Sample records for b-52 mother ship

  1. X-38 Ship #2 in Free Flight after Release from B-52 Mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-38 research vehicle drops away from NASA's B-52 mothership immediately after being released from the B-52's wing pylon. More than 30 years earlier, this same B-52 launched the original lifting-body vehicles flight tested by NASA and the Air Force at what is now called the Dryden Flight Research Center and the Air Force Flight Test Center. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  2. X-38 Ship #2 Mated to B-52 Mothership in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photo shows one of the X-38 lifting-body research vehicles mated to NASA's B-52 mothership in flight prior to launch. The B-52 has been a workhorse for the Dryden Flight Research Center for more than 40 years, carrying numerous research vehicles aloft and conducting a variety of other research flight experiments. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  3. Sizing of "Mother Ship and Catcher" Concepts for LEO Small Debris Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Most Low Earth Orbit (LEO) debris lies in a limited number of inclination "bands" associated with launch latitudes, or with specific useful orbit inclinations (such as polar orbits). Such narrow inclination bands generally have a uniform spread over all possible Right Ascensions of Ascending Node (RAANs), creating a different orbit plane for nearly every piece of debris. This complicates concept of rendezvous and capture for debris removal. However, a low-orbiting satellite will always phase in RAAN faster than debris objects in higher orbits at the same inclination, potentially solving the problem. Such a base can serve as a single space-based launch facility (a "mother ship") that can tend and then send tiny individual catcher devices for each debris object, as the facility drifts into the same RAAN as the higher object. This presentation will highlight characteristic system requirements of such an architecture, including structural and navigation requirements, power, mass and dV budgets for both the mother ship and the mass-produced common catcher devices that would clean out selected inclination bands. The altitude and inclination regime over which a band is to be cleared, the size distribution of the debris, and the inclusion of additional mission priorities all affect the sizing of the system. It is demonstrated that major LEO hazardous debris reductions can be realized in each band with a single LEO launch of a single mother ship, with simple attached catchers of total mass less than typical commercial LEO launch capability.

  4. B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership is seen here photographed from a KC-135 Tanker aircraft. The X-43 adapter is visible attached to the right wing. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and is also both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet.

  5. B-52B Cockpit Instrument Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a close-up view of the instrument panel in the cockpit of NASA's B-52 research aircraft. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the HiMAT, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  6. B-52 Testing F-111 Parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A mock-up of an F-111 cockpit section drops out of the bomb bay of NASA's B-52 mothership on a test flight of a new parachute system for the F-111 'Aardvark' bomber. The F-111's ejection system separated the entire cockpit from the rest of the aircraft, and a large parachute was then deployed to lower the cockpit section to the ground. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  7. B-52 Flight Mission Symbology - Close up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A close-up view of some of the mission markings that tell the story of the NASA B-52 mothership's colorful history. These particular markings denote some of the experiments the bomber conducted to develop parachute recovery systems for the solid rocket boosters used by the Space Shuttle. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet.. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  8. B-52 Testing F-111 Parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The main parachute begins to deploy on the mock-up of an F-111 'Aardvark' bomber cockpit section after being dropped from NASA's B-52 mothership during 1988 flight tests on improved parachute systems for the Air Force bomber. The F-111's ejection system separated the entire cockpit from the rest of the aircraft, and a large parachute was then deployed to lower the cockpit section to the ground. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  9. Sizing of "Mother Ship and Catcher" Missions for LEO Small Debris and for GEO Large Object Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Most LEO debris lies in a limited number of inclination "bands" associated with specific useful orbits. Objects in such narrow inclination bands have all possible Right Ascensions of Ascending Node (RAANs), creating a different orbit plane for nearly every piece of debris. However, a low-orbiting satellite will always phase in RAAN faster than debris objects in higher orbits at the same inclination, potentially solving the problem. Such a low-orbiting base can serve as a "mother ship" that can tend and then send small, disposable common individual catcher/deboost devices--one for each debris object--as the facility drifts into the same RAAN as each higher object. The dV necessary to catch highly-eccentric orbit debris in the center of the band alternatively allows the capture of less-eccentric debris in a wider inclination range around the center. It is demonstrated that most LEO hazardous debris can be removed from orbit in three years, using a single LEO launch of one mother ship--with its onboard magazine of freeflying low-tech catchers--into each of ten identified bands, with second or potentially third launches into only the three highest-inclination bands. The nearly 1000 objects near the geostationary orbit present special challenges in mass, maneuverability, and ultimate disposal options, leading to a dramatically different architecture and technology suite than the LEO solution. It is shown that the entire population of near-GEO derelict objects can be gathered and tethered together within a 3 year period for future scrap-yard operations using achievable technologies and only two earth launches.

  10. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight over Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership flies over the main building at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and has also been both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  11. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  12. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Dryden Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership sits on the ramp in front of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  13. Spin Research Vehicle (SRV) in B-52 Captive Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This in-flight photo of NASA's B-52 mothership shows the bomber carrying a subscale model of an Air Force F-15, a remotely piloted vehicle that was used to conduct spin research. The F-15 Remotely Piloted Research Vehicles (RPRV) was air launched from the B-52 at approximately 45,000 feet and was controlled by a pilot in a ground cockpit complete with flight controls and a television screen. The F-15 model in this particular configuration was known as the Spin Research Vehicle (SRV). NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  14. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An aerial view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  15. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploys an experimental drag chute just after landing the runway at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  16. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An experimental drag chute deploys amidst a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  17. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A close-up of an experimental drag chute deploying in a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  18. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A rear view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  19. X-38 Mounted on Pylon of B-52 Mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A close-up view of the X-38 research vehicle mounted under the wing of the B-52 mothership prior to a 1997 test flight. The X-38, which was designed to help develop technology for an emergency crew return vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station, is one of many research vehicles the B-52 has carried aloft over the past 40 years. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  20. B-52 Flight Mission Symbology on Side of Craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A view of some of the mission markings, painted on the side of NASA's B-52 mothership, that tell the story of its colorful history. Just as combat aircraft would paint a bomb on the side of an aircraft for each bombing mission completed, NASA crew members painted a silhouette on the side of the B-52's fuselage to commemorate each drop of an X-15, lifting body, remotely piloted research vehicle, X-38 crew return vehicle, or other experimental vehicle or parachute system. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  1. Pegasus Mated to B-52 Mothership - Front View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's B-52 launch aircraft takes off with the second Pegasus vehicle under its wing from the Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  2. X-15 Mated to B-52 Captive Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    One of three X-15 rocket-powered research aircraft being carried aloft under the wing of its B-52 mothership. The X-15 was air launched from the B-52 so the rocket plane would have enough fuel to reach its high speed and altitude test points. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. The X-15s made a total of 199 flights over a period of nearly 10 years and set world's unofficial speed and altitude records of 4,520 miles per hour (Mach 6.7) and 354,200 feet. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the development of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo manned spaceflight programs and also the Space Shuttle program. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet.. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the airc

  3. Pegasus Mated to B-52 Mothership - First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Pegasus air-launched space booster is carried aloft under the right wing of NASA's B-52 carrier aircraft on its first captive flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The first of two scheduled captive flights was completed on November 9, 1989. Pegasus is used to launch satellites into low-earth orbits cheaply. In 1997, a Pegasus rocket booster was also modified to test a hypersonic experiment (PHYSX). An experimental 'glove,' installed on a section of its wing, housed hundreds of temperature and pressure sensors that sent hypersonic flight data to ground tracking facilities during the experiment's flight. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  4. X-15 Mated to B-52 Captive Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    High-altitude contrails frame the B-52 mothership as it carries the X-15 aloft for a research flight on 13 April 1960 on Air Force Maj. Robert M. White's first X-15 flight. The X-15s were air-launched so that they would have enough rocket fuel to reach their high speed and altitude test points. For this early research flight, the X-15 was equipped with a pair of XLR-11 rocket engines until the XLR-99 was available. The X-15s made a total of 199 flights over a period of nearly 10 years--1959 to 1968--and set unofficial world speed and altitude records of 4,520 mph (Mach 6.7) and 354,200 feet. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the development of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo piloted spaceflight programs, and also the Space Shuttle program. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  5. X-15 Mounted to B-52 Mothership Pylon in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This photo illustrates how the X-15 rocket powered aircraft was taken aloft under the wing of a B-52. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a B-52 aircraft at 45,000 ft and a speed of about 500 mph. This photo was taken from one of the observation windows in the B-52 shortly before dropping the X-15. The X-15 was flown over a period of nearly 10 years -- June 1959 to Oct. 1968 -- and set the world's unofficial speed and altitude records of 4,520 mph (Mach 6.7) and 354,200 ft in a program to investigate all aspects of manned hypersonic flight. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the development of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo manned spaceflight programs, and also the Space Shuttle program. The X-15s made a total of 199 flights, and were manufactured by North American Aviation. X-15-1, serial number 56-6670, is now located at the National Air and Space Museum, Washington DC. North American X-15A-2, serial number 56-6671, is at the United States Air Force Museum, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The X-15-3, serial number 56-6672, crashed on November 15, 1967, resulting in the death of Major Michael J. Adams.

  6. Commercial winged booster to launch satellites from B-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covault, Craig

    1988-06-01

    A newly developed commercial winged space booster, the Pegasus, which will launch satellites from a B-52, is described. The booster will be able to launch a 600 lb, 72 in long craft into a 250 nm equatorial orbit. The Pegasus is 49.2 ft long with a 22 ft wing span and a weight of 40,000 lb. The winged design allows for an angle of attack of 20 degrees and a supersonic lift over drag ratio of 4:1. It operates with three solid rocket motors and will be launched from a B-52 at an altitude of 40,000 ft. The first motor provides an average of 112,000 lbs of thrust for about 82 seconds; burnout occurs at 208,000 ft and Mach 8.7. The third stage provides 9,000 lbs of thrust for 65 seconds, accelerating the vehicle into 25,000 fps orbital velocity. The first launch will be a 400 lb relay satellite targeted for July 1989 over the Pacific Ocean. Future launches will be possible from any site and will cost 10 million dollars. The Pegasus can also carry a 1500 payload at high altitude Mach cruise flights that do not achieve orbit, providing data to validate spaceplane conceptual fluid dynamic codes generated by computer.

  7. Pegasus Engine Ignites after Drop from B-52 Mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Against the midnight blue of a high-altitude sky, Orbital Sciences' Pegasus winged rocket booster ignites after being dropped from NASA's B-52 mothership on a July 1991 flight. A NASA chase plane for the flight is also visible above the rocket and below the B-52. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable data on aerodynamics. By conducting experiments in a piggyback mode on Pegasus, some critical and secondary design and development issues were addressed at hypersonic speeds. The vehicle was also used to develop hypersonic flight instrumentation and test techniques. NASA's B-52 carrier-launch vehicle was used to get the Pegasus airborne during six launches from 1990 to 1994. Thereafter, an Orbital Sciences L-1011 aircraft launched the Pegasus. The Pegasus launch vehicle itself has a 400- to 600-pound payload capacity in a 61-cubic-foot payload space at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle is capable of placing a payload into low earth orbit. This vehicle is 49 feet long and 50 inches in diameter. It has a wing span of 22 feet. (There is also a Pegasus XL vehicle that was introduced in 1994. Dryden has never launched one of these vehicles, but they have greater thrust and are 56 feet long.)

  8. Cockpit resource management skills enhance combat mission performance in a B-52 simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povenmire, H. Kingsley; Rockway, Marty R.; Bunecke, Joseph L.; Patton, Mark W.

    1989-01-01

    A cockpit resource management (CRM) program for mission-ready B-52 aircrew is developed. The relationship between CRM performance and combat mission performance is studied. The performances of six crew members flying a simulated high workload mission in a B-52 weapon system trainer are evaluated. The data reveal that CRM performance enhances tactical maneuvers and bombing accuracy.

  9. B-52B Shuttle Drag Chute Test #6 - Duration: 32 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA obtained a B-52H bomber from the U.S. Air Force in 2001, intending to use the aircraft as an air-launch and testbed aircraft to support NASA, Air Force and industry flight research and advance...

  10. M2-F2 Mated to B-52 Mothership on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    A head-on view of the M2-F2 lifting body mounted on the wing pylon of its B-52 mothership in 1965. This was for a captive flight made the following month. The M2-F2 remained attached to the B-52 throughout the flight to test its on-board systems. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet.. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  11. HiMAT Subscale Research Vehicle Mated to B-52 Mothership in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) research vehicle is shown here mated to a wing pylon on NASA's B-52 mothership aircraft. The HiMAT was a technology demonstrator to test structures and configurations for advanced fighter concepts. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 proved a valuable workhorse for NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center (under various names), launching a wide variety of vehicles and conducting numerous other research flights. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  12. Pre-flight transient dynamic analysis of B-52 carrying Space Shuttle solid rocket booster drop-test vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Schuster, L. S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper concerns the transient dynamic analysis of the B-52 aircraft carrying the Space Shuttle solid-rocket booster drop-test vehicle (SRB/DTV). The NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) finite-element computer program was used in the analysis. The B-52 operating conditions considered for analysis were (1) landing and (2) braking on aborted takeoff runs. The transient loads for the B-52 pylon front and rear hooks were calculated. The results can be used to establish the safe maneuver envelopes for the B-52 carrying the SRB/DTV in landings and brakings.

  13. Preflight transient dynamic analyses of B-52 aircraft carrying Space Shuttle solid rocket booster drop-test vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Schuster, L. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper concerns the transient dynamic analysis of the B-52 aircraft carrying the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster drop test vehicle (SRB/DTV). The NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) finite element computer program was used in the analysis. The B-52 operating conditions considered for analysis were (1) landing and (2) braking on aborted takeoff runs. The transient loads for the B-52 pylon front and rear hooks were calculated. The results can be used to establish the safe maneuver envelopes for the B-52 carrying the SRB/DTV in landings and brakings.

  14. Research in Military Aircraft Emissions Photo of a B-52 bomber taking

    E-print Network

    Research in Military Aircraft Emissions Photo of a B-52 bomber taking off (above) and landing) · Focus on high-payload aircraft · Aircraft emissions play a significant role in atmospheric pollution ­ Large amounts of elemental carbon and sulfate are present in aircraft emitted particulate matter ­ Most

  15. M2-F2 Lifting Body being Carried Aloft by B-52 Mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The M2-F2 Lifting Body is shown here being carried aloft by the Air Force's B-52 (tail number 003) prior to a research launch. The success of Dryden's 'homebuilt' M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies--the M2-F2 and the HL-10, both built by the Northrop Corporation. The 'M' refers to 'manned' and 'F' refers to 'flight' version. 'HL' comes from 'horizontal landing.' The first flight of the M2-F2--which looked much like the 'F1'--was on July 12, 1966. Milt Thompson was the pilot. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During the X-15 and Lifting-Body programs, another B-52, tail number 003, also served as a launch aircraft. During those programs, both B-52s were operated by the Air Force, NASA's partner in both programs. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  16. B-52/Pegasus with X-43A departing on first captive flight.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. After taking off from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., at 12:33 p.m. PDT, the B-52 soared off the California coast on the predetermined flight path, and returned to Dryden for a 2:19 p.m. PDT landing. Pending thorough evaluation of all flight data, this captive-carry test could lead to the first flight of the X-43A 'stack' as early as mid-May. The first free flight will be air-launched by NASA's B-52 at about 24,000 feet altitude. The booster will accelerate the X-43A to Mach 7 to approximately 95,000 feet altitude. At booster burnout, the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power on a preprogrammed flight path. The hydrogen-fueled aircraft has a wingspan of approximately 5 feet, measures 12 feet long and weighs about 2,800 pounds.

  17. Close view of B-52/Pegasus with X-43A in flight.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. After taking off from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., at 12:33 p.m. PDT, the B-52 soared off the California coast on the predetermined flight path, and returned to Dryden for a 2:19 p.m. PDT landing. Pending thorough evaluation of all flight data, this captive-carry test could lead to the first flight of the X-43A 'stack' as early as mid-May. The first free flight will be air-launched by NASA's B-52 at about 24,000 feet altitude. The booster will accelerate the X-43A to Mach 7 to approximately 95,000 feet altitude. At booster burnout, the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power on a preprogrammed flight path. The hydrogen-fueled aircraft has a wingspan of approximately 5 feet, measures 12 feet long and weighs about 2,800 pounds.

  18. B-52/Pegasus with X-43A landing after first captive carry flight.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. After taking off from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., at 12:33 p.m. PDT, the B-52 soared off the California coast on the predetermined flight path, and returned to Dryden for a 2:19 p.m. PDT landing. Pending thorough evaluation of all flight data, this captive-carry test could lead to the first flight of the X-43A 'stack' as early as mid-May. The first free flight will be air-launched by NASA's B-52 at about 24,000 feet altitude. The booster will accelerate the X-43A to Mach 7 to approximately 95,000 feet altitude. At booster burnout, the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power on a preprogrammed flight path. The hydrogen-fueled aircraft has a wingspan of approximately 5 feet, measures 12 feet long and weighs about 2,800 pounds.

  19. B-52/Pegasus with X-43A in flight over Pacific Ocean.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. The NASA X-43A hypersonic research vehicle and its Pegasus booster rocket, mounted beneath the wing of their B-52 mothership, had a successful first captive-carry flight on April 28, 2001, Basically a dress rehearsal for a subsequent free flight, the captive-carry flight kept the X-43A-and-Pegasus combination attached to the B-52's wing pylon throughout the almost two-hour mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., over the Pacific Missile Test Range, and back to Dryden. After taking off from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., at 12:33 p.m. PDT, the B-52 soared off the California coast on the predetermined flight path, and returned to Dryden for a 2:19 p.m. PDT landing. Pending thorough evaluation of all flight data, this captive-carry test could lead to the first flight of the X-43A 'stack' as early as mid-May. The first free flight will be air-launched by NASA's B-52 at about 24,000 feet altitude. The booster will accelerate the X-43A to Mach 7 to approximately 95,000 feet altitude. At booster burnout, the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power on a preprogrammed flight path. The hydrogen-fueled aircraft has a wingspan of approximately 5 feet, measures 12 feet long and weighs about 2,800 pounds.

  20. X-15 on Lakebed after Landing with B-52 Mothership Flyover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    As crew members secure the X-15 rocket-powered aircraft after a research flight, the B-52 mothership used for launching this unique aircraft does a low fly-by overhead. The X-15s made a total of 199 flights over a period of nearly 10 years -- 1959 to 1968 -- and set unofficial world speed and altitude records of 4,520 mph (Mach 6.7) and 354,200. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the development of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo piloted spaceflight programs, and also the Space Shuttle program. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet.. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  1. Optimization of the polyplanar optical display electronics for a monochrome B-52 display

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, L.

    1998-04-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten-inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a new 200 mW green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments (TI). In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. In order to achieve increased brightness a monochrome digitizing interface was investigated. The operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with the RS-170 video format specific to the B-52 aircraft will be discussed, including the increased brightness of the monochrome digitizing interface. A brief description of the electronics required to drive the new 200 mW laser is also presented.

  2. Optimization of the polyplanar optical display electronics for a monochrome B-52 display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSanto, Leonard

    1998-09-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten-inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a new 200 mW green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLPTM) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments (TI). In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMDTM) chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. In order to achieve increased brightness a monochrome digitizing interface was investigated. The operation of the DMDTM divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMDTM board with the RS-170 video format specific to the B-52 aircraft will be discussed, including the increased brightness of the monochrome digitizing interface. A brief description of the electronics required to drive the new 200 mW laser is also presented.

  3. A B-52H, tail number 61-0025, arrives at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center after landing July 30,

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, received an 'H' model B-52 Stratofortress aircraft on July 30, 2001. The B-52H will be used as an air-launch aircraft supporting NASA's flight research and advanced technology demonstration efforts. Dryden received the B-52H from the U.S. Air Force's (USAF) 23rd Bomb Squadron, 5th Bombardment Wing (Air Combat Command), located at Minot AFB, N.D. A USAF crew flew the aircraft to Dryden. The aircraft, USAF tail number 61-0025, will be loaned initially, then later transferred from the USAF to NASA. The B-52H is scheduled to leave Dryden Aug. 2 for de-militarization and Programmed Depot Maintenance (PDM) at Tinker Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma. The depot-level maintenance is scheduled to last about six months and includes a thorough maintenance and inspection process. The newly arrived B-52H is slated to replace Dryden's famous B-52B '008,' in the 2003-2004 timeframe. It will take about one year for the B-52H to be ready for flight research duties. This time includes PDM, construction of the new pylon, installation of the flight research instrumentation equipment, and aircraft envelope clearance flights.

  4. M2-F3 In-flight Launch from B-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This photo shows the M2-F3 Lifting Body being launched from NASA's B-52 mothership at the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC--now the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. A fleet of lifting bodies flown at the FRC from 1963 to l975 demonstrated the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land a wingless vehicle designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an aircraft at a pre-determined site. Early flight testing of the M2-F1 and M2-F2 lifting body reentry configurations had validated the concept of piloted lifting body reentry from space. When the M2-F2 crashed on May 10, 1967, valuable information had already been obtained and was contributing to new designs. NASA pilots said the M2-F2 had lateral control problems, so when the M2-F2 was rebuilt at Northrop and redesignated the M2-F3, it was modified with an additional third vertical fin -- centered between the tip fins -- to improve control characteristics. First flight of the M2-F3, with NASA pilot Bill Dana at the controls, was June 2, 1970. The modified vehicle exhibited much better lateral stability and control characteristics than before, and only three glide flights were necessary before the first powered flight on Nov. 25, 1970. Over the next 26 missions, the M2-F3 reached a top speed of l,064 mph (Mach 1.6). Highest altitude reached by vehicle was 7l,500 feet on Dec. 20, 1972, the date of its last flight, with NASA pilot John Manke at the controls. NASA donated The M2-F3 vehicle to the Smithsonian Institute in December 1973. It is currently hanging in the Air and Space Museum along with the X-15 aircraft number 1, which was its hangar partner from 1965 to 1969. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located

  5. Operation Redwing -- Project 5. 2. In-flight participation of a B-52. Report for May-July 1956

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, F.L.

    1985-04-01

    The primary objective of this Project was to obtain measured-energy input and aircraft-response data on an instrumented B-52 aircraft when subjected to the thermal, blast, and gust effects of a nuclear explosion. To accomplish this, analysis was used in selecting the spatial location for the B-52, relative to a detonation, that would result in the desired aircraft inputs and responses. The B-52 was extensively instrumented with the major portion of the instrumentation devoted to measuring aircraft responses. The B-52 participated in nine shots, including one shot which the aircraft aborted just prior to time zero because of Bombing Navigation System difficulties. The reliability of the instrumentation system was between 95% and 100% throughout the test program.

  6. Analysis and testing of aeroelastic model stability augmentation systems. [for supersonic transport aircraft wing and B-52 aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.; Patel, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Testing and evaluation of a stability augmentation system for aircraft flight control were performed. The flutter suppression system and synthesis conducted on a scale model of a supersonic wing for a transport aircraft are discussed. Mechanization and testing of the leading and trailing edge surface actuation systems are described. The ride control system analyses for a 375,000 pound gross weight B-52E aircraft are presented. Analyses of the B-52E aircraft maneuver load control system are included.

  7. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The new pylon for the X-38 following a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 research vehicle to be carried aloft and launched from the B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  8. HiMAT Subscale Research Vehicle Mated to B-52 Mothership in Flight, Close-up View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A close-up view of the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) research vehicle attached to a wing pylon on NASA's B-52 mothership during a 1980 test flight. The HiMAT used sharply swept-back wings and a canard configuration to test possible technology for advanced fighters. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  9. NASA's B-52 takes the X-38 aloft for the seventh free flight of the program, July 10, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The X-38, mounted beneath the right wing of NASA's B-52, climbed from the runway at Edwards Air Force Base for the seventh free flight test of the X-38, July 10, 2001. The X-38 was released at 37,500 feet and completed a thirteen minute glide flight to a landing on Rogers Dry Lake.

