Sample records for b-52 mother ship

  1. X-38 Ship #2 in Free Flight after Release from B-52 Mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-38 research vehicle drops away from NASA's B-52 mothership immediately after being released from the B-52's wing pylon. More than 30 years earlier, this same B-52 launched the original lifting-body vehicles flight tested by NASA and the Air Force at what is now called the Dryden Flight Research Center and the Air Force Flight Test Center. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  2. X-38 Ship #2 Mated to B-52 Mothership in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photo shows one of the X-38 lifting-body research vehicles mated to NASA's B-52 mothership in flight prior to launch. The B-52 has been a workhorse for the Dryden Flight Research Center for more than 40 years, carrying numerous research vehicles aloft and conducting a variety of other research flight experiments. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  3. B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership is seen here photographed from a KC-135 Tanker aircraft. The X-43 adapter is visible attached to the right wing. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and is also both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet.

  4. B-52B Cockpit Instrument Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a close-up view of the instrument panel in the cockpit of NASA's B-52 research aircraft. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the HiMAT, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  5. B-52 Flight Mission Symbology - Close up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A close-up view of some of the mission markings that tell the story of the NASA B-52 mothership's colorful history. These particular markings denote some of the experiments the bomber conducted to develop parachute recovery systems for the solid rocket boosters used by the Space Shuttle. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet.. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  6. Sizing of "Mother Ship and Catcher" Missions for LEO Small Debris and for GEO Large Object Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Most LEO debris lies in a limited number of inclination "bands" associated with specific useful orbits. Objects in such narrow inclination bands have all possible Right Ascensions of Ascending Node (RAANs), creating a different orbit plane for nearly every piece of debris. However, a low-orbiting satellite will always phase in RAAN faster than debris objects in higher orbits at the same inclination, potentially solving the problem. Such a low-orbiting base can serve as a "mother ship" that can tend and then send small, disposable common individual catcher/deboost devices--one for each debris object--as the facility drifts into the same RAAN as each higher object. The dV necessary to catch highly-eccentric orbit debris in the center of the band alternatively allows the capture of less-eccentric debris in a wider inclination range around the center. It is demonstrated that most LEO hazardous debris can be removed from orbit in three years, using a single LEO launch of one mother ship--with its onboard magazine of freeflying low-tech catchers--into each of ten identified bands, with second or potentially third launches into only the three highest-inclination bands. The nearly 1000 objects near the geostationary orbit present special challenges in mass, maneuverability, and ultimate disposal options, leading to a dramatically different architecture and technology suite than the LEO solution. It is shown that the entire population of near-GEO derelict objects can be gathered and tethered together within a 3 year period for future scrap-yard operations using achievable technologies and only two earth launches.

  7. Stress analyses of B-52 pylon hooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Schuster, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASTRAN finite element computer program was used in the two dimensional stress analysis of B-52 carrier aircraft pylon hooks: (1) old rear hook (which failed), (2) new rear hook (improved geometry), (3) new DAST rear hook (derated geometry), and (4) front hook. NASTRAN model meshes were generated by the aid of PATRAN-G computer program. Brittle limit loads for all the four hooks were established. The critical stress level calculated from NASTRAN agrees reasonably well with the values predicted from the fracture mechanics for the failed old rear hook.

  8. Stress Analysis of B-52B and B-52H Air-Launching Systems Failure-Critical Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2005-01-01

    The operational life analysis of any airborne failure-critical structural component requires the stress-load equation, which relates the applied load to the maximum tangential tensile stress at the critical stress point. The failure-critical structural components identified are the B-52B Pegasus pylon adapter shackles, B-52B Pegasus pylon hooks, B-52H airplane pylon hooks, B-52H airplane front fittings, B-52H airplane rear pylon fitting, and the B-52H airplane pylon lower sway brace. Finite-element stress analysis was performed on the said structural components, and the critical stress point was located and the stress-load equation was established for each failure-critical structural component. The ultimate load, yield load, and proof load needed for operational life analysis were established for each failure-critical structural component.

  9. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight over Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership flies over the main building at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and has also been both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  10. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploys an experimental drag chute just after landing the runway at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  11. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Dryden Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership sits on the ramp in front of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  12. X-38 Mounted on Pylon of B-52 Mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A close-up view of the X-38 research vehicle mounted under the wing of the B-52 mothership prior to a 1997 test flight. The X-38, which was designed to help develop technology for an emergency crew return vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station, is one of many research vehicles the B-52 has carried aloft over the past 40 years. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  13. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A rear view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  14. B-52 Flight Mission Symbology on Side of Craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A view of some of the mission markings, painted on the side of NASA's B-52 mothership, that tell the story of its colorful history. Just as combat aircraft would paint a bomb on the side of an aircraft for each bombing mission completed, NASA crew members painted a silhouette on the side of the B-52's fuselage to commemorate each drop of an X-15, lifting body, remotely piloted research vehicle, X-38 crew return vehicle, or other experimental vehicle or parachute system. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  15. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An experimental drag chute deploys amidst a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  16. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A close-up of an experimental drag chute deploying in a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  17. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  18. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An aerial view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  19. Pegasus Mated to B-52 Mothership - Front View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's B-52 launch aircraft takes off with the second Pegasus vehicle under its wing from the Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  20. Pegasus Mated to B-52 Mothership - First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Pegasus air-launched space booster is carried aloft under the right wing of NASA's B-52 carrier aircraft on its first captive flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The first of two scheduled captive flights was completed on November 9, 1989. Pegasus is used to launch satellites into low-earth orbits cheaply. In 1997, a Pegasus rocket booster was also modified to test a hypersonic experiment (PHYSX). An experimental 'glove,' installed on a section of its wing, housed hundreds of temperature and pressure sensors that sent hypersonic flight data to ground tracking facilities during the experiment's flight. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  1. Cockpit resource management skills enhance combat mission performance in a B-52 simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povenmire, H. Kingsley; Rockway, Marty R.; Bunecke, Joseph L.; Patton, Mark W.

    1989-01-01

    A cockpit resource management (CRM) program for mission-ready B-52 aircrew is developed. The relationship between CRM performance and combat mission performance is studied. The performances of six crew members flying a simulated high workload mission in a B-52 weapon system trainer are evaluated. The data reveal that CRM performance enhances tactical maneuvers and bombing accuracy.

  2. DAST Mated to B-52 on Ramp - Close-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Technicians mount a BQM-43 Firebee II drone on the wing pylon of NASA's B-52B launch aircraft. The drone was test flown as part of the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program. Research flights of drones with modified wings for the DAST program were conducted from 1977 to 1983. After the initial flights of Firebee II 72-1564, it was fitted with the Instrumented Standard Wing (also called the 'Blue Streak' wing). The first free flight attempt on March 7, 1979, was aborted before launch due to mechanical problems with the HH-53 recovery helicopter. The next attempt, on March 9, 1979, was successful. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic forces and resulting in structural failure. The program used refined theoretical tools to predict at what speed flutter would occur. It then designed a high-response control system to counteract the motion and permit a much lighter wing structure. The wing had, in effect, 'electronic stiffness.' Flight research with this concept was extremely hazardous because an error in either the flutter prediction or control system implementation would result in wing structural failure and the loss of the vehicle. Because of this, flight demonstration of a sub-scale vehicle made sense from the standpoint of both safety and cost. The program anticipated structural failure during the course of the flight research. The Firebee II was a supersonic drone selected as the DAST testbed because its wing could be easily replaced, it used only tail-mounted control surfaces, and it was available as surplus from the U. S. Air Force. It was capable of 5-g turns (that is, turns producing acceleration equal to 5 times that of gravity). Langley outfitted a drone with an aeroelastic, supercritical research wing suitable for a Mach 0.98 cruise transport with a predicted flutter speed of Mach 0.95 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Dryden and Langley, in conjunction with Boeing, designed and fabricated a digital flutter suppression system (FSS). Dryden developed an RPRV (remotely piloted research vehicle) flight control system; integrated the wing, FSS, and vehicle systems; and conducted the flight program. In addition to a digital flight control system and aeroelastic wings, each DAST drone had research equipment mounted in its nose and a mid-air retrieval system in its tail. The drones were originally launched from the NASA B-52 bomber and later from a DC-130. The DAST vehicle's flight was monitored from the sky by an F-104 chase plane. When the DAST's mission ended, it deployed a parachute and then a specially equipped Air Force helicopter recovered the drone in mid-air. On the ground, a

  3. B-52H Flying over the Mojave Desert in California - Duration: 0:35.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA obtained a B-52H bomber from the U.S. Air Force in 2001, intending to use the aircraft as an air-launch and testbed aircraft to support NASA, Air Force and industry flight research and advance...

  4. B-52B Shuttle Drag Chute Test #6 - Duration: 0:32.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA obtained a B-52H bomber from the U.S. Air Force in 2001, intending to use the aircraft as an air-launch and testbed aircraft to support NASA, Air Force and industry flight research and advance...

  5. X-38 on B-52 Wing Pylon - View from Observation Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A unique, close-up view of the X-38 under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership prior to launch of the lifting-body research vehicle. The photo was taken from the observation window of the B-52 bomber as it banked in flight. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  6. Wind Tunnel Results of the B-52B with the X-43A Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mark C.; Sim, Alexander G.; Rhode, Matthew; Johnson, Kevin D.

    2006-01-01

    A low-speed wind-tunnel test was performed with a three-percent-scale model of a booster rocket mated to an X-43A research vehicle, a combination referred to as the Hyper-X launch vehicle. The test was conducted both in free-stream air and in the presence of a partial model of the B-52B airplane. The objectives of the test were to obtain force and moment data to generate structural loads affecting the pylon of the B-52B airplane and to determine the aerodynamic influence of the B-52B airplane on the Hyper-X launch vehicle to evaluate launch separation characteristics. The wind-tunnel test was conducted at a low-speed wind tunnel in Hampton, Virginia. All moments and forces reported are based either on the aerodynamic influence of the B-52B airplane or are for the Hyper-X launch vehicle in free-stream air. Overall, the test showed that the B-52B airplane imparts a strong downwash onto the Hyper-X launch vehicle, reducing the net lift of the Hyper-X launch vehicle. Also, pitching and rolling moments are imparted onto the booster and are a strong function of the launch-drop angle of attack.

  7. Wind-Tunnel Results of the B-52B with the X-43A Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mark C.; Sim, Alexander G.; Rhode, Matthew; Johnson, Kevin D., Sr.

    2007-01-01

    A low-speed wind-tunnel test was performed with a 3%-scale model of a booster rocket mated to an X-43A research vehicle, a combination referred to as the Hyper-X launch vehicle. The test was conducted both in freestream air and in the presence of a partial model of the B-52B airplane. The objectives of the test were to obtain force and moment data to generate structural loads affecting the pylon of the B-52B airplane and to determine the aerodynamic influence of the B-52B on the Hyper-X launch vehicle for evaluating launch separation characteristics. The windtunnel test was conducted at a low-speed wind tunnel in Hampton, Virginia. All moments and forces reported are based either on the aerodynamic influence of the B-52B airplane or are for the Hyper-X launch vehicle in freestream air. Overall, the test showed that the B-52B airplane imparts a strong downwash onto the Hyper-X launch vehicle, reducing the net lift of the Hyper-X launch vehicle. Pitching and rolling moments are also imparted onto the booster and are a strong function of the launch-drop angle of attack.

  8. F-15 RPRV Attached Under the Wing of the B-52 Mothership in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This photograph shows one of NASA's 3/8th-scale F-15 remotely piloted research vehicles under the wing of the B-52 mothership in flight during 1973, the year that the research program began. The vehicle was used to make stall-spin studies of the F-15 shape before the actual F-15s began their flight tests. B-52 Project Description: NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant. - - - - - - - - - - - F-15A RPRV/SRV Project Description: In April of 1971, Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Research and Development Grant Hanson sent a memorandum noting the comparatively small amount of research being conducted on stalls (losses of lift) and spins despite the yearly losses that they caused (especially of fighter aircraft). In the spring and summer of that year, NASA's Flight Research Center (redesignated in 1976 the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) studied the feasibility of conducting flight research with a sub-scale fighter-ty

  9. Optimization of the polyplanar optical display electronics for a monochrome B-52 display

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, L.

    1998-04-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten-inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a new 200 mW green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments (TI). In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. In order to achieve increased brightness a monochrome digitizing interface was investigated. The operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with the RS-170 video format specific to the B-52 aircraft will be discussed, including the increased brightness of the monochrome digitizing interface. A brief description of the electronics required to drive the new 200 mW laser is also presented.

  10. Optimization of the polyplanar optical display electronics for a monochrome B-52 display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSanto, Leonard

    1998-09-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten-inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a new 200 mW green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLPTM) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments (TI). In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMDTM) chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. In order to achieve increased brightness a monochrome digitizing interface was investigated. The operation of the DMDTM divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMDTM board with the RS-170 video format specific to the B-52 aircraft will be discussed, including the increased brightness of the monochrome digitizing interface. A brief description of the electronics required to drive the new 200 mW laser is also presented.

  11. A B-52H, tail number 61-0025, arrives at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center after landing July 30,

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, received an 'H' model B-52 Stratofortress aircraft on July 30, 2001. The B-52H will be used as an air-launch aircraft supporting NASA's flight research and advanced technology demonstration efforts. Dryden received the B-52H from the U.S. Air Force's (USAF) 23rd Bomb Squadron, 5th Bombardment Wing (Air Combat Command), located at Minot AFB, N.D. A USAF crew flew the aircraft to Dryden. The aircraft, USAF tail number 61-0025, will be loaned initially, then later transferred from the USAF to NASA. The B-52H is scheduled to leave Dryden Aug. 2 for de-militarization and Programmed Depot Maintenance (PDM) at Tinker Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma. The depot-level maintenance is scheduled to last about six months and includes a thorough maintenance and inspection process. The newly arrived B-52H is slated to replace Dryden's famous B-52B '008,' in the 2003-2004 timeframe. It will take about one year for the B-52H to be ready for flight research duties. This time includes PDM, construction of the new pylon, installation of the flight research instrumentation equipment, and aircraft envelope clearance flights.

  12. Influence of iron(III) and pyoverdine on extracellular proteinase and lipase production by Pseudomonas fluorescens B52

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. McKellar; K. Shamsuzzaman; C. San Jose; H. Cholette

    1987-01-01

    Factors associated with the production of extracellular lipase and proteinase by Pseudomonas fluorescens B52 during the late-log, early-stationary phase of grown were examined. Active lipase production by resting cell suspensions was observed when cells were harvested during the log phase (A600 of 0.3–0.9) Resting suspensions of younger cells (A600P. fluorescens RM14 to B52 cells at low density resulted in stimulation

  13. X-38 flies free from NASA's B-52 mothership, July 10, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The second free-flight test of an evolving series of X-38 prototypes took place July 10, 2001 when the X-38 was released from NASA's B-52 mothership over the Edwards Air Force Base range in California's Mojave Desert. Shortly after the photo was taken, a sequenced deployment of a drogue parachute followed by a large parafoil fabric wing slowed the X-38 to enable it to land safely on Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards. NASA engineers from the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, and the Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, are developing a 'lifeboat' for the International Space Station based on X-38 research.

  14. Ship Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Guided missile cruiser equipped with advanced Aegis fleet defense system which automatically tracks hundreds of attacking aircraft or missiles, then fires and guides the ship's own weapons in response. Designed by Ingalls Shipbuilding for the US Navy, the U.S.S. Ticonderoga is the first of four CG-47 cruisers to be constructed. NASTRAN program was used previously in another Navy/Ingalls project involving design and construction of four DDG-993 Kidd Class guided missile destroyers.

  15. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The new pylon for the X-38 following a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 research vehicle to be carried aloft and launched from the B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  16. Takayasu's arteritis is associated with HLA-B*52, but not with HLA-B*51, in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction HLA-B*51 and HLA-B*52 are two close human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele groups with minor amino acid differences. However, they are associated with two different vasculitides (HLA-B*51 in Behçet's disease and HLA-B*52 in Takayasu's arteritis (TAK)) and with major clinical and immunological differences. In this study, we aimed to screen a large cohort of TAK patients from Turkey for the presence of HLA-B*51 and HLA-B*52 as susceptibility and severity factors. Methods TAK patients (n = 330) followed at a total of 15 centers were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 37.8 years, and 86% were women. DNA samples from the patients and healthy controls (HC; n = 210) were isolated, and the presence of HLA-B*51 or HLA-B*52 was screened for by using PCR with sequence-specific primers. Results We found a significant association of HLA-B*52 with TAK (20.9% vs HC = 6.7%, P = 0.000, OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 2.02 to 6.77). The distribution of HLA-B*51 did not differ between TAK patients and HCs (22.7% vs 24.8%, OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.60 to 1.34). The presence of HLA-B*52 decreased in late-onset patients (> 40 years of age; 12.0%, P = 0.024, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.20 to 0.91). Patients with angiographic type I disease with limited aortic involvement also had a lower presence of HLA-B*52 compared to those with all other disease subtypes (13.1% vs 26%, P = 0.005, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.23 to 0.78). Conclusions In this study, the previously reported association of TAK with HLA-B*52 in other populations was confirmed in patients from Turkey. The functional relevance of HLA-B*52 in TAK pathogenesis needs to be explored further. PMID:22309845

  17. Analysis and testing of stability augmentation systems. [for supersonic transport aircraft wing and B-52 aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.; Patel, S. M.; Wattman, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Testing and evaluation of stability augmentation systems for aircraft flight control were conducted. The flutter suppression system analysis of a scale supersonic transport wing model is described. Mechanization of the flutter suppression system is reported. The ride control synthesis for the B-52 aeroelastic model is discussed. Model analyses were conducted using equations of motion generated from generalized mass and stiffness data.

  18. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Andy Blua and Jeff Doughty of Dryden's Experimental Fabrication Shop, along with B-52 Crew Chief Dan Bains and assistant Mark Thompson, all eye the new X-38 pylon during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon, which was fabricated at Dryden, was mated to the B-52. The pylon served as an 'adapter' that allowed the X-38 to be attached to the B-52's wing. Earlier flight research vehicles had used the X-15 pylon for attachment to and launch from the B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  19. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Tom McMullen, Chief of Dryden's Experimental Fabrication Shop, makes adjustments to the new pylon for NASA's X-38 during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 to be attached to and launched from the B-52's wing. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  20. Pegasus Mated under Wing of B-52 Mothership - Close-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A close-up view of the Pegasus space-booster attached to the wing pylon of NASA's B-52 launch aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Pegasus rocket booster was designed as a way to get small payloads into space orbit more easily and cost-effectively. It has also been used to gather data on hypersonic flight. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable data on aerodynamics. By conducting experiments in a piggyback mode on Pegasus, some critical and secondary design and development issues were addressed at hypersonic speeds. The vehicle was also used to develop hypersonic flight instrumentation and test techniques. NASA's B-52 carrier-launch vehicle was used to get the Pegasus airborne during six launches from 1990 to 1994. Thereafter, an Orbital Sciences L-1011 aircraft launched the Pegasus. The Pegasus launch vehicle itself has a 400- to 600-pound payload capacity in a 61-cubic-foot payload space at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle is capable of placing a payload into low earth orbit. This vehicle is 49 feet long and 50 inches in diameter. It has a wing span of 22 feet. (There is also a Pegasus XL vehicle that was introduced in 1994. Dryden has never launched one of these vehicles, but they have greater thrust and are 56 feet long.)

  1. DAST Mated to B-52 in Flight - Close-up from Below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This photo shows a BQM-34 Firebee II drone being carried aloft under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership during a 1977 research flight. The Firebee/DAST research program ran from 1977 to 1983 at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. This is the original Firebee II wing. Firebee 72-1564 made three captive flights--on November 25, 1975; May 17, 1976; and June 22, 1977--in preparation for the DAST project with modified wings. These were for checkout of the Firebee's systems and the prelaunch procedures. The first two used a DC-130A aircraft as the launch vehicle, while the third used the B-52. A single free flight using this drone occurred on July 28, 1977. The remote (ground) pilot was NASA research pilot Bill Dana. The launch and flight were successful, and the drone was caught in midair by an HH-53 helicopter. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic forces and resulting in structural failure. The program used refined theoretical tools to predict at what speed flutter would occur. It then designed a high-response control system to counteract the motion and permit a much lighter wing structure. The wing had, in effect, 'electronic stiffness.' Flight research with this concept was extremely hazardous because an error in either the flutter prediction or control system implementation would result in wing structural failure and the loss of the vehicle. Because of this, flight demonstration of a sub-scale vehicle made sense from the standpoint of both safety and cost. The program anticipated structural failure during the course of the flight research. The Firebee II was a supersonic drone selected as the DAST testbed because its wing could be easily replaced, it used only tail-mounted control surfaces, and it was available as surplus from the U. S. Air Force. It was capable of 5-g turns (that is, turns producing acceleration equal to 5 times that of gravity). Langley outfitted a drone with an aeroelastic, supercritical research wing suitable for a Mach 0.98 cruise transport with a predicted flutter speed of Mach 0.95 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Dryden and Langley, in conjunction with Boeing, designed and fabricated a digital flutter suppression system (FSS). Dryden developed an RPRV (remotely piloted research vehicle) flight control system; integrated the wing, FSS, and vehicle systems; and conducted the flight program. In addition to a digital flight control system and aeroelastic wings, each DAST drone had research equipment mounted in its nose and a mid-air retrieval system in its tail. The drones were originally launched from the NASA B-52 bomber and later from a DC-130. The DAST vehic

  2. Shrimp Dscam and its cytoplasmic tail splicing activator serine/arginine (SR)-rich protein B52 were both induced after white spot syndrome virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yi-An; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Chung-Wei; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Wang, Han-Ching

    2013-01-01

    The serine/arginine (SR)-rich protein family is phylogenetically conserved and plays significant roles in mRNA maturation, including alternative splicing (AS). In Drosophila, SR protein B52 functions as a splicing activator to regulate AS events in several genes, including the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam). In this study, the B52 gene from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvB52) was isolated and characterized. The open reading frame of LvB52 contains 1149 bp encoding 382 amino acids. The deduced LvB52 protein includes two RNA recognition motifs (RRM) at the N terminus and an arginine/serine rich domain (RS rich domain) at the C terminus, and thus shows the expected RRM1-RRM2-RS domain architecture. Tissue tropism analysis revealed that LvB52 is expressed in most tissues and at high levels in stomach and muscle. After white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, a parallel increase in the expression of total LvDscam, tail-less LvDscam, membrane-bound LvDscam and LvB52 was observed after 24 hpi. Conversely, there was no obvious change in the expression of the AS repressor Lvhrp36. In vivo dsRNA silencing of LvB52 induced element 3 exclusion in the LvDscam cytoplasmic tail, but no abnormal exclusions in the Ig2-Ig3 region or the transmembrane region. We also found that the exon of the Ig7 region was quite often excluded, even in normal shrimp, and that LvB52 silencing was associated with a decrease in the variability of this region. Taken together, our data suggest that LvB52 acts as a splicing activator that regulates AS events in LvDscam. PMID:23123640

  3. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Dryden Experimental Fabrication Shop's Andy Blua and Jeff Doughty make sure the new pylon for the X-38 fits precisely during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in 1997. The 1,200-pound steel pylon, fabricated at Dryden, was an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 research vehicle to be carried aloft and launched from the bomber. The X-38 was a designed as a technology demonstrator to help develop an emergency Crew Return Vehicle for the International Space Station. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  4. Ship handling research facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Rinehart; T. Hutchison

    1974-01-01

    A major new ship handling research capability will be embodied in the Maritime Research Simulator now being built by the Maritime Administration. Human engineering research related to ship handling will be possible to a degree not previously available. The relationships of operator action, ship dynamics, instrumentation, bridge crew duty assignments, and the outside world environment (including harbor configuration, visibility, other

  5. A B-52H, on loan to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, makes a pass down the runway prior to land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, received an 'H' model B-52 Stratofortress aircraft on July 30, 2001. The B-52H will be used as an air-launch aircraft supporting NASA's flight research and advanced technology demonstration efforts. Dryden received the B-52H from the U.S. Air Force's (USAF) 23rd Bomb Squadron, 5th Bombardment Wing (Air Combat Command), located at Minot AFB, N.D. A USAF crew flew the aircraft to Dryden. The aircraft, USAF tail number 61-0025, will be loaned initially, then later transferred from the USAF to NASA. The B-52H is scheduled to leave Dryden Aug. 2 for de-militarization and Programmed Depot Maintenance (PDM) at Tinker Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma. The depot-level maintenance is scheduled to last about six months and includes a thorough maintenance and inspection process. The newly arrived B-52H is slated to replace Dryden's famous B-52B '008,' in the 2003-2004 timeframe. It will take about one year for the B-52H to be ready for flight research duties. This time includes PDM, construction of the new pylon, installation of the flight research instrumentation equipment, and aircraft envelope clearance flights.

  6. Mothering Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeptner Poling, Linda; Suominen Guyas, Anniina; Keys, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    This article attends to revealing complicated, intersecting, and symbiotic relationships of mothering, academia, and art education practice. The authors seek to articulate rhizomatic interconnections through their narratives and art, attempting to make sense of what it means to educate, nurture, and care within a location of power, in the…

  7. Development and Testing of a Drogue Parachute System for X-37 ALTV/B-52H Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Jensen, Steven C.; Hennings, Elsa J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple scenarios were identified in which the X-37 approach and landing test vehicle (ALTV) catastrophically recontacts the B-52H carrier aircraft after separation. The most cost-effective recontact risk mitigation is the prelaunch deployment of a drogue parachute that is released after the X-37 ALTV has safely cleared the B-52H. After release, a fully-inflated drogue parachute takes 30 min to reach ground and results in a large footprint that excessively restricts the days available for flight. To reduce the footprint, a passive collapse mechanism consisting of an elastic reefing line attached to the parachute skirt was developed. At flight loads the elastic is stretched, allowing full parachute inflation. After release, drag loads drop dramatically and the elastic line contracts, reducing the frontal drag area. A 50 percent drag reduction results in an approximately 75 percent ground footprint reduction. Eleven individual parachute designs were evaluated at flight load dynamic pressures in the High Velocity Airflow System (HIVAS) at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, California. Various options for the elastic reefing system were also evaluated at HIVAS. Two best parachute designs were selected from HIVAS to be carried forward to flight test. Detailed HIVAS test results are presented in this report.

  8. Development and Testing of a Drogue Parachute System for X-37 ALTV/B-52H Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Jensen, Steven C.; Hennings, Elsa J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple scenarios were identified in which the X-37 approach and landing test vehicle (ALTV) catastrophically recontacts the B-52H carrier aircraft after separation. The most cost-effective recontact risk mitigation is the prelaunch deployment of a drogue parachute that is released after the X-37 ALTV has safely cleared the B-52H. After release, a fully-inflated drogue parachute takes 30 min to reach ground and results in a large footprint that excessively restricts the days available for flight. To reduce the footprint, a passive collapse mechanism consisting of an elastic reefing line attached to the parachute skirt was developed. At flight loads the elastic is stretched, allowing full parachute inflation. After release, drag loads drop dramatically and the elastic line contracts, reducing the frontal drag area. A 50-percent drag reduction results in an approximately 75-percent ground footprint reduction. Eleven individual parachute designs were evaluated at flight load dynamic pressures in the High Velocity Airflow System (HIVAS) at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, California. Various options for the elastic reefing system were also evaluated at HIVAS. Two best parachute designs were selected from HIVAS to be carried forward to flight test. Detailed HIVAS test results are presented in this report.

  9. NUCLEAR POWERED EMIGRANT SHIP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Takeuchi; T. Okamura; S. Murakami

    1959-01-01

    A nuclear-powered emigrant ship has been designed and would operate ; between Japan and the East Coast of South America, a distance of 12,000 miles. ; The ship would be 20,000 tons gross with a cruising speed of 23 knots. The main ; propulsion machinery would consist of two sets of 22,000 SRP steam turbines using ; saturated steam. A

  10. Emissions from ships

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.J.; Fischbeck, P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-10-31

    Recently the International Maritime Organization has made the first attempt to address air pollution from ships. This article presents information showing that ships are a significant source of air pollution on a global scale and discusses the policy implications of such a finding. The air pollution components included in the survey were NOx, SO2, CO2. 34 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Emissions from Ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James J. Corbett; Paul Fischbeck

    1997-01-01

    Recently the International Maritime Organization has made the first attempt to address air pollution from ships. This article presents information showing that ships are a significant source of air pollution on a global scale and discusses the policy implications of such a finding. The air pollution components included in the survey were NOx, SO2, CO2. 34 refs., 1 fig., 2

  12. Bahamian ship graffiti

    E-print Network

    Turner, Grace Sandrena Rosita

    2005-02-17

    by documenting examples of ship graffiti throughout the Bahamas. Examples of ship graffiti were documented with photographs and tracings. The Bahamian examples all date to the 19th and 20th centuries, 100 years later than other examples from the Caribbean...

  13. Merchant Shipping: Ships and Shipowners: The Merchant Shipping (Department of Scientific and Industrial Research Ships) Order, 1957 

    E-print Network

    Agnew, W.G.

    1957-01-01

    Section 80 of the Merchant Shipping Act, 1906, provides that Her Majesty may by Order in Council make regulations with respect to the manner in which Government ships may be registered as British ships for the purpose of ...

  14. Columbus ships at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    On the 500th arniversary of Christopher Columbus' discovery of the New World, replicas of his three ships sailed past the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) while the space shuttle Columbia sat poised for lift off.

