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1

Robot mother ship design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Small physical agents will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA); chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, sentry; and communications relay will have advanced sensor and mobility characteristics. The mother ship much effectively deliver/retrieve, service, and control these robots as well as fuse the information gathered by these highly mobile robot teams. The mother ship concept presented in this paper includes the case where the mother ship is itself a robot or a manned system. The mother ship must have long-range mobility to deploy the small, highly maneuverable agents that will operate in urban environments and more localized areas, and act as a logistics base for the robot teams. The mother ship must also establish a robust communications network between the agents and is an up-link point for disseminating the intelligence gathered by the smaller agents; and, because of its global knowledge, provides the high-level information fusion, control and planning for the collaborative physical agents. Additionally, the mother ship incorporates battlefield visualization, information fusion, and multi-resolution analysis, and intelligent software agent technology, to support mission planning and execution. This paper discusses on going research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that supports the development of a robot mother ship. This research includes docking, battlefield visualization, intelligent software agents, adaptive communications, information fusion, and multi- modal human computer interaction.

Budulas, Peter P.; Young, Stuart H.; Emmerman, Philip J.

2000-07-01

2

X-38 Ship #2 in Free Flight after Release from B-52 Mothership  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The X-38 research vehicle drops away from NASA's B-52 mothership immediately after being released from the B-52's wing pylon. More than 30 years earlier, this same B-52 launched the original lifting-body vehicles flight tested by NASA and the Air Force at what is now called the Dryden Flight Research Center and the Air Force Flight Test Center. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1999-01-01

3

X-38 Ship #2 Mated to B-52 Mothership in Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photo shows one of the X-38 lifting-body research vehicles mated to NASA's B-52 mothership in flight prior to launch. The B-52 has been a workhorse for the Dryden Flight Research Center for more than 40 years, carrying numerous research vehicles aloft and conducting a variety of other research flight experiments. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1999-01-01

4

B-52 Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A team of researchers from the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch (NESB) perform tests with the Magneto-Optical Imager (MOI) on the fuselage of a B-52 aircraft. As part of the NASA's Airframe Structural Integrity Program (NASIP) applications of the MOI to the detection of corrosion and multi-site fatigue damage are being explored. The NESB group has made significant contributions to the technology in the areas of image processing and computer simulations which have led to an improved instrument more able to meet the demanding needs of airframe inspection. Pictured in the photo from left to right are John Simpson, Ron Todhunter, Min Namkung, Jim Fulton, Jerry Clendenin and Buz Wincheski. The Magneto-Optic Imager is manufactured by PRI Instrumentation, Torrance, CA.

1992-01-01

5

Pegasus Carried by B-52  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image shows a Pegasus being carried to altitude by B-52. An air-launched, three stage, all solid-propellant, three-axis stabilized vehicle, the Pegasus can set a 400-1,000 pound payload into low-Earth orbit. For more information about Pegasus, please see Chapter 5 in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

1990-01-01

6

B-52 Can it Fly Until 2050.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A recent Department of Defense program initiative would keep the B- 52H Bomber flying until the year 2050. This proposal, which extends the life of the B-52H for an unprecedented 90-year term is understandable in light of current Department of Defense bud...

P. D. Axelso

2000-01-01

7

Sizing of "Mother Ship and Catcher" Concepts for LEO Small Debris Capture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most Low Earth Orbit (LEO) debris lies in a limited number of inclination "bands" associated with launch latitudes, or with specific useful orbit inclinations (such as polar orbits). Such narrow inclination bands generally have a uniform spread over all possible Right Ascensions of Ascending Node (RAANs), creating a different orbit plane for nearly every piece of debris. This complicates concept of rendezvous and capture for debris removal. However, a low-orbiting satellite will always phase in RAAN faster than debris objects in higher orbits at the same inclination, potentially solving the problem. Such a base can serve as a single space-based launch facility (a "mother ship") that can tend and then send tiny individual catcher devices for each debris object, as the facility drifts into the same RAAN as the higher object. This presentation will highlight characteristic system requirements of such an architecture, including structural and navigation requirements, power, mass and dV budgets for both the mother ship and the mass-produced common catcher devices that would clean out selected inclination bands. The altitude and inclination regime over which a band is to be cleared, the size distribution of the debris, and the inclusion of additional mission priorities all affect the sizing of the system. It is demonstrated that major LEO hazardous debris reductions can be realized in each band with a single LEO launch of a single mother ship, with simple attached catchers of total mass less than typical commercial LEO launch capability.

Bacon, John B.

2009-01-01

8

B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's venerable B-52 mothership is seen here photographed from a KC-135 Tanker aircraft. The X-43 adapter is visible attached to the right wing. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and is also both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet.

2001-01-01

9

B-52B Cockpit Instrument Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photo shows a close-up view of the instrument panel in the cockpit of NASA's B-52 research aircraft. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the HiMAT, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1996-01-01

10

B-52 Testing F-111 Parachute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main parachute begins to deploy on the mock-up of an F-111 'Aardvark' bomber cockpit section after being dropped from NASA's B-52 mothership during 1988 flight tests on improved parachute systems for the Air Force bomber. The F-111's ejection system separated the entire cockpit from the rest of the aircraft, and a large parachute was then deployed to lower the cockpit section to the ground. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1988-01-01

11

B-52 Flight Mission Symbology - Close up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A close-up view of some of the mission markings that tell the story of the NASA B-52 mothership's colorful history. These particular markings denote some of the experiments the bomber conducted to develop parachute recovery systems for the solid rocket boosters used by the Space Shuttle. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet.. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1993-01-01

12

Development of the B-52 Nose Radome Container, CNU-680/E.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this test series was to qualify the B-52 Nose Radome Shipping and Storage container, AFPTEF project number O4-P-111, for production release by AFMC LSO/LOP. The container is a sealed, reusable, aluminum container engineered for the physic...

S. J. Evans

2006-01-01

13

Stress analyses of B-52 pylon hooks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASTRAN finite element computer program was used in the two dimensional stress analysis of B-52 carrier aircraft pylon hooks: (1) old rear hook (which failed), (2) new rear hook (improved geometry), (3) new DAST rear hook (derated geometry), and (4) front hook. NASTRAN model meshes were generated by the aid of PATRAN-G computer program. Brittle limit loads for all the four hooks were established. The critical stress level calculated from NASTRAN agrees reasonably well with the values predicted from the fracture mechanics for the failed old rear hook.

Ko, W. L.; Schuster, L. S.

1985-01-01

14

Stress Analysis of B-52B and B-52H Air-Launching Systems Failure-Critical Structural Components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The operational life analysis of any airborne failure-critical structural component requires the stress-load equation, which relates the applied load to the maximum tangential tensile stress at the critical stress point. The failure-critical structural components identified are the B-52B Pegasus pylon adapter shackles, B-52B Pegasus pylon hooks, B-52H airplane pylon hooks, B-52H airplane front fittings, B-52H airplane rear pylon fitting, and the B-52H airplane pylon lower sway brace. Finite-element stress analysis was performed on the said structural components, and the critical stress point was located and the stress-load equation was established for each failure-critical structural component. The ultimate load, yield load, and proof load needed for operational life analysis were established for each failure-critical structural component.

Ko, William L.

2005-01-01

15

Sizing of "Mother Ship and Catcher" Missions for LEO Small Debris and for GEO Large Object Capture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most LEO debris lies in a limited number of inclination "bands" associated with specific useful orbits. Objects in such narrow inclination bands have all possible Right Ascensions of Ascending Node (RAANs), creating a different orbit plane for nearly every piece of debris. However, a low-orbiting satellite will always phase in RAAN faster than debris objects in higher orbits at the same inclination, potentially solving the problem. Such a low-orbiting base can serve as a "mother ship" that can tend and then send small, disposable common individual catcher/deboost devices--one for each debris object--as the facility drifts into the same RAAN as each higher object. The dV necessary to catch highly-eccentric orbit debris in the center of the band alternatively allows the capture of less-eccentric debris in a wider inclination range around the center. It is demonstrated that most LEO hazardous debris can be removed from orbit in three years, using a single LEO launch of one mother ship--with its onboard magazine of freeflying low-tech catchers--into each of ten identified bands, with second or potentially third launches into only the three highest-inclination bands. The nearly 1000 objects near the geostationary orbit present special challenges in mass, maneuverability, and ultimate disposal options, leading to a dramatically different architecture and technology suite than the LEO solution. It is shown that the entire population of near-GEO derelict objects can be gathered and tethered together within a 3 year period for future scrap-yard operations using achievable technologies and only two earth launches.

Bacon, John B.

2009-01-01

16

Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight over Dryden  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's venerable B-52 mothership flies over the main building at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and has also been both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1996-01-01

17

HL-10 on lakebed with B-52 flyby  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA research pilot Bill Dana takes a moment to watch NASA's NB-52B cruise overhead after a research flight in the HL-10. On the left, John Reeves can be seen at the cockpit of the lifting body. The HL-10 was one of five heavyweight lifting-body designs flown at NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC--later Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, from July 1966 to November 1975 to study and validate the concept of safely maneuvering and landing a low lift-over-drag vehicle designed for reentry from space. Northrop Corporation built the HL-10 and M2-F2, the first two of the fleet of 'heavy' lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center. The contract for construction of the HL-10 and the M2-F2 was $1.8 million. 'HL' stands for horizontal landing, and '10' refers to the tenth design studied by engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. After delivery to NASA in January 1966, the HL-10 made its first flight on Dec. 22, 1966, with research pilot Bruce Peterson in the cockpit. Although an XLR-11 rocket engine was installed in the vehicle, the first 11 drop flights from the B-52 launch aircraft were powerless glide flights to assess handling qualities, stability, and control. In the end, the HL-10 was judged to be the best handling of the three original heavy-weight lifting bodies (M2-F2/F3, HL-10, X-24A). The HL-10 was flown 37 times during the lifting body research program and logged the highest altitude and fastest speed in the Lifting Body program. On Feb. 18, 1970, Air Force test pilot Peter Hoag piloted the HL-10 to Mach 1.86 (1,228 mph). Nine days later, NASA pilot Bill Dana flew the vehicle to 90,030 feet, which became the highest altitude reached in the program. Some new and different lessons were learned through the successful flight testing of the HL-10. These lessons, when combined with information from it's sister ship, the M2-F2/F3, provided an excellent starting point for designers of future entry vehicles, including the Space Shuttle.

1969-01-01

18

Spin Research Vehicle (SRV) in B-52 Captive Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This in-flight photo of NASA's B-52 mothership shows the bomber carrying a subscale model of an Air Force F-15, a remotely piloted vehicle that was used to conduct spin research. The F-15 Remotely Piloted Research Vehicles (RPRV) was air launched from the B-52 at approximately 45,000 feet and was controlled by a pilot in a ground cockpit complete with flight controls and a television screen. The F-15 model in this particular configuration was known as the Spin Research Vehicle (SRV). NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1981-01-01

19

X-38 Mounted on Pylon of B-52 Mothership  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A close-up view of the X-38 research vehicle mounted under the wing of the B-52 mothership prior to a 1997 test flight. The X-38, which was designed to help develop technology for an emergency crew return vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station, is one of many research vehicles the B-52 has carried aloft over the past 40 years. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

20

B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploys an experimental drag chute just after landing the runway at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1990-01-01

21

B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental drag chute deploys amidst a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1990-01-01

22

Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1996-01-01

23

B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aerial view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1990-01-01

24

B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A close-up of an experimental drag chute deploying in a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1990-01-01

25

B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rear view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1990-01-01

26

B-52 Flight Mission Symbology on Side of Craft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A view of some of the mission markings, painted on the side of NASA's B-52 mothership, that tell the story of its colorful history. Just as combat aircraft would paint a bomb on the side of an aircraft for each bombing mission completed, NASA crew members painted a silhouette on the side of the B-52's fuselage to commemorate each drop of an X-15, lifting body, remotely piloted research vehicle, X-38 crew return vehicle, or other experimental vehicle or parachute system. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1993-01-01

27

Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Dryden Ramp  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's venerable B-52 mothership sits on the ramp in front of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1996-01-01

28

Pegasus Mated to B-52 Mothership - Front View  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's B-52 launch aircraft takes off with the second Pegasus vehicle under its wing from the Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1991-01-01

29

Status of display systems in B-52H  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Display technologies for the B-52 were selected some 40 years ago have become unsupportable. Electromechanical and old cathode ray tube technologies, including an exotic six-gun 13 in. tube, have become unsupportable due to the vanishing vendor syndrome. Thus, it is necessary to insert new technologies which will be available for the next 40 years to maintain the capability heretofore provided by those now out of favor with the commercial sector. With this paper we begin a look at the status of displays in the B-52H, which will remain in inventory until 2046 according to current plans. From a component electronics technology perspective, such as displays, the B-52H provides several 10-year life cycle cost (LCC) planning cycles to consider multiple upgrades. Three Productivity, Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (PRAM) projects are reviewed to replace 1950s CRTs in several sizes: 3, 9, and 13 in. A different display technology has been selected in each case. Additional display upgrades in may be anticipated and are discussed.

Hopper, Darrel G.; Meyer, Frederick M.; Wodke, Kenneth E.

1999-08-01

30

X-15 Mated to B-52 Captive Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of three X-15 rocket-powered research aircraft being carried aloft under the wing of its B-52 mothership. The X-15 was air launched from the B-52 so the rocket plane would have enough fuel to reach its high speed and altitude test points. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. The X-15s made a total of 199 flights over a period of nearly 10 years and set world's unofficial speed and altitude records of 4,520 miles per hour (Mach 6.7) and 354,200 feet. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the development of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo manned spaceflight programs and also the Space Shuttle program.

1959-01-01

31

Pegasus Engine Ignites after Drop from B-52 Mothership  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Against the midnight blue of a high-altitude sky, Orbital Sciences' Pegasus winged rocket booster ignites after being dropped from NASA's B-52 mothership on a July 1991 flight. A NASA chase plane for the flight is also visible above the rocket and below the B-52. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable data on aerodynamics. By conducting experiments in a piggyback mode on Pegasus, some critical and secondary design and development issues were addressed at hypersonic speeds. The vehicle was also used to develop hypersonic flight instrumentation and test techniques. NASA's B-52 carrier-launch vehicle was used to get the Pegasus airborne during six launches from 1990 to 1994. Thereafter, an Orbital Sciences L-1011 aircraft launched the Pegasus. The Pegasus launch vehicle itself has a 400- to 600-pound payload capacity in a 61-cubic-foot payload space at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle is capable of placing a payload into low earth orbit. This vehicle is 49 feet long and 50 inches in diameter. It has a wing span of 22 feet. (There is also a Pegasus XL vehicle that was introduced in 1994. Dryden has never launched one of these vehicles, but they have greater thrust and are 56 feet long.)

1991-01-01

32

DAST Mated to B-52 on Ramp - Close-up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technicians mount a BQM-43 Firebee II drone on the wing pylon of NASA's B-52B launch aircraft. The drone was test flown as part of the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program. Research flights of drones with modified wings for the DAST program were conducted from 1977 to 1983. After the initial flights of Firebee II 72-1564, it was fitted with the Instrumented Standard Wing (also called the 'Blue Streak' wing). The first free flight attempt on March 7, 1979, was aborted before launch due to mechanical problems with the HH-53 recovery helicopter. The next attempt, on March 9, 1979, was successful. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic forces and resulting in structural failure. The program used refined theoretical tools to predict at what speed flutter would occur. It then designed a high-response control system to counteract the motion and permit a much lighter wing structure. The wing had, in effect, 'electronic stiffness.' Flight research with this concept was extremely hazardous because an error in either the flutter prediction or control system implementation would result in wing structural failure and the loss of the vehicle. Because of this, flight demonstration of a sub-scale vehicle made sense from the standpoint of both safety and cost. The program anticipated structural failure during the course of the flight research. The Firebee II was a supersonic drone selected as the DAST testbed because its wing could be easily replaced, it used only tail-mounted control surfaces, and it was available as surplus from the U. S. Air Force. It was capable of 5-g turns (that is, turns producing acceleration equal to 5 times that of gravity). Langley outfitted a drone with an aeroelastic, supercritical research wing suitable for a Mach 0.98 cruise transport with a predicted flutter speed of Mach 0.95 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Dryden and Langley, in conjunction with Boeing, designed and fabricated a digital flutter suppression system (FSS). Dryden developed an RPRV (remotely piloted research vehicle) flight control system; integrated the wing, FSS, and vehicle systems; and conducted the flight program. In addition to a digital flight control system and aeroelastic wings, each DAST drone had research equipment mounted in its nose and a mid-air retrieval system in its tail. The drones were originally launched from the NASA B-52 bomber and later from a DC-130. The DAST vehicle's flight was monitored from the sky by an F-104 chase plane. When the DAST's mission ended, it deployed a parachute and then a specially equipped Air Force helicopter recovered the drone in mid-air. On the ground, a

1979-01-01

33

X-38 on B-52 Wing Pylon - View from Observation Window  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A unique, close-up view of the X-38 under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership prior to launch of the lifting-body research vehicle. The photo was taken from the observation window of the B-52 bomber as it banked in flight. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

34

Wind Tunnel Results of the B-52B with the X-43A Stack  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A low-speed wind-tunnel test was performed with a three-percent-scale model of a booster rocket mated to an X-43A research vehicle, a combination referred to as the Hyper-X launch vehicle. The test was conducted both in free-stream air and in the presence of a partial model of the B-52B airplane. The objectives of the test were to obtain force and moment data to generate structural loads affecting the pylon of the B-52B airplane and to determine the aerodynamic influence of the B-52B airplane on the Hyper-X launch vehicle to evaluate launch separation characteristics. The wind-tunnel test was conducted at a low-speed wind tunnel in Hampton, Virginia. All moments and forces reported are based either on the aerodynamic influence of the B-52B airplane or are for the Hyper-X launch vehicle in free-stream air. Overall, the test showed that the B-52B airplane imparts a strong downwash onto the Hyper-X launch vehicle, reducing the net lift of the Hyper-X launch vehicle. Also, pitching and rolling moments are imparted onto the booster and are a strong function of the launch-drop angle of attack.

Davis, Mark C.; Sim, Alexander G.; Rhode, Matthew; Johnson, Kevin D.

2006-01-01

35

Opportunity and Its Mother Ship  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's navigation camera shows the rover and the now-empty lander that carried it 283 million miles to Meridiani Planum, Mars. Engineers received confirmation that Opportunity's six wheels rolled off the lander and onto martian soil at 3:02 a.m. PST, January 31, 2004, on the seventh martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover, seen at the bottom of the image, is approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in front of the lander, facing north.

2004-01-01

36

M2-F2 Lifting Body being Carried Aloft by B-52 Mothership  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The M2-F2 Lifting Body is shown here being carried aloft by the Air Force's B-52 (tail number 003) prior to a research launch. The success of Dryden's 'homebuilt' M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies--the M2-F2 and the HL-10, both built by the Northrop Corporation. The 'M' refers to 'manned' and 'F' refers to 'flight' version. 'HL' comes from 'horizontal landing.' The first flight of the M2-F2--which looked much like the 'F1'--was on July 12, 1966. Milt Thompson was the pilot. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During the X-15 and Lifting-Body programs, another B-52, tail number 003, also served as a launch aircraft. During those programs, both B-52s were operated by the Air Force, NASA's partner in both programs. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1966-01-01

37

Close view of B-52/Pegasus with X-43A in flight.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. After taking off from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., at 12:33 p.m. PDT, the B-52 soared off the California coast on the predetermined flight path, and returned to Dryden for a 2:19 p.m. PDT landing. Pending thorough evaluation of all flight data, this captive-carry test could lead to the first flight of the X-43A 'stack' as early as mid-May. The first free flight will be air-launched by NASA's B-52 at about 24,000 feet altitude. The booster will accelerate the X-43A to Mach 7 to approximately 95,000 feet altitude. At booster burnout, the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power on a preprogrammed flight path. The hydrogen-fueled aircraft has a wingspan of approximately 5 feet, measures 12 feet long and weighs about 2,800 pounds.

2001-01-01

38

B-52/Pegasus with X-43A departing on first captive flight.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. After taking off from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., at 12:33 p.m. PDT, the B-52 soared off the California coast on the predetermined flight path, and returned to Dryden for a 2:19 p.m. PDT landing. Pending thorough evaluation of all flight data, this captive-carry test could lead to the first flight of the X-43A 'stack' as early as mid-May. The first free flight will be air-launched by NASA's B-52 at about 24,000 feet altitude. The booster will accelerate the X-43A to Mach 7 to approximately 95,000 feet altitude. At booster burnout, the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power on a preprogrammed flight path. The hydrogen-fueled aircraft has a wingspan of approximately 5 feet, measures 12 feet long and weighs about 2,800 pounds.

2001-01-01

39

B-52/Pegasus with X-43A in flight over Pacific Ocean.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. After taking off from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., at 12:33 p.m. PDT, the B-52 soared off the California coast on the predetermined flight path, and returned to Dryden for a 2:19 p.m. PDT landing. Pending thorough evaluation of all flight data, this captive-carry test could lead to the first flight of the X-43A 'stack' as early as mid-May. The first free flight will be air-launched by NASA's B-52 at about 24,000 feet altitude. The booster will accelerate the X-43A to Mach 7 to approximately 95,000 feet altitude. At booster burnout, the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power on a preprogrammed flight path. The hydrogen-fueled aircraft has a wingspan of approximately 5 feet, measures 12 feet long and weighs about 2,800 pounds.

2001-01-01

40

B-52/Pegasus with X-43A landing after first captive carry flight.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. After taking off from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., at 12:33 p.m. PDT, the B-52 soared off the California coast on the predetermined flight path, and returned to Dryden for a 2:19 p.m. PDT landing. Pending thorough evaluation of all flight data, this captive-carry test could lead to the first flight of the X-43A 'stack' as early as mid-May. The first free flight will be air-launched by NASA's B-52 at about 24,000 feet altitude. The booster will accelerate the X-43A to Mach 7 to approximately 95,000 feet altitude. At booster burnout, the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power on a preprogrammed flight path. The hydrogen-fueled aircraft has a wingspan of approximately 5 feet, measures 12 feet long and weighs about 2,800 pounds.

2001-01-01

41

F-15 RPRV Attached Under the Wing of the B-52 Mothership in Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph shows one of NASA's 3/8th-scale F-15 remotely piloted research vehicles under the wing of the B-52 mothership in flight during 1973, the year that the research program began. The vehicle was used to make stall-spin studies of the F-15 shape before the actual F-15s began their flight tests. B-52 Project Description: NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant. - - - - - - - - - - - F-15A RPRV/SRV Project Description: In April of 1971, Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Research and Development Grant Hanson sent a memorandum noting the comparatively small amount of research being conducted on stalls (losses of lift) and spins despite the yearly losses that they caused (especially of fighter aircraft). In the spring and summer of that year, NASA's Flight Research Center (redesignated in 1976 the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) studied the feasibility of conducting flight research with a sub-scale fighter-ty

1973-01-01

42

Cloning, expression, and nucleotide sequence of a lipase gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens B52.  

PubMed Central

In this study, we report the cloning and expression of lipase gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens B52, a psychrotrophic spoilage bacterium isolated from refrigerated raw milk. Sequence analysis revealed one major open reading frame of 1,428 nucleotides that was predicted to encode a protein with a molecular weight of 50,241. The predicted enzyme was found to contain an amino acid sequence highly homologous to the putative substrate-binding domain present within all lipases examined to date.

Tan, Y; Miller, K J

1992-01-01

43

Optimization of the polyplanar optical display electronics for a monochrome B-52 display  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten-inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a new 200 mW green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLPTM) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments (TI). In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMDTM) chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. In order to achieve increased brightness a monochrome digitizing interface was investigated. The operation of the DMDTM divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMDTM board with the RS-170 video format specific to the B-52 aircraft will be discussed, including the increased brightness of the monochrome digitizing interface. A brief description of the electronics required to drive the new 200 mW laser is also presented.