  10. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Tom McMullen, Chief of Dryden's Experimental Fabrication Shop, makes adjustments to the new pylon for NASA's X-38 during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 to be attached to and launched from the B-52's wing. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  11. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Dryden Experimental Fabrication Shop's Andy Blua and Jeff Doughty make sure the new pylon for the X-38 fits precisely during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in 1997. The 1,200-pound steel pylon, fabricated at Dryden, was an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 research vehicle to be carried aloft and launched from the bomber. The X-38 was a designed as a technology demonstrator to help develop an emergency Crew Return Vehicle for the International Space Station. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  12. A B-52H, on loan to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, makes a pass down the runway prior to land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, received an 'H' model B-52 Stratofortress aircraft on July 30, 2001. The B-52H will be used as an air-launch aircraft supporting NASA's flight research and advanced technology demonstration efforts. Dryden received the B-52H from the U.S. Air Force's (USAF) 23rd Bomb Squadron, 5th Bombardment Wing (Air Combat Command), located at Minot AFB, N.D. A USAF crew flew the aircraft to Dryden. The aircraft, USAF tail number 61-0025, will be loaned initially, then later transferred from the USAF to NASA. The B-52H is scheduled to leave Dryden Aug. 2 for de-militarization and Programmed Depot Maintenance (PDM) at Tinker Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma. The depot-level maintenance is scheduled to last about six months and includes a thorough maintenance and inspection process. The newly arrived B-52H is slated to replace Dryden's famous B-52B '008,' in the 2003-2004 timeframe. It will take about one year for the B-52H to be ready for flight research duties. This time includes PDM, construction of the new pylon, installation of the flight research instrumentation equipment, and aircraft envelope clearance flights.

  13. Ships and shipping: a comprehensive guide

    SciTech Connect

    Nersesian, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A guide to petroleum industry ships and shipping is presented. The world fleet is discussed, along with forecasting tanker demand and shipping economics. In addition, tankers, liquefied gas carriers, general cargo and container vessels, bulk carriers, and combination carriers are discussed. (JMT)

  14. Association of the HLA-B*52 allele with non-progression to AIDS in Brazilian HIV-1-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, S L M; de Sá, N B R; Campos, D P; Coelho, A B; Guimarães, M L; Leite, T C N F; Veloso, V G; Morgado, M G

    2014-04-01

    Several human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles are associated with the susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection and/or AIDS progression. Of these, the HLA-B alleles are considered the strongest genetic determinant of disease outcome. We evaluated the influence of the HLA-B alleles on AIDS progression among HIV-1-positive individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, who were categorized as rapid progressors (RPs), typical progressors (TPs) or long-term non-progressors (LTNPs). In this study, significant differences in HLA-B allele frequencies were observed among the three progression groups for the B*48, B*49 and B*52 alleles. After controlling for other factors associated with AIDS progression, the presence of the B*52 allele was shown to be a significant protective factor (hazard ratio (HR) 0.49 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27-0.90) P<0.03). Although no direct association was observed between the presence of the B*27 or B*57 allele and the LTNP profile compared with the TP or RP groups, the adjusted model confirmed that these alleles are protective factors against AIDS progression (HR 0.62 (95% CI 0.38-0.99) P<0.05), as previously described. These data corroborate the existence of significant differences in HLA-B allele frequencies among the distinct AIDS progression profiles and further elucidate the role of HLA alleles in the outcome of HIV infections in diverse populations. PMID:24718028

  15. Development and Testing of a Drogue Parachute System for X-37 ALTV/B-52H Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Jensen, Steven C.; Hennings, Elsa J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple scenarios were identified in which the X-37 approach and landing test vehicle (ALTV) catastrophically recontacts the B-52H carrier aircraft after separation. The most cost-effective recontact risk mitigation is the prelaunch deployment of a drogue parachute that is released after the X-37 ALTV has safely cleared the B-52H. After release, a fully-inflated drogue parachute takes 30 min to reach ground and results in a large footprint that excessively restricts the days available for flight. To reduce the footprint, a passive collapse mechanism consisting of an elastic reefing line attached to the parachute skirt was developed. At flight loads the elastic is stretched, allowing full parachute inflation. After release, drag loads drop dramatically and the elastic line contracts, reducing the frontal drag area. A 50-percent drag reduction results in an approximately 75-percent ground footprint reduction. Eleven individual parachute designs were evaluated at flight load dynamic pressures in the High Velocity Airflow System (HIVAS) at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, California. Various options for the elastic reefing system were also evaluated at HIVAS. Two best parachute designs were selected from HIVAS to be carried forward to flight test. Detailed HIVAS test results are presented in this report.

  16. Development and Testing of a Drogue Parachute System for X-37 ALTV/B-52H Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Jensen, Steven C.; Hennings, Elsa J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple scenarios were identified in which the X-37 approach and landing test vehicle (ALTV) catastrophically recontacts the B-52H carrier aircraft after separation. The most cost-effective recontact risk mitigation is the prelaunch deployment of a drogue parachute that is released after the X-37 ALTV has safely cleared the B-52H. After release, a fully-inflated drogue parachute takes 30 min to reach ground and results in a large footprint that excessively restricts the days available for flight. To reduce the footprint, a passive collapse mechanism consisting of an elastic reefing line attached to the parachute skirt was developed. At flight loads the elastic is stretched, allowing full parachute inflation. After release, drag loads drop dramatically and the elastic line contracts, reducing the frontal drag area. A 50 percent drag reduction results in an approximately 75 percent ground footprint reduction. Eleven individual parachute designs were evaluated at flight load dynamic pressures in the High Velocity Airflow System (HIVAS) at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, California. Various options for the elastic reefing system were also evaluated at HIVAS. Two best parachute designs were selected from HIVAS to be carried forward to flight test. Detailed HIVAS test results are presented in this report.

  17. Sunken Slave Ship

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lesson plan teaching how marine archaeologists find a sunken ship and how they recover and preserve their find. Activity is based on the 18th century slave ship, the Henrietta Marie, which sank off the Florida coast shortly after delivering African slaves to Jamaica. Explore what goes into resurrecting sunken ships, as well as how to minimize the damage done to the ecosystem.

  18. Berkeley SHIP & Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Walker, Matthew P.

    Berkeley SHIP & Healthcare Reform: What's Right for You? December 11, 2013 #12;Why are we here? · Help you understand your insurance options · Give you time to ask questions · Talk to Berkeley SHIP. · SHIP's plan meets all ACA requirements. · Reminder: all UC students are required to have health

  19. Load and dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for finned configuration 1 space shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The B-52B airplane was identified for use in solid rocket booster (RSB) parachute drop flight testing. The purpose of this study was to determine by theoretical analysis methods the compatability and structural capability of B-52B drop test vehicle configuration (with fins) to accomplish the drop test mission. This document consist of four volumes. This volume presents a summary of airplane flutter and load strength evaluation analysis results and a comparative study of the pylon loading resulting from drop test vehicle inertia and aerodynamic considerations.

  20. Mothers: The Unacknowledged Victims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    Used coercion theory to investigate aversive mother- child interactions. Literature indicated younger children produced higher rates of aversive interactions with their mothers. Mothers' role satisfaction varied as a function of such rates. Observation data showed mothers of aggressive children encountered higher rates of aversive interactions…

  1. Suicidal mothers

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Epidemiological research has demonstrated that suicidal ideation is a relatively frequent complication of pregnancy in both developed and developing countries. Hence, the aims of this study are: to assess whether or not pregnancy may be considered a period highly susceptible to suicidal acts; to recognize potential contributing factors to suicidal behaviors; to describe the repercussions of suicide attempts on maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcome; to identify a typical profile of women at high risk of suicide during pregnancy. Methods: Medical literature information published in any language since 1950 was identified using MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. Search terms were: "pregnancy", (antenatal) "depression", "suicide". Searches were last updated on 28 September 2010. Forty-six articles assessing the suicidal risk during pregnancy and obstetrical outcome of pregnancies complicated by suicide attempts were analyzed, without methodological limitations. Results: Worldwide, frequency of suicidal attempts and the rate of death by suicidal acts are low. Although this clinical event is rare, the consequences of a suicidal attempt are medically and psychologically devastating for the mother-infant pair. We also found that common behaviors exist in women at high risk for suicide during pregnancy. Review data indeed suggest that a characteristic profile can prenatally identify those at highest risk for gestational suicide attempts. Conclusions: Social and health organizations should make all possible efforts to identify women at high suicidal risk, in order to establish specific programs to prevent this tragic event. The available data informs health policy makers with a typical profile to screen women at high risk of suicide during pregnancy. Those women who have a current or past history of psychiatric disorders, are young, unmarried, unemployed, have incurred an unplanned pregnancy (eventually terminated with an induced abortion), are addicted to illicit drugs and/or alcohol, lack effective psychosocial support, have suffered from episodes of sexual or physical violence are particularly vulnerable. PMID:21498972

  2. [The Thule case. Mortality and hospitalization after the crash of an American B-52 bomber in 1968].

    PubMed

    Juel, K

    1993-07-26

    In 1968, a B-52 bomber carrying nuclear bombs crashed near the Thule US Air-Base in Greenland. By 1986, many cases of disease had been reported among Danish workers employed at the base. A database has been constructed from staff files of workers employed from 1963 to 1971. Of 4,322 workers, 98.7% were identified in 1987. The study group consisted of 1,202 workers employed during the clean up period (from the time of the crash until the last of the contaminated material had been removed). The reference group consisted of 3,120 workers employed outside the clean up period. No differences were found in total mortality, or mortality from cancer, heart disease or accidents between the groups after adjusting for age, marital status and length of employment. Mortality from suicide was lower in the study group. The hospitalization rates for the period 1977-1985 also showed no differences between the two groups. The conclusion of the register surveys is that no harmful effect on health due to the crash can be established by measuring mortality or hospital admissions. PMID:8346574

  3. Merchant Shipping: Ships and Shipowners: The Merchant Shipping (Department of Scientific and Industrial Research Ships) Order, 1957 

    E-print Network

    Agnew, W.G.

    1957-01-01

    . This Order allows ships in the service of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research to be so registered and determines the Sections and provisions of the Merchant Shipping Acts which shall apply to them. It revokes the Merchant Shipping...

  4. Emissions from ships

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.J.; Fischbeck, P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-10-31

    Recently the International Maritime Organization has made the first attempt to address air pollution from ships. This article presents information showing that ships are a significant source of air pollution on a global scale and discusses the policy implications of such a finding. The air pollution components included in the survey were NOx, SO2, CO2. 34 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Viking Ship Design Challenge

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    In this design challenge, students learn about the Vikings from an engineering point-of-view. While investigating the history and anatomy of Viking ships, they learn how engineering solutions are shaped by the surrounding environment and availability of resources. Students apply this knowledge to design, build and test their own model Viking ships.

  6. Ships to the Sea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

    This lesson contains materials for the U.S. Navy Museum's "Ships to the Sea" program. The program is appropriate for students in grades 2-4 and was designed in accordance with local and national social studies standards. The materials introduce students to the world of ship technology and naval terminology. The lesson is presented in five…

  7. Mother's Day Card

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-01

    This activity page which supports the Cyberchase video, "Saving Mother's Day" uses lines of symmetry to create a Madre Bonita flower, the symbol of Mother's Day. This activity can be printed for student use.

  8. [Psychopathology service on ships].

    PubMed

    Nowosielski, Rados?aw; Mazurek, Tomasz; Florkowski, Antoni

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the specific engineering services and suitability of candidates for the psychophysical performance. Navy ships are equipped with equipment and weapons are controlled by electronic devices ship and crew. Advanced technology puts high demands on operator. For the ship's staff are recruited soldiers of the psychophysical characteristics predisposing to this kind of action. The paper uses personal experience to work in military units of the Navy, and data from the literature. Terms of sailing ships off the summer season are defined as difficult. The crew during a combat mission felt the risks associated with movements of the ship in difficult meteorological conditions, and associated with the implementation of the task. The development of ship's technical equipment, working in isolated groups, functioning within a limited space, noise, vibration, electromagnetic waves heighten the emotional burden on crew members. Military service on Navy ships require high psycho-physical predisposition, resistance to stress. The crucial factor is proper selection among the candidates based on psychiatric and psychological counseling for military and medical jurisprudence. Also plays a significant role for training doctors and specialists in psychoprophylaxy of military units in the field of mental hygiene. PMID:20642117

  9. Amygdala Response to Mother

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tottenham, Nim; Shapiro, Mor; Telzer, Eva H.; Humphreys, Kathryn L.

    2012-01-01

    In altricial species, like the human, the caregiver, very often the mother, is one of the most potent stimuli during development. The distinction between mothers and other adults is learned early in life and results in numerous behaviors in the child, most notably mother-approach and stranger wariness. The current study examined the influence of…

  10. NOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the

    E-print Network

    NOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the programs of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Southeast Fisheries Science Center. The ship conducts fisheries and living marine resource the Castro regime came to power in the late 1950's. The ship was in Cuban waters to conduct a cooperative

  11. NOAA Ship Miller Freeman The ship is named for Miller

    E-print Network

    NOAA Ship Miller Freeman The ship is named for Miller Freeman, founder of Pacific Fisherman of Washington to create a new fisheries school in 1919. NOAA ship Miller Freeman conducts a wide variety monitoring; and deploying surface and subsurface moorings. The ship is a Pacific stern trawler that conducts

  12. Spirit and Its Now-Empty Mother Ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This overhead polar image was captured after the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took a few baby rolls away from the spacecraft that bore it millions of miles to Mars. The empty lander, now named the Columbia Memorial Station, can be seen to the right of the rover. This image was taken by Spirit's navigation camera.

  13. B-52B-008/DTV (Drop Test Vehicle) configuration 1 (with and without fins) flight test results - captive flight and drop test missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The B-52B-008 drop test consisted of one takeoff roll to 60 KCAS, two captive flights to accomplish limited safety of flight flutter and structural demonstration testing, and seven drop test flights. Of the seven drop test missions, one flight was aborted due to the failure of the hook mechanism to release the drop test vehicle (DTV); but the other six flights successfully dropped the DTV.

  14. Computation and Minimisation of Ship

    E-print Network

    Stokes, Yvonne

    Computation and Minimisation of Ship Waves E.O. Tuck 1 Introduction Ships make waves. Sometimes extremes: the ambient sea is seldom quite as calm as in Figure 1, and most ships avoid seas as rough as in Figure 2. Most of the life of most ships is spent in seas nearer to the calm state than the rough state

  15. Optimal ship routing

    E-print Network

    Avgouleas, Kyriakos

    2008-01-01

    Fuel savings in ship navigation has always been a popular subject in the maritime industry as well as the world's largest Navies. Oil prices and environmental considerations drive the effort for more fuel-efficient navigation. ...

  16. Ancient ships of Japan 

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Hiroaki

    2006-10-30

    Ancient ships of Japan, which are little known outside of Japan, are presented based on the studies of past researchers, as well as a comprehensive analysis of archaeological remains. The process of development from logboats ...

  17. Short sea shipping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert F. Mulligan; Gary A. Lombardo

    2006-01-01

    This paper quantifies the potential environmental benefit of short sea shipping. Critical strategic issues relevant to formulating\\u000a public policy are developed. Coastal shipping has traditionally been a major sector of the maritime industry. This continues\\u000a to be the case in the European Union, but the sector has diminished in relative importance in North America as the transport\\u000a industry has become

  18. Dangerous Goods Shipping Federal and international shipping rules require that anyone wishing to ship biological materials,

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Dangerous Goods Shipping Federal and international shipping rules require that anyone wishing to ship biological materials, infectious substances, or dry ice must complete training in Dangerous Goods Shipping. Pitt EH&S offers a web based program that fulfills the training and certification requirements

  19. Great Lakes Shipping Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Provided by the University of Detroit Mercy Libraries/Media Services, this site is a great resource for anyone interested in the history of shipping on the Great Lakes. The database indexes information on a large number of ships that have worked these waters, offering information such as registry number, year built, final disposition, company, physical measurements, name of shipbuilders, and additional remarks, among other categories. Both company name and shipbuilder are cross-referenced to additional ships owned or built. Most of the entries also include some excellent historical photos, though these did not load correctly in Netscape (they worked fine with IE).The entry for the Edmund Fitzgerald, for instance, contained ten photos. The database may be searched by keyword with multiple modifiers.

  20. Metacenter and ship stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mégel, Jacques; Kliava, Janis

    2010-07-01

    We address the location of the metacenter M of a floating body such as a ship. Previous studies of M in relation to the stability of a ship have mainly used geometrical approaches and were limited to near equilibrium. We develop a quantitative approach to the location of M for a general shape of the cross-section of a floating body in a rolling/pitching motion and for an arbitrary heel angle. We show that different definitions of M refer to one and the same special point of the floating body. We discuss the relation between the height of M with respect to the line of flotation and the contribution of the buoyancy force to ship stability. We provide expressions and graphs of the buoyancy, flotation, and metacentric curves for some simple shapes of floating bodies.

  1. Merchant Shipping: The Merchant Shipping (Fire Appliances) Rules, 1952 

    E-print Network

    Jenkins, Gilmour

    1952-01-01

    These Rules arrange ships into classes, the classification being uniform with that in the Merchant Shipping (Life-Saving Appliances) Rules, 1952 (S.I. 1952/1949). The Rules provide for the fire appliances to be carried in ...

  2. Are nuclear ships environmentally safer than conventionally powered ships

    SciTech Connect

    Bone, C.A.; Molgaard, C.A.; Helmkamp, J.C.; Golbeck, A.L.

    1988-03-01

    An epidemiologic analysis was conducted to determine if risk of hospitalization varied by age, ship type, or occupation between nuclear and conventional powered ship crews in the U.S. Navy. Study cohorts consisted of all male enlisted personnel who served exclusively aboard conventional or nuclear powered aircraft carriers and cruisers during the years 1975-1979; cases were those men hospitalized during this period (N = 48,242). Conventional ship personnel showed significantly elevated rates of injury and disease when compared to nuclear ship personnel. The largest relative risks by age occurred for conventional ship crewmen less than 30 years old. Seaman, logistics (supply), and healthcare personnel serving aboard conventional ships comprised the occupational groups exhibiting the highest hospitalization rate differentials. The results strongly suggest that nuclear ships provide a healthier, safer working and living environment than conventional ships.

  3. X-15 ship #3 on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The X-15 ship #3 (56-6672) is seen here on the lakebed at the Edwards Air Force Base, Edwards, California. Ship #3 made 65 flights during the program, attaining a top speed of Mach 5.65 and a maximum altitude of 354,200 feet. Only 10 of the 12 X-15 pilots flew Ship #3, and only eight of them earned their astronaut wings during the program. Robert White, Joseph Walker, Robert Rushworth, John 'Jack' McKay, Joseph Engle, William 'Pete' Knight, William Dana, and Michael Adams all earned their astronaut wings in Ship #3. Neil Armstrong and Milton Thompson also flew Ship #3. In fact, Armstrong piloted Ship #3 on its first flight, on 20 December 1961. On 15 November 1967, Ship #3 was launched over Delamar Lake, Nevada with Maj. Michael J. Adams at the controls. The vehicle soon reached a speed of Mach 5.2, and a peak altitude of 266,000 feet. During the climb, an electrical disturbance degraded the aircraft's controllability. Ship #3 began a slow drift in heading, which soon became a spin. Adams radioed that the X-15 'seems squirrelly,' and then said 'I'm in a spin.' Through some combination of pilot technique and basic aerodynamic stability, Adams recovered from the spin, and entered an inverted Mach 4.7 dive. As the X-15 plummeted into the increasingly thicker atmosphere, the Honeywell adaptive flight control system caused the vehicle to begin oscillating. As the pitching motion increased, aerodynamic forces finally broke the aircraft into several major pieces. Adams was killed when the forward fuselage impacted the desert. This was the only fatal accident during the entire X-15 program. The X-15 was a rocket powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow-on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and movable horizontal stabilizers to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a B-52 aircraft at 45,000 ft and a speed of about 500 mph. Depending on the mission, the rocket engine provided thrust for the first 80 to 120 sec of flight. The remainder of the normal 10 to 11 min. flight was powerless and ended with a 200-mph glide landing. Generally, one of two types of X-15 flight profiles was used; a high-altitude flight plan that called for the pilot to maintain a steep rate of climb, or a speed profile that called for the pilot to push over and maintain a level altitude. The X-15 was flown over a period of nearly 10 years -- June 1959 to Oct. 1968 -- and set the world's unofficial speed and altitude records of 4,520 mph or Mach 6.7 (set by Ship #2) and 354,200 ft (set by Ship #3) in a program to investigate all aspects of manned hypersonic flight. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the development of the Mercury, Gemini,and Apollo manned spaceflight programs, and also the Space Shuttle program. The X-15s made a total of 199 flight

  4. Dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for the revised Space Shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The structural integrity of B-52B-008, pylon, and hooks for the drop test missions was determined by theoretical analysis. The results of the analysis and conclusions are presented in this document. The major modification to the drop test vehicle was shortening it about 54 inches, which resulted in the forward hook attach structure being located at the base of the nosecone. The shims that are located in the aft hook structures are increased from two inches to three inches. Airspeed, aerodynamic configuration, and load charts are included.

  5. Ships as complex technical systems

    E-print Network

    Dugan, David

    2004-08-17

    The combination of elements out of which a ship is made, particularly the great ships of the eighteenth century onwards, turned them into complex technical systems. They worked by treating people as things. They consisted of many mass produced...

  6. Mothering Taboo Talk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth Francis-Connolly

    2008-01-01

    Motherhood is a common occupation, it is a major occupational role for many women in the United States, yet it is this very commonality that masks the importance and complexity of this role. Research to date tends to focus on the transition to parenthood and mothering young children with little attention paid to how mothering evolves and changes through the

  7. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping...SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

  8. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping...SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

  9. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping...SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

  10. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping...SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

  11. Fire growth in combat ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintiere, J.; Baum, H.; Lawson, R.

    1985-06-01

    A discussion of fire phenomenology pertaining to ships is presented. It draws a background from ship fires, combat ship construction characteristics and scientific knowledge developed for building fires. The immediate goal of this research is to assess the prospect of developing a deterministic (physics) model for ship fire growth as initiated by explosive weapon effects. A specific analysis of vented explosion flows is given as well as a procedure for computing fire growth phenomena from formulae.

  12. Recovery Ship Freedom Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, is towing a barge containing the third Space Shuttle Super Lightweight External Tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT was slated for use to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October 1998. This first time towing arrangement, part of a cost saving plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks were manufactured. The barge was transported up Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tug boat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allowed NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies showed a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications would be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, also underwent deck strengthening enhancements and had the necessary towing wench installed.

  13. Ship infrared detection\\/vulnerability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arie N. de Jong

    1993-01-01

    The IR contrast of ships at sea is of importance for those who want to detect or identify the ship and for those who worry about this. This IR contrast is determined by a large number of parameters. Of course temperatures of the ship's structure and those of the ambient sea and air are important, but also important are the

  14. Integrating electromagnetic launchers on ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonios Challita; John Barber; John Ykema; Cliff Allen

    2004-01-01

    Naval combatant ships of the future will have high power electrically powered weapons systems, including electromagnetic launchers. Integrating high power electric gun systems into ships poses unique issues that ship designers have not faced before. These issues must be identified and addressed early in the conceptual design stage for successful development and integration of high power electric gun systems into

  15. The History of Payload Ships

    E-print Network

    The History of Modular Payload Ships: 1975 - 2005 Jack W. Abbott Naval Postgraduate School, April 27, 2006 #12;2 Ship Design Myths of the 1980's · Computer architecture will never be distributed will always cause increase in construction costs (a compact ship is cheapest) · Development of open interface

  16. Mathematical Modeling: Convoying Merchant Ships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Susann M.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a mathematical model that connects mathematics with social studies. Students use mathematics to model independent versus convoyed ship deployments and sinkings to determine if the British should have convoyed their merchant ships during World War I. During the war, the British admiralty opposed sending merchant ships grouped…

  17. 3, 17171746, 2006 Mediterranean Ships

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OSD 3, 1717­1746, 2006 Mediterranean Ships Of Opportunity Program G. M. R. Manzella et al. Title The improvements of the Ships Of Opportunity Program in MFSTEP G. M. R. Manzella1 , F. Reseghetti1 , G. Coppini2 Ships Of Opportunity Program G. M. R. Manzella et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  18. JOURNAL OF SHIPS & OCEAN ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    31 , 40 2005 11 JOURNAL OF SHIPS & OCEAN ENGINEERING Vol.40 November 2005 3 3 Grilli) (CPM; Constant Panel Method) #12;JOURNAL OF SHIPS & OCEAN ENGINEERING Vol.40 November 2005 32 OF SHIPS & OCEAN ENGINEERING Vol.40 November 2005 34 (9) Dirichlet Neumann

  19. SHIP VELOCITY FIELDS , Lichuan Guib

    E-print Network

    Gui, Lichuan

    1 CHAPTER 3 SHIP VELOCITY FIELDS Joe Longoa , Lichuan Guib , and Fred Sterna a IIHR Hydroscience of applications of PIV for ship velocity fields. Overview is given of PIV techniques used, including PIV systems directions. 1. Introduction Knowledge of flow around ships is important for design, model development

  20. Wallops Ship Surveillance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Donna C.

    2011-01-01

    Approved as a Wallops control center backup system, the Wallops Ship Surveillance Software is a day-of-launch risk analysis tool for spaceport activities. The system calculates impact probabilities and displays ship locations relative to boundary lines. It enables rapid analysis of possible flight paths to preclude the need to cancel launches and allow execution of launches in a timely manner. Its design is based on low-cost, large-customer- base elements including personal computers, the Windows operating system, C/C++ object-oriented software, and network interfaces. In conformance with the NASA software safety standard, the system is designed to ensure that it does not falsely report a safe-for-launch condition. To improve the current ship surveillance method, the system is designed to prevent delay of launch under a safe-for-launch condition. A single workstation is designated the controller of the official ship information and the official risk analysis. Copies of this information are shared with other networked workstations. The program design is divided into five subsystems areas: 1. Communication Link -- threads that control the networking of workstations; 2. Contact List -- a thread that controls a list of protected item (ocean vessel) information; 3. Hazard List -- threads that control a list of hazardous item (debris) information and associated risk calculation information; 4. Display -- threads that control operator inputs and screen display outputs; and 5. Archive -- a thread that controls archive file read and write access. Currently, most of the hazard list thread and parts of other threads are being reused as part of a new ship surveillance system, under the SureTrak project.