  15. Computation and Minimisation of Ship

    E-print Network

    Stokes, Yvonne

    of model towing tanks for ship design. Essentially a small scaled model is used to determine wave drag the concept of the boundary layer, e.g. as The University of Adelaide #12;Figure 1. A cruise ship in a calmComputation and Minimisation of Ship Waves E.O. Tuck 1 Introduction Ships make waves. Sometimes

  16. Suicidal mothers

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Epidemiological research has demonstrated that suicidal ideation is a relatively frequent complication of pregnancy in both developed and developing countries. Hence, the aims of this study are: to assess whether or not pregnancy may be considered a period highly susceptible to suicidal acts; to recognize potential contributing factors to suicidal behaviors; to describe the repercussions of suicide attempts on maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcome; to identify a typical profile of women at high risk of suicide during pregnancy. Methods: Medical literature information published in any language since 1950 was identified using MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. Search terms were: "pregnancy", (antenatal) "depression", "suicide". Searches were last updated on 28 September 2010. Forty-six articles assessing the suicidal risk during pregnancy and obstetrical outcome of pregnancies complicated by suicide attempts were analyzed, without methodological limitations. Results: Worldwide, frequency of suicidal attempts and the rate of death by suicidal acts are low. Although this clinical event is rare, the consequences of a suicidal attempt are medically and psychologically devastating for the mother-infant pair. We also found that common behaviors exist in women at high risk for suicide during pregnancy. Review data indeed suggest that a characteristic profile can prenatally identify those at highest risk for gestational suicide attempts. Conclusions: Social and health organizations should make all possible efforts to identify women at high suicidal risk, in order to establish specific programs to prevent this tragic event. The available data informs health policy makers with a typical profile to screen women at high risk of suicide during pregnancy. Those women who have a current or past history of psychiatric disorders, are young, unmarried, unemployed, have incurred an unplanned pregnancy (eventually terminated with an induced abortion), are addicted to illicit drugs and/or alcohol, lack effective psychosocial support, have suffered from episodes of sexual or physical violence are particularly vulnerable. PMID:21498972

  17. Dangerous Goods Shipping Federal and international shipping rules require that anyone wishing to ship biological materials,

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Dangerous Goods Shipping Federal and international shipping rules require that anyone wishing to ship biological materials, infectious substances, or dry ice must complete training in Dangerous Goods. In order to receive the required certification for shipping Dangerous Goods, you must: 1. Review

  18. Great Lakes Shipping Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Provided by the University of Detroit Mercy Libraries/Media Services, this site is a great resource for anyone interested in the history of shipping on the Great Lakes. The database indexes information on a large number of ships that have worked these waters, offering information such as registry number, year built, final disposition, company, physical measurements, name of shipbuilders, and additional remarks, among other categories. Both company name and shipbuilder are cross-referenced to additional ships owned or built. Most of the entries also include some excellent historical photos, though these did not load correctly in Netscape (they worked fine with IE).The entry for the Edmund Fitzgerald, for instance, contained ten photos. The database may be searched by keyword with multiple modifiers.

  19. Simulators for Safer Shipping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Each year one ship out of every five afloat collides with another vessel, rams a dock, or runs a ground. CAORF (Computer Aided Operations Research Facility), designed and built by Sperry Rand Corporation, incorporates technology developed in a wide variety of aerospace simulation and technical training programs. CAORF can be set up to duplicate the exact handling qualities of any vessel under various conditions of wind, tide and current. Currently a dozen different ships can be "plugged in." Bridge instrumentation is typical of modern shipboard equipment including radar, internal and external c.ommunications and new collision avoidance systems. From repetitive operation of simulated ships, MarAd is building a valuable data base for improving marine safety.

  20. Shipping for Survival

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    IEEE

    2014-05-22

    In this activity, learners explore how packaging engineers develop customized shipping and packaging containers to meet the needs of many different industries. Learners learn about different packages that have been engineered to transport hearts for surgery, blood for analysis, and foods to retain freshness. Learners then work in teams to build a container that will allow a flower to be shipped without damage and with water using everyday items. Flowers must remain fresh and not wilted for 24 hours after being sealed in the box.

  1. Merchant Shipping: The Merchant Shipping (Fire Appliances) Rules, 1952 

    E-print Network

    Jenkins, Gilmour

    1952-01-01

    These Rules arrange ships into classes, the classification being uniform with that in the Merchant Shipping (Life-Saving Appliances) Rules, 1952 (S.I. 1952/1949). The Rules provide for the fire appliances to be carried in ...

  2. Mothers and Mothers-in-Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Lucy Rose

    1983-01-01

    Indicated how a shift in the structure of kinship networks created changes in both the content and balance of kinship relationships. Compared the mother-daughter and the mother-in-law/daughter-in-law relationships. The shift in their kin network consisted of the birth of the daughter(in-law)'s child. (Author/RC)

  3. NOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the

    E-print Network

    after North Atlantic distant-water trawlers, designed for extended cruising range, versatilityNOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the programs of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Southeast Fisheries Science Center. The ship conducts fisheries and living marine resource

  4. The Good Ship Lollipop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Donald M.

    1976-01-01

    A cruise ship converted into a college took students to many foreign countries giving them the opportunity to study other cultures, politics, mores, and histories through their own observations and experiences under the guidance of teachers using a planned curriculum. (JD)

  5. ALASKA CRUISE SHIP INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the course of the annual vacation season, luxury cruise ships carrying up to 3000 passengers visit the coastal cities and small towns of Alaska. Alaska is the first state to impose regulations requiring such vessels to submit to inspection and monitoring of gray water and...

  6. Recovery Ship Freedom Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, is towing a barge containing the third Space Shuttle Super Lightweight External Tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT was slated for use to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October 1998. This first time towing arrangement, part of a cost saving plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks were manufactured. The barge was transported up Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tug boat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allowed NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies showed a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications would be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, also underwent deck strengthening enhancements and had the necessary towing wench installed.

  7. Mother's Day Card

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-01

    This activity page which supports the Cyberchase video, "Saving Mother's Day" uses lines of symmetry to create a Madre Bonita flower, the symbol of Mother's Day. This activity can be printed for student use.

  8. Wallops Ship Surveillance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Donna C.

    2011-01-01

    Approved as a Wallops control center backup system, the Wallops Ship Surveillance Software is a day-of-launch risk analysis tool for spaceport activities. The system calculates impact probabilities and displays ship locations relative to boundary lines. It enables rapid analysis of possible flight paths to preclude the need to cancel launches and allow execution of launches in a timely manner. Its design is based on low-cost, large-customer- base elements including personal computers, the Windows operating system, C/C++ object-oriented software, and network interfaces. In conformance with the NASA software safety standard, the system is designed to ensure that it does not falsely report a safe-for-launch condition. To improve the current ship surveillance method, the system is designed to prevent delay of launch under a safe-for-launch condition. A single workstation is designated the controller of the official ship information and the official risk analysis. Copies of this information are shared with other networked workstations. The program design is divided into five subsystems areas: 1. Communication Link -- threads that control the networking of workstations; 2. Contact List -- a thread that controls a list of protected item (ocean vessel) information; 3. Hazard List -- threads that control a list of hazardous item (debris) information and associated risk calculation information; 4. Display -- threads that control operator inputs and screen display outputs; and 5. Archive -- a thread that controls archive file read and write access. Currently, most of the hazard list thread and parts of other threads are being reused as part of a new ship surveillance system, under the SureTrak project.

  9. Amygdala Response to Mother

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tottenham, Nim; Shapiro, Mor; Telzer, Eva H.; Humphreys, Kathryn L.

    2012-01-01

    In altricial species, like the human, the caregiver, very often the mother, is one of the most potent stimuli during development. The distinction between mothers and other adults is learned early in life and results in numerous behaviors in the child, most notably mother-approach and stranger wariness. The current study examined the influence of…

  10. Children of Incarcerated Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara J. Myers; Tina M. Smarsh; Kristine Amlund-Hagen; Suzanne Kennon

    1999-01-01

    We review the literature on children whose mothers are incarcerated in jails or prisons. These children typically experience a great many risk factors besides their mothers' incarceration, including poverty, drug and alcohol problems in their families, community violence, and multiple changes in caregivers. Children's lives are greatly disrupted when mothers are arrested, and most children show emotional and behavioral problems.

  11. The US Cruise Ship Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Willis H.

    1985-01-01

    The cruise ship industry relates directly to many features of the natural and cultural environments. The U.S. cruise ship industry is analyzed. Discusses the size of the industry, precruise passenger liners, current cruise ships, cruise regions and routes, ports of call, major ports, passengers, and future prospects. (RM)

  12. Ocean drilling ship chosen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara T. Richman

    1984-01-01

    The Sedco\\/BP 471, owned jointly by Sedco, Inc., of Dallas, Tex., and British Petroleum, has been selected as the drill ship for the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). The contract, with a specified initial term of 4 years with 10 1-year options after that, is expected to be signed by mid March by Texas A&M University, the ODP science operator, and

  13. Sea & Ships: Explore online

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Maritime Museum (NMM) in England notes that its goal is "working to illustrate for everyone the importance of the sea, ships, time and the stars and their relationship with people." There is so much to explore in the "Sea and Ships" portion of the NMM website, but a great way to see everything it has to offer is by using the "Sea and Ships Directory" at the bottom of the homepage. It divides the material up by "Subjects", "People", "Collections", "Online Galleries", and "Games and Interactives". Visitors interested in lessons about the ocean that come in the form of games, quizzes and stories, should definitely check out the "Your Ocean" link from the "Games and Interactives". The "Your Waste" lesson gives visitors the opportunity to test their skills at "managing an oil spill clean-up operation", in the game "Oil Crisis!" Keeping waste to a minimum is what the quiz "Pollution Solutions" addresses, and is also on the "Your Waste" page. Other lessons include "Your Energy", "Your Stuff" and "Your Climate".

  14. DOING MOTHERING BEHIND BARS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF INCARCERATED MOTHERS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phyllis E. Berry; J. Smith-Mahdi

    2006-01-01

    A qualitative study was performed involving 109 mothers in a minimum-security prison. The purpose of this study was to explore how mothers in prison define the word “mother” and how they fulfill that role while incarcerated. Most of the mothers defined mother as someone who loves and cares for her children. Four novel identities were identified, which include Self-Improving Incarcerated

  15. Cockroach infestation on seagoing ships.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Marcus; Baur, Xaver

    2008-01-01

    Cockroaches are detected ashore worldwide. At present, little is known about cockroach infestation on ships. The authors' objective in this study was to assess the current prevalence of cockroach infestation on seagoing vessels. In August 2005, port officials investigated cockroach infestation on 59 ships in Hamburg's port via standardized procedures (ie, illuminating hiding places and using pyrethrum spray). About 3 minutes after illumination or chemical provocation, the inspectors counted the number of insects escaping from their hiding places. The examination revealed cockroach presence in the galley or mess room of 6 ships (10.2%). These ships were bigger than 10,000 gross register tons (GRT) and older than 7 years. Inspectors detected the cockroach species Blattella germanica on 5 ships and Blatta orientalis on 1 ship. The standardized use of pyrethrum spray more frequently detected cockroaches than did inspection or illumination of their hiding places. PMID:18479998

  16. Ship Creek bioassessment investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.; Murphy, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB) personnel to conduct a series of collections of macroinvertebrates and sediments from Ship Creek to (1) establish baseline data on these populations for reference in evaluating possible impacts from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) activities at two operable units, (2) compare current population indices with those found by previous investigations in Ship Creek, and (3) determine baseline levels of concentrations of any contaminants in the sediments associated with the macroinvertebrates. A specific suite of indices established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was requested for the macroinvertebrate analyses; these follow the Rapid Bioassessment Protocol developed by Plafkin et al. (1989) and will be described. Sediment sample analyses included a Microtox bioassay and chemical analysis for contaminants of concern. These analyses included, volatile organic compounds, total gasoline and diesel hydrocarbons (EPA method 8015, CA modified), total organic carbon, and an inductive-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) metals scan. Appendix A reports on the sediment analyses. The Work Plan is attached as Appendix B.

  17. Mothers and Sons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olga Silverstein

    1989-01-01

    The mythology surrounding the mother\\/son relationship is embedded in the social structure. Women have been collusive in their silence, thus protecting the status quo of male supremacy. The conflict for female family therapists is compared to that of mothers of sons, as they seesaw between the social injunction to he1 individuals achieve autonomy, and the simultaneous injunction to help them

  18. Cruise ship port planning factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeth Al Fogg

    2001-01-01

    The predictions contained within this dissertation suggest further rapid growth of the cruise industry and the requirement for additional cruise ship berthing worldwide. The factors leading to the tremendous growth in the cruise marketplace are identified and individually addressed. Unfortunately, planning factors associated with the design and construction of cruise ship seaports are not readily available and methods to manage

  19. Extreme roll motions of ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edwin Kreuzer; RMC Mestrom; Marc-Andre Pick

    2004-01-01

    The ship capsizing problem is one of the major challenges in naval architecture. The criterion of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) regarding capsize stability is still not including dynamic loads. Existing mathematical models of ships taking into account all degrees of freedom as well as uidñstructureñinteraction can hardly be used for stability analysis with common methods from nonlinear dynamics theory

  20. 3, 17171746, 2006 Mediterranean Ships

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract The Ships Of Opportunity Program in the Mediterranean Sea was established at the end of 1999 of the Mediterranean Sea circulation have been verified, such as eddies and gyres in the various sub-basins, and denseOSD 3, 1717­1746, 2006 Mediterranean Ships Of Opportunity Program G. M. R. Manzella et al. Title

  1. Facts about Noroviruses on Cruise Ships

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sanitation Program Share Compartir Facts About Noroviruses on Cruise Ships Noroviruses Norovirus is a very contagious virus. You ... more about norovirus Why noroviruses are associated with cruise ships Health officials track illness on cruise ships. So ...

  2. Systems modeling for electric ship design

    E-print Network

    Soultatis, Charalambos

    2004-01-01

    Diesel and gas turbine electric ship propulsion are of current interest for several types of vessels that are important for commercial shipping and for the next generation of war ships. During the design process of a ...

  3. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

  4. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

  5. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

  6. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

  7. Overstepping Mother Earth's Boundaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH Educational Foundation

    2010-03-31

    Have we overstepped Mother Earth's boundaries? What are the consequences? In this video segment adapted from Haskell Indian Nations University, hear a Native perspective on our relationship with the natural environment.

  8. Mothers, Daughters, and Disordered Eating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen M. Pike; Judith Rodin

    1991-01-01

    We examined features of 77 mothers' attitudes and behavior that relate to disordered eating among their adolescent daughters. Mothers whose daughters reported a level of disordered eating comparable with clinical samples of bulimic patients were compared with mothers whose daughters reported a low level of eating disturbances. As hypothesized, mothers of daughters with disordered eating were more dissatisfied with the

  9. Black Ships & Samurai

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In the early days of July 1853, the residents of Uraga on the outskirts of the feudal capital of Japan at Edo were privy to a rather unusual sight: Four hulking foreign warships had entered their harbor under the power of coal, and under the command of Commodore Matthew Perry of the United States. So began one of the pivotal cultural interactions between East and West. Commodore Perry came as an emissary of the United States in order to create a formal relationship with the empire of Japan. Developed by Professors John W. Dower and Shigeru Miyagawa from MIT, this site brings together a wealth of rarely seen graphics from both sides of this historic encounter, and original textual commentaries by Professor Dower. The Core Exhibit area contains the bulk of these amazing visual materials, including those renderings of the initial encounters of the two cultures in the years 1853 and 1854 and some revealing portraits of both Japanese officials and Commodore Perry himself. Visitors should not leave the site without viewing at least part of the interactive recreation of the 30-foot-long Japanese Black Ship Scroll, which was painted in 1854. The scroll features a number of scenes documenting these encounters, and also includes explanatory text as well.

  10. COGAS propulsion for LNG ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Edwin G.

    2011-06-01

    Propulsion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) ships is undergoing significant change. The traditional steam plant is losing favor because of its low cycle efficiency. Medium-speed diesel-electric and slow-speed diesel-mechanical drive ships are in service, and more are being built. Another attractive alternative is combined gas and steam turbine (COGAS) drive. This approach offers significant advantages over steam and diesel propulsion. This paper presents the case for the COGAS cycle.

  11. Math Model for Naval Ship Handling Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golovcsenko, Igor V.

    The report describes the math model for an experimental ship handling trainer. The training task is that of a replenishment operation at sea. The model includes equations for ship dynamics of a destroyer, propeller-engine response times, ship separation, interaction effects between supply ship and destroyer, and outputs to a visual display system.…

  12. NOAA Ship OSCAR DYSON The ship is named after the Alaskan

    E-print Network

    out of the region of hull- generated flow noise. This feature enables the ship to moveNOAA Ship OSCAR DYSON The ship is named after the Alaskan fisherman Oscar Dyson and the ship's home that are used to ensure the net is fully open. NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson is the first of four new fisheries survey

  13. Application of fracture mechanics and half-cycle method to the prediction of fatigue life of B-52 aircraft pylon components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Carter, A. L.; Totton, W. W.; Ficke, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Stress intensity levels at various parts of the NASA B-52 carrier aircraft pylon were examined for the case when the pylon store was the space shuttle solid rocket booster drop test vehicle. Eight critical stress points were selected for the pylon fatigue analysis. Using fracture mechanics and the half-cycle theory (directly or indirectly) for the calculations of fatigue-crack growth ,the remaining fatigue life (number of flights left) was estimated for each critical part. It was found that the two rear hooks had relatively short fatigue life and that the front hook had the shortest fatigue life of all the parts analyzed. The rest of the pylon parts were found to be noncritical because of their extremely long fatigue life associated with the low operational stress levels.

  14. Mothering against the Odds: Diverse Voices of Contemporary Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Cynthia Garcia, Ed.; Surrey, Janet L., Ed.; Weingarten, Kathy, Ed.

    Based on the view that increasing numbers of mothers who do not fit a narrow traditional image are often maligned, misunderstood, or ignored, this book presents the stories of a diverse group of mothers whose life circumstances place them outside the mainstream. Chapters explore the lives of mothers of exceptional children and biracial children;…

  15. bottom board mother board

    E-print Network

    Tentzeris, Manos

    LCP top board LCP bottom board FR4 mother board Antenna Up-Mixer LNA Down-Mixer Tx board Rx board on the organic substrate Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP) and the paper substrate have been presented. The key polymer (LCP), multilayer modules, RF and mm-waves front-end module, system-on-package (SOP), three

  16. The Mother's Almanac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Marguerite; Parsons, Elia

    This book is a compilation of practical suggestions for mothers on caring for children from birth through age 6. Everyday problems are discussed in an easy-to-read anecdotal style. The first section of the book deals with family life, including discussions of birth, breast feeding, basic child care (e.g., how to diaper a squirming baby),…

  17. Divorced Mothers' Guilt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virginia M. Boney

    2002-01-01

    The deficit view of female-headed single-parent families continues to be reinforced through the dominant sociocultural discourse and research from the modernist paradigm. Exploration of divorced mothers' experiences from a feminist perspective illuminates interpersonal and intrapersonal sources of guilt for these women, and how guilt is reinforced by social, economic, legal, and religious institutions. Guilt impedes the divorce recovery process for

  18. Mother, doctor, wife.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Women physicians often play a triple role: mother, doctor, and wife. This situation can be extremely stressful. Understanding the stresses of each role and setting priorities to help make each role more fulfilling are important for balancing career and personal life. PMID:8348020

  19. The Maturing Teenage Mother

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Campbell Thomas

    1979-01-01

    The public consciousness about teenage childbearing and its associated hazards has been raised through widespread documentation of the phenomenon. This study was conducted to obtain information from maturing teenage mothers about their lifestyles, health habits and attitudes towards family planning. Results showed some definite trends with age maturity. Recommendations include the development of services for males, programs for parents, increased

  20. Our Mother Corn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathers, Sherry; And Others

    Developed to provide an understanding of the magnitude of the role of corn, referred to as Mother Corn in the cultures of the Seneca, Pawnee, and Hopi tribes, the student text provides information on the tribes' basic lifestyles and the way they grew and used corn in three different parts of the United States. The section on the origin of corn…

  1. NASA tracking ship navigation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenna, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The ship position and attitude measurement system that was installed aboard the tracking ship Vanguard is described. An overview of the entire system is given along with a description of how precise time and frequency is utilized. The instrumentation is broken down into its basic components. Particular emphasis is given to the inertial navigation system. Each navigation system used, a mariner star tracker, navigation satellite system, Loran C and OMEGA in conjunction with the inertial system is described. The accuracy of each system is compared along with their limitations.

  2. Early Mother-Child Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Agostino, Micheline

    1986-01-01

    This journal issue presents an overview of mother-child interaction during the first year of the child's life. Contents of the first section, which concern the development of the mother-child relationship, focus on the concept of the maternal instinct, mother and child during intrauterine life, birth of the child, the postnatal period (including…

  3. Ship Tracks in the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Because clouds represent an area of great uncertainty in studies of global climate, scientists are interested in better understanding the processes by which clouds form and change over time. In recent years, scientists have turned their attention to the ways in which human-produced aerosol pollution modifies clouds. One area that has drawn scientists' attention is 'ship tracks,' or clouds that form from the sulfate aerosols released by large ships. Although ships are not significant sources of pollution themselves, they do release enough sulfur dioxide in the exhaust from their smokestacks to modify overlying clouds. Specifically, the aerosol particles formed by the ship exhaust in the atmosphere cause the clouds to be more reflective, carry more water, and possibly inhibit them from precipitating. This is one example of how humans have been creating and modifying clouds for generations through the burning of fossil fuels. This image was acquired over the northern Pacific Ocean by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on April 29, 2002. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  4. Updated emissions from ocean shipping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James J. Corbett; Horst W. Koehler

    2003-01-01

    Marine vessel inventories demonstrate that ship emissions cannot be neglected in assessing environmental impacts of air pollution, although significant uncertainty in these inventories remains. We address this uncertainty by employing a bottom-up estimate of fuel consumption and vessel activity for internationally registered fleets, including cargo vessels, other commercial vessels, and military vessels. We identify model bias in previous work, which

  5. Antispin Thruster Control for Ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. N. Smogeli; A. J. Sorensen

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the control of thrusters and propellers on ships in extreme operating conditions. In normal operating conditions, recent results have demonstrated that torque and power thruster control will lead to reduced mechanical wear and tear of the propulsion unit, more accurate thrust production, and more predictable power consumption when compared to conventional shaft speed control. In high seas,

  6. NUCLEAR PROPULSION FOR MERCHANT SHIPS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L. Smith; J. E. Richards

    1959-01-01

    Views arising from the British Shipbuilding Research Association studies ; on the possible application of nuclear propulsion to merchant ships are presented. ; The capital cost of nuclear reactors is much higher than that of oil-fired ; boilers and for this and other reasons the first commercial application of ; nuclear power will possibly be to a large oil tanker.

  7. 7 CFR 989.106 - Ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations Definitions § 989.106 Ship. Ship means the...

  8. Time domain geoacoustic inversion using ship noise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Woojae Seong; Peter Gerstoft; David Battle; Peter Nielsen

    2003-01-01

    A time domain geoacoustic inversion method using ship noise received on a towed horizontal array is presented. The received signal, containing ship noise, is time-reversed and then back-propagated to the vicinity of the ship. The back-propagated signal is correlated with the received signal which is expected to peak at the ship's location in case of a good match for the

  9. Shore-To-Ship Power Supply System for a Cruise Ship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Paul; V. Haddian

    2009-01-01

    The power demand for a large cruise ship during berthing is close to 10 MVA. Such a power demand from the shore-to-ship requires multiple parallel feeds at medium voltage to match with the ship's connection point voltage. The cruise ship authority required installation of a neutral grounding disconnect switch (DS) and insulated ground conductor (IG) at the shore power transformer

  10. Smoother sailing [ship design and control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Dooling

    1996-01-01

    Advanced designs and controls for ships traveling at up to 70 km\\/h offer attractive transport options and passenger comfort even in rough seas. In particular the author discusses the design of the HSS 1500 catamaran which uses jet engines for propulsion, the FastShip Atlantic (also using gas turbines), and large cargo ships for Asia's Pacific coast based on hydrofoils and

  11. Cruising digital ships on electronic seas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. I. Lewin

    1999-01-01

    Naval architects now use a different kind of ship model, a hydrodynamic computer simulation, to design faster, quieter, or more economically efficient ships for the world's navies, merchant marines, and cruise lines. A leader in the use of computers to determine the hydrodynamic behavior of surface and undersea craft is the US Navy's David Taylor Model Ship Basin, part of

  12. Analysis of ship maneuvering data from simulators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Frette; G. Kleppe; K. Christensen

    2011-01-01

    We analyze complex manuevering histories of ships obtained from training sessions on bridge simulators. Advanced ships are used in fields like offshore oil exploration: dive support vessels, supply vessels, anchor handling vessels, tugs, cable layers, and multi-purpose vessels. Due to high demands from the operations carried out, these ships need to have very high maneuverability. This is achieved through a

  13. Underwater radiated noise from modern commercial ships.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Megan F; Ross, Donald; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Underwater radiated noise measurements for seven types of modern commercial ships during normal operating conditions are presented. Calibrated acoustic data (<1000 Hz) from an autonomous seafloor-mounted acoustic recorder were combined with ship passage information from the Automatic Identification System. This approach allowed for detailed measurements (i.e., source level, sound exposure level, and transmission range) on ships of opportunity. A key result was different acoustic levels and spectral shapes observed from different ship-types. A 54 kGT container ship had the highest broadband source level at 188 dB re 1 ?Pa@1m; a 26 kGT chemical tanker had the lowest at 177 dB re 1 ?Pa@1m. Bulk carriers had higher source levels near 100 Hz, while container ship and tanker noise was predominantly below 40 Hz. Simple models to predict source levels of modern merchant ships as a group from particular ship characteristics (e.g., length, gross tonnage, and speed) were not possible given individual ship-type differences. Furthermore, ship noise was observed to radiate asymmetrically. Stern aspect noise levels are 5 to 10 dB higher than bow aspect noise levels. Collectively, these results emphasize the importance of including modern ship-types in quantifying shipping noise for predictive models of global, regional, and local marine environments. PMID:22280574

  14. Incarcerated mothers and parenting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorothy C. Howze Browne

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes as a primary prevention strategy, a parent-education program aimed at enhancing the parenting skills and knowledge of incarcerated women (the majority of whom were mothers). Data are presented which describe changes in program participants' self-evaluations, parenting attitudes, and expectations of children. Upon completing of the parenting program, few differences were observed for the various pre- and post-test

  15. 47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...Compulsory Ships § 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels equipped with a Ship Security Alert System pursuant to the Safety...

  16. 47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...Compulsory Ships § 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels equipped with a Ship Security Alert System pursuant to the Safety...

  17. 47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...Compulsory Ships § 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels equipped with a Ship Security Alert System pursuant to the Safety...

  18. 47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...Compulsory Ships § 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels equipped with a Ship Security Alert System pursuant to the Safety...

  19. Underage mothers in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Erdal; Nacar, Mehmet Can; Yildirim, Ali; Enginyurt, Ozgur; Din, Hasan; Evcuman, Durmus

    2014-01-01

    Background All individuals under the age of 18 are considered as children by the Convention on the Rights of Children. Underage mothers are a pediatric-age group of children that become pregnant and give birth. It may be unfamiliar in Western countries, but in Middle-Eastern countries ruled by religious laws and old-fashioned traditions, it is common for an older man to marry a girl. The aim of this study was to describe the status of underage mothers within the framework of children’s rights and to draw attention to this issue. We presented this study to increase awareness and sensitivity, and to scrutinize and discuss these topics. Material/Methods We retrospectively investigated cases of underaged pregnant girls who applied to Forensic Science Department outpatient clinics and Obstetrics and Gynecology Department outpatient clinics of Gaziosmanpasa University Faculty of Medicine between 2003 and 2013. Results We accessed records of 163 underage mothers (?18 age). Mean age was 16.9±0.83 (14–18 years). Gravida and parity rates increased proportionately with increasing age. Most of our cases were 16 and 17 years of age (n: 117, 71.8%). Conclusions Underage motherhood is not only a medical issue; it is a multi-dimensional problem with social, economic, traditional, religious, and legal aspects. PMID:24714663

  20. Undermining Mothers: A Content Analysis of the Representation of Mothers in Magazines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deirdre D. Johnston; Debra H. Swanson

    2003-01-01

    Mother wars, the pitting of at-home and employed mothers against each other, domi- nate public discourse. Mother roles are contested and, as a result, mothers are inun- dated with contradictory messages that affirm a particular mother role and simulta- neously condemn a mother for achieving it. This content analysis explores 4 maternal contradictions in contemporary women's magazines: (a) mothers are

  1. TMI-2 core shipping preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

    1988-01-01

    Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

  2. QuickShip: General Section

    Cancer.gov

    Welcome to the Frederick National Lab Shipment Wizard, this application will guide you through the process of requesting a shipment. The requestor should submit this form within 24 hours for domestic shipments and 1 week (5 business days) before ship date of international shipments. Once the information is successfully submitted, you must print the resulting form, an Authorizing Official must sign the form, and the form must then be faxed to Transportation (301-846-6971) Department.

  3. World Ships - Architectures & Feasibility Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, A. M.; Pak, M.; Putz, D.; Buhler, C.; Reiss, P.

    A world ship is a concept for manned interstellar flight. It is a huge, self-contained and self-sustained interstellar vehicle. It travels at a fraction of a per cent of the speed of light and needs several centuries to reach its target star system. The well- known world ship concept by Alan Bond and Anthony Martin was intended to show its principal feasibility. However, several important issues haven't been addressed so far: the relationship between crew size and robustness of knowledge transfer, reliability, and alternative mission architectures. This paper addresses these gaps. Furthermore, it gives an update on target star system choice, and develops possible mission architectures. The derived conclusions are: a large population size leads to robust knowledge transfer and cultural adaptation. These processes can be improved by new technologies. World ship reliability depends on the availability of an automatic repair system, as in the case of the Daedalus probe. Star systems with habitable planets are probably farther away than systems with enough resources to construct space colonies. Therefore, missions to habitable planets have longer trip times and have a higher risk of mission failure. On the other hand, the risk of constructing colonies is higher than to establish an initial settlement on a habitable planet. Mission architectures with precursor probes have the potential to significantly reduce trip and colonization risk without being significantly more costly than architectures without. In summary world ships remain an interesting concept, although they require a space colony-based civilization within our own solar system before becoming feasible.

  4. 47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. 80.1121 Section 80.1121 Telecommunication...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. (a) Ship or ship earth stations that receive a distress alert...

  5. 47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. 80.1121 Section 80.1121 Telecommunication...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. (a) Ship or ship earth stations that receive a distress alert...

  6. 47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. 80.1121 Section 80.1121 Telecommunication...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. (a) Ship or ship earth stations that receive a distress alert...

  7. 47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. 80.1121 Section 80.1121 Telecommunication...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. (a) Ship or ship earth stations that receive a distress alert...

  8. 47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. 80.1121 Section 80.1121 Telecommunication...acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations. (a) Ship or ship earth stations that receive a distress alert...

  9. Teenage mothers at age 30.

    PubMed

    Smithbattle, Lee

    2005-11-01

    This longitudinal, interpretive study explored how teen mothers experienced the self and future during a 12-year period. Sixteen families were first interviewed intensively in 1988-1989 once the teen's infant reached age 8 to 10 months; they were reinterviewed in 1993, 1997, and 2001 (Time 4). Twenty-seven family members were reinterviewed at Time 4. The metaphor of a narrative spine is used to describe how the mothers'lives unfolded during the 12-year period. The narrative spines of some mothers were large and supported well-developed, coherent "chapters" on mothering, adult love, and work. For others, mothering provided a "backbone" for a meaningful life; however, chapters on adult love and work were less fully developed. The lives of a third group of mothers lacked a coherent narrative structure. Each pattern is presented with a paradigm case. PMID:16275703

  10. Relationship between container ship underwater noise levels and ship design, operational and oceanographic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Megan F.; Wiggins, Sean M.; Hildebrand, John A.