DeSanto, Leonard

1998-09-01

44

Research Pilot Milt Thompson in M2-F2 Aircraft Attached to B-52 Mothership  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA research pilot Milt Thompson sits in the M2-F2 'heavyweight' lifting body research vehicle before a 1966 test flight. The M2-F2 and the other lifting-body designs were all attached to a wing pylon on NASA's B-52 mothership and carried aloft. The vehicles were then drop-launched and, at the end of their flights, glided back to wheeled landings on the dry lake or runway at Edwards AFB. The lifting body designs influenced the design of the Space Shuttle and were also reincarnated in the design of the X-38 in the 1990s. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1966-01-01

45

A B-52H, tail number 61-0025, arrives at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center after landing July 30,  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, received an 'H' model B-52 Stratofortress aircraft on July 30, 2001. The B-52H will be used as an air-launch aircraft supporting NASA's flight research and advanced technology demonstration efforts. Dryden received the B-52H from the U.S. Air Force's (USAF) 23rd Bomb Squadron, 5th Bombardment Wing (Air Combat Command), located at Minot AFB, N.D. A USAF crew flew the aircraft to Dryden. The aircraft, USAF tail number 61-0025, will be loaned initially, then later transferred from the USAF to NASA. The B-52H is scheduled to leave Dryden Aug. 2 for de-militarization and Programmed Depot Maintenance (PDM) at Tinker Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma. The depot-level maintenance is scheduled to last about six months and includes a thorough maintenance and inspection process. The newly arrived B-52H is slated to replace Dryden's famous B-52B '008,' in the 2003-2004 timeframe. It will take about one year for the B-52H to be ready for flight research duties. This time includes PDM, construction of the new pylon, installation of the flight research instrumentation equipment, and aircraft envelope clearance flights.

2001-01-01

46

Role of HLA-B51 and HLA-B52 in susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis.  

PubMed

MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells are important for the generation of protective immune responses in MTB infection. CD8+ CTL (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte)-derived IFN-g may be especially important both for cells lacking MHC class II molecules, e.g. in the lung and for macrophages where mycobacteria can evade recognition during chronic infection by sequestering their antigens away from sensitized CD4+ T cells. This study was designed to detect any association of MHC class I (HLA-B) molecules with pulmonary tuberculosis. A total of 75 individuals, comprising of 33 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis; 12 HIV patients who developed tuberculosis and 30 healthy controls, were included in the study. They were typed for HLA-B by the PCR-SSP method. The results of only HLA-B alleles, which are highly significant, are presented here. The number of healthy individuals with HLA-B52 was significantly high when compared to the patient groups (healthy versus TB: 21.2% versus 0.0%, OR=0.0, P<0.0001, P(c)=0.003; healthy versus HIV-TB: 21.2% versus 16.7%; OR=0.74; P<0.001; P(c)=0.003). In contrast, the number of patients, both TB- and HIV-TB-positive, with HLA-B51 was significantly high when compared to the healthy group of individuals (TB versus healthy: 36.7% versus 3%; OR=18.53; P<0.0001; P(c)=0.001; HIV-TB versus healthy: 41.7% versus 3%; OR=22.86; P<0.0001; P(c)=0.001). Only one healthy control was positive to HLA-B51; however this individual also had HLA-B52. The results of this study suggest that HLA-B52(5) has a negative, i.e. a protective association and HLA-B51(5) has a positive (susceptible) association, for pulmonary tuberculosis. Studies on HLA-B51 and HLA-B52 in a larger population to assess their role in tuberculosis may be useful for TB-vaccination strategies, since HLA profiles are likely to be related to vaccine efficacy. PMID:16563877

Vijaya Lakshmi, V; Rakh, Shilpa S; Anu Radha, B; Hari Sai Priya, V; Pantula, Vinod; Jasti, Susmita; Suman Latha, G; Murthy, K J R

2006-11-01

47

Analysis and testing of aeroelastic model stability augmentation systems. [for supersonic transport aircraft wing and B-52 aircraft control system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Testing and evaluation of a stability augmentation system for aircraft flight control were performed. The flutter suppression system and synthesis conducted on a scale model of a supersonic wing for a transport aircraft are discussed. Mechanization and testing of the leading and trailing edge surface actuation systems are described. The ride control system analyses for a 375,000 pound gross weight B-52E aircraft are presented. Analyses of the B-52E aircraft maneuver load control system are included.

Sevart, F. D.; Patel, S. M.

1973-01-01

48

Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The new pylon for the X-38 following a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 research vehicle to be carried aloft and launched from the B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

49

Ship Tracks  

article title:  Ship Tracks in a Stratiform Cloud Layer     ... stratocumulus. These striking linear patterns are known as "ship tracks", and are produced when fine particles (also called aerosols) from ... be used with the red filter placed over your left eye. Ship tracks are important examples of aerosol-cloud interactions. They are ...

2013-04-19

50

Takayasu's arteritis is associated with HLA-B*52, but not with HLA-B*51, in Turkey  

PubMed Central

Introduction HLA-B*51 and HLA-B*52 are two close human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele groups with minor amino acid differences. However, they are associated with two different vasculitides (HLA-B*51 in Behçet's disease and HLA-B*52 in Takayasu's arteritis (TAK)) and with major clinical and immunological differences. In this study, we aimed to screen a large cohort of TAK patients from Turkey for the presence of HLA-B*51 and HLA-B*52 as susceptibility and severity factors. Methods TAK patients (n = 330) followed at a total of 15 centers were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 37.8 years, and 86% were women. DNA samples from the patients and healthy controls (HC; n = 210) were isolated, and the presence of HLA-B*51 or HLA-B*52 was screened for by using PCR with sequence-specific primers. Results We found a significant association of HLA-B*52 with TAK (20.9% vs HC = 6.7%, P = 0.000, OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 2.02 to 6.77). The distribution of HLA-B*51 did not differ between TAK patients and HCs (22.7% vs 24.8%, OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.60 to 1.34). The presence of HLA-B*52 decreased in late-onset patients (> 40 years of age; 12.0%, P = 0.024, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.20 to 0.91). Patients with angiographic type I disease with limited aortic involvement also had a lower presence of HLA-B*52 compared to those with all other disease subtypes (13.1% vs 26%, P = 0.005, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.23 to 0.78). Conclusions In this study, the previously reported association of TAK with HLA-B*52 in other populations was confirmed in patients from Turkey. The functional relevance of HLA-B*52 in TAK pathogenesis needs to be explored further.

2012-01-01

51

Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Andy Blua and Jeff Doughty of Dryden's Experimental Fabrication Shop, along with B-52 Crew Chief Dan Bains and assistant Mark Thompson, all eye the new X-38 pylon during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon, which was fabricated at Dryden, was mated to the B-52. The pylon served as an 'adapter' that allowed the X-38 to be attached to the B-52's wing. Earlier flight research vehicles had used the X-15 pylon for attachment to and launch from the B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

52

Pegasus Mated under Wing of B-52 Mothership - Close-up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A close-up view of the Pegasus space-booster attached to the wing pylon of NASA's B-52 launch aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Pegasus rocket booster was designed as a way to get small payloads into space orbit more easily and cost-effectively. It has also been used to gather data on hypersonic flight. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable data on aerodynamics. By conducting experiments in a piggyback mode on Pegasus, some critical and secondary design and development issues were addressed at hypersonic speeds. The vehicle was also used to develop hypersonic flight instrumentation and test techniques. NASA's B-52 carrier-launch vehicle was used to get the Pegasus airborne during six launches from 1990 to 1994. Thereafter, an Orbital Sciences L-1011 aircraft launched the Pegasus. The Pegasus launch vehicle itself has a 400- to 600-pound payload capacity in a 61-cubic-foot payload space at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle is capable of placing a payload into low earth orbit. This vehicle is 49 feet long and 50 inches in diameter. It has a wing span of 22 feet. (There is also a Pegasus XL vehicle that was introduced in 1994. Dryden has never launched one of these vehicles, but they have greater thrust and are 56 feet long.)

1994-01-01

53

Ship Hydrodynamics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

Lafrance, Pierre

1978-01-01

54

DAST Mated to B-52 in Flight - Close-up from Below  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photo shows a BQM-34 Firebee II drone being carried aloft under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership during a 1977 research flight. The Firebee/DAST research program ran from 1977 to 1983 at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. This is the original Firebee II wing. Firebee 72-1564 made three captive flights--on November 25, 1975; May 17, 1976; and June 22, 1977--in preparation for the DAST project with modified wings. These were for checkout of the Firebee's systems and the prelaunch procedures. The first two used a DC-130A aircraft as the launch vehicle, while the third used the B-52. A single free flight using this drone occurred on July 28, 1977. The remote (ground) pilot was NASA research pilot Bill Dana. The launch and flight were successful, and the drone was caught in midair by an HH-53 helicopter. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic forces and resulting in structural failure. The program used refined theoretical tools to predict at what speed flutter would occur. It then designed a high-response control system to counteract the motion and permit a much lighter wing structure. The wing had, in effect, 'electronic stiffness.' Flight research with this concept was extremely hazardous because an error in either the flutter prediction or control system implementation would result in wing structural failure and the loss of the vehicle. Because of this, flight demonstration of a sub-scale vehicle made sense from the standpoint of both safety and cost. The program anticipated structural failure during the course of the flight research. The Firebee II was a supersonic drone selected as the DAST testbed because its wing could be easily replaced, it used only tail-mounted control surfaces, and it was available as surplus from the U. S. Air Force. It was capable of 5-g turns (that is, turns producing acceleration equal to 5 times that of gravity). Langley outfitted a drone with an aeroelastic, supercritical research wing suitable for a Mach 0.98 cruise transport with a predicted flutter speed of Mach 0.95 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Dryden and Langley, in conjunction with Boeing, designed and fabricated a digital flutter suppression system (FSS). Dryden developed an RPRV (remotely piloted research vehicle) flight control system; integrated the wing, FSS, and vehicle systems; and conducted the flight program. In addition to a digital flight control system and aeroelastic wings, each DAST drone had research equipment mounted in its nose and a mid-air retrieval system in its tail. The drones were originally launched from the NASA B-52 bomber and later from a DC-130. The DAST vehic

1977-01-01

55

Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tom McMullen, Chief of Dryden's Experimental Fabrication Shop, makes adjustments to the new pylon for NASA's X-38 during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 to be attached to and launched from the B-52's wing. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

56

Working Mothers  

MedlinePLUS

... Life > Work & Play > Working Mothers Family Life Listen Working Mothers Article Body ?In the United States today, more ... compared to about one third in the 1970s. Working mothers are now the rule rather than the exception. ...

57

Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dryden Experimental Fabrication Shop's Andy Blua and Jeff Doughty make sure the new pylon for the X-38 fits precisely during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in 1997. The 1,200-pound steel pylon, fabricated at Dryden, was an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 research vehicle to be carried aloft and launched from the bomber. The X-38 was a designed as a technology demonstrator to help develop an emergency Crew Return Vehicle for the International Space Station. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

58

A B-52H, on loan to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, makes a pass down the runway prior to land  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, received an 'H' model B-52 Stratofortress aircraft on July 30, 2001. The B-52H will be used as an air-launch aircraft supporting NASA's flight research and advanced technology demonstration efforts. Dryden received the B-52H from the U.S. Air Force's (USAF) 23rd Bomb Squadron, 5th Bombardment Wing (Air Combat Command), located at Minot AFB, N.D. A USAF crew flew the aircraft to Dryden. The aircraft, USAF tail number 61-0025, will be loaned initially, then later transferred from the USAF to NASA. The B-52H is scheduled to leave Dryden Aug. 2 for de-militarization and Programmed Depot Maintenance (PDM) at Tinker Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma. The depot-level maintenance is scheduled to last about six months and includes a thorough maintenance and inspection process. The newly arrived B-52H is slated to replace Dryden's famous B-52B '008,' in the 2003-2004 timeframe. It will take about one year for the B-52H to be ready for flight research duties. This time includes PDM, construction of the new pylon, installation of the flight research instrumentation equipment, and aircraft envelope clearance flights.

2001-01-01

59

Association of the HLA-B*52 allele with non-progression to AIDS in Brazilian HIV-1-infected individuals.  

PubMed

Several human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles are associated with the susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection and/or AIDS progression. Of these, the HLA-B alleles are considered the strongest genetic determinant of disease outcome. We evaluated the influence of the HLA-B alleles on AIDS progression among HIV-1-positive individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, who were categorized as rapid progressors (RPs), typical progressors (TPs) or long-term non-progressors (LTNPs). In this study, significant differences in HLA-B allele frequencies were observed among the three progression groups for the B*48, B*49 and B*52 alleles. After controlling for other factors associated with AIDS progression, the presence of the B*52 allele was shown to be a significant protective factor (hazard ratio (HR) 0.49 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27-0.90) P<0.03). Although no direct association was observed between the presence of the B*27 or B*57 allele and the LTNP profile compared with the TP or RP groups, the adjusted model confirmed that these alleles are protective factors against AIDS progression (HR 0.62 (95% CI 0.38-0.99) P<0.05), as previously described. These data corroborate the existence of significant differences in HLA-B allele frequencies among the distinct AIDS progression profiles and further elucidate the role of HLA alleles in the outcome of HIV infections in diverse populations. PMID:24718028

Teixeira, S L M; de Sá, N B R; Campos, D P; Coelho, A B; Guimarães, M L; Leite, T C N F; Veloso, V G; Morgado, M G

2014-04-01

60

Development and Testing of a Drogue Parachute System for X-37 ALTV/B-52H Separation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiple scenarios were identified in which the X-37 approach and landing test vehicle (ALTV) catastrophically recontacts the B-52H carrier aircraft after separation. The most cost-effective recontact risk mitigation is the prelaunch deployment of a drogue parachute that is released after the X-37 ALTV has safely cleared the B-52H. After release, a fully-inflated drogue parachute takes 30 min to reach ground and results in a large footprint that excessively restricts the days available for flight. To reduce the footprint, a passive collapse mechanism consisting of an elastic reefing line attached to the parachute skirt was developed. At flight loads the elastic is stretched, allowing full parachute inflation. After release, drag loads drop dramatically and the elastic line contracts, reducing the frontal drag area. A 50-percent drag reduction results in an approximately 75-percent ground footprint reduction. Eleven individual parachute designs were evaluated at flight load dynamic pressures in the High Velocity Airflow System (HIVAS) at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, California. Various options for the elastic reefing system were also evaluated at HIVAS. Two best parachute designs were selected from HIVAS to be carried forward to flight test. Detailed HIVAS test results are presented in this report.

Whitmore, Stephen A.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Jensen, Steven C.; Hennings, Elsa J.

2004-01-01

61

Development and Testing of a Drogue Parachute System for X-37 ALTV/B-52H Separation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiple scenarios were identified in which the X-37 approach and landing test vehicle (ALTV) catastrophically recontacts the B-52H carrier aircraft after separation. The most cost-effective recontact risk mitigation is the prelaunch deployment of a drogue parachute that is released after the X-37 ALTV has safely cleared the B-52H. After release, a fully-inflated drogue parachute takes 30 min to reach ground and results in a large footprint that excessively restricts the days available for flight. To reduce the footprint, a passive collapse mechanism consisting of an elastic reefing line attached to the parachute skirt was developed. At flight loads the elastic is stretched, allowing full parachute inflation. After release, drag loads drop dramatically and the elastic line contracts, reducing the frontal drag area. A 50 percent drag reduction results in an approximately 75 percent ground footprint reduction. Eleven individual parachute designs were evaluated at flight load dynamic pressures in the High Velocity Airflow System (HIVAS) at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, California. Various options for the elastic reefing system were also evaluated at HIVAS. Two best parachute designs were selected from HIVAS to be carried forward to flight test. Detailed HIVAS test results are presented in this report.

Whitmore, Stephen A.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Jensen, Steven C.; Hennings, Elsa J.

2004-01-01

62

Developing, mechanizing and testing of a digital active flutter suppression system for a modified B-52 wind-tunnel model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A digital flutter suppression system was developed and mechanized for a significantly modified version of the 1/30-scale B-52E aeroelastic wind tunnel model. A model configuration was identified that produced symmetric and antisymmetric flutter modes that occur at 2873N/sq m (60 psf) dynamic pressure with violent onset. The flutter suppression system, using one trailing edge control surface and the accelerometers on each wing, extended the flutter dynamic pressure of the model beyond the design limit of 4788N/sq m (100 psf). The hardware and software required to implement the flutter suppression system were designed and mechanized using digital computers in a fail-operate configuration. The model equipped with the system was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center and results showed the flutter dynamic pressure of the model was extended beyond 4884N/sq m (102 psf).

Matthew, J. R.

1980-01-01

63

Economics of Ship Construction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report contains an examination of problems in the economics, organization, and planning of ship-building production examined in the curriculum of a ship-building technicum, namely: principles of the economics, organization, and planning of ship-buildi...

Y. E. Krotov

1976-01-01

64

Ship Operations Report 1974.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The NOAA Ship Operations Report 1974 was developed to provide a summary of projects undertaken during calendar year 1974. The report was prepared from season, cruise and special reports submitted by ships of the fleet. Throughout the year, ships routinely...

1975-01-01

65

The SR Protein B52/SRp55 Is Required for DNA Topoisomerase I Recruitment to Chromatin, mRNA Release and Transcription Shutdown  

PubMed Central

DNA- and RNA-processing pathways are integrated and interconnected in the eukaryotic nucleus to allow efficient gene expression and to maintain genomic stability. The recruitment of DNA Topoisomerase I (Topo I), an enzyme controlling DNA supercoiling and acting as a specific kinase for the SR-protein family of splicing factors, to highly transcribed loci represents a mechanism by which transcription and processing can be coordinated and genomic instability avoided. Here we show that Drosophila Topo I associates with and phosphorylates the SR protein B52. Surprisingly, expression of a high-affinity binding site for B52 in transgenic flies restricted localization, not only of B52, but also of Topo I to this single transcription site, whereas B52 RNAi knockdown induced mis-localization of Topo I in the nucleolus. Impaired delivery of Topo I to a heat shock gene caused retention of the mRNA at its site of transcription and delayed gene deactivation after heat shock. Our data show that B52 delivers Topo I to RNA polymerase II-active chromatin loci and provide the first evidence that DNA topology and mRNA release can be coordinated to control gene expression.

Juge, Francois; Tazi, Jamal

2010-01-01

66

Warrior Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational institutions should inspire "warrior mothers" to work together against androcentric agendas of homogenization and acculturation. The history of aboriginal women in Canada, whose children were abducted and raised in religious schools, is one of cultural denigration. These students' daughters and granddaughters are the warrior mothers

Haig-Brown, Celia

1998-01-01

67

Load and dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for finned configuration 1 space shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle. Volume 1: Summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The B-52B airplane was identified for use in solid rocket booster (RSB) parachute drop flight testing. The purpose of this study was to determine by theoretical analysis methods the compatability and structural capability of B-52B drop test vehicle configuration (with fins) to accomplish the drop test mission. This document consist of four volumes. This volume presents a summary of airplane flutter and load strength evaluation analysis results and a comparative study of the pylon loading resulting from drop test vehicle inertia and aerodynamic considerations.

Quade, D. A.

1978-01-01

68

Effect of temperature shifts on extracellular proteinase-specific mRNA pools in Pseudomonas fluorescens B52.  

PubMed Central

The influence of a shift in temperature from 20 to 32 degrees C on extracellular proteinase synthesis by Pseudomonas fluorescens B52 was examined. When cells actively synthesizing proteinase at 20 degrees C were shifted to 32 degrees C, enzyme synthesis ceased immediately. After 30 min at 32 degrees C, cells recovered at 20 degrees C after a lag of 30 min. Rifampin and chloramphenicol prevented recovery of synthesis at 20 degrees C. Rifampin-insensitive proteinase synthesis (an indirect measure of proteinase-specific mRNA pools) decreased after the exposure of cells to 32 degrees C for 30 min but was recovered during incubation at 20 degrees C. Controls not exposed to a temperature shift experienced no loss of rifampin-independent synthesis. Cells experienced a 50% reduction in mRNA pools after 15 min at 32 degrees C. The data support the working hypothesis that the loss of mRNA pools after treatment at 32 degrees C is responsible for the lag before the recovery of extracellular proteinase synthesis.

McKellar, R C; Cholette, H

1987-01-01

69

Design of a Control System to Stabilize the Aft Fuselage of a B-52 Bomber in the Presence of a Random Wind Gust.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A control system was designed to stabilize the flexible aft-body of a B-52 bomber, under the influence of a 1.0 ft/sec rms vertical wind gust. Optical instruments, mounted in the aft-body, can therefore be aimed more accurately, and with a less complex ai...

C. A. Harrington

1974-01-01

70

Ship Material Readiness.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research memorandum evaluates ship material condition on the basis of mission-degrading casualty reports. Tobit models estimate the effect on ship material readiness of such resource variables as manning, crew stability, months since last overhaul, s...

A. Quester R. Beland W. Mulligan

1989-01-01

71

Optimal Ship Berthing Plans.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A ship berthing plan assigns surface vessels a berth prior to their port entrance, or reassigns ships once in port to allow them to accomplish in a timely manner maintenance, training, and certification events which build readiness for future operational ...

K. P. Thurman

1989-01-01

72

ATOMIC PROPULSION OF SHIPS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The advantages and disadvantages of the nuclear propulsion of ships are ; considered both for naval and maritime purposes. The increased range of nuclear ; ships justifies their use in both submarine and surface naval vessels. However, ; the economic problems are of importance for merchant ships. The conditions to be ; realized before the application of nuclear energy to

Ricard

1962-01-01

73

Sunken Slave Ship  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Lesson plan teaching how marine archaeologists find a sunken ship and how they recover and preserve their find. Activity is based on the 18th century slave ship, the Henrietta Marie, which sank off the Florida coast shortly after delivering African slaves to Jamaica. Explore what goes into resurrecting sunken ships, as well as how to minimize the damage done to the ecosystem.

74

Determinants of Ship Accident Seaworthiness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates determinants of the seaworthiness of ships involved in accidents, utilizing detailed data of individual tanker, container and bulk ship (U.S. and foreign) accidents investigated by the U.S. Coast Guard. Ordered probit estimation results suggest that ship accident seaworthiness: 1) increases with ship size; 2) is greater if the ship is classified by the American Bureau of Shipping

Wayne K Talley

1999-01-01

75

Genetic relationships between resistance to stalk-tunneling by the European corn borer and cell-wall components in maize population B73×B52  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to assess the relationships among quantitative trait loci (QTL) detected for European corn borer (ECB) tunneling and cell-wall components (CWC) neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), and acid detergent lignin (ADL) content in leaf-sheath and stalk tissues in a maize recombinant inbred line population derived from inbred lines B73 and B52. Most

Andrea J. Cardinal; Michael Lee

2005-01-01

76

B-52B-008/DTV (Drop Test Vehicle) configuration 1 (with and without fins) flight test results - captive flight and drop test missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The B-52B-008 drop test consisted of one takeoff roll to 60 KCAS, two captive flights to accomplish limited safety of flight flutter and structural demonstration testing, and seven drop test flights. Of the seven drop test missions, one flight was aborted due to the failure of the hook mechanism to release the drop test vehicle (DTV); but the other six flights successfully dropped the DTV.

Quade, D. A.