  1. Melancholic Mothering: Mothers, Daughters and Family Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenway, Jane; Fahey, Johannah

    2008-01-01

    Through selected theories of melancholia, this paper seeks to shed some fresh interpretive light on the reproduction and disruption of gender, violence and family turmoil across generations of mothers and daughters. The originality of the paper lies in its exploratory deployment of theories of melancholia to consider issues of women, violence and…

  2. EMP coupling to ships

    SciTech Connect

    Deadrick, F.J.; Cabayan, H.S.; Kunz, K.F.; Bevensee, R.M.; Martin, L.C.; Egbert, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Scale-model tests were conducted to establish the adequacy and limitations of model measurements as tools for predicting electromagnetic pulse (EMP) coupling voltages and currents to the critical antennas, cables, and metallic structures on ships. The scale-model predictions are compared with the results of the full-scale EMP simulation test of the Canadian ASW ship, HMCS Huron. (The EMP coupling predictions in this report were made without prior knowledge of the results of the data from the HMCS Huron tests.) This report establishes that the scale-model tests in conjunction with the data base from EMP coupling modules provides the necessary information for source model development and permits effective, low-cost study of particular system configurations. 184 figures, 9 tables.

  3. Naval ship recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino García, I.; Zölzer, U.

    2012-09-01

    Object recognition is a very interesting task with multiple applications and for that reason it has been dealt with very intensively in the last years. In particular, the application to naval ship pictures may facilitate the work of the coastguards or the navy. However, this type of images entails some difficulties due to their specific environment. Water reflects the light and as a consequence, some areas may presumably show different brightness and color. Waves from wind or moving ships pose a problem due to the additional edges that they produce. The camouflage of ships in the military context is also an issue to take into account. Therefore, it is difficult to propose a simple method that is valid for every image. A discussion about which techniques may solve these problems is presented and finally a combined solution based on contour recognition is suggested. Test images are preprocessed by histogram stretching. Then, the Canny method is applied to the image and to the reference contour in order to obtain not only their edges, but also their respective orientations. The problem of recognizing the reference contour within the detected edges is addressed by making use of the Generalized Hough Transform (GHT).

  4. Infants' Recognition of Their Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Ann

    The ability of infants to recognize their mothers as distinct from others was investigated by presenting 6 boys and 6 girls at two age levels (5 weeks and 13 weeks) with the following six sequential stimulus conditions: (1) mother's face (MO); (2) stranger's face (SO); (3) mother's face with stranger's voice (MS); (4) stranger's face with mother's…

  5. Application of fracture mechanics and half-cycle method to the prediction of fatigue life of B-52 aircraft pylon components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Carter, A. L.; Totton, W. W.; Ficke, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Stress intensity levels at various parts of the NASA B-52 carrier aircraft pylon were examined for the case when the pylon store was the space shuttle solid rocket booster drop test vehicle. Eight critical stress points were selected for the pylon fatigue analysis. Using fracture mechanics and the half-cycle theory (directly or indirectly) for the calculations of fatigue-crack growth ,the remaining fatigue life (number of flights left) was estimated for each critical part. It was found that the two rear hooks had relatively short fatigue life and that the front hook had the shortest fatigue life of all the parts analyzed. The rest of the pylon parts were found to be noncritical because of their extremely long fatigue life associated with the low operational stress levels.

  6. Hydrogen fueled ships

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, J.P.

    1980-12-01

    Several prior studies have analyzed the impacts of hydrogen fuel on land and air based vehicles. This paper investigates the impacts of hydrogen fuel on military and commercial marine vehicles. The studies performed by the U.S. Navy in the mid-seventies are reviewed and updated using more accurate powering predictions, high efficiency gas turbine propulsion systems, and current fuel prices. The results of the Navy studies are then extended to commercial ships and a concept design for a hydrogen fueled ore carrier is proposed.

  7. Ship Creek bioassessment investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.; Murphy, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB) personnel to conduct a series of collections of macroinvertebrates and sediments from Ship Creek to (1) establish baseline data on these populations for reference in evaluating possible impacts from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) activities at two operable units, (2) compare current population indices with those found by previous investigations in Ship Creek, and (3) determine baseline levels of concentrations of any contaminants in the sediments associated with the macroinvertebrates. A specific suite of indices established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was requested for the macroinvertebrate analyses; these follow the Rapid Bioassessment Protocol developed by Plafkin et al. (1989) and will be described. Sediment sample analyses included a Microtox bioassay and chemical analysis for contaminants of concern. These analyses included, volatile organic compounds, total gasoline and diesel hydrocarbons (EPA method 8015, CA modified), total organic carbon, and an inductive-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) metals scan. Appendix A reports on the sediment analyses. The Work Plan is attached as Appendix B.

  8. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

  9. Shipping and Transport of Biological Materials

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Shipping and Transport of Biological Materials Biological Safety General Biosafety Practices (GBP Modified Organisms (GMOs), and Infectious Substances being shipped require special packaging requires special packaging, permits, or training in order to ship, please review the EHS Hazardous

  10. Drizzle Suppression in Ship Tracks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald J. Ferek; Timothy Garrett; Peter V. Hobbs; Scott Strader; Doug Johnson; Jonathan P. Taylor; Kurt Nielsen; Andrew S. Ackerman; Yefim Kogan; Qingfu Liu; Bruce A. Albrecht; David Babb

    2000-01-01

    Although drizzle was a relatively infrequent occurrence during the Monterey Area Ship Track study, diverse measurements from several sources produced data signals consistent with a reduction in drizzle drops in stratus clouds affected by ship effluents. Concurrent increases in liquid water in the cloud droplet size range, due to redistribution from the drizzle mode, were not always observed, possibly because

  11. Coal-fired ships reappear

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    Interest in coal-fired ships is re-awakening and six are now under construction in Italy, Japan and Spain. The application of dense-phase pneumatic conveying to handle the coal on-board ship is described with particular reference to the Denseveyor system.

  12. Volunteer Mother Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellucci, Arthur, Ed.

    Five members of a school library administration class developed guidelines for a Volunteer Mother Program in public school libraries. Guidelines were stated for the following aspects of volunteer programs: (1) reasons for using volunteers; (2) introduction to the program; (3) recruitment; (4) qualifications; (5) amount of help needed; (6)…

  13. Nuclear-powered ships

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports that using Puget Sound Naval Shipyard as a model, GAO examined the Navy's accounting practices at nuclear shipyards. In fiscal year 1991, Puget Sound worked on 24 nuclear-powered and three conventionally powered ships. About 31 percent of the workdays and 35 percent of total costs were for nuclear work. The average cost per workday for nuclear labor was 25 percent higher than for non-nuclear work, and the average cost per day for overhead for nuclear work was about 60 percent higher. These higher costs are due to the complexity of nuclear work, which requires a higher level of services, and the higher cost of specially trained workers and specialized shipyard departments that support nuclear work.

  14. Early Mother-Child Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Agostino, Micheline

    1986-01-01

    This journal issue presents an overview of mother-child interaction during the first year of the child's life. Contents of the first section, which concern the development of the mother-child relationship, focus on the concept of the maternal instinct, mother and child during intrauterine life, birth of the child, the postnatal period (including…

  15. The aerodynamics of ship superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, J. V.

    1991-11-01

    After 70 years of naval aviation, a belated understanding of the aerodynamics of ships is slowly emerging. The lack of understanding, and undoubtedly other reasons, has led to superstructure configurations that are unsuited to adjacent helicopter flight. This has resulted in severely limited safe operating envelopes, danger to pilots and ship personnel and blade strikes that occasionally result in the complete loss of a helicopter. The air flows around ships abound with recirculating zones, bounded by shear layers that emanate from the sharp edges of the superstructures. These zones vary enormously in size in an intermittent manner, giving rise to flows with extreme velocity gradients and turbulence intensity levels that are too high to be measured with hot wire anemometers. This complicates the situation because, at the present time, a data base for simulation can be established only via measurement. The essential ingredients for the aerodynamic design of new ships are proposed and some suggestions for the improvement of the aerodynamics of existing ships are made. Correcting an aerodynamically poor ship is no substitute for the incorporation of aerodynamics into the ship design process.

  16. Occupational accidents aboard merchant ships

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, H; Nielsen, D; Frydenberg, M

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the frequency, circumstances, and causes of occupational accidents aboard merchant ships in international trade, and to identify risk factors for the occurrence of occupational accidents as well as dangerous working situations where possible preventive measures may be initiated. Methods: The study is a historical follow up on occupational accidents among crew aboard Danish merchant ships in the period 1993–7. Data were extracted from the Danish Maritime Authority and insurance data. Exact data on time at risk were available. Results: A total of 1993 accidents were identified during a total of 31 140 years at sea. Among these, 209 accidents resulted in permanent disability of 5% or more, and 27 were fatal. The mean risk of having an occupational accident was 6.4/100 years at sea and the risk of an accident causing a permanent disability of 5% or more was 0.67/100 years aboard. Relative risks for notified accidents and accidents causing permanent disability of 5% or more were calculated in a multivariate analysis including ship type, occupation, age, time on board, change of ship since last employment period, and nationality. Foreigners had a considerably lower recorded rate of accidents than Danish citizens. Age was a major risk factor for accidents causing permanent disability. Change of ship and the first period aboard a particular ship were identified as risk factors. Walking from one place to another aboard the ship caused serious accidents. The most serious accidents happened on deck. Conclusions: It was possible to clearly identify work situations and specific risk factors for accidents aboard merchant ships. Most accidents happened while performing daily routine duties. Preventive measures should focus on workplace instructions for all important functions aboard and also on the prevention of accidents caused by walking around aboard the ship. PMID:11850550

  17. SUPPORT CREW MORALE The NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer's ship's

    E-print Network

    as of November 2011 Left Chest Decals and Patches Left Chest Back Garment Front Across Chest Ballcaps and Left Chest on Polos Mugs, Zippos America's Ship for Ocean Exploration OKEANOS EXPLOREROKEANOS EXPLOREROKEANOS

  18. Mothers Speaking: A Study on the Experience of Mothers with Mother-Child Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocak, Aylin; Bekman, Sevda

    This study investigated the change experienced by mothers participating in the Mother-Child Education Program (MOCEP) in Turkey, which is provided in adult education centers in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education and the Mother-Child Education Foundation. MOCEP targets both the child and the child's immediate environment and aims…

  19. 46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

  20. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping...A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General...

  1. 46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

  2. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping...A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General...

  3. 46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

  4. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping...A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General...

  5. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping...A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General...

  6. 46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

  7. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping...A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General...

  8. 46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

  9. Research Ship Information and Schedules

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This unusual resource for Research Ship Information and Schedules is maintained by the University of Delaware's Ocean Information Center (OCEANIC). Complete with a searchable database of schedules and characteristics of deep-water scientific research vessels, this site is an excellent example of the range of eclectic and specialized information available on the Web. Information on facilities, research capabilities, layouts, schedules, and much more is organized by country and ship name; for US research vessels, information is also listed by agency and institution. Other features include links to a staggering array of related research ship information sites.

  10. Qualities of adolescent mothers' parenting.

    PubMed

    East, P L; Matthews, K L; Felice, M E

    1994-03-01

    This study examined the interrelations among adolescent mothers' parenting attitudes, parenting confidence, and parenting stress and the potential differences in these dimensions by mothers' age, race, and parity, and age and sex of child. Subjects were 119 former adolescent mothers (mean age = 20.2 years) from predominantly poor, minority backgrounds (50% Hispanic, 27% African American, 17% non-Hispanic White). All subjects completed questionnaires about their parenting qualities twice an average of 10 weeks apart. All children were at least 1 year of age (mean age = 37.2 months; range 12-50 months). Subjects' parenting attitudes were assessed by the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory, a 32-item questionnaire. The Maternal Self-Report inventory was used to assess the mothers' self-esteem or their confidence in the mothering role. To assess the stress experienced with parenting, the Parenting Daily Hassles scale was used. Results indicated that for some mothers there exists a triple jeopardy of low parenting confidence, high parenting stress, and inappropriate parenting values. Mothers who reported feeling high parenting stress had low confidence in themselves as mothers, low empathy to their children's needs, and low acceptance of their children. Mothers who were older at the time of the study placed greater value on physical punishment and had less confidence in their caretaking abilities. Young maternal age at delivery and young maternal age at the time of this study were associated with low child acceptance. Non-Hispanic White mothers had significantly more favorable parenting values (greater empathy to child's needs and less value of physical punishment) than did African-American and Hispanic mothers, and African-American mothers reported significantly greater caretaking confidence than did Hispanic mothers. No parity or sex of child effects were found. These results suggest the presence of meaningful patterns of convergence and within-group variation for the psychological qualities of adolescent mothers' parenting. PMID:8018690

  11. SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    associated with the ship and maintained by the ship's force. B. Institution scientific equipment - is defined, such as the duration of a scientific program. This machinery is not owned or maintained by OSU Ship Operations. It is the responsibility of the Chief Mate to maintain in safe and working condition, and test as per Permanent Ship

  12. Ship Patrol: Multiagent Patrol in Complex

    E-print Network

    Stone, Peter

    Ship Patrol: Multiagent Patrol in Complex Environmental Conditions Noa Agmon1 , Daniel Urieli2 point to another. For example, in marine environments, the travel time of ships depends on parameters used a custom developed ship simulator that realistically models ship movement constraints

  13. Ship Motion Prediction for Maritime Flight Operations

    E-print Network

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Ship Motion Prediction for Maritime Flight Operations Xilin Yang , Hemanshu Pota , Matt Garratt procedure for ship motion in the presence of uncertain tendency of ship motion dynamic variations relationship between an observer and a ship deck is constructed, from which an initial algorithm is implemented

  14. Containerized compressed natural gas shipping

    E-print Network

    Skarvelis, Georgios V

    2013-01-01

    In the last decades, the demand for energy is increasing. It is necessary to develop new ways to distribute the energy using economically feasible solutions. In this project an Ultra Large Container Ship is used that can ...

  15. COGAS propulsion for LNG ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Edwin G.

    2011-06-01

    Propulsion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) ships is undergoing significant change. The traditional steam plant is losing favor because of its low cycle efficiency. Medium-speed diesel-electric and slow-speed diesel-mechanical drive ships are in service, and more are being built. Another attractive alternative is combined gas and steam turbine (COGAS) drive. This approach offers significant advantages over steam and diesel propulsion. This paper presents the case for the COGAS cycle.

  16. NOAA Ship OSCAR DYSON The ship is named after the Alaskan

    E-print Network

    NOAA Ship OSCAR DYSON The ship is named after the Alaskan fisherman Oscar Dyson and the ship's home that are used to ensure the net is fully open. NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson is the first of four new fisheries survey ships to be built by VT Halter Marine, Inc. in Moss Point, Mississippi. Oscar Dyson is a state

  17. Ship infrared detection/vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Arie N.

    1993-11-01

    The IR contrast of ships at sea is of importance for those who want to detect or identify the ship and for those who worry about this. This IR contrast is determined by a large number of parameters. Of course temperatures of the ship's structure and those of the ambient sea and air are important, but also important are the reflection properties of the sea background and the radiance distribution of the surrounding sky. Modeling of these phenomena appears to be very complicated and the accuracy of the results is rather course in many cases. Therefore, at FEL- TNO an approach has been followed, using a package of sensors on board the ship, giving radiometric or real temperature data of specific surface elements and background radiometric data. These data are taken into a PC system, providing radiant contrast data in any IR-spectral band. Taking into account atmospheric propagation effects and sensor performance, a simplified detection model provides range data in the form of polar diagrams with elevation as parameter. The commander of the ship uses the system as an IR Tactical Decision Aid (TDA), as he may decide upon countermeasures, if the vulnerability of his ship exceeds certain limits.

  18. Engine system for ships

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, C.W.

    1987-02-24

    This patent describes an engine system for ships, comprising: an engine body including a main combustion engine for transmitting the power generated by explosion pressure to a pumping piston and a power transmission apparatus for transmitting to a power crank shaft the power that is increased by the ratio of the cross-sectional areas of a combustion chamber piston to a power piston, wherein the stroke distance of the combustion chamber piston is equal to that of the power piston; one or more swash plate-type stirling engines coupled to the exhaust gas outlet of the main combustion engine to be driven by the exhaust gas heat; a single-stage screw-type compressor coupled by the drive shaft to the swash plate-type stirling engine; thereby generating a great amount of compressed air; a compressed air source connected to the compressor for storing a great amount of compressed air from the compressor; a booster connected between the compressed air source and the power transmission apparatus to amplify the air pressure derived from the compressed air source and then to provide the amplified air pressure to the power transmission apparatus by operation of the cam in accordance with the rotation of a crank shaft; an accumulator in communication with the power transmission apparatus through a fluid oil pipe, thereby maintaining constant control of the oil pressure in the power transmission apparatus; and a compressed air control device for intake and exhaust of compressed air which is added and released to/from the pumping piston of the power transmission apparatus.

  19. Identification of SHIP-1 and SHIP-2 homologs in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erin B; Nayak, Deepak K; Quiniou, Sylvie M A; Bengten, Eva; Wilson, Melanie

    2015-07-01

    Src homology domain 2 (SH2) domain-containing inositol 5'-phosphatases (SHIP) proteins have diverse roles in signal transduction. SHIP-1 and SHIP-2 homologs were identified in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, based on sequence homology to murine and human SHIP sequences. Full-length cDNAs for catfish SHIP-1 and SHIP-2 (IpSHIP-1 and IpSHIP-2) were obtained using 5' and 3' RACE protocols. Catfish SHIP molecules share a high degree of sequence identity to their respective SHIP sequences from diverse taxa and both are encoded by single copy genes. IpSHIP-1 and IpSHIP-2 transcripts were expressed in all catfish tissues analyzed except for skin, and IpSHIP-1 message was more abundant than IpSHIP-2 message in lymphoid tissues. Catfish clonal B, cytotoxic T, and macrophage cell lines also expressed message for both molecules. IpSHIP-1 and IpSHIP-2 SH2 domains were expressed as recombinant proteins and were both found to be bound by cross-reacting rabbit anti-mouse SHIP-1 pAb. The anti-mouse SHIP-1 pAb also reacted with cell lysates from the cytotoxic T cell lines, macrophages and stimulated PBL. SHIP-1 is also phosphorylated at a conserved tyrosine residue, as shown by immunoprecipitation studies. PMID:25743379

  20. Teenage mothers at age 30.

    PubMed

    Smithbattle, Lee

    2005-11-01

    This longitudinal, interpretive study explored how teen mothers experienced the self and future during a 12-year period. Sixteen families were first interviewed intensively in 1988-1989 once the teen's infant reached age 8 to 10 months; they were reinterviewed in 1993, 1997, and 2001 (Time 4). Twenty-seven family members were reinterviewed at Time 4. The metaphor of a narrative spine is used to describe how the mothers'lives unfolded during the 12-year period. The narrative spines of some mothers were large and supported well-developed, coherent "chapters" on mothering, adult love, and work. For others, mothering provided a "backbone" for a meaningful life; however, chapters on adult love and work were less fully developed. The lives of a third group of mothers lacked a coherent narrative structure. Each pattern is presented with a paradigm case. PMID:16275703

  1. Repositioning Mothers: Mothers, Disabled Children and Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Sara; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    In this article we set out to review the ways in which mothers of disabled children have been portrayed within disability studies and the more broader academic literature. We argue that within disability studies mothers of disabled children occupy a liminal position because they are often not disabled and yet they can experience forms of…

  2. X-15 ship #1 on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    The X-15 aircraft, ship #1 (56-6670), sits on the lakebed early in its illustrious career of high speed flight research. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation made three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and canted horizontal surfaces on the tail to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a B-52 aircraft at 45,000 ft and a speed of about 500 mph. Depending on the mission, the rocket engine provided thrust for the first 80 to 120 sec of flight. The remainder of the normal 10 to 11 min. flight was powerless and ended with a 200-mph glide landing. Generally, one of two types of X-15 flight profiles was used; a high-altitude flight plan that called for the pilot to maintain a steep rate of climb, or a speed profile that called for the pilot to push over and maintain a level altitude. The X-15 was flown over a period of nearly 10 years -- June 1959 to Oct. 1968 -- and set the world's unofficial speed and altitude records of 4,520 mph (Mach 6.7) and 354,200 ft in a program to investigate all aspects of manned hypersonic flight. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the development of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo manned spaceflight programs, and also the Space Shuttle program. The X-15s made a total of 199 flights, and were manufactured by North American Aviation. X-15-1, serial number 56-6670, is now located at the National Air and Space museum, Washington DC. North American X-15A-2, serial number 56-6671, is at the United States Air Force Museum, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The X-15-3, serial number 56-6672, crashed on 15 November 1967, resulting in the death of Maj. Michael J. Adams.

  3. Shipping container for fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Crowder, H.E.

    1984-12-17

    The present invention is directed to a shipping container for the interstate transportation of enriched uranium materials. The shipping container is comprised of a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical-shaped outer vessel lined with thermal insulation. Disposed inside the thermal insulation and spaced apart from the inner walls of the outer vessel is a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical inner vessel impervious to liquid and gaseous substances and having the inner surfaces coated with a layer of cadmium to prevent nuclear criticality. The cadmium is, in turn, lined with a protective shield of high-density urethane for corrosion and wear protection. 2 figs.

  4. Working Mothers and Their Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment Standards Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Women's Bureau.

    This booklet contains government compiled statistics on various aspects of maternal employment. Figures are presented for numbers of working mothers broken down by marital status and ages of children and for numbers of minority working mothers broken down by marital status and ages of children. Statistical trends in labor force participation are…

  5. Single Mothers: Issues of Stigma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worell, Judith

    This paper examines psychological and social issues for single mothers in the context of therapeutic strategies for effective intervention. Never married, previously married, and Lesbian mothers are considered in terms of sociocultural myths and sources of stigma; research findings related to these myths; and interventions targeting the…

  6. Strategies for Supporting Teenage Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Robin A.; Thompson, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Programs for teenage mothers provided through school districts or community agencies often have their own curricular agenda for teaching teenage mothers about the proper care of and nutrition for infants and the typical stages of child development, but not all programs are successful in supporting the development of positive early relationships…

  7. Teenage Mothers' Experiences of Stigma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yardley, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This article is concerned with exploring the impact of stigma upon teenage mothers. Drawing upon the findings of in-depth interviews with 20 teenage mothers, the study explores the ways and contexts within which stigma is experienced and identifies differential effects and coping mechanisms reported by the participants. Thereafter, it is suggested…

  8. Adolescent Mothers Leaving Multigenerational Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberlander, Sarah E.; Shebl, Fatma M.; Magder, Laurence S.; Black, Maureen M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how the developmental processes of autonomy and relatedness are related to changes in the residential status of 181 first-time, adolescent, urban, low-income, African American mothers over the first 24 months postpartum. Although adolescent mothers were eager to live independently, few made a clear transition out of the…

  9. Resilient Adolescent Mothers: Ethnographic Interviews

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabrielle Carey; Dan Ratliff; Randall R. Lyle

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the strengths and resiliencies of successful adolescent mothers and raises important questions for our ongoing collaborative conversations about nonmarital teenage parenthood. A qualitative research study, inspired by the Wolin Resiliency Model, employed ethnographic interviews to determine successful adolescent mothers’ perceptions of their strengths. Strength-based interviews were found to be a powerful intervention with these participants. A strong

  10. How To Improve You Shipping and Receiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how two universities improved their shipping and receiving operations and cut costs. Examples from the University of Texas at Dallas and John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, illustrate how they established greater shipping and receiving department efficiencies. (GR)

  11. Stochastic ship fleet routing with inventory limits 

    E-print Network

    Yu, Yu

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a stochastic ship routing problem with inventory management. The problem involves finding a set of least costs routes for a fleet of ships transporting a single commodity when the demand for ...