    2013-05-01

    Low-frequency ocean ambient noise is dominated by noise from commercial ships, yet understanding how individual ships contribute deserves further investigation. This study develops and evaluates statistical models of container ship noise in relation to design characteristics, operational conditions, and oceanographic settings. Five-hundred ship passages and nineteen covariates were used to build generalized additive models. Opportunistic acoustic measurements of ships transiting offshore California were collected using seafloor acoustic recorders. A 5-10 dB range in broadband source level was found for ships depending on the transit conditions. For a ship recorded multiple times traveling at different speeds, cumulative noise was lowest at 8 knots, 65% reduction in operational speed. Models with highest predictive power, in order of selection, included ship speed, size, and time of year. Uncertainty in source depth and propagation affected model fit. These results provide insight on the conditions that produce higher levels of underwater noise from container ships.

  11. Mothers and models of disability.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Gail

    2005-01-01

    Based on a qualitative anthropological study of American mothers of infants and young children newly diagnosed with disability, this essay examines how mothers understand their children and define disability in relation to publicly available discourses of disability and identity. In seeking to improve their children's opportunities in mainstream society, mothers appear to comply with the medical model. But over time and in the process of providing meaning to their experience, mothers retool models, drawing both on the social and minority group models' rejection of a problem-based definition of disability as inherently caused by impairment and on their own intimate engagement with impairment as an embodied experience. PMID:15877195

  12. Assessment of early mothering: A tool

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elaine E. Hayes

    1983-01-01

    Much has been written in the last few years about the importance of early mother?infant contact in order to establish the mother?infant bond. The success or failure of this early bonding may have lasting effects on both mother and infant. Mothers give behavioral clues that indicate their progress toward mothering (bonding). But far too often the nurses caring for both

  13. Repositioning Mothers: Mothers, Disabled Children and Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Sara; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    In this article we set out to review the ways in which mothers of disabled children have been portrayed within disability studies and the more broader academic literature. We argue that within disability studies mothers of disabled children occupy a liminal position because they are often not disabled and yet they can experience forms of…

  14. A Mother's Humiliation: School Organizational Violence toward Latina Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monzo, Lilia D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how Latina mothers experience violence in schools through everyday interactions with those positioned with greater power in our society. Drawing on Bourdieu's concept of symbolic violence, the article discusses how deficit perspectives held toward Latina mothers and the privileging of White, middle-class frames result in…

  15. Hearing My Mother's Voice: A Study of Sisters and Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Beverley

    There seems to be an assumption among many people that parents can mold the later adult personality of their offspring by manipulating their childhood upbringing. To tease out the variables in childrearing and to discover some of the sources of the childbearing practices of mothers in the 1980s, a study of sisters and their mothers (N=48) in the…

  16. Where's the Feminism in Mothering?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Arcy, Catherine; Turner, Colleen; Crockett, Belinda; Gridley, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This article is a reflective narrative bringing together personal, collective, and action learning reflections from three women: all mothers, feminists, and community psychology practitioners. Its focus on mothering highlights the interconnectedness and tensions across these roles, as well as the shared learnings arising from this collaboration.…

  17. Mother's Leading: Models of Maternalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masini, Douglas E.

    When examining basic leadership models, the traits of one of the most important leaders in society, the mother, are rarely considered. This paper reflects on models of leadership found in textbooks and feminist literature and conjures a model, inclusive of popularly held beliefs, of the role of mothers in family and society. The paper asks whether…

  18. 8.G Shipping Rolled Oats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Rolled oats (dry oatmeal) come in cylindrical containers with a diameter of 5 inches and a height of 9$\\frac12$ inches. These containers are shipped to...

  19. Ship plume modelling in EOSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Iersel, M.; Mack, A.; Degache, M. A. C.; van Eijk, A. M. J.

    2014-10-01

    The EOSTAR model aims at assessing the performance of electro-optical (EO) sensors deployed in a maritime surface scenario, by providing operational performance measures (such as detection ranges) and synthetic images. The target library of EOSTAR includes larger surface vessels, for which the exhaust plume may constitute a significant signature element in the thermal wavelength bands. The main steps of the methodology to include thermal signatures of exhaust plumes in EOSTAR are discussed, and illustrative examples demonstrate the impact of the ship's superstructure, the plume exit conditions, and the environment on the plume behavior and signature.

  20. Study on photovoltaic power system on ships

    SciTech Connect

    Katagi, Takeshi; Fujii, Yoshimi; Nishikawa, Eiichi; Hashimoto, Takeshi [Kobe Univ. of Mercantile Marine (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents the application of photovoltaic power systems to ships. Two types of leisure or fishing boats powered by photovoltaics are designed. The boats described are single hull and catamaran type with twin hulls. The design of a new electric power system using a photovoltaic power system in a harbor ship having 20 tons is also proposed. The results of this study show that the photovoltaic power system can apply to small ships.

  1. Our Mother Tongues

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-06

    Frequently when one hears about the Native American experience in the United States, the focus is on the loss of traditions, folkways, and language. In contrast, this website was created to highlight a recent documentary by Anne Makepeace that focuses on the ways in which Native American languages have recovered and thrived in recent times. On the site, visitors should start by clicking on the interactive "Language Map." Here visitors can learn about twelve different languages, including Crow, Cherokee, Dakota, Euchee, and Lakota. Clicking on the "Voices" area gives visitors the opportunity to listen to Native Americans from different tribal communities speaking in their mother tongues. Additionally, visitors can send an electronic postcard from the site, read the site blog, and learn more about the project and the documentary.

  2. Ship emissions and their externalities for Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzannatos, Ernestos

    2010-06-01

    The existing and emerging international and European policy framework for the reduction of ship exhaust emissions dictates the need to produce reliable national, regional and global inventories in order to monitor emission trends and consequently provide the necessary support for future policy making. Furthermore, the inventories of ship exhaust emissions constitute the basis upon which their external costs are estimated in an attempt to highlight the economic burden they impose upon the society and facilitate the cost-benefit analysis of the proposed emission abatement technologies, operational measures and market-based instruments prior to their implementation. The case of Greece is of particular interest mainly because the dense ship traffic within the Greek seas directly imposes the impact of its exhaust emission pollutants (NO x, SO 2 and PM) upon the highly populated, physically sensitive and culturally precious Greek coastline, as well as upon the land and seas of Greece in general, whereas the contribution of Greece in the global CO 2 inventory at a time of climatic change awareness cannot be ignored. In this context, this paper presents the contribution of Greece in ship exhaust emissions of CO 2, NO x, SO 2 and PM from domestic and international shipping over the last 25 years (1984-2008), utilizing the fuel-based (fuel sales) emission methodology. Furthermore, the ship exhaust emissions generated within the Greek seas and their externalities are estimated for the year 2008, through utilizing the fuel-based (fuel sales) approach for domestic shipping and the activity-based (ship traffic) approach for international shipping. On this basis, it was found that during the 1984 to 2008 period the fuel-based (fuel sales) ship emission inventory for Greece increased at an average annual rate of 2.85%. In 2008, the CO 2, NO x, SO 2 and PM emissions reached 12.9 million tons (of which 12.4 million tons of CO 2) and their externalities were found to be around 3.1 billion euro. With regard to shipping within the Greek seas, the utilization of the fuel-based (fuel sales) analysis for domestic shipping and the activity-based (ship traffic) analysis for international shipping shows that the ship-generated emissions reached 7.4 million tons (of which 7 million tons of CO 2) and their externalities were estimated at 2.95 billion euro. Finally, the internalization of external costs for domestic shipping was found to produce an increase of 12.96 and 2.71 euro per passenger and transported ton, respectively.

  3. First Results from SHIP Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bagryansky, P.A. (and others)

    2005-01-15

    At present, the GDT facility is being upgraded. The first stage of the upgrade is the Synthesised Hot Ion Plasmoid (SHIP) experiment. It aims, on the one hand, at the investigation of plasmas which are expected to appear in the region of high neutron production in a GDT based fusion neutron source proposed by the Budker Institute and, on the other hand, at the investigation of plasmas the parameters of which have never been achieved before in axisymmetric magnetic mirrors.The experiment is performed in a small mirror section which is installed at the end of one side of GDT. The magnetic field on axis is in the range of 0.5-2.0 Tesla and the mirror ratio is 1.2-1.4. The mirror is filled with background plasma streaming in from the central cell. This plasma component is maxwellised and has an electron temperature of about 100 eV. Two neutral beam injectors perpendicularly inject a total current of about 50 Atom Amperes of deuterium neutrals with an energy of 20 keV as a pulse with a duration of about 1 ms. Ionisation of the beams generates the high-energy ion component. The device has been equipped with several diagnostic methods which are successfully used in GDT experiments.The paper presents first results of plasma parameter measurements in SHIP experiment.

  4. Technical overview on designing wireless remote control steering mechanisms for small ships and scaled model ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Barbos; C. Cristescu

    2008-01-01

    A shippsilas steering mechanism is a complex electro-mechanical or electro-hydraulic system designed to control the process of adjusting the angle of the rudder, in turn changing the direction of the boat or ship. Classic methods of rudder angle adjustment for ships use a wheel, which is typically connected to a mechanical or hydraulic steering mechanism. In some modern ships the

  5. Effects of uncertain geoacoustic parameters and coastal shipping densities on shipping noise directionality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J. Hayward; Richard M. Heitmeyer

    2005-01-01

    The bearing-elevation directionality of low-frequency shipping noise is influenced both by the sediment geoacoustic parameters and by the coastal shipping density. This study examines the effects of geoacoustic parameter and shipping density uncertainties on noise directionality through simulations for a North Pacific site. The simulations are based in part on stochastic models of the spatial variations of geoacoustic parameters that

  6. The superconducting MHD-propelled ship YAMATO1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yohei Sasakawa; Setsuo Takezawa; Yoshinori Sugawara; Yoshihiro Kyotani

    1995-01-01

    In 1985 the Ship & Ocean Foundation (SOF) created a committee under the chairmanship of Mr. Yohei Sasakawa, Former President of the Ship & Ocean Foundation, and began researches into superconducting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ship propulsion. In 1989 SOF set to construction of a experimental ship on the basis of theoretical and experimental researches pursued until then. The experimental ship named

  7. A Bayesian approach for understanding the role of ship speed in whale-ship encounters.

    PubMed

    Gende, Scott M; Hendrix, A Noble; Harris, Karin R; Eichenlaub, Bill; Nielsen, Julie; Pyare, Sanjay

    2011-09-01

    Mandatory or voluntary reductions in ship speed are a common management strategy for reducing deleterious encounters between large ships and large whales. This has produced strong resistance from shipping and marine transportation entities, in part because very few studies have empirically demonstrated whether or to what degree ship speed influences ship-whale encounters. Here we present the results of four years of humpback whale sightings made by observers aboard cruise ships in Alaska, representing 380 cruises and 891 ship-whale encounters. Encounters occurred at distances from 21 m to 1000 m (x = 567 m) with 61 encounters (7%) occurring between 200 m and 100 m, and 19 encounters (2%) within 100 m. Encounters were spatially aggregated and highly variable across all ship speeds. Nevertheless a Bayesian change-point model found that the relationship between whale distance and ship speed changed at 11.8 knots (6.1 m/s) with whales encountering ships, on average, 114 m closer when ship speeds were above 11.8 knots. Binning encounter distances by 1-knot speed increments revealed a clear decrease in encounter distance with increasing ship speed over the range of 7-17 knots (3.6-8.7 m/s). Our results are the first to demonstrate that speed influences the encounter distance between large ships and large whales. Assuming that the closer ships come to whales the more likely they are to be struck, our results suggest that reduced ship speed may be an effective management action in reducing the probability of a collision. PMID:21939057

  8. the good mother: neutralization techniques used by pageant mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martha Heltsley; Thomas C. Calhoun

    2003-01-01

    This study examines Sykes and Matza's (1957) techniques of neutralization through accounts by 43 mothers whose children participated in six national beauty pageants between September 1996 and May 1997. Respondents used \\

  9. Lactating Mother and Psychotropic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, B. M.; Majumder, Pradipta

    2010-01-01

    Usage of psychotropics during pregnancy and lactation has always been a topic of debate and controversy. The debate stems from the potential adverse effects on the growing fetus or infants due to the transfer of psychotropic drugs through placenta or breast milk of mothers receiving them; and the problem of discontinuing psychotropics in lactating mother considering chances of relapse. However, most of the psychotropics are found to be relatively safe when used cautiously during the lactation phase. This article describes available data on the use of psychotropics in lactating mothers, in particular, in relation to the safety profile of infants. PMID:21327172

  10. Moving from Ship to Arctic Sea Ice

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Two U.S. Coast Guard members are being transported by crane from U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy onto a piece of multi-year Arctic sea ice. This was during a scientific expedition to map the Arctic seafloor. The expedition was a joint effort using two ships, the Healy and the Canadian Coast Guard Ship...

  11. Propulsion units for high speed ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Mavlyudov; A. A. Rusetskiy; Y. M. Sadovnikov; E. A. Fisher

    1975-01-01

    Methods of designing propulsion systems for ships with hydrodynamic and aerodynamic support principles are examined along with the characteristic features of propulsion systems for high-speed ships and the problems of their structural composition. Emphasis is placed on the following propulsion systems: cavitating propellers; propulsion systems with angular power transmission; water-jet propulsion systems; and gas-water and air propulsion systems.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Blanton; K. Eberl

    2008-01-01

    A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and

  13. SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 7.20 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Originator. #12;SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 7.20 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Originator protective equipment (PPE) aboard the R/V Oceanus. To this end, all appropriate safety precautions relevant

  14. Ship detection based on spatial partial features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-hu; Zhou, Fu-gen; Jin, Ting

    2013-09-01

    This paper mainly studies how to detect a wide variety of ships from the ship-borne infrared images in order to implement sea monitoring. Different types of ships have significant differences in their appearance. The traditional detection method which uses the global texture features of the object is not suitable to detect varied ships. This paper presents a novel detection algorithm which extracts spatial partial texture features trained by Adaboost to establish the ship model for detection. We first extract all the partial regions of the object through random traversal, and then extract the texture features by using the "Uniform LBP" operator. Compared to the traditional way, we save each partial feature individually as one feature vector, which not only reduces the vector dimension but also highlights the key regions when the partial regions with strong generality are selected by Adaboost at the second step. Finally, the selected partial features are boosted with weights to establish ship model for the ship detection. The proposed approach is efficient and robust in the infrared ship detection.

  15. Ballast Tank of Ocean-Going Ship

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The empty interior of an ocean-going ship's ballast tank. Such tanks are filled with water to balance a ship's loads. Unless the water is treated before it is emptied into foreign waters, it can introduce foreign organisms into the water that may become established and compe...

  16. A life-saving device for ships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converti, P.

    1985-01-01

    A life-saving device is described which can be used on either ships or airplanes. The device consists of an airtight container for passengers equipped with elements needed for survival (oxygen, food, medicines, etc.), an energy source, and a parachute. This device can be ejected from the plane or ship when an emergency arises.

  17. Effect of Training from Trained Mothers and Education from Mother to Mother on Family Functions and Child-Rearing Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demircioglu, Haktan; Ömeroglu, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The effect of training from trained mothers and education from mother to mother on family functions and child-rearing attitudes was examined. The study was conducted in the 2010-2011 academic year in Ankara, and was modeled based on a pre-test, post-test control group experimental pattern. The study was conducted with a total of 96 mothers, with…

  18. SNF shipping cask shielding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Pace, J.V. III

    1996-01-01

    The Waste Management and Remedial Action Division has planned a modification sequence for storage facility 7827 in the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA). The modification cycle is: (1) modify an empty caisson, (2) transfer the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of an occupied caisson to a hot cell in building 3525 for inspection and possible repackaging, and (3) return the package to the modified caisson in the SWSA. Although the SNF to be moved is in the solid form, it has different levels of activity. Thus, the following 5 shipping casks will be available for the task: the Loop Transport Carrier, the In- Pile Loop LITR HB-2 Carrier, the 6.5-inch HRLEL Carrier, the HFIR Hot Scrap Carrier, and the 10-inch ORR Experiment Removal Shield Cask. This report describes the shielding tasks for the 5 casks: determination of shielding characteristics, any streaming avenues, estimation of thermal limits, and shielding calculational uncertainty for use in the transportation plan.

  19. Wave cancellation small waterplane multihull ships

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.C.; Wilson, M.B. [CRDKNSWC, Bethesda, MD (United States). David Taylor Model Basin

    1994-12-31

    A new patented wave cancellation multihull ship concept (Hsu, 1993) is presented. Such ships consist of various arrangements of tapered hull elements. The tapered hull design provides a small waterplane area for enhanced seakeeping while producing smaller surface disturbances. In addition, proper arrangement of hull elements provides favorable wave interference effects. The saving in effective horsepower with a realistic wave cancellation tri-hull arrangement, was found to be about 30 percent compared to small waterplane area twin-hull ships. Power reductions of this magnitude translate to considerably fuel consumptions and improved range. Applications to several ship types, such as for fast ferries, cruise and container ships, appear promising, wherever good seakeeping, large deck space and high speed in the design.

  20. 46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship's service refrigeration systems. 128.410 Section 128.410 Shipping ...Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.410 Ship's service refrigeration systems. No self-contained unit either for...

  1. 46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship's service refrigeration systems. 128.410 Section 128.410 Shipping ...Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.410 Ship's service refrigeration systems. No self-contained unit either for...

  2. 46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship's service refrigeration systems. 128.410 Section 128.410 Shipping ...Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.410 Ship's service refrigeration systems. No self-contained unit either for...

  3. 78 FR 51728 - Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ...Prevention Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...the 1970s as a cooperative activity with the cruise ship industry. VSP helps the cruise ship industry prevent and control the...

  4. 77 FR 50511 - Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ...Prevention Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...the 1970s as a cooperative activity with the cruise ship industry. VSP helps the cruise ship industry prevent and control the...

  5. 77 FR 12843 - Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ...Prevention Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...the 1970s as a cooperative activity with the cruise ship industry. VSP assists the cruise ship industry to prevent and control the...

  6. 47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

  7. 47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80.377 ...THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency band...

  8. 47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80.377 ...THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency band...

  9. 47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

  10. 47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

  11. 47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80.377 ...THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency band...

  12. 47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80.377 ...THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency band...

  13. 47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

  14. 47 CFR 80.377 - Frequencies for ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Frequencies for ship earth stations. 80.377 Section 80.377 ...THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Ship Earth Stations § 80.377 Frequencies for ship earth stations. The frequency band...

  15. 47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses § 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.164 - Ship's propulsion machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Ship's propulsion machinery. 1915.164 Section 1915.164...STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems § 1915.164 Ship's propulsion machinery. (a) Before work is...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.164 - Ship's propulsion machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Ship's propulsion machinery. 1915.164 Section 1915.164...STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems § 1915.164 Ship's propulsion machinery. (a) Before work is...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.164 - Ship's propulsion machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Ship's propulsion machinery. 1915.164 Section 1915.164...STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems § 1915.164 Ship's propulsion machinery. (a) Before work is...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.164 - Ship's propulsion machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Ship's propulsion machinery. 1915.164 Section 1915.164...STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems § 1915.164 Ship's propulsion machinery. (a) Before work is...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.164 - Ship's propulsion machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Ship's propulsion machinery. 1915.164 Section 1915.164...STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems § 1915.164 Ship's propulsion machinery. (a) Before work is...

  1. 75 FR 54415 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ...general alarm systems on passenger ships; --Development of new framework...Development of a mandatory Code for ships operating in polar waters...immersion suits; --Protection against noise on board ships; --Amendments to the...

  2. 76 FR 82027 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ...float free Capabilities; --Development of a mandatory Code for ships operating in polar waters; --Protection against noise on board ships; --Provisions for the reduction of noise from commercial shipping and its adverse impacts on marine...

  3. Ship candidates extraction for optical color imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinran; Shi, Zhenwei

    2013-08-01

    Ship detection is of great significance lowing to its wide applications. In most existing approaches, some predetection methods are often used to extract ship candidates since applying an accurate algorithm throughout the whole image will be time-consuming and could even cause a lot of false alarms. In addition, most related work focuses on panchromatic imagery but only a little attention has been paid to color imagery. Color images contain more discriminative information of ships than panchromatic images, so it will be easier to extract ships in color images. Further, more information also means more potential to implement image enhancement techniques to solve the problem caused by poor illumination, which is very common in optical images. In this paper, with respect to optical color imagery, we propose a new predetection approach to extract ship candidates preliminarily and rapidly using color information. Firstly, an image enhancement algorithm is employed to improve the quality of input images. Then, we regard the color image as a hyperspectral image and extract ship candidates using a hyperspectral algorithm based on spectral signature model. This hyperspectral algorithm, in essence, utilizes the color information of ships, but the color information is processed in a hyperspectral manner. Unlike the commonly used color segment algorithms which focus on the thresholds in color space, this hyperspectral algorithm concerns more on the patterns of color vectors. Experimental results on real dataset indicate that this image enhancement algorithm is quite suitable for remote sensing images and its performance is better than histogram equalization based techniques. In addition, the hyperspectral algorithm also shows good performance in extracting ship candidates in color images, especially for small ships. As a whole, large areas of background can be removed and most ships can be detected. Although some false alarms still remain, the mount of false alarms is decreased greatly.

  4. Working Mothers and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Margaret

    1970-01-01

    How our technology and social structure adversely affect stability and continuity of care for infants whose mothers work outside the home. Various solutions to the resulting problems are suggested. (RH)

  5. Dissociative Mothers' Subjective Experience of Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Lynn R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of 54 mothers with a dissociative disorder, 20 mothers with other mental problems, and 20 normal mothers investigated what effect, if any, dissociation had on parenting. When tested on the Subjective Experiences of Parenting Scale, mothers with dissociation presented significantly more negative parenting behavior and attitudes. (CR)

  6. Parental attitudes of retarded young mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lillian H. Robinson

    1978-01-01

    Thirty-two retarded young mothers were found to have significantly more protective, controlling, and punitive attitudes toward their children than a control group of mothers who had completed two or more years of college work. The retarded mothers regarded their own mothers as even more controlling, protective, and punitive than they themselves were. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that

  7. Mothers' and Girls' Perspectives on Adolescent Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan-Arvay, Marla; Keats, Patrice A.

    2004-01-01

    A study of communication between mothers and daughters about mothers' sexual experience discloses mothers' and daughters' fears, concerns, and judgments about each other. In this study, 15 women, all mothers of girls, were interviewed about the history of their own sexual experience. Some of these women had chosen to share their personal…

  8. Mother and Daughter Reports about Upward Transfers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, I-Fen

    2008-01-01

    Using 619 mother-daughter dyads interviewed in the 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Mature Women and Young Women, this study examines the assistance that adult daughters provide to their mothers and its covariates. Mothers and daughters have low levels of agreement on transfers. Using mothers' reports identifies different covariates of…

  9. Neuroendocrinology of the mother—child interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerstin Uvnäs-Moberg

    1996-01-01

    Mother-child interaction is usually described in psychological terms; however, it is becoming increasingly clear that neuroendocrine mechanisms are involved in the mother-child interaction. Mother and fetus influence each other by hormonal mechanisms in utero, and after birth, mother and child interact by way of sensory stimulation. In the breastfeeding situation, the infant's suckling stimulates maternal oxytocin and PRL release and,

  10. Mothers' Home Business Network (MHBN)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Established in 1984, the Mothers' Home Business Network (MHBN) provides ideas, inspiration and support for mothers who choose to work at home. Home entrepreneur mom resources include a daily success strategy tip, the newsletter HomeWorkingMom Monthly, and Mom-to-Mom--a list of recommended home business opportunities. Readers may also view MHBN book selections on related topics via the Homeworking Mom Bookshelf.

  11. 46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Ship's service refrigeration systems. 128...SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS... Ship's service refrigeration systems. No self-contained unit either for air-conditioning or for...

  12. 46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Ship's service refrigeration systems. 128...SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS... Ship's service refrigeration systems. No self-contained unit either for air-conditioning or for...

  13. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Hideaki; ORIHARA, Hideo; SATO, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author’s laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship’s motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process. PMID:25311139

  14. The use of wingsails on oceanographic ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, T. J. G.

    There has been considerable discussion over the last few years about ships that the oceanographie field needs to carry it into the 21st century. Many of the ships in use today were built in the 1960s and will need replacing in the 1990s [Dinsmore, 1982; Barbee, 1986]. This is not only true of the Universities National Oceanographic Laboratories System (UNOLS) fleet in the United States, but of many European ships as well. The British research vessel Discovery was completed in 1963, the Frenchman Charcot in 1965.

  15. Load and dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for finned configuration 1 space shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle. Volume 2: Airplane flutter and load analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The airplane flutter and maneuver-gust load analysis results obtained during B-52B drop test vehicle configuration (with fins) evaluation are presented. These data are presented as supplementary data to that given in Volume 1 of this document. A brief mathematical description of airspeed notation and gust load factor criteria are provided as a help to the user. References are defined which provide mathematical description of the airplane flutter and load analysis techniques. Air-speed-load factor diagrams are provided for the airplane weight configurations reanalyzed for finned drop test vehicle configuration.

  16. Characterization of the Volatile Composition and Variations Between Infant Formulas and Mother’s Milk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helene Hausner; Mia Philipsen; Thomas H. Skov; Mikael A. Petersen; Wender L. P. Bredie

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that mother’s milk has a more diverse flavor composition than infant formula milk as it reflects the\\u000a maternal diet. This study aimed to identify volatile compounds in mother’s milk and infant formula milks to obtain more knowledge\\u000a about these sources of early sensory exposure in infant feeding. Mother’s milk collected by ten lactating women, three times

  17. Asteroids as Propulsion Systems of Space Ships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Currently, rockets are used to change the trajectory of space ships and probes. This method is very expensive and requires a lot of fuel, which limits the feasibility of space stations, interplanetary space ships, and probes. Sometimes space probes use the gravity field of a planet However, there am only nine planets in the Solar System, all separated by great distances. There are tons of millions of asteroids in outer space. This paper offers a revolutionary method for changing the trajectory of space probes. The method uses the kinetic or rotary energy of asteroids, comet nuclei, meteorites or other space bodies (small planets, natural planetary satellites, space debris, etc.) to increase (to decrease) ship (probe) speed up to 1000 m/sec (or more) and to achieve any new direction in outer space. The flight possibilities of space ships and probes are increased by a factor of millions.

  18. Shipping charts a high carbon course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bows-Larkin, Alice; Anderson, Kevin; Mander, Sarah; Traut, Michael; Walsh, Conor

    2015-04-01

    The shipping industry expects ongoing growth in CO2 emissions to 2050, despite an apparent recent decline. Opportunities for decarbonizing the sector in line with international commitments on climate change need to be re-evaluated.

  19. Improving tsunami warning using commercial ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, James H.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Wang, Dailin; Carter, Glenn S.; Merrifield, Mark A.

    2012-05-01

    Accurate and rapid detection and assessment of tsunamis is critical for effective mitigation. We show here that a modest ˜10 cm tsunami from the M8.8 27 Feb 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake was detected by kinematic Global Positions System (GPS) solutions from a ship underway in the open ocean - the first time shipboard tsunami detection has been achieved. Our results illustrate how the commercial shipping fleet represents a vast infrastructure of potential open ocean GPS platforms on shipping lanes that provide extremely good spatial coverage around most tsunamigenic source regions. Given the affordability of geodetic GPS systems, and ever-improving satellite communications, it would be possible to equip a significant portion of the shipping fleet with real-time-streamed GPS systems and create a cost-effective tsunami monitoring network with denser and more distributed coverage. We project that such a system would have detected the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in less than an hour.

  20. Ship dynamics for maritime ISAR imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-02-01

    Demand is increasing for imaging ships at sea. Conventional SAR fails because the ships are usually in motion, both with a forward velocity, and other linear and angular motions that accompany sea travel. Because the target itself is moving, this becomes an Inverse- SAR, or ISAR problem. Developing useful ISAR techniques and algorithms is considerably aided by first understanding the nature and characteristics of ship motion. Consequently, a brief study of some principles of naval architecture sheds useful light on this problem. We attempt to do so here. Ship motions are analyzed for their impact on range-Doppler imaging using Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR). A framework for analysis is developed, and limitations of simple ISAR systems are discussed.

  1. 46 CFR 310.4 - Training Ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...310.4 Section 310.4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...Standards for State, Territorial or Regional Maritime Academies and Colleges § 310.4 ...by the Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, for the purpose...

  2. 46 CFR 310.4 - Training Ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...310.4 Section 310.4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...Standards for State, Territorial or Regional Maritime Academies and Colleges § 310.4 ...by the Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, for the purpose...

  3. 46 CFR 310.4 - Training Ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...310.4 Section 310.4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...Standards for State, Territorial or Regional Maritime Academies and Colleges § 310.4 ...by the Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, for the purpose...

  4. 46 CFR 310.4 - Training Ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...310.4 Section 310.4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...Standards for State, Territorial or Regional Maritime Academies and Colleges § 310.4 ...by the Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, for the purpose...

  5. Ship hull resistance calculations using CFD methods

    E-print Network

    Voxakis, Petros

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the computational power and run-time required by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes restricted their use in ship design space exploration. Increases in computational power available to designers, in ...

  6. Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

  7. QuickShip: Create your account

    Cancer.gov

    HOME  |   RESEARCH  |   CAREERS  |   CAMPUS  |   PHONE  |   CONTACT Shipping Wizard Frederick National Lab Shipment Wizard Log In Step 2 Welcome to the Frederick National Lab Shipment Wizard. All items are required except where noted. Create a New Account:

  8. 31 CFR 361.3 - Shipping procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT CLAIMS PURSUANT TO THE GOVERNMENT LOSSES IN SHIPMENT ACT § 361.3 Shipping procedure. Shipments of valuables shall be made so...

  9. 31 CFR 361.3 - Shipping procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT CLAIMS PURSUANT TO THE GOVERNMENT LOSSES IN SHIPMENT ACT § 361.3 Shipping procedure. Shipments of valuables shall be made so...