1978-01-01

77

Pirate Ship Ride Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pirate Ship Ride Model was originally inspired by the Pirate Ride at Hershey Park. The "ship" part of the ride has a center of mass that lies 14 m from the pivot point (approximately the center of the boat). The ship swings freely from the pivot, and is driven by a roller built into the floor directly below the ship. The operator presses either the clockwise torque button or the counter clockwise torque button to change the motion of the ship. Because the drive can only push the ship when it is in contact, the drive is only available when the ship is within 30º of its lowest postion. The drive buttons are grey when no drive is available (simulation is paused or the ship coes not contact the drive roller), the turn white when the drive is available. When drive button is pressed, it turns green and a constant torque is exerted on the ship unitl the button is released or until the ship moves out of contact with the drive roller. Note that torque can not be applied if the simulation is paused or has not been started. The Pirate Ship Ride Model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Gallis, Michael R.

2012-01-15

78

Pirate Ship JS Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pirate Ship JavaScript Model is a JavaScript implementation of the Java version of the same model. These simulations were inspired by the Pirate Ride at Hershey Park. The "ship" part of the ride has a center of mass that lies 14 m from the pivot point (approximately the center of the boat). The ship swings freely from the pivot, and is driven by a roller built into the floor directly below the ship. The operator presses either the clockwise torque button or the counter clockwise torque button to change the motion of the ship. Because the drive can only push the ship when it is in contact, the drive is only available when the ship is within 30º of its lowest position. The drive buttons are grey when no drive is available (simulation is paused or the ship does not contact the drive roller), the turn white when the drive is available. When drive button is pressed, it turns green and a constant torque is exerted on the ship until the button is released or until the ship moves out of contact with the drive roller. Note that torque can not be applied if the simulation is paused or has not been started. The Pirate Ship JavaScript Model was developed using the Easy Java Simulations (EjsS) version 5. It is distributed as a ready-to-run html page and requires only a browser with JavaScript support.

Gallis, Michael R.

2014-04-22

79

Periscope video ship classification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Automatic classification of surface ships by means of imaging sensors through the submarine's periscope is of interest to the naval underwater warfare center of the US Navy. In this paper we discuss a testbed designed for periscope video ship classification based on model-based automatic target recognition paradigm, will present the performance results for the application of some of the existing algorithms and will present a sequential tree based technique for ship recognition.

Sadjadi, Firooz A.; OSullivan, Jack

1996-05-01

80

Dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for the revised Space Shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structural integrity of B-52B-008, pylon, and hooks for the drop test missions was determined by theoretical analysis. The results of the analysis and conclusions are presented in this document. The major modification to the drop test vehicle was shortening it about 54 inches, which resulted in the forward hook attach structure being located at the base of the nosecone. The shims that are located in the aft hook structures are increased from two inches to three inches. Airspeed, aerodynamic configuration, and load charts are included.

Doty, L. J.

1983-01-01

81

FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR  

FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR Project Title:  FIRE III ACE Discipline:  ... Level:  L3 Platform:  SHEBA Ship Instrument:  Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer ... Info:  Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) Ship SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B Products ...

2013-07-31

82

Metacenter and ship stability  

Microsoft Academic Search

We address the location of the metacenter M of a floating body such as a ship. Previous studies of M in relation to the stability of a ship have mainly used geometrical approaches and were limited to near equilibrium. We develop a quantitative approach to the location of M for a general shape of the cross-section of a floating body

Jacques Mégel; Janis Kliava

2010-01-01

83

SHIP VULNERABILITY TO FLOODING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Design of a safe ship is by far the most fundamental goal of a naval architect. Determination of what is safe, however, has been the subject of centuries-long and relentless endeavours by the profession as well as relevant lobbies representing diverse interests and public concerns. Flooding of ship void spaces and thus possibly rapid depletion of the physical basis providing

Andrzej Jasionowski; Dracos Vassalos; Strathclyde Andrew Scott

84

Periscope video ship classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Automatic classification of surface ships by means of imaging sensors through the submarine's periscope is of interest to the naval underwater warfare center of the US Navy. In this paper we discuss a testbed designed for periscope video ship classification based on model-based automatic target recognition paradigm, will present the performance results for the application of some of the existing

Firooz A. Sadjadi; Jack Osullivan

1996-01-01

85

Nuclear Merchant Ship Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The operation of about 300 nuclear naval vessels has proven the feasibility of nuclear ship propulsion. Until now six non military ships have been built or are under construction. In the Soviet Union two nuclear icebreakers are in operation, and a third o...

E. Schroeder W. Jager H. G. Schafstall

1977-01-01

86

Emissions from Ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently the International Maritime Organization has made the first attempt to address air pollution from ships. This article presents information showing that ships are a significant source of air pollution on a global scale and discusses the policy implications of such a finding. The air pollution components included in the survey were NOx, SO2, CO2. 34 refs., 1 fig., 2

James J. Corbett; Paul Fischbeck

1997-01-01

87

Viking Ship Design Challenge  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this design challenge, students learn about the Vikings from an engineering point-of-view. While investigating the history and anatomy of Viking ships, they learn how engineering solutions are shaped by the surrounding environment and availability of resources. Students apply this knowledge to design, build and test their own model Viking ships.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

88

Ships to the Sea.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson contains materials for the U.S. Navy Museum's "Ships to the Sea" program. The program is appropriate for students in grades 2-4 and was designed in accordance with local and national social studies standards. The materials introduce students to the world of ship technology and naval terminology. The lesson is presented in five…

Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

89

Ship the Chip  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore engineering package designs that meet the needs of safely shipping a product. Learners work in teams of "engineers" to design a package using standard materials that will safely ship a single chip through the mail to their address.

Ieee

2013-07-08

90

Tow-Ship Noise.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Geoacoustic inversion from tow-ship noised data acquired on a horizontal towed array is discussed. Through simulations and experimental results, it is shown that even very quiet ships radiate sufficient noise power to enable self-noise inversion of basic ...

W. A. Kuperman W. S. Hodgkiss

2004-01-01

91

Nonlinear dynamics of ship oscillations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stability of a ship's motions is crucial for the safety of its crew, its cargo, and the environment. To prevent losses due to unstable motions, particularly in high seas, a better understanding of ship stability is necessary. We analyze the stability of ship motions using a hydrodynamic model accounting for all the rigid body motions of a ship, as

Edwin Kreuzer; Mareike Wendt

2000-01-01

92

Identification of dynamically positioned ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today's model-based dynamic positioning (DP) systems require that the ship and thruster dynamics are known with some accuracy in order to use linear quadratic optimal control theory. However, it is difficult to identify the mathematical model of a dynamically positioned (DP) ship, since the ship is not persistently excited under DP. In addition, the ship parameter-estimation problem is nonlinear and

Thor I. Fossen; Svein I. Sagatun; Asgeir J. Sørensen

1996-01-01

93

Suicidal mothers  

PubMed Central

Abstract: Background: Epidemiological research has demonstrated that suicidal ideation is a relatively frequent complication of pregnancy in both developed and developing countries. Hence, the aims of this study are: to assess whether or not pregnancy may be considered a period highly susceptible to suicidal acts; to recognize potential contributing factors to suicidal behaviors; to describe the repercussions of suicide attempts on maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcome; to identify a typical profile of women at high risk of suicide during pregnancy. Methods: Medical literature information published in any language since 1950 was identified using MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. Search terms were: "pregnancy", (antenatal) "depression", "suicide". Searches were last updated on 28 September 2010. Forty-six articles assessing the suicidal risk during pregnancy and obstetrical outcome of pregnancies complicated by suicide attempts were analyzed, without methodological limitations. Results: Worldwide, frequency of suicidal attempts and the rate of death by suicidal acts are low. Although this clinical event is rare, the consequences of a suicidal attempt are medically and psychologically devastating for the mother-infant pair. We also found that common behaviors exist in women at high risk for suicide during pregnancy. Review data indeed suggest that a characteristic profile can prenatally identify those at highest risk for gestational suicide attempts. Conclusions: Social and health organizations should make all possible efforts to identify women at high suicidal risk, in order to establish specific programs to prevent this tragic event. The available data informs health policy makers with a typical profile to screen women at high risk of suicide during pregnancy. Those women who have a current or past history of psychiatric disorders, are young, unmarried, unemployed, have incurred an unplanned pregnancy (eventually terminated with an induced abortion), are addicted to illicit drugs and/or alcohol, lack effective psychosocial support, have suffered from episodes of sexual or physical violence are particularly vulnerable.

Gentile, Salvatore

2011-01-01

94

Buckling of Ship Grillages.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The subject of this report is the mechanical behavior of stiffened plates, basic structural components of ships and submarines. The buckling loads of grillages subjected to axial compression with and without lateral pressure are calculated using a finite ...

D. A. Danielson

1996-01-01

95

Space Ship Pilot Lesson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Space Ship Pilot lesson is a study of Newton's Laws of motion. Students use a model of a space shuttle and a ferry boat to study differences in an oject's motion with and without resistive forces.

Joiner, David; The Shodor Education Foundation, Inc.

96

Producibility in Ship Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Much attention has been given in recent years to the problem of reducing ship construction costs. Efforts have primarily focused on the improvement of production techniques, processes, and management controls. However, there is a great deal more that can ...

G. L. Kraine S. Ingvason

1989-01-01

97

Cruise Ship White Paper.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On March 17, 2000, the Bluewater Network sent a petition to Administrator Carol Browner on behalf of 53 organizations, asking the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to take regulatory action on measures to address pollution by cruise ships. The petitio...

2000-01-01

98

Application of fracture mechanics and half-cycle method to the prediction of fatigue life of B-52 aircraft pylon components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stress intensity levels at various parts of the NASA B-52 carrier aircraft pylon were examined for the case when the pylon store was the space shuttle solid rocket booster drop test vehicle. Eight critical stress points were selected for the pylon fatigue analysis. Using fracture mechanics and the half-cycle theory (directly or indirectly) for the calculations of fatigue-crack growth ,the remaining fatigue life (number of flights left) was estimated for each critical part. It was found that the two rear hooks had relatively short fatigue life and that the front hook had the shortest fatigue life of all the parts analyzed. The rest of the pylon parts were found to be noncritical because of their extremely long fatigue life associated with the low operational stress levels.

Ko, W. L.; Carter, A. L.; Totton, W. W.; Ficke, J. M.

1989-01-01

99

Dynamic compensation system [ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

A dynamic compensation system (DC-system) has been developed. It is used as an extension of the KaMeWa polar joystick system, where the horizontal motions of a ship are controlled by main propellers, rudders and bow thrusters. It acts like a compensator for wind and current disturbances, allowing the joystick operator to run the ship in almost all weather conditions as

C. G. Kallstrom; Kalle Theoren

1994-01-01

100

Great Lakes Shipping Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the University of Detroit Mercy Libraries/Media Services, this site is a great resource for anyone interested in the history of shipping on the Great Lakes. The database indexes information on a large number of ships that have worked these waters, offering information such as registry number, year built, final disposition, company, physical measurements, name of shipbuilders, and additional remarks, among other categories. Both company name and shipbuilder are cross-referenced to additional ships owned or built. Most of the entries also include some excellent historical photos, though these did not load correctly in Netscape (they worked fine with IE).The entry for the Edmund Fitzgerald, for instance, contained ten photos. The database may be searched by keyword with multiple modifiers.

101

Mother's Day Card  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity page which supports the Cyberchase video, "Saving Mother's Day" uses lines of symmetry to create a Madre Bonita flower, the symbol of Mother's Day. This activity can be printed for student use.

2003-01-01

102

Increasing Working Mothers' Earnings.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Table of Contents: Executive Summary; The Increasing Importance of Mothers' Earnings; The Current Study; Characteristics of Working Mothers; The Impact of Family, Human Capital, and Job Characteristics on Hourly Wages; Estimated Impact of Policy Strategie...

R. M. Spalter-Roth H. I. Hartmann

1991-01-01

103

Shipping for Survival  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore how packaging engineers develop customized shipping and packaging containers to meet the needs of many different industries. Learners learn about different packages that have been engineered to transport hearts for surgery, blood for analysis, and foods to retain freshness. Learners then work in teams to build a container that will allow a flower to be shipped without damage and with water using everyday items. Flowers must remain fresh and not wilted for 24 hours after being sealed in the box.

Ieee

2013-07-08

104

Mother-Child Bonding.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the nature of mother-child bonding from the prenatal stage through early infancy, discussing how the mother's actions, even before birth, stimulate her child's senses. Explains the crucial role that physical contact, breastfeeding, and visual stimuli have on mother-child bonding in human and animal newborns. (MDM)

Pearce, Joseph Chilton

1994-01-01

105

Information for Cruise Ship Travelers  

MedlinePLUS

... Favorites Delicious Digg Google Bookmarks Information for Cruise Ship Travelers Healthy Cruising How to stay healthy on ... Tips Tips for Healthy Cruising Related Resources Cruise Ship Inspection Scores & Information Inspection Scores Cruise Line Directory ...

106

Variability of Ship Noise Measurements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ship noise measurements are subject to relatively large variations that should be considered when these data are used. For modern naval ships operating at high speeds, propeller cavitation is the dominant source of radiated noise. This paper examines the ...

N. Sponagle

1988-01-01

107

Cruise Ship Discharge Assessment Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Cruise ships operate in every ocean worldwide, often in pristine coastal waters and sensitive marine ecosystems. Cruise ship operators provide amenities to their passengers that are similar to those of luxury resort hotels, including pools, hair salons, r...

L. S. Johnson

2008-01-01

108

46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping...SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

2012-10-01

109

46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping...SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

2013-10-01

110

X-15 ship #3 on lakebed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The X-15 ship #3 (56-6672) is seen here on the lakebed at the Edwards Air Force Base, Edwards, California. Ship #3 made 65 flights during the program, attaining a top speed of Mach 5.65 and a maximum altitude of 354,200 feet. Only 10 of the 12 X-15 pilots flew Ship #3, and only eight of them earned their astronaut wings during the program. Robert White, Joseph Walker, Robert Rushworth, John 'Jack' McKay, Joseph Engle, William 'Pete' Knight, William Dana, and Michael Adams all earned their astronaut wings in Ship #3. Neil Armstrong and Milton Thompson also flew Ship #3. In fact, Armstrong piloted Ship #3 on its first flight, on 20 December 1961. On 15 November 1967, Ship #3 was launched over Delamar Lake, Nevada with Maj. Michael J. Adams at the controls. The vehicle soon reached a speed of Mach 5.2, and a peak altitude of 266,000 feet. During the climb, an electrical disturbance degraded the aircraft's controllability. Ship #3 began a slow drift in heading, which soon became a spin. Adams radioed that the X-15 'seems squirrelly,' and then said 'I'm in a spin.' Through some combination of pilot technique and basic aerodynamic stability, Adams recovered from the spin, and entered an inverted Mach 4.7 dive. As the X-15 plummeted into the increasingly thicker atmosphere, the Honeywell adaptive flight control system caused the vehicle to begin oscillating. As the pitching motion increased, aerodynamic forces finally broke the aircraft into several major pieces. Adams was killed when the forward fuselage impacted the desert. This was the only fatal accident during the entire X-15 program. The X-15 was a rocket powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow-on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and movable horizontal stabilizers to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a B-52 aircraft at 45,000 ft and a speed of about 500 mph. Depending on the mission, the rocket engine provided thrust for the first 80 to 120 sec of flight. The remainder of the normal 10 to 11 min. flight was powerless and ended with a 200-mph glide landing. Generally, one of two types of X-15 flight profiles was used; a high-altitude flight plan that called for the pilot to maintain a steep rate of climb, or a speed profile that called for the pilot to push over and maintain a level altitude. The X-15 was flown over a period of nearly 10 years -- June 1959 to Oct. 1968 -- and set the world's unofficial speed and altitude records of 4,520 mph or Mach 6.7 (set by Ship #2) and 354,200 ft (set by Ship #3) in a program to investigate all aspects of manned hypersonic flight. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the development of the Mercury, Gemini,and Apollo manned spaceflight programs, and also the Space Shuttle program. The X-15s made a total of 199 flight

1962-01-01

111

Ship Navigation Alarm System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report covers all work done under Contract DAAK02-68-C-0513 by Stewart Warner Electronics (SWE), Chicago, Ill., from 28 June 1968 till 15 July 1969 to develop and test the Ship Navigation Alarm System (SNAS). The prime objective was to determine whet...

H. J. Osinga

1969-01-01

112

ALASKA CRUISE SHIP INITIATIVE  

EPA Science Inventory

During the course of the annual vacation season, luxury cruise ships carrying up to 3000 passengers visit the coastal cities and small towns of Alaska. Alaska is the first state to impose regulations requiring such vessels to submit to inspection and monitoring of gray water and...

113

Computation of Ship Waves.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research covered by this grant was directed toward developing a numerical method for computing wave drag on ship hulls of general shape. The research as originally proposed was to extend for three years, however only fifteen months of research were su...

J. C. Strikwerda J. F. Geer

1985-01-01

114

Magnetohydrodynamic propulsion of ships.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion of ships has been studied by scientists and technicians since the early 1960's. The major reason for the interest is the potential for a high energy efficiency and low noise propulsion. The report gives a brief introdu...

B. Wolff

1990-01-01

115

Geography by Cargo Ship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on his maritime background, a teacher at a rural middle school in California decided to use a "Pacific Rim and Basin" theme as the focus for his gifted class. Students learned about the Far East by tracking and communicating with a cargo ship bound for Yokohama, Japan. (MLH)

Mociun, Tony

1989-01-01

116

ATOMIC PROPULSION OF SHIPS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of the development of the U. S. Navy's nuclear submarine ; propulsion program is briefly reviewed. The factors which influence nuclear ; shipdesign are discussed and compared with more conventional propulsion design ; factors. Of special interest are the influences of nuclear radiation and the ; exceptional endurance which are characteristic of nuclear ships. The ; construction materials

1959-01-01

117

Recovery Ship Freedom Star  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, is towing a barge containing the third Space Shuttle Super Lightweight External Tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT was slated for use to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October 1998. This first time towing arrangement, part of a cost saving plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks were manufactured. The barge was transported up Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tug boat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allowed NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies showed a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications would be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, also underwent deck strengthening enhancements and had the necessary towing wench installed.

1998-01-01

118

Space Ship Pilot Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Space Ship Pilot model is a model of motion under Newton's laws with and without resistive forces. The first environment puts the user in control of docking a space shuttle, and the second puts the user in control of docking a boat.

Joiner, David; The Shodor Education Foundation, Inc.

119

The Good Ship Lollipop  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A cruise ship converted into a college took students to many foreign countries giving them the opportunity to study other cultures, politics, mores, and histories through their own observations and experiences under the guidance of teachers using a planned curriculum. (JD)

Murray, Donald M.

1976-01-01

120

Capital Ships: A Historical Perspective.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 'capital ship of the fleet' drove the operational employment of naval forces. Strength in capital ships equated to the strength of the maritime nation. This paper traces the historical development of capital ships and their profound impact on naval st...

J. L. Fleming

1993-01-01

121

Surface Warfare Test Ship Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A systems engineering approach to the design of a ship conversion to satisfy the requirements for a Surface Warfare Test Ship (SWTS) to be employed by the Port Hueneme Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center is presented. The ship described would mee...

C. N. Calvano D. Wickersham I. Farsaris P. Malone R. C. Harney

2000-01-01

122

Mathematical Modeling: Convoying Merchant Ships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a mathematical model that connects mathematics with social studies. Students use mathematics to model independent versus convoyed ship deployments and sinkings to determine if the British should have convoyed their merchant ships during World War I. During the war, the British admiralty opposed sending merchant ships grouped…

Mathews, Susann M.

2004-01-01

123

The US Cruise Ship Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The cruise ship industry relates directly to many features of the natural and cultural environments. The U.S. cruise ship industry is analyzed. Discusses the size of the industry, precruise passenger liners, current cruise ships, cruise regions and routes, ports of call, major ports, passengers, and future prospects. (RM)

Miller, Willis H.

1985-01-01

124

Wallops Ship Surveillance System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Approved as a Wallops control center backup system, the Wallops Ship Surveillance Software is a day-of-launch risk analysis tool for spaceport activities. The system calculates impact probabilities and displays ship locations relative to boundary lines. It enables rapid analysis of possible flight paths to preclude the need to cancel launches and allow execution of launches in a timely manner. Its design is based on low-cost, large-customer- base elements including personal computers, the Windows operating system, C/C++ object-oriented software, and network interfaces. In conformance with the NASA software safety standard, the system is designed to ensure that it does not falsely report a safe-for-launch condition. To improve the current ship surveillance method, the system is designed to prevent delay of launch under a safe-for-launch condition. A single workstation is designated the controller of the official ship information and the official risk analysis. Copies of this information are shared with other networked workstations. The program design is divided into five subsystems areas: 1. Communication Link -- threads that control the networking of workstations; 2. Contact List -- a thread that controls a list of protected item (ocean vessel) information; 3. Hazard List -- threads that control a list of hazardous item (debris) information and associated risk calculation information; 4. Display -- threads that control operator inputs and screen display outputs; and 5. Archive -- a thread that controls archive file read and write access. Currently, most of the hazard list thread and parts of other threads are being reused as part of a new ship surveillance system, under the SureTrak project.

Smith, Donna C.

2011-01-01

125

Sea & Ships: Explore Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Maritime Museum (NMM) in England notes that its goal is "working to illustrate for everyone the importance of the sea, ships, time and the stars and their relationship with people." There is so much to explore in the "Sea and Ships" portion of the NMM website, but a great way to see everything it has to offer is by using the "Sea and Ships Directory" at the bottom of the homepage. It divides the material up by "Subjects", "People", "Collections", "Online Galleries", and "Games and Interactives". Visitors interested in lessons about the ocean that come in the form of games, quizzes and stories, should definitely check out the "Your Ocean" link from the "Games and Interactives". The "Your Waste" lesson gives visitors the opportunity to test their skills at "managing an oil spill clean-up operation", in the game "Oil Crisis!" Keeping waste to a minimum is what the quiz "Pollution Solutions" addresses, and is also on the "Your Waste" page. Other lessons include "Your Energy", "Your Stuff" and "Your Climate".

2010-05-04

126

Observations of Ship Tracks from Ship-Based Platforms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ship-based measurements in June 1994 provided information about ship-track clouds and associated atmospheric environment observed from below cloud levels that provide a perspective different from satellite and aircraft measurements. Surface measurements of latent and sensible heat fluxes, sea surface temperatures, and meteorological profiles with free and tethered balloons provided necessary input conditions for models of ship-track formation and maintenance. Remote

W. Porch; R. Borys; P. Durkee; R. Gasparovic; W. Hooper; E. Hindman; K. Nielsen

1999-01-01

127

Analysis of a ship-to-ship collision  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is involved in a safety assessment for the shipment of radioactive material by sea. One part of this study is investigation of the consequences of ship-to-ship collisions. This paper describes two sets of finite element analyses performed to assess the structural response of a small freighter and the loading imparted to radioactive material (RAM) packages during several postulated collision scenarios with another ship. The first series of analyses was performed to evaluate the amount of penetration of the freighter hull by a striking ship of various masses and initial velocities. Although these analyses included a representation of a single RAM package, the package was not impacted during the collision so forces on the package could not be computed. Therefore, a second series of analyses incorporating a representation of a row of seven packages was performed to ensure direct package impact by the striking ship. Average forces on a package were evaluated for several initial velocities and masses of the striking ship. In addition to. providing insight to ship and package response during a few postulated ship collisions scenarios, these analyses will be used to benchmark simpler ship collision models used in probabilistic risk assessment analyses.

Porter, V.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

1996-02-01

128

Single Mothers "Do" Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores how single mothers both incorporate others into family life (e.g., when they ask others to care for their children) and simultaneously "do families" in a manner that holds out a vision of a "traditional" family structure. Drawing on research with White, rural single mothers, the author explores the manner in which these women…

Nelson, Margaret K.