  12. SHIP3QARD ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY JOIDES RESOLUTION

    E-print Network

    SHIP3QARD ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY ON JOIDES RESOLUTION Kay-Christian Bneis Ocean Drilling Program infrastructure for geochemical work onboard ship was the immediate reason for writing this series. Equally

  13. Our Mother Tongues

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-06

    Frequently when one hears about the Native American experience in the United States, the focus is on the loss of traditions, folkways, and language. In contrast, this website was created to highlight a recent documentary by Anne Makepeace that focuses on the ways in which Native American languages have recovered and thrived in recent times. On the site, visitors should start by clicking on the interactive "Language Map." Here visitors can learn about twelve different languages, including Crow, Cherokee, Dakota, Euchee, and Lakota. Clicking on the "Voices" area gives visitors the opportunity to listen to Native Americans from different tribal communities speaking in their mother tongues. Additionally, visitors can send an electronic postcard from the site, read the site blog, and learn more about the project and the documentary.

  14. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

  15. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

  16. 47 CFR 80.1083 - Ship radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship radio installations. 80.1083 Section 80...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1083 Ship radio installations. (a) Ships must...

  17. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

  18. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

  19. 47 CFR 80.1083 - Ship radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship radio installations. 80.1083 Section 80...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1083 Ship radio installations. (a) Ships must...

  20. 47 CFR 80.1083 - Ship radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship radio installations. 80.1083 Section 80...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1083 Ship radio installations. (a) Ships must...

  1. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

  2. Lidar Observations of Ship Spray Plumes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, William P.; James, Jeffrey E.

    2000-08-01

    As part of the Monterey Area Ship Track experiment, which was designed to study ship-generated cloud tracks, ship-based measurements were made by a gyroscopically stabilized scanning lidar system. This paper focuses on the spray plume observed by lidar behind the USS Truxton, a nuclear-powered surface ship. Measurements are included from five passes at different speeds. Observed parameters include the speed of the plume meander, maximum speed of vertical mixing, and dispersion time.

  3. Modelling and analysis of ship surface BRDF

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Vaitekunas

    2007-01-01

    Modelling the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a ship surface is an integral part of any infrared ship signature model. The ShipIR surface BRDF model is based on Sandford and Robertson (1985) and makes a discrete assumption for lobe-width and solar-glint. The ShipIR sea surface reflectance model uses a roughness model based on the early work of Cox and

  4. Optimal modeling of ship moving

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Elyukhina; L. Kholpanov; A. Khomyakov

    2010-01-01

    We consider some aspects allowing to optimize the designing of ships with the desired propulsion properties and to estimate the tactical and technicoeconomic characteristics. First question concerns a forecasting of characteristics of flow near hull, including one in boundary layer and viscous wakes, and, above all, a data on water resistance in real conditions. Simulation is carried out in the

  5. Automatic Piping System in Ship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ubald Nienhuis

    One of the most complicated and time-consuming process in ship production is to determine the optimum route of piping. The automatic system to generate optimum collision free routes for pipes is presented in this paper. In the past, research has been primarily focused on the use of only deterministic or only nondeterministic optimization techniques to find the optimal route. In

  6. Updated emissions from ocean shipping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James J. Corbett; Horst W. Koehler

    2003-01-01

    Marine vessel inventories demonstrate that ship emissions cannot be neglected in assessing environmental impacts of air pollution, although significant uncertainty in these inventories remains. We address this uncertainty by employing a bottom-up estimate of fuel consumption and vessel activity for internationally registered fleets, including cargo vessels, other commercial vessels, and military vessels. We identify model bias in previous work, which

  7. Identification of SHIP-1 and SHIP-2 homologs in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Src homology domain 2 (SH2) domain-containing inositol 5’-phosphatases (SHIP) proteins have diverse roles in signal transduction. SHIP-1 and SHIP-2 homologs were identified in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, based on sequence homology to murine and human SHIP sequences. Full-length cDNAs for ...

  8. Wave energy utilization into ship propulsion by fins attached to a ship

    SciTech Connect

    Isshiki, H. [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Resistance of a ship increases in waves, that is, so called resistance increase of a ship due to waves. However, an oscillatory hydrofoil attached to the ship bow generates thrust. Under a certain condition, the ship can be driven by wave power alone. This paper reviews the design and performance of such a system.

  9. An automatic ship and ship wake detection system for spaceborne SAR images in coastal regions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Eldhuset

    1996-01-01

    An automatic ship and ship wake detection system for spaceborne SAR images is described and assessed. The system is designed for coastal regions with eddies, fronts, waves and swells. The system uses digital terrain models to simulate synthetic SAR images to mask out land areas. Then a search for ship targets is performed followed by wake search around detected ship

  10. Ship energy conservation assist team (SECAT)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICHARD DANGEL; A. EDWARD BRICE

    1984-01-01

    The Ship Energy Conservation Assist Team (SECAT) Program was initiated in Fiscal Year (FY) 82 by the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) to demonstrate and introduce individual Ship Commands to known energy conserving techniques without adding equipment complexity or additional maintenance burden. The principal objective is to provide each ship with an energy consumption, coupled with recommended energy conservation strategies.

  11. Smoother sailing [ship design and control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Dooling

    1996-01-01

    Advanced designs and controls for ships traveling at up to 70 km\\/h offer attractive transport options and passenger comfort even in rough seas. In particular the author discusses the design of the HSS 1500 catamaran which uses jet engines for propulsion, the FastShip Atlantic (also using gas turbines), and large cargo ships for Asia's Pacific coast based on hydrofoils and

  12. Line Defaults Modify Line/Shipping/Accounting

    E-print Network

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    Line Defaults and Modify Line/Shipping/Accounting NUFinancials Supply Chain FMS815 03/31/2010 --rkw, vlr Line Defaults & Modify Line/Shipping/Accounting © 2010 Northwestern University FMS815­ Job Aid Page 1 of 5 This job aid describes how and when to use Line Defaults and Modify Line/Shipping/Accounting

  13. Underactuated ship global tracking under relaxed conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. D. Do; Z. P. Jiang; J. Pan

    2002-01-01

    A controller is developed for underactuated surface ships with only surge force and yaw moment available to globally asymptotically track a reference trajectory generated by a suitable virtual ship in a frame attached to the ship body. The reference trajectory is allowed too be a curve including a straight line. The control development is based on Lyapunov's direct method and

  14. 6, 85538604, 2006 Impact of ship

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 8553­8604, 2006 Impact of ship emissions on chemistry and climate V. Eyring et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions Multi-model simulations of the impact of international shipping­8604, 2006 Impact of ship emissions on chemistry and climate V. Eyring et al. Title Page Abstract

  15. 6, 10231071, 2006 Impact of ship

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 1023­1071, 2006 Impact of ship emissions on properties of marine stratus M. Schreier et al and Physics Discussions Impact of ship emissions on the microphysical, optical and radiative properties Commons License. 1023 #12;ACPD 6, 1023­1071, 2006 Impact of ship emissions on properties of marine stratus

  16. BIODIVERSITY Transoceanic ships as vectors for

    E-print Network

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Transoceanic ships as vectors for nonindigenous freshwater bryozoans R. Kipp1 , S. A. Bailey2 , H. J. MacIsaac2 and A. Ricciardi1, * INTRODUCTION Transoceanic shipping into the Great Lakes, but ships with unpumpable residual water in their ballast tanks (reported as `No Ballast

  17. SHIPPING MEMO FORM FEDERAL EXPRESS / UPS

    E-print Network

    Kolner, Brian H.

    SHIPPING MEMO FORM FEDERAL EXPRESS / UPS Senders Name: Date:Phone: Email Address: Budget to Charge: Ship via [check appropriate box(es)]: Next Day Standard (3 p.m. delivery) Federal Express Shipments UPS International First UPS Ground Amount Insurance Requested SHIPPING INFORMATION: Recipient's Name: Company Name

  18. SUGGESTIONS FOR OPERATORS OF TUNA RECEIVING SHIPS

    E-print Network

    SUGGESTIONS FOR OPERATORS OF TUNA RECEIVING SHIPS · FISHER Y LEAFLET 301 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE be anticipated in northern waters. Operators of tuna receiving ships may find it necessary to make arrangements is advisable to round out production. A receiving ship must have sustained and near capacity landings to prove

  19. Mother and Daughter Reports about Upward Transfers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, I-Fen

    2008-01-01

    Using 619 mother-daughter dyads interviewed in the 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Mature Women and Young Women, this study examines the assistance that adult daughters provide to their mothers and its covariates. Mothers and daughters have low levels of agreement on transfers. Using mothers' reports identifies different covariates of…

  20. Mothers' and Girls' Perspectives on Adolescent Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan-Arvay, Marla; Keats, Patrice A.

    2004-01-01

    A study of communication between mothers and daughters about mothers' sexual experience discloses mothers' and daughters' fears, concerns, and judgments about each other. In this study, 15 women, all mothers of girls, were interviewed about the history of their own sexual experience. Some of these women had chosen to share their personal…

  1. Dissociative Mothers' Subjective Experience of Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Lynn R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of 54 mothers with a dissociative disorder, 20 mothers with other mental problems, and 20 normal mothers investigated what effect, if any, dissociation had on parenting. When tested on the Subjective Experiences of Parenting Scale, mothers with dissociation presented significantly more negative parenting behavior and attitudes. (CR)

  2. Breastfeeding in Depressed Mother-Infant Dyads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Feijo, Larissa

    2002-01-01

    Interviewed depressed and non-depressed mothers on their breastfeeding practices and perceptions of their infants' feeding behavior. Found that, compared to non-depressed mothers, depressed mothers breast fed less often, stopped breastfeeding earlier, and scored lower on a breastfeeding confidence scale. Mothers who breastfed rather than bottle…

  3. World Ships - Architectures & Feasibility Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, A. M.; Pak, M.; Putz, D.; Buhler, C.; Reiss, P.

    A world ship is a concept for manned interstellar flight. It is a huge, self-contained and self-sustained interstellar vehicle. It travels at a fraction of a per cent of the speed of light and needs several centuries to reach its target star system. The well- known world ship concept by Alan Bond and Anthony Martin was intended to show its principal feasibility. However, several important issues haven't been addressed so far: the relationship between crew size and robustness of knowledge transfer, reliability, and alternative mission architectures. This paper addresses these gaps. Furthermore, it gives an update on target star system choice, and develops possible mission architectures. The derived conclusions are: a large population size leads to robust knowledge transfer and cultural adaptation. These processes can be improved by new technologies. World ship reliability depends on the availability of an automatic repair system, as in the case of the Daedalus probe. Star systems with habitable planets are probably farther away than systems with enough resources to construct space colonies. Therefore, missions to habitable planets have longer trip times and have a higher risk of mission failure. On the other hand, the risk of constructing colonies is higher than to establish an initial settlement on a habitable planet. Mission architectures with precursor probes have the potential to significantly reduce trip and colonization risk without being significantly more costly than architectures without. In summary world ships remain an interesting concept, although they require a space colony-based civilization within our own solar system before becoming feasible.

  4. QuickShip: General Section

    Cancer.gov

    Welcome to the Frederick National Lab Shipment Wizard, this application will guide you through the process of requesting a shipment. The requestor should submit this form within 24 hours for domestic shipments and 1 week (5 business days) before ship date of international shipments. Once the information is successfully submitted, you must print the resulting form, an Authorizing Official must sign the form, and the form must then be faxed to Transportation (301-846-6971) Department.

  5. TMI-2 core shipping preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

    1988-01-01

    Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

  6. Load and dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for finned configuration 1 space shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle. Volume 2: Airplane flutter and load analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The airplane flutter and maneuver-gust load analysis results obtained during B-52B drop test vehicle configuration (with fins) evaluation are presented. These data are presented as supplementary data to that given in Volume 1 of this document. A brief mathematical description of airspeed notation and gust load factor criteria are provided as a help to the user. References are defined which provide mathematical description of the airplane flutter and load analysis techniques. Air-speed-load factor diagrams are provided for the airplane weight configurations reanalyzed for finned drop test vehicle configuration.

  7. When mothers leave their children behind.

    PubMed

    Schen, Cathy R

    2005-01-01

    Psychiatry has studied the effect on children of separation from their mothers or primary caregivers, but has not given equal attention to the effect on mothers of separation from their children. This article examines the current literature on separation from the mother's perspective. Following a review of the literature on mothers' attachment behaviors, as evidenced by separation from their very young children due to ordinary circumstances, attention will turn to specific populations of mothers enduring separation from their children in situations of hardship: mothers with mental illness, homeless mothers, mothers in prison, and two groups of working mothers-immigrant mothers and deployed navy mothers. Separation can be experienced as temporary, bringing on anxiety, or may involve a mother's choice between her child's safety and her own wish to keep the child near her, causing a conflict in the mother's feelings. In other situations, separation may be involuntary and long-lasting, inducing symptoms of depression, despair, and grief, all of which are characteristic of loss. The particular conditions of the separation-such as choice, control, and ongoing communication between mother and child-can mitigate the impact of the separation and transform it from a total to a partial loss. Three clinical cases of mothers forced to separate from their children in extreme circumstances are examined, with recommendations for treatment. PMID:16126609

  8. Constructing the “Good Mother”: The Experience of Mothering Ideologies by Work Status

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deirdre D. Johnston; Debra H. Swanson

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how mothers construct their worker–parent identity within a cultural context of competing mothering ideologies. We used narrative data from interviews with 95 married mothers with at least 1 child under the age of 5 to compare the construction of intensive mothering expectations by middle-class full-time employed mothers, part-time employed mothers, and at-home

  9. Portuguese Ships on Japanese Namban Screens

    E-print Network

    Yamafune, Kotaro

    2012-10-19

    , Sannomaru Shozokan Version (1610s) by an unknown artist .................. 58 4-9 Type D Namban ship (No.5): Suntory Museum of Art Version (1600-1620) by a Kano-school artist ......................................................... 59 4...-10 Type D Namban ship (No.9): Private Collection-K family Version (1610s) by a Kano-school artist ................................................................. 60 4-11 Type E Namban ship (No.10): Private Collection-T family Version...

  10. DC Protection on the Electric Ship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. N. Schulz

    2007-01-01

    The need for DC power at continuous uninterrupted rates is a reality for ship survival during highly intense combat and regular travel. One of the new proposed distribution systems on the all-electric ship (E-ship) is designed using a DC distribution method (zones) in which the use of transformers and possible frequency issues\\/manipulations can be eliminated with the use of power

  11. Study on photovoltaic power system on ships

    SciTech Connect

    Katagi, Takeshi; Fujii, Yoshimi; Nishikawa, Eiichi; Hashimoto, Takeshi [Kobe Univ. of Mercantile Marine (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents the application of photovoltaic power systems to ships. Two types of leisure or fishing boats powered by photovoltaics are designed. The boats described are single hull and catamaran type with twin hulls. The design of a new electric power system using a photovoltaic power system in a harbor ship having 20 tons is also proposed. The results of this study show that the photovoltaic power system can apply to small ships.

  12. Canonical correlation of shipping forward curves

    E-print Network

    Hadjiyiannis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The behavior and interrelations between the main shipping forward curves are analyzed using multivariate statistics after removing the volatility distortions dictated by the Samuelson hypothesis. Principal Components ...

  13. 8.G Shipping Rolled Oats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-05-01

    This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Rolled oats (dry oatmeal) come in cylindrical containers with a diameter of 5 inches and a height of 9$\\frac12$ inches. These containers are shipped to...

  14. Investigation of ship-plume chemistry using a newly-developed photochemical ship-plume model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. S. Kim; R. S. Park; C. H. Song

    2009-01-01

    A photochemical ship-plume model, which can consider the ship-plume dynamics and ship-plume chemistry, simultaneously, was developed to gain a better understanding of atmospheric impact of ship emissions. The model performance was then evaluated by a comparison with the observation data measured on a NOAA WP-3D flight during the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002 (ITCT 2K2) airborne field campaign. The

  15. A Narrative of Fear: Advice to Mothers.

    PubMed

    Åström, Berit

    2015-01-01

    Taking present-day research into so-called new momism and intense mothering as a starting point, this article argues that the current mothering discourse, rather than articulating a new phenomenon, perpetuates a regulative discourse developed in the nineteenth century, in advice books written by medical doctors for pregnant women and new mothers. Both the Victorian and the present-day texts play on feelings of guilt and inadequacy in order to control the actions and emotions of mothers, although the threatened outcome differs: present-day mothers are warned that their children may become obese or develop neuropsychological disorders, whereas Victorian mothers are warned that their children might die. PMID:26095843

  16. "Good mothering" or "good citizenship"?

    PubMed

    Porter, Maree; Kerridge, Ian H; Jordens, Christopher F C

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood banking is one of many biomedical innovations that confront pregnant women with new choices about what they should do to secure their own and their child's best interests. Many mothers can now choose to donate their baby's umbilical cord blood (UCB) to a public cord blood bank or pay to store it in a private cord blood bank. Donation to a public bank is widely regarded as an altruistic act of civic responsibility. Paying to store UCB may be regarded as a "unique opportunity" to provide "insurance" for the child's future. This paper reports findings from a survey of Australian women that investigated the decision to either donate or store UCB. We conclude that mothers are faced with competing discourses that force them to choose between being a "good mother" and fulfilling their role as a "good citizen." We discuss this finding with reference to the concept of value pluralism. PMID:23180199

  17. Medieval orality, mothers, and bonding.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Scott C

    2004-01-01

    The role of women in the Middle Ages was vilification, veneration, and exclusion. Due to the high rates of maternal and infant mortality bonding shifted from the mother-child dyad to one in which the Church, Holy Family, and king acted as pseudo-parents. In art this is suggested by the virtual absence of eye contact between the Virgin and Christ-child. Frustration of early oral needs consequent to lack of adequate mother-child bonding prompted a reactive emphasis on orality in art and legend. A decrease in infant mortality and a reciprocal improvement in mother child bonding contributed to cultural shifts in how self-realization would be accomplished during the Renaissance and in the later emergence of secular humanism. PMID:15132195

  18. Ship collision risk assessment for the Singapore Strait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaobo Qu; Qiang Meng; Li Suyi

    2011-01-01

    The Singapore Strait is considered as the bottleneck and chokepoint of the shipping routes connecting the Indian and the Pacific Ocean. Therefore, the ship collision risk assessment is of significant importance for ships passing through the narrow, shallow, and busy waterway. In this paper, three ship collision risk indices are initially proposed to quantitatively assess the ship collision risks in

  19. (Unsafe Ship-handling) ,f<,,, SC"ZOE--,--\\`

    E-print Network

    Ishii, Hitoshi

    (Unsafe Ship-handling) ,f criteria of unsafe situation judgment of unsafe ship handling operation detection of unsafe ship handling situation water area ship motion (u,v,r) operational condition (rudder, engine, etc.) (XG,YG,Õ·j own ship

  20. Shipping and Receiving Dangerous Goods at Georgia Tech

    E-print Network

    Shipping and Receiving Dangerous Goods at Georgia Tech Contacts: Biological Shipments: Shane 404-385-9531 ryan.lisk@ehs.gatech.edu SHIPPING FORMS: Biological Shipments (http://www.ehs.gatech.edu/shipping/biological_shipping.pdf) Domestic Chemical Shipments (http://www.ehs.gatech.edu/shipping/chem_domestic.pdf) International Chemical

  1. Shipping, Ships and Waterways: A Marine Education Infusion Unit. Northern New England Marine Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. Coll. of Education.

    This multidisciplinary unit is designed to increase familiarity with various types of ships and purposes for different varieties of marine vessels. It seeks to increase familiarity with routes of ocean shipping and the effect of ocean conditions such as currents upon shipping route patterns. A discussion treats the uses of various navigation…

  2. JOIDES Resolution Ship Security Plan The JOIDES Resolution is operating under the International Ship &

    E-print Network

    JOIDES Resolution Ship Security Plan The JOIDES Resolution is operating under the International Ship & Port Facility Security Code (ISPS). These security measures & procedures have been adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to enhance the protection of ships, personnel, cargo, and ports

  3. Coal-fired ships reappear

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    A situation now exists where, in many countries, coal prices are almost half those of oil, and indications point toward this trend continuing. It is not surprising, therefore, that many shipowners are planning and building the next generation of steamships with coal-fired propulsion units. Six new coal-fired ships, the first for over 25 years, are now being built in Italy, Japan, and Spain. In the forefront in technology and systems for handling coal and ash is the British company Macawber Engineering. It has developed on-board systems responding to the problems created by coal handling on a modern steamship, problems that formed a major reason for the universal changeover to oil firing in the 1950s and 1960s. The traditional method of handling coal uses mechanical systems such as belt and draglink conveyors, and bucket elevators. These methods have disadvantages that make their use on ships far from satisfactory. Pneumatic conveying systems, due to their totally enclosed construction and relative simplicity, overcome these problems. The type of pneumatic system chosen, however, has to accommodate several other constraints imposed by on-board handling of coal. (SC)

  4. Maternal experiences and the mother–infant dyad’s development: introducing the Interview of Mother’s Experiences (IME)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Björn Salomonsson; Rolf Sandell

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study introduces an instrument, the Interview of Mother’s Experiences (I-ME), focusing on how the mother’s past and present experiences relate to her psychological state and interaction with the baby. Background: Questionnaires and video-taped interactions are used for assessing dyadic relationship disturbances. Validated interviews are rarer and might yield additional information. Method: Analyses were made on 86 dyads from

  5. Mothers Speaking: A Study on the Experience of Mothers within the Mother-Child Education Programme (MOCEP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocak, Aylon; Bekman, Sevda

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the experiences of mothers participating in MOCEP in Istanbul, through a qualitative research methodology. Overall effectiveness of the programme, its implementation and how the mothers benefited were the main concerns. The study was carried out with 20 mothers. Individual and focus interviews, participant…

  6. Factors Affecting Employment of Welfare Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrissinger, Marlene Sonju

    1980-01-01

    Examined the relationship between the length of time worked by mothers receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children and three categories of variables. Only economic factors appeared to significantly affect the mothers' decision whether to work. (Author)

  7. When Should a Mother Avoid Breastfeeding?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases and Conditions When should a mother avoid breastfeeding? Health professionals agree that human milk provides the ... to Strategies to Support Breastfeeding Mothers and Babies Breastfeeding Information for Families Breastfeeding Hotline The HHS Office ...

  8. 7 CFR 3201.74 - Thermal shipping containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Thermal shipping containers. 3201... OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF...Designated Items § 3201.74 Thermal shipping containers. (a...temperature-sensitive materials. (2) Thermal shipping containers for...

  9. 7 CFR 3201.74 - Thermal shipping containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Thermal shipping containers. 3201... OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF...Designated Items § 3201.74 Thermal shipping containers. (a...temperature-sensitive materials. (2) Thermal shipping containers for...

  10. 7 CFR 3201.74 - Thermal shipping containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Thermal shipping containers. 3201... OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF...Designated Items § 3201.74 Thermal shipping containers. (a...temperature-sensitive materials. (2) Thermal shipping containers for...

  11. 47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80.377 ...THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency band...

  12. 47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80.377 ...THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency band...

  13. 47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

  14. 47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80.377 ...THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency band...