  10. Ship'S Ballast Water And Marine Pollution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Satir

    The introduction of invasive marine species into new environments by ships' ballast water attached to ships' hulls and via\\u000a other vectors has been identified as one of the four greatest threats to the world's oceans. The other three are land-based\\u000a sources of marine pollution, over exploitation of living marine resources and physical alteration\\/destruction of marine habitat.\\u000a Ballast is any material

  11. Pollution control: A Houston Ship Channel issue.

    E-print Network

    Williams, Edward Barney

    1972-01-01

    POLLUTION CONTROL: A HOUSTON SHIP CHANNEL ISSUE A Thesis by EDWARD B. WILLIAMS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A%? University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August, 1972 Major... Subject: Political Science POLLUTION CONTROL: A HOUSTON SHIP CHANNEL ISSUE A Thesis by EDWARD B. WILLIAMS, ZR. Approved as to sty1e and content by: o J~&2 Head of epartmen embe hazrman of' ommmttee Member August, 1/72 ABSTRACT Pollution Control...

  12. Radio Telephone Service to Ships at Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Wilson; Lloyd Espenschied

    1930-01-01

    The paper discusses the American end of the ship-to-shore radio telephone system and the connecting equipment on board the Leviathan. The most suitable wavelengths for this service are in the short-wave range, but the use of these wavelengths complicates the problem, since different wavelengths are required according to the distance of the ship from shore, the time of day, season

  13. 47 CFR 80.1083 - Ship radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship radio installations. 80.1083 Section 80...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...for Ship Stations § 80.1083 Ship radio installations. (a) Ships must be...

  14. 47 CFR 80.1083 - Ship radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship radio installations. 80.1083 Section 80...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...for Ship Stations § 80.1083 Ship radio installations. (a) Ships must be...

  15. 47 CFR 80.1083 - Ship radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship radio installations. 80.1083 Section 80...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...for Ship Stations § 80.1083 Ship radio installations. (a) Ships must be...

  16. 47 CFR 80.1083 - Ship radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship radio installations. 80.1083 Section 80...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...for Ship Stations § 80.1083 Ship radio installations. (a) Ships must be...

  17. Pre-Ship Review November 13 &14, 2001

    E-print Network

    Ship Review- November 2001 10 Nov 11 Introduction: High-level Requirements · Photon noise-limited skyPre-Ship Review November 13 &14, 2001 #12;Pre Ship Review- November 2001 2 Nov 11 Agenda 1) 10. Documentation (David C) 11. Shipping and handling (David C) 12. Integration and commissioning

  18. Vertical arrival structure of shipping noise in deep water channels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zizheng Li; Lisa M. Zurk; Barry Ma

    2010-01-01

    In passive sonar systems, knowledge of low-frequency shipping noise is significant for target detection performance. However, an accurate model for the shipping noise structure is difficult to obtain, because of the varying distributions of ships and complicated underwater environment. This work characterizes low-frequency distant shipping noise observed in deep water environments as a function of receiver depth and vertical arrival

  19. Through a Mother’s Eyes: Sources of Bias When Mothers with Co-occurring Disorders Assess Their Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen M. Hennigan; Maura O’Keefe; Chanson D. Noether; Deborah J. Rinehart; Lisa A. Russell

    2006-01-01

    Mothers are the principal informants on children’s emotional and behavioral functioning. Maternal assessments of child functioning\\u000a can be influenced by a mother’s own psychological state. The magnitude and valence of distortion in maternal assessments associated\\u000a with current maternal mental health and substance abuse symptoms were explored in a clinical sample of 253 mothers with co-occurring\\u000a disorders and histories of trauma.

  20. Speckle noise reduction in SAR images ship detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ji; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Qingqing; Chen, Jingbo; Ren, Lin

    2012-09-01

    At present, there are two types of method to detect ships in SAR images. One is a direct detection type, detecting ships directly. The other is an indirect detection type. That is, it firstly detects ship wakes, and then seeks ships around wakes. The two types all effect by speckle noise. In order to improve the accuracy of ship detection and get accurate ship and ship wakes parameters, such as ship length, ship width, ship area, the angle of ship wakes and ship outline from SAR images, it is extremely necessary to remove speckle noise in SAR images before data used in various SAR images ship detection. The use of speckle noise reduction filter depends on the specification for a particular application. Some common filters are widely used in speckle noise reduction, such as the mean filter, the median filter, the lee filter, the enhanced lee filter, the Kuan filter, the frost filter, the enhanced frost filter and gamma filter, but these filters represent some disadvantages in SAR image ship detection because of the various types of ship. Therefore, a mathematical function known as the wavelet transform and multi-resolution analysis were used to localize an SAR ocean image into different frequency components or useful subbands, and effectively reduce the speckle in the subbands according to the local statistics within the bands. Finally, the analysis of the statistical results are presented, which demonstrates the advantages and disadvantages of using wavelet shrinkage techniques over standard speckle filters.

  1. When Should a Mother Avoid Breastfeeding?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases and Conditions When should a mother avoid breastfeeding? Health professionals agree that human milk provides the ... to Strategies to Support Breastfeeding Mothers and Babies Breastfeeding Information for Families Breastfeeding Hotline The HHS Office ...

  2. Working Mothers and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Margaret

    1970-01-01

    Discusses possible ways of providing continuity of care for young children of working mothers, including industry - sponsored day nurseries, cooperative nursery schools, communal clusters where working and nonworking women share household tasks and child care, and expanded neighborhood day care. (MG)

  3. Problems Faced by Single Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nidhi Kotwal; Bharti Prabhakar

    The role of single parent is challenging one especially when the family is headed by a women. Problem of single mother are linked with the up bringing of children, their future and setting down in life. Till the time children get married and or get jobs they are dependent on the single parent. After that the problems are considerably reduced.

  4. Academic Mothers: Exploring Disciplinary Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf-Wendel, Lisa; Ward, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    In this article we explore the role of academic discipline on the careers of tenure-line faculty women with children. Longitudinal, qualitative findings show that disciplinary contexts and ideal worker norms shape what it means to be an academic and a mother. Even after achieving tenure, ideal worker norms affect these roles; professional…

  5. A Letter to My Mother.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daisley, Margaret

    In a letter to her mother, herself a former English teacher, a teaching assistant details impressions of her first year in the Writing Program at the University of Massachusetts (Amherst). During a semester an instructor gets to know writing students individually in a way that pierces deeply through the veneer of stereotype. The class published…

  6. Parenting Education for Incarcerated Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennon, Suzanne S.; Mackintosh, Virginia H.; Myers, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    A parenting curriculum developed for incarcerated mothers was evaluated using a pretest, posttest, follow-up design with 57 women incarcerated in state prisons. Developmental psychologists delivered a 12-session curriculum focused on parenting issues unique to incarcerated parents. Each class met for 2 hours and followed a prepared curriculum that…

  7. Like Mother, Like Child - Inheritance

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-04-05

    Thirty-seventh monthly installment of our "What A Year!" website project, introducing life science breakthroughs to middle and high school students and their teachers. Can a mother's experiences affect the memory of her future children? Harkening back in some ways to the Lamarckian idea of "soft inheritance," recent research seems to confirm that there is some transmissibility.

  8. Mother-Son Relationships of Juvenile Felons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott W. Henggeler; Cindy L. Hanson; Charles M. Borduin; Sylvia M. Watson; Molly A. Brunk

    1985-01-01

    The mother-son relationships of juvenile felons were examined. Subjects were 67 mother-son dyads from father-absent families and were divided into three groups: violent felon, nonviolent felon, and normal control. During the assessment session, mothers and sons completed self-report inventories and engaged in an interaction task that was audiorecorded. Consistent with prior research, mother-son relationships in families with juvenile offenders were

  9. An assessment of simplified methods to determine damage from ship-to-ship collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, M.B.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1996-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is studying the safety of shipping, radioactive materials (RAM) by sea, the SeaRAM project (McConnell, et al. 1995), which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The project is concerned with the potential effects of ship collisions and fires on onboard RAM packages. Existing methodologies are being assessed to determine their adequacy to predict the effect of ship collisions and fires on RAM packages and to estimate whether or not a given accident might lead to a release of radioactivity. The eventual goal is to develop a set of validated methods, which have been checked by comparison with test data and/or detailed finite element analyses, for predicting the consequences of ship collisions and fires. These methods could then be used to provide input for overall risk assessments of RAM sea transport. The emphasis of this paper is on methods for predicting- effects of ship collisions.

  10. How having boys could shorten a mother's lifespan: They put more strain on their mother's

    E-print Network

    Lummaa, Virpi

    to mothers by their daughters. But Dr Helle suggested that similar effects would be unlikely to be seenHow having boys could shorten a mother's lifespan: They put more strain on their mother's body of mothers have always known ­ having boys may shorten your lifespan. Researchers found that women who had

  11. Mothers' Representations of Relationships With Their Children: Relations With Mother Characteristics and Feeding Sensitivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Messina Sayre; Robert C. Pianta; Robert S. Marvin; Elizabeth W. Saft

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To examine parenting representations and feeding interactions of mothers and their children with cerebral palsy (CP) and the extent to which mothers' representations predict their feeding behavior beyond other mother and child characteristics. Methods: Fifty-eight mothers of children with mild to severe CP ages 16to 52 months were interviewed with an adapted form of the Parent Development Interview (PDI).

  12. Song 12, 'A Song for Mother'

    E-print Network

    Hu Qianma

    This song is about missing one’s mother and says, “My mother is so great that I can’t prevent myself from thinking about her. Although there are so many things distracting me, I can’t forget my mother. I should take care of her. She is the most...

  13. Exploring Behavioral Intentions among Young Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turney, Howard M.; Conway, Pat; Plummer, Pam; Adkins, Samuel E.; Hudson, George Cliff; McLeod, David A.; Zafaroni, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between young mothers' individual characteristics (demographics and self-efficacy), social support, and behavioral intentions regarding education and child bearing. Using a home visiting model, the program recruited 141 teen mothers to participate. Young mothers completed an initial assessment, measuring…

  14. Incest Survivor Mothers: Protecting the Next Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreklewetz, Christine M.; Piotrowski, Caroline C.

    1998-01-01

    A study involving 16 incest-survivor mothers with daughters between the ages of 9-14 found the mothers described themselves as very protective and often overly-protective parents, wanting to parent differently, and better, than they were parented. Many survivors strive to be the "perfect mother" including over-protecting and over-nurturing…

  15. Mothers' Coping and Hope in Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einav, Michal; Levi, Uzi; Margalit, Malka

    2012-01-01

    The goals of the study were to examine the relations between maternal coping and hope among mothers who participated in early intervention program for their infants. Earlier studies focused attention on mothers' experiences of stress and their coping. Within the salutogenic construct, we aim at examining relations between mothers' coping and hope…

  16. College Students' Positivity toward Teen Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    Although teen pregnancy and parenthood are more visible in society than in the past, teen mothers are often stereotyped and stigmatized. The study examined positivity toward teen mothers among college students (N = 316) at a midwestern university. Although students responded positively to some items regarding teen mothers, other statements showed…

  17. Mothers' Judgment in Moments of Anger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dix, Theodore; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The influence of anger on mothers' judgments of children and socialization was examined in a 5-week study of 48 mothers of 6- to 8-year-old children. Findings provided evidence that angry mothers expect their children to act more negatively, thereby supporting the proposal that anger may negatively bias parents' reactions. (SH)

  18. 75 FR 26875 - Mother's Day, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ...grandmother, or a guardian. Mother's Day gives us an opportunity...As we honor today's mothers, we also reflect upon...us. The Congress, by a joint resolution approved...in May each year as ``Mother's Day'' and requested...us express our deepest love and thanks to our...

  19. Accelerated immunosenescence in preindustrial twin mothers

    E-print Network

    Lummaa, Virpi

    Accelerated immunosenescence in preindustrial twin mothers Samuli Helle* , Virpi Lummaa , and Jukka Finland between 1702 and 1859. We found that mothers delivering twins had reduced postreproductive survival after age 65. This effect arose because mothers of twins had a higher probability of succumbing

  20. Radiative Forcing Over Ocean by Ship Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Wilcox, E.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -0.00014 plus or minus 53% Watts per square meter assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size of greater than or equal to 100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Watts per square meter), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

  1. MotherJones.com: The Mother Jones 400

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    Using data from the Federal Election Commission which was compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics (CRP) (see the July 10, 1999 Scout Report), Mother Jones has put together an eye-opening Website which reveals the nation's top 400 financial political contributors and what they may be expecting for their contributions. Users may browse the list of contributors by industry or individual donor rank or search by donor, state, industry, party, or recipient. The rankings include donor name, amount given and to whom, their rank in 1998, and their industry. This information is interesting and useful, but it is also available elsewhere. The real value of the Mother Jones 400 lies in its profiles of the donors and the industry summaries, which are an excellent resource for learning about the various individuals, not always well known, who influence government policy and legislation with their donations and personal relationships with our representatives.

  2. Automatic Classification Of Infrared Ship Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovar, Joseph J.; Knecht, John; Chenoweth, Darrell

    1981-12-01

    The Naval Weapons Center (NWC) is currently developing automatic target classification systems for future surveillance and attack aircraft and missile seekers. Target classification has been identified as a critical operational capability which should be included on new Navy aircraft and missile developments or systems undergoing significant modifications. The objective for the Automatic Classification Infrared Ship Imagery System is to provide the following new capablities for surveillance and attack aircraft and antiship missiles: near real-time automatic classification of ships in day and night at long standoff ranges with a wide area coverage imaging infrared sensor. The sensor applies classical pattern recognition technology to automatically classify ships using Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) images. Automatic Classification of Infrared Ship Imagery is based on the extraction of features which uniquely describe the classes of ships. These features are used in conjunction with decision rules which are established during a training phase. Conventional classification techniques require labeled samples of all expected targets, threats and non-threats for this training phase. To overcome the resulting need for the collection of an immense data base, NWC developed a Generalized Classifier which, in the training phase, requires signals only from the targets of interest, such as high value combatant threats. In the testing phase, the signals from the combatants are classified and signals from other ships, which are sufficiently different from the training data, are classified as "other" targets. This technique provides a considerable savings in computer processing time, in memory requirements and data collection efforts. Since sufficient IIR images of the appropriate quality and quantity were not available for investigating automatic IIR ship classification, TV images of ship models were used for an initial feasibility demonstration. The initial investigation made use of the experience gained with preprocessing and classifying ROR and ISAR data. For this reason, the most expedient method was to collapse the 2-dimensional TV ship images onto the longitudinal axis by summing the amplitude data in the vertical ship axis. The resulting 128 point 1-dimensional profiles show the silhouette of the ship and bear an obvious similarity with the radar data. Based on that observation, a 128 point Fourier transform was computed and the ten low order squared amplitudes of the complex Fourier coefficients were then used as feature vectors for the Generalized Classifier. In contrast to the radar data, the size of TV or IIR images of ships changes as a function of range. It is therefore necessary to develop feature extraction algorithms which are scale invariant. The central moments, which have scale and rotational invariant properties were therefore implemented. This method was suggested in 1962 by M. K. Hu (IRE Transactions on Information Theory). Using the moments alone resulted in unsatisfactory classification performance and indicated that edge enhancement was necessary and that the background needed to be rejected. The images were therefore processed with the Sobel nonlinear edge enhancement algorithm, which also has the desirable property that it works for images with low signal-to-noise ratios and poorly defined edges. Satisfactory results were obtained. In another experiment, the feature vector was composed of the five lower-order invariant moments and the five lower-order FFT coefficient squared magnitudes, excluding the zero frequency coefficient. This paper will describe the data base, the processing and classification techniques, discuss the results and addresses the topic of "Processing of Images and Data Optical Sensors."

  3. Ship information system: overview and research trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng; Xing, Bowen; Li, Bing; Gu, Mingming

    2014-09-01

    Ship Information Systems (SISs) have been one of the main research focuses in ship design and become a multidisciplinary area. With these growing research trends, it is important to consolidate the latest knowledge and information to keep up with the research needs. In this paper, the SIS and its different forms are introduced and discussed. The beginning of this paper discusses the history and evolution of SIS. The next part of this paper focuses on different fields and research areas such as networking technology, information fusion, information decision, message display, ship control in real-time SISs. A Semi-Physical Simulation Platform (SPSIM) designed for SIS research and its running effect through a new Fuzzy-PID fusion algorithm are introduced in this paper then. A brief literature survey and possible future direction concerning each topic is included

  4. The superconducting MHD-propelled ship YAMATO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sasakawa, Yohei; Takezawa, Setsuo; Sugawara, Yoshinori; Kyotani, Yoshihiro

    1995-04-01

    In 1985 the Ship & Ocean Foundation (SOF) created a committee under the chairmanship of Mr. Yohei Sasakawa, Former President of the Ship & Ocean Foundation, and began researches into superconducting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ship propulsion. In 1989 SOF set to construction of a experimental ship on the basis of theoretical and experimental researches pursued until then. The experimental ship named YAMATO-1 became the world`s first superconducting MHD-propelled ship on her trial runs in June 1992. This paper describes the outline of the YAMATO-1 and sea trial test results.

  5. The superconducting MHD-propelled ship YAMATO-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasakawa, Yohei; Takezawa, Setsuo; Sugawara, Yoshinori; Kyotani, Yoshihiro

    1995-04-01

    In 1985 the Ship & Ocean Foundation (SOF) created a committee under the chairmanship of Mr. Yohei Sasakawa, Former President of the Ship & Ocean Foundation, and began researches into superconducting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ship propulsion. In 1989 SOF set to construction of a experimental ship on the basis of theoretical and experimental researches pursued until then. The experimental ship named YAMATO-1 became the world's first superconducting MHD-propelled ship on her trial runs in June 1992. This paper describes the outline of the YAMATO-1 and sea trial test results.

  6. The superconducting MHD-propelled ship YAMATO-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasakawa, Yohei; Takezawa, Setsuo; Sugawara, Yoshinori; Kyotani, Yoshihiro

    1995-01-01

    In 1985 the Ship & Ocean Foundation (SOF) created a committee under the chairmanship of Mr. Yohei Sasakawa, Former President of the Ship & Ocean Foundation, and began researches into superconducting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ship propulsion. In 1989 SOF set to construction of a experimental ship on the basis of theoretical and experimental researches pursued until then. The experimental ship named YAMATO-1 became the world's first superconducting MHD-propelled ship on her trial runs in June 1992. This paper describes the outline of the YAMATO-1 and sea trial test results.

  7. Eighteenth-century merchant ship interiors

    E-print Network

    Renner, Mary Anne

    1987-01-01

    and Yorktown, Cornwallis deemed the latter the only defendable port of the three. Cornwallis' fleet of 50-60 ships, mostly merchant vessels, arrived in Yorktown on August 1, 1781. Cornwallis promptly removed most of the cannon and men from his ships... Comte de Grasse. On September 5, the Battle of the Capes ensued, a brief engagement which damaged the British fleet sufficiently to force its return to New York. This retreat in early September, 1781, left the French in control of the Chesapeake Bay...

  8. 5.G Battle Ship Using Grid Paper

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Materials The students will need grid paper and colored pencils; some color for the ships and (for example) red for explosions on their ships and their...

  9. Ship trim optimization: assessment of influence of trim on resistance of MOERI container ship.

    PubMed

    Sherbaz, Salma; Duan, Wenyang

    2014-01-01

    Environmental issues and rising fuel prices necessitate better energy efficiency in all sectors. Shipping industry is a stakeholder in environmental issues. Shipping industry is responsible for approximately 3% of global CO? emissions, 14-15% of global NO(X) emissions, and 16% of global SO(X) emissions. Ship trim optimization has gained enormous momentum in recent years being an effective operational measure for better energy efficiency to reduce emissions. Ship trim optimization analysis has traditionally been done through tow-tank testing for a specific hullform. Computational techniques are increasingly popular in ship hydrodynamics applications. The purpose of this study is to present MOERI container ship (KCS) hull trim optimization by employing computational methods. KCS hull total resistances and trim and sinkage computed values, in even keel condition, are compared with experimental values and found in reasonable agreement. The agreement validates that mesh, boundary conditions, and solution techniques are correct. The same mesh, boundary conditions, and solution techniques are used to obtain resistance values in different trim conditions at Fn = 0.2274. Based on attained results, optimum trim is suggested. This research serves as foundation for employing computational techniques for ship trim optimization. PMID:24578649

  10. Ship Trim Optimization: Assessment of Influence of Trim on Resistance of MOERI Container Ship

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenyang

    2014-01-01

    Environmental issues and rising fuel prices necessitate better energy efficiency in all sectors. Shipping industry is a stakeholder in environmental issues. Shipping industry is responsible for approximately 3% of global CO2 emissions, 14-15% of global NOX emissions, and 16% of global SOX emissions. Ship trim optimization has gained enormous momentum in recent years being an effective operational measure for better energy efficiency to reduce emissions. Ship trim optimization analysis has traditionally been done through tow-tank testing for a specific hullform. Computational techniques are increasingly popular in ship hydrodynamics applications. The purpose of this study is to present MOERI container ship (KCS) hull trim optimization by employing computational methods. KCS hull total resistances and trim and sinkage computed values, in even keel condition, are compared with experimental values and found in reasonable agreement. The agreement validates that mesh, boundary conditions, and solution techniques are correct. The same mesh, boundary conditions, and solution techniques are used to obtain resistance values in different trim conditions at Fn = 0.2274. Based on attained results, optimum trim is suggested. This research serves as foundation for employing computational techniques for ship trim optimization. PMID:24578649

  11. Mother's personality and infant temperament

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Macedo; M. Marques; S. Bos; B. R. Maia; T. Pereira; M. J. Soares; J. Valente; A. A. Gomes; V. Nogueira; M. H. Azevedo

    2011-01-01

    We examined if perfectionism and the perception of being an anxious person were associated with more negative infant temperament ratings by the mothers. 386 women (mean age=30.08; standard deviation=4.21) in their last trimester of pregnancy completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS), the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and an item about their perception of being or not an anxious person. The

  12. Job Displacement Among Single Mothers:

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jennie E.; Thomas, Juli Simon

    2015-01-01

    Given the recent era of economic upheaval, studying the effects of job displacement has seldom been so timely and consequential. Despite a large literature associating displacement with worker well-being, relatively few studies focus on the effects of parental displacement on child well-being, and fewer still focus on implications for children of single parent households. Moreover, notwithstanding a large literature on the relationship between single motherhood and children’s outcomes, research on intergenerational effects of involuntary employment separations among single mothers is limited. Using 30 years of nationally representative panel data and propensity score matching methods, we find significant negative effects of job displacement among single mothers on children’s educational attainment and social-psychological well-being in young adulthood. Effects are concentrated among older children and children whose mothers had a low likelihood of displacement, suggesting an important role for social stigma and relative deprivation in the effects of socioeconomic shocks on child well-being. PMID:25032267

  13. Mothers’ Part-time Employment: Associations with Mother and Family Well-being

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Cheryl; O’Brien, Marion

    2011-01-01

    The associations between mothers’ part-time employment and mother well-being, parenting, and family functioning were examined using seven waves of the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development data (N = 1,364), infancy through middle childhood. Concurrent comparisons were made between families in which mothers were employed part time and both those in which mothers were not employed and those in which mothers were employed full time. Using multivariate analysis of covariance with extensive controls, results indicated that mothers employed part time had fewer depressive symptoms during the infancy and preschool years and better self-reported health at most time points than did nonemployed mothers. Across the time span studied, mothers working part time tended to report less conflict between work and family than those working full time. During their children’s preschool years, mothers employed part time exhibited more sensitive parenting than did other mothers, and at school age were more involved in school and provided more learning opportunities than mothers employed full time. Mothers employed part time reported doing a higher proportion of child care and housework than mothers employed full time. Part-time employment appears to have some benefits for mothers and families throughout the child-rearing years. PMID:22004432

  14. Optimum Reset of Ship's Inertial Navigation System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. E. Bona; Robert J. Smay

    1966-01-01

    Optimum linear filter and control theory is applied to the practical problem of supplementing an inertial navigation system with discrete reference information. The information takes the form of position obtained from Loran C or Decca, for example, and occasional azimuth fixes obtained from star sightings. In particular, optimum use of this information is discussed for the Ship's Inertial Navigation System

  15. Evacuability of Passenger Ships at Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Vassalos; G. Christiansen; H. S. Kim; M. Bole; J. Majumder

    SUMMARY The term Evacuability (passenger evacuation performance capability) entails a wide range of capabilities encompassing evaluation of evacuation time, identification of potential bottlenecks, assessment of accommodation module layout, life saving appliances, passenger familiarisation with a ship's environment, crew training, effective evacuation procedures\\/strategies, intelligent decision support systems for crisis management and design\\/modification for ease of evacuation. From a technical point of

  16. Baby Birds for Sale Bird Shipping

    E-print Network

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    Home My ACCOUNT Nursery Baby Birds for Sale Bird Shipping Health Guarantee Reserve Deposits & Pymts Cages Clothing Designer Bags DNA Sexing FlightSuits & Leashes Food / Supplements Gift Items Jewelry behind the colors of parrots, describing on a molecular level what is responsible for their bright red

  17. Environmental Impact of Ship Hull Repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stavros Drakopoulos; Konstantinos Salonitis; George Tsoukantas; George Chryssolouris

    This study presents an environmental analysis of a number of cutting and joining processes taking place during the ship hull repair. These processes include Oxy-acetylene cutting, Plasma arc cutting, Shielded metal arc welding, Flux core arc welding and Submerged arc welding. The processes are modelled in terms of their environmental impact. The environmental-related inputs and outputs of each process are

  18. CRUISE REPORT NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    CRUISE REPORT NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer U.S. Law of the Sea Cruise to Map the Eastern Mendocino Ridge, Eastern Pacific Ocean CRUISE EX0903 May 5, to May 26, 2009 San Francisco, CA to San Francisco, CA....................................................................31 Table 5. Cruise Statistics

  19. NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson June 1527

    E-print Network

    Galveston, Texas on June 15 for its third research mission to study the Deepwater Horizon/BP oil spill samples show conditions that existed in an area before any impacts from the spill have occurred. The ship the wellhead to study the structure of the main plume of oil rising from the seafloor to the surface. Water

  20. Technique for ship\\/wake detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roskovensky; John K

    2012-01-01

    An automated ship detection technique includes accessing data associated with an image of a portion of Earth. The data includes reflectance values. A first portion of pixels within the image are masked with a cloud and land mask based on spectral flatness of the reflectance values associated with the pixels. A given pixel selected from the first portion of pixels

  1. Laser Assisted Forming for Ship Building

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Dearden; S. P. Edwardson

    Laser forming has become a viable process for the shaping of metallic components, as a means of rapid prototyping and of adjusting and aligning. The process is similar to the well established torch flame bending used on large sheet material in the ship building industry but a great deal more control of the final product can be achieved. This paper

  2. Response analysis of an automobile shipping container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, L.; Lee, S. H.; Johnstone, B.

    1973-01-01

    The design and development of automobile shipping containers to reduce enroute damage are discussed. Vibration tests were conducted to determine the system structural integrity. A dynamic analysis was made using NASTRAN and the results of the test and the analysis are compared.

  3. 46 CFR 310.4 - Training Ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...representatives of the School and the Administration...found in order, the School representative shall...costs incidental to the operation of the Training Ship...f) Cruises. The school shall submit the cruise...Repatriation and return to home port. The School...

  4. Cathodic protection of ships in brackish water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jari Aromaa; Antero Pehkonen; Olof Forsén

    2006-01-01

    The operation of ice-going vessels depends on the condition of the hull surface. Corrosion increases the roughness of ship hull, which increases drag and fuel consumption. The hull surface smoothness is maintained by using coatings and cathodic protection. The cold brackish water is different from ocean water as it has lower salt content, lower conductivity, and higher concentration of dissolved

  5. EFFECT OF SHIP NOISE ON SLEEP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Tamura; T. Kawada; Y. Sasazawa

    1997-01-01

    The effects of a steady sound level of 65 dB(A) from a diesel ship engine on nocturnal sleep were studied using polygraphic and subjective sleep parameters. Three healthy men, aged 29 to 33 years, participated in the experiment. Sleep polygrams and the sound level in a sleep laboratory were recorded for each subject for five exposure nights and five control

  6. Ship noise spectrum analysis based on HHT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhang Zhimeng; Liu Chenchen; Liu Bosheng

    2010-01-01

    Ship noise spectrum analysis by HHT is a new method and essential for underwater target recognition. In the process, the end swings and overshoots\\/undershoots exist during empirical mode decomposition. Analyzing the feature of the cubic spline interpolation and cubic Hermite polynomial interpolation, a new method was proposed which made use of cubic Hermite polynomial interpolation for envelopes fitting, and the

  7. Investigation of shipping accident injury severity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jinxian; Yang, Dong

    2015-03-01

    Shipping movements are operated in a complex and high-risk environment. Fatal shipping accidents are the nightmares of seafarers. With ten years' worldwide ship accident data, this study develops a binary logistic regression model and a zero-truncated binomial regression model to predict the probability of fatal shipping accidents and corresponding mortalities. The model results show that both the probability of fatal accidents and mortalities are greater for collision, fire/explosion, contact, grounding, sinking accidents occurred in adverse weather conditions and darkness conditions. Sinking has the largest effects on the increment of fatal accident probability and mortalities. The results also show that the bigger number of mortalities is associated with shipping accidents occurred far away from the coastal area/harbor/port. In addition, cruise ships are found to have more mortalities than non-cruise ships. The results of this study are beneficial for policy-makers in proposing efficient strategies to prevent fatal shipping accidents. PMID:25617776

  8. 31. Floating original Ship Canal draw (in background) to University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Floating original Ship Canal draw (in background) to University Heights location. New Ship Canal draw in foreground. June 1906 photograph. - University Heights Bridge, Spanning Harlem River at 207th Street & West Harlem Road, New York, New York County, NY

  9. 29 CFR 1915.165 - Ship's deck machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Ship's deck machinery. 1915.165 Section 1915.165...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems §...

  10. 7 CFR 945.9 - Ship or handle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 945.9 Ship or handle. Ship or...

  11. Optimal control theory applied to ship maneuvering in restricted waters

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Brian S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    Ship drivers have long understood that powerful interaction forces exist when ships operate in close proximity to rigid boundaries or other vessels. Controlling the effects of these forces has been traditionally handled ...

  12. 46 CFR 166.01 - Approval of nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...necessary to qualify the graduates for the rating of “qualified...respectively. (c) The school ships operated by...approved and their graduates, if meeting the...as such. (d) A graduate of any of those school ships, if...