2006-01-01

129

Melancholic Mothering: Mothers, Daughters and Family Violence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through selected theories of melancholia, this paper seeks to shed some fresh interpretive light on the reproduction and disruption of gender, violence and family turmoil across generations of mothers and daughters. The originality of the paper lies in its exploratory deployment of theories of melancholia to consider issues of women, violence and…

Kenway, Jane; Fahey, Johannah

2008-01-01

130

Computation of Surface Ship Wave Profiles with Thin Ship Theory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The analytical method for computing the free-surface wave height of a ship is one of the most important tasks in naval hydrodynamics. The steady ship wave profile is usually linearly superimposed on other free-surface wave profiles. In the computational o...

Y. S. Hong

1983-01-01

131

On the global ship hull bending energy in ship collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

During ship collisions part of the kinetic energy of the involved vessels immediately prior to contact is absorbed as energy dissipated by crushing of the hull structures, by friction and by elastic energy. The purpose of this report is to present an estimate of the elastic energy that can be stored in elastic hull vibrations during a ship collision.When a

Preben Terndrup Pedersen; Yujie Li

2009-01-01

132

Ship Creek bioassessment investigations  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB) personnel to conduct a series of collections of macroinvertebrates and sediments from Ship Creek to (1) establish baseline data on these populations for reference in evaluating possible impacts from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) activities at two operable units, (2) compare current population indices with those found by previous investigations in Ship Creek, and (3) determine baseline levels of concentrations of any contaminants in the sediments associated with the macroinvertebrates. A specific suite of indices established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was requested for the macroinvertebrate analyses; these follow the Rapid Bioassessment Protocol developed by Plafkin et al. (1989) and will be described. Sediment sample analyses included a Microtox bioassay and chemical analysis for contaminants of concern. These analyses included, volatile organic compounds, total gasoline and diesel hydrocarbons (EPA method 8015, CA modified), total organic carbon, and an inductive-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) metals scan. Appendix A reports on the sediment analyses. The Work Plan is attached as Appendix B.

Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.; Murphy, M.T.

1995-06-01

133

49 CFR 174.24 - Shipping papers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Each person receiving a shipping paper required by this section must...business and must make the shipping paper available, upon request, to...and locations. For a hazardous waste, each shipping paper copy must be retained for...

2013-10-01

134

49 CFR 177.817 - Shipping papers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...transportation unless the shipping paper describing the material...Except for a hazardous waste, the certification...must make the shipping paper available, upon request...locations. For a hazardous waste, the shipping paper copy must be...

2013-10-01

135

49 CFR 176.24 - Shipping papers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Each person receiving a shipping paper required by this section must...business and must make the shipping paper available, upon request, to...and locations. For a hazardous waste, each shipping paper copy must be retained for...

2013-10-01

136

7 CFR 989.106 - Ship.  

...Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ship. 989.106 Section 989.106 Agriculture Regulations...Administrative Rules and Regulations Definitions § 989.106 Ship. Ship means the physical movement of raisins other than...

2014-01-01

137

46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section Sec. 19...SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

2010-10-01

138

46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section Sec. 19...SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

2011-10-01

139

Designing Ships to the Natural Environment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Until recently, the natural environment has played a very minor role in ship design. The consideration of ship performance in the prevailing environment was focused primarily on optimization of calm water resistance and other factors related to the ship's...

S. L. Bales

1982-01-01

140

Facts about Noroviruses on Cruise Ships  

MedlinePLUS

... Digg Google Bookmarks Facts About Noroviruses on Cruise Ships Noroviruses Norovirus is a very contagious virus. You ... about norovirus Why noroviruses are associated with cruise ships Health officials track illness on cruise ships. So ...

141

NASA Tracking Ship Navigation Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The ship position and attitude measurement system that was installed aboard the tracking ship Vanguard is described. An overview of the entire system is given along with a description of how precise time and frequency is utilized. The instrumentation is b...

J. J. Mckenna

1976-01-01

142

Surface Effect Ships for Commerce.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ships using the surface effect principle have been suggested as a means of improving the transport of U.S. international commerce. The functional principles of the surface effect ships (SES) appear to offer an avenue for developing transoceanic vehicles p...

1966-01-01

143

The Ship Hull Fouling Penalty  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ship resistance penalties of slime, shell and weed are discussed in turn. Methods to measure the hard paint roughness of antifouling coatings are recapitulated. The determination of a satisfactory roughness parameter from correlations with measured roughness functions is described. This in turn, allows a relationship between ship added friction and roughness height to be found. This recapitulation allows consideration

R. L. Townsin

2003-01-01

144

Shipping Container for Tritiated Water.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A reusable shipping container for Type B and large quantities of tritiated water has been designed and tested at Mound Facility. An inner and an outer container are used for shipping up to 100,000 Ci of tritium in water absorbed on molecular sieve, silica...

R. A. Watkins T. B. Rhinehammer J. F. Griffin

1978-01-01

145

TMI2 spent fuel shipping  

Microsoft Academic Search

TMI-2 failed fuel will be shipped to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for use in the DOE Core Examination Program. The fuel debris will be loaded into three types of canisters during defueling and dry loaded into a spent fuel shipping cask. The cask design accommodates seven canisters per cask and has two separate containment vessels with ''leaktight'' seals. Shipments

G. J. Quinn; H. M. Burton

1985-01-01

146

Mother's Day Math  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Mother's Day themed set of word problems provides students with practice problem solving using ratios, algebraic thinking, operations with whole numbers, decimals, and percents, and more. The resource includes an answer key.

Malen, Mary L.; Holtz, Gwenn

2000-01-01

147

My mother, the smoker  

Microsoft Academic Search

Watching a frail parent, with a pack-a-day smoking habit, decline into dementia, I wrote a blog and morphed it into a narrative of my mother’s smoking, paralleling her habit with the rise and fall of smoking through the ages. I imagine that some readers might be grappling with similar anguish and I offer this part memoir, part history, part health

Kirsten Levy

2007-01-01

148

46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping...A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General...

2012-10-01

149

46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

2011-10-01

150

46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

2012-10-01

151

46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping...A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General...

2013-10-01

152

46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

2013-10-01

153

Ship Squat Predictions for Ship/Tow Simulator.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) summarizes several empirical ship squat predictions based on Permanent International Association of Navigation Congresses (PIANC), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Japanese guidance. A Fortra...

M. J. Briggs

2006-01-01

154

The ship hull fouling penalty.  

PubMed

The ship resistance penalties of slime, shell and weed are discussed in turn. Methods to measure the hard paint roughness of antifouling coatings are recapitulated. The determination of a satisfactory roughness parameter from correlations with measured roughness functions is described. This in turn, allows a relationship between ship added friction and roughness height to be found. This recapitulation allows consideration of using the same route for a surface with filamentous fouling. Consideration is given to low surface energy coatings and their roughness idiosyncrasies. The determination of economic penalties is discussed, both for a particular ship and globally. PMID:14618699

Townsin, R L

2003-04-01

155

Research Ship Information and Schedules  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This unusual resource for Research Ship Information and Schedules is maintained by the University of Delaware's Ocean Information Center (OCEANIC). Complete with a searchable database of schedules and characteristics of deep-water scientific research vessels, this site is an excellent example of the range of eclectic and specialized information available on the Web. Information on facilities, research capabilities, layouts, schedules, and much more is organized by country and ship name; for US research vessels, information is also listed by agency and institution. Other features include links to a staggering array of related research ship information sites.

1999-01-01

156

47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. 80.1121 Section 80.1121 Telecommunication... Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. (a) Ship...

2010-10-01

157

47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. 80.1121 Section 80.1121 Telecommunication... Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. (a) Ship...

2011-10-01

158

47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. 80.1121 Section 80.1121 Telecommunication... Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. (a) Ship...

2012-10-01

159

Math Model for Naval Ship Handling Trainer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report describes the math model for an experimental ship handling trainer. The training task is that of a replenishment operation at sea. The model includes equations for ship dynamics of a destroyer, propeller-engine response times, ship separation, interaction effects between supply ship and destroyer, and outputs to a visual display system.…

Golovcsenko, Igor V.

160

Output feedback tracking control for ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

For most ships, measurements of the ship velocities are not available. For feedback control of the ship, estimates of the velocities must therefore be computed from the position and heading measurements. The ship position is typically measured using the Navstar differential global positioning systern (DGPS), while the heading is usually measured by a gyro compass. As the position measurements are

K. Y. Pettersen; H. Nijmeijer

161

46 CFR 310.4 - Training Ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Training Ship. 310.4 Section 310.4 Shipping ...Academies and Colleges § 310.4 Training Ship. The Administration may furnish a Training Ship, if such is available, to any School....

2012-10-01

162

46 CFR 310.4 - Training Ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training Ship. 310.4 Section 310.4 Shipping ...Academies and Colleges § 310.4 Training Ship. The Administration may furnish a Training Ship, if such is available, to any School....

2010-10-01

163

46 CFR 310.4 - Training Ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Training Ship. 310.4 Section 310.4 Shipping ...Academies and Colleges § 310.4 Training Ship. The Administration may furnish a Training Ship, if such is available, to any School....

2011-10-01

164

46 CFR 310.4 - Training Ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Training Ship. 310.4 Section 310.4 Shipping ...Academies and Colleges § 310.4 Training Ship. The Administration may furnish a Training Ship, if such is available, to any School....

2013-10-01

165

Formal safety assessment of cruise ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the applicability of formal safety assessment to the cruise industry. Formal safety assessment and its development in the cruise shipping industry are described. Cruise ship accident statistics are studied and discussed. This is followed by an analysis of cruise ship characteristics and a proposed formal safety assessment methodology for cruise ships. A case study is carried out

P Lois; J Wang; A Wall; T Ruxton

2004-01-01

166

47 CFR Procedures - Ship Stations  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Stations Procedures Operating Procedures Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS...MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Procedures-Land Stations §...

2010-10-01

167

47 CFR Procedures - Ship Stations  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Stations Procedures Special Procedures Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS...MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Special Procedures-Private Coast Stations...

2010-10-01

168

An Analysis of Ship Resistance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research conducted under this grant has been concerned with the development of a computational scheme for theoretically predicting a ship's resistance. The computation is divided into two portions. First, the fluid flow is calculated under the assumpt...

B. H. Adee P. J. Harvey

1975-01-01

169

The Efficiency of Ship Automation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The automation of ships opens new possibilities for further improving their technical-economic indicators. Determining the economic advisability of automation is possible if appropriate methods of evaluating the automation are developed. Included is a sel...

B. I. Yurkevich N. F. Broido A. I. Semenenko G. A. Zakharov V. K. Bernikov

1971-01-01

170

Analysis of Overseas Shipping Practices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This analysis addresses the issue of whether shipping freight to the Military Traffic Management Command's (MTMC) Container Stuffing Activities (CSAs) would be a more cost effective way for the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) to containerize cargo for surf...

M. Kleinhenz

1994-01-01

171

Black Ships & Samurai  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the early days of July 1853, the residents of Uraga on the outskirts of the feudal capital of Japan at Edo were privy to a rather unusual sight: Four hulking foreign warships had entered their harbor under the power of coal, and under the command of Commodore Matthew Perry of the United States. So began one of the pivotal cultural interactions between East and West. Commodore Perry came as an emissary of the United States in order to create a formal relationship with the empire of Japan. Developed by Professors John W. Dower and Shigeru Miyagawa from MIT, this site brings together a wealth of rarely seen graphics from both sides of this historic encounter, and original textual commentaries by Professor Dower. The Core Exhibit area contains the bulk of these amazing visual materials, including those renderings of the initial encounters of the two cultures in the years 1853 and 1854 and some revealing portraits of both Japanese officials and Commodore Perry himself. Visitors should not leave the site without viewing at least part of the interactive recreation of the 30-foot-long Japanese Black Ship Scroll, which was painted in 1854. The scroll features a number of scenes documenting these encounters, and also includes explanatory text as well.

172

How Do Mothers in Prison Differ From Non-Mothers?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adjustment patterns and criminal characteristics of 350 incarcerated mothers of children under 21 years of age were contrasted to those of 166 women from the same institution that had never had children. There were no observed differences between mothers and non-mothers in terms of self-reported mental illness symptoms, emotional distress, or conflict with other individuals at the prison. There were

Ann B. Loper

2006-01-01

173

Our Mother Corn.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed to provide an understanding of the magnitude of the role of corn, referred to as Mother Corn in the cultures of the Seneca, Pawnee, and Hopi tribes, the student text provides information on the tribes' basic lifestyles and the way they grew and used corn in three different parts of the United States. The section on the origin of corn…

Mathers, Sherry; And Others

174

Information for Working Mothers  

PubMed Central

Women are entering, staying, or returning to the workforce following childbirth in increasing numbers. They report various amounts of success in the workplace after they become mothers. This column presents a review of five Web sites that provide useful resources to working Moms.

Montgomery, Kristen S.

2002-01-01

175

Information for working mothers.  

PubMed

Women are entering, staying, or returning to the workforce following childbirth in increasing numbers. They report various amounts of success in the workplace after they become mothers. This column presents a review of five Web sites that provide useful resources to working Moms. PMID:17273297

Montgomery, Kristen S

2002-01-01

176

Mother's Day (Episode 206)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this 23-minute video the Cyberchase squad uses their knowledge of fractions and decimals to fix the rails for the Madre Bonita Express and save Mother's Day. Throughout the video the crew is faced with challenges that require them to measure pieces of track and add together different fraction and decimal amounts.

2014-01-01

177

SEA modelling of ship structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) has been used to get analytical estimates, as an alternative method to the empirical one, of the the transmission losses of structure-borne noise along the ship hull, which is one of the most important procedures in predicting cabin noise. Major members such as decks, shell plates, and bulkheads were modeled as subsystems representing flexural and/or in-plane wave groups. The modeling process was relatively simple because only structural members of a cross section were considered. However, when one wishes to obtain more theroetical predictions by using SEA, modeling must include a much larger number of subsystems including air spaces, which is no longer simple, even for the aft-part of a ship. The ship structures are so complicated that it is a difficult job to define subsystems themselves. And the number of subsystems in general is so large that preparing the input data will require enormous efforts. More importantly, numerous empirical factors accumulated in past experience and on-board measurements should be appropriately considered in the SEA modeling. Moreover, taking every detail of the multi-connected structures as subsystems does not necessarily yield more accurate results. In this paper, we discuss various aspects of the SEA modeling of the ship. In particular, we are concerned with the simplifying of complex structures and inclusion of the empirical factors. We suggest some practical techniques, which might be useful in noise analysis of commercial ships.

Kang, Hyun J.; Kim, Hyun S.; Kim, Jae S.; Lee, Young C.

178

Mothering in a Foreign Land  

Microsoft Academic Search

The process of becoming a mother in an adopted land presents unique challenges in identity formation of immigrant mothers. The bidirectional influence of the mother's own transformation and that of the larger family system has significant implications for child development. This article addresses the ways in which cultural displacement has an impact on the dilemmas of motherhood, as evident in

Pratyusha Tummala-Narra

2004-01-01

179

Ship waves and lee waves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dynamics analogous to those of surface ship waves on water of finite depth are noted for the three-dimensional trapped lee wave modes produced by an isolated obstacle in a stratified fluid. This vertical trapping of wave energy is modeled by uniform upstream flow and stratification, bounded above by a rigid lid, and by a semiinfinite fluid of uniform stability whose wind velocity increases exponentially with height, representing the atmosphere. While formal asymptotic solutions are produced, limited quantitative usefulness is obtained through them because of the limitations of the approximations and the infinity of modes in the solution. Time-dependent numerical models are accordingly developed for both surface ship waves and internal and atmospheric ship waves, yielding a variety of results.

Sharman, R. D.; Wurtele, M. G.

1983-01-01

180

Shipping container for fissile material  

DOEpatents

The present invention is directed to a shipping container for the interstate transportation of enriched uranium materials. The shipping container is comprised of a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical-shaped outer vessel lined with thermal insulation. Disposed inside the thermal insulation and spaced apart from the inner walls of the outer vessel is a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical inner vessel impervious to liquid and gaseous substances and having the inner surfaces coated with a layer of cadmium to prevent nuclear criticality. The cadmium is, in turn, lined with a protective shield of high-density urethane for corrosion and wear protection. 2 figs.

Crowder, H.E.

1984-12-17

181

Hypertext: Another Step Toward the Paperless Ship.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The original ideal of a Paperless Ship is a clear, concise, strategy statement that mandates paper reduction and office automation on ships. Its intent is to alleviate combat units of the serious limitations imposed by paper. Nevertheless, paper eradicati...

D. A. Kellett

1989-01-01

182

A New Propulsion System for Ships.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Executive Summary; Introduction -- Limitation of Existing Propulsion Systems, Trends in Ship Power Requirements, Propeller Configuration, Supercavitating Propellers, Water Jet Propulsion, Integrate Ship and Propeller Into a Single System; The Ne...

H. E. Sheets T. Kowalski A. P. Davis

1980-01-01

183

How To Improve You Shipping and Receiving.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses how two universities improved their shipping and receiving operations and cut costs. Examples from the University of Texas at Dallas and John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, illustrate how they established greater shipping and receiving department efficiencies. (GR)

Sturgeon, Julie

2001-01-01

184

What teen mothers know  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the United States, low-income or minority populations tend toward earlier births than the more advantaged. In disadvantaged\\u000a populations, one factor that may exert pressure toward early births is “weathering,” or pervasive health uncertainty. Are\\u000a subjective perceptions of health related to fertility timing? Drawing on a small sample of intensive interviews with teenage\\u000a mothers-to-be, I suggest that low-income African American

Arline T. Geronimus

1996-01-01

185

47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate...than one ship. Portable ship earth stations are also authorized...international or United States domestic waters. (b) Portable ship earth stations must meet the rule...

2010-10-01

186

47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate...than one ship. Portable ship earth stations are also authorized...international or United States domestic waters. (b) Portable ship earth stations must meet the rule...

2009-10-01

187

47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...Compulsory Ships § 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels equipped with a Ship Security Alert System pursuant to the Safety...

2013-10-01

188

47 CFR 80.1083 - Ship radio installations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship radio installations. 80.1083 Section 80...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1083 Ship radio installations. (a) Ships must...

2011-10-01

189

46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

2011-10-01

190

47 CFR 80.1083 - Ship radio installations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship radio installations. 80.1083 Section 80...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1083 Ship radio installations. (a) Ships must...

2012-10-01

191

46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

2012-10-01

192

46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

2013-10-01

193

Underage mothers in Turkey  

PubMed Central

Background All individuals under the age of 18 are considered as children by the Convention on the Rights of Children. Underage mothers are a pediatric-age group of children that become pregnant and give birth. It may be unfamiliar in Western countries, but in Middle-Eastern countries ruled by religious laws and old-fashioned traditions, it is common for an older man to marry a girl. The aim of this study was to describe the status of underage mothers within the framework of children’s rights and to draw attention to this issue. We presented this study to increase awareness and sensitivity, and to scrutinize and discuss these topics. Material/Methods We retrospectively investigated cases of underaged pregnant girls who applied to Forensic Science Department outpatient clinics and Obstetrics and Gynecology Department outpatient clinics of Gaziosmanpasa University Faculty of Medicine between 2003 and 2013. Results We accessed records of 163 underage mothers (?18 age). Mean age was 16.9±0.83 (14–18 years). Gravida and parity rates increased proportionately with increasing age. Most of our cases were 16 and 17 years of age (n: 117, 71.8%). Conclusions Underage motherhood is not only a medical issue; it is a multi-dimensional problem with social, economic, traditional, religious, and legal aspects.

Ozer, Erdal; Nacar, Mehmet Can; Yildirim, Ali; Enginyurt, Ozgur; Din, Hasan; Evcuman, Durmus

2014-01-01

194

Long Ship Waves in Shallow Water Bodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a Wakes from large high-speed ships frequently reveal many interesting and important features that are not present in the classical\\u000a Kelvin ship wave system. Only a few differences are connected with the increase in the ship’s speed in a straightforward way.\\u000a The majority of effects reflect nonlinear processes of wave generation and propagation. This overview concentrates on the\\u000a recent results concerning

Tarmo Soomere

195

Infrared ship\\/decoy\\/missile encounter model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simulations of missile-ship-countermeasures engagements are used to determine the effective ways of defending a ship against infrared-guided missile threats. This paper describes one type of simulation that models the engagement of a ship deploying IR decoys by an infrared-guided seeker-head missile. This model was developed to assess the efficiency of IR decoys in protecting ships against these missiles. The simulation,

Josee Morin; Francoise Reid; Andre Morin

1993-01-01

196

Time domain geoacoustic inversion using ship noise  

Microsoft Academic Search

A time domain geoacoustic inversion method using ship noise received on a towed horizontal array is presented. The received signal, containing ship noise, is time-reversed and then back-propagated to the vicinity of the ship. The back-propagated signal is correlated with the received signal which is expected to peak at the ship's location in case of a good match for the

Woojae Seong; Peter Gerstoft; David Battle; Peter Nielsen

2003-01-01

197

Modification of ship hydrodynamic interaction forces and moment by underwater ship geometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hydrodynamic interaction forces\\/moments acting on a moored ship due to the passage of another ship in its proximity is researched by considering the influence of ship form against the idealized approach of the use of parabolic sectional area distribution. Comparisons with experimental results show that the interaction effects are predicted better by inclusion of ship's form.

K. S. Varyani; P. Krishnankutty

2006-01-01

198

Design Practice of Ship Fin Stabilizers and Applying Techniques of Ship Motion Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays more and more ship motion control systems are applied in various ships. Among ship motions, roll motion causes serious damages to the equipments of ship and its performance, many efforts have been made to invent or create some equipment to weaken these bad effects. However, few types of equipment have had the same impact on roll stabilization as the

Hongzhang Jin

2007-01-01

199

An automatic ship and ship wake detection system for spaceborne SAR images in coastal regions  

Microsoft Academic Search

An automatic ship and ship wake detection system for spaceborne SAR images is described and assessed. The system is designed for coastal regions with eddies, fronts, waves and swells. The system uses digital terrain models to simulate synthetic SAR images to mask out land areas. Then a search for ship targets is performed followed by wake search around detected ship

K. Eldhuset

1996-01-01

200

Shore-To-Ship Power Supply System for a Cruise Ship  

Microsoft Academic Search

The power demand for a large cruise ship during berthing is close to 10 MVA. Such a power demand from the shore-to-ship requires multiple parallel feeds at medium voltage to match with the ship's connection point voltage. The cruise ship authority required installation of a neutral grounding disconnect switch (DS) and insulated ground conductor (IG) at the shore power transformer

D. Paul; V. Haddian

2009-01-01

201

TMI2 core shipping preparations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities,

L. J. Ball; R. J. Barkanic; W. T. II Conaway; D. S. Schmoker

1988-01-01

202

``Camouflage'' of Ships in War  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN his speech at the Royal Academy banquet the Prince of Wales referred to one of the factors of modern warfare which is of special scientific interest-the art of ``camouflage.'' In the highly successful ``camouflage'' of ships as it was carried out during the closing phases of the war the principle made use of was that, familiar to biologists, of

J. Graham Kerr

1919-01-01

203

Updated emissions from ocean shipping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine vessel inventories demonstrate that ship emissions cannot be neglected in assessing environmental impacts of air pollution, although significant uncertainty in these inventories remains. We address this uncertainty by employing a bottom-up estimate of fuel consumption and vessel activity for internationally registered fleets, including cargo vessels, other commercial vessels, and military vessels. We identify model bias in previous work, which

James J. Corbett; Horst W. Koehler

2003-01-01

204

Ship Tracks South of Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page from NASA's Earth Observatory shows images of visible tracks made in the Earth's atmosphere from clouds forming around ship exhaust particles. One of these images shows the relative sizes of the particles, and the text relates the relative sizes to the relative brightness of the clouds that are formed.

2009-05-27

205

Cruise Ship Port Planning Factors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The cruise ship industry started off like a healthy plant in a small pot. When it was small, it struggled, survived and flourished in the small pot. But after a thriving youth, the pot became restrictive and the plant is starting to get root bound. Is it ...