  15. 47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

  16. 47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

  17. 29 CFR 1918.87 - Ship's cargo elevators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Ship's cargo elevators. 1918.87 Section 1918.87...Cargo § 1918.87 Ship's cargo elevators. (a) Safe working load. The safe working loads of ship's cargo elevators shall be determined and...

  18. 29 CFR 1918.87 - Ship's cargo elevators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Ship's cargo elevators. 1918.87 Section 1918.87...Cargo § 1918.87 Ship's cargo elevators. (a) Safe working load. The safe working loads of ship's cargo elevators shall be determined and...

  19. 29 CFR 1918.87 - Ship's cargo elevators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Ship's cargo elevators. 1918.87 Section 1918.87...Cargo § 1918.87 Ship's cargo elevators. (a) Safe working load. The safe working loads of ship's cargo elevators shall be determined and...

  20. 29 CFR 1918.87 - Ship's cargo elevators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Ship's cargo elevators. 1918.87 Section 1918.87...Cargo § 1918.87 Ship's cargo elevators. (a) Safe working load. The safe working loads of ship's cargo elevators shall be determined and...

  1. 29 CFR 1918.87 - Ship's cargo elevators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Ship's cargo elevators. 1918.87 Section 1918.87...Cargo § 1918.87 Ship's cargo elevators. (a) Safe working load. The safe working loads of ship's cargo elevators shall be determined and...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.163 - Ship's piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ship's piping systems. 1915.163 Section 1915.163...STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems § 1915.163 Ship's piping systems. (a) Before work is...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.163 - Ship's piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ship's piping systems. 1915.163 Section 1915.163...STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems § 1915.163 Ship's piping systems. (a) Before work is...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.163 - Ship's piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ship's piping systems. 1915.163 Section 1915.163...STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems § 1915.163 Ship's piping systems. (a) Before work is...

  5. 75 FR 10546 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ...bulkheads and decks of ro-ro spaces on passenger and cargo ships --Requirements for ships carrying hydrogen and compressed natural gas vehicles --Guidelines for a visible element to general emergency alarm systems on passenger ships...

  6. 9 CFR 83.7 - Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. 83.7 Section 83.7 Animals... Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. (a) All live fish that are...disinfected. (1) Cleaning and disinfection of shipping containers must be...

  7. 9 CFR 83.7 - Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. 83.7 Section 83.7 Animals... Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. (a) All live fish that are...disinfected. (1) Cleaning and disinfection of shipping containers must be...

  8. 9 CFR 83.7 - Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. 83.7 Section 83.7 Animals... Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. (a) All live fish that are...disinfected. (1) Cleaning and disinfection of shipping containers must be...

  9. 9 CFR 83.7 - Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. 83.7 Section 83.7 Animals... Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. (a) All live fish that are...disinfected. (1) Cleaning and disinfection of shipping containers must be...

  10. 9 CFR 83.7 - Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. 83.7 Section 83.7 Animals... Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. (a) All live fish that are...disinfected. (1) Cleaning and disinfection of shipping containers must be...

  11. 76 FR 13655 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...or other forms of information. Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

  12. 32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization § 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

  13. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

  14. 78 FR 27984 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...or other forms of information. Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

  15. 47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

  16. 47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Antenna requirements for ship stations. 80.81 Section 80.81 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of...

  17. 47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Antenna requirements for ship stations. 80.81 Section 80.81 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of...

  18. 47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80 Section 80.80 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point...

  19. 32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

  20. 47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipment—General. This section...

  1. 76 FR 2403 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...information collection requirement concerning the Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...following information collection: Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

  2. 47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

  3. 32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

  4. 47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipment—General. This section...

  5. 47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements § 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

  6. 32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization § 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

  7. 78 FR 15031 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...information collection requirement concerning the Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...following information collection: Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

  8. 47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

  9. 32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization § 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

  10. 47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements § 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

  11. 47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80 Section 80.80 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point...

  12. 47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Antenna requirements for ship stations. 80.81 Section 80.81 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of...

  13. 47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements § 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

  14. 47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Antenna requirements for ship stations. 80.81 Section 80.81 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of...

  15. 47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80 Section 80.80 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point...

  16. 32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

  17. 47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipment—General. This section...

  18. 47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80 Section 80.80 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point...

  19. 32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

  20. 47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements § 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

  1. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

  2. 47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Antenna requirements for ship stations. 80.81 Section 80.81 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of...

  3. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

  4. 32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization § 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

  5. 47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

  6. 47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipment—General. This section...

  7. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

  8. 47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

  9. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

  10. 47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80 Section 80.80 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point...

  11. 32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

  12. 47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements § 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

  13. SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 7.20 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Originator. #12;SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 7.20 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Originator protective equipment (PPE) aboard the R/V Oceanus. To this end, all appropriate safety precautions relevant

  14. Moving from Ship to Arctic Sea Ice

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Two U.S. Coast Guard members are being transported by crane from U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy onto a piece of multi-year Arctic sea ice. This was during a scientific expedition to map the Arctic seafloor. The expedition was a joint effort using two ships, the Healy and the Canadian Coast Guard Ship...

  15. NEW METHODS OF UNDERWATER SHIP NOISE CLASSIFICATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EUGENIUSZ KOZACZKA

    The detection, classification, identification and recognition ships noise features have been of the highest importance for scientific and also defense interest. A big effort is made in the passive sonar technologies that allow applying underwater noise for practical purpose. Results are presented which demonstrate the ability of the network to classify man made sources as are underwater ships noise. The

  16. Ballast Tank of Ocean-Going Ship

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The empty interior of an ocean-going ship's ballast tank. Such tanks are filled with water to balance a ship's loads. Unless the water is treated before it is emptied into foreign waters, it can introduce foreign organisms into the water that may become established and compe...

  17. Early Stage Integrated Parametric Ship Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Bole; C. Forrest

    Innovative ship design projects often require an extensive concept design phase to allow a wide range of potential solutions to be investigated, identifying which best suits the requirements. In these situations, the majority of ship design tools do not provide the best solution, limiting quick reconfiguration by focusing on detailed definition only. Parametric design, including generation of the hull surface,

  18. CFAR ship detection system using polarimetric data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ting Liu; George A. Lampropoulos; Chuhong Fei

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop optimal polarimetric Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) ship detection system. Polarimetric transformation\\/decompositions, clutter analysis, modeling, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and multi-CFAR detection are the necessary components of optimal polarimetric CFAR ship detectors. The resulting CFAR detector outperforms the conventional polarimetric CFAR detector by providing higher probability of detection without introducing much more

  19. A New Polarimetric CFAR Ship Detection System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ting Liu; George Lampropoulos

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop optimal polarimetric Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector for ship detection. Polarimetric transformations and decompositions, clutter analysis, modeling, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and multi-CFAR detection are the necessary components of optimal polarimetric CFAR ship detectors. The resulting CFAR detector outperforms the conventional polarimetric CFAR detector by providing higher probability of detection.

  20. Automatic surface modelling of a ship hull

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Pérez-arribas; J. A. Suárez-suárez; L. Fernández-jambrina

    2006-01-01

    When defining a ship hull surface, the main objective is to obtain a faired surface or surfaces that contain some specific points of the hull, that have been selected in the design process and give the ship its hydrodynamic, stability and other properties. So, the hull surface should be a compromise between fairness and precision, and this is not and

  1. Measurements during SWATH ship sea trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Hart

    2000-01-01

    A new ship must undergo a rigorous set of sea trials to receive final certification. The sea trials program measures the vessel's performance against its design specifications and code requirements. The performance evaluation includes the ship's powering requirements (ability to achieve and maintain its design speed in a variety of conditions), fuel economy, maneuvering capabilities (safe and efficient handling), and

  2. Naval Ship Assurance - A New Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Buckley

    The UK MoD (MoD), in conjunction with Class and industrial stakeholders has been investigating, and increasingly adopting, a more commercially based approach for the assurance of naval ship acquisition and operation in an effort to reduce costs, whilst maintaining safety, environmental, and military capability. The approach being taken in the UK is based on a Naval Ship Assurance (NSA) framework.

  3. 2, 525575, 2002 Modeling of ship

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    European Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Modeling the chemical-free marine boundary layer is examined with a box model. Dilution of the ship plume via entrainmentACPD 2, 525­575, 2002 Modeling of ship exhaust in the MBL R. von Glasow et al. Title Page Abstract

  4. The return of satellite and space ship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Pao

    1977-01-01

    The problem of returning a satellite and space ship to the ground is a rather important and complex problem in space technology at present. In order to let the readers have a preliminary understanding, this article simply introduces the principles, methods, and returning procedures of the satellite and space ship based on the materials published in foreign books and magazines.

  5. Infrared ship signature analysis and optimisation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Filip Neele

    2005-01-01

    The last decade has seen an increase in the awareness of the infrared signature of naval ships. New ship designs show that infrared signature reduction measures are being incorporated, such as exhaust gas cooling systems, relocation of the exhausts and surface cooling systems. Hull and superstructure are cooled with dedicated spray systems, in addition to special paint systems that are

  6. Operation Shipping for Mobile File Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yui-wah Lee; Kwong-sak Leung; Mahadev Satyanarayanan

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses a bottleneck problem in mobile file systems: the propagation of updated large files from a weakly- connected client to its servers. It proposes an efficient mechanism called operation shipping or operation-based update propagation .I n the new mechanism, the client ships the user operation that updated the large files, rather than the files themselves, across the weak

  7. Biodegradable plastics for LSI shipping materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Hashitani; E. Yano; Y. Ando; Y. Kanazawa

    1999-01-01

    A basic component in the environmental strategy of Fujitsu is supporting product recycling so as to protect the environment. This report describes the use of biodegradable plastics in the shipping materials of electronic parts. It is essential for Fujitsu's strategy that shipping materials, such as LSI trays, can be reused to complete the recycling system, which consists of the following

  8. Way-point tracking control of ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Y. Pettersen; E. Lefeber

    2001-01-01

    The paper considers way-point tracking control of ships using yaw torque control. A full state feedback control law is developed using a cascaded approach, and proved to globally asymptotically stabilize the heading and the cross-track error of the ship. Simulation results are presented

  9. Academic Mothers: Exploring Disciplinary Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf-Wendel, Lisa; Ward, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    In this article we explore the role of academic discipline on the careers of tenure-line faculty women with children. Longitudinal, qualitative findings show that disciplinary contexts and ideal worker norms shape what it means to be an academic and a mother. Even after achieving tenure, ideal worker norms affect these roles; professional…

  10. Mothers As Family Change Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiter, Gregg F.; Kilmann, Peter R.

    1975-01-01

    The impact of a seven-week counseling program for mothers on the perceptions and behavior of family members was investigated. The experimental families reflected a significant increase in the number of positive responses and a significant decrease in the number of negative responses used by the three family members. (Author)

  11. Food Taboos among Nursing Mothers of Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Irene Santos-Torres; Edgar Vásquez-Garibay

    2003-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried out in Guadalajara, Mexico, during 1998-1999 to identify food taboos among nursing mothers who participated in a breast-feeding support programme. The study included 493 nursing mothers who were interviewed 10-45 days after delivery. A chi-square test was used for finding an association among food taboos, mother's characteristics, and demographic variables. 50.3% of the mothers avoided

  12. How having boys could shorten a mother's lifespan: They put more strain on their mother's

    E-print Network

    Lummaa, Virpi

    How having boys could shorten a mother's lifespan: They put more strain on their mother's body of mothers have always known ­ having boys may shorten your lifespan. Researchers found that women who had only boys die younger. Having boys could shorten a mother's lifespan | Mail Online http

  13. Exploring Behavioral Intentions among Young Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turney, Howard M.; Conway, Pat; Plummer, Pam; Adkins, Samuel E.; Hudson, George Cliff; McLeod, David A.; Zafaroni, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between young mothers' individual characteristics (demographics and self-efficacy), social support, and behavioral intentions regarding education and child bearing. Using a home visiting model, the program recruited 141 teen mothers to participate. Young mothers completed an initial assessment, measuring…

  14. Mothers' Repartnering after a Nonmarital Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bzostek, Sharon H.; McLanahan, Sara S.; Carlson, Marcia J.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the prevalence, predictors and outcomes of unmarried mothers' repartnering patterns following a nonmarital birth. Results indicate that, within five years after a birth, approximately two-thirds of unmarried mothers end their relationship with the focal child's biological father, and more than half of these mothers enter new…

  15. Incest Survivor Mothers: Protecting the Next Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreklewetz, Christine M.; Piotrowski, Caroline C.

    1998-01-01

    A study involving 16 incest-survivor mothers with daughters between the ages of 9-14 found the mothers described themselves as very protective and often overly-protective parents, wanting to parent differently, and better, than they were parented. Many survivors strive to be the "perfect mother" including over-protecting and over-nurturing…

  16. Mothers' personal social networks and child maltreatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne Salzinger; Sandra Kaplan; Connie Artemyeff

    1983-01-01

    The social networks of 32 mothers in families being treated in a hospital-based program for indicated cases of child abuse and neglect were compared to the networks of a demographically comparable control group of 24 mothers whose children were not subject to maltreatment. The mean age of Ss in both samples was 35 yrs. The clinic mothers were found to

  17. Mothers' Coping and Hope in Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einav, Michal; Levi, Uzi; Margalit, Malka

    2012-01-01

    The goals of the study were to examine the relations between maternal coping and hope among mothers who participated in early intervention program for their infants. Earlier studies focused attention on mothers' experiences of stress and their coping. Within the salutogenic construct, we aim at examining relations between mothers' coping and hope…

  18. Emotional Determinants of Infant-Mother Attachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Carroll E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Mothers' emotion and personality characteristics were assessed by behavior ratings and self-reports; infants' characteristics by maternal reports and objective coding. Security of infant-mother attachment in the Ainsworth Strange Situation was predicted by mothers' emotional experience, expressive behavior, and personality traits, and by infants'…

  19. Attention Deficit Disorder: Two Mothers' Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Roy C.; O'Connor, Carol

    This report discusses the outcomes of a study that investigated the decision-making process of two mothers' selection of treatment for their sons' attention deficit disorder (ADD). One mother opted for a medical treatment, and the other mother opted for a non-medical treatment. The boy who is medically treated is 14, and the non-medically treated…

  20. Ship Classification And Aimpoint Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, D. N.; Holben, R. D.; Politopoulos, A. S.; Yin, B. H.

    1988-05-01

    This paper describes a suite of target cueing algorithms which has been developed for the recognition of ship targets in the open ocean through FLIR Imagery. Imaging prepro cessing is first used to remove pattern and temporal noise. A relaxation technique is implemented to extract the target's silhouette. The superstructure profile is then obtained and classification is performed based on low-order coefficients of the discrete Fourier transform of the profile. This classification approach was found to have a 93% accuracy for short ranges (7-11 miles) and 70% accuracy for long ranges (11-20 miles) for eight target classes tested against 11398 images. Finally, a terminal homing algo rithm is described which incorporates scene tracking for maintaining track on a selected aimpoint which demonstrates superior performance over more conventional approaches.

  1. SNF shipping cask shielding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Pace, J.V. III

    1996-01-01

    The Waste Management and Remedial Action Division has planned a modification sequence for storage facility 7827 in the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA). The modification cycle is: (1) modify an empty caisson, (2) transfer the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of an occupied caisson to a hot cell in building 3525 for inspection and possible repackaging, and (3) return the package to the modified caisson in the SWSA. Although the SNF to be moved is in the solid form, it has different levels of activity. Thus, the following 5 shipping casks will be available for the task: the Loop Transport Carrier, the In- Pile Loop LITR HB-2 Carrier, the 6.5-inch HRLEL Carrier, the HFIR Hot Scrap Carrier, and the 10-inch ORR Experiment Removal Shield Cask. This report describes the shielding tasks for the 5 casks: determination of shielding characteristics, any streaming avenues, estimation of thermal limits, and shielding calculational uncertainty for use in the transportation plan.

  2. Moms Hating Moms: The Internalization of Mother War Rhetoric

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deirdre D. Johnston; Debra H. Swanson

    2004-01-01

    Work status and mothering are culturally constructed as rigid binaries. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect on mothers of these polarized characterizations of motherhood and to assess the social support mothers perceive they receive for their mother identity. This study, based on interview data collected from 98 married mothers of preschool children, demonstrated that Mother War

  3. MotherJones.com: The Mother Jones 400

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    Using data from the Federal Election Commission which was compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics (CRP) (see the July 10, 1999 Scout Report), Mother Jones has put together an eye-opening Website which reveals the nation's top 400 financial political contributors and what they may be expecting for their contributions. Users may browse the list of contributors by industry or individual donor rank or search by donor, state, industry, party, or recipient. The rankings include donor name, amount given and to whom, their rank in 1998, and their industry. This information is interesting and useful, but it is also available elsewhere. The real value of the Mother Jones 400 lies in its profiles of the donors and the industry summaries, which are an excellent resource for learning about the various individuals, not always well known, who influence government policy and legislation with their donations and personal relationships with our representatives.

  4. [Malnutrition in children of adolescent mothers].

    PubMed

    Soriano, G; Robles, F; Medina-calderon, B; Pena-torres, C B; Mendoza, H

    1991-01-01

    Infant growth records of the National Center for Research in Maternal-Child Health were analyzed to compare malnutrition among children of adolescent mothers and of mothers over age 20. 235 children of adolescent mothers were the cases, and 470 children of mothers over age 20 were controls, with low birth weight, prematurity, educational level, and marital status controlled. Infants were considered malnourished at one year if their weight was below one standard deviation for their age, according to US National Center for Health Statistics norms. 49.8% of children of adolescent mothers were malnourished at 1 year by this criterion, compared to 40.2% of children of older mothers, indicating a risk of malnutrition 1.47 times greater for children of adolescent mothers. The odds ratio was 2.5 for low birth weight children of adolescent mothers compared to 0.4 for children of older mothers. It was 1.88 for children of adolescent mothers with primary education or less compared to 1.51 for older mothers with primary or less. Prematurity and marital status were not significantly associated with differential risk of malnutrition. PMID:12290549

  5. Infrared ship signature analysis and optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neele, Filip

    2005-05-01

    The last decade has seen an increase in the awareness of the infrared signature of naval ships. New ship designs show that infrared signature reduction measures are being incorporated, such as exhaust gas cooling systems, relocation of the exhausts and surface cooling systems. Hull and superstructure are cooled with dedicated spray systems, in addition to special paint systems that are being developed for optimum stealth. This paper presents a method to develop requirements for the emissivity of a ship's coating that reduces the contrast of the ship against its background in the wavelength band or bands of threat sensors. As this contrast strongly depends on the atmospheric environment, these requirements must follow from a detailed analysis of the infrared signature of the ship in its expected areas of operation. Weather statistics for a large number of areas have been collected to produce a series of 'standard environments'. These environments have been used to demonstrate the method of specifying coating emissivity requirements. Results are presented to show that the optimised coatings reduce the temperature contrast. The use of the standard environments yields a complete, yet concise, description of the signature of the ship over its areas of operation. The signature results illustrate the strong dependence of the infrared signature on the atmospheric environment and can be used to identify those conditions where signature reduction is most effective in reducing the ship's susceptibility to detection by IR sensors.

  6. Mapping probability of shipping sound exposure level.

    PubMed

    Gervaise, Cédric; Aulanier, Florian; Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie

    2015-06-01

    Mapping vessel noise is emerging as one method of identifying areas where sound exposure due to shipping noise could have negative impacts on aquatic ecosystems. The probability distribution function (pdf) of sound exposure levels (SEL) is an important metric for identifying areas of concern. In this paper a probabilistic shipping SEL modeling method is described to obtain the pdf of SEL using the sonar equation and statistical relations linking the pdfs of ship traffic density, source levels, and transmission losses to their products and sums. PMID:26093451

  7. Ship wakes: Kelvin or Mach angle?

    E-print Network

    Rabaud, Marc

    2013-01-01

    From the analysis of a set of airborne images of ship wakes, we show that the wake angles decrease as $U^{-1}$ at large velocities, in a way similar to the Mach cone for supersonic airplanes. This previously unnoticed Mach-like regime is in contradiction with the celebrated Kelvin prediction of a constant angle of $19.47\\degree$ independent of the ship's speed. We propose here a model, confirmed by numerical simulations, in which the finite size of the disturbance explains this transition between the Kelvin and Mach regimes at a Froude number $Fr = U/\\sqrt{gL} \\simeq 0.5$, where $L$ is the hull ship length.

  8. Ship2Shore Marine Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, N. R.; Sen, G.; Doehler, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) Observatory, comprised of VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada (NC) cabled networks, supports transformative coastal to deep ocean research and enables real-time interactive experiments. Engaging students, educators and the public is critical to increasing the global awareness of our integral relationship with the ocean. One way to accomplish this is to encourage educators to incorporate marine science concepts into their lesson plans. ONC's new initiative, Ship2Shore Marine Educators (S2SME), enables educators to learn first hand about marine science and technology by going to sea on a maintenance/research cruise. While at sea Marine Educators (ME) participate in technology deployments, assist with water and core sampling, write daily blogs, produce short video updates, develop learning resources and conduct presentations to students on shore via video conferencing. MEs participating in the last NC cruise -"Wiring the Abyss 2012" - were fascinated with being a part of science in the real world. They had an experience of a lifetime and anticipate incorporating what they have learned into their lessons during the upcoming semester. Outreach between the MEs and ONC communication staff aboard the ship resulted in nearly 7,000 unique visitors to the "Wiring the Abyss 2012'' cruise website. Live ROPOS video feeds (~ 9,000 views), highlight videos (436 views/day), daily blogs (~1200 views) and stunning images (~391 views/day) were among the top rated pages. Visitors from 10 countries tuned in to "Wiring the Abyss 2012" and experienced the Pacific's deep sea! One of the best experiences for the MEs was connecting with students and teachers on shore via video conferencing. Roughly 300 students in BC and USA received a live connection from approximately 200km off the west coast. Students were most fascinated by a demo involving compressed Styrofoam cups, showing the intensity of pressure at the bottom of the sea. Successes: A positive working relationship with the NC team was established; scientists on board enjoyed being included in outreach activities. The two educators that participated had a memorable experience and thoroughly enjoyed the activities and opportunities on board. Both educators expressed that clear expectations from ONC prior to the cruise allowed them to establish themselves as part of the team and complete their intended activities and outputs. Those on shore interacting with the MEs and the cruise website provided favorable feedback about the program and wish to participate in the future. Lessons Learned: Increased promotion to teachers, teachers' associations, school districts, museums, aquariums and science centers would have increased the awareness of the S2SME program among educators. Greater promotion online prior to and during the cruise would have drawn even more visitors to the website. Furthermore, scheduling classrooms to participate in live video conferencing presentations in advance would have resulted in more students engaged. We aim to expand the S2SME Program across Canada. In particular, we hope to encourage educators living in regions removed from the ocean to participate on the ship and in live connections to-shore. Connecting educators and students coast-to-coast with the ocean in real-time will enhance their awareness and understanding of the marine ecosystem and its many processes.

  9. Monitoring shipping fuel sulfur content regulations with in-situ measurements of shipping emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattner, Lisa; Mathieu-Ueffing, Barbara; Seyler, André; Aulinger, Armin; Burrows, John; Matthias, Volker; Neumann, Daniel; Richter, Andreas; Schmolke, Stefan; Theobald, Norbert; Wittrock, Folkard

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution from shipping emissions contributes to overall air quality problems and has direct health effects on the population especially in coastal regions and harbor cities. In order to reduce these emissions the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) has tightened the regulations for air pollution from ships. Since January 1st 2015, the allowed amount of sulfur in shipping fuel which is responsible for SO2 emissions, has dropped from 1% to 0,1% in the Emission Control area (ECA) that combines the North Sea and Baltic Sea. This effectively excludes the use of heavy fuel oils by ships in this area. However, until now there is no regular monitoring system available to verify that ships are complying with these new regulations. The project MeSMarT (Measurements of shipping emissions in the marine troposphere) has been established as a cooperation between the University of Bremen and the German Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie (Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency) with the support of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht to estimate the influence of shipping emissions on the chemistry of the atmospheric boundary layer and to establish a monitoring system for main shipping routes. Within the project, several hundred ships have been monitored with focus on their sulfur fuel content, which is estimated by the ratio of SO2 and CO2, both measured with in-situ instruments from measurement stations near the passing ships. It is shown how well ships have been complying to the sulfur content regulation so far and which ships and how many are affected by the new regulations. Three different measurement sites, ranging from measurements near the Elbe River to open sea measurements from a research vessel are compared to show if the distance to the coast has an effect on the fuel quality. First results from very recent measurements of 2015 will be presented to show how the new regulations are implemented and how this will result in reduced SO2 and thus better air quality.