  13. ShippingInfectious Substances, Genetically Modified Microorganisms, and Exempt Specimens

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    ShippingInfectious Substances, Genetically Modified Microorganisms, and Exempt Specimens Goods: Biological Substances, Category B (BSCB), Genetically Modified Microorganisms (GMMO) and Exempt · Individuals wishing to ship Biological Substances Category B (BSCB) and/or Genetically Modified

  14. Shipping : is it a high risk low return business?

    E-print Network

    Patitsas, Leon S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the risk and return characteristics of the shipping business. Shipping profitability and returns are evaluated and an analysis is performed to examine whether the returns are ...

  15. FINISHED CASTINGS ARE ONLY GROUND BEFORE THEY ARE SHIPPED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FINISHED CASTINGS ARE ONLY GROUND BEFORE THEY ARE SHIPPED TO CUSTOMERS WHO COMPLETE THE FINISHING IN THEIR OWN MACHINE SHOPS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Grinding & Shipping, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Ship Noise Evaluation Based On Segmented Decision Trees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose M. Fonseca; Fernando Moura-Pires

    1992-01-01

    Signature recognition can be useful in a wide range of applications. A decision tree method for ship noise classification is presented. Thie ship noise, once transposed to the frequency's domain through the application of a b\\

  17. 13.122 Ship Structural Analysis & Design, Spring 2003

    E-print Network

    Burke, David V.

    Ship longitudinal strength and hull primary stresses. Ship structural design concepts. Effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength. Transverse shear stresses in the hull girder. Torsional strength ...

  18. Environmental accounting for Arctic shipping - a framework building on ship tracking data from satellites.

    PubMed

    Mjelde, A; Martinsen, K; Eide, M; Endresen, O

    2014-10-15

    Arctic shipping is on the rise, leading to increased concern over the potential environmental impacts. To better understand the magnitude of influence to the Arctic environment, detailed modelling of emissions and environmental risks are essential. This paper describes a framework for environmental accounting. A cornerstone in the framework is the use of Automatic Identification System (AIS) ship tracking data from satellites. When merged with ship registers and other data sources, it enables unprecedented accuracy in modelling and geographical allocation of emissions and discharges. This paper presents results using two of the models in the framework; emissions of black carbon (BC) in the Arctic, which is of particular concern for climate change, and; bunker fuels and wet bulk carriage in the Arctic, of particular concern for oil spill to the environment. Using the framework, a detailed footprint from Arctic shipping with regards to operational emissions and potential discharges is established. PMID:25168183

  19. Designing container shipping network under changing demand and freight rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chao Chen; Qingcheng Zeng

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the optimization of container shipping network and its operations under changing cargo demand and freight rates. The problem is formulated as a mixed integer non?linear programming problem (MINP) with an objective of maximizing the average unit ship?slot profit at three stages using analytical methodology. The issues such as empty container repositioning, ship?slot allocating, ship sizing, and

  20. 29 CFR 1915.163 - Ship's piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ship's piping systems. 1915.163 Section 1915.163 Labor...SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems § 1915.163 Ship's piping systems. (a) Before work is performed on a...

  1. Descriptive Epidemiology of Injury and Illness Among Cruise Ship Passengers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dwight Edward Peake; Charles Lanford Gray; Melissa Renee Ludwig; Carter Degen Hill

    1999-01-01

    Study objective: To provide information, which can be used in the formation of guidelines concerning medical facilities and staff on cruise ships, on the descriptive epidemiology of the medical conditions encountered by cruise ship physicians. Methods: A retrospective descriptive epidemiologic study design was used to evaluate patient physician encounters on cruises originating in a calendar-year period for the 4 ships

  2. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Additional requirements-cruise ships. 104.295 Section 104.295...104.295 Additional requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the following:...

  3. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Additional requirements-cruise ships. 104.295 Section 104.295...104.295 Additional requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the following:...

  4. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Additional requirements-cruise ships. 104.295 Section 104.295...104.295 Additional requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the following:...

  5. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Additional requirements-cruise ships. 104.295 Section 104.295...104.295 Additional requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the following:...

  6. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Additional requirements-cruise ships. 104.295 Section 104.295...104.295 Additional requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the following:...

  7. Pollution control: utility ships adapt for spill cleanups

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    A practical and cost effective approach to oil spill cleanup is being undertaken by Dutch companies. The approach involves constructing and equipping multi-use ships for pollution control. Usually, these ships are maintained in another type of service and come into use for spill cleanup only when needed. The use of these ships in pollution control is discussed.

  8. VELOS: A VR platform for ship-evacuation analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. I. Ginnis; K. V. Kostas; C. G. Politis; P. D. Kaklis

    2010-01-01

    “Virtual Environment for Life On Ships” (VELOS) is a multi-user Virtual Reality (VR) system that aims to support designers to assess (early in the design process) passenger and crew activities on a ship for both normal and hectic conditions of operations and to improve ship design accordingly. This article focuses on presenting the novel features of VELOS related to both

  9. Service contracts, rate discounting, and the future of shipping conferences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard E. Neel; Carl W. Gooding

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the impact of service contracts and rate discounting on the future of ocean linear shipping conferences. As a result of increased competition between ocean liner conference carriers and nonconference carriers and excess shipping capacity in the ocean liner container industry, conference carriers on many shipping lanes are engaging in rate discounting and

  10. 47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

  11. 47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

  12. 47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

  13. 47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

  14. 47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

  15. The maximum shipping capacity of the Suez Canal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Griffiths; Emtissal M. Hassan

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the determination of the maximum shipping capacity of the Suez canal. Initially, some assumptions are made in order to calculate the ‘theoretical’ maximum capacity in terms of ‘standard ships’. This last term defines ships which transit the Canal at a given speed and at a given time interval from the vessel ahead and astern. Data has been

  16. 47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipment—General. This...

  17. 47 CFR 80.1085 - Ship radio equipment-General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-General. 80.1085 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...for Ship Stations § 80.1085 Ship radio equipment—General. This...

  18. 47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...and marine utility stations on board ships are authorized to communicate...the ship or to any person on board. (2) Every ship...another station. All such radio messages must be preceded by the safety...mobile service. Whenever such messages or communications have...

  19. 47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...and marine utility stations on board ships are authorized to communicate...the ship or to any person on board. (2) Every ship...another station. All such radio messages must be preceded by the safety...mobile service. Whenever such messages or communications have...

  20. 47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...and marine utility stations on board ships are authorized to communicate...the ship or to any person on board. (2) Every ship...another station. All such radio messages must be preceded by the safety...mobile service. Whenever such messages or communications have...

  1. 47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...and marine utility stations on board ships are authorized to communicate...the ship or to any person on board. (2) Every ship...another station. All such radio messages must be preceded by the safety...mobile service. Whenever such messages or communications have...

  2. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view of Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (left) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (right) on the Arctic Ocean. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This was during a scientific expedition to map the ...

  3. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (bottom left) stopped in the Arctic Ocean as Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (top right) comes alongside it. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This was durin...

  4. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (left) and Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (right) on the Arctic Ocean. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This was during a scientific expedition to map the ...

  5. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view of Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (top) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (bottom) on the Arctic Ocean. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This was during a scientific expedition to map the ...

  6. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view of Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (top) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (bottom) on the Arctic Ocean. Louis is approaching Healy to come alongside it. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. Th...

  7. U.S. and Canadian Ships in Arctic Ocean

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopter view Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent (left) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy (right) on the Arctic Ocean. You can see the bubbler system working on Louis. The ships are coming together because the crews are planning to meet and learn the operations of the other ship. This ...

  8. Ship noise and cortisol secretion in European freshwater fishes

    E-print Network

    Ladich, Friedrich

    Ship noise and cortisol secretion in European freshwater fishes Lidia Eva Wysocki*, John P. Dittami October 2005 Accepted 11 October 2005 Available online 28 November 2005 Keywords: Fish Ship noise Stress addressed the effects of ship noise and continuous Gaussian noise on adrenal activity in three European

  9. POSSIBLE STEPS TOWARDS REDUCING IMPACTS OF SHIPPING NOISE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russell Leaper; Martin Renilson; Veronica Frank; Vassili Papastavrou

    Concerns about increases in offshore ambient noise due to commercial shipping have resulted in a work program by the International Maritime Organization to develop technical guidelines to reduce shipping noise. Targets to reduce the contribution from shipping noise to ambient noise have also been endorsed by the IWC Scientific Committee. At frequencies below 300Hz, the underwater noise signature from large

  10. Beam forming on bottom-interacting tow-ship noise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WILLIAM A. KUPERMAN; MICHAEL F. WERBY; KENNETH E. GILBERT; GERARD J. TANGO

    1985-01-01

    Ship noise received on a horizontal array towed behind the ship is shown to be useful as a potentially diagnostic tool for estimating local acoustic bottom properties. In numerical simulations, tow-ship noise which bounces off the bottom is processed on a beamformer that shows the arrival angles; the beamformer output is readily interpreted by relating it to the Green's function

  11. 33 CFR 169.125 - What classes of ships are required to make reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.125 What classes of ships are required to make reports? Each self-propelled ship of 300 gross tons or...

  12. 33 CFR 169.130 - When are ships required to make reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.130 When are ships required to make reports? Participating ships must report to the shore-based authority...

  13. 33 CFR 169.125 - What classes of ships are required to make reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.125 What classes of ships are required to make reports? Each self-propelled ship of 300 gross tons or...

  14. 33 CFR 169.130 - When are ships required to make reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.130 When are ships required to make reports? Participating ships must report to the shore-based authority...

  15. 33 CFR 169.130 - When are ships required to make reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.130 When are ships required to make reports? Participating ships must report to the shore-based authority...

  16. 33 CFR 169.125 - What classes of ships are required to make reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.125 What classes of ships are required to make reports? Each self-propelled ship of 300 gross tons or...

  17. 33 CFR 169.125 - What classes of ships are required to make reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.125 What classes of ships are required to make reports? Each self-propelled ship of 300 gross tons or...

  18. 33 CFR 169.130 - When are ships required to make reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.130 When are ships required to make reports? Participating ships must report to the shore-based authority...

  19. 33 CFR 169.130 - When are ships required to make reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.130 When are ships required to make reports? Participating ships must report to the shore-based authority...

  20. 33 CFR 169.125 - What classes of ships are required to make reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...SAFETY SHIP REPORTING SYSTEMS Establishment of Two Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems for the Protection of Northern Right Whales § 169.125 What classes of ships are required to make reports? Each self-propelled ship of 300 gross tons or...

  1. 76 FR 76811 - Stakeholders Meeting Regarding Ready Reserve Force (RRF) Ship Manager Contract Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ...Regarding Ready Reserve Force (RRF) Ship Manager Contract Program AGENCY: Maritime Administration...consideration of possible changes to the Ship Manager Contract requirements for maintaining...12-ship award limit. Definition of Ship Manager ``business entity''....

  2. Mothers' speech in three social classes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Snow; A. Arlman-Rupp; Y. Hassing; J. Jobse; J. Joosten; J. Vorster

    1976-01-01

    Functional and linguistic aspects of the speech of Dutch-speaking mothers from three social classes to their 2-year-old children were studied. Mothers' speech in Dutch showed the same characteristics of simplicity and redundancy found in other languages. In a free play situation, both academic and lower middle class mothers produced more expansions and used fewer imperatives, more substantive deixis, and fewer

  3. Patronesses and “mothers” of Roman collegia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily Hemelrijk

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the meaning and function of the titles “patroness” and “mother” of collegia in Italy and the Latin-speaking provinces of the Roman Empire in the Wrst three centuries ce. It is investigated why some collegia co-opted female patrons or appointed “mothers.” What was expected from these women and was there any diVerence between a “mother” and a patroness

  4. Contribution of ship traffic to aerosol particle concentrations downwind of a major shipping lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivekäs, N.; Massling, A.; Grythe, H.; Lange, R.; Rusnak, V.; Carreno, S.; Skov, H.; Swietlicki, E.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Glasius, M.; Kristensson, A.

    2014-08-01

    Particles in the atmosphere are of concern due to their toxic properties and effects on climate. In coastal areas, ship emissions can be a significant anthropogenic source. In this study we investigated the contribution from ship emissions to the total particle number and mass concentrations at a remote location. We studied the particle number concentration (12 to 490 nm in diameter), the mass concentration (12 to 150 nm in diameter) and number and volume size distribution of aerosol particles in ship plumes for a period of 4.5 months at Høvsøre, a coastal site on the western coast of Jutland in Denmark. During episodes of western winds, the site is about 50 km downwind of a major shipping lane and the plumes are approximately 1 hour old when they arrive at the site. We have used a sliding percentile-based method for separating the plumes from the measured background values and to calculate the ship plume contribution to the total particle number and PM0.15 mass concentration (mass of particles below 150 nm in diameter, converted from volume assuming sphericity) at the site. The method is not limited to particle number or volume concentration, but can also be used for different chemical species in both particle and gas phase. The total number of analyzed ship plumes was 726, covering on average 19% of the time when air masses were arriving at the site over the shipping lane. During the periods when plumes were present, the particle concentration exceeded the background values on average by 790 cm-3 by number and 0.10 ?g m-3 by mass. The corresponding daily average values were 170 cm-3 and 0.023 ?g m-3, respectively. This means that the ship plumes contributed between 11 and 19% to the particle number concentration and between 9 and 18% to PM0.15 during days when air was arriving over the shipping lane. The estimated annual contribution from ship plumes, where all wind directions were included, was in the range of 5-8% in particle number concentration and 4-8% in PM0.15.

  5. Creating Mother: Mother's Legacies in the Context of the Conduct Literature of Seventeenth-Century England

    E-print Network

    Morales, Cecilia Ann

    2013-02-04

    This thesis, focusing on seventeenth-century English writers, examines the genre of Mothers’ Legacies in relation to the conduct literature being written around the same time. It discusses the manner in which the women writers of Mothers’ Legacies...

  6. Social class, anxieties and mothers' foodwork.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jan; Maher, JaneMaree; Tanner, Claire

    2015-03-01

    In the context of concerns about childhood obesity, mothers are placed at the forefront of responsibility for shaping the eating behaviour and consequently the health of their young children. This is evident in a multitude of diverse sites such as government reports, health promotion materials, reality TV shows and the advice of childcare nurses and preschools. These sites produce a range of resources available to mothers to draw on to constitute themselves as mothers in terms of caring for their children's health. Drawing on a qualitative study of mothers recruited through three Australian preschool centres, this article examines how the working-class and middle-class mothers of preschool-aged children engage with knowledge about motherhood, children and health and how those engagements impact on their mothering, their foodwork and their children. We argue that, unlike the working-class mothers pathologised in some literature on obesity, these working-class mothers demonstrated a no-nonsense (but still responsibilised) approach to feeding their children. The middle-class mothers, on the other hand, were more likely to engage in practices of self-surveillance and to demonstrate considerable anxieties about the appropriateness of their practices for their children's current and future health. PMID:25677342

  7. GENERAL: Signal Analysis by New Mother Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jin-Bo; Fan, Hong-Yi; Qi, Kai-Guo

    2009-06-01

    Based on the general formula for finding qualified mother wavelets [Opt. Lett. 31 (2006) 407] we make wavelet transforms computed with the newly found mother wavelets (characteristic of the power 2n) for some optical Gaussian pulses, which exhibit the ability to measure frequency of the pulse more precisely and clearly. We also work with complex mother wavelets composed of new real mother wavelets, which offer the ability of obtaining phase information of the pulse as well as amplitude information. The analogy between the behavior of Hermite-Gauss beams and that of new wavelet transforms is noticed.

  8. Mothers in prison: maintaining connections with children.

    PubMed

    Mignon, Sylvia I; Ransford, Paige

    2012-01-01

    The significant increase in the number of incarcerated women ensures that many children must live without their mothers for some period of time. Women in prison were interviewed about their efforts to maintain relationships with their children. Mail and telephone contacts were more frequent than actual visits. Almost one half of mothers had never received a visit from their children. This article identifies challenges to the development and maintenance of contact between incarcerated mothers and their children. Recommendations are made for correctional agencies to enhance opportunities for incarcerated mothers to foster positive connections with their children. PMID:22239379

  9. a Comparison Between Chemically Dependent Mothers and Drug-Free Mothers: Lifestyle during the Perinatal Period

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lila Milica Uskokovic

    1990-01-01

    This study compared maternal lifestyle variables pertinent to the perinatal period in groups of chemically dependent mothers and drug-free mothers. Twenty-nine cocaine -abusing mothers were compared to 29 drug-free mothers carefully matched on age, race, education, and primipara versus multipara status. The drug history of each chemically dependent woman was explicitly documented. The chemically dependent group was subdivided into two

  10. A review of mother–child relational interventions and their usefulness for mothers with schizophrenia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming Wai Wan; Steff Moulton; Kathryn M. Abel

    2008-01-01

    This review evaluates empirical studies that have attempted to improve observed mother–infant relationships in order to inform\\u000a a potential approach for mothers with schizophrenia, a growing group of vulnerable families where mothers are known to have\\u000a relational difficulties. Parenting intervention studies in: (1) mothers with a mental disorder; (2) other vulnerable groups\\u000a were reviewed. Only interventions that empirically evaluated observations

  11. DEPLOYMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.

    2013-10-10

    A new Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) was designed by the Savannah River National Laboratory to be a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The BTSP was certified by the National Nuclear Safety Administration in 2011 for shipments of up to 150 grams of Tritium. Thirty packages were procured and are being delivered to various DOE sites for operational use. This paper summarizes the design features of the BTSP, as well as associated engineered material improvements. Fabrication challenges encountered during production are discussed as well as fielding requirements. Current approved tritium content forms (gas and tritium hydrides), are reviewed, as well as, a new content, tritium contaminated water on molecular sieves. Issues associated with gas generation will also be discussed.

  12. Worry and its correlates onboard cruise ships.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Katharina; Larsen, Svein; Marnburg, Einar; Øgaard, Torvald

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined job-specific worry, as well as possible predictors of such worry, namely job-specific self-efficacy and supervisor dispositionism. 133 non-supervising crew members at different departments onboard upmarket cruise ships filled in a questionnaire during one of their journeys. Findings show that employees report moderate amounts of job-specific worry and the galley crew reports significantly greater amounts of worry than the other departments. Results also indicate that cruise ship crews worry somewhat more than workers in the land based service sector. Furthermore it was found that supervisor dispositionism, i.e. supervisors with fixed mindsets, was related to greater amounts of worry among the crew. Surprisingly, job-specific self-efficacy was unrelated to job-specific worry. PMID:23788226

  13. Technique for ship/wake detection

    DOEpatents

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-05-01

    An automated ship detection technique includes accessing data associated with an image of a portion of Earth. The data includes reflectance values. A first portion of pixels within the image are masked with a cloud and land mask based on spectral flatness of the reflectance values associated with the pixels. A given pixel selected from the first portion of pixels is unmasked when a threshold number of localized pixels surrounding the given pixel are not masked by the cloud and land mask. A spatial variability image is generated based on spatial derivatives of the reflectance values of the pixels which remain unmasked by the cloud and land mask. The spatial variability image is thresholded to identify one or more regions within the image as possible ship detection regions.

  14. H1616 Shipping Container Radiographic Inspection Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, D.G.

    1998-11-01

    The HI616 shipping container is a certified type B(U) packaging used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship tritium in support of defense programs. During the 1997 recertification of the container, DOE became concerned about the possible cracking of the polyurethane foam in the overpacks of the 2300 containers currently in service. In response, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) initiated a radiographic inspection program to determine if cracking of the foam was occurring in the H1616 overpacks. SNL developed the radiographic technique for inspecting the foam and contracted the Savannah River Site's Tritium Engineering division to inspect a representative sample of overpacks in service. This report details the development process and the results of all of the radiography performed both at SNL and Savannah River.

  15. Asbestos and Ship-Building: Fatal Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2008-01-01

    The severe bombing of Belfast in 1941 had far-reaching consequences. Harland and Wolff was crippled. The British Merchant Ship Building Mission to the USA was being constrained by the UK treasury. On being told of the Belfast destruction, the British Mission and the United States Maritime Commission were emboldened. The result was 2,710 Liberty Ships launched to a British design. The necessary asbestos use associated with this and other shipbuilding, after a quarter century or more latency, is a genesis of malignancy killing thousands. Reversal of studies on asbestos limitation of fire propagation was crucial to Allied strategic planning of mass-fires which resulted in the slaughter of one to two million civilians. Boston and Belfast institutions made seminal discoveries about asbestos use and its sequelae. PMID:18956802

  16. GOME-2 satellite observations of NOx emissions from ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Hilboll, Andreas; Zien, Achim; Burrows, John P.

    2010-05-01

    The volume of international shipping has been rapidly increasing over the last decades, and further increases are expected for the coming years. A large fraction of the shipping is close to coastal areas but for intercontinental transport, shipping routes also pass through the remote oceans. As the volume of transported goods is increasing, so is the amount of shipping related pollutant emissions into the marine boundary layer. As result of the lack of legislation on shipping emissions, in particular in international waters, in combination with substantial emission reductions for many land based sources, the relative importance of pollution from ships is increasing. Satellite observations of NO2 and HCHO by GOME and SCIAMACHY have been used to identify shipping emissions mainly in the Indian Ocean, where high vessel densities and low background pollution levels facilitate the detection of small signals. With the better spatial coverage of recent satellite instruments such as GOME-2 and OMI, the statistics improved and better detection limits can now be achieved. In this study, three years of GOME-2 data of NO2 have been systematically examined for shipping signals. Compared to previous studies, additional shipping tracks could be identified in the NO2 maps. Comparison with SCIAMACHY measurements shows interesting changes in the paths taken by the ships in the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean. The observed patterns in ship emissions will be discussed with respect to reported vessel densities and GOME-2 measurement uncertainties.

  17. Emotional References in Mother-Daughter and Mother-Son Dyads' Conversations about School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannagan, Dorothy; Perese, San

    1998-01-01

    Examined the emotional content of conversations of 100 mother-child dyads about the children's school experiences. Mother-daughter dyads made more emotional references than mother-son dyads, especially when discussing interpersonal relationships or emotions experienced by the daughters. Ethnic and socioeconomic differences are also discussed. (SLD)

  18. Sexual Health Discussions between African-American Mothers and Mothers of Latino Descent and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ashley; Ellis, Monica U.; Castellanos, Ted; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Sneed, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined approaches used by African-American mothers and mothers of Latino descent for informal sex-related discussions with their children to inform sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV intervention development efforts. We recruited mothers (of children aged 12-15) from youth service agencies and a university in southern California.…

  19. Mothers' Experiences with a Mother-Child Education Programme in Five Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekman, Sevda; Koçak, Aylin Atmaca

    2013-01-01

    Although previous quantitative studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of the mother-child education programme (MOCEP) that originated in Turkey in 1993, the study reported here uses a qualitative approach to gain an in-depth understanding of mothers' views of the outcomes of the programme. The study was conducted with 100 mothers from…

  20. Mothering Differently: Narratives of Mothers with Intellectual Disability Whose Children Have Been Compulsorily Removed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Rachel; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite the frequency with which mothers with intellectual disability have their children removed, little theoretical or empirical work has understood the mothers' perspectives on this. A few studies have reported mothers' feelings of grief and loss and their sense of powerlessness in the child protection system. Method: This…

  1. The Impact of Daughters' Eating Disorders in Mothers' Sense of Self: Contextualizing Mothering Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Marie L.; Lam, Eugenie

    2001-01-01

    Examines how daughters' anorexia influence the mothers' understandings of mothering and self within the greater context of societal influences. Using constructivist theory and discursive psychology, four themes characterized participants' relationship to cultural myths and discourses associated with eating disorders and mothering. (Contains 48…

  2. Adolescent mothers' relationships with their own mothers: impact on parenting outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Katie; Black, Maureen M; Boris, Neil W; Oberlander, Sarah E; Myers, Leann

    2011-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between mother-grandmother relationship quality and adolescent mothers' parenting behaviors using longitudinal multimethod, multi-informant data. Participants were 181 urban, African American adolescent mothers. Self-report data on mother-grandmother relationship conflict and depressive symptoms were collected after delivery and at 6-, 13-, and 24-month follow-up visits. Videotaped observations were used to measure mother-grandmother relationship quality at baseline. Mother-child interactions were videotaped at 6, 13, and 24 months to operationalize parenting. Mixed-model regression methods were used to investigate the relation between mother-grandmother relationships and mother-child interactions. Mother-grandmother relationship quality predicted both negative control and nurturing parenting. Mothers whose own mothers were more direct (both demanding and clear) and who reported low relationship conflict demonstrated low negative control in their parenting. Mothers who demonstrated high levels of individuation (a balance of autonomy and mutuality) and reported low relationship conflict showed high nurturing parenting. The implications of these findings for adolescent health and emotional development are discussed. PMID:21219072

  3. Weaving Dreamcatchers: Mothering among American Indian Women who were Teen Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Janelle F.; Strickland, Carolyn J.; Chesla, Catherine A.; Kennedy, Holly P.; Portillo, Carmen J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to explore the mothering experience and practice among reservation based adult American Indian women who had been adolescent mothers. Background Adolescent American Indian women are at an elevated risk for teen pregnancy and poor maternal/child outcomes. Identifying mothering practices among this population may help guide intervention development that will improve health outcomes. Design A collaborative orientation to community based participatory research approach. Methods Employing interpretive phenomenology, 30 adult American Indian women who resided on a Northwestern reservation were recruited. In-depth, face-to-face and telephone interviews were conducted between 2007 and 2008. Findings Women shared their mothering experience and practice which encompassed a lifespan perspective grounded in their American Indian cultural tradition. Four themes were identified: mother hen, interrupted mothering and second chances, breaking cycles and mothering a community. Mothering originated in childhood, extended across their lifespan and moved beyond mothering their biological offspring. Conclusion These findings challenge the Western construct of mothering and charge nurses to seek culturally sensitive interventions that reinforce positive mothering practices and identify when additional mothering support is needed across a woman’s lifespan. PMID:23713884

  4. Conversational Styles of Mothers with Different Value Priorities: Comparing Estonian Mothers in Estonia and Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulviste, Tiia; Kants, Luule

    2001-01-01

    Examines the conversational styles and value preferences of Estonian mothers living in Estonia and Sweden. Adolescents and their mothers were videotaped in their homes during mealtime. States that there are differences in conversational styles, explaining that mothers in Estonia are more concerned with controlling the behavior of adolescents. (CMK)

  5. Incarcerated Mothers Reports of Their Daughters' Antisocial Behavior, Maternal Supervision and Mother-Daughter Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence-Wills, Shonda

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the extent of delinquency and antisocial behavior among adolescent daughters of incarcerated mothers and the influence of the mother-daughter relationship and maternal supervision on daughters' participation in delinquency and antisocial behavior. One hundred and one incarcerated mothers completed survey questionnaires that…

  6. Cluster Analysis and Fuzzy Query in Ship Maintenance and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Jianhua; He, Qinming; Zhao, Yinggang; Qian, Feng; Chen, Qi

    Cluster analysis and fuzzy query win wide-spread applications in modern intelligent information processing. In allusion to the features of ship maintenance data, a variant of hypergraph-based clustering algorithm, i.e., Correlation Coefficient-based Minimal Spanning Tree(CC-MST), is proposed to analyze the bulky data rooting in ship maintenance process, discovery the unknown rules and help ship maintainers make a decision on various device fault causes. At the same time, revising or renewing an existed design of ship or device maybe necessary to eliminate those device faults. For the sake of offering ship designers some valuable hints, a fuzzy query mechanism is designed to retrieve the useful information from large-scale complicated and reluctant ship technical and testing data. Finally, two experiments based on a real ship device fault statistical dataset validate the flexibility and efficiency of the CC-MST algorithm. A fuzzy query prototype demonstrates the usability of our fuzzy query mechanism.

  7. Ship extraction and categorization from ASTER VNIR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Miliaresis, George

    2014-08-01

    We present a methodology for ship extraction and categorization from relatively low resolution multispectral ASTER imagery, corresponding to the sea region south east of Athens in Greece. At a first level, in the radiometrically corrected image, quad tree decomposition and bounding rectangular extraction automatically outline location of objects - possible ships, by statistically evaluating spectral responses throughout the segmented image. Subsequently, the object borders within the rectangular regions are extracted, while connected component labelling combined by size and shape filtering allows ship characterization. The ships' spectral signature is determined in green, red and infrared bands while cluster analysis allows the identification of ship categories on the basis of their size and reflectance. Additional pixel- based measures reveal estimated ship orientation, direction, movement, stability and turning. The results are complemented with additional geographic information and inference tools are formed towards the determination of probable ship type and its destination.

  8. A refined ship segmentation method in SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Kefeng; Xing, Xiangwei; Zhao, Zhi; Zou, Huanxin; Sun, Jixiang

    2013-10-01

    Precise segmentation is crucial for the feature extraction and classification of ships in SAR imagery. To alleviate the Doppler shift and the cross ambiguity, this paper propose to segment the ship area from its background based on the radon transform. Assuming that the region of interest (ROI) of ship in SAR imagery has been extracted, the detail procedures of the proposed refined segmentation can be summarized as follows. First, the ship's ROI image is transformed to radon domain, in which pixel intensities are cumulated along different directions. Then, the peak areas are separated to extract the ship's orientation and the main image area of the ship that orthogonal to the principal axis. Finally, the refined segmentation is achieved in the main image area. Experiments, accomplished over measured medium and high resolution SAR ship images, show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  9. WORLD SURFACE CURRENTS FROM SHIP'S DRIFT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, C.P.; Schladow, S.G.

    1980-11-01

    Over 4 million observations of ship's drift are on file at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Centre, in Washington, D. C., representing a vast amount of information on ocean surface currents. The observed drift speeds are dependent on the frequency of occurence of the particular current speeds and the frequency of observation. By comparing frequency of observation with the drift speeds observed it is possible to confirm known current patterns and detect singularities in surface currents.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic ship propulsion with superconducting magnets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Mitchell; D. U. Gubser

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ship propulsion using superconducting magnets is reviewed in light of recent advances in high-temperature superconductivity. The scaling relations for the electrical and hydraulic efficiencies of MHD pump-jets show that overall efficiencies >50% are feasible at speeds of 40 knots and higher provided that magnetic fields >5T can be maintained over volumes of the order of

  11. Methanol plant ship: Appendix. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-30

    The document is an appendix to the final report on a proposed methanol plant ship off of the coast of Trinidad. The document incorporates the results of the redetermination of capital required to implement the project. It also presents a revised cost analysis, with better accuracy, for the project. The projected operating revenues and revised expenses are also given. As a continuation of the information presented in the final report, the methanol market and proposed products are discussed in the report.