J. A. Fogg

2001-01-01

206

CONTROL OF SHIP MOTION IN MANOEUVRING SITUATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY: The paper presents a regulator controlling ship motion in manoeuvring situations. The control system makes use of three fuzzy logic controllers, the task of which is to keep the ship at a given point, bearing the name of the reference point, with simultaneous stabilisation of the set course. The ship motion is controlled by tracing and following coordinates of

Leszek Morawski

207

Using Numerical Simulation to Analyze Ship Collision  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nonlinear finite element method (FEM) is a powerful tool for analyzing ship collision problem and has seen more and more applications in recent years. The reliability of the numerical simulation results largely depends on the proper definition of the problem and careful control of some critical parameters. As part of a benchmarking exercise for a ship-to-ship collision project, the work

Fuqiang Wu; Ge Wang

208

Control of Ship-Mounted Cranes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed an integrated systems solution, which enables the transfer of cargo from one pitching, rolling, yawing, surging, heaving, and swaying ship to another pitching, rolling, yawing, surging, heaving, and swaying ship adjacent to it without damage to the ships or the material, personnel, or equipment. The total solution has been demonstrated through computer simulations, which account for the interaction

Ali H. Nayfeh; Ziyad Masoud; Nader Nayfeh; Eihab Abdel-Rahman

209

33 CFR 151.29 - Foreign ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foreign ships. 151.29 Section 151.29 Navigation...Antarctic Treaty as it Pertains to Pollution from Ships Oil Pollution § 151.29 Foreign ships. (a) Each oil tanker of 150 gross...

2010-07-01

210

33 CFR 151.29 - Foreign ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foreign ships. 151.29 Section 151.29 Navigation...Antarctic Treaty as it Pertains to Pollution from Ships Oil Pollution § 151.29 Foreign ships. (a) Each oil tanker of 150 gross...

2012-07-01

211

33 CFR 151.29 - Foreign ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foreign ships. 151.29 Section 151.29 Navigation...Antarctic Treaty as it Pertains to Pollution from Ships Oil Pollution § 151.29 Foreign ships. (a) Each oil tanker of 150 gross...

2011-07-01

212

Cruising digital ships on electronic seas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Naval architects now use a different kind of ship model, a hydrodynamic computer simulation, to design faster, quieter, or more economically efficient ships for the world's navies, merchant marines, and cruise lines. A leader in the use of computers to determine the hydrodynamic behavior of surface and undersea craft is the US Navy's David Taylor Model Ship Basin, part of

D. I. Lewin

1999-01-01

213

33 CFR 151.29 - Foreign ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foreign ships. 151.29 Section 151.29 Navigation...Antarctic Treaty as it Pertains to Pollution from Ships Oil Pollution § 151.29 Foreign ships. (a) Each oil tanker of 150 gross...

2013-07-01

214

Underactuated ship global tracking under relaxed conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A controller is developed for underactuated surface ships with only surge force and yaw moment available to globally asymptotically track a reference trajectory generated by a suitable virtual ship in a frame attached to the ship body. The reference trajectory is allowed too be a curve including a straight line. The control development is based on Lyapunov's direct method and

K. D. Do; Z. P. Jiang; J. Pan

2002-01-01

215

Underwater radiated noise from modern commercial ships.  

PubMed

Underwater radiated noise measurements for seven types of modern commercial ships during normal operating conditions are presented. Calibrated acoustic data (<1000 Hz) from an autonomous seafloor-mounted acoustic recorder were combined with ship passage information from the Automatic Identification System. This approach allowed for detailed measurements (i.e., source level, sound exposure level, and transmission range) on ships of opportunity. A key result was different acoustic levels and spectral shapes observed from different ship-types. A 54 kGT container ship had the highest broadband source level at 188 dB re 1 ?Pa@1m; a 26 kGT chemical tanker had the lowest at 177 dB re 1 ?Pa@1m. Bulk carriers had higher source levels near 100 Hz, while container ship and tanker noise was predominantly below 40 Hz. Simple models to predict source levels of modern merchant ships as a group from particular ship characteristics (e.g., length, gross tonnage, and speed) were not possible given individual ship-type differences. Furthermore, ship noise was observed to radiate asymmetrically. Stern aspect noise levels are 5 to 10 dB higher than bow aspect noise levels. Collectively, these results emphasize the importance of including modern ship-types in quantifying shipping noise for predictive models of global, regional, and local marine environments. PMID:22280574

McKenna, Megan F; Ross, Donald; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

2012-01-01

216

TMI2 fuel debris shipping campaign  

Microsoft Academic Search

General Public Utilities Nuclear Corp. (GPU Nuclear) and the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) have undertaken the task of shipping the damaged Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor core from the site to the Idaho National Engineering Lab. This shipping program has required innovative preparation, hardware, and operations for successful performance. The fuel shipping campaign consists of the preparation

J. A. Renshaw; W. T. Conaway; A. Lengyel

1987-01-01

217

Prediction of Ship Pitching Based on Support Vector Machines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ship pitching influences mostly ship motion, it's important to study ship pitching modeling and prediction in order to improve ship's seaworthiness. Based on the random character of ship movement, this paper put forward a method for prediction of ship pitching movement with SVM. Based on the phase-space reconstruction theory, the method, the characteristic, and the selecting of the key parameters

Li-hong Sun; Ji-hong Shen

2009-01-01

218

Characteristics of material, ship side structure response and ship survivability in ship collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on ship collision and grounding has taken giant steps during the last decade. One reason is that computer capacity has increased and, therefore, also the possibility to simulate various collision scenarios in a realistic way using more advanced and larger models. As a result, it has been possible to investigate in more detail the understanding of structural integrity, characteristics

Jonas W. Ringsberg

2010-01-01

219

47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. 80.1121 Section 80.1121 Telecommunication...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. (a) Ship or ship earth stations that receive a distress alert...

2013-10-01

220

Reversing mother's curse revisited.  

PubMed

Because of maternal mtDNA inheritance, mtDNA mutations detrimental only in males are not expected to be selected against, an effect termed the "mother's curse." However, if there is positive-assortative mating, equivalent to what was called "inbreeding" by Wade and Brandvain (2009), then selection can act to reduce the frequency of these male-specific detrimental mtDNA mutants. On the other hand, as shown here negative-assortative mating, or "outbreeding, " paradoxically can result in an increase in the frequency of male-specific detrimental mtDNA mutants. The implications of these findings are briefly discussed. PMID:22276553

Hedrick, Philip W

2012-02-01

221

Predicting ship fuel consumption: Update. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report is concerned with the prediction of ship propulsion fuel consumption as a function of ship speed for U.S. Navy combatant and auxiliary ships. Prediction is based on fitting an analytic function to published ship class speed-fuel use data using nonlinear regression. The form of the analytic function fitted is motivated by the literature on ship powering and resistance. The report discusses data sources and data issues, and the impact of ship propulsion plant configuration on fuel use. The regression coefficients of the exponential function fitted, tabular numerical comparison of predicted and actual fuel use data, the standard error of the estimate, and plots of actual and fitted data are given for 22 classes of Navy ships.

Schrady, D.A.; Smyth, G.K.; Vassian, R.B.

1996-07-01

222

Relationship between container ship underwater noise levels and ship design, operational and oceanographic conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low-frequency ocean ambient noise is dominated by noise from commercial ships, yet understanding how individual ships contribute deserves further investigation. This study develops and evaluates statistical models of container ship noise in relation to design characteristics, operational conditions, and oceanographic settings. Five-hundred ship passages and nineteen covariates were used to build generalized additive models. Opportunistic acoustic measurements of ships transiting offshore California were collected using seafloor acoustic recorders. A 5-10 dB range in broadband source level was found for ships depending on the transit conditions. For a ship recorded multiple times traveling at different speeds, cumulative noise was lowest at 8 knots, 65% reduction in operational speed. Models with highest predictive power, in order of selection, included ship speed, size, and time of year. Uncertainty in source depth and propagation affected model fit. These results provide insight on the conditions that produce higher levels of underwater noise from container ships.

McKenna, Megan F.; Wiggins, Sean M.; Hildebrand, John A.

2013-05-01

223

Repositioning Mothers: Mothers, Disabled Children and Disability Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we set out to review the ways in which mothers of disabled children have been portrayed within disability studies and the more broader academic literature. We argue that within disability studies mothers of disabled children occupy a liminal position because they are often not disabled and yet they can experience forms of…

Ryan, Sara; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

2008-01-01

224

TMI-2 core shipping preparations  

SciTech Connect

Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

1988-01-01

225

Ocean acoustic tomography from ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mesoscale mapping of the ocean sound speed field in a 1000 km×1000 km area by means of ocean acoustic tomography is greatly enhanced by augmenting a few acoustic moorings with a movable ship-based receiver. Computer similations based on realistic noise levels in the measured acoustic travel times give 5% (1%) residual variance in DeltaC(xy,z) for four (six) acoustic source moorings

B. Cornuelle; W. Munk; P. Worcester

1989-01-01

226

QuickShip: General Section  

Cancer.gov

Welcome to the Frederick National Lab Shipment Wizard, this application will guide you through the process of requesting a shipment. The requestor should submit this form within 24 hours for domestic shipments and 1 week (5 business days) before ship date of international shipments. Once the information is successfully submitted, you must print the resulting form, an Authorizing Official must sign the form, and the form must then be faxed to Transportation (301-846-6971) Department.

227

World Ships - Architectures & Feasibility Revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A world ship is a concept for manned interstellar flight. It is a huge, self-contained and self-sustained interstellar vehicle. It travels at a fraction of a per cent of the speed of light and needs several centuries to reach its target star system. The well- known world ship concept by Alan Bond and Anthony Martin was intended to show its principal feasibility. However, several important issues haven't been addressed so far: the relationship between crew size and robustness of knowledge transfer, reliability, and alternative mission architectures. This paper addresses these gaps. Furthermore, it gives an update on target star system choice, and develops possible mission architectures. The derived conclusions are: a large population size leads to robust knowledge transfer and cultural adaptation. These processes can be improved by new technologies. World ship reliability depends on the availability of an automatic repair system, as in the case of the Daedalus probe. Star systems with habitable planets are probably farther away than systems with enough resources to construct space colonies. Therefore, missions to habitable planets have longer trip times and have a higher risk of mission failure. On the other hand, the risk of constructing colonies is higher than to establish an initial settlement on a habitable planet. Mission architectures with precursor probes have the potential to significantly reduce trip and colonization risk without being significantly more costly than architectures without. In summary world ships remain an interesting concept, although they require a space colony-based civilization within our own solar system before becoming feasible.

Hein, A. M.; Pak, M.; Putz, D.; Buhler, C.; Reiss, P.

228

Where's the Feminism in Mothering?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a reflective narrative bringing together personal, collective, and action learning reflections from three women: all mothers, feminists, and community psychology practitioners. Its focus on mothering highlights the interconnectedness and tensions across these roles, as well as the shared learnings arising from this collaboration.…

D'Arcy, Catherine; Turner, Colleen; Crockett, Belinda; Gridley, Heather

2012-01-01

229

Resilient Adolescent Mothers: Ethnographic Interviews  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the strengths and resiliencies of successful adolescent mothers and raises important questions for our ongoing collaborative conversations about nonmarital teenage parenthood. A qualitative research study, inspired by the Wolin Resiliency Model, employed ethnographic interviews to determine successful adolescent mothers’ perceptions of their strengths. Strength-based interviews were found to be a powerful intervention with these participants. A strong

Gabrielle Carey; Dan Ratliff; Randall R. Lyle

1998-01-01

230

Strategies for Supporting Teenage Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Programs for teenage mothers provided through school districts or community agencies often have their own curricular agenda for teaching teenage mothers about the proper care of and nutrition for infants and the typical stages of child development, but not all programs are successful in supporting the development of positive early relationships…

Wells, Robin A.; Thompson, Barbara

2004-01-01

231

Our Mother Tongues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Frequently when one hears about the Native American experience in the United States, the focus is on the loss of traditions, folkways, and language. In contrast, this website was created to highlight a recent documentary by Anne Makepeace that focuses on the ways in which Native American languages have recovered and thrived in recent times. On the site, visitors should start by clicking on the interactive "Language Map." Here visitors can learn about twelve different languages, including Crow, Cherokee, Dakota, Euchee, and Lakota. Clicking on the "Voices" area gives visitors the opportunity to listen to Native Americans from different tribal communities speaking in their mother tongues. Additionally, visitors can send an electronic postcard from the site, read the site blog, and learn more about the project and the documentary.

2012-01-06

232

Executive function and mothering: challenges faced by teenage mothers.  

PubMed

Previous research has established that in comparison to adult mothers teen mothers respond less sensitively to their infants. In adults, components of executive functions relate directly to maternal sensitivity. Since teenagers are known to have a less developed prefrontal cortex and greater difficulties in parenting, this study sought to determine whether the association between executive processes and mothering exists among teenagers. Two groups of mothers, teens (n?=?30) and adults (n?=?27), who were approximately 4-6 months postpartum, completed tasks assessing spatial working memory and attentional set shifting (cognitive flexibility) using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Mothers were videotaped interacting with their infants and were later coded for various maternal behaviors. As predicted, teenagers performed more poorly than adults on tasks of cognitive flexibility and were less sensitive in their infant interactions. Among both groups there was a negative association between executive function and mothering; however, depending on the age of the mother different executive function tasks were relevant. PMID:24523069

Chico, Elsie; Gonzalez, Andrea; Ali, Nida; Steiner, Meir; Fleming, Alison S

2014-07-01

233

Practical Use of Ship Motion Calculations for Design and Operation of Ships.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ship motion calculation methods are reviewed and discussed, from a practical point of view. Some examples are given of the use of these methods in ship design procedures and for operational applications.

J. Gerritsma

1984-01-01

234

A UNIFIED SEAKEEPING AND MANEUVERING ANALYSIS OF TWO INTERACTING SHIPS  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY: Hydrodynamic interaction between two ships advancing in either calm water or regular waves is numerically studied during typical overtaking and UNderway\\/VERtical REPlenishment (UNREP; VERTREP) ship-to- ship operation. Knowledge about the maneuvering characteristics of the two ships in waves is essential for a safe joint operation with collision avoidance. The seakeeping and maneuvering analysis of two interacting ships is a

Renato Skejic; Odd M. Faltinsen

235

Ship scheduling decision support system based on Data Warehouse  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to improve the shipping efficiency and shipping safety, this paper proposes a ship scheduling decision support system (DSS) which integrates Data Warehouse (DW), On Line Analysis Process (OLAP) and Data Mining (DM) technologies. Under the background of large state-owned shipping companies, the design and implementation of the ship scheduling DSS are described in detail. OLAP is first used

Feixiang Zhu; Yingjun Zhang; Li Zhao

2008-01-01

236

Three-dimensional numerical analysis of shipping water onto a moving ship using a particle method  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to develop a numerical analysis method based on the moving particle semi-implicit method for\\u000a simulating shipping water on a moving ship. Towing tests of a very large crude carrier were numerically analyzed for three\\u000a typical wavelengths. The ship was forced to move in order to express previously measured ship oscillations, and the calculated\\u000a fluid

Kazuya Shibata; Seiichi Koshizuka; Katsuji Tanizawa

2009-01-01

237

Numerical analysis on ship maneuvering coupled with ship motion in waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers a numerical analysis of ship maneuvering performance in the presence of incident waves and resultant ship motion responses. To this end, a time-domain ship motion program is developed to solve the wave–body interaction problem with the ship slip speed and rotation, and it is coupled with a modular-type 4-DOF maneuvering problem. In this coupled problem, the second-order

Min-Guk Seo; Yonghwan Kim

238

TMI-2 Core Shipping Preparations  

SciTech Connect

Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes of the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hard-ware-systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience. (author)

Ball, L.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 9206, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Barkanic, R.J. [Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States); Conaway, W.T. II [GPU Nuclear Corporation, P.O. Box 480, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA 17057 (United States); Schmoker, D. S. [Nuclear Packaging, Inc. 1010 South 336th Street Federal Way, Washington 98003 (United States); Post, Roy G. (ed.) [Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

1988-01-15

239

8.G Shipping Rolled Oats  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Rolled oats (dry oatmeal) come in cylindrical containers with a diameter of 5 inches and a height of 9$\\frac12$ inches. These containers are shipped to...

240

Heavy Element Research at Ship  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report summarizes achievements made at GSI in the field of heavy-element research using the velocity separator SHIP. The presentation of the current program together with the experiences obtained during the last 30 years of experiments clearly show that superheavy-element research was always based on efforts to extend the limits of technical possibilities. Of these the increase of beam intensity and of the overall detection efficiency are the major contributions. Therefore we present in this report technical information on possible upgrades of the present facility, which result in an overall increase of the experimental sensitivity by a factor of ten.

Hofmann, S.; Ackermann, D.; Barth, W.; Dahl, L.; Hessberger, F. P.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Münzenberg, G.; Tinschert, K.; Ratzinger, U.; Schempp, A.

2005-09-01

241

Effects of uncertain geoacoustic parameters and coastal shipping densities on shipping noise directionality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bearing-elevation directionality of low-frequency shipping noise is influenced both by the sediment geoacoustic parameters and by the coastal shipping density. This study examines the effects of geoacoustic parameter and shipping density uncertainties on noise directionality through simulations for a North Pacific site. The simulations are based in part on stochastic models of the spatial variations of geoacoustic parameters that

Thomas J. Hayward; Richard M. Heitmeyer

2005-01-01

242

Follow Ship Program Request for Proposals (RFP) for Construction of Follow Ship (FY80) for the Follow Ship Class.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is a notional Request for Proposal (RFP) for the Procurement of a hypothetical follow-ship. The RFP introduces a new type of contractual instrument, the Fixed Price Incentive/Award Fee Contract for use in acquiring follow ships. Because most...

1979-01-01

243

Ship-Track Clouds, Aerosol, and Ship Dynamic Effects; A Climate Perspective from Ship-Based Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Ship-track clouds are marine boundary layer clouds that form behind ocean ships and are observed from satellites in the visible and near infrared. Ship-track clouds provide a rare opportunity to connect aerosol cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) emissions and observable changes in marine stratiform clouds. A very small change in the reflectivity of these eastern Pacific and Atlantic clouds (about 4%) provides a climate feedback of similar magnitude to doubling CO{sub 2} (increasing cloud reflectivity corresponds to global cooling). The Department of Energy sponsored research from 1991 to 1995 to study ship-track clouds including two ocean-based experiments in the summers of 1991 and 1994. These experiments showed that ship-track cloud properties were often more complex those related to a reduction of droplet size with an increase in number associated with increasing CCN from the ship's plume. The clouds showed evidence of morphological changes more likely to be associated with cloud dynamic effects either initiated by the increased CCN or directly by the ship's heat output or turbulent air wake. The fact that marine stratiform clouds, that are susceptible to ship track formation, are starved for both CCN and convective turbulence complicates the separation of the two effects.

Porch, W.M.

1998-10-13

244

EEZ bathymetry: Ship time opportunities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A recent interagency agreement offers the prospect of ship time for federal and nonfederal researchers. Under the agreement, recently signed by John V. Byrne, Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Dallas L. Peck, Director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the two federal agencies have agreed to a joint program of bathymetric mapping of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) (Eos, June 12, 1984, p. 393). These cruises will present the opportunity for other investigators to gather data in conjunction with the bathymetric surveys.NOAA ships, employing modern multibeam sonars and the best available navigation, will conduct the field surveys and process the data. The data and other products will be used by NOAA for their nautical charting program and by the USGS for their geological and geophysical marine map series. NOAA plans to produce a new series of high resolution bathymetric maps based on these data. The data will also be available to others via NOAA's data center in Boulder (National Geophysical Data Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303).

Pryor, Donald

1984-04-01

245

First Results from SHIP Experiment  

SciTech Connect

At present, the GDT facility is being upgraded. The first stage of the upgrade is the Synthesised Hot Ion Plasmoid (SHIP) experiment. It aims, on the one hand, at the investigation of plasmas which are expected to appear in the region of high neutron production in a GDT based fusion neutron source proposed by the Budker Institute and, on the other hand, at the investigation of plasmas the parameters of which have never been achieved before in axisymmetric magnetic mirrors.The experiment is performed in a small mirror section which is installed at the end of one side of GDT. The magnetic field on axis is in the range of 0.5-2.0 Tesla and the mirror ratio is 1.2-1.4. The mirror is filled with background plasma streaming in from the central cell. This plasma component is maxwellised and has an electron temperature of about 100 eV. Two neutral beam injectors perpendicularly inject a total current of about 50 Atom Amperes of deuterium neutrals with an energy of 20 keV as a pulse with a duration of about 1 ms. Ionisation of the beams generates the high-energy ion component. The device has been equipped with several diagnostic methods which are successfully used in GDT experiments.The paper presents first results of plasma parameter measurements in SHIP experiment.

Bagryansky, P.A. (and others)

2005-01-15

246

A Bayesian approach for understanding the role of ship speed in whale-ship encounters.  

PubMed

Mandatory or voluntary reductions in ship speed are a common management strategy for reducing deleterious encounters between large ships and large whales. This has produced strong resistance from shipping and marine transportation entities, in part because very few studies have empirically demonstrated whether or to what degree ship speed influences ship-whale encounters. Here we present the results of four years of humpback whale sightings made by observers aboard cruise ships in Alaska, representing 380 cruises and 891 ship-whale encounters. Encounters occurred at distances from 21 m to 1000 m (x = 567 m) with 61 encounters (7%) occurring between 200 m and 100 m, and 19 encounters (2%) within 100 m. Encounters were spatially aggregated and highly variable across all ship speeds. Nevertheless a Bayesian change-point model found that the relationship between whale distance and ship speed changed at 11.8 knots (6.1 m/s) with whales encountering ships, on average, 114 m closer when ship speeds were above 11.8 knots. Binning encounter distances by 1-knot speed increments revealed a clear decrease in encounter distance with increasing ship speed over the range of 7-17 knots (3.6-8.7 m/s). Our results are the first to demonstrate that speed influences the encounter distance between large ships and large whales. Assuming that the closer ships come to whales the more likely they are to be struck, our results suggest that reduced ship speed may be an effective management action in reducing the probability of a collision. PMID:21939057

Gende, Scott M; Hendrix, A Noble; Harris, Karin R; Eichenlaub, Bill; Nielsen, Julie; Pyare, Sanjay

2011-09-01

247

47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

2013-10-01

248

47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80.377 ...THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency band...

2013-10-01

249

46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship's service refrigeration systems. 128.410 Section 128.410 Shipping ...Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.410 Ship's service refrigeration systems. No self-contained unit either for...

2011-10-01

250

46 CFR 169.817 - Master to instruct ship's company.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Master to instruct ship's company. 169.817 Section 169.817 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.817 Master to instruct ship's company....

2013-10-01

251

46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173...CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical...

2010-10-01

252

46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173...CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical...

2009-10-01

253

46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173...CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical...

2009-10-01

254

46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173...CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical...

2010-10-01

255

47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

2010-10-01

256

47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels...

2010-10-01

257

47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements § 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

2011-10-01

258

32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization § 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

2011-07-01

259

47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

2011-10-01

260

32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

2012-07-01

261

47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80 Section 80.80 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point...

2010-10-01

262

47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements § 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

2010-10-01

263

47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

2012-10-01

264

32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

2011-07-01

265

32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization § 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

2010-07-01

266

47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Antenna requirements for ship stations. 80.81 Section 80.81 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of...

2011-10-01

267

47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false General provisions for ship stations. 80.141 Section 80.141 ...Requirements and Procedures Special Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.141 General provisions for ship stations. (a) Points of...

2012-10-01

268

47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipment—General. This section...

2012-10-01

269

47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80...STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency...

2012-10-01

270

47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80...STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency...

2010-10-01

271

47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Antenna requirements for ship stations. 80.81 Section 80.81 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of...