  10. Economics on the optimal port queuing pricing to bulk ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chen-Hsiu Laih; Kuan-Yu Chen

    2009-01-01

    This article develops the optimal single step toll scheme which is levied to bulk ships for a queuing port. Bulk ships’ arrival times at the port will be rationally dispersed after pricing this toll scheme. Consequently, the queuing time at the anchorage to all bulk ships will be rationally decreased. This article shows bulk ships’ equilibrium arrival rate distributions during

  11. Application of Moving Horizon Filter for Dynamic Positioning Ship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Furong Liu; Hui Chen

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic positioning (DP) ship maintains its position and heading by active thrusters. Some measurements of the ship motion variables can be obtained from certain reference sensor systems. However, the other measurements may be expensive or impossible to be obtained, such as ship velocity and acceleration. Fortunately, they can probably be estimated using the available measurements and the ship dynamic

  12. Ship motion prediction for launch and recovery of air vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ameer Khan; Cees Bil; Kaye E Marion

    2005-01-01

    Due to the random nature of the ship's motion in an open water environment, the deployment and the landing of air vehicles from a ship can often be difficult and even dangerous. The ability to reliably predict the motion will allow improvements in safety on board ships and facilitate more accurate deployment of vehicles off ships. This paper presents an

  13. Ship Motion Prediction for Launch and Recovery of Air Vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaye E Marion

    2009-01-01

    Due to the random nature of the ship's motion in an open water environment, the deployment and the landing of air vehicles from a ship can often be difficult and even dangerous. The ability to reliably predict the motion will allow improvements in safety on board ships and facilitate more accurate deployment of vehicles off ships. This paper presents an

  14. 46 CFR 166.01 - Approval of nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Approval of nautical school ships. 166.01 Section 166.01 Shipping...DESIGNATION AND APPROVAL OF NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS § 166.01 Approval of nautical school ships. (a) Under 46 U.S.C....

  15. Outsourcing ship management: Implications for the logistics chain

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EA 4272 Outsourcing ship management: Implications for the logistics chain Pierre Cariou* Francois,version1-17May2011 #12;Outsourcing ship management: Implications for the logistics chain Pierre Cariou that shipping companies outsource the management of vessels to ship management companies, a decision with many

  16. Access to and Usage of Offshore Liberty Ship

    E-print Network

    Access to and Usage of Offshore Liberty Ship Reefs in Texas ROBERT B. DITTON, ALAN R. GRAEFE, ANTHONY J. FEDLER, and JOHN D. SCHWARTZ Sinking aLiberty Ship offthe Texas coast. Texas Coastal and Marine for surplus Liberty Ships and to use these ships for establish- ABSTRACT-Allhou[?h arlificial reefs have been

  17. 46 CFR 166.01 - Approval of nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Approval of nautical school ships. 166.01 Section 166.01 Shipping...DESIGNATION AND APPROVAL OF NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS § 166.01 Approval of nautical school ships. (a) Under 46 U.S.C....

  18. Wave Resistance of Thin Ships and Catamarans University of Adelaide

    E-print Network

    Stokes, Yvonne

    Wave Resistance of Thin Ships and Catamarans by E.O.Tuck University of Adelaide Applied Mathematics Michell's thin ship theory is implemented to yield the wave resistance of single or double-hulled vessels for conventional single- hull ships and for the class of catamarans known as SWATH ships. The present computational

  19. 46 CFR 166.01 - Approval of nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Approval of nautical school ships. 166.01 Section 166.01 Shipping...DESIGNATION AND APPROVAL OF NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS § 166.01 Approval of nautical school ships. (a) Under 46 U.S.C....

  20. 46 CFR 166.01 - Approval of nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Approval of nautical school ships. 166.01 Section 166.01 Shipping...DESIGNATION AND APPROVAL OF NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS § 166.01 Approval of nautical school ships. (a) Under 46 U.S.C....

  1. Pre-Ship Review November 13 &14, 2001

    E-print Network

    Pre-Ship Review November 13 &14, 2001 #12;Pre Ship Review- November 2001 2 Nov 11 Agenda 1) 10. Documentation (David C) 11. Shipping and handling (David C) 12. Integration and commissioning Issues (Sandy) 16. Future Plans (Sandy) #12;Pre Ship Review- November 2001 3 Nov 11 DEIMOS Front View #12

  2. Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair

    E-print Network

    Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair: Your displays and materials can be shipped to the following address: Location to be determined Note: Packages should arrive at least one for preparing your materials to be shipped back, including shipping labels that will be provided to you. You may

  3. 46 CFR 166.01 - Approval of nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Approval of nautical school ships. 166.01 Section 166.01 Shipping...DESIGNATION AND APPROVAL OF NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS § 166.01 Approval of nautical school ships. (a) Under 46 U.S.C....

  4. 46 CFR 45.51 - Types of ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    46 ? Shipping ? 2 ? 2013-10-01 ? 2013-10-01 ? false ? Types of ships. ? 45.51 ? Section 45.51 ? Shipping ? COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ? LOAD LINES ? GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES ? Freeboards ? § 45.51 ? Types of ships. ? (a) For the purpose of this subpart, a type A...

  5. 46 CFR 45.51 - Types of ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    46 ? Shipping ? 2 ? 2012-10-01 ? 2012-10-01 ? false ? Types of ships. ? 45.51 ? Section 45.51 ? Shipping ? COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ? LOAD LINES ? GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES ? Freeboards ? § 45.51 ? Types of ships. ? (a) For the purpose of this subpart, a type A...

  6. 46 CFR 45.51 - Types of ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    46 ? Shipping ? 2 ? 2011-10-01 ? 2011-10-01 ? false ? Types of ships. ? 45.51 ? Section 45.51 ? Shipping ? COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ? LOAD LINES ? GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES ? Freeboards ? § 45.51 ? Types of ships. ? (a) For the purpose of this subpart, a type A...

  7. 46 CFR 45.51 - Types of ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    46 ? Shipping ? 2 ? 2014-10-01 ? 2014-10-01 ? false ? Types of ships. ? 45.51 ? Section 45.51 ? Shipping ? COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ? LOAD LINES ? GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES ? Freeboards ? § 45.51 ? Types of ships. ? (a) For the purpose of this subpart, a type A...

  8. 46 CFR 45.51 - Types of ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    46 ? Shipping ? 2 ? 2010-10-01 ? 2010-10-01 ? false ? Types of ships. ? 45.51 ? Section 45.51 ? Shipping ? COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ? LOAD LINES ? GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES ? Freeboards ? § 45.51 ? Types of ships. ? (a) For the purpose of this subpart, a type A...

  9. Asteroids as Propulsion Systems of Space Ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, A.

    Currently, rockets are used to change the trajectory of space ships and probes. This method is very expensive and requires a lot of fuel, which limits the feasibility of space stations, interplanetary space ships, and probes. Sometimes space probes use the gravity field of a planet. However, there are only nine planets in the Solar System, all separated by great distances. There are tens of millions of asteroids in outer space. This paper offers a revolutionary method for changing the trajectory of space probes. The method uses the kinetic or rotary energy of asteroids, comet nuclei, meteorites or other space bodies (small planets, natural planetary satellites, space debris, etc.) to increase (to decrease) ship (probe) speed up to 1000 m/sec (or more) and to achieve any new direction in outer space. The flight possibilities of space ships and probes are increased by a factor of millions.

  10. Extracting Cultural Information from Ship Timber 

    E-print Network

    Creasman, Pearce

    2012-02-14

    This dissertation is rooted in one general question: what can the wood from ships reveal about the people and cultures who built them? Shipwrecks are only the last chapter of a complex story, and while the last fifty ...

  11. Humanitarian otolaryngology: a navy hospital ship experience.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Jonathan L; Sridhara, Shankar; Goodrich, Jennifer; Mitchell, Allen O; Gessler, Eric M

    2014-12-01

    The USNS Comfort (T-AH-20) is 1 of 2 United States Navy hospital ships. In 2011, she deployed to 9 countries in Central and South America including Jamaica, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, El Salvador, Costa Rica, and Haiti. Eight surgical specialties including otolaryngology were involved, for a combined total of about 150 cases per country. An advance team coordinated patients with the Host Nation to be seen for presurgical screening. Selected patients were then taken aboard the ship for surgery and recovered in either the ship's intensive care unit or ward. They were then discharged prior to ship embarkment to the next country. A total of 95 otolaryngology cases were performed during 9 mission stops. The mean number of procedures performed was 12 per country, with thyroidectomy being the most common. A wide variety of general otolaryngology procedures were performed without significant complications, markedly impacting the quality of life in these underserved countries. PMID:25193516

  12. Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

  13. Ship detection in RADARSAT SAR imagery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qingshan Jiang; Shengrui Wang; Djemel Ziou; Ali El Zaart; Maria T. Rey; G. B. Benie; M. Henschel

    1998-01-01

    An automatic detection model for ship targets in RADARSAT SAR images is being developed by using statistical methods, Radon transform and other image processing techniques. This paper presents current progress made on the detection model

  14. Continuous and discontinuous unloading of ships

    SciTech Connect

    Soros, P.; Zador, A.T.

    1983-05-21

    Papers presented at the Coal Trans' 82 Conference (Paris, October 1982) discuss ship unloading equipment and compare the unloading speeds and capacities, as well as the capital investment, of continuous and discontinuous systems.

  15. Asteroids as Propulsion Systems of Space Ships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Currently, rockets are used to change the trajectory of space ships and probes. This method is very expensive and requires a lot of fuel, which limits the feasibility of space stations, interplanetary space ships, and probes. Sometimes space probes use the gravity field of a planet However, there am only nine planets in the Solar System, all separated by great distances. There are tons of millions of asteroids in outer space. This paper offers a revolutionary method for changing the trajectory of space probes. The method uses the kinetic or rotary energy of asteroids, comet nuclei, meteorites or other space bodies (small planets, natural planetary satellites, space debris, etc.) to increase (to decrease) ship (probe) speed up to 1000 m/sec (or more) and to achieve any new direction in outer space. The flight possibilities of space ships and probes are increased by a factor of millions.

  16. Ship hull resistance calculations using CFD methods

    E-print Network

    Voxakis, Petros

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the computational power and run-time required by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes restricted their use in ship design space exploration. Increases in computational power available to designers, in ...

  17. MAX-DOAS measurements of shipping emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, André; Wittrock, Folkard; Kattner, Lisa; Mathieu-Üffing, Barbara; Peters, Enno; Richter, Andreas; Schmolke, Stefan; Theobald, Norbert; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution from ships contributes to overall air quality problems and it has direct health effects on the population in particular in coastal regions, and in harbor cities. In order to reduce the emissions the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) have tightened the regulations for air pollution. E.g. Sulfur Emission Control Areas (SECA) have been introduced where the sulfur content of marine fuel is limited. Recently, on the 1st of January 2015, the allowed sulfur content of marine fuels inside Sulfur Emission Control Areas has been significantly decreased from 1.0% to 0.1%. However, up to now there is no regular monitoring system available to verify that ships are complying with the new regulations. Furthermore measurements of reactive trace gases in marine environments are in general sparse. The project MeSMarT (Measurements of shipping emissions in the marine troposphere, www.mesmart.de) has been established as a cooperation between the University of Bremen and the German Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie (Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency) with support of the Helmholtz Research Centre Geesthacht to estimate the influence of ship emissions on the chemistry of the atmospheric boundary layer and to establish a monitoring system for main shipping routes. Here we present MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 and SO2 carried out from two permanent sites close to the Elbe river (Wedel, Germany) and on the island Neuwerk close to the mouths of Elbe and Weser river since the year 2013. Mixing ratios of both trace gases have been retrieved using different approaches (pure geometric and taking into account the radiative transfer) and compared to in situ observations (see Kattner et al., Monitoring shipping fuel sulfur content regulations with in-situ measurements of shipping emissions). Furthermore, simple approaches have been used to calculate emission factors of NOx and SO2 for single ships.

  18. Polarization scattering characteristics of some ships using polarimetric SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Weigen; Yang, Jingsong; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Huaguo

    2011-11-01

    Polarimetric scattering information has a potential application for ship classification and identification in SAR image. This paper investigates in the polarimetric scattering of several types of ships like hospital ship, LPD (Landing Platform Dock), container ship and oil tanker. The scattering characteristics of every ship's pixel is got by using polarimetric decompositions such as Pauli decomposition, SDH (Sphere-Dihedral-Helix) decomposition, Freeman-Durden decomposition, Moriyama decomposition, Yamaguchi decomposition and Cameron decomposition. Then the scattering types of every pixel are fused by voting mechanism. Based on scattering mechanism, the scatterings are merged to four scattering types: sphere scattering, diplane scattering, volume scattering and other scattering. So the polarimetric scattering information of ships has been got. It is shown that hospital ship, LPD, container ship and oil tanker have different polarimetric scattering information. This is useful for ship classification and ship identification.

  19. Structural health monitoring for ship structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Angel, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bement, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salvino, Liming [NSWC, CADEROCK

    2009-01-01

    Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.

  20. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Hideaki; Orihara, Hideo; Sato, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author's laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship's motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process. PMID:25311139

  1. Independent influences upon mother-toddler role reversal: infant-mother attachment disorganization and role reversal in mother's childhood.

    PubMed

    Macfie, Jenny; Fitzpatrick, Katie L; Rivas, Elaine M; Cox, Martha J

    2008-03-01

    In role reversal a child takes an inappropriate parental, spousal, or peer role with the caregiver. The study assessed attachment disorganization with mother in infancy in the Strange Situation (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 1978) and role reversal at 2 years old in videotaped mother-child interactions. By closely observing role reversal at this early age, results fill in the picture concerning the link between disorganized infant-mother attachment and controlling role reversal at 6 years old (Main & Cassidy, 1988; Main, Kaplan, & Cassidy, 1985). As hypothesized, infant-mother disorganization significantly predicted mother-toddler role reversal. The study also deepened research that predicted role reversal from parent Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) role reversal assessed before the child was born (Macfie, McElwain, Houts, & Cox, 2005). As hypothesized, mother AAI role reversal with her mother in childhood significantly predicted mother-toddler role reversal over and above infant-mother disorganization. Results are discussed within a developmental psychopathology framework including opportunities for developmentally sensitive interventions. PMID:18351492

  2. Training for how to ship `excepted quantities' of regulated chemicals Addendum 1 to the Shipping Biological Materials Quick Reference Guide

    E-print Network

    California at Irvine, University of

    Training for how to ship `excepted quantities' of regulated chemicals Addendum 1 to the Shipping/9/2007 Purpose International and federal shipping laws require appropriate training for anyone who transports ship regulated chemicals, you normally need to 1) attend multiple-day, vendor-taught training or 2

  3. Steady-state estuarine modeling of the Brownsville ship channel 

    E-print Network

    Maldonado, Roberto Jaime

    1976-01-01

    Channel, May 1975 ~pa e 23 28 30 8 Dissolved Oxygen, Brownsville Ship Channel, May 1975 . . 31 10 12 13 Dissolved Oxygen Contours Brownsville Ship Channel, May 1975 Idealized Homogeneous Estuary Ideal ized Hi gh ly Strati fi ed Estuary Station... Channel, July 30, 1975 Observed Turbid Plume -Agricultural Ditch Brownsvi lie Ship Channel, July 29, 1975 Surface Dissolved Oxygen for July 28-30, 1975 Brownsville Ship Channel System Waters Bottom Dissolved Oxygen for July 28-30, 1975 Brownsville Ship...

  4. MOTHERS’ UNION HISTORIES AND THE MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH OF ADOLESCENTS BORN TO UNMARRIED MOTHERS

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristi; Sassler, Sharon; Frech, Adrianne; Addo, Fenaba; Cooksey, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    As nonmarital childbearing becomes a dominant pathway to family formation, understanding its long-term consequences for children’s well-being is increasingly important. Analysis of linked mother-child data from the NLSY79 indicates a negative association of having been born to a never-married mother with adolescent self-assessed health, but not with depressive symptoms. We also consider the role of mothers’ subsequent union histories in shaping the adolescent health outcomes of youth born to unmarried mothers. With two exceptions, unmarried mothers’ subsequent unions appear to have little consequence for the health of their offspring during adolescence. Adolescents whose mothers subsequently married and remained with their biological fathers reported better health, yet adolescents whose mothers continuously cohabited with the biological father without subsequent marriage reported worse adolescent mental health when compared with adolescents whose mothers remained continually unpartnered. PMID:23956357

  5. Adolescent Females and Their Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Volkman, Julie E.; Silk, Kami J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research indicates environmental factors and personal behaviors are related to breast cancer risk, but adopting a healthy lifestyle as early as adolescence can serve a protective function. To investigate perceptions of breast cancer risk and the environment, 10 focus groups (N = 91) were conducted with adolescent females (n = 55) and mothers (n = 36) across four counties in the Midwest, USA. The Uncertainty Management Theory provides a framework for discussing statements, and results suggest that uncertainty is maintained through ambiguity about environmental risk factors and breast cancer. Recommendations for prevention messages are presented. PMID:18987091

  6. Helplessness in Children of Depressed and Nondepressed Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Assessed helplessness behaviors in five- to seven-year-old children of mothers with and without depression. Found that, although mothers with depression set a more negative affective tone than mothers without depression during mother-child puzzle tasks, there were few significant differences between the two groups of mothers and children. (MDM)

  7. Ship Timber: Forests and Ships in the Iberian Peninsula during the Age of Discovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pearce Paul Creasman

    The 15th and 16th centuries were crucial to the economic, political, and social development of the Western world, in large part due to exploration and expansion from the Iberian Peninsula. The primary vessels of this expansion were ocean going ships. Without the resources to build and maintain the naus, caravels, and other large ocean going ships the world would certainly

  8. FellowSHIP - Fuel Cells for Low Emission Ships A project presentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomas Tronstad; Norske Veritas; Øyvind Endresen; Det Norske Veritas

    Fuel cell technology holds promising results, but fail to meet the requirements of large industrial applications, such as for ships and offshore. The poor load-following performance of high temperature fuel cells is one short stopper. The goal of the FellowSHIP project is to develop, design, build, test and qualify integrated system solutions that will enable today's fuel cell to meet

  9. Analysis of ship maneuvering data from simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frette, V.; Kleppe, G.; Christensen, K.

    2011-03-01

    We analyze complex manuevering histories of ships obtained from training sessions on bridge simulators. Advanced ships are used in fields like offshore oil exploration: dive support vessels, supply vessels, anchor handling vessels, tugs, cable layers, and multi-purpose vessels. Due to high demands from the operations carried out, these ships need to have very high maneuverability. This is achieved through a propulsion system with several thrusters, water jets, and rudders in addition to standard propellers. For some operations, like subsea maintenance, it is crucial that the ship accurately keeps a fixed position. Therefore, bridge systems usually incorporate equipment for Dynamic Positioning (DP). DP is a method to keep ships and semi submersible rigs in a fixed position using the propulsion systems instead of anchors. It may also be used for sailing a vessel from one position to another along a predefined route. Like an autopilot on an airplane, DP may operate without human involvement. The method relies on accurate determination of position from external reference systems like GPS, as well as a continuously adjusted mathematical model of the ship and external forces from wind, waves and currents. In a specific simulator exercise for offshore crews, a ship is to be taken up to an installation consisting of three nearby oil platforms connected by bridges (Frigg field, North Sea), where a subsea inspection is to be carried out. Due to the many degrees of freedom during maneuvering, including partly or full use of DP, the chosen routes vary significantly. In this poster we report preliminary results on representations of the complex maneuvering histories; representations that allow comparison between crew groups, and, possibly, sorting of the different strategic choices behind.

  10. Sexual Health Discussions between African-American Mothers and Mothers of Latino Descent and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ashley; Ellis, Monica U.; Castellanos, Ted; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Sneed, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined approaches used by African-American mothers and mothers of Latino descent for informal sex-related discussions with their children to inform sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV intervention development efforts. We recruited mothers (of children aged 12-15) from youth service agencies and a university in southern California.…

  11. Weaving Dreamcatchers: Mothering among American Indian Women who were Teen Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Janelle F.; Strickland, Carolyn J.; Chesla, Catherine A.; Kennedy, Holly P.; Portillo, Carmen J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to explore the mothering experience and practice among reservation based adult American Indian women who had been adolescent mothers. Background Adolescent American Indian women are at an elevated risk for teen pregnancy and poor maternal/child outcomes. Identifying mothering practices among this population may help guide intervention development that will improve health outcomes. Design A collaborative orientation to community based participatory research approach. Methods Employing interpretive phenomenology, 30 adult American Indian women who resided on a Northwestern reservation were recruited. In-depth, face-to-face and telephone interviews were conducted between 2007 and 2008. Findings Women shared their mothering experience and practice which encompassed a lifespan perspective grounded in their American Indian cultural tradition. Four themes were identified: mother hen, interrupted mothering and second chances, breaking cycles and mothering a community. Mothering originated in childhood, extended across their lifespan and moved beyond mothering their biological offspring. Conclusion These findings challenge the Western construct of mothering and charge nurses to seek culturally sensitive interventions that reinforce positive mothering practices and identify when additional mothering support is needed across a woman’s lifespan. PMID:23713884

  12. Incarcerated Mothers Reports of Their Daughters' Antisocial Behavior, Maternal Supervision and Mother-Daughter Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence-Wills, Shonda

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the extent of delinquency and antisocial behavior among adolescent daughters of incarcerated mothers and the influence of the mother-daughter relationship and maternal supervision on daughters' participation in delinquency and antisocial behavior. One hundred and one incarcerated mothers completed survey questionnaires that…

  13. Referential Choice and Informativeness in Mother-Child Conversation: A Focus on the Mother

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiung-chih

    2012-01-01

    This study explored Mandarin-speaking mothers' referential choice in relation to informativeness. The data consisted of two Mandarin-speaking mothers' natural conversation with their children, collected when the children were between the ages of 2;2 and 3;1. The subject and object arguments of the mothers' utterances were coded for the categories…

  14. Mothering while Imprisoned: The Effects of Family and Child Dynamics on Mothering Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, Ebonie Cunningham; Barnes, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, the number of children with imprisoned mothers has increased 131%. A mother's imprisonment potentially exposes children to a concentrated disadvantage that undermines their cognitive, emotional, and intellectual abilities. Additionally, such experiences can have deleterious effects on mother-child relationships, stand-in…

  15. Mothers' Cognitions about Children's Self-Control: Implications for Mothers' Responses to Children's Helplessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Elizabeth A.; Pomerantz, Eva M.

    2008-01-01

    This research examined the role of mothers' cognitions about children's self-control in their responses to children's helplessness. Mothers and their four-year-old children (N = 109) were asked to work on a difficult task in the laboratory. Mothers' hostility and warmth as well as children's helpless (vs. mastery) behavior were coded every minute.…

  16. Independent influences upon mother–toddler role reversal: infant–mother attachment disorganization and role reversal in mother's childhood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jenny Macfie; Katie L. Fitzpatrick; Elaine M. Rivas; Martha J. Cox

    2008-01-01

    In role reversal a child takes an inappropriate parental, spousal, or peer role with the caregiver. The study assessed attachment disorganization with mother in infancy in the Strange Situation (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 1978) and role reversal at 2 years old in videotaped mother–child interactions. By closely observing role reversal at this early age, results fill in the picture

  17. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Mohammadi, Eissa; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Pirzadeh, Akbar; Mahmoudi, Hamzeh; Ansari, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child’s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabilities. The reliability and validity of the instrument were confirmed through content validity and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (?=86%), respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS-15 software. Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P<0.033). The stigma score was higher in mothers who were living independently of their relatives (P<0.029). The mean stigma score in mothers of children with a cochlear implant was lower than that of mothers of children with earphones (86.70 vs. 99.64), and this difference tended towards significance (P=0.057). Conclusion: This study showed that half of all mothers with deaf children were scorned and felt ashamed of having a deaf child in the family because of the stigma. The majority of mothers with deaf children felt stigmatized, and only their education and residency status affected this issue. The mothers of cochlear-implanted children perceived less stigma. Due to the various social and psychological problems caused by hearing impairment, it is necessary to consider the emotional health and psychological state of the mothers in addition to rehabilitation programs and standard services for the children themselves. PMID:25938082

  18. In situ measurements of ship tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, Lawrence F.; Lyons, Jamie H.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Coakley, James E.