  12. HYDROFOIL DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION FOR FAST SHIPS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Besnard; Adeline Schmitz; Kalle Kaups; George Tzong; Hamid Hefazi; Orhan Kural; Hsun Chen; Tuncer Cebeci

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents a multi-discipli nary design\\/optimization method for the conceptual design of a hydrofoil based fast ship. The method is used to determine the maximum achievable lift-to-drag ratio (L\\/D) of an isolated foil-strut arrangement (hopefully greater than 50) at high transit speeds (greater than 75 knots) while lifting masses of 5,000 and 10,000 tons. First, the tools necessary for

  13. Light absorbing carbon emissions from commercial shipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lack, Daniel; Lerner, Brian; Granier, Claire; Baynard, Tahllee; Lovejoy, Edward; Massoli, Paola; Ravishankara, A. R.; Williams, Eric

    2008-07-01

    Extensive measurements of the emission of light absorbing carbon aerosol (LAC) from commercial shipping are presented. Vessel emissions were sampled using a photoacoustic spectrometer in the Gulf of Mexico region. The highest emitters (per unit fuel burnt) are tug boats, thus making significant contributions to local air quality in ports. Emission of LAC from cargo and non cargo vessels in this study appears to be independent of engine load. Shipping fuel consumption data (2001) was used to calculate a global LAC contribution of 133(+/-27) Ggyr-1, or ~1.7% of global LAC. This small fraction could have disproportionate effects on both air quality near port areas and climate in the Arctic if direct emissions of LAC occur in that region due to opening Arctic sea routes. The global contribution of this LAC burden was investigated using the MOZART model. Increases of 20-50 ng m-3 LAC (relative increases up to 40%) due to shipping occur in the tropical Atlantic, Indonesia, central America and the southern regions of South America and Africa.

  14. Geoacoustic inversion using ship noise received on the ship-towed line array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. C.; Yoo, Kwang; Fialkowski, Laurie

    2005-09-01

    There has been increased interest in geoacoustic inversion using a ship-towed line array including recent work by M. Siderius et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 11, 1523 (2002), D. J. Battle et al., IEEE J. Ocean Eng. 28, 454 (2003), and M. R. Fallat et al., IEEE J. Ocean Eng. 29, 78 (2004). One notes that bottom properties in the littoral oceans can vary substantially over a small spatial scale (a few kilometers). Using either manned noise or own ship noise received on the towed array, one can invert for the geoacoustic properties of the bottom under the ship. With the ship's mobility, one can potentially survey a large area in a short time. The problem is that geoacoustic inversion can have ambiguous solutions, namely, that often more than one solution can fit the data. For building a database, this method becomes useless if inconsistent solutions are obtained between measurements. In this paper, recent advances that lead to a reliable, consistent, and often unique solution using a signal with known waveform are reviewed. This is demonstrated with at-sea data and generalized to geoacoustic inversion using own ship noise. [Work supported by the U.S. ONR.

  15. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    ScienceCinema

    Ritchie, Robert

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

  16. Egyptian Moslem Mothers and their Leisure Patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nirvana M. Saad

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the relationship between Egyptian Moslem mothers' perceived social position (gender, religion and social class) and their leisure activities. It discusses these women's experiences of leisure constraints and their negotiation strategies to overcome these obstacles. The study is based on semi-structured qualitative interviews with 20 Moslem mothers who were stratified into upper, middle and lower social classes.

  17. Native American Languages as Heritage Mother Tongues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Teresa L. McCarty

    2008-01-01

    This article examines current efforts to revitalise, stabilise, and maintain Indigenous languages in the USA. Most Native American languages are no longer acquired as a first language by children. They are nonetheless languages of identity and heritage, and in this sense can and should be considered mother tongues. The article begins with a discussion of the concept of heritage mother

  18. Science Sampler: Happy science Mother's Day

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    JulieAnn Hugick

    2009-04-01

    It's almost May and review for final exams will soon be in full swing. Mother's Day is celebrated every second Sunday in May. Have students combine their use of science vocabulary and their love for Mom by creating scientific Mother's Day greeting cards.

  19. Mothers' singing to infants and preschool children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tonya R. Bergeson; Sandra E. Trehub

    1999-01-01

    Mothers were recorded singing two versions of the same song, one to their infants and the other to their preschool children. In Experiment 1, naive adult listeners accurately identified the infant-directed versions from each pair of mothers' songs. Pitch was higher for the infant-directed versions but tempo and intensity did not differ across contexts. In Experiment 2, naive listeners judged

  20. Addressing the Needs of Working Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanne Lindbom

    1996-01-01

    A complex interplay of indivual, family, work, and public policy factors often makes it difficult for working mothers to perform adequately in their dual roles as family mebers and employee. This article presents an overview of the changing nature of these social systems and their relatinoship to the needs of employed mothers. To train undergraduate and gradute students for effective

  1. Kangaroo Mother Care and the Bonding Hypothesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathalie Charpak; Réjean Tessier; Marta Cristo; Stella Velez; Marta Girón; Juan G. Ruiz-Paláez; Yves Charpak

    2010-01-01

    Background. Based on the general bond- ing hypothesis, it is suggested that kangaroo mother care (KMC) creates a climate in the family whereby parents become prone to sensitive caregiving. The general hy- pothesis is that skin-to-skin contact in the KMC group will build up a positive perception in the mothers and a state of readiness to detect and respond to

  2. How Mothers Perceive Their Own Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trice-Black, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    For women, the transition to motherhood is often a time period filled with excitement, changes, and challenges. Mothers often face changes in their own sexuality in their adjustment to motherhood. The majority of research on the sexual changes during motherhood has focused on the first year postpartum of mothers and has emphasized biological,…

  3. Child Sexual Abuse: Impact on Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Betty Carter

    1993-01-01

    This article explores the broader context in which child sexual abuse occurs and the ethic of blame with respect to mothers of victims. It is based on in-depth interviews with 24 mothers after their children's disclosure, interviews with 15 experts in this area, and an analysis of child welfare case records. It concludes that policy and practice based on familist

  4. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  5. Effects of Parenting Training for Incarcerated Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Alvin R.; Clement, Mary J.

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of a parenting-training program, Mothers Inside Loving Kids, was evaluated (N=40). Effects on parenting techniques and on self-esteem were studied. Data from a national profile of incarcerated women are reviewed, and the effects of mother's incarceration on children are discussed. Implications for public policy are addressed.…

  6. Mothering in the Bahamas: A Student Ethnography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahnlen, Nicole C.; Rosado, Mashawn S.; Capozzi, Kristin A.; Hamon, Raeann R.

    Bahamian women often carry the bulk of responsibility for family well-being, particularly in the domain of parenting. This ethnographic study investigated the role of Bahamian mothers and their perceptions of parenting. Face-to-face qualitative interviews, comprised of a series of open-ended questions, were conducted with 18 mothers on the islands…

  7. Fooling Mother Nature: Forcing Flower Bulbs

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fooling Mother Nature: Forcing Flower Bulbs for Indoor Bloom by George Graine,Virginia Cooperative of Horticulture, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA Publication HORT-76NP #12;Fooling Mother Nature: Forcing Flower. Regardless, all of these bulbs have one thing in common that separates them from other flowering annual

  8. Mothering and Intellectual Disability: Partnership Rhetoric?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Chrissie

    2011-01-01

    This paper is about mothering an intellectually disabled child identified with special educational needs. It specifically looks at the parent partnership rhetoric that has dominated UK government policy and directives for nearly three decades and yet research suggests parents and more often mothers have to battle to be recognised as legitimate…

  9. Academic Mothers Finding Rhyme and Reason

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Venitha

    2009-01-01

    In this paper I argue that the "balancing two lives" approach to motherhood and work has particular limitations for academic mothers. I interrogate the perceived oppositionalities in being mother, traditionally associated with nurturing, love and emotion, and being academic, traditionally associated with reason and logic. My purpose is to show…

  10. Effects of Parenting Training for Incarcerated Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvinr Moore; Mary J. Clement

    1998-01-01

    This study used a non-equivalent control group design to evaluate the effects of a parenting training program (Mothers Inside Loving Kids, or MILK) at the Virginia Correctional Center for Women. Pre- and post-training measures were administered to 20 incarcerated mothers in the treatment group and 20 in the control group. Bivariate analyses revealed no significant differences between scores relative to

  11. Mother Teresa: A Mission Ends: India Today

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brijnath, Rohit.

    The life and death of Mother Teresa is honored in the September 19, 1997 issue of India Today (discussed in the August 29, 1997 issue of the Scout Report) with two cover stories about Mother Teresa, including a guest column entitled "Touch the Poor," by her official biographer, Navin Chawla.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2008-09-14

    A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50-1/2 inches high by 24-1/2 inches in outside diameter. With contents the gross weight of the BTSP is 650 lbs. The BTSP is designed for the safe shipment of 150 grams of tritium in a solid or gaseous state. To comply with the federal regulations that govern Type B shipping packages, the BTSP is designed so that it will not lose tritium at a rate greater than the limits stated in 10CFR 71.51 of 10{sup -6} A2 per hour for the 'Normal Conditions of Transport' (NCT) and an A2 in 1 week under 'Hypothetical Accident Conditions' (HAC). Additionally, since the BTSP design incorporates a valve as part of the tritium containment boundary, secondary containment features are incorporated in the CV Lid to protect against gas leakage past the valve as required by 10CFR71.43(e). This secondary containment boundary is designed to provide the same level of containment as the primary containment boundary when subjected to the HAC and NCT criteria.

  13. Parenting from prison: helping children and mothers.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P J; Harm, N J

    2000-01-01

    Incarceration of a mother disrupts the mother-child relationship and the child's emotional development. The researchers evaluated a 15-week parenting program in a women's prison that was designed to enhance mother-child interactions during imprisonment. Pre- and postmeasures for the 104 women were Hudson's (1982) Index of Self-Esteem, Bavolek's (1984) Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory, and semistructured questionnaires. Self-esteem and attitudes about expectations of children, corporal punishment, and family roles improved significantly. Empathy and mother-child interactions through visits and letters improved. Participants identified the most helpful components of the program. Those who had been physically, sexually, and emotionally abused and those who had used drugs and alcohol had positive results. Findings support the value of parent education for self-development of incarcerated mothers and for the welfare of their children. PMID:11111498

  14. [Newborn children under phototherapy: the mother's perception].

    PubMed

    Campos, Antonia do Carmo Soares; Cardoso, Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão

    2004-01-01

    Since 1958, phototherapy has been used as a method to cure jaundice, which is still an important disease in newborn children. Supported by a phenomenological and qualitative approach, this study aims to investigate the mothers' perception of the phototherapy treatment their children are submitted to. Research subjects were ten mothers of newborns under phototherapy treatment at the Neonatological Hospitalization Unit of a public maternity in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Data were collected between May and July 2002. We used group meetings with the mothers as suggested by Carl Rogers. Discourse was organized into categories according to Bardin, which revealed themes that were analyzed in view of Paterson's and Zderad's humanistic nursing theory, as follows: mothers' knowledge on phototherapy and concerns about the treatment. We concluded that the analyzed mothers' major concern is related to the babies' vision. PMID:15651644

  15. Cortisol in mother’s milk across lactation reflects maternal life history and predicts infant temperament

    PubMed Central

    Skibiel, Amy L.; Foster, Alison B.; Del Rosso, Laura; Mendoza, Sally P.; Capitanio, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The maternal environment exerts important influences on offspring mass/growth, metabolism, reproduction, neurobiology, immune function, and behavior among birds, insects, reptiles, fish, and mammals. For mammals, mother’s milk is an important physiological pathway for nutrient transfer and glucocorticoid signaling that potentially influences offspring growth and behavioral phenotype. Glucocorticoids in mother’s milk have been associated with offspring behavioral phenotype in several mammals, but studies have been handicapped by not simultaneously evaluating milk energy density and yield. This is problematic as milk glucocorticoids and nutrients likely have simultaneous effects on offspring phenotype. We investigated mother’s milk and infant temperament and growth in a cohort of rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) mother–infant dyads at the California National Primate Research Center (N = 108). Glucocorticoids in mother’s milk, independent of available milk energy, predicted a more Nervous, less Confident temperament in both sons and daughters. We additionally found sex differences in the windows of sensitivity and the magnitude of sensitivity to maternal-origin glucocorticoids. Lower parity mothers produced milk with higher cortisol concentrations. Lastly, higher cortisol concentrations in milk were associated with greater infant weight gain across time. Taken together, these results suggest that mothers with fewer somatic resources, even in captivity, may be “programming” through cortisol signaling, behaviorally cautious offspring that prioritize growth. Glucocorticoids ingested through milk may importantly contribute to the assimilation of available milk energy, development of temperament, and orchestrate, in part, the allocation of maternal milk energy between growth and behavioral phenotype. PMID:25713475

  16. Simulated ship recognition using two-dimensional PCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangzhou; Zhu, Guangxi; Peng, Feng; Wang, Shuwen; Xu, Huazhong

    2007-11-01

    This paper proposes a fast and robust algorithm for classification and recognition of ships based on the two-dimensional Principal Component Analysis (2DPCA) method. The three-dimensional ship models achieve by modeling software of MultiGen, and then they are projected by Vega simulating software for two-dimensional ship silhouettes. The 2DPCA method as against conventional PCA method for simulated ship recognition using training and testing experiments, as the training and testing sample size is large, and there are great variations in different azimuth and elevation for ship viewpoints. The experiment of ship recognition using the global feature of ships is not satisfied with us, so we proposed an improved 2DPCA method based on the local feature of ships. Some recognition results from simulated data are presented, it shows that the improved 2DPCA method outperform PCA in ship recognition and also superior to PCA in terms of computational efficiency for feature extraction. So our method is more preferable for ship classification and recognition.

  17. SHIP deficiency causes Crohn's disease-like ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi-Young; Maubert, Monique; Engelman, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can arise from genetic mutations that compromise intestinal epithelial cell integrity or immune regulation. SHIP has previously been shown to play a pivotal role in limiting the number of immunoregulatory cells and their function. Aim To determine whether SHIP plays a pivotal role in control of immune tolerance in the gut mucosa. Methods Gastrointestinal pathology was assessed in three separate strains of SHIP-deficient mice and their respective wild-type (WT) littermates. Gastrointestinal pathology was analysed in SHIP-deficient hosts reconstituted with WT haematopoietic cell grafts, and WT hosts reconstituted with SHIP-deficient haematopoietic cell grafts including whole splenocytes, purified T cells or natural killer (NK) cells. Major immune cell populations were also analysed in the small intestine of SHIP-deficient mice and WT controls. Results SHIP-deficient mice developed segmental, transmural pyo-granulomatous ilietis that recapitulated classical features of Crohn's disease enteric pathology. Analysis of haematopoietic chimeras showed that WT bone marrow reconstitution of SHIP?/? hosts corrects ileitis. Reconstitution with SHIP?/? splenocytes transferred ileitis to WT hosts. Adoptive transfer of purified SHIP?/? T cells or NK cells to WT hosts did not transfer ileitis. There was a paucity of both CD4 and CD8 T cells in the small intestines of SHIP-deficient mice; however, neutrophil numbers were significantly increased. Conclusions SHIP plays a pivotal role in immune function in the intestine; further scrutiny of this pathway in IBD patients is warranted. It is proposed that SHIP-deficient ileitis results from a local deficit in mucosal T cell immunity that promotes a damaging granulocyte–monocyte inflammation of the distal ileum. PMID:20940287

  18. Emissions from Ships with respect to Their Effects on Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Ferek, Ronald J.; Strader, Scott R.; Hegg, Dean A.; Frick, Glendon M.; Hoppel, William A.; Gasparovic, Richard F.; Russell, Lynn M.; Johnson, Douglas W.; O'Dowd, Colin; Durkee, Philip A.; Nielsen, Kurt E.; Innis, George

    2000-08-01

    Emissions of particles, gases, heat, and water vapor from ships are discussed with respect to their potential for changing the microstructure of marine stratiform clouds and producing the phenomenon known as `ship tracks.' Airborne measurements are used to derive emission factors of SO2 and NO from diesel-powered and steam turbine-powered ships, burning low-grade marine fuel oil (MFO); they were 15-89 and 2-25 g kg1 of fuel burned, respectively. By contrast a steam turbine-powered ship burning high-grade navy distillate fuel had an SO2 emission factor of 6 g kg1.Various types of ships, burning both MFO and navy distillate fuel, emitted from 4 × 1015 to 2 × 1016 total particles per kilogram of fuel burned (4 × 1015-1.5 × 1016 particles per second). However, diesel-powered ships burning MFO emitted particles with a larger mode radius (0.03-0.05 m) and larger maximum sizes than those powered by steam turbines burning navy distillate fuel (mode radius 0.02 m). Consequently, if the particles have similar chemical compositions, those emitted by diesel ships burning MFO will serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at lower supersaturations (and will therefore be more likely to produce ship tracks) than the particles emitted by steam turbine ships burning distillate fuel. Since steam turbine-powered ships fueled by MFO emit particles with a mode radius similar to that of diesel-powered ships fueled by MFO, it appears that, for given ambient conditions, the type of fuel burned by a ship is more important than the type of ship engine in determining whether or not a ship will produce a ship track. However, more measurements are needed to test this hypothesis.The particles emitted from ships appear to be primarily organics, possibly combined with sulfuric acid produced by gas-to-particle conversion of SO2. Comparison of model results with measurements in ship tracks suggests that the particles from ships contain only about 10% water-soluble materials. Measurements of the total particles entering marine stratiform clouds from diesel-powered ships fueled by MFO, and increases in droplet concentrations produced by these particles, show that only about 12% of the particles serve as CCN.The fluxes of heat and water vapor from ships are estimated to be 2-22 MW and 0.5-1.5 kg s1, respectively. These emissions rarely produced measurable temperature perturbations, and never produced detectable perturbations in water vapor, in the plumes from ships. Nuclear-powered ships, which emit heat but negligible particles, do not produce ship tracks. Therefore, it is concluded that heat and water vapor emissions do not play a significant role in ship track formation and that particle emissions, particularly from those burning low-grade fuel oil, are responsible for ship track formation. Subsequent papers in this special issue discuss and test these hypotheses.

  19. EFFECTS OF RISING FUEL COSTS ON CONTAINER SHIPPING NETWORKS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani, Koichi; Imai, Akio

    Fuel cost increase forces liner shipping companies to bear higher ship operation costs and subsequently a lager total cost. To cope with such a fuel cost increase, they attempt to reduce the ship speed to maintain the low operation costs, even resulting in increase of the transit time. This study examines effects of ship speed reduction on fuel savings as well as profit increase, by using a mathematical model for a container liner service network design with a consideration o f empty container repositioning. Throughout numeric al experiments for the Asia-North America trade, the ship speed reduction is effective in fuel cost savings. Furthermore, it was found that the reduction of ship dwell time at port offset the longer transit time resulting from the cruising speed reduction.

  20. Update on emissions and environmental impacts from the international fleet of ships: the contribution from major ship types and ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalsøren, S. B.; Eide, M. S.; Endresen, Ø.; Mjelde, A.; Gravir, G.; Isaksen, I. S. A.

    2009-03-01

    A reliable and up-to-date ship emission inventory is essential for atmospheric scientists quantifying the impact of shipping and for policy makers implementing regulations and incentives for emission reduction. The emission modelling in this study takes into account ship type and size dependent input data for 15 ship types and 7 size categories. Global port arrival and departure data for more than 32 000 merchant ships are used to establish operational profiles for the ship segments. The modelled total fuel consumption amounts to 217 Mt in 2004 of which 11 Mt is consumed in in-port operations. This is in agreement with international sales statistics. The modelled fuel consumption is applied to develop global emission inventories for CO2, NO2, SO2, CO, CH4, VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds), N2O, BC (Black Carbon) and OC (Organic Carbon). The global emissions from ships at sea and in ports are distributed geographically, applying extended geographical data sets covering about 2 million global ship observations and global port data for 32 000 ships. In addition to inventories for the world fleet, inventories are produced separately for the three dominating ship types, using ship type specific emission modelling and traffic distributions. A global Chemical Transport Model (CTM) was used to calculate the environmental impacts of the emissions. We find that ship emissions is a dominant contributor over much of the world oceans to surface concentrations of NO2 and SO2. The contribution is also large over some coastal zones. For surface ozone the contribution is high over the oceans but clearly also of importance over Western North America (contribution 15-25%) and Western Europe (5-15%). The contribution to tropospheric column ozone is up to 5-6%. The overall impact of ship emissions on global methane lifetime is large due to the high NOx emissions. With regard to acidification we find that ships contribute 11% to nitrate wet deposition and 4.5% to sulphur wet deposition globally. In certain coastal regions the contributions may be in the range 15-50%. In general we find that ship emissions have a large impact on acidic deposition and surface ozone in Western North America, Scandinavia, Western Europe, western North Africa and Malaysia/Indonesia. For most of these regions container traffic, the largest emitter by ship type, has the largest impact. This is the case especially for the Pacific and the related container trade routes between Asia and North America. However, the contributions from bulk ships and tank vessels are also significant in the above mentioned impact regions. Though the total ship impact at low latitudes is lower, the tank vessels have a quite large contribution at low latitudes and near the Gulf of Mexico and Middle East. The bulk ships are characterized by large impact in Oceania compared to other ship types. In Scandinavia and north-Western Europe, one of the major ship impact regions, the three largest ship types have rather small relative contributions. The impact in this region is probably dominated by smaller ships operating closer to the coast. For emissions in ports impacts on NO2 and SO2 seem to be of significance. For most ports the contribution to the two components is in the range 0.5-5%, for a few ports it exceeds 10%. The approach presented provides an improvement in characterizing fleet operational patterns, and thereby ship emissions and impacts. Furthermore, the study shows where emission reductions can be applied to most effectively minimize the impacts by different ship types.

  1. Update on emissions and environmental impacts from the international fleet of ships. The contribution from major ship types and ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalsøren, S. B.; Eide, M. S.; Endresen, Ø.; Mjelde, A.; Gravir, G.; Isaksen, I. S. A.

    2008-10-01

    A reliable and up-to-date ship emission inventory is essential for atmospheric scientists quantifying the impact of shipping and for policy makers implementing regulations and incentives for emission reduction. The emission modelling in this study takes into account ship type and size dependent input data for 15 ship types and 7 size categories. Global port arrival and departure data for more than 32 000 merchant ships are used to establish operational profiles for the ship segments. The modelled total fuel consumption amounts to 217 Mt in 2004 of which 11 Mt is consumed in in-port operations. This is in agreement with international sales statistics. The modelled fuel consumption is applied to develop global emission inventories for CO2, NO2, SO2, CO, CH4, VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds), N2O, BC (Black Carbon) and OC (Organic Carbon). The global emissions from ships at sea and in ports are distributed geographically, applying extended geographical data sets covering about 2 million global ship observations and global port data for 32 000 ships. In addition to inventories for the world fleet, inventories are produced separately for the three dominating ship types, using ship type specific emission modelling and traffic distributions. A global Chemical Transport Model (CTM) was used to calculate the environmental impacts of the emissions. We find that ship emissions is a dominant contributor over much of the world oceans to surface concentrations of NO2 and SO2. The contribution is also large over some coastal zones. For surface ozone the contribution is high over the oceans but clearly also of importance over western North America (contribution 15 25%) and western Europe (5 15%). The contribution to tropospheric column ozone is up to 5 6%. The overall impact of ship emissions on global methane lifetime is large due to the high NOx emissions. With regard to acidification we find that ships contribute 11% to nitrate wet deposition and 4.5% to sulphur wet deposition globally. In certain coastal regions the contributions may be in the range 15 50%. In general we find that ship emissions have a large impact on acidic deposition and surface ozone in western North America, Scandinavia, western Europe, western North Africa and Malaysia/Indonesia. For most of these regions container traffic, the largest emitter by ship type, has the largest impact. This is the case especially for the Pacific and the related container trade routes between Asia and North America. However, the contributions from bulk ships and tank vessels are also significant in the above mentioned impact regions. Though the total ship impact at low latitudes is lower, the tank vessels have a quite large contribution at low latitudes and near the Gulf of Mexico and Middle East. The bulk ships are characterized by large impact in Oceania compared to other ship types. In Scandinavia and north-western Europe, one of the major ship impact regions, the three largest ship types have rather small relative contributions. The impact in this region is probably dominated by smaller ships operating closer to the coast. For emissions in ports impacts on NO2 and SO2 seem to be of significance. For most ports the contribution to the two components is in the range 0.5 5%, for a few ports it exceeds 10%. The approach presented provides an improvement in characterizing fleet operational patterns, and thereby ship emissions and impacts. Furthermore, the study shows where emission reductions can be applied to most effectively minimize the impacts by different ship types.

  2. Mothers’ perceptions of fever in children

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Akaberian, Sherafat; Hatami, Gissou

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fever is one of the most common symptoms for children. Most fevers are not dangerous; parents, especially mothers, nevertheless experience severe anxiety confronting children's fevers. This study aimed to explore the mothers’ perceptions of fever in their children. Materials and Methods: Mothers of hospitalized febrile children were selected by purposeful sampling method from two hospitals in Bushehr in 2012. Data saturation was reached after in-depth semi structured interviews with 12 participants. Data analysis was done by conventional content analysis method. Findings: Sense of concern, the necessity for quick action and the need for protection emerged from mothers’ views. Sense of concern came from concerns over cause of fever, child's hospitalization and possible side-effects of fever. The necessity for quick action resulted from gathering information, self-medication and referring to healthcare centres; the need for spiritual and emotional protection created the need to protect in mothers. Conclusion: Findings showed that mothers need educational, emotional and spiritual protection in order to overcome their concerns and managing their children's fever. It is recommended that an empowering model based on these findings be developed in order to strengthen mothers in dealing with fevers in order to prevent excessive concern and anxiety. PMID:25250363

  3. Topology Configuration for Effective InShip Network Construction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mi-Jin Kim; Jong-Wook Jang; Yun-sik Yu

    \\u000a Recently, all areas of IT has been rapidly in land. As a result, the location is very important in everyday life. But in ship\\u000a are limits network with communication Equipment and service. As a result, be far removed from information age. Currently,\\u000a ship is connected with the outside world via satellite on the voyage. But, because high billing, ship is

  4. Vibrio parahaemolyticus gastroenteritis outbreaks aboard two cruise ships.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, D N; Blake, P A; Yashuk, J C; Wells, J G; Creech, W B; Hughes, J H

    1979-01-01

    Outbreaks of Vibrio parahaemolyticus gastrointestinal illness occurred on two Caribbean cruise ships in late 1974 and early 1975. In all, 697 passengers and 27 crew were affected. Epidemiologic evidence incriminated seafoods served on the ships as the vehicles of transmission. The seafoods were probably contaminated by V. parahaemolyticus after cooking in seawater from the ships' internal seawater distribution systems. Use of seawater in foodhandling areas was discontinued, and no further outbreaks occurred. PMID:433918

  5. Emissions from Ships with respect to Their Effects on Clouds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter V. Hobbs; Timothy J. Garrett; Ronald J. Ferek; Scott R. Strader; Dean A. Hegg; Glendon M. Frick; William A. Hoppel; Richard F. Gasparovic; Lynn M. Russell; Douglas W. Johnson; Colin O’Dowd; Philip A. Durkee; Kurt E. Nielsen; George Innis

    2000-01-01

    Emissions of particles, gases, heat, and water vapor from ships are discussed with respect to their potential for changing the microstructure of marine stratiform clouds and producing the phenomenon known as ''ship tracks.'' Airborne measurements are used to derive emission factors of SO 2 and NO from diesel-powered and steam turbine-powered ships, burning low-grade marine fuel oil (MFO); they were

  6. Progress of the MHD ship propulsion project in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. G. Yan; C. W. Sha; K. Zhou; Y. Peng; A. H. Yang; J. Q. Qin

    2000-01-01

    A small project for developing superconducting MHD ship propulsion is included in China's State High Technology Development Program. The project goal is to construct a MHD model ship with a 5T superconducting helical thruster. A 1.0 ton model ship with 3.5 m length, 0.85 m width was driven by the 5 T, 270 A superconducting helical thruster in a 25

  7. Lesbian mothers and their children: a comparison with solo parent heterosexual mothers and their children.

    PubMed

    Green, R; Mandel, J B; Hotvedt, M E; Gray, J; Smith, L

    1986-04-01

    Two types of single-parent households and their effects on children ages 3-11 years were compared. One type comprised 50 homosexual mothers and their 56 children, and the other was a group of 40 heterosexual mothers and their 48 children. There were 30 daughters and 26 sons of homosexual mothers and 28 daughters and 20 sons of heterosexual mothers. The sexual identity and social relationships of the children were assessed in relation to the sexual orientation of the mothers. The samples consisted of families from rural and urban areas in 10 American states. All have lived without adult males (18 years or older) in the household for a minimum of 2 years (average 4). Families with heterosexual mothers were matched to families with homosexual mothers on age and race of mother; length of mother and child separation from father; educational level and income of mother; and number, age, and sex of children. Data are reported from childrens' tests designed to provide information on general intelligence, core-morphologic sexual identity, gender-role preferences, family and peer group relationships, and adjustment to the single-parent family. No significant differences were found between the two types of households for boys and few significant differences for girls. Concerns that being raised by a homosexual mother might produce sexual identity conflict and peer group stigmatization were not supported by the research findings. Data also revealed more similarities than differences in parenting experiences, marital history, and present living situations of the two groups of mothers. The postulated compromised parental fitness of lesbian mothers, commonly asserted in child custody cases, is not supported by these data. PMID:3718205

  8. The Ship of Classics: The Ark, the Titanic, or the Good Ship Lollipop?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Robert E.

    Various problems confronting teachers of the classics are explored through frequent reference to the metaphor of the classics viewed as a sailing ship in a sea of troubled waters. Several of the difficulties confronting classics teachers are seen to be related to an anti-intellectual mood prevailing in academe, scheduling problems, shifting school…

  9. Geoacoustic inversion using ship noise received on the ship-towed line array

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. C. Yang; Kwang Yoo; Laurie Fialkowski

    2005-01-01

    There has been increased interest in geoacoustic inversion using a ship-towed line array including recent work by M. Siderius et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 11, 1523 (2002), D. J. Battle et al., IEEE J. Ocean Eng. 28, 454 (2003), and M. R. Fallat et al., IEEE J. Ocean Eng. 29, 78 (2004). One notes that bottom properties in the

  10. [Medicine aboard cruise ships--law insurance specifics].