2012-10-01

272

32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

2010-07-01

273

47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels...

2012-10-01

274

47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements § 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

2012-10-01

275

48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

2010-10-01

276

47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80 Section 80.80 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point...

2012-10-01

277

47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80...STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency...

2011-10-01

278

47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80 Section 80.80 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point...

2011-10-01

279

47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Antenna requirements for ship stations. 80.81 Section 80.81 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of...

2010-10-01

280

32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization § 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

2012-07-01

281

47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels...

2011-10-01

282

47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipment—General. This section...

2011-10-01

283

47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipment—General. This section...

2010-10-01

284

48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

2011-10-01

285

48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

2012-10-01

286

47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false General provisions for ship stations. 80.141 Section 80.141 ...Requirements and Procedures Special Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.141 General provisions for ship stations. (a) Points of...

2011-10-01

287

47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 false General provisions for ship stations. 80.141 Section 80.141 ...Requirements and Procedures Special Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.141 General provisions for ship stations. (a) Points of...

2009-10-01

288

77 FR 50511 - Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Prevention Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...1970s as a cooperative activity with the cruise ship industry. VSP helps the cruise ship industry prevent and control the...

2012-08-21

289

47 CFR 80.142 - Ships using radiotelegraphy.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ships using radiotelegraphy. 80.142 Section 80...Requirements and Procedures Special Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.142 Ships using radiotelegraphy. (a) Calling by...

2013-10-01

290

47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipmentâGeneral. This section...

2013-10-01

291

47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false General provisions for ship stations. 80.141 Section 80.141 ...Requirements and Procedures Special Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.141 General provisions for ship stations. (a) Points of...

2010-10-01

292

76 FR 2403 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...information collection requirement concerning the Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...following information collection: Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

2011-01-13

293

47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements § 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

2013-10-01

294

77 FR 12843 - Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Prevention Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...1970s as a cooperative activity with the cruise ship industry. VSP assists the cruise ship industry to prevent and control the...

2012-03-02

295

47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipmentâGeneral. This section...

2009-10-01

296

32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization § 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

2013-07-01

297

78 FR 27984 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...or other forms of information. Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

2013-05-13

298

48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

2013-10-01

299

47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false General provisions for ship stations. 80.141 Section 80.141 ...Requirements and Procedures Special Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.141 General provisions for ship stations. (a) Points of...

2013-10-01

300

47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Antenna requirements for ship stations. 80.81 Section 80.81 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of...

2013-10-01

301

78 FR 15031 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...information collection requirement concerning the Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...following information collection: Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

2013-03-08

302

78 FR 51728 - Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Prevention Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...1970s as a cooperative activity with the cruise ship industry. VSP helps the cruise ship industry prevent and control the...

2013-08-21

303

47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80 Section 80.80 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point...

2013-10-01

304

76 FR 13655 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...or other forms of information. Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

2011-03-14

305

47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission license....

2010-10-01

306

47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission license....

2009-10-01

307

Resource Mothers for Pregnant Teens.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of the project was to reduce the morbidity and mortality rates among infants born to primagravida adolescents and to improve the parenting skills of these adolescents. The Resource Mothers Project utilized paraprofessional women to provide social...

S. E. Woolbert

1989-01-01

308

Postpartum Services for Adolescent Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An agency program designed to reduce the incidence of teenage pregnancy and meet the needs of school age mothers found that assertive postpartum services were essential to preserve prenatal gains. (Author/SE)

Cartoff, Virginia G.

1978-01-01

309

Attitudes toward breastfeeding working mothers.  

PubMed

This investigation assesses attitudes towards breastfeeding working mothers, employees' knowledge of their legal rights and employees' views of the new amendment of Law 427 in Puerto Rico. The sample consists of 36 men and 64 women (N = 101) employed in different institutions of the San Juan metropolitan area. Participants completed the Attitude Scale toward working breastfeeding mothers. The scale's consistency is substantiated by an item-total reliability coefficient yielding r (92) = .70, p < .05. Results show that employed Puerto Ricans may support breastfeeding working mothers. However, many individuals are not aware of the laws that protect a breastfeeding working mother and how extracting milk may help productivity instead of impairing it. PMID:14619459

Cardalda, Elsa B; Miranda, Susana E; Pérez, Melanie; Sierra, Elizabeth M

2003-09-01

310

Infrared ship signature analysis and optimisation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last decade has seen an increase in the awareness of the infrared signature of naval ships. New ship designs show that infrared signature reduction measures are being incorporated, such as exhaust gas cooling systems, relocation of the exhausts and surface cooling systems. Hull and superstructure are cooled with dedicated spray systems, in addition to special paint systems that are

Filip Neele

2005-01-01

311

Defense Against Ship as a Weapon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As an example of ships used as weapons (SAW), an oil tanker is hijacked and commandeered by terrorists to collide with a high-value maritime or shore target. If sunk or destroyed in a shipping lane as a result of a counter measure, the SAW's collateral da...

K. W. Yung

2011-01-01

312

Ship-Shore Packet Switched Communications System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This thesis presents an architecture for ship-shore sea service communications. Starting with the ARPANET packet switching model (TCP/IP), Network and Logical Link layers are defined which deal with the following problems: (1) Many ship-shore links are on...

R. A. Buddenberg

1986-01-01

313

Navy Ship Names: Background For Congress.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Names for Navy ships traditionally have been chosen and announced by the Secretary of the Navy. Members of the public are sometimes interested in having Navy ships named for certain persons, places, or things. Congress in recent years has proposed, and so...

R. O'Rourke

2007-01-01

314

Moving from Ship to Arctic Sea Ice  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Two U.S. Coast Guard members are being transported by crane from U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy onto a piece of multi-year Arctic sea ice. This was during a scientific expedition to map the Arctic seafloor. The expedition was a joint effort using two ships, the Healy and the Canadian Coast Guard Ship...

2008-12-29

315

29 CFR 1915.162 - Ship's boilers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ship's boilers. 1915.162 Section 1915.162 ...Piping Systems § 1915.162 Ship's boilers. (a) Before work is performed in the fire, steam, or water spaces of a boiler where employees may be subject...

2013-07-01

316

Ship power system testing and simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper highlights the capability at CAPS and some of the key research efforts underway in support of the Navy's all-electric ship program. This includes the testing and evaluation of the 5 MW superconducting prototype propulsion motor developed by American Superconductor Corporation for ONR and the application of the RTDS in ship system simulation and hardware in the loop testing

S. J. Dale

2005-01-01

317

Operation Shipping for Mobile File Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses a bottleneck problem in mobile file systems: the propagation of updated large files from a weakly- connected client to its servers. It proposes an efficient mechanism called operation shipping or operation-based update propagation .I n the new mechanism, the client ships the user operation that updated the large files, rather than the files themselves, across the weak

Yui-wah Lee; Kwong-sak Leung; Mahadev Satyanarayanan

2002-01-01

318

Way-point tracking control of ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper considers way-point tracking control of ships using yaw torque control. A full state feedback control law is developed using a cascaded approach, and proved to globally asymptotically stabilize the heading and the cross-track error of the ship. Simulation results are presented

K. Y. Pettersen; E. Lefeber

2001-01-01

319

Early Stage Integrated Parametric Ship Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Innovative ship design projects often require an extensive concept design phase to allow a wide range of potential solutions to be investigated, identifying which best suits the requirements. In these situations, the majority of ship design tools do not provide the best solution, limiting quick reconfiguration by focusing on detailed definition only. Parametric design, including generation of the hull surface,

M. Bole; C. Forrest

320

The Maximum Sinkage of a Ship  

Microsoft Academic Search

A ship moving steadily forward in shallow water of constant depth h is usually subject to downward forces and hence squat, which is a potentially dangerous sinkage or increase in draft. Sinkage increases with ship speed, until it reaches a maximum at just below the critical speed p gh. Here we use both a linear transcritical shallow-water equation and a

T. P. Gourlay; E. O. Tuck

321

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN MOTHER AND INFANT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pregnancy and birth form the beginning of and on-going interaction between mother and infant which involves intersubjective communication (Stern, 1985) and that evolves with the growing and interrelated perceptual, cognitive and motor capacities of the infant. The early post-natal development of most non-human primates occurs in an environment formed in large part by the mother's body. Closely attached to her,

Juan Carlos Garelli

322

Mothers' and Girls' Perspectives on Adolescent Sexuality  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study of communication between mothers and daughters about mothers' sexual experience discloses mothers' and daughters' fears, concerns, and judgments about each other. In this study, 15 women, all mothers of girls, were interviewed about the history of their own sexual experience. Some of these women had chosen to share their personal experience with their daughters and some had not,

Marla Buchananarvay; Patrice A. Keats

2005-01-01

323

State of the World's Mothers, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that the well-being of children and that of mothers cannot be separated, this report uses the Mothers' Index to compare the well-being of mothers and children in 17 developed countries and 77 developing countries. The Mothers' Index is a composite of elements contributing to a woman's well-being, including health status, educational status,…

Maddux, Hilary; Cobb, Nina

324

Mice Acquire Flavor Preferences During Shipping  

PubMed Central

Vigorous motion can cause rodents to develop flavor aversions and show other signs of malaise. We tested whether a flavor aversion could be induced by shipping mice from an animal breeder to a test site. Boxes of 12 male C57BL/6J mice were shipped ~950 km from Bar Harbor, ME to Philadelphia, PA by truck. For some boxes, the gel provided for hydration was flavored with almond and for others it was flavored with banana. After the journey, the mice were individually housed and allowed to recover for 5 days. They then received a choice between the two flavors of gel. Contrary to expectations, mice preferred the flavor they had previously ingested during shipping. Controls given flavored gel under similar conditions but while stationary did not show a preference. These results suggest that mice find shipping or its sequelae pleasurable. If mice are travel sick this must be inconsequential relative to other components of the shipping experience.

Tordoff, Michael G.; Alarcon, Laura K.; Byerly, Erica A.; Doman, Samantha A.

2006-01-01

325

Ship candidates extraction for optical color imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ship detection is of great significance lowing to its wide applications. In most existing approaches, some predetection methods are often used to extract ship candidates since applying an accurate algorithm throughout the whole image will be time-consuming and could even cause a lot of false alarms. In addition, most related work focuses on panchromatic imagery but only a little attention has been paid to color imagery. Color images contain more discriminative information of ships than panchromatic images, so it will be easier to extract ships in color images. Further, more information also means more potential to implement image enhancement techniques to solve the problem caused by poor illumination, which is very common in optical images. In this paper, with respect to optical color imagery, we propose a new predetection approach to extract ship candidates preliminarily and rapidly using color information. Firstly, an image enhancement algorithm is employed to improve the quality of input images. Then, we regard the color image as a hyperspectral image and extract ship candidates using a hyperspectral algorithm based on spectral signature model. This hyperspectral algorithm, in essence, utilizes the color information of ships, but the color information is processed in a hyperspectral manner. Unlike the commonly used color segment algorithms which focus on the thresholds in color space, this hyperspectral algorithm concerns more on the patterns of color vectors. Experimental results on real dataset indicate that this image enhancement algorithm is quite suitable for remote sensing images and its performance is better than histogram equalization based techniques. In addition, the hyperspectral algorithm also shows good performance in extracting ship candidates in color images, especially for small ships. As a whole, large areas of background can be removed and most ships can be detected. Although some false alarms still remain, the mount of false alarms is decreased greatly.

Yu, Xinran; Shi, Zhenwei

2013-08-01

326

The Relationships among Mother’s Resilience, Family Health Work, and Mother’s Health-Promoting Lifestyle Practices in Families with Preschool Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypotheses derived from the Developmental Model of Health and Nursing were tested by examining relationships among mothers’ resilience (health potential), family health-promoting activity (health work), and mothers’ health-promoting lifestyle practices (competence in health behavior) in 67 families with preschool children. Mothers completed a mailed survey containing self-report measures of the study variables and a demographic form. As hypothesized, both mother’s

Bonnie Monteith; Marilyn Ford-Gilboe

2002-01-01

327

SNF shipping cask shielding analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management and Remedial Action Division has planned a modification sequence for storage facility 7827 in the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA). The modification cycle is: (1) modify an empty caisson, (2) transfer the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of an occupied caisson to a hot cell in building 3525 for inspection and possible repackaging, and (3) return the package to the modified caisson in the SWSA. Although the SNF to be moved is in the solid form, it has different levels of activity. Thus, the following 5 shipping casks will be available for the task: the Loop Transport Carrier, the In- Pile Loop LITR HB-2 Carrier, the 6.5-inch HRLEL Carrier, the HFIR Hot Scrap Carrier, and the 10-inch ORR Experiment Removal Shield Cask. This report describes the shielding tasks for the 5 casks: determination of shielding characteristics, any streaming avenues, estimation of thermal limits, and shielding calculational uncertainty for use in the transportation plan.

Johnson, J.O.; Pace, J.V. III

1996-01-01

328

Infrared ship signature analysis and optimisation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The last decade has seen an increase in the awareness of the infrared signature of naval ships. New ship designs show that infrared signature reduction measures are being incorporated, such as exhaust gas cooling systems, relocation of the exhausts and surface cooling systems. Hull and superstructure are cooled with dedicated spray systems, in addition to special paint systems that are being developed for optimum stealth. This paper presents a method to develop requirements for the emissivity of a ship's coating that reduces the contrast of the ship against its background in the wavelength band or bands of threat sensors. As this contrast strongly depends on the atmospheric environment, these requirements must follow from a detailed analysis of the infrared signature of the ship in its expected areas of operation. Weather statistics for a large number of areas have been collected to produce a series of 'standard environments'. These environments have been used to demonstrate the method of specifying coating emissivity requirements. Results are presented to show that the optimised coatings reduce the temperature contrast. The use of the standard environments yields a complete, yet concise, description of the signature of the ship over its areas of operation. The signature results illustrate the strong dependence of the infrared signature on the atmospheric environment and can be used to identify those conditions where signature reduction is most effective in reducing the ship's susceptibility to detection by IR sensors.

Neele, Filip

2005-05-01

329

Constructing the “Good Mother”: The Experience of Mothering Ideologies by Work Status  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore how mothers construct their worker–parent identity within a cultural context of competing mothering ideologies. We used narrative data from interviews with 95 married mothers with at least 1 child under the age of 5 to compare the construction of intensive mothering expectations by middle-class full-time employed mothers, part-time employed mothers, and at-home

Deirdre D. Johnston; Debra H. Swanson

2006-01-01

330

Ship2Shore Marine Educators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) Observatory, comprised of VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada (NC) cabled networks, supports transformative coastal to deep ocean research and enables real-time interactive experiments. Engaging students, educators and the public is critical to increasing the global awareness of our integral relationship with the ocean. One way to accomplish this is to encourage educators to incorporate marine science concepts into their lesson plans. ONC's new initiative, Ship2Shore Marine Educators (S2SME), enables educators to learn first hand about marine science and technology by going to sea on a maintenance/research cruise. While at sea Marine Educators (ME) participate in technology deployments, assist with water and core sampling, write daily blogs, produce short video updates, develop learning resources and conduct presentations to students on shore via video conferencing. MEs participating in the last NC cruise -"Wiring the Abyss 2012" - were fascinated with being a part of science in the real world. They had an experience of a lifetime and anticipate incorporating what they have learned into their lessons during the upcoming semester. Outreach between the MEs and ONC communication staff aboard the ship resulted in nearly 7,000 unique visitors to the "Wiring the Abyss 2012'' cruise website. Live ROPOS video feeds (~ 9,000 views), highlight videos (436 views/day), daily blogs (~1200 views) and stunning images (~391 views/day) were among the top rated pages. Visitors from 10 countries tuned in to "Wiring the Abyss 2012" and experienced the Pacific's deep sea! One of the best experiences for the MEs was connecting with students and teachers on shore via video conferencing. Roughly 300 students in BC and USA received a live connection from approximately 200km off the west coast. Students were most fascinated by a demo involving compressed Styrofoam cups, showing the intensity of pressure at the bottom of the sea. Successes: A positive working relationship with the NC team was established; scientists on board enjoyed being included in outreach activities. The two educators that participated had a memorable experience and thoroughly enjoyed the activities and opportunities on board. Both educators expressed that clear expectations from ONC prior to the cruise allowed them to establish themselves as part of the team and complete their intended activities and outputs. Those on shore interacting with the MEs and the cruise website provided favorable feedback about the program and wish to participate in the future. Lessons Learned: Increased promotion to teachers, teachers' associations, school districts, museums, aquariums and science centers would have increased the awareness of the S2SME program among educators. Greater promotion online prior to and during the cruise would have drawn even more visitors to the website. Furthermore, scheduling classrooms to participate in live video conferencing presentations in advance would have resulted in more students engaged. We aim to expand the S2SME Program across Canada. In particular, we hope to encourage educators living in regions removed from the ocean to participate on the ship and in live connections to-shore. Connecting educators and students coast-to-coast with the ocean in real-time will enhance their awareness and understanding of the marine ecosystem and its many processes.

Ewing, N. R.; Sen, G.; Doehler, S.

2012-12-01

331

"Good mothering" or "good citizenship"?  

PubMed

Umbilical cord blood banking is one of many biomedical innovations that confront pregnant women with new choices about what they should do to secure their own and their child's best interests. Many mothers can now choose to donate their baby's umbilical cord blood (UCB) to a public cord blood bank or pay to store it in a private cord blood bank. Donation to a public bank is widely regarded as an altruistic act of civic responsibility. Paying to store UCB may be regarded as a "unique opportunity" to provide "insurance" for the child's future. This paper reports findings from a survey of Australian women that investigated the decision to either donate or store UCB. We conclude that mothers are faced with competing discourses that force them to choose between being a "good mother" and fulfilling their role as a "good citizen." We discuss this finding with reference to the concept of value pluralism. PMID:23180199

Porter, Maree; Kerridge, Ian H; Jordens, Christopher F C

2012-03-01

332

Medieval orality, mothers, and bonding.  

PubMed

The role of women in the Middle Ages was vilification, veneration, and exclusion. Due to the high rates of maternal and infant mortality bonding shifted from the mother-child dyad to one in which the Church, Holy Family, and king acted as pseudo-parents. In art this is suggested by the virtual absence of eye contact between the Virgin and Christ-child. Frustration of early oral needs consequent to lack of adequate mother-child bonding prompted a reactive emphasis on orality in art and legend. A decrease in infant mortality and a reciprocal improvement in mother child bonding contributed to cultural shifts in how self-realization would be accomplished during the Renaissance and in the later emergence of secular humanism. PMID:15132195

Schwartz, Scott C

2004-01-01

333

46 CFR 166.01 - Approval of nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Approval of nautical school ships. 166.01 Section 166.01 Shipping...DESIGNATION AND APPROVAL OF NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS § 166.01 Approval of nautical school ships. (a) Under 46 U.S.C....

2012-10-01

334

46 CFR 166.01 - Approval of nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Approval of nautical school ships. 166.01 Section 166.01 Shipping...DESIGNATION AND APPROVAL OF NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS § 166.01 Approval of nautical school ships. (a) Under 46 U.S.C....

2010-10-01

335

46 CFR 166.01 - Approval of nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Approval of nautical school ships. 166.01 Section 166.01 Shipping...DESIGNATION AND APPROVAL OF NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS § 166.01 Approval of nautical school ships. (a) Under 46 U.S.C....

2011-10-01

336

33 CFR 158.240 - Ship repair yards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2000-07-01 false Ship repair yards. 158.240 Section 158.240 Navigation...Containing Oil § 158.240 Ship repair yards. The reception facility that services oceangoing ships using a ship repair yard must have a capacity for...

2000-07-01

337

Ship lock system with hydroelectric pumped-storage capability  

Microsoft Academic Search

A ship lock system having a ship lock interconnecting two bodies of water at different water levels is described. The system includes one or more underground hydroelectric pumped-storage units connected by one or more penstocks with the ship lock which serves as the upper reservoir to the pumped-storage units so that water can be drained from the ship lock through

F. L. Mazzone; J. E. Tegda

1982-01-01

338

Automatic Ship Photo Interpretation by the Method of Moments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a study undertaken to determine the feasibility of automatic interpretation of ship photographs using the spatial moments of the image as features to characterize the image are reported. The photo interpretation consisted of estimating the location, orientation, dimensions, and heading of the ship. The study used simulated ship images in which the outline of the ship was

F. W. Smith; M. H. Wright

1971-01-01

339

46 CFR 166.01 - Approval of nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Approval of nautical school ships. 166.01 Section 166.01 Shipping...DESIGNATION AND APPROVAL OF NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS § 166.01 Approval of nautical school ships. (a) Under 46 U.S.C....

2013-10-01

340

Path planning combined with Fuzzy control for autonomous ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is linked to a research proposing autonomous ships for risky humanitarian operations, like sea demining or poisonous spill recovery on the sea. This mission is based upon placing waypoints and the autonomous ships are under a Fuzzy control. Since ships have limited turning radii, a specific path planning strategy is developed, so the ship trajectory turns around waypoints

H. G. de Marina; F. J. Pereda; J. M. Giron-Sierra

2010-01-01

341

Vertical arrival structure of shipping noise in deep water channels  

Microsoft Academic Search

In passive sonar systems, knowledge of low-frequency shipping noise is significant for target detection performance. However, an accurate model for the shipping noise structure is difficult to obtain, because of the varying distributions of ships and complicated underwater environment. This work characterizes low-frequency distant shipping noise observed in deep water environments as a function of receiver depth and vertical arrival

Zizheng Li; Lisa M. Zurk; Barry Ma

2010-01-01

342

Technical analysis of a proposed ship-to-ship chemical laser transmission experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Equipment and procedures for performing a DF laser ship-to-ship transmission experiment are described. A low-power, CW DF laser, a Fourier Transform Spectrometer, and a 32 inch diameter optical tracking system with 50 microradian resolution will be installed aboard the aircraft carrier USS LEXINGTON. A 60 inch-diameter tracking receiver and aerosol and meteorological equipment will be installed aboard an escort ship.

D. H. Leslie

1982-01-01

343

Modeling of Electromagnetic Scattering from Ships.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this research is to develop a stochastic model of distributed radar targets, especially ships, that directly incorporate target structure and motion. The model was required to be especially useful as a tool in the stochastic simulation and ...

D. Y. Northam

1985-01-01

344

Ship Propellers: A Bibliography, 1969 - 1974.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Included are 307 abstracts of articles in various languages from 1969 to 1974 covering the following fields: ship propellers in general; propeller design; variable pitch propellers; contra-rotating propellers; nozzle (ducted) propellers; Voith-Schneider p...

1975-01-01

345

Radioactive materials shipping cask anticontamination enclosure  

DOEpatents

An anticontamination device for use in storing shipping casks for radioactive materials comprising (1) a seal plate assembly; (2) a double-layer plastic bag; and (3) a water management system or means for water management.

Belmonte, Mark S. (Irwin, PA); Davis, James H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Williams, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01

346

Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data  

DOE Data Explorer

CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

347

Analytical Technique for Ship-Fender Interaction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The design and selection of appropriate fender systems must consider the dynamic interaction between the ship and port or pier structure. Energy absorption characteristics of marine fender systems vary as a function of fender geometry material, load time ...

C. W. Jiang R. C. Janava

1983-01-01

348

A Limited Survey of Ship Structural Damage.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A limited investigation, conducted to determine the availability of data on ship casualties involving structural damage, revealed 824 applicable cases. A method was devised for reducing reported casualty data into a format adaptable to automatic tabulatio...