    1990-01-01

    It has long been known that cloud droplet concentrations are strongly influenced by cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and that anthropogenic sources of pollution can affect CCN concentrations. More recently it has been suggested that CCN may play an important role in climate through their effect on cloud albedo. A interesting example of the effect of anthropogenic CCN on cloud albedo is the so-called 'ship track' phenomenon. Ship tracks were first observed in satellite imagery when the ship's emissions were evidently needed for the formation of a visible cloud. However, they appear more frequently in satellite imagery as modifications to existing stratus and stratocumulus clouds. The tracks are seen most clearly in satellite imagery by comparing the radiance at 3.7 microns with that at 0.63 and 11 microns. To account for the observed change in radiance, droplet concentrations must be high, and the mean size of the droplets small, in ship tracks. Researchers describe what they believe to be the first in situ measurements in what appears to have been a ship track.

  19. Radiative Forcing Over Ocean by Ship Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Wilcox, E.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -0.00014 plus or minus 53% Watts per square meter assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size of greater than or equal to 100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Watts per square meter), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

  20. Academic Mothers Finding Rhyme and Reason

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Venitha

    2009-01-01

    In this paper I argue that the "balancing two lives" approach to motherhood and work has particular limitations for academic mothers. I interrogate the perceived oppositionalities in being mother, traditionally associated with nurturing, love and emotion, and being academic, traditionally associated with reason and logic. My purpose is to show…

  1. Mother Teresa: A Mission Ends: India Today

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brijnath, Rohit.

    The life and death of Mother Teresa is honored in the September 19, 1997 issue of India Today (discussed in the August 29, 1997 issue of the Scout Report) with two cover stories about Mother Teresa, including a guest column entitled "Touch the Poor," by her official biographer, Navin Chawla.

  2. White Women and the Dark Mother

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia Eller

    2000-01-01

    One of the foremost champions of the ‘Dark Mother’ today is the overwhelmingly white feminist spirituality movement, based in the United States and Europe. Over the past twenty-five years, white spiritual feminists have approached the figure of the Dark Mother, which is borrowed from Hindu, African and Christian sources, with a uniquely fraught mix of longing, envy, hope, fear and

  3. Kangaroo Mother Care and the Bonding Hypothesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathalie Charpak; Réjean Tessier; Marta Cristo; Stella Velez; Marta Girón; Juan G. Ruiz-Paláez; Yves Charpak

    2010-01-01

    Background. Based on the general bond- ing hypothesis, it is suggested that kangaroo mother care (KMC) creates a climate in the family whereby parents become prone to sensitive caregiving. The general hy- pothesis is that skin-to-skin contact in the KMC group will build up a positive perception in the mothers and a state of readiness to detect and respond to

  4. Parenting Styles of Lower Class Minority Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Wendy Middlemiss; And Others

    Efforts were undertaken to develop a parental interview for determining parenting style of parents of children of all ages and children within several subcultural groups. The interview provided mothers with descriptions of common situations in the home and asked the mothers to choose specific responses representing the following parenting styles:…

  5. Perinatal Metabolism of Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene in Nicaraguan Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Dorea; A. C. Cruz-Granja; M. L. Lacayo-Romero; J. Cuadra-Leal

    2001-01-01

    Umbilical cord and venous blood samples were collected at the time of delivery from 52 mothers living in urban and rural areas of the Atoya River basin, Nicaragua. In a subsample of 24 mothers that delivered by Cesarean section, abdominal adipose tissue samples were also collected, as was breast milk later in lactation. Cord and venous blood sera were analyzed

  6. Does mother nature punish rotten kids?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carl T. Bergstrom; Theodore C. Bergstrom

    1999-01-01

    The theory of parent-offspring conflict predicts that mothers and their offspring may not agree about how resources should be allocated among family members. An offspring, for example, may favor a later weaning date than does its mother. Despite a parent's physical superiority, it may be that offspring are able to manipulate their parents' behavior. In this paper, we investigate a

  7. Looking Mother Tongue Instruction through Different Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regmi, Kapil Dev

    2008-01-01

    Mother Tongue Instruction has been a debatable issue since long. There may be two options in the medium of instruction: either to teach especially primary and preprimary schoolchildren in their own mother tongue or continue using second or foreign language as the medium of instruction. Both of the approaches bear some pros and cons. This article…

  8. A Mother/Daughter Journey into Unschooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Linda; Garrett, Katie

    2001-01-01

    A mother (Linda) and daughter (Katie) tried a cooperative "unschool," public school, home schooling, private school, and returned to unschooling. Linda feels that public school compromises creativity and freedom too much, but she had trouble letting go of the structure. Katie says unschooling let her enjoy her relationship with her mother, focus…

  9. Mothers and Daughters: The Value of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ann K.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined mothers' and their college-age daughters' attitudes about the value of children, rural-urban differences in attitudes, and family size effects. Correlations between mothers and daughters on two of nine Opinions About Children scales, rural-urban differences on three scales, and negligible differences for family size were found. (Author/BL)

  10. When Street Sex Workers Are Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine M. Sloss; Gary W. Harper

    2004-01-01

    Many women who engage in street sex work experience pregnancies and become mothers. Unfortunately, little research has examined how their pregnancies and parenting impact themselves as street sex workers and their street sex work. In this qualitative research study, 16 mothers who were currently involved in street sex work in a Midwestern city of the United States participated in semistructured

  11. Effects of Mother Photographs on Separation Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passman, Richard H.; Longeway, Kathleen P.

    This study was designed to identify some of the individual physical features of the mother that promote adaptive responding of 2-year-old children in a novel environment. Previous studies have suggested that any ambiguous stimulus configuration might be effective if the child can be led to perceive it as his mother. After being separated from…

  12. Science Sampler: Happy science Mother's Day

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    JulieAnn Hugick

    2009-04-01

    It's almost May and review for final exams will soon be in full swing. Mother's Day is celebrated every second Sunday in May. Have students combine their use of science vocabulary and their love for Mom by creating scientific Mother's Day greeting cards.

  13. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  14. 20 CFR 404.342 - Mother's and father's benefit amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Mother's and father's benefit amounts. 404.342 Section...Divorced Spouses § 404.342 Mother's and father's benefit amounts. Your mother's or father's monthly benefit is equal to 75...

  15. 20 CFR 404.342 - Mother's and father's benefit amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Mother's and father's benefit amounts. 404.342 Section...Divorced Spouses § 404.342 Mother's and father's benefit amounts. Your mother's or father's monthly benefit is equal to 75...

  16. Mothers' experiences of caring for a child with severe brain

    E-print Network

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    of stress Identity Meaning of occupation Changed roles Need to relax Spirituality #12;3. Lived social of mothers, including their roles and occupational configurations mothers' lived time mothers' lived social

  17. The superconducting MHD-propelled ship YAMATO-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasakawa, Yohei; Takezawa, Setsuo; Sugawara, Yoshinori; Kyotani, Yoshihiro

    1995-01-01

    In 1985 the Ship & Ocean Foundation (SOF) created a committee under the chairmanship of Mr. Yohei Sasakawa, Former President of the Ship & Ocean Foundation, and began researches into superconducting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ship propulsion. In 1989 SOF set to construction of a experimental ship on the basis of theoretical and experimental researches pursued until then. The experimental ship named YAMATO-1 became the world's first superconducting MHD-propelled ship on her trial runs in June 1992. This paper describes the outline of the YAMATO-1 and sea trial test results.

  18. The superconducting MHD-propelled ship YAMATO-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasakawa, Yohei; Takezawa, Setsuo; Sugawara, Yoshinori; Kyotani, Yoshihiro

    1995-04-01

    In 1985 the Ship & Ocean Foundation (SOF) created a committee under the chairmanship of Mr. Yohei Sasakawa, Former President of the Ship & Ocean Foundation, and began researches into superconducting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ship propulsion. In 1989 SOF set to construction of a experimental ship on the basis of theoretical and experimental researches pursued until then. The experimental ship named YAMATO-1 became the world's first superconducting MHD-propelled ship on her trial runs in June 1992. This paper describes the outline of the YAMATO-1 and sea trial test results.

  19. What maritime ISAR designers should know about ship dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.

    2012-06-01

    ISAR has enjoyed some success in imaging maritime targets, particularly ships. In fact, a number of maritime ISAR systems have been operational for a number of years. With ISAR, the ship's own motion is critical to forming well-resolved ISAR images. Seemingly important to accounting for ship motion is to first understand the nature of the ship motion that we are likely to encounter. Designing ships for specific motion characteristics is the domain of naval architecture. This paper presents some preliminary analysis of naval architecture principles, and typical ship designs' impact on the ISAR problem.

  20. Stability criterion and its calculation for sail-assisted ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yihuai; Tang, Juanjuan; Xue, Shuye; Liu, Shewen

    2015-01-01

    Stability criterion and its calculation are the crucial issue in the application of sail-assisted ship. How- ever, there is at present no specific criterion and computational methods for the stability of sail-assisted ship. Based on the stability; requirements for seagoing ships, the stability criterion of the sail-assisted ships is suggested in this paper. Furthermore, how to calculate the parameters and determine some specific coefficients for the ship stability; calculation, as well as how to redraw stability! curve are also discussed in this paper. Finally, to give an illustration, the proposed method is applied on a sail assisted-ship model with comments and recommendations for improvement.

  1. Automatic Classification Of Infrared Ship Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovar, Joseph J.; Knecht, John; Chenoweth, Darrell

    1981-12-01

    The Naval Weapons Center (NWC) is currently developing automatic target classification systems for future surveillance and attack aircraft and missile seekers. Target classification has been identified as a critical operational capability which should be included on new Navy aircraft and missile developments or systems undergoing significant modifications. The objective for the Automatic Classification Infrared Ship Imagery System is to provide the following new capablities for surveillance and attack aircraft and antiship missiles: near real-time automatic classification of ships in day and night at long standoff ranges with a wide area coverage imaging infrared sensor. The sensor applies classical pattern recognition technology to automatically classify ships using Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) images. Automatic Classification of Infrared Ship Imagery is based on the extraction of features which uniquely describe the classes of ships. These features are used in conjunction with decision rules which are established during a training phase. Conventional classification techniques require labeled samples of all expected targets, threats and non-threats for this training phase. To overcome the resulting need for the collection of an immense data base, NWC developed a Generalized Classifier which, in the training phase, requires signals only from the targets of interest, such as high value combatant threats. In the testing phase, the signals from the combatants are classified and signals from other ships, which are sufficiently different from the training data, are classified as "other" targets. This technique provides a considerable savings in computer processing time, in memory requirements and data collection efforts. Since sufficient IIR images of the appropriate quality and quantity were not available for investigating automatic IIR ship classification, TV images of ship models were used for an initial feasibility demonstration. The initial investigation made use of the experience gained with preprocessing and classifying ROR and ISAR data. For this reason, the most expedient method was to collapse the 2-dimensional TV ship images onto the longitudinal axis by summing the amplitude data in the vertical ship axis. The resulting 128 point 1-dimensional profiles show the silhouette of the ship and bear an obvious similarity with the radar data. Based on that observation, a 128 point Fourier transform was computed and the ten low order squared amplitudes of the complex Fourier coefficients were then used as feature vectors for the Generalized Classifier. In contrast to the radar data, the size of TV or IIR images of ships changes as a function of range. It is therefore necessary to develop feature extraction algorithms which are scale invariant. The central moments, which have scale and rotational invariant properties were therefore implemented. This method was suggested in 1962 by M. K. Hu (IRE Transactions on Information Theory). Using the moments alone resulted in unsatisfactory classification performance and indicated that edge enhancement was necessary and that the background needed to be rejected. The images were therefore processed with the Sobel nonlinear edge enhancement algorithm, which also has the desirable property that it works for images with low signal-to-noise ratios and poorly defined edges. Satisfactory results were obtained. In another experiment, the feature vector was composed of the five lower-order invariant moments and the five lower-order FFT coefficient squared magnitudes, excluding the zero frequency coefficient. This paper will describe the data base, the processing and classification techniques, discuss the results and addresses the topic of "Processing of Images and Data Optical Sensors."

  2. Sea loads on ships and offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Faltinsen, O. (Norwegian Inst. of Technology (NO))

    1990-01-01

    The book introduces the theory of the structural loading on ships and offshore structures caused by wind, waves and currents, and goes on to describe the applications of this theory in terms of real structures. The main topics described are linear-wave induced motions, loads on floating structures, numerical methods for ascertaining wave induced motions and loads, viscous wave loads and damping, stationkeeping and water impact and entry. The applications of the theoretical principles are introduced with extensive use of exercises and examples. Applications covered include conventional ships, barges, high speed marine vehicles, semisubmersibles, tension leg platforms, moored or dynamic positioned ships, risers, buoys, fishing nets, jacket structures and gravity platforms. One aim of the book is to provide a physical understanding through simplified mathematical models. In this way one can develop analytical tools to evaluate results from test models, full scale trials or computer simulation, and learns which parameters represent the major contributions and influences on sea loads.

  3. Code development for ships -- A demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyub, B. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Mansour, A.E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of NAOE; White, G. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Div. of Engineering; Wirsching, P.H. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A demonstration summary of a reliability-based structural design code for ships is presented for two ship types, a cruiser and a tanker. For both ship types, code requirements cover four failure modes: hull girder bulking, unstiffened plate yielding and buckling, stiffened plate buckling, and fatigue of critical detail. Both serviceability and ultimate limit states are considered. Because of limitation on the length, only hull girder modes are presented in this paper. Code requirements for other modes will be presented in future publication. A specific provision of the code will be a safety check expression. The design variables are to be taken at their nominal values, typically values in the safe side of the respective distributions. Other safety check expressions for hull girder failure that include load combination factors, as well as consequence of failure factors, are considered. This paper provides a summary of safety check expressions for the hull girder modes.

  4. Modern alternative to oil-fired ships

    SciTech Connect

    Botts, T E; Powell, J R; Powell, J D

    1980-01-01

    A direct coal-fired turbine is a very light engine for powering ships. Weight savings over a diesel engine nearly make up for the added weight associated with fuel bunkering when converting from oil to coal-firing. A method of hot-gas-particulate cleanup based on packed and fluidized rotating beds of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is discussed as a means of providing adequate turbine blade lifetime. Two cases, a cargo ship and large merchant tanker are considered. Present value of fuel savings equates to the value of a coal-fired turbine. For a ten-year lifetime, the value of the turbine due to fuel-lost savings is projected to be roughly 48 M$ for the cargo ship and 194 M$ for the tanker.

  5. Cortisol in mother’s milk across lactation reflects maternal life history and predicts infant temperament

    PubMed Central

    Skibiel, Amy L.; Foster, Alison B.; Del Rosso, Laura; Mendoza, Sally P.; Capitanio, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The maternal environment exerts important influences on offspring mass/growth, metabolism, reproduction, neurobiology, immune function, and behavior among birds, insects, reptiles, fish, and mammals. For mammals, mother’s milk is an important physiological pathway for nutrient transfer and glucocorticoid signaling that potentially influences offspring growth and behavioral phenotype. Glucocorticoids in mother’s milk have been associated with offspring behavioral phenotype in several mammals, but studies have been handicapped by not simultaneously evaluating milk energy density and yield. This is problematic as milk glucocorticoids and nutrients likely have simultaneous effects on offspring phenotype. We investigated mother’s milk and infant temperament and growth in a cohort of rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) mother–infant dyads at the California National Primate Research Center (N = 108). Glucocorticoids in mother’s milk, independent of available milk energy, predicted a more Nervous, less Confident temperament in both sons and daughters. We additionally found sex differences in the windows of sensitivity and the magnitude of sensitivity to maternal-origin glucocorticoids. Lower parity mothers produced milk with higher cortisol concentrations. Lastly, higher cortisol concentrations in milk were associated with greater infant weight gain across time. Taken together, these results suggest that mothers with fewer somatic resources, even in captivity, may be “programming” through cortisol signaling, behaviorally cautious offspring that prioritize growth. Glucocorticoids ingested through milk may importantly contribute to the assimilation of available milk energy, development of temperament, and orchestrate, in part, the allocation of maternal milk energy between growth and behavioral phenotype. PMID:25713475

  6. Monilial Infections in Infants and Their Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Miriam; Bass, Martin J.

    1983-01-01

    To explore the association of monilia in infants and their mothers, the office charts of 45 mother-infant pairs were reviewed. There was a significant association (p<.01) between monilia in infants and their mothers. In seven out of eight instances, the mother's infection was diagnosed after her infant's. Monilial infections were more common in males and in infants of lower socioeconomic status, but the difference in incidence was not statistically significant. The major problem of this study is that it was a chart review using data collected routinely in the course of care. The stage is set for a prospective study that can best be done by family physicians, who provide day-to-day care for both mothers and infants. PMID:20469403

  7. Are mother–child similarities in value orientations related to mothers' parenting? A comparative study of American and Romanian mothers and their adolescent children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mihaela Friedlmeier; Gisela Trommsdorff

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated similarities between mothers' and their adolescent children's individualistic and collectivistic values by analysing data from 337 American mother–adolescent dyads and 100 Romanian mother–adolescent dyads. The two countries differ in the degree of socioeconomic and political changes as well as quality of intergenerational relationships, therefore differences in the extent of shared values between mothers and adolescents were

  8. Ship trim optimization: assessment of influence of trim on resistance of MOERI container ship.

    PubMed

    Sherbaz, Salma; Duan, Wenyang

    2014-01-01

    Environmental issues and rising fuel prices necessitate better energy efficiency in all sectors. Shipping industry is a stakeholder in environmental issues. Shipping industry is responsible for approximately 3% of global CO? emissions, 14-15% of global NO(X) emissions, and 16% of global SO(X) emissions. Ship trim optimization has gained enormous momentum in recent years being an effective operational measure for better energy efficiency to reduce emissions. Ship trim optimization analysis has traditionally been done through tow-tank testing for a specific hullform. Computational techniques are increasingly popular in ship hydrodynamics applications. The purpose of this study is to present MOERI container ship (KCS) hull trim optimization by employing computational methods. KCS hull total resistances and trim and sinkage computed values, in even keel condition, are compared with experimental values and found in reasonable agreement. The agreement validates that mesh, boundary conditions, and solution techniques are correct. The same mesh, boundary conditions, and solution techniques are used to obtain resistance values in different trim conditions at Fn = 0.2274. Based on attained results, optimum trim is suggested. This research serves as foundation for employing computational techniques for ship trim optimization. PMID:24578649

  9. 5.G Battle Ship Using Grid Paper

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-05-01

    This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Materials The students will need grid paper and colored pencils; some color for the ships and (for example) red for explosions on their ships and their...

  10. Hierarchical classifier design for airborne SAR images of ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Langis; Klepko, Robert

    1998-09-01

    We report about a hierarchical design for extracting ship features and recognizing ships from SAR images, and which will eventually feed a multisensor data fusion system for airborne surveillance. The target is segmented from the image background using directional thresholding and region merging processes. Ship end-points are then identified through a ship centerline detection performed with a Hough transform. A ship length estimate is calculated assuming that the ship heading and/or the cross-range resolution are known. A high-level ship classification identifies whether the target belongs to Line (mainly combatant military ships) or Merchant ship categories. Category discrimination is based on the radar scatterers' distribution in 9 ship sections along the ship's range profile. A 3-layer neural network has been trained on simulated scatterers distributions and supervised by a rule- based expert system to perform this task. The NN 'smoothes out' the rules and the confidence levels on the category declaration. Line ship type (Frigate, Destroyer, Cruiser, Battleship, Aircraft Carrier) is then estimated using a Bayes classifier based on the ship length. Classifier performances using simulated images are presented.

  11. 13.122 Ship Structural Analysis & Design, Spring 2003

    E-print Network

    Burke, David V.

    Ship longitudinal strength and hull primary stresses. Ship structural design concepts. Effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength. Transverse shear stresses in the hull girder. Torsional strength ...

  12. The bunkering industry and its effect on shipping tanker operations

    E-print Network

    Boutsikas, Angelos

    2004-01-01

    The bunkering industry provides the shipping industry with the fuel oil that the vessels consume. The quality of the fuel oil provided will ensure the safe operation of vessels. Shipping companies under their fuel oil ...

  13. Shipping : is it a high risk low return business?

    E-print Network

    Patitsas, Leon S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the risk and return characteristics of the shipping business. Shipping profitability and returns are evaluated and an analysis is performed to examine whether the returns are ...

  14. FINISHED CASTINGS ARE ONLY GROUND BEFORE THEY ARE SHIPPED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FINISHED CASTINGS ARE ONLY GROUND BEFORE THEY ARE SHIPPED TO CUSTOMERS WHO COMPLETE THE FINISHING IN THEIR OWN MACHINE SHOPS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Grinding & Shipping, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  15. Aerial view of construction of both LTA ship hangars (looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of construction of both LTA ship hangars (looking north) circa 1942. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  16. Aerial view of reroofing of northern LTA ship hangar, circa ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of re-roofing of northern LTA ship hangar, circa 1957. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  17. 'Cruise Ship' Norovirus Bug Can Spread by Air

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_152407.html 'Cruise Ship' Norovirus Bug Can Spread by Air, Study Finds ... infected scores of people and ruined countless cruise ship vacations -- can spread through the air and infect ...

  18. 31. Floating original Ship Canal draw (in background) to University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Floating original Ship Canal draw (in background) to University Heights location. New Ship Canal draw in foreground. June 1906 photograph. - University Heights Bridge, Spanning Harlem River at 207th Street & West Harlem Road, New York, New York County, NY

  19. 1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR AND DATE, SOURCE: BISHOP MUSEUM, HONOLULU, HI. - Ship "Falls of Clyde", Hawaii Maritime Center,Pier 7, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Ship Propeller Strikes: Potential Impacts on Green Sturgeon

    E-print Network

    Ship Propeller Strikes: Potential Impacts on Green Sturgeon JACK KILLGORE and DOUG CLARKE U.S. Army · Anecdotal evidence of relatively frequent occurrences of ship strikes on Atlantic sturgeon · Poses difficult

  1. Mother-loss: recreating relationship and meaning.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, P J; McWilliam, C L; Ralyea, S F; Schweitzer, A T

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe adult women's experiences in losing their mother. Using an interpretive phenomenological frame of inquiry, 5 women were purposively selected to share their loss experience. Memories of the mother-daughter relationship were explored, and the meanings the daughters attached to their loss described, in written narratives, 2 in-depth interviews, and 1 group session. Seven themes emerged: Recalling, Holding On, Saying Goodbye, Longings of the Heart, Shifting Patterns of Relationship, Recreating the Dialogue, and Honouring Our Mothers/Ourselves. The loss of one's mother represents the loss of one's first intimate relationship, a relationship that has a unique meaning for daughters because their personal development is profoundly and uniquely shaped by it. This potentially pervasive and transforming life experience is best understood from an in-depth exploration and understanding of the nature of the mother-daughter relationship. Nurses who come to understand the dynamic interaction of grief and development through women's experience of mother-loss can more successfully offer their presence, their understanding of the complexity of the mother-daughter relationship, and their skills in bereavement care to facilitate healing and to promote health and personal growth. PMID:10696162

  2. Mothers’ perceptions of fever in children

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Akaberian, Sherafat; Hatami, Gissou

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fever is one of the most common symptoms for children. Most fevers are not dangerous; parents, especially mothers, nevertheless experience severe anxiety confronting children's fevers. This study aimed to explore the mothers’ perceptions of fever in their children. Materials and Methods: Mothers of hospitalized febrile children were selected by purposeful sampling method from two hospitals in Bushehr in 2012. Data saturation was reached after in-depth semi structured interviews with 12 participants. Data analysis was done by conventional content analysis method. Findings: Sense of concern, the necessity for quick action and the need for protection emerged from mothers’ views. Sense of concern came from concerns over cause of fever, child's hospitalization and possible side-effects of fever. The necessity for quick action resulted from gathering information, self-medication and referring to healthcare centres; the need for spiritual and emotional protection created the need to protect in mothers. Conclusion: Findings showed that mothers need educational, emotional and spiritual protection in order to overcome their concerns and managing their children's fever. It is recommended that an empowering model based on these findings be developed in order to strengthen mothers in dealing with fevers in order to prevent excessive concern and anxiety. PMID:25250363

  3. UNOLS Ship Time Request Form -Section ONE UNOLS Request ID #: 20010807112419

    E-print Network

    Menke, William

    UNOLS Ship Time Request Form - Section ONE, Palisades, NY 10964 USA X Principal Use _ No Ship Required _ Long Range Planning Document =============================================================================== Ship(s) Requested # Science Year (Name or Size) Days Req. Optimum Dates Alternate Dates

  4. 46 CFR 153.12 - IMO Certificates for United States Ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false IMO Certificates for United States Ships. 153.12 Section 153.12 Shipping...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS...12 IMO Certificates for United States Ships. Either a classification...