    PubMed

    Ottomann, C; Frenzel, R; Muehlberger, T

    2013-04-01

    The booming cruise industry, associated with ships with more passengers and crew on board, results in growing medical needs for the ship doctor. The ship's doctor insurance policy includes different jurisdictions, namely national law, international law, tort law, insurance law and labor law. In addition, international agreements must be taken into account, which complicates the design of an adequate insurance policy. Equally high are the costs and defense costs for the ship's doctor in case of liability. In order to limit the liability for all parties is to ask for appropriately qualified medical staff, hired on board. PMID:23589048

  11. The right whale mandatory ship reporting system: a retrospective

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jeffrey D.; Asaro, Michael J.; Cole, Timothy V.N.; Moore, Katie S.; Ward-Geiger, Leslie I.; Zoodsma, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    In 1998, the United States sought and received International Maritime Organization-endorsement of two Mandatory Ship Reporting (MSR) systems designed to improve mariner awareness about averting ship collisions with the endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis). Vessel collisions are a serious threat to the right whale and the program was among the first formal attempts to reduce this threat. Under the provisions of the MSR, all ships >300 gross tons are required to report their location, speed, and destination to a shore-based station when entering two key right whale habitats: one in waters off New England and one off coastal Georgia and Florida. In return, reporting ships receive an automatically-generated message, delivered directly to the ship’s bridge, that provides information about right whale vulnerability to vessel collisions and actions mariners can take to avoid collisions. The MSR has been in operation continuously from July 1999 to the present. Archived incoming reports provided a 15-plus year history of ship operations in these two locations. We analyzed a total of 26,772 incoming MSR messages logged between July 1999 and December 2013. Most ships that were required to report did so, and compliance rates were generally constant throughout the study period. Self-reported vessel speeds when entering the systems indicated that most ships travelled between 10 and 16 (range = 5–20 +) knots. Ship speeds generally decreased in 2009 to 2013 following implementation of vessel speed restrictions. The number of reports into the southern system remained relatively constant following a steady increase through 2007, but numbers in the northern system decreased annually beginning in 2008. If reporting is indicative of long-term patterns in shipping operations, it reflects noteworthy changes in marine transportation. Observed declines in ship traffic are likely attributable to the 2008–2009 economic recession, the containerized shipping industry making increased use of larger ships that made fewer trips, and diminished oil/gas US imports as previously inaccessible domestic deposits were exploited. Recent declines in shipping activity likely resulted in lowered collision risks for right whales and reduced their exposure to underwater noise from ships.

  12. Unmarried mothers in Ireland, 1880-1973.

    PubMed

    Luddy, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the changing experiences and representation of Ireland's unmarried mothers from 1880 to 1973. It focuses on the stigma of illegitimacy in political and cultural discourse and the representation of unmarried mothers as immoral and their children as a drain on resources. These remained constant themes within the discourse of unmarried motherhood in Ireland throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The article uses the records of philanthropic, government and religious organisations to chart the rising interest in the moral reformation of unmarried mothers at the end of the nineteenth century and rising tolerance towards them by the end of the twentieth century. PMID:21299014

  13. Effect of Ship Noise on Sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Kawada, T.; Sasazawa, Y.

    1997-08-01

    The effects of a steady sound level of 65 dB(A) from a diesel ship engine on nocturnal sleep were studied using polygraphic and subjective sleep parameters. Three healthy men, aged 29 to 33 years, participated in the experiment. Sleep polygrams and the sound level in a sleep laboratory were recorded for each subject for five exposure nights and five control nights. The following morning, the subjects answered a self-rating sleep questionnaire (called the OSA) and underwent simple reaction time tests. The percentage of S2, SREM latency and the REM interval increased, while %SREM decreased during the noise-exposed nights as compared with corresponding values on the control nights. Other parameters of sleep EEG were unchanged. Five scale scores for OSA, sleepiness, sleep maintenance, worry, integrated sleep feeling and sleep initiation deteriorated significantly on the noise-exposed nights as compared with the control nights. Canonical discriminant analysis was conducted using 19 sleep parameters. The standard partial regression coefficients of %SREM, %S2 and %S1 were somewhat higher than other parameters. It was suggested that exposure to the 65 dB(A) ship noise exerted adverse effects on nocturnal sleep, subjectively and in part polygraphically (REM sleep and shallow sleep).

  14. Relational Psychotherapy Mothers' Group: a randomized clinical trial for substance abusing mothers.

    PubMed

    Luthar, Suniya S; Suchman, Nancy E; Altomare, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the effectiveness of the Relational Psychotherapy Mothers' Group (RPMG), a supportive parenting group intervention for substance abusing women. Sixty mothers receiving RPMG were compared to 67 women receiving recovery training (RT); both treatments supplemented treatment in the methadone clinics. At the end of the 6-month treatment period, RPMG mothers showed marginally significant improvement on child maltreatment (self-reported) and cocaine abuse based on urinalyses when compared with RT mothers; notably, children of RPMG mothers reported significantly greater improvement in emotional adjustment and depression than children of RT mothers. At 6 months follow-up, however, treatment gains were no longer apparent. Overall, the findings suggest that whereas supportive parenting interventions for substance abusing women do have some preventive potential, abrupt cessation of the therapeutic program could have deleterious consequences. PMID:17241493

  15. Why are Chinese Mothers More Controlling than American Mothers? “My Child is My Report Card”

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Florrie Fei-Yin; Pomerantz, Eva M.; Deng, Ciping

    2013-01-01

    Chinese parents exert more control over children than do American parents. The current research examined whether this is due in part to Chinese parents' feelings of worth being more contingent on children's performance. Twice over a year, 215 mothers and children (mean age = 12.86 years) in China and the United States (European and African Americans) reported on psychologically controlling parenting. Mothers also indicated the extent to which their worth is contingent on children's performance. Psychologically controlling parenting was higher among Chinese than American mothers, particularly European (vs. African) American mothers. Chinese (vs. American) mothers' feelings of worth were more contingent on children's performance, with this contributing to their heightened psychological control relative to American mothers. PMID:23581633

  16. Relational Psychotherapy Mothers’ Group: A developmentally informed intervention for at-risk mothers

    PubMed Central

    Luthar, Suniya S.; Suchman, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    The Relational Psychotherapy Mothers’ Group (RPMG), a developmentally informed, supportive psychotherapy designed to serve heroin-addicted mothers with children up to 16 years of age, aims at addressing psychosocial vulnerabilities, and facilitating optimal parenting, among at-risk mothers. We present preliminary evidence on the efficacy of RPMG as an “add on” treatment in comparison with standard methadone counseling alone. At the end of the 24-week treatment period, mothers receiving RPMG plus standard methadone counseling demonstrated lower levels of risk for child maltreatment, greater involvement with their children, and more positive psychosocial adjustment than women who received methadone counseling alone. Children of RPMG participants also reflected fewer problems in multiple areas. At 6 months posttreatment, RPMG recipients continued to be at a relative advantage, although the magnitude of group differences was often attenuated. Notably, urinalyses indicated that RPMG mothers showed greater improvements in levels of opioid use over time than comparison mothers. PMID:10847626

  17. Relational Psychotherapy Mothers’ Group: A randomized clinical trial for substance abusing mothers

    PubMed Central

    LUTHAR, SUNIYA S.; SUCHMAN, NANCY E.; ALTOMARE, MICHELLE

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the effectiveness of the Relational Psychotherapy Mothers’ Group (RPMG), a supportive parenting group intervention for substance abusing women. Sixty mothers receiving RPMG were compared to 67 women receiving recovery training (RT); both treatments supplemented treatment in the methadone clinics. At the end of the 6-month treatment period, RPMG mothers showed marginally significant improvement on child maltreatment (self-reported) and cocaine abuse based on urinalyses when compared with RT mothers; notably, children of RPMG mothers reported significantly greater improvement in emotional adjustment and depression than children of RT mothers. At 6 months follow-up, however, treatment gains were no longer apparent. Overall, the findings suggest that whereas supportive parenting interventions for substance abusing women do have some preventive potential, abrupt cessation of the therapeutic program could have deleterious consequences. PMID:17241493

  18. A Study of Ultrasonic Flowmeter in Ship Piping Leakage Detection System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xuefeng Han; Jie Wang; Zhongbo Peng; Jie Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Ship piping is one system that can ensure the ship voyage, and satisfy ship sailing normally and people’s life requirement. It consists of pipes comprising accessories, machines, apparatus, and meters and so on. Ship piping is divided into two categories: one is called the power pipeline which means the piping system that serves for the power of the ship and

  19. Emotional References in Mother-Daughter and Mother-Son Dyads' Conversations About School

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorothy Flannagan; San Perese

    1998-01-01

    The conversations of 100 mother-child (mean age4.5 years) dyads about the children's school experienceswere examined for their emotional content. Dyads variedalong the dimensions of gender of child (53 girls; 57 boys), ethnicity (31African-American, 39 Anglo-American, and 40Mexican-American), and SES (55 lower and 55 higher).When compared to mother-son dyads, mother-daughter dyadsmade more emotional references, particularly when discussing topicsrelated to interpersonal relationships

  20. Mother-child interactional patterns in high-and low-risk mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel S. Milner

    1997-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which mother-child interactional patterns in high-and low-risk (for child physical abuse) mothers were similar to patterns observed in physically abusive parents.Method: Ten high-risk and 10 demographically similar low-risk mother-child dyads were studied. Trained observers coded maternal-child interaction patterns in the home during five 1-hour periods using the

  1. Coadaptation between Mother and Offspring: Why Not?

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jason B; Cowley, Michael; Ward, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    A Formal Comment has challenged the interpretation of a study into an imprinted gene, maintaining that conflict, rather than mother-offspring co-adaptation, provides a better mechanistic explanation. Here authors of the original Research Article reply. PMID:25786111

  2. 77 FR 28761 - Mother's Day, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ...honor the remarkable women who strive and sacrifice every day to ensure their children have every opportunity to pursue their dreams. Our Nation first came together to celebrate Mother's Day on May 11, 1913, with the introduction of a House...

  3. Analytical characterisation of homoeopathic mother tinctures.

    PubMed

    Biber, A; Franck-Karl, G; Waimer, F; Riegert, U; Wiget, R

    2009-03-01

    Quality of homoeopathic mother tinctures is assured by the definition of the starting material, the manufacturing process and the analytical characteristics described in the monograph. Traditionally analytical characterisation of the mother tincture comprises appearance, odour, identity, density and dry residue. According to annex I of directive 2001/83/EC an assay is only performed in case of a health hazard due to toxic compounds. The concept of marker substances as usually used in phytotherapy cannot be transferred to mother tinctures without research effort. For example the marker substances echinacoside, apigenin-7-glucoside and rosmarinic acid found in dried underground parts of Echinacea pallida Nutt., dried flower heads of Matricaria recutita L. and dried herb of Pulmonaria officinalis L. cannot be found in homoeopathic mother tinctures prepared from fresh material thereof. PMID:19275866

  4. Mother and offspring in conflict: why not?

    PubMed

    Úbeda, Francisco; Gardner, Andy

    2015-03-01

    A gene mediating interactions between mouse mothers and their pups has recently been claimed to support coadaptation rather than the kinship theory of genomic imprinting. This Formal Comment argues that this claim is unfounded. PMID:25785938

  5. Mother-daughter coping and disordered eating.

    PubMed

    Lantzouni, Eleni; Cox, Molly Havnen; Salvator, Ann; Crosby, Ross D

    2015-03-01

    This study explores whether the coping style of teenage girls with and without an eating disorder is similar to that of their mothers' (biological and adoptive), and whether teens with disordered eating utilize more maladaptive coping compared with those without. Eating disorder was diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria, and the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations was administered to distinguish the coping style of the participants. Our findings suggest that daughters coped very similarly to their mothers in either group. Contrary to previous studies, our sample of teenage girls with eating disorders as well as their mothers utilized less frequently the avoidance-distraction coping compared with the girls without eating disorders and their mothers. These findings reinforce the importance for family involvement and for simultaneous focus on intrapersonal and interpersonal maintenance factors during eating disorder treatment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. PMID:25645347

  6. Coping patterns of mothers of poor boys.

    PubMed

    Adams, P L; Horovitz, J H

    1980-01-01

    Using the same 201 impoverished, urban dwelling black and Cuban refugee mothers from their previous study "Psychopathology & Fatherlessness in Poor Boys,'' Adams and Horovitz examine the coping sytles of these women. The differing groups of mothers were classified according to their firstborn son's ages, their ethnicity and the presence or absence of a father in their household. Scored according to scales L, F, K, 1--4, and 6--9 of the MMPI, the women were profiled and a descriptive comparison employed. In most instances the null hypothesis was confirmed: mothers of fathered boys did not differ in their coping strategies from mothers of fatherless boys regardless of the family's ethnicity and the boy's psychopathology or age. Of note was the high scores in the "paranoia'' scale of MMPI, indicating that it may be functional and adaptive to use projection in an urban slum. PMID:7357997

  7. Mothering during war and postwar in Bosnia.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Cheryl Lee; Duckett, Laura

    2007-11-01

    The study aim was to describe displaced Bosnian mothers' experiences caring for their children during and immediately after the war (1992-1995). Mothers described their progression into war, through war, and into vastly changed lives. Using ethnographic methods, narrative data were collected near Sarajevo, Bosnia, from 14 displaced women who participated in one to three interviews each between 1996 and 1999. Data from the semistructured interviews were analyzed to determine patterns in participants' descriptions of mothering during war. Four common themes of mothering were identified in the data: "on the move," "I have to feed them," "living somewhere in between," and "still living the war inside." As care providers and policy makers develop initiatives to improve the health of women and children during complex humanitarian emergencies, there is much to learn from the narratives of Bosnian women about their extraordinary struggle to protect the lives of their children amid violence and loss. PMID:18180470

  8. Mother's Employment and Children's Achievement: A Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyns, Barbara; Catsambis, Sophia

    1986-01-01

    Provides a conceptual and methodological critique of Milne's article (SO515520). Provides an alternative analysis of the data, showing that structural, attitudinal, and socioeconomic determinants of mother's employment substantially diminish the effects noted by Milne. (JDH)

  9. The right whale mandatory ship reporting system: a retrospective.

    PubMed

    Silber, Gregory K; Adams, Jeffrey D; Asaro, Michael J; Cole, Timothy V N; Moore, Katie S; Ward-Geiger, Leslie I; Zoodsma, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    In 1998, the United States sought and received International Maritime Organization-endorsement of two Mandatory Ship Reporting (MSR) systems designed to improve mariner awareness about averting ship collisions with the endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis). Vessel collisions are a serious threat to the right whale and the program was among the first formal attempts to reduce this threat. Under the provisions of the MSR, all ships >300 gross tons are required to report their location, speed, and destination to a shore-based station when entering two key right whale habitats: one in waters off New England and one off coastal Georgia and Florida. In return, reporting ships receive an automatically-generated message, delivered directly to the ship's bridge, that provides information about right whale vulnerability to vessel collisions and actions mariners can take to avoid collisions. The MSR has been in operation continuously from July 1999 to the present. Archived incoming reports provided a 15-plus year history of ship operations in these two locations. We analyzed a total of 26,772 incoming MSR messages logged between July 1999 and December 2013. Most ships that were required to report did so, and compliance rates were generally constant throughout the study period. Self-reported vessel speeds when entering the systems indicated that most ships travelled between 10 and 16 (range = 5-20 +) knots. Ship speeds generally decreased in 2009 to 2013 following implementation of vessel speed restrictions. The number of reports into the southern system remained relatively constant following a steady increase through 2007, but numbers in the northern system decreased annually beginning in 2008. If reporting is indicative of long-term patterns in shipping operations, it reflects noteworthy changes in marine transportation. Observed declines in ship traffic are likely attributable to the 2008-2009 economic recession, the containerized shipping industry making increased use of larger ships that made fewer trips, and diminished oil/gas US imports as previously inaccessible domestic deposits were exploited. Recent declines in shipping activity likely resulted in lowered collision risks for right whales and reduced their exposure to underwater noise from ships. PMID:25861555

  10. Significance of Waterway Navigation Positioning Systems On Ship's Manoeuvring Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galor, W.

    The main goal of navigation is to lead the ship to the point of destination safety and efficiently. Various factors may affect ship realisating this process. The ship movement on waterway are mainly limited by water area dimensions (surface and depth). These limitations cause the requirement to realise the proper of ship movement trajectory. In case when this re requirement cant't fulfil then marine accident may happend. This fact is unwanted event caused losses of human health and life, damage or loss of cargo and ship, pollution of natural environment, damage of port structures or blocking the port of its ports and lost of salvage operation. These losses in same cases can be catas- trophical especially while e.i. crude oil spilling could be place. To realise of safety navigation process is needed to embrace the ship's movement trajectory by waterways area. The ship's trajectory is described by manoeuvring lane as a surface of water area which is require to realise of safety ship movement. Many conditions affect to ship manoeuvring line. The main are following: positioning accuracy, ship's manoeuvring features and phenomena's of shore and ship's bulk common affecting. The accuracy of positioning system is most important. This system depends on coast navigation mark- ing which can range many kinds of technical realisation. Mainly used systems based on lights (line), radionavigation (local system or GPS, DGPS), or radars. If accuracy of positiong is higer, then safety of navigation is growing. This article presents these problems exemplifying with approaching channel to ports situated on West Pomera- nian water region.

  11. Predictors of Parenting Stress for Abusive and Nonabusive Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Andrea V.; Lewis, Kristen M.; Lynn, Amy E.; Haskett, Mary E.; Behrend, Tara S.

    2009-01-01

    We examined a model of parenting stress for abusive mothers (n = 80) and nonabusive mothers (n = 86) using linear regression analyses. Predictors in the model included (a) the degree to which mothers were bothered by child misbehavior, (b) mothers' general psychological functioning, and (c) observed child behavior during parent-child interactions.…

  12. Parenting among Mothers with Bipolar Disorder: Children's Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkataraman, Meenakshi

    2011-01-01

    Four children from three families in which the mother had a bipolar disorder were interviewed to understand their perspectives on their mothers' parenting. Children identified strengths in their mother's parenting, such as helping them with homework and moods and providing for their wants. They also identified challenges, such as mothers sleeping…

  13. Single, Cohabitating, and Married Mothers' Time with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendig, Sarah M.; Bianchi, Suzanne M.

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing the 2003 and 2004 American Time Use Survey (ATUS), this study examines the relationship between family structure and maternal time with children among 4,309 married mothers and 1,821 single mothers with children less than 13 years of age. Single mothers spend less time with their children than married mothers, though the differences are…

  14. Training Mothers in the Child's Game: A Comparison of Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantin-Page, Lisette; And Others

    This study compared immediate, short-term effects of different training components on mothers' acquisition of non-directive play skills. Subjects were dyads of 49 mothers and their sons, ages 4 to 6. Mother-son pairs were randomly assigned to one of four conditions. The control group received no training. All other mothers viewed the videotape…

  15. Interactive Behaviors of Ethnic Minority Mothers and their Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Jada L.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Landerman, Lawrence R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the interactive behaviors of American Indian mothers and their premature infants with those of African American mothers and their premature infants. Design Descriptive, comparative study. Setting Three neonatal intensive care units and two pediatric clinics in the southeast. Participants Seventy-seven mother-infant dyads: 17 American Indian mother-infant dyads and 60 African American mother-infant dyads. Methods Videotapes of mother-infant interactions and the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) were used to assess the interactions of the mothers and their premature infants at six months corrected age. Results American Indian mothers looked more, gestured more, and were more often the primary caregivers to their infants than the African American mothers. American Indian infants expressed more positive affect and gestured more to their mothers, whereas African American infants engaged in more non-negative vocalization toward their mothers. African American mothers scored higher on the HOME subscales of provision of appropriate play materials and parental involvement with the infant. American Indian mothers scored higher on the opportunities for variety in daily living subscale. Conclusion Although many of the interactive behaviors of American Indian and African American mother-infant dyads were similar, some differences did occur. Clinicians need to be aware of the cultural differences in mother-infant interactions. To optimize child developmental outcomes, nurses need to support mothers in their continuation or adoption of positive interactive behaviors. PMID:23682698

  16. Predictors of Mothers' Use of Spanking with Their Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs-Orme, Terri; Cain, Daphne S.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: This study describes mothers who report spanking their infants in the first 13 months of life. Methods: Two hundred forty-six (246) mothers were interviewed in the Mother-Baby Unit of a large university-affiliated hospital in a large southeastern city of the United States. Ninety-three percent (93%) of those mothers were reinterviewed…

  17. Dieting among Adolescent Girls and Their Mothers: An Interpretive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogle, Jennifer Paff; Damhorst, Mary Lynn

    2000-01-01

    A study of 20 mothers and their adolescent daughters found that both groups distinguished between going on a diet and watching eating habits. Dieting/watching patterns varied in content, duration, and intent. Daughters' modeling of mothers' behavior varied depending on degree of identification with mothers or mothers' verbal reinforcement.…

  18. Personalization in Mother-Child Emotion Talk across Three Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucirkova, Natalia; Tompkins, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    An unexplored aspect of contextual variation in emotion talk is the extent to which the emotions mothers and children discuss relate to the child, mother, or another self. To establish the extent to which mothers and children personalize the emotions they discuss, we examined the emotion talk of 40 American mother-child dyads in three…

  19. Operationalization and Predictive Utility of Mother-Daughter Synchrony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Pamela H.; McCallum, R. Steve

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between mother-daughter synchrony and adolescent girls' self-esteem and academic competence was examined for 212 daughters and their mothers using the Mother-Daughter Synchrony Scale (MDSS). Results show that synchrony between mother and daughter, as perceived by the daughter, was significantly related to the daughter's…

  20. Mothers' Behavior and Sons' Adjustment Following Divorce

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M. Greene; Leigh A. Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Research on children's adjustment to divorce has repeatedly found that sons fare more poorly than daughters. In an effort to better understand the post-divorce adjustment of boys, this study focuses on two aspects of the mother-son relationship; maternal support and coercion, as reported by the son. In addition, we examine the extent to which the mother's attitude toward her ex-spouse

  1. Child murder by mothers: patterns and prevention

    PubMed Central

    HATTERS FRIEDMAN, SUSAN; RESNICK, PHILLIP J

    2007-01-01

    The tragedy of maternal filicide, or child murder by mothers, has occurred throughout history and throughout the world. This review of the research literature sought to identify common predictors in the general population as well as in correctional and psychiatric samples. Further research is needed to improve identification of children and mothers at risk. Infanticide laws are discussed. Suggestions for prevention are made based on the current literature and the authors' experiences. PMID:18188430

  2. 100 Best Companies for Working Mothers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The results of the tenth annual Women's Wire "Working Mother 100" are now available on the web. Each year the companies that provide the best working environment for mothers are chosen on the basis of four criteria: pay, opportunities to advance, child care, and other family-friendly benefits. More than just a listing, the survey provides an annotation for each company, highlighting specifics and pointing out particular strengths. A nomination form for next year's list appears at the bottom of the listings.

  3. Substance Use among Adolescent Mothers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Shawna L. Carroll; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2013-01-01

    Maternal substance abuse is a critical problem, and adolescent mothers appear to be at high risk for such behaviors. We review studies on postpartum adolescent substance use to explore the extent of this problem and avenues for new research. Authors screened 1,300 studies, identifying 12 articles on substance use among postpartum adolescent mothers for this review. Adolescent mothers reported greater substance use before pregnancy compared to other adolescent females. Although some adolescents continued substance use during pregnancy, most stopped using only to resume within six months after birth. Comparisons of use to national samples of nulliparous adolescent females showed a higher prevalence of substance use in this population. Substances used often varied by race/ethnicity, with white mothers more likely to smoke cigarettes and use marijuana, and Black mothers more likely than whites to drink and use drugs. Of all identified studies, only one focused on Hispanics. Beliefs about drug use grew less negative as girls transitioned from pregnancy to parenthood. As they transitioned to adulthood, substance use remained prevalent and stable. Psychological distress and low self-esteem appeared to influence continued use. Friends’ cigarette smoking predicted early initiation of and persistent smoking, while increased education predicted quitting. Early initiation of substances often predicted problem behaviors. Adolescent mothers are a vulnerable population, implicating use of problem behavior theory or the self-medication hypothesis in future research. Multiple avenues for new studies are needed to help identify effective treatment and intervention for this understudied population. PMID:23641120

  4. Substance Use among Adolescent Mothers: A Review.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Shawna L Carroll; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2013-05-01

    Maternal substance abuse is a critical problem, and adolescent mothers appear to be at high risk for such behaviors. We review studies on postpartum adolescent substance use to explore the extent of this problem and avenues for new research. Authors screened 1,300 studies, identifying 12 articles on substance use among postpartum adolescent mothers for this review. Adolescent mothers reported greater substance use before pregnancy compared to other adolescent females. Although some adolescents continued substance use during pregnancy, most stopped using only to resume within six months after birth. Comparisons of use to national samples of nulliparous adolescent females showed a higher prevalence of substance use in this population. Substances used often varied by race/ethnicity, with white mothers more likely to smoke cigarettes and use marijuana, and Black mothers more likely than whites to drink and use drugs. Of all identified studies, only one focused on Hispanics. Beliefs about drug use grew less negative as girls transitioned from pregnancy to parenthood. As they transitioned to adulthood, substance use remained prevalent and stable. Psychological distress and low self-esteem appeared to influence continued use. Friends' cigarette smoking predicted early initiation of and persistent smoking, while increased education predicted quitting. Early initiation of substances often predicted problem behaviors. Adolescent mothers are a vulnerable population, implicating use of problem behavior theory or the self-medication hypothesis in future research. Multiple avenues for new studies are needed to help identify effective treatment and intervention for this understudied population. PMID:23641120

  5. Mother-child bonding assessment tools?

    PubMed Central

    Perrelli, Jaqueline Galdino Albuquerque; Zambaldi, Carla Fonseca; Cantilino, Amaury; Sougey, Everton Botelho

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify and describe research tools used to evaluate bonding between mother and child up to one year of age, as well as to provide information on reliability and validity measures related to these tools. Data source: Research studies available on PUBMED, LILACS, ScienceDirect, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases with the following descriptors: mother-child relations and mother infant relationship, as well as the expressions validity, reliability and scale. Data synthesis: 23 research studies were selected and fully analyzed. Thirteen evaluation research tools were identified concerning mother and child attachment: seven scales, three questionnaires, two inventories and one observation method. From all tools analyzed, the Prenatal Attachment Inventory presented the higher validity and reliability measures to assess mother and fetus relation during pregnancy. Concerning the puerperal period, better consistency coefficients were found for Maternal Attachment Inventory and Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire. Besides, the last one revealed a higher sensibility to identify amenable and severe disorders in the affective relations between mother and child. Conclusions: The majority of research tools are reliable to study the phenomenon presented, although there are some limitations regarding the construct and criterion related to validity. In addition to this, only two of them are translated into Portuguese and adapted to women and children populations in Brazil, being a decisive gap to scientific production in this area. PMID:25479859

  6. "Renewed" "older" motherhood/mothering: a qualitative exploration.

    PubMed

    Jarvie, Rachel; Letherby, Gayle; Stenhouse, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This UK-based qualitative study explored multiparous women's experiences of being "older" mothers. Respondents were "renewed mothers" who had a child/children relatively early in their reproductive careers and then again after 35 years of age. Key themes arising from the empirical data were: instrumental role of male partners in post-35 mothering, purported "renewal" of self in the face of menopause/diminution of mothering, caring for teenagers and babies/toddlers simultaneously, and subjection to criticisms of "wrong-aged" motherhood. Experiences of "renewed" "older" mothers suggest significant hard work is necessitated both in terms of mothering and presentation of self as an appropriate mother. PMID:25581375

  7. Handgrip force of maltreating mothers in reaction to infant signals.

    PubMed

    Compier-de Block, Laura H C G; Alink, Lenneke R A; Reijman, Sophie; Werner, Claudia D; Maras, Athanasios; Rijnberk, Corine; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2015-02-01

    Handgrip force responses to infant signals were examined in a sample of 43 maltreating and 40 non-maltreating mothers. During a standardized handgrip paradigm, mothers were asked to squeeze a handgrip dynamometer at maximal and at half of their maximal handgrip strength while listening to infant crying and laughter sounds. Maltreating mothers used excessive force more often while listening to infant crying and laughter than non-maltreating mothers. Of the maltreating mothers, only neglectful mothers (n=20) tended to use excessive force more often during crying than non-maltreating mothers. Participants did not rate the sounds differently, indicating that maltreating mothers cannot be differentiated from non-maltreating mothers based on their perception of infant signals, but show different behavioral responses to the signals. Results imply that, in response to infant signals (i.e., crying or laughing), maltreating mothers may be insufficiently able to regulate the exertion of physical force. PMID:24717144

  8. SHIPDAVISStudent Health Insurance Plan Davis SHIP has you covered.

    E-print Network

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    comprehensive, affordable health insurance for registered students. Davis SHIP helps cover health care expenses introduced by the Affordable Care Act (ACA): · Guaranteed coverage to all students, with no waiting periods company. Five Things You Need to Know About the Affordable Care Act & Davis SHIP #12;SHIPDAVISStudent

  9. Role of SHIP1 in cancer and mucosal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sandra; Iyer, Sonia; Kerr, William G

    2013-03-01

    The SH-2 containing inositol 5'-polyphosphatase 1 (SHIP1) is a multifunctional protein expressed predominantly, but not exclusively, by hematopoietic cells. SHIP1 removes the 5'-phosphate from the product of PI3K, PI(3,4,5)P?, to generate PI(3,4)P?. Both PIP species influence the activity level of Akt and ultimately regulate cell survival and differentiation. SHIP1 also harbors several protein interaction domains that endow it with many nonenzymatic cell signaling or receptor masking functions. In this review, we discuss the opposing roles of SHIP1 in cancer and in mucosal inflammation. On one hand, germline loss of SHIP1 causes myeloid lung consolidation and severe inflammation in the ileum, a phenotype that closely mimics human Crohn's disease and can be rescued by reconstitution with SHIP1-competent T cells. On the other, transient inhibition of the enzymatic activity of SHIP1 in cancer cells leads to apoptosis and enhances survival in lethal murine xenograft models. Overall, careful dissection of the different pathological mechanisms involved in several diseases provides novel opportunities for therapeutic intervention targeting SHIP1. PMID:23551094

  10. Referral Tip Sheet for students without SHIP insurance

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Referral Tip Sheet for students without SHIP insurance www.uhs.berkeley.edu n (510)642-2000 If you do not have SHIP, the insurance plan sponsored by the University, and are referred by your Tang Center clinician to an off-campusproviderforcare,youwillneedtocontact your health insurer to determine

  11. Journeys on the Rivers and Oceans: Ship Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.; Carper, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Ship transportation includes various forms of technology. Ships have special designs to meet technological needs. They are used to transport people and cargoes and have been a major part of history throughout civilization. Products are available from around the world because they can be economically moved from producers to consumers. Not only are…

  12. Hygiene inspections on passenger ships in Europe - an overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Varvara A. Mouchtouri; Sandra Westacott; Gordon Nichols; Tobias Riemer; Mel Skipp; Christopher LR Bartlett; Jenny Kremastinou; Christos Hadjichristodoulou

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hygiene inspections on passenger ships are important for the prevention of communicable diseases. The European Union (EU) countries conduct hygiene inspections on passenger ships in order to ensure that appropriate measures have been taken to eliminate potential sources of contamination which could lead to the spread of communicable diseases. This study was implemented within the framework of the EU

  13. Innovative concepts for power station design in all electric ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Da Rin; S. Quaia; G. Sulligoi

    2008-01-01

    The paper points out innovative design issues of the shipboard power stations for all electric ships (AESs). Alternators and voltage control system operations are reviewed under an approach which emphasizes the impact of design choices on power generation and availability. The work moves from an in-deep analysis of modern cruise ship integrated electric power systems (IEPSs), in order to assess

  14. Rainfall Measurement on Ship Revisited: The 1997 PACS TEPPS Cruise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra E. Yuter; Wendy S. Parker

    2001-01-01

    Fifteen rain measurement instruments were deployed on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ship Ronald H. Brown during the 1997 Pan American Climate Studies (PACS) Tropical Eastern Pacific Process Study (TEPPS). To examine differences in rainfall catchment related to instrument design, three types of disdrometers, an optical rain gauge, a ship rain gauge, and a siphon gauge were clustered in

  15. Sexual health of women working aboard cruise ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle A. Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Objective This paper reports on the sexual health of women working in the cruise sector of the shipping industry.Design Data reported in this paper was collected as part of a larger study exploring company policies and practices relating to women seafarers, and the experiences of women seafarers in both the cruise and cargo . sectors of the shipping industry. Qualitative

  16. Automatic classification of ships from infrared (FLIR) images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Withagen; Klamer Schutte; Albert Vossepoel; Marcel Breuers

    The aim of the research presented in this paper is to find out whether automatic classification of ships from Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) images is feasible in maritime patrol aircraft. An image processing system has been developed for this task. It includes iterative shading correction and a top hat filter for the detection of the ship. It uses a segmentation

  17. 73 FR 23310 - Long Range Identification and Tracking of Ships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2008-04-29

    ...Policy Act of 1969 NOA Notice of Arrival NM Nautical Mile NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...navigating within 1,000 nautical miles (nm) of the U.S. baseline, unless the ship's...if the ship operates-- Within 100 nm of the United States baseline, or...