S. Hawkins G. H. Levine R. Taggart

1971-01-01

349

Asteroids as Propulsion Systems of Space Ships  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Currently, rockets are used to change the trajectory of space ships and probes. This method is very expensive and requires a lot of fuel, which limits the feasibility of space stations, interplanetary space ships, and probes. Sometimes space probes use the gravity field of a planet However, there am only nine planets in the Solar System, all separated by great distances. There are tons of millions of asteroids in outer space. This paper offers a revolutionary method for changing the trajectory of space probes. The method uses the kinetic or rotary energy of asteroids, comet nuclei, meteorites or other space bodies (small planets, natural planetary satellites, space debris, etc.) to increase (to decrease) ship (probe) speed up to 1000 m/sec (or more) and to achieve any new direction in outer space. The flight possibilities of space ships and probes are increased by a factor of millions.

Bolonkin, Alexander

2003-01-01

350

Factors Influencing Ship Repair Part Consumption.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An investigation was made of possible linear relationships between several specific factors concerning ships of the Navy and the actual repair part consumption dollar figures for a two year period for the purpose of using such relationships for planning a...

R. A. Lippert W. T. Lee

1973-01-01

351

Ship dynamics for maritime ISAR imaging.  

SciTech Connect

Demand is increasing for imaging ships at sea. Conventional SAR fails because the ships are usually in motion, both with a forward velocity, and other linear and angular motions that accompany sea travel. Because the target itself is moving, this becomes an Inverse- SAR, or ISAR problem. Developing useful ISAR techniques and algorithms is considerably aided by first understanding the nature and characteristics of ship motion. Consequently, a brief study of some principles of naval architecture sheds useful light on this problem. We attempt to do so here. Ship motions are analyzed for their impact on range-Doppler imaging using Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR). A framework for analysis is developed, and limitations of simple ISAR systems are discussed.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2008-02-01

352

Improving tsunami warning using commercial ships  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate and rapid detection and assessment of tsunamis is critical for effective mitigation. We show here that a modest ˜10 cm tsunami from the M8.8 27 Feb 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake was detected by kinematic Global Positions System (GPS) solutions from a ship underway in the open ocean - the first time shipboard tsunami detection has been achieved. Our results illustrate how the commercial shipping fleet represents a vast infrastructure of potential open ocean GPS platforms on shipping lanes that provide extremely good spatial coverage around most tsunamigenic source regions. Given the affordability of geodetic GPS systems, and ever-improving satellite communications, it would be possible to equip a significant portion of the shipping fleet with real-time-streamed GPS systems and create a cost-effective tsunami monitoring network with denser and more distributed coverage. We project that such a system would have detected the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in less than an hour.

Foster, James H.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Wang, Dailin; Carter, Glenn S.; Merrifield, Mark A.

2012-05-01

353

QuickShip: Create your account  

Cancer.gov

HOME  |   RESEARCH  |   CAREERS  |   CAMPUS  |   PHONE  |   CONTACT Shipping Wizard Frederick National Lab Shipment Wizard Log In Step 2 Welcome to the Frederick National Lab Shipment Wizard. All items are required except where noted. Create a New Account:

354

Automatic FLOLS Compensation for Ship Mistrim.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A solution is developed for eliminating ship mistrim as an accident causitive factor in carrier landing. A design is presented for the fabrication of an engineering model of an electronic filter that is suitable for demonstrating the solution in operation...

T. S. Durand

1970-01-01

355

Ship Pitch Stabilization - Progress and Prognosis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The problem of pitch stabilization of ships is considered for different vessels of varying size, with application to both commercial and military craft. The various operational benefits of pitch stabilization are described, together with the history of pr...

A. E. Baitis P. Kaplan A. Clark G. Gaudin

1984-01-01

356

Southeast Alaska Cruise Ship Underwater Acoustic Noise.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Between September 2000 and June 2001, the underwater radiated noise levels for six Southeast Alaska cruise ships were measured at the U.S. Navy's Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility near Ketchikan, Alaska. The primary objective of this project ...

B. Kipple

2002-01-01

357

Cruise Ship Plume Tracking Survey Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a Cruise Ship Discharge Assessment Report in response to a petition the agency received in March 2000. The petition requested that EPA assess and where necessary control discharges from cruise ...

2002-01-01

358

Superconducting Electric Machines for Ship Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Several superconducting AC machine concepts were studied for ship propulsion applications. These concepts evolved from previous work at MIT on superconducting AC machines. The superconducting machines considered were: (1) multipole, low-speed motors, (2) ...

J. L. Kirtley J. L. Smith

1977-01-01

359

Mother Love: Natural Mothering, Birth to Three Years.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book discusses aspects of natural parenthood based largely on the author's own experiences, with references to other supportive studies and expert opinions. Topics covered include emotional changes brought on by pregnancy; home type delivery; family sleeping quarters and baby-led nursing. Chapters are (1) On Becoming a Mother; (2) Conscious,…

Bricklin, Alice G.

360

Mother and Student: The Experience of Mothering in College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditionally the academic discussion and popular discourse surrounding how a female will engage the role of mother primarily focuses on the decision of whether to be "at-home" or "at-work". However, this ignores the many different parents, parenting decisions, and role conflict experiences that exist in contemporary society. For instance, a…

Pare, Elizabeth R.

2009-01-01

361

Ship Airwake Analysis by CFD Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is concerned with computational predictions of the highly unsteady turbulent airwake of nonaviation ships. This is the first step in studying complex flow field of fully coupled helicopter\\/ship interaction. Numerical simulations carried out in this study are performed by using commercial CFD solver CFX 10.0 and FLUENT 6.2.16. The flows around two generic frigate models are investigated. A

H. Yesilel; F. O. Edis

2007-01-01

362

Ships Thruster Allocation Logic With Rudder Interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The minimum energy control of a ship's motion with available thrusters is of interest. Precision control is needed for various ocean transfer and\\/or oil drilling support operations. Specialized ships are outfitted with fixed\\/ steerable thrusters in addition to the usual main screw(s) and rudder(s). The control of the available thrusters (thrust force and direction) to meet some desired surge, sway

D. Molnar; M. Cramer

1978-01-01

363

The enforcement of shipping standards under UNCLOS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the enforcement of shipping standards, with a particular focus on Part XII of UNCLOS. Section 6 of\\u000a Part XII contains the only comprehensive set of vessel-related enforcement provisions in the Convention, but the Part’s scope\\u000a is limited to “the preservation and protection of the marine environment.” Therefore, not all shipping standards fall clearly\\u000a within Part XII’s ambit, including

Bevan Marten

2011-01-01

364

Sampled-data output regulation for ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

In navigation and control of vehicles such as automotives, ships and airplanes, control of attitude and\\/or trajectories is important. In this paper we consider the stabilization and the step tracking control problems of a ship. Using the output regulation of constant exogenous signals for linear sampled-data systems with time-varying measurement matrices, we design step tracking controllers. Then we apply the

Hirotaka Kaji; Hitoshi Katayama

2008-01-01

365

Study of SHE at SHIP  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell-closure beyond {sup 208}Pb is at a proton number Z = 114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N = 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical 'SuperHeavy Elements'(SHEs). Experimental methods are described, which allowed for the identification of elements produced on a cross-section level of about 1 pb. Reactions used at SHIP are based on targets of lead and uranium. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is alpha emission, not fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results obtained at other laboratories and with results of theoretical investigations. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental set-up and the application of new techniques, as for instance the precise mass measurement of the produced nuclei using ion traps. At increased sensitivity, detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will start, after first steps on the island of SHEs were made in recent years.

Hofmanna, Sigurd [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max von Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2010-06-01

366

Studies of SHE at SHIP  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell-closure beyond {sup 208}Pb is at a proton number Z = 114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N = 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical 'Super-Heavy Elements'(SHEs). Experimental methods are described, which allowed for the identification of elements produced on a cross-section level of about 1 pb. Reactions used at SHIP are based on targets of lead and uranium. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is alpha emission, not fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results obtained at other laboratories and with results of theoretical investigations. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental setup and the application of new techniques, as for instance the precise mass measurement of the produced nuclei using ion traps. At increased sensitivity, detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will start, after first steps on the island of SHEs were made in recent years.

Hofmann, Sigurd [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max von Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2010-04-30

367

Modelling and analysis of ship surface BRDF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modelling the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a ship surface is an integral part of any infrared ship signature model. The ShipIR surface BRDF model is based on Sandford and Robertson (1985) and makes a discrete assumption for lobe-width and solar-glint. The ShipIR sea surface reflectance model uses a roughness model based on the early work of Cox and Munk (1954) and refined using the integral solution proposed by Mermelstein et al. (1994). A similar approach was used by Ward (1992) to model the visual properties of a real surface, considering isotropic and anisotropic surface roughness. This paper compares the two roughness models and shows how a slope probability density function (PDF) version of the bi-directional reflectance is better suited for modelling micro-faceted surface reflections. The simulation of an actual ship IR glint measurement demonstrates the effect of BRDF lobes in the paint property and provides a qualitative assessment of the ShipIR model.

Vaitekunas, David A.

2007-05-01

368

Infrared ship/decoy/missile encounter model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Simulations of missile-ship-countermeasures engagements are used to determine the effective ways of defending a ship against infrared-guided missile threats. This paper describes one type of simulation that models the engagement of a ship deploying IR decoys by an infrared-guided seeker-head missile. This model was developed to assess the efficiency of IR decoys in protecting ships against these missiles. The simulation, Missile Infrared Decoy And Ship (MIDAS), is composed of three major blocks, the infrared scene generation, the seeker simulation and the missile dynamics simulation. The infrared scene generation block produces a three-dimensional IR scene from the target ship and flare models and transforms it into the two-dimensional IR image viewed by the seeker. The seeker simulation block is based on a generic conical scan seeker which uses a crossed-detector array for target detection. It processes the IR image to select a target and generates a steering command. The missile dynamics block computes the changes in missile trajectory according to the seeker steering command. The computations performed by each of the three blocks are explained in detail.

Morin, Josee; Reid, Francoise; Morin, Andre

1993-08-01

369

Structural health monitoring for ship structures  

SciTech Connect

Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.

Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Angel, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bement, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salvino, Liming [NSWC, CADEROCK

2009-01-01

370

Team Education for Adolescent Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Project TEAM (Team Education for Adolescent Mothers) is a support program designed to counteract the socioeconomic consequences of early childbearing, by developing a model for providing high-quality care services for pregnant adolescents, adolescent parents, their infants, and their extended families. The project has four site locations:…

Mitchell, Helen; Casto, Glendon

371

Like Mother, Like Child - Inheritance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Thirty-seventh monthly installment of our "What A Year!" website project, introducing life science breakthroughs to middle and high school students and their teachers. Can a mother's experiences affect the memory of her future children? Harkening back in some ways to the Lamarckian idea of "soft inheritance," recent research seems to confirm that there is some transmissibility.

2010-04-05

372

Mother Galaxies -- Halton Arp's Cosmology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Findings by Halton Arp concerning the observed link between some quasars and "mother galaxies" are amply presented and discussed. After showing the possible observational evidence, issues such as cosmological redshift are examined in depth in the light of: a) Hoyle stationary state cosmological theory; b) Narlikar's explanation of redshift according to galaxy's age; c) macro-quantum effects in AGN.

Teodorani, M.

2006-04-01

373

NURTURING ABUSED AND ABUSIVE MOTHERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on a group work approach to the treatment and prevention of child abuse. It briefly reviews some historical and organizational facts, then analyzes the theoretical framework underlying the approach. Parenting abusive mothers, within the medium of the small group experience, involves meeting basic needs for physical comfort, food, and shelter, and higher-level needs for a sense of

Margot Breton

1979-01-01

374

The Mother and the Child.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This reprint of a 1915 conference paper discusses the mother's role in the spiritual and moral development of her children, as well the right of all children to grow spiritually and morally, unimpeded by the power of adults. Stresses the civil rights of children, including their right to a nurturing, healthy environment. (MDM)

Montessori, Maria

1995-01-01

375

Mother Tongue Maintenance: The Debate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This debate presents two viewpoints on mother tongue maintenance: (1) that all individuals have a fundamental right to education in their native tongue, and that multilingual societies should actively promote multilingualism for all individuals; and (2) that the multitude of languages and rapid economic development in many countries calls for…

Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove; Sridhar, Kamal

1994-01-01

376

Will the Child be Normal? Ask Mother  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports that a mother's perception of her newborn infant frequently predicts how well the child will adjust in later childhood. The more positive the mother perceives the child, the more emotionally healthy the child will later become. (SL)

Science News, 1977

1977-01-01

377

Speckle noise reduction in SAR images ship detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At present, there are two types of method to detect ships in SAR images. One is a direct detection type, detecting ships directly. The other is an indirect detection type. That is, it firstly detects ship wakes, and then seeks ships around wakes. The two types all effect by speckle noise. In order to improve the accuracy of ship detection and get accurate ship and ship wakes parameters, such as ship length, ship width, ship area, the angle of ship wakes and ship outline from SAR images, it is extremely necessary to remove speckle noise in SAR images before data used in various SAR images ship detection. The use of speckle noise reduction filter depends on the specification for a particular application. Some common filters are widely used in speckle noise reduction, such as the mean filter, the median filter, the lee filter, the enhanced lee filter, the Kuan filter, the frost filter, the enhanced frost filter and gamma filter, but these filters represent some disadvantages in SAR image ship detection because of the various types of ship. Therefore, a mathematical function known as the wavelet transform and multi-resolution analysis were used to localize an SAR ocean image into different frequency components or useful subbands, and effectively reduce the speckle in the subbands according to the local statistics within the bands. Finally, the analysis of the statistical results are presented, which demonstrates the advantages and disadvantages of using wavelet shrinkage techniques over standard speckle filters.

Yuan, Ji; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Qingqing; Chen, Jingbo; Ren, Lin

2012-09-01

378

State of the World's Mothers 2002: Mothers & Children in War & Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides a comprehensive look at the challenges facing mothers and children during and after armed conflict. The examination is divided into the sections "Mothers in War,""Mothers Rebuilding," and "Call to Action." Key findings include the following: (1) the nature of war has changed dramatically in recent decades, putting mothers and…

Geoghegan, Tracy

379

Dispositional Empathy in Neglectful Mothers and Mothers at High Risk for Child Physical Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates whether mothers who are neglectful and at high risk for child physical abuse present a deficit in empathy. Participants were neglectful mothers (n = 37), mothers at high risk for child physical abuse (n = 22), and nonmaltreating mothers (n = 37). The Interpersonal Reactivity Index, a self-report measure assessing specific…

de Paul, Joaquin; Perez-Albeniz, Alicia; Guibert, Maria; Asla, Nagore; Ormaechea, Amaia

2008-01-01

380

Mothers' Representations of Their Relationships with Their Toddlers: Links to Adult Attachment and Observed Mothering.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied 125 mothers and firstborn sons over 11-month period to examine relations between mothers' representations of their relationships with their children, adult representations of attachment, and observed mothering. Findings revealed significant relationship between mothers' representations of relationships with their children and adult…

Slade, Arietta; Belsky, Jay; Aber, J. Lawrence; Phelps, June L.

1999-01-01

381

Mothers’ coping and hope in early intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goals of the study were to examine the relations between maternal coping and hope among mothers who participated in early intervention program for their infants. Earlier studies focused attention on mothers’ experiences of stress and their coping. Within the salutogenic construct, we aim at examining relations between mothers’ coping and hope while considering individual resources (sense of coherence) and

Michal Einav; Uzi Levi; Malka Margalit

2012-01-01

382

Mother's age at menarche and offspring size  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:An individual's growth trajectory is, at least in part, inherited. Mother's early age at menarche has been associated with taller offspring height and greater body mass index (BMI) at age 9 years, suggesting that mother's age at menarche may be an intergenerational marker of growth. We examined the association between mother's age at menarche and childhood size at birth, and

O Basso; M L Pennell; A Chen; M P Longnecker

2010-01-01

383

Mothers' Coping and Hope in Early Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goals of the study were to examine the relations between maternal coping and hope among mothers who participated in early intervention program for their infants. Earlier studies focused attention on mothers' experiences of stress and their coping. Within the salutogenic construct, we aim at examining relations between mothers' coping and hope…

Einav, Michal; Levi, Uzi; Margalit, Malka

2012-01-01

384

76 FR 27601 - Mother's Day, 2011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...importance of mothers in our lives. The bond of love and dedication a mother shares with her...we continue to celebrate the influence, love, and nurturing our mothers provide in...communities. In gratitude for their generous love, patient counsel, and lifelong...

2011-05-11

385

75 FR 26875 - Mother's Day, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...throughout our lives, our mothers protect us from harm, nurture...service across our country. Many mothers have struggled to raise children...careers, or as single parents working to provide for their families...biological, or foster, mothers share an unbreakable bond...

2010-05-12

386

Mothers' Repartnering after a Nonmarital Birth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the prevalence, predictors and outcomes of unmarried mothers' repartnering patterns following a nonmarital birth. Results indicate that, within five years after a birth, approximately two-thirds of unmarried mothers end their relationship with the focal child's biological father, and more than half of these mothers enter new…

Bzostek, Sharon H.; McLanahan, Sara S.; Carlson, Marcia J.

2012-01-01

387

The Mother Who Works Outside the Home.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Issues confronting the working mother are explored, including child care, career counseling, family relationships, the one-parent family, and the troubled child. Readers are told that there are almost no constant differences found between the children of employed and nonemployed mothers. Children develop best when the mother herself is satisfied…

Olds, Sally Wendkos

388

Exploring Behavioral Intentions among Young Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship between young mothers' individual characteristics (demographics and self-efficacy), social support, and behavioral intentions regarding education and child bearing. Using a home visiting model, the program recruited 141 teen mothers to participate. Young mothers completed an initial assessment, measuring…

Turney, Howard M.; Conway, Pat; Plummer, Pam; Adkins, Samuel E.; Hudson, George Cliff; McLeod, David A.; Zafaroni, Aileen

2011-01-01

389

College Students' Positivity toward Teen Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although teen pregnancy and parenthood are more visible in society than in the past, teen mothers are often stereotyped and stigmatized. The study examined positivity toward teen mothers among college students (N = 316) at a midwestern university. Although students responded positively to some items regarding teen mothers, other statements showed…

Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

2011-01-01

390

Attention Deficit Disorder: Two Mothers' Perceptions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report discusses the outcomes of a study that investigated the decision-making process of two mothers' selection of treatment for their sons' attention deficit disorder (ADD). One mother opted for a medical treatment, and the other mother opted for a non-medical treatment. The boy who is medically treated is 14, and the non-medically treated…

Fernandez, Roy C.; O'Connor, Carol

391

Incest Survivor Mothers: Protecting the Next Generation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study involving 16 incest-survivor mothers with daughters between the ages of 9-14 found the mothers described themselves as very protective and often overly-protective parents, wanting to parent differently, and better, than they were parented. Many survivors strive to be the "perfect mother" including over-protecting and over-nurturing…

Kreklewetz, Christine M.; Piotrowski, Caroline C.

1998-01-01

392

Closing the Loop - or Can the Ship Motion Simulator Simulate Ship Motion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The main purpose of this report is to document in detail the procedure for insuring that the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory's Ship Motion Simulator (SMS) motion outputs match real world, at-sea ship motion data acquired during sea trails or via validated si...

G. C. Willems

1989-01-01

393

Planning for Cruise Ship Resilience: An Approach to Managing Cruise Ship Impacts in Haines, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resilience theory has management implications useful when planning for cruise ship tourism. In small coastal communities, cruise ships often provide welcomed economic incentives that can bolster a waning economy. However, in some coastal communities, the magnitude and intensity of passenger visits can reduce social resilience and induce an economic regime shift that leads to rapid socioeconomic reorganization. The implications of

Alex W. Adams

2010-01-01

394

MotherJones.com: The Mother Jones 400  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using data from the Federal Election Commission which was compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics (CRP) (see the July 10, 1999 Scout Report), Mother Jones has put together an eye-opening Website which reveals the nation's top 400 financial political contributors and what they may be expecting for their contributions. Users may browse the list of contributors by industry or individual donor rank or search by donor, state, industry, party, or recipient. The rankings include donor name, amount given and to whom, their rank in 1998, and their industry. This information is interesting and useful, but it is also available elsewhere. The real value of the Mother Jones 400 lies in its profiles of the donors and the industry summaries, which are an excellent resource for learning about the various individuals, not always well known, who influence government policy and legislation with their donations and personal relationships with our representatives.

2001-01-01

395

Infant massage improves mother–infant interaction for mothers with postnatal depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Postnatal depression can have long term adverse consequences for the mother–infant relationship and the infant’s development. Improving a mother’s depression per se has been found to have little impact on mother–infant interaction. The aims of this study were to determine whether attending regular massage classes could reduce maternal depression and also improve the quality of mother–infant interaction. Method: Thirty-four

Katsuno Onozawa; Vivette Glover; Diana Adams; Neena Modi; R. Channi Kumar

2001-01-01

396

Moms Hating Moms: The Internalization of Mother War Rhetoric  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work status and mothering are culturally constructed as rigid binaries. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect on mothers of these polarized characterizations of motherhood and to assess the social support mothers perceive they receive for their mother identity. This study, based on interview data collected from 98 married mothers of preschool children, demonstrated that Mother War

Deirdre D. Johnston; Debra H. Swanson

2004-01-01

397

Radiative Forcing Over Ocean by Ship Wakes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -0.00014 plus or minus 53% Watts per square meter assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size of greater than or equal to 100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Watts per square meter), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

Gatebe, Charles K.; Wilcox, E.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

2011-01-01

398

The superconducting MHD-propelled ship YAMATO-1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1985 the Ship & Ocean Foundation (SOF) created a committee under the chairmanship of Mr. Yohei Sasakawa, Former President of the Ship & Ocean Foundation, and began researches into superconducting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ship propulsion. In 1989 SOF set to construction of a experimental ship on the basis of theoretical and experimental researches pursued until then. The experimental ship named YAMATO-1 became the world's first superconducting MHD-propelled ship on her trial runs in June 1992. This paper describes the outline of the YAMATO-1 and sea trial test results.

Sasakawa, Yohei; Takezawa, Setsuo; Sugawara, Yoshinori; Kyotani, Yoshihiro

1995-01-01

399

Induced lactation in adoptive mothers.  

PubMed

The results of a pilot study of 6 women who undertook breast feeding their adopted infants are discussed, with a review of methods available for inducing lactation if this form of infant feeding is undertaken. It is concluded that whilst induced lactation can be successful for the mother and baby, further studies are necessary before conclusive advice can be given that this technique is effective and safe. PMID:6598379

Thearle, M J; Weissenberger, R

1984-11-01

400

Modern alternative to oil-fired ships  

SciTech Connect

A direct coal-fired turbine is a very light engine for powering ships. Weight savings over a diesel engine nearly make up for the added weight associated with fuel bunkering when converting from oil to coal-firing. A method of hot-gas-particulate cleanup based on packed and fluidized rotating beds of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is discussed as a means of providing adequate turbine blade lifetime. Two cases, a cargo ship and large merchant tanker are considered. Present value of fuel savings equates to the value of a coal-fired turbine. For a ten-year lifetime, the value of the turbine due to fuel-lost savings is projected to be roughly 48 M$ for the cargo ship and 194 M$ for the tanker.

Botts, T E; Powell, J R; Powell, J D

1980-01-01

401

Ship wake detection by Raman lidar.  

PubMed

We carried out a remote study of ship wakes by optical methods. Both Mie and Raman scattering signals and their evolution were simultaneously recorded by gated detector (intensified CCD). The Mie scattering signal was detectable within 1?min after water disturbance by a high-speed boat. According to an approximation of experimental data, Raman signal fluctuations can be detected for a much longer time under the same conditions. We have demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy is substantially more sensitive to water perturbation compared to conventional acoustic (sonar) technique and can be used for ship wake detection and monitoring. PMID:21283224

Bunkin, Alexey F; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Lukyanchenko, Vladislav A; Pershin, Sergey M

2011-02-01

402

National Geographic: SpaceShipOne  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Geographic presents Burt Rutan's accomplishments with his rocketship, SpaceShipOne. Users can learn about the preparation and flight through a series of fascinating images and a concise article. The website features photographer Jim Sugar's experience covering the event. Visitors can find interesting facts and links to outside resources. For those who would like to discuss the topic, individuals can join in the online forum. Everyone should visit the Multimedia link to take a closer look at SpaceShipOne's cockpit.

