% of soluble residual COD in the form of VFA, thus improving permeate quality. On its turn, PAC exhibited the ability to adsorb byproducts (aromatic amines) of azo dye degradation as well as to act as source of immobilized redox mediator (quinone groups on its surface), thereby enhancing color removal. PMID:23810998

  9. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular modeling and antimicrobial studies of tridentate azo-dye Schiff base metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Zayed, Mohamed E.; Alharbi, Suliman A.

    2015-03-01

    Nine mononuclear Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pt(IV) complexes of azo-dye Schiff's base ligand were synthesized and determined by different physical techniques. All the nine metal complexes are reported using elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR, UV-Vis, thermal analysis and 1H NMR, 13C NMR, mass, SEM, TEM, EDX, XRD spectral studies. The molar conductance measurements of all the complexes in DMF solution correspond to non-electrolytic nature. All complexes were of the high-spin type and found to have six-coordinate octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complex which was four coordinate, square planar. Quantum chemical calculations were performed with semi-empirical method to find the optimum geometry of the ligand and its complexes. In molecular modeling the geometries of azo-dye Schiff base ligand HL and its metal (II/III/IV) complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31G basis set. These ligand and its metal complexes have also been screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activities.

  10. Acute and subchronic toxicity of metal complex azo acid dye and anionic surfactant oil on fish Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Amwele, Hilma Rantilla; Papirom, Pittaya; Chukanhom, Kanit; Beamish, Fredrick Henry William; Petkam, Rakpong

    2015-01-01

    The acute toxicity study of metal complex dark green azo acid dye, anionic surfactant oil and their mixture determined the 96 hr LC50, and fish behaviours. Subchronic toxicity determined haematology parameters and concentrations of copper and chromium in blood. The 96 hr LC50 was determined by probit analysis and subchronic toxicity was conducted in 90 days. No mortalities were observed in control and anionic surfactant oil treatments. The 96 hr LC50 value of mixture was 26.7 mg I(-1) (95% CL = 20.7 - 46.8) and that of metal complex dark green azo acid dye was not met as the percentage of dead was below 50% of tested organisms. In a treatment of anionic surfactant oil and that of mixture observed behaviours were respiration response, uncoordinated movement, loss of equilibrium, erratic posture and loss of responsiveness. Subchronic toxicity indicated fluctuations in number of erythrocytes, leukocytes and thrombocytes in all chemical treatments. Erythrocyte morphology such as anisocytosis, erythrocytes hypertrophy, karyolysis, cytoplasm vacuolation, ghost cell were observed in fish blood in all chemical treatments. An inverse relation was observed between total copper and chromium concentration in blood. However, the toxicity effect was chemical dose dependent and length of exposure. PMID:26536793