  18. Optimisation of the Survivability of Naval Ships by Genetic Algorithms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evangelos K. Boulougouris; Apostolos D. Papanikolaou

    2004-01-01

    Surface warships are a special category of ships given the fact that compared to other ship types they are designed to operate in a lethal environment. Therefore their survivability is a vital feature of their design. The damage stability characteristics form a major design parameter of the vulnerability and therefore of the survivability of a naval combatant. The naval architect

  19. Recovery energy from ship propulsion system based on microelectronic technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Iordanoaia; M. Nicorescu

    2009-01-01

    All shipping companies are involved in the several management programs for increasing of efficiency of transportation on the sea. Optimal transportation is one of actual tendency in the world shipbuilding which requests a lot of human resources in design development respectively in construction of the ships. One direction with very good results is to use one part of propulsion energy

  20. Digital Measuring System for Monitoring Motor Shaft Parameters on Ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Dzapo; Z. Stare; N. Bobanac

    2008-01-01

    The robust measuring system for continuous monitoring of the ship motor shaft average torque, power and rotational speed was developed and tested. The system was designed for permanent installation in ships under realistic working conditions. The strain gage sensor is employed to measure the torque, while the shaft rotational speed is measured by the inductive proximity switch. Contactless power transmission

  1. Digital Measuring System for Monitoring Motor Shaft Parameters on Ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Dzapo; Zoran Stare; Nenad Bobanac

    2009-01-01

    The robust measuring system for the continuous monitoring of the ship motor shaft average torque, power, and rotational speed was developed and tested. The system was designed for permanent installation in ships under realistic working conditions. The strain gage sensor is employed to measure the torque, whereas the shaft rotational speed is measured by the inductive proximity switch. The strain

  2. 1. AERIAL VIEW, NAVAL INACTIVE SHIPS MAINTENANCE FACILITY, SINCLAIR ISLET, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, NAVAL INACTIVE SHIPS MAINTENANCE FACILITY, SINCLAIR ISLET, BREMERTON, KITSAP COUNTY, WASHINGTON WITH EX-USS HORNET CVS-12, THREE MINECRAFT ALONGSIDE TO PORT. OTHER INACTIVE SHIPS IN BACKGROUND. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  3. Accelerations and Errors in Gravity Measurements on Surface Ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. NEUMAN

    1972-01-01

    Typical samples of ship accelerations are used to examine errors in gravity measurement at sea. Ships experience large vertical (heave) accelerations that must be filtered out in order to obtain accurate measurements from a gravimeter mounted on a stabilized platform. Four heave filters designed to reduce such accelerations to %1 mgal while not affecting the gravity signals are examined. The

  4. Trajectory tracking control of nonlinear full actuated ship with disturbances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yang Yang; Jialu Du; Chen Guo; Guangqiang Li

    2011-01-01

    Based on backstepping technique, this paper presents a design of any reference trajectory tracking controller for marine surface vessels under unknown time-variant environmental disturbances. The mathematical model of nonlinear surface ship movement includes Coriolis and centripetal matrix and nonlinear damp term. The observer is constructed for providing an estimation of unknown disturbances. It is proved that the designed ship trajectory

  5. Emissions from international shipping: 1. The last 50 years

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Eyring; H. W. Köhler; J. van Aardenne; A. Lauer

    2005-01-01

    Seagoing ships emit exhaust gases and particles into the marine boundary layer and significantly contribute to the total budget of anthropogenic emissions. We present an emission inventory for international shipping for the past five decades to be used in global modeling studies with detailed tropospheric chemistry. The inventory is a bottom-up analysis using fuel consumption and fleet numbers for the

  6. Hydrogen fuel cells could power ships at port

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Joe

    2013-06-27

    Sandia National Laboratories researcher Joe Pratt conducted a study on the use of hydrogen fuel cells to power docked ships at major ports. He found the potential environmental and cost benefits to be substantial. Here, he discusses the study and explains how hydrogen fuel cells can provide efficient, pollution-free energy to ships at port.

  7. Make a Model Home Made From Shipping Containers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-03-03

    Watch an interview with a couple who built a home from shipping containers. Then, design and construct a scale model of a unique shipping container home using printed templates, and estimate the cost of flooring and paint based on model dimensions.

  8. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable...Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington Ship Canal. (a) When fog prevails by day or by night, the...

  9. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable...Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington Ship Canal. (a) When fog prevails by day or by night, the...

  10. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable...Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington Ship Canal. (a) When fog prevails by day or by night, the...

  11. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable...Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington Ship Canal. (a) When fog prevails by day or by night, the...

  12. Management information system for the promotion of safety in shipping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Goulielmos; E. Tzannatos

    1997-01-01

    Proposes the establishment of a management information system (MIS) for the promotion of safety in shipping. Considers the information technology in shipping to be the combination of satellite systems and computers onboard and ashore. In this combination, which enables the provision of an optimum selection and management of data for automatic or human decision making, the role of satcoms is

  13. Recovery and cultivation of keratinocytes from shipped mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Ya; La, Thi Dinh; Gurenko, Janna; Steenhuis, Pieter; Liu, Wei; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2014-08-27

    Murine keratinocyte culture from neonatal skin is an important tool for studying the functional role of specific genes in epithelial biology. However, when the transgenic animal is only available in a geographically distant local, obtaining viable keratinocytes can be problematic. A method for transferring the isolated murine skin from collaborating labs could decrease the cost of shipping live animals, and would allow the efficient use of the tissues from the transgenic animals. Here we optimized shipping conditions and characterized the cells retrieved and cultured from mouse skin shipped for 48 hours at 0°C. The cultured keratinocytes from the control, non-shipped skin and the 2-day shipped skin were 43.6 +/- 7.8% viable, doubled every 2 days, and expressed comparable amounts of heat shock proteins and CD29/integrin beta-1. However, under the same shipping conditions, the 3-day shipped tissue failed to establish colonies in the culture. Therefore, this 2-day shipping technique allows the transfer mouse skin from distant locations with recovery of viable, propagatable keratinocytes, facilitating long-distance collaborations. J. Cell. Physiol. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25160898

  14. Rainfall Measurement on Ship Revisited: The 1997 PACS TEPPS Cruise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra E. Yuter; Wendy S. Parker

    2001-01-01

    Fifteen rain measurement instruments were deployed on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ship Ronald H. Brownduring the 1997 Pan American Climate Studies (PACS) Tropical Eastern Pacific Process Study (TEPPS). To examine differences in rainfall catchment related to instrument design, three types of dis- drometers, an optical rain gauge, a ship rain gauge, and a siphon gauge were clustered in

  15. Eighteenth-century colonial American merchant ship construction

    E-print Network

    VanHorn, Kellie Michelle

    2005-02-17

    .... 8 III CLASSIFICATION OF EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY SHIPS: HULL AND RIG TYPES....................................................... 23 Chapman?s Hull Types .............................................. 24 Types of Rig... ............................................................................................................... 238 viii LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Shipwreck locations......................................................................... 6 2 Two styles of English tucks used on square-sterned vessels........... 26 3 Ship rig c. 1760...

  16. The Houston Ship Channel security: a case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Han Q. Le; P. A. Bellamy; S. S. S. Pei

    2007-01-01

    The Houston Ship Channel (HSC) is a 50-mile long shipping channel that contains many private ports including the Port of Houston Authority. It has a uniquely critical role with respect to the US petroleum energy supply. The HSC security is currently planned for significant enhancement under the auspices of the Harris County and the Houston-based Port Strategic Security Council. The

  17. The Houston Ship Channel Physical Security - A Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Han Q. Le; P. A. Bellamy; S. S. S. Pei

    The Houston Ship Channel (HSC) is a 50-mile long shipping channel that contains many private ports including the Port of Houston Authority. It has a uniquely critical role with respect to the US petroleum energy supply. The HSC security is currently planned for significant enhancement under the auspices of the Harris County and the Houston-based Port Strategic Security Council. The

  18. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES...installed on the ship or aircraft. (c) The station...constitute a hazard to the safety of life or property. For a station aboard an aircraft, the apparatus...

  19. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES...installed on the ship or aircraft. (c) The station...constitute a hazard to the safety of life or property. For a station aboard an aircraft, the apparatus...

  20. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES...installed on the ship or aircraft. (c) The station...constitute a hazard to the safety of life or property. For a station aboard an aircraft, the apparatus...

  1. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES...installed on the ship or aircraft. (c) The station...constitute a hazard to the safety of life or property. For a station aboard an aircraft, the apparatus...

  2. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES...installed on the ship or aircraft. (c) The station...constitute a hazard to the safety of life or property. For a station aboard an aircraft, the apparatus...

  3. Nuclear ships in the maritime law of Yugoslavia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Filipovic

    1973-01-01

    From first international meeting on nuclear law: Nuclear Inter Jura 73; ; Karlsruhe, Ger. (11 Sep 1973). The safety regulations of the SOLAS agreement ; and the regulations of international law are applied to nuclear ships under ; foreign colors obtaining permission to enter a harbor after examination of the ; safety report. The problems of distressed nuclear ships at

  4. Hydrogen fuel cells could power ships at port

    ScienceCinema

    Pratt, Joe

    2013-11-22

    Sandia National Laboratories researcher Joe Pratt conducted a study on the use of hydrogen fuel cells to power docked ships at major ports. He found the potential environmental and cost benefits to be substantial. Here, he discusses the study and explains how hydrogen fuel cells can provide efficient, pollution-free energy to ships at port.

  5. Identification of a ship or submarine from its magnetic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioannidis, G.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between the measured time fluctuations of the ambient magnetic field due to the passage of a ship or submarine and the characteristic magnetization properties of this vessel are derived. This relationship would be useful in identifying or classifying ships and submarines according to their magnetization properties.

  6. 47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...maintain a continuous watch: (1) On VHF DSC channel 70, if the ship is fitted with...2); (2) On the distress and safety DSC frequency 2187.5 kHz, if the ship is...3); (3) On the distress and safety DSC frequencies 2187.5 kHz and 8414.5...

  7. Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping July 8, 2013

    E-print Network

    - 1 - Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal July 8, 2013 Lab breaks another record with three months remaining in fiscal year LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 8, 2013--Los Alamos National Laboratory, which in fiscal year 2013. During the past nine months, Los Alamos shipped 1,074 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU

  8. Ship noise and cortisol secretion in European freshwater fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lidia Eva Wysocki; John P. Dittami; Friedrich Ladich

    2006-01-01

    Underwater noise pollution is a growing problem in aquatic environments and as such may be a major source of stress for fish. In the present study, we addressed the effects of ship noise and continuous Gaussian noise on adrenal activity in three European freshwater species. Underwater ship noise recorded in the Danube River and two Austrian lakes was played back

  9. Numerical method for predicting ship propeller cavitation noise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong-Kun Zhang; Ying Xiong

    2011-01-01

    During ship travels in high-velocity, propeller cavitation noise predominates in the radiated noise sources. However, experiential data regress method was use to predicate propeller cavitation noise in the past. In this article, propeller cavitation noise has been calculated by numerical computation method. From the engineering point of view, ship propeller has been disposed as a dipole bubble. Bubble volume pulse

  10. Mapping cumulative noise from shipping to inform marine spatial planning

    E-print Network

    Mapping cumulative noise from shipping to inform marine spatial planning Christine Erbea) Centre demonstrate one such tool for the example of Canada's Pacific Exclu- sive Economic Zone (EEZ). 2. Ship noise@st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract: Including ocean noise in marine spatial planning requires predictions of noise levels on large

  11. Hull–superstructure interaction in optimised passenger ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jani Romanoff; Heikki Remes; Petri Varsta; Jasmin Jelovica; Alan Klanac; Ari Niemelä; Svemir Bralic; Hendrik Naar

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates the interaction between the hull and the superstructure in optimised passenger ships when exposed to bending loads. The coupled beam theory was applied to extend the basic beam theory to take into account the vertical and shear stiffness between various decks. Optimisation of passenger ships with respect to weight and vertical centre of gravity (VCG) is carried

  12. Lidar observations of the plumes of incineration ships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klapheck, K.

    1984-01-01

    Operations of a lidar system on board a ship in the incineration area of the North Sea are summarized. The plumes of incineration ships were observed, to study propagation processes in the boundary layer above the sea surface. Examples of lidar soundings are presented.

  13. Gender and Patterns of Concerned Responsiveness in Representations of the Mother-Daughter and Mother-Son Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Ruth; Shalit-Naggar, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Given that girls show more interpersonal concern than boys, it was predicted that more mother-daughter than mother-son dyads would develop a relationship of mutual concerned responsiveness (CR). Two hundred and twenty-six Israeli children (7-8 years old) and 91 mother-child pairs provided narratives of mother-child interactions. At high levels of…

  14. Infants of Depressed Mothers Exhibit Atypical Frontal Electrical Brain Activity during Interactions with Mother and with a Familiar, Nondepressed Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Geraldine; Frey, Karin; Panagiotides, Heracles; Yamada, Emily; Hessl, David; Osterling, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Examined whether the atypical pattern of brain activity found in infants of depressed mothers generalized to situations not involving the mother. Found that 13- to 15-month-olds of depressed mothers exhibited reduced left--relative to right--frontal activity during baseline and during interactions with mother and familiar experimenter. This…

  15. Postpartum Mothers’ Attitudes, Knowledge, and Trust Regarding Vaccination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann Chen Wu; Daryl J. Wisler-Sher; Katherine Griswold; Eve Colson; Eugene D. Shapiro; Eric S. Holmboe

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine attitudes and knowledge about vaccinations in postpartum mothers. Methods This cross-sectional study collected data via written survey to postpartum mothers in a large teaching hospital in Connecticut.\\u000a We used multivariable analysis to identify mothers who were less trusting with regard to vaccines. Results Of 228 mothers who participated in the study, 29% of mothers worried about vaccinating

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF THE H1700 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Loftin, B.; Mann, P.

    2009-06-05

    The H1700 Package is based on the DOE-EM Certified 9977 Packaging. The H1700 will be certified by the Packaging Certification Division of the National Nuclear Security Administration for the shipment of plutonium by air by the United Stated Military both within the United States and internationally. The H1700 is designed to ship radioactive contents in assemblies of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) or arrangements of nested food-pack cans. The RTG containers are designed and tested to remain leaktight during transport, handling, and storage; however, their ability to remain leaktight during transport in the H1700 is not credited. This paper discusses the design and special operation of the H1700.

  17. Apollo 8 Capsule Hoisted Onto Recovery Ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This is a photograph of the Apollo 8 Capsule being hoisted onto the recovery ship following splashdown on December 27, 1968. The first manned Apollo mission to escape Earth's gravity and travel to the lunar vicinity, the Saturn V, SA-503, Apollo 8 mission liftoff occurred seven days prior, on December 21, 1968. Aboard were astronauts William Anders, Lunar Module (LM) Pilot; James Lovell, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Frank Borman, commander. The mission achieved operational experience and tested the Apollo command module systems, including communications, tracking, and life-support, in cis-lunar space and lunar orbit, and allowed evaluation of crew performance on a lunar orbiting mission. The crew photographed the lunar surface, both far side and near side, obtaining information on topography and landmarks as well as other scientific information necessary for future Apollo landings. All systems operated within allowable parameters and all objectives of the mission were achieved.

  18. EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-05050

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2014-11-06

    Shipping package 9975-05050 was examined in K-Area following its identification as a high wattage package. Elevated temperature and fiberboard moisture content are key parameters that impact the degradation rate of fiberboard within 9975 packages in a storage environment. The high wattage of this package contributes significantly to component temperatures. After examination in K-Area, the package was provided to SRNL for further examination of the fiberboard assembly. The moisture content of the fiberboard was relatively low (compared to packages examined previously), but the moisture gradient (between fiberboard ID and OD surfaces) was relatively high, as would be expected for the high heat load. The cane fiberboard appeared intact and displayed no apparent change in integrity relative to a new package.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic ship propulsion with superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.L.; Gubser, D.U.

    1988-12-01

    The feasibility of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ship propulsion using superconducting magnets is reviewed in light of recent advances in high-temperature superconductivity. The scaling relations for the electrical and hydraulic efficiencies of MHD pump-jets show that overall efficiencies > 50% are feasible at speeds of 40 knots and higher provided that magnetic fields > 5 T can be maintained over volumes of the order of 100 m/sup 3/. The development of large-scale electrical machinery and magnets using the high-temperature superconductors now under development could make it practical to construct submersibles for high-speed and silent operation. Low-speed tankers for movement of bulk cargo would be efficient with even lower fields.

  20. Ship-in-a-bottle catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Haw, James F.; Song, Weiguo

    2006-07-18

    In accordance with the present invention there is provided a novel catalyst system in which the catalytic structure is tailormade at the nanometer scale using the invention's novel ship-in-a-bottle synthesis techniques. The invention describes modified forms of solid catalysts for use in heterogeneous catalysis that have a microporous structure defined by nanocages. Examples include zeolites, SAPOs, and analogous materials that have the controlled pore dimensions and hydrothermal stability required for many industrial processes. The invention provides for modification of these catalysts using reagents that are small enough to pass through the windows used to access the cages. The small reagents are then reacted to form larger molecules in the cages.

  1. Damage location system for a tanker ship

    SciTech Connect

    Strange, B.B.; Thigpen, B.B.

    1991-05-21

    This patent describes a ship having a plurality of liquid cargo tanks, a method for locating a point of impact due to collision with an object. It comprises: mounting a hydrophone array in each one of the plurality of cargo tanks; detecting with the hydrophone arrays, average ambient noise transients and impulsive shock waves; measuring the relative times of first arrival of the impulsive shock waves at each the hydrophone; calculating the differences in the times of first arrival of the impulsive shock waves at the two hydrophones of any two selected pairs of hydrophones; from the calculated shock wave arrival time differences defining two lines of constant shock wave first arrival time difference with respect to the two hydrophones corresponding to each the selected pair of hydrophones; and fixing the point of impact at the point of intersection of the two lines of constant shock wave arrival time difference.

  2. Integration of SAR and AIS for ship detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chan-Su; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2012-06-01

    This abstract describes the preliminary design concept for an integration system of SAR and AIS data. SAR sensors are used to acquire image data over large coverage area either through the space borne or airborne platforms in UTC. AIS reports should also obtained on the same date as of the SAR acquisition for the purpose to perform integration test. Once both data reports are obtained, one need to match the timings of AIS data acquisition over the SAR image acquisition time with consideration of local time & boundary to extract the closest time signal from AIS report in order to know the AIS based ship positions, but still one cannot be able to distinguish which ships have the AIS transponder after projection of AIS based position onto the SAR image acquisition boundary. As far as integration is concerned, the ship dead-reckoning concept is most important forecasted position which provides the AIS based ship position at the time of SAR image acquisition and also provides the hints for azimuth shift which occurred in SAR image for the case of moving ships which moves in the direction perpendicular to the direction of flight path. Unknown ship's DR estimation is to be carried out based on the initial positions, speed and course over ground, which has already been shorted out from AIS reports, during the step of time matching. This DR based ship's position will be the candidate element for searching the SAR based ship targets for the purpose of identification & matching within the certain boundary around DR. The searching method is performed by means of estimation of minimum distance from ship's DR to SAR based ship position, and once it determines, so the candidate element will look for matching like ship size match of DR based ship's dimension wrt SAR based ship's edge, there may be some error during the matching with SAR based ship edges with actual ship's hull design as per the longitudinal and transverse axis size information obtained from the AIS reports due to blurring effect in SAR based ship signatures, once the conditions are satisfied, candidate element will move & shift over the SAR based ship signature target with the minimum displacement and it is known to be the azimuth shift compensation and this overall methodology are known to be integration of AIS report data over the SAR image acquisition boundary with assessment of time matching. The expected result may provide the good accuracy of the SAR and AIS contact position along with dimension and classification of ships over SAR image. There may be possibilities of matching speed and course from candidate element with SAR based ship signature, but still the challenges are presents in front of us that to estimation of speed and course by means of SAR data, if it may be possible so the expected final result may be more accurate as due to extra matching effects and the results may be used for the near real time performance for ship identification with help of integrated system design based on SAR and AIS data reports.

  3. Ontologies for ship's flag search on the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinos, Nikolaos-Panagiotis; Triakosaris, Evangelos; Galiotou, Eleni

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss issues on the representation and search of maritime data on the semantic web. In particular, we are concerned with data related to the requirements put forward by ship registries and should be met in view of a ship's flag acquisition. The choice of a ship's flag is a matter of crucial importance since it is the basis of tax payment and rule and regulation enforcement for the flying of flags. In our approach, flags and corresponding requirements are represented in the form of a ontology. Data "opening" and linking with the use of the ontology in question, will facilitate a ship's flag search based on its particular characteristics and will provide useful information on ship registration requirements.

  4. Research activities on CFD at the Ship Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Yoshiaki

    1990-10-01

    The CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) method is used for the analysis of flow pattern in the area of ship fluid flow analysis. Research activities of the following themes utilizing the CFD method at the Ship Research Inst. were briefly described: viscous flow around the ship body, waves generated in free surface, the flow pattern around propellers, and interference between propellers and ship stern by the accompanying flow. The CFD can be utilized with advantages for the numerical simulation under hypothetical flow patterns. As one example of CFD application, control of water flow around the ship body by magnetohydrodynamics was simulated. The Lorentz force is developed in the sea water, when electric current is applied under high magnetic field. This Lorentz force can be useful for the control of fluid field.

  5. LNG demand, shipping will expand through 2010

    SciTech Connect

    True, W.R.

    1998-02-09

    The 1990s, especially the middle years, have witnessed a dramatic turnaround in the growth of liquefied-natural-gas demand which has tracked equally strong natural-gas demand growth. This trend was underscored late last year by several annual studies of world LNG demand and shipping. As 1998 began, however, economic turmoil in Asian financial markets has clouded near-term prospects for LNG in particular and all energy in general. But the extent of damage to energy markets is so far unclear. A study by US-based Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL, reveals that LNG imports worldwide have climbed nearly 8%/year since 1980 and account for 25% of all natural gas traded internationally. In the mid-1970s, the share was only 5%. In 1996, the most recent year for which complete data are available, world LNG trade rose 7.7% to a record 92 billion cu m, outpacing the overall consumption for natural gas which increased 4.7% in 1996. By 2015, says the IGT study, natural-gas use would surpass coal as the world`s second most widely used fuel, after petroleum. Much of this growth will occur in the developing countries of Asia where gas use, before the current economic crisis began, was projected to grow 8%/year through 2015. Similar trends are reflected in another study of LNG trade released at year end 1997, this from Ocean Shipping Consultants Ltd., Surrey, U.K. The study was done too early, however, to consider the effects of the financial problems roiling Asia.

  6. Surgeon-superintendents on convict ships.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J

    1996-04-01

    Surgeon-superintendents on the convict ships transporting convicted men, women and youths to Australia played a key role in the evolution of medical standards in Australia. The British Transportation Acts of 1717 and 1825 added the punishment of exile and banishment to the prevailing penology of the era, that of retribution and deterrence. The surgeon-superintendents formed a bulwark during the sea voyages (between 88 and 258 days), protecting the convicts against the potential abuses of the time. Between 1787 and 1868, some 160 000 convicts were transported to the open air gaols at Sydney, Norfolk Island, Van Diemen's Land (Hobart, Macquarie Harbour, Maria Island and Port Arthur), Moreton Bay, Melville Island and Fremantle. Seventeen convict ships left England for Australia in 1823 alone. The surgeon-superintendent's role on the high seas evolved over this time from one of amateur casualness with a primary responsibility to the system rather than to individual convicts, to that of a highly efficient, courageous professionalism. It became a new specialty discipline in its own right. Mortality on the convict transportation voyages fell from one in three convicts embarked in 1790 to zero mortality in the convicts transported on the Sultana in 1859. The key role of the surgeon-superintendent, in the context of preventive medicine, is developed in the present paper. Historical nodes in the evolution of the new discipline of prison doctor were the 1814 Report of Redfern (himself a former convict), and the evolution from the 1820s of doctors who became the pioneers of the specialty discipline of the Prison Medical Service in Australia. The experiences and influences of surgeon-superintendents on convict transportation vessels formed the catalyst for the Passenger Act (UK) of 1855 which, for the remaining decades of the 19th century, regulated the lives of millions of immigrants to Australia and New Zealand. PMID:8611134

  7. The welfare of livestock transported by ship.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Clive J C; Santurtun, Eduardo

    2013-06-01

    The transport of livestock by ship is growing in importance, but there are concerns about the welfare impact on the animals. Short sea journeys are usually completed in the vehicles that are used to transport the animals by road, and injury and stress can result. Long sea journeys require offloading of the animals into pens, where they are mixed and provided with feed, water and sometimes artificial ventilation. In addition, animals are often exposed to high stocking densities, elevated temperature and ammonia concentration, as well as noise and changes in photoperiod and light intensity. Mortality rate is the main measure of welfare used by the Australian live export industry for long distance shipments, and the rate is higher at sea compared to the same period of transport on land. Heat stress often challenges livestock when they are transported from cold to hot regions at high stocking densities with no diurnal temperature fluctuation. Sheep cope with heat stress better than cattle, but can still develop respiratory alkalosis if hyperventilation ensues. Bos taurus cattle cope less well with heat stress than Bos indicus breeds. High ammonia concentrations may accumulate on long voyages, causing mucosal irritation and pulmonary inflammation. Some sheep and goats do not adapt to the pellets provided after extensive grazing in Australia, resulting in inanition, often in combination with salmonellosis, which together are the main cause of high mortality rates. Long distance transport may also result in disease transmission to the recipient country and high standards of biosecurity are necessary. It is concluded that there are significant risks to the welfare of livestock caused by transporting them in ships, especially over long distances. PMID:23473873

  8. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  9. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  10. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  11. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  12. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  13. 77 FR 36955 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara Harbor, Santa Barbara, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ...RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara Harbor, Santa...security zones around and under any cruise ships visiting Santa Barbara Harbor...national security reasons to protect cruise ships, vessels, users of the...

  14. OP-0001-P1 GTEx Specimen Collection Supplies and Shipping Kit Process Flow

    Cancer.gov

    Kit Receipt Supply Shipping Procedure Process Flow Biospecimen Source Site Processing Centers Kit Supplies to the BSSs Shipping Processing Collection Event & Packing Work Instruction for Packing & Shipping Green Kit (OP-0001-W2) [Alert Courier & Obtain

  15. 9 CFR 96.10 - Uncertified casings; transportation for disinfection; original shipping containers; disposition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...original shipping containers; disposition of salt. 96.10 Section 96.10 Animals...original shipping containers; disposition of salt. (a) Foreign animal casings...six hours filled with water. (c) The salt removed from all original shipping...

  16. 9 CFR 96.10 - Uncertified casings; transportation for disinfection; original shipping containers; disposition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...original shipping containers; disposition of salt. 96.10 Section 96.10 Animals...original shipping containers; disposition of salt. (a) Foreign animal casings...six hours filled with water. (c) The salt removed from all original shipping...

  17. 9 CFR 96.10 - Uncertified casings; transportation for disinfection; original shipping containers; disposition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...original shipping containers; disposition of salt. 96.10 Section 96.10 Animals...original shipping containers; disposition of salt. (a) Foreign animal casings...six hours filled with water. (c) The salt removed from all original shipping...

  18. 9 CFR 96.10 - Uncertified casings; transportation for disinfection; original shipping containers; disposition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...original shipping containers; disposition of salt. 96.10 Section 96.10 Animals...original shipping containers; disposition of salt. (a) Foreign animal casings...six hours filled with water. (c) The salt removed from all original shipping...

  19. 9 CFR 96.10 - Uncertified casings; transportation for disinfection; original shipping containers; disposition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...original shipping containers; disposition of salt. 96.10 Section 96.10 Animals...original shipping containers; disposition of salt. (a) Foreign animal casings...six hours filled with water. (c) The salt removed from all original shipping...

  20. 33 CFR 165.1154 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California. 165.1154 Section 165.1154 Navigation and Navigable...165.1154 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Cruise ship” as used...