403

5.G Battle Ship Using Grid Paper  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Materials The students will need grid paper and colored pencils; some color for the ships and (for example) red for explosions on their ships and their...

404

Assessment of Options for Enhancing Surface Ship Acquisition.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study examines options for enhancing the ship acquisition process so as to enable effective and efficient Navy ship procurement and at the same time help to strengthen the shipbuilding industry. Based on information obtained through extensive intervi...

L. D. Simmons

1996-01-01

405

46 CFR 167.05-25 - Nautical school ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nautical school ship. 167.05-25 Section 167.05-25...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-25...

2013-10-01

406

Flame Straightening Quenched-and-Tempered Steels in Ship Construction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Flame straightening quenched-and-tempered steel procedures were successfully employed by trained shipyard personnel on portions of a LASH (Lighter Aboard Ship) ship under construction with minimal acceptable loss in mechanical properties and with consider...

R. L. Rothman

1974-01-01

407

FINISHED CASTINGS ARE ONLY GROUND BEFORE THEY ARE SHIPPED TO ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FINISHED CASTINGS ARE ONLY GROUND BEFORE THEY ARE SHIPPED TO CUSTOMERS WHO COMPLETE THE FINISHING IN THEIR OWN MACHINE SHOPS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Grinding & Shipping, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

408

77 FR 22057 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...port for passenger ships --Development...verification of damage stability requirements for...Review of the damage stability regulations for ro-ro passenger ships --Revision of...subdivision and damage stability...

2012-04-12

409

77 FR 70525 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...port for passenger ships --Development...verification of damage stability requirements for...Review of the damage stability regulations for ro-ro passenger ships --Revision of...subdivision and damage stability...

2012-11-26

410

48 CFR 1352.271-87 - Changes-ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1352...PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1352.271-87 Changesâship repair. As prescribed...the following clause: ChangesâShip Repair (APR...

2013-10-01

411

46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Ship's service refrigeration systems. 128.410 Section 128.410... Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.410 Ship's service refrigeration systems. No self-contained unit...

2010-10-01

412

Ship Survivability Enhancement Program: Management of the Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Ship Survivability Enhancement Program (SSEP) was devised to generate scientific data in research areas related to the survivability of ships and crews against attack from modern weapons. The experiments were concerned with electronic radiation, fire,...

J. S. Howe

1996-01-01

413

The Design of A Ship's Control Space for Polar Icebreakers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper presents the design of the ship control space for medium size polar icebreaker presently scheduled for construction award in the early 1970's. The ship control space (in past designs designated as pilothouse) is where navigation surveillance an...

R. P. Voelker E. Koch

1968-01-01

414

Aerial view of reroofing of northern LTA ship hangar, circa ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Aerial view of re-roofing of northern LTA ship hangar, circa 1957. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

415

1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR AND DATE, SOURCE: BISHOP MUSEUM, HONOLULU, HI. - Ship "Falls of Clyde", Hawaii Maritime Center,Pier 7, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

416

31. Floating original Ship Canal draw (in background) to University ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

31. Floating original Ship Canal draw (in background) to University Heights location. New Ship Canal draw in foreground. June 1906 photograph. - University Heights Bridge, Spanning Harlem River at 207th Street & West Harlem Road, New York, New York County, NY

417

Aerial view of construction of both LTA ship hangars (looking ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Aerial view of construction of both LTA ship hangars (looking north) circa 1942. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

418

View southsouthwest of drydock no. 2 caisson with receiving ship ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View south-southwest of drydock no. 2 caisson with receiving ship and ship FS 2 in background. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 2, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

419

Ship Noise Evaluation Based On Segmented Decision Trees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Signature recognition can be useful in a wide range of applications. A decision tree method for ship noise classification is presented. Thie ship noise, once transposed to the frequency's domain through the application of a b\\

Jose M. Fonseca; Fernando Moura-Pires

1992-01-01

420

32 CFR 700.1056 - Command of a ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Command of a ship. 700.1056 Section 700.1056 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued...Authority and Command Detail to Duty § 700.1056 Command of a ship. (a) The officer...

2009-07-01

421

46 CFR 14.207 - Content and form of shipping articles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Content and form of shipping articles. 14.207 Section 14.207 Shipping...14.207 Content and form of shipping articles. (a)(1) The content and form of shipping articles for each vessel of the United...

2013-10-01

422

46 CFR 98.30-14 - Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. 98...Tanks § 98.30-14 Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. (a) The person in charge of a ship, except a ship under subpart...

2011-10-01

423

32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

2012-07-01

424

46 CFR 153.12 - IMO Certificates for United States Ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false IMO Certificates for United States Ships. 153.12 Section 153.12 Shipping...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS...12 IMO Certificates for United States Ships. Either a classification...

2011-10-01

425

46 CFR 153.12 - IMO Certificates for United States Ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false IMO Certificates for United States Ships. 153.12 Section 153.12 Shipping...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS...12 IMO Certificates for United States Ships. Either a classification...

2010-10-01

426

32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

2011-07-01

427

32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

2010-07-01

428

46 CFR 98.30-14 - Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. 98...Tanks § 98.30-14 Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. (a) The person in charge of a ship, except a ship under subpart...

2010-10-01

429

47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

2011-10-01

430

46 CFR 153.12 - IMO Certificates for United States Ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false IMO Certificates for United States Ships. 153.12 Section 153.12 Shipping...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS...12 IMO Certificates for United States Ships. Either a classification...

2012-10-01

431

46 CFR 98.30-14 - Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. 98...Tanks § 98.30-14 Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. (a) The person in charge of a ship, except a ship under subpart...

2012-10-01

432

47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

2012-10-01

433

33 CFR 169.130 - When are ships required to make reports?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.130 When are ships required to make reports? Participating ships must report to the shore-based authority...

2011-07-01

434

33 CFR 169.125 - What classes of ships are required to make reports?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.125 What classes of ships are required to make reports? Each self-propelled ship of 300 gross tons or...

2011-07-01

435

33 CFR 169.130 - When are ships required to make reports?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.130 When are ships required to make reports? Participating ships must report to the shore-based authority...

2012-07-01

436

33 CFR 169.125 - What classes of ships are required to make reports?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.125 What classes of ships are required to make reports? Each self-propelled ship of 300 gross tons or...

2010-07-01

437

33 CFR 169.130 - When are ships required to make reports?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.130 When are ships required to make reports? Participating ships must report to the shore-based authority...

2010-07-01

438

33 CFR 169.125 - What classes of ships are required to make reports?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.125 What classes of ships are required to make reports? Each self-propelled ship of 300 gross tons or...

2012-07-01

439

47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

2013-10-01

440

32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

2013-07-01

441

47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

2009-10-01

442

Integrated power system brings innovation to naval ship designs  

SciTech Connect

The development of an integrated power system (IPS) with lower life-cycle costs for the U.S. Navy is outlined in this article. The IPS combines electric propulsion, DC ship service distribution, and power management. Integrating ship service and propulsion power reduces the ship operating costs and improves overall life-cycle cost; generation capacity is controlled to closely match actual load requirements. The IPS design, ship arrangement studies, and land based evaluation are described in some detail in the article.

Spotts, T.E. [Lockheed Martin, Liverpool, NY (United States)

1997-07-01

443

Computation of turbulent free-surface flows around modern ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the calculated results for three classes of typical modern ships in modelling of ship-generated waves. Simulations of turbulent free-surface flows around ships are performed in a numerical water tank, based on the FINFLO-RANS SHIP solver developed at Helsinki University of Technology. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the artificial compressibility and the non-linear free-surface boundary conditions are

Tingqiu Li

2003-01-01

444

Traffic simulation based ship collision probability modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maritime traffic poses various risks in terms of human, environmental and economic loss. In a risk analysis of ship collisions, it is important to get a reasonable estimate for the probability of such accidents and the consequences they lead to. In this paper, a method is proposed to assess the probability of vessels colliding with each other. The method is

Floris Goerlandt; Pentti Kujala

2011-01-01

445

Advanced insulations for refrigerated shipping containers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on a research project that was recently conducted to find a cost effective insulation for refrigerated shipping containers (reefers) that avoids the environmental problems associated with CFCs currently used in foam insulated reefers. Advanced vacuum insulations (which contain no CFCs and have high thermal resistances) have been studied at U.S. National Laboratories and at several companies in

K. T. Jr

1993-01-01

446

Protection Against a Ship as a Weapon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Stopping a ship commandeered and used as a weapon to attack shore infrastructure in the Strait of Malacca is a challenging problem. The purpose of this thesis is to determine systems that constitute architectures of an SoS to stop oil tanker that is hijac...

C. D. Epp

2008-01-01

447

Thermochemical Tests of Domestic Turbine Driven Ships.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The standards for the quality of feed water and boiler water, which have been accepted by the instructions for servicing of KVG-25 and KVG-34 boilers, which are installed on the LENINSKIY KOMSOMOL and PEKIN class of ships should be changed; these standard...

A. Goldenfon R. Taranenko

1966-01-01

448

Automated intelligent video surveillance system for ships  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To protect naval and commercial ships from attack by terrorists and pirates, it is important to have automatic surveillance systems able to detect, identify, track and alert the crew on small watercrafts that might pursue malicious intentions, while ruling out non-threat entities. Radar systems have limitations on the minimum detectable range and lack high-level classification power. In this paper, we present an innovative Automated Intelligent Video Surveillance System for Ships (AIVS3) as a vision-based solution for ship security. Capitalizing on advanced computer vision algorithms and practical machine learning methodologies, the developed AIVS3 is not only capable of efficiently and robustly detecting, classifying, and tracking various maritime targets, but also able to fuse heterogeneous target information to interpret scene activities, associate targets with levels of threat, and issue the corresponding alerts/recommendations to the man-in- the-loop (MITL). AIVS3 has been tested in various maritime scenarios and shown accurate and effective threat detection performance. By reducing the reliance on human eyes to monitor cluttered scenes, AIVS3 will save the manpower while increasing the accuracy in detection and identification of asymmetric attacks for ship protection.

Wei, Hai; Nguyen, Hieu; Ramu, Prakash; Raju, Chaitanya; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yadegar, Jacob

2009-05-01

449

POLSSS: policy making for sea shipping safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

After The Netherlands Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management published the progress report “Vessel Traffic Management on the North Sea” (1997), a need remained for policy refinement and extension of scope: (1) determination of the most appropriate mix of traffic management instruments; (2) inclusion of inland waters for sea-going ships; (3) specific attention for risk analysis of maritime

W van Urk; W. A de Vries

2000-01-01

450

Ship Fire Characteristics. Part 1. Sealed Compartments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To optimize weight and cost of fire protection for aluminum ships, it is essential to know the characteristics of the fire threat. Since fire behavior is a function of fuel and environment--particularly of ventilation, fire characteristics are studied as ...

R. S. Alger S. J. Wiersma R. G. McKee W. H. Johnson F. I. Laughridge

1976-01-01

451

Cavitation Research and Ship Propeller Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The role of cavitation research in the design of ship propellers and the influence of research on propeller design is reviewed. The historical development of research on bubble cavitation is an example of a lack of communication between research and desig...

G. Kuiper

1998-01-01

452

Cavitation Research and Ship Propeller Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of cavitation research in the design of ship propellers and the influence of research on propeller design is reviewed. The historical development of research on bubble cavitation is an example of a lack of communication between research and design. Research on sheet cavitation is starting now and simplifications such as two dimensional cavitation are being made. It is

G. Kuiper

1997-01-01

453

Laser Assisted Forming for Ship Building  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laser forming has become a viable process for the shaping of metallic components, as a means of rapid prototyping and of adjusting and aligning. The process is similar to the well established torch flame bending used on large sheet material in the ship building industry but a great deal more control of the final product can be achieved. This paper

G. Dearden; S. P. Edwardson

454

Intelligent ship autopilots––A historical perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a historical perspective of the development and use of the so-called intelligent paradigms of fuzzy logic and\\/or neural networks in ship autopilot designs. After a brief review of the development of the first PID autopilots, the paper describes how early work using fuzzy logic techniques to describe and model the actions of helmsmen led to the development

G. N. Roberts; R. Sutton; A. Zirilli; A. Tiano

2003-01-01

455

Optimum Reset of Ship's Inertial Navigation System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optimum linear filter and control theory is applied to the practical problem of supplementing an inertial navigation system with discrete reference information. The information takes the form of position obtained from Loran C or Decca, for example, and occasional azimuth fixes obtained from star sightings. In particular, optimum use of this information is discussed for the Ship's Inertial Navigation System

B. E. Bona; Robert J. Smay

1966-01-01

456

Evaluation of Electric Motors for Ship Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An evaluation was conducted of the various propulsion motors being considered for electric ship propulsion. The benefit of such an evaluation is that all of the propulsion options being considered by the U.S. Navy have been described in one document. The ...

B. A. Bassham

2003-01-01

457

Index of Ship Structure Committee Publications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is an index to all publications of the Ship Structure Committee in their SSC series from the time of its formation in 1946 to December 1968. These documents have been announced in the Technical Abstract Bulletin (TAB) of the Defense Documentati...

1969-01-01

458

Sea Wave Measurements Using a Ship's Radar.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The capabilities of a shore based ship radar as an ocean wave sensor for short ranges up to 5 km were assessed. Radar data was recorded from a number of fixed points at the sea surface along the line of sight, during a certain time, giving a two dimension...

P. Hoogeboom J. C. M. Kleijweg D. Vanhalsema

1986-01-01

459

Weapon engagement management for ship defense  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technological advances in threat technology, the increasing tempo and diversity of open-ocean and littoral scenarios, and the volume and imperfect nature of data to be processed under time-critical conditions pose significant challenges for future shipboard command and control systems and operators who must use these systems to defend their ship and fulfill their mission. To address these challenges, we are

Bruce A. Chalmers; Dale E. Blodgett

1997-01-01

460

The Added Mass of Berthing Ships.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Model tests have been performed for a selection of ship types, to find the values of added mass and added moment of inertia, and the effects of water depth, berth type and fender stiffness. The effect of shallow water is very strong, increasing the added ...

M. J. Barratt

1981-01-01

461

Polarimetric detection and estimation of ship wakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Classification of Earth natural components within a full polarimetric SAR image is one of the most important applications of radar polarimetry in remote sensing. An unsupervised classification procedure, based on neural networks with competitive architectures, is applied to the full polarimetric SAR images of sea surface and ship wakes for segmentation and clustering of different ocean components. The linear feature

E. Pottier; W. M. Boerner; D. L. Schuler

1999-01-01

462

Container Shipping And Ports: An Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Globalisation, deregulation, logistics integration and containerisation have reshaped the port and shipping industry. Port and maritime companies are challenged to redefine their functional role in the value chain for the sake of creating customer value and of ensuring the survival and growth of the company. Companies are busily trying to disrupt the status quo rather than preserve it. Based on

Theo E. Notteboom

2004-01-01

463

Sea loads on ships and offshore structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The book introduces the theory of the structural loading on ships and offshore structures caused by wind, waves and currents, and goes on to describe the applications of this theory in terms of real structures. The main topics described are linear-wave induced motions, loads on floating structures, numerical methods for ascertaining wave induced motions and loads, viscous wave loads and

O. M. Faltinsen

1990-01-01

464

Ship noise spectrum analysis based on HHT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ship noise spectrum analysis by HHT is a new method and essential for underwater target recognition. In the process, the end swings and overshoots\\/undershoots exist during empirical mode decomposition. Analyzing the feature of the cubic spline interpolation and cubic Hermite polynomial interpolation, a new method was proposed which made use of cubic Hermite polynomial interpolation for envelopes fitting, and the

Zhang Zhimeng; Liu Chenchen; Liu Bosheng

2010-01-01

465

EFFECT OF SHIP NOISE ON SLEEP  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of a steady sound level of 65 dB(A) from a diesel ship engine on nocturnal sleep were studied using polygraphic and subjective sleep parameters. Three healthy men, aged 29 to 33 years, participated in the experiment. Sleep polygrams and the sound level in a sleep laboratory were recorded for each subject for five exposure nights and five control

Y. Tamura; T. Kawada; Y. Sasazawa

1997-01-01

466

Development of a Ship Service Fuel Cell.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Under a three-phase program sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), FuelCell Energy, Inc. is developing a 2.5 MW fuel cell power plant for ship service power generation aboard surface combatants. During the first phase, the conceptual design of t...

S. Abens H. Ghezel-Ayagh G. Steinfeld R. Sanderson M. Cervi

2000-01-01

467

Effect of Torsion on Strength of Ship Hulls (Maximum Strength of Ship Hulls).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A method for the determination of the behavior and maximum strength of longitudinally stiffened single-cell ship hull girders under the combined loading of moment, shear and torque is described. The main features are: (1) Individual components are analyze...

A. Ostapenko Y. Chen

1982-01-01

468

Shipping finance: time to follow a new track?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we introduce, for the first time, a methodology from the most recent literature of finance to reveal the duration of shipping cycles and then show the benefit of the use of this information to make more successful shipping loans. This is so as banks are willing to finance, during boom periods, shipping loans for new buildings but

Alexandros M. Goulielmos; Mariniki Psifia

2006-01-01

469

Security assessment of DC zonal naval-ship power system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Security assessment of naval-ship power system under different fault conditions is important for real time operation of naval-ship power system. The existing indices of security assessment did not incorporate the probability of disturbances: therefore this paper proposes a probabilistic security assessment index. As the naval ship architecture is integrated with DC zonal distribution, then a special power flow analysis is

J. A. Momoh; S. S. Kaddah; W. Salawu

2001-01-01

470

The maximum shipping capacity of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the determination of the maximum shipping capacity of the Suez canal. Initially, some assumptions are made in order to calculate the ‘theoretical’ maximum capacity in terms of ‘standard ships’. This last term defines ships which transit the Canal at a given speed and at a given time interval from the vessel ahead and astern. Data has been

J. D. Griffiths; Emtissal M. Hassan

1977-01-01

471

Minimum time-energy trajectory planning for automatic ship berthing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A ship optimal trajectory planning method based on the dynamic model of the ship is presented. First a mathematical modular model is introduced for describing the non-linear dynamics of the ship. Then the problem of optimal trajectory planning is discussed. The trajectory is obtained through the optimization of a time-energy criterion, taking into account constraints on the steering system, environment,

Karim Djouani; Yskandar Hamam

1995-01-01

472

47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

2013-10-01

473

Estimation of Ship Velocities From MODIS and OCM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detection of ships and their tracks in the atmosphere from satellites was earlier demonstrated by Porch, Noone, and Kaufman, among others. In this letter, we have gone one step further to estimate the ship speed and direction by locating them and their tracks from multisatellite imagery. Exhausts from the ships create streaks of clouds in the atmosphere that help identify

N. Srinivasa Rao; M. M. Ali; M. V. Rao; I. V. Ramana

2005-01-01

474

Precise Positioning of Ships for Maritime Disasters Prevention Using GPS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most ships use the marine DGPS (Differential Global Positioning System) service to know position information in the sea. In Korea, the Ministry of Land Transport and Maritime Affairs (MLTM) provides the nationwide DGPS (NDGPS) service to users trying to secure the safety of traffic of ships. The precision of ship position information obtained by the MLTM NDGPS system is about

J. Ha; M. Heo; S. Chun; D. Cho

2010-01-01

475

47 CFR 80.1099 - Ship sources of energy.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Ship sources of energy. 80.1099 Section 80.1099 Telecommunication...Stations § 80.1099 Ship sources of energy. (a) There must be available at...ship is at sea, a supply of electrical energy sufficient to operate the radio...

2013-10-01

476

THE INTACT SHIP STABILITY CODE: PRESENT STATUS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Provisions concerning intact ship stability have been introduced at a later stage in international regulations of ship safety. The General Stability Criteria based on righting arm characteristics was adopted in 1968 and the Weather Criterion was adopted in 1985. Both criteria were based on ideas, concepts and ship typologies\\/dimensions, existing long before their adoption, so that the need of

Alberto Francescutto

477

Numerical simulation of ship stability for dynamic environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prediction of ship stability during the early stages of design is very important from the point of vessel’s safety. Out of the six motions of a ship, the critical motion leading to capsize of a vessel is the rolling motion. In the present study, particular attention is paid to the performance of a ship in beam sea. The linear

S. Surendran; J. Venkata Ramana Reddy

2003-01-01

478

47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...For satellite shore-to-ship distress alert, if the ship is fitted with an INMARSAT...manned. (d) On receipt of a distress alert transmitted by use of digital selective...calling frequency on which the distress alert was received. (e) Ship stations...

2013-10-01

479

U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Helicopter view of Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (top) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (bottom) on the Arctic Ocean. Louis is approaching Healy to come alongside it. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. Th...

2009-01-28

480

U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Helicopter view of Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (left) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (right) on the Arctic Ocean. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This was during a scientific expedition to map the ...

2009-01-28

481

U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Helicopter view of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (left) and Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (right) on the Arctic Ocean. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This was during a scientific expedition to map the ...

2009-01-28

482

47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189...Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on...

2012-10-01

483

46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2012-10-01

484

47 CFR 80.59 - Compulsory ship inspections.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compulsory ship inspections. 80.59 Section 80.59 Telecommunication...Applications and Licenses § 80.59 Compulsory ship inspections. (a) Inspection of ships subject to the Communications Act or the...

2012-10-01

485

47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

2010-10-01

486

47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

2011-10-01

487

47 CFR 80.59 - Compulsory ship inspections.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compulsory ship inspections. 80.59 Section 80.59 Telecommunication...Applications and Licenses § 80.59 Compulsory ship inspections. (a) Inspection of ships subject to the Communications Act or the...

2010-10-01

488

27 CFR 26.114 - Permit to ship required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permit to ship required. 26.114 Section 26.114 ...Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Permit to Ship Liquors and Articles § 26.114 Permit to ship required. Before liquors and...

2011-04-01

489

47 CFR 80.59 - Compulsory ship inspections.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compulsory ship inspections. 80.59 Section 80.59 Telecommunication...Applications and Licenses § 80.59 Compulsory ship inspections. (a) Inspection of ships subject to the Communications Act or the...

2011-10-01

490

7 CFR 948.8 - Handle or ship.  

...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Handle or ship. 948.8 Section 948.8 Agriculture Regulations...Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.8 Handle or ship. Handle or ship means to transport, sell, or in any way to...

2014-01-01

491

47 CFR 80.1099 - Ship sources of energy.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship sources of energy. 80.1099 Section 80.1099...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1099 Ship sources of energy. (a) There must be...

2011-10-01

492

46 CFR 115.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 115.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2011-10-01

493

15 CFR 8b.15 - Employment on ships.  

... 2014-01-01 false Employment on ships. 8b.15 Section 8b.15 Commerce...Employment Practices § 8b.15 Employment on ships. No qualified handicapped individual...subjected to discrimination in employment on ships under any program or activity to which...

2014-01-01

494

46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2010-10-01

495

46 CFR 115.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 115.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2010-10-01

496

27 CFR 26.114 - Permit to ship required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permit to ship required. 26.114 Section 26.114 ...Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Permit to Ship Liquors and Articles § 26.114 Permit to ship required. Before liquors and...

2010-04-01

497

47 CFR 80.1099 - Ship sources of energy.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship sources of energy. 80.1099 Section 80.1099...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1099 Ship sources of energy. (a) There must be...

2012-10-01

498

7 CFR 927.8 - Ship or handle.  

...Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ship or handle. 927.8 Section 927.8 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 927.8 Ship or handle. Ship or handle means to sell, deliver, consign,...

2014-01-01

499

46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2011-10-01

500

47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

2012-10-01