  5. 47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

  6. 46 CFR 153.12 - IMO Certificates for United States Ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false IMO Certificates for United States Ships. 153.12 Section 153.12 Shipping...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS...12 IMO Certificates for United States Ships. Either a classification...

  7. 46 CFR 153.12 - IMO Certificates for United States Ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false IMO Certificates for United States Ships. 153.12 Section 153.12 Shipping...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS...12 IMO Certificates for United States Ships. Either a classification...

  8. 32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

  9. 47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

  10. 32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

  11. 47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

  12. 47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

  13. 32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

  14. 32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

  15. Regional Class Research VesselsThe next generation of ships for coastal science

    E-print Network

    Regional Class Research VesselsThe next generation of ships for coastal science http://ceoas.oregonstate.edu/ships/rcrv Regional Class Research VesselsThe next generation of ships for coastal science http://ceoas.oregonstate.edu/ships

  16. 46 CFR 153.12 - IMO Certificates for United States Ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false IMO Certificates for United States Ships. 153.12 Section 153.12 Shipping...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS...12 IMO Certificates for United States Ships. Either a classification...

  17. 32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards § 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

  18. 47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

  19. 46 CFR 153.12 - IMO Certificates for United States Ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false IMO Certificates for United States Ships. 153.12 Section 153.12 Shipping...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS...12 IMO Certificates for United States Ships. Either a classification...

  20. Mercy Ship--a wave of healing.

    PubMed

    K?oda, El?bieta

    2013-01-01

    Mercy Ships is an international charity that was founded in 1978 as the maritime division of Youth WithA Mission and currently operates as the largest non-governmental hospital ship in the world. The merchant vessel(M/V) Africa Mercy provides free health care, community development projects, community health education,agriculture projects, and palliative care for terminally ill patients. M/V Anastasis (1978-2007, retired) wasa flagship of the four-strong Mercy Ships Fleet which was manned by volunteers and equipped through donationsto bring physical and spiritual healing to the poor and needy in port cities around the world. The purpose of thisarticle is to make known the growing need for help in developing countries and to share my personal experiencewhile working for the Mercy Ships organisation on board the M/V Anastasis.In developing nations, 1,2 billion people live in absolute poverty and have no access to basic health care, cleanwater and sanitation. The "big killers" in our world today (such as infectious and parasitic diseases, lack of basicsanitation, diarrheal diseases, upper respiratory infections, lack of vaccination, malaria, tuberculosis, hungerand hunger-related diseases, death in childbirth) are preventable. Behind every statistics there is a story, a lifeand a person waiting for hope and healing. What little we do to prevent these can have a major impact. PMID:23788164

  1. Curriculum development for addressing ship pollution issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, J.G. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Reader, G.T. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Keating, E.L. [Environmental Kinetics Ltd., Arnold, MD (United States); Gupta, A. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    Environmental studies are now included in most engineering and science degree programs. Indeed, majors in environmental engineering have been relatively commonplace. Invariably, the content of these courses and programs has been concentrated focused on land-based environmental issues and applications. However, quite recently courses dealing with ship generated waste and ocean pollution management have also started to appear in marine, naval and ocean engineering programs. Many navies have adopted vigorous Green Ship policies and as a consequence have provided a major impetus for the inclusion of maritime environmental topics in naval (and related) engineering programs. An example of this curriculum activity is the elective courses that have been developed for undergraduate programs at the US Naval Academy (USNA). These courses specifically address maritime environmental issues and the material presented supports the US Navy`s Green Ship Policy. The ethical, technical and engineering issues that need to be considered so that warships can operate within the needs of the current and future at-sea environmental legislation are examined in the courses. Variants of these electives are also under development or on offer at other institutions. In this paper the needs for, and the underlying philosophy of the Green Ship curriculum developments are described and discussed.

  2. Cavitation Research and Ship Propeller Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Kuiper

    1997-01-01

    The role of cavitation research in the design of ship propellers and the influence of research on propeller design is reviewed. The historical development of research on bubble cavitation is an example of a lack of communication between research and design. Research on sheet cavitation is starting now and simplifications such as two dimensional cavitation are being made. It is

  3. Propagation of light through ship exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Iersel, M.; Mack, A.; van Eijk, A. M. J.; Schleijpen, H. M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Looking through the atmosphere, it is sometimes difficult to see the details of an object. Effects like scintillation and blur are the cause of these difficulties. Exhaust plumes of e.g. a ship can cause extreme scintillation and blur, making it even harder to see the details of what lies behind the plume. Exhaust plumes come in different shapes, sizes, and opaqueness and depending on atmospheric parameters like wind speed and direction, as well as engine settings (power, gas or diesel, etc.). A CFD model is used to determine the plume's flow field outside the stack on the basis of exhaust flow properties, the interaction with the superstructure of the ship, the meteorological conditions and the interaction of ship's motion and atmospheric wind fields. A modified version of the NIRATAM code performs the gas radiation calculations and provides the radiant intensity of the (hot) exhaust gases and the transmission of the atmosphere around the plume is modeled with MODTRAN. This allows assessing the irradiance of a sensor positioned at some distance from the ship and its plume, as function of the conditions that influence the spatial distribution and thermal properties of the plume. Furthermore, an assessment can be made of the probability of detecting objects behind the plume. This plume module will be incorporated in the TNO EOSTAR-model, which provides estimates of detection range and image quality of EO-sensors under varying meteorological conditions.

  4. SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    , but not limited to: winches, capstan, tuggers, and the ship's crane. 6.5.3 General A. The A-frame is operated from a fixed control box on the starboard A-frame pedestal. The single lever operates the hydraulics the hydraulics to extend or retract the boom. The normal position for transiting and when not in use is fully

  5. SHIP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO HIGH EXPLOSIVE DETONATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Z. Vulitsky; John J. McMullen; H. Karni

    Predicting the structural response of a naval vessel to a high explosive detonation is an important requirement in naval shipbuilding. Unfortunately, current analysis methods do not provide high level of confidence leading to the utilization of large structural design safety factors. As a result, ships are heavier and more expensive to construct and maintain than may actually be required. Moreover,

  6. Compact gas turbine power for fast ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lauriat

    1986-01-01

    Gas turbines in the medium power class, 1000 to 5000 SHP, usually enjoy lightweight and small size due to an aircraft engine heritage and allow the designer of small ships the ability to consider much higher speed craft and still maintain a reasonable space allotment for machinery. This paper describes several gas turbines in the medium power range and discuss

  7. Concrete LNG GBS Terminal Ship Collision Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fuqiang Wu; Frank Puskar

    2008-01-01

    A Concrete Gravity Based Structure (GBS) provides an opportunity for the storage of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and represents one of the key elements of an LNG receiving and regasification terminal. The impact resistance of an offshore LNG GBS against accidental ship collision needs to be evaluated. Nonlinear elasto-plastic Finite Element Analysis (FEA) provides a useful numerical tool to assess

  8. Fatigue life prediction of welded ship details

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carole Erny; David Thevenet; Jean-Yves Cognard; Manuel Körner

    Ship structures are submitted to variable cyclic loading during navigation. The cyclic motion of waves induces variable and complex loadings in the structure, which could generate fatigue damage. Moreover, most of these metallic structures are welded assemblies. This technique generates local stress concentrations at the weld toe, which becomes a critical area regarding fatigue. In previous works, a methodology to

  9. Shielding Analysis of the 5320 Shipping Cask

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Nathan, S. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that the 5320 shipping cask meets Federal regulations for maximum radiation dose rates when loaded with the intended plutonium oxide cargo. It should be emphasized that the 5320 is an existing cask, and therefore this work represents confirmatory analysis rather than design analysis.

  10. On the surface manifestations of ship wakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, Ivan; Ermakov, Stanislav; Lazareva, Tatyana

    2010-05-01

    During the field experiments on the Black Sea and on the Gorky Reservoir for the last 4 years the widening of the turbulent region generated by surface ships and the surface manifestations of the ship wakes has been studied. Measurements of currents in ship wakes have been made using ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) deployed from a motor boat. It was obtained that the time dependence of the wake width could be described approximately by a 0.4-power function, and the depth of wake remained constant at its initial stage, the latter allowed one to consider the wake widening as a one-dimensional process. We have developed a simple one-dimensional model of ship wake evolution using the semi-empirical theory of turbulence, and the initial stage of the wake widening (when neglecting dissipation) was described by the equation of turbulent energy balance with the pulse initial condition. We also observed in experiment mean circulating currents in the wake region resulting in the wind wave intensification on the boundaries of the wake region. It was shown that the later stage of the wake evolution is characterized by the presence of slicks bands on the edges of the wake. The slick bands formation is a result of the surfactants transport due to air bubbles in the turbulent wake and their compression by the mean currents. The work was supported by RFBR (projects 08-05-00634, 08-05-97011), the Program RAN Radiophysics, and the IPY THORPEX Project.

  11. Portage Bay Lake Washington Ship Canal

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Drumheller Fountain Portage Bay Lake Washington Ship Canal 4041 Denny Field IMA Tennis Courts IMA Microscopic Market, UW Medicine at South Lake Union The Nook, McMahon Hall RESTAURANTS & CAFÉS The 8, McMahon Hall (Cashless) By George, Odegaard Undergraduate Library Café 815 Mercer, UW Medicine at South Lake

  12. Reduction Methods of NOx Emission from Ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuyuki Maeda; Hiroshi Matsushita; Hiroshi Kanaoka; Takayuki Suetsugu

    This paper presented the reduction methods of NOx emission from not marine diesel engines, but marine transportation. In the first part of the paper, evaluations of NOx emission from sailing ships based on naval architecture and marine engineering were examined theoretically. Then, in order to demonstrate the evaluations, fuel injection timing retard and sailing performance under two different conditions (before

  13. Maintainability design of ship electronic system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Kras; J. Susanj

    2005-01-01

    Maintainabilify of any ship electronic system is the ease, economy, safety and accuracy with which the necessaly maintenance of the system is undertaken and can be measured either in terms of probability or in terms of the level of resouxes required to maintain the system. It therefore has a direct efect on the ability of the system to satisfjl the

  14. Container Shipping And Ports: An Overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theo E. Notteboom

    2004-01-01

    Globalisation, deregulation, logistics integration and containerisation have reshaped the port and shipping industry. Port and maritime companies are challenged to redefine their functional role in the value chain for the sake of creating customer value and of ensuring the survival and growth of the company. Companies are busily trying to disrupt the status quo rather than preserve it. Based on

  15. Sea loads on ships and offshore structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. M. Faltinsen

    1990-01-01

    The book introduces the theory of the structural loading on ships and offshore structures caused by wind, waves and currents, and goes on to describe the applications of this theory in terms of real structures. The main topics described are linear-wave induced motions, loads on floating structures, numerical methods for ascertaining wave induced motions and loads, viscous wave loads and

  16. NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, June 2009 1 NOAA SHIP OKEANOS EXPLORER

    E-print Network

    the ship's high-precision UTC clock and GPS. SCS data can be accessed with feature-rich software from is for data manipulation. There is a server for the inventory, maintenance and repair database. A Telepresence

  17. Advanced Camera for Surveys Pre-Ship Review

    E-print Network

    Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astonomy, Advanced Camera for Surveys Team

    Operations Systems Engineering & Software NCC NICMOS Cryogenic Cooler NCS NICMOS Cooling System NSSC NASAPre-ship ACS Review ACS Advanced Camera for Surveys Pre-Ship Review Goddard Space-Flight Center-ship ACS Review Acronyms Acronym Description ACS Advanced Camera for Surveys ARB Anomaly Review Board ASCS

  18. Trajectory Optimization for Ship Collision Avoidance System Using Genetic Algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. D. Cheng; Z. Y. Liu; X. T. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The safety of ships oceangoing or navigating in inland waterways has been increasingly concerned because it may cause great losses in human life and property and bring environmental pollution. Ship collision avoidance system is expected to reduce such maritime accident. How to find an optimum trajectory is crucial for the success of a ship collision avoidance system. As the basis

  19. Collision avoidance of moving obstacles for ship with genetic algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiao-ming Zeng; Masanori Ito; Etsuro Shimizu

    2000-01-01

    By use of a path planning method-genetic algorithms (GA), collisions with navigation obstacles and other moving ships can be avoided according to navigation traffic rule (the ship must pass on the right). Navigation obstacles and moving ships are identified by automatic radar plotting aids (ARPA), and then the future danger which is generated by the obstacles is predicted using a

  20. Can we always ignore ship-generated food waste?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Polglaze

    2003-01-01

    Considerable quantities of food waste can be generated at a rapid rate in ships, particularly those with large numbers of people onboard. By virtue of the amounts involved and its nature, food waste is potentially the most difficult to manage component of a ship’s garbage stream, however, in most sea areas it may be dealt with by the simple expedient

  1. 47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

  2. 47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

  3. 47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

  4. Toward an Automated Ship and Wake Detection System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. Wackerman; W. Pichel; X. Li; C. Jackson

    An automated, constant false alarm rate, detection algorithm for a ship hard target signature in a SAR image is presented based on a K-distribution model for the background clutter. It is validated against a number of SAR images that contained ships at known locations, many with known lengths. The algorithm detects ~90% of all the ships, although it is shown

  5. The ES model for ship pipes routing design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoning Fan; Yan Lin; Zhuoshang Ji

    2010-01-01

    According to the characteristics of ship pipes routing design, a set of expert system model for ship pipes routing design was proposed and constructed. In this model the working process of the system was designed and the optimization algorithms for ship pipes routing design were incorporated into it. The example shows that the constructed model is feasible and effective in

  6. Vibrations monitoring on board ship with a fiber optic sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renato Ivce; Irena Jurdana; Robert Mohovic

    2011-01-01

    Ship's vibration are caused by the propeller, engine and auxiliary machinery, bow thruster and effects of the sea. Vibrations can be so high that it provides discomfort on board and make damage to ship's hull, machinery and equipments. During recent years fiber- optic sensors have gained increasing interest in the field of ship monitoring. Fiber optic sensors have been used

  7. The maximum shipping capacity of the Suez Canal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Griffiths; Emtissal M. Hassan

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the determination of the maximum shipping capacity of the Suez canal. Initially, some assumptions are made in order to calculate the ‘theoretical’ maximum capacity in terms of ‘standard ships’. This last term defines ships which transit the Canal at a given speed and at a given time interval from the vessel ahead and astern. Data has been

  8. Exploratory analysis of free shipping policies of online retailers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tonya Boone; Ram Ganeshan

    Online retailers (or Internet divisions of brick and mortar retailers) often offer shipping discounts (for example “free shipping on orders above $150”) to entice customers. The premise is that the retailer will attract more customers and these customers will likely buy more per order to avail the shipping discount, increasing total revenues and profits. In parallel, the retailer must also

  9. Satellite measurements of formaldehyde linked to shipping emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Marbach; S. Beirle; U. Platt; P. Hoor; F. Wittrock; A. Richter; M. Vrekoussis; M. Grzegorski; J. P. Burrows; T. Wagner

    2009-01-01

    International shipping is recognized as a pollution source of growing importance, in particular in the remote marine boundary layer. Nitrogen dioxide originating from ship emissions has previously been detected in satellite measurements. This study presents the first satellite measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO) linked to shipping emissions as derived from observations made by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instrument. We

  10. The ship placement problem: Exact and heuristic approaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jannes Verstichel; Patrick De Causmaecker; Frits Spieksma; Greet Vanden Berghe

    2012-01-01

    The placement of in and outbound ships in locks constitutes a daily challenge for planners in tide river harbors. In essence, this entails positioning a set of ships into as few lock chambers as possible while satisfying a number of general and specific placement constraints. These specific constraints make the ship placement problem different from traditional 2D bin packing. A

  11. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

  12. Ship To Methods PeopleSoft Supply Chain

    E-print Network

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    Ship To Methods PeopleSoft Supply Chain FMS803 Method 1 (basic) Use for single line item requisition. Method 2 (advanced) Use for multi-line item requisition if same Ship To applies to multiple line items. IMPORTANT NOTE: Catalog Requisitions See reverse side of this job aid. Ship To Methods ­ job aid

  13. 46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

  14. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view of Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (top) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (bottom) on the Arctic Ocean. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This was during a scientific expedition to map the ...

  15. 46 CFR 115.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 115.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

  16. SELF-CONFIGURABLE DISTRIBUTED CONTROL NETWORKS ON NAVAL SHIPS

    E-print Network

    Maris, Marinus

    SELF-CONFIGURABLE DISTRIBUTED CONTROL NETWORKS ON NAVAL SHIPS J.A.A.J. Janssen, M.G. Maris the ship's response capabilities to calamities. In our view, self-configuring distributed control networks such an automated robust ship control system. The researched system consists of autonomous control clusters

  17. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (SHIP)

    E-print Network

    Walker, Matthew P.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (SHIP) WAIVER REVERSAL REQUEST FORM SPRING 2012 As a UC Berkeley registered student, you must enroll in SHIP if 1. You are no longer OR 2. Your insurance does not meet minimum requirements for a waiver of SHIP. In order to reverse

  18. Implementing parametrization of non-linear chemistry of shipping

    E-print Network

    Haak, Hein

    Implementing parametrization of non-linear chemistry of shipping plumes in a Global Chemistry instantaneous mixing of shipping emissions over the model grid cells, thereby neglecting the eects of non and actual release, and photolysis rate constants for NO2 and O(1 D). This parametrization of shipping

  19. LOGIC BASED DESIGN OF OPTIMAL RECONFIGURATION STRATEGIES FOR SHIP

    E-print Network

    Kwatny, Harry G.

    LOGIC BASED DESIGN OF OPTIMAL RECONFIGURATION STRATEGIES FOR SHIP POWER SYSTEMS Harry G. Kwatny: A ship electric power system is characterized by a family of nonlinear differential algebraic equations dynamics 1. INTRODUCTION In a ship integrated power system (IPS), electricity supplies the propulsive power

  20. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view of Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (left) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (right) on the Arctic Ocean. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This was during a scientific expedition to map the ...

  1. Manoeuvring Ship Model Identification and Interacting Multiple Model Tracking Algorithm

    E-print Network

    Mihaylova, Lyudmila

    Manoeuvring Ship Model Identification and Interacting Multiple Model Tracking Algorithm Design 1/95 with Bulgarian Science Fund. Abstract. Precise discrete models of the manoeuvring ship motion and xtended Kalman target motions [2, 5, 8] do not describe the nonlinear specificity of the manoeuvring ship. To solve

  2. 46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

  3. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (left) and Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (right) on the Arctic Ocean. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This was during a scientific expedition to map the ...

  4. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

  5. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

  6. Shipping and climate change: Scope for unilateral action

    E-print Network

    Matthews, Adrian

    Shipping and climate change: Scope for unilateral action Paul Gilbert, Tyndall Manchester Alice on international shipping emissions and climate change undertaken at The University of Manchester by the Tyndall considers the role that the shipping sector could play in mitigating total global emissions

  7. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (bottom left) stopped in the Arctic Ocean as Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (top right) comes alongside it. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This was durin...

  8. 27 CFR 26.114 - Permit to ship required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permit to ship required. 26.114 Section 26.114 ...Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Permit to Ship Liquors and Articles § 26.114 Permit to ship required. Before liquors and...

  9. 46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

  10. 27 CFR 26.114 - Permit to ship required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permit to ship required. 26.114 Section 26.114 ...Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Permit to Ship Liquors and Articles § 26.114 Permit to ship required. Before liquors and...

  11. VOLUNTARY OBSERVING SHIPS (VOS) CLIMATE SUBSET PROJECT (VOSCLIM) PROJECT DOCUMENT

    E-print Network

    WMO IOC JCOMM VOLUNTARY OBSERVING SHIPS (VOS) CLIMATE SUBSET PROJECT (VOSCLIM) PROJECT DOCUMENT #12 observations 4. Selection of ships 5. Instrumentation and observations 6. Data collection and verification 7 FOR THE VOLUNTARY OBSERVING SHIPS (VOS) CLIMATE SUBSET PROJECT (VOSCLIM) 1. Objectives The primary objective

  12. Celebrating 10 years of Centre for Ships and

    E-print Network

    Malinnikova, Eugenia

    Celebrating 10 years of Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Marine Technology Centre Otto knowledge about how ships and other ocean structures behave in the ocean environment, using analytical been inspired by the future needs for structures and operations in shipping, oil and gas, aqua- culture

  13. Ship noise and cortisol secretion in European freshwater fishes

    E-print Network

    Ladich, Friedrich

    Ship noise and cortisol secretion in European freshwater fishes Lidia Eva Wysocki*, John P. Dittami October 2005 Accepted 11 October 2005 Available online 28 November 2005 Keywords: Fish Ship noise Stress addressed the effects of ship noise and continuous Gaussian noise on adrenal activity in three European

  14. 46 CFR 115.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 115.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

  15. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view of Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (top) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (bottom) on the Arctic Ocean. Louis is approaching Healy to come alongside it. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. Th...

  16. Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair

    E-print Network

    Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair: Your displays and materials can be shipped to the following address: LANL Bikini Atoll Road, SM-30 Mary Anne With, MS-M719 TA-00, 199, Drop: At the conclusion of the Career Fair, you are responsible for preparing your materials to be shipped back, including

  17. OSU SHIP OPERATIONS SMS MANAGEMENT REVIEW FOR 20____

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    OSU SHIP OPERATIONS SMS MANAGEMENT REVIEW FOR 20____ Number: SMF 12.2 Revision: 0 Effective Date: 1 not discussed elsewhere) Attendees: Name Position #12;OSU SHIP OPERATIONS SMS MANAGEMENT REVIEW FOR 20: ADDITIONAL REVIEWER: DATE OF REVIEW: NO. ITEM SMS REFERENCE OBSERVATIONS/REMARKS #12;OSU SHIP OPERATIONS SMS

  18. 47 CFR 80.59 - Compulsory ship inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compulsory ship inspections. 80.59 Section 80.59 Telecommunication...Applications and Licenses § 80.59 Compulsory ship inspections. (a) Inspection of ships subject to the Communications Act or the...

  19. 46 CFR 115.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 115.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

  20. SHIP UW (03-2012) LifeWise Assurance Company

    E-print Network

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    SHIP UW (03-2012) LifeWise Assurance Company Home Office: 7001-220th Street SW Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2124 student.lifewiseac.com University of Washington Policyholder SHIP UW (03-2012) Policy President and Chief Executive Officer LifeWise Assurance Company #12;SHIP UW (03-2013) P-1 Policy

  1. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

  2. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

  3. 27 CFR 26.114 - Permit to ship required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Permit to ship required. 26.114 Section 26.114 ...Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Permit to Ship Liquors and Articles § 26.114 Permit to ship required. Before liquors and...

  4. S. S. PACI FIC EX PLORER FACTORY SHIP

    E-print Network

    S. S. PACI FIC EX PLORER FACTORY SHIP FISHERY LEAFLET 414 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE , UNITED STATES for Operators of Tl1na Receiving Ships 316 - BeloH Deck ArranCe1'le nts and Refri era on Eq1.lipmen 326 completed factory ship, the Pacific Explorer, left in January for Central and South American waters

  5. 46 CFR 115.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 115.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

  6. Further Improvements to the Statistical Hurricane Intensity Prediction Scheme (SHIPS)

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    Further Improvements to the Statistical Hurricane Intensity Prediction Scheme (SHIPS) MARK DEMARIA versions of the operational Statistical Hurricane Intensity Prediction Scheme (SHIPS) for each year from-adiabatic model beginning in 2001. A verification of the SHIPS operational intensity forecasts is presented

  7. 46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

  8. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (SHIP)

    E-print Network

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

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    USGS Multimedia Gallery

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

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    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permit to ship required. 26.114 Section 26.114 ...Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Permit to Ship Liquors and Articles § 26.114 Permit to ship required. Before liquors and...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 115.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) § 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

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    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permit to ship required. 26.114 Section 26.114 ...Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Permit to Ship Liquors and Articles § 26.114 Permit to ship required. Before liquors and...