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1

Robot mother ship design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Small physical agents will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA); chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, sentry; and communications relay will have advanced sensor and mobility characteristics. The mother ship much effectively deliver/retrieve, service, and control these robots as well as fuse the information gathered by these highly mobile robot teams. The mother ship concept presented in this paper includes the case where the mother ship is itself a robot or a manned system. The mother ship must have long-range mobility to deploy the small, highly maneuverable agents that will operate in urban environments and more localized areas, and act as a logistics base for the robot teams. The mother ship must also establish a robust communications network between the agents and is an up-link point for disseminating the intelligence gathered by the smaller agents; and, because of its global knowledge, provides the high-level information fusion, control and planning for the collaborative physical agents. Additionally, the mother ship incorporates battlefield visualization, information fusion, and multi-resolution analysis, and intelligent software agent technology, to support mission planning and execution. This paper discusses on going research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that supports the development of a robot mother ship. This research includes docking, battlefield visualization, intelligent software agents, adaptive communications, information fusion, and multi- modal human computer interaction.

Budulas, Peter P.; Young, Stuart H.; Emmerman, Philip J.

2000-07-01

2

X-38 Ship #2 in Free Flight after Release from B-52 Mothership  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The X-38 research vehicle drops away from NASA's B-52 mothership immediately after being released from the B-52's wing pylon. More than 30 years earlier, this same B-52 launched the original lifting-body vehicles flight tested by NASA and the Air Force at what is now called the Dryden Flight Research Center and the Air Force Flight Test Center. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1999-01-01

3

X-38 Ship #2 Mated to B-52 Mothership in Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photo shows one of the X-38 lifting-body research vehicles mated to NASA's B-52 mothership in flight prior to launch. The B-52 has been a workhorse for the Dryden Flight Research Center for more than 40 years, carrying numerous research vehicles aloft and conducting a variety of other research flight experiments. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1999-01-01

4

Mother ship and physical agents collaboration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses ongoing research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that investigates the feasibility of developing a collaboration architecture between small physical agents and a mother ship. This incudes the distribution of planning, perception, mobility, processing and communications requirements between the mother ship and the agents. Small physical agents of the future will be virtually everywhere on the battlefield of the 21st century. A mother ship that is coupled to a team of small collaborating physical agents (conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA); logistics; sentry; and communications relay) will be used to build a completely effective and mission capable intelligent system. The mother ship must have long-range mobility to deploy the small, highly maneuverable agents that will operate in urban environments and more localized areas, and act as a logistics base for the smaller agents. The mother ship also establishes a robust communications network between the agents and is the primary information disseminating and receiving point to the external world. Because of its global knowledge and processing power, the mother ship does the high-level control and planning for the collaborative physical agents. This high level control and interaction between the mother ship and its agents (including inter agent collaboration) will be software agent architecture based. The mother ship incorporates multi-resolution battlefield visualization and analysis technology, which aids in mission planning and sensor fusion.

Young, Stuart H.; Budulas, Peter P.; Emmerman, Philip J.

1999-07-01

5

Sizing of "Mother Ship and Catcher" Concepts for LEO Small Debris Capture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most Low Earth Orbit (LEO) debris lies in a limited number of inclination "bands" associated with launch latitudes, or with specific useful orbit inclinations (such as polar orbits). Such narrow inclination bands generally have a uniform spread over all possible Right Ascensions of Ascending Node (RAANs), creating a different orbit plane for nearly every piece of debris. This complicates concept of rendezvous and capture for debris removal. However, a low-orbiting satellite will always phase in RAAN faster than debris objects in higher orbits at the same inclination, potentially solving the problem. Such a base can serve as a single space-based launch facility (a "mother ship") that can tend and then send tiny individual catcher devices for each debris object, as the facility drifts into the same RAAN as the higher object. This presentation will highlight characteristic system requirements of such an architecture, including structural and navigation requirements, power, mass and dV budgets for both the mother ship and the mass-produced common catcher devices that would clean out selected inclination bands. The altitude and inclination regime over which a band is to be cleared, the size distribution of the debris, and the inclusion of additional mission priorities all affect the sizing of the system. It is demonstrated that major LEO hazardous debris reductions can be realized in each band with a single LEO launch of a single mother ship, with simple attached catchers of total mass less than typical commercial LEO launch capability.

Bacon, John B.

2009-01-01

6

B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's venerable B-52 mothership is seen here photographed from a KC-135 Tanker aircraft. The X-43 adapter is visible attached to the right wing. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and is also both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet.

2001-01-01

7

B-52B Cockpit Instrument Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photo shows a close-up view of the instrument panel in the cockpit of NASA's B-52 research aircraft. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the HiMAT, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1996-01-01

8

B-52 Flight Mission Symbology - Close up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A close-up view of some of the mission markings that tell the story of the NASA B-52 mothership's colorful history. These particular markings denote some of the experiments the bomber conducted to develop parachute recovery systems for the solid rocket boosters used by the Space Shuttle. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet.. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1993-01-01

9

B-52B Shuttle Drag Chute Test #6  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA obtained a B-52H bomber from the U.S. Air Force in 2001, intending to use the aircraft as an air-launch and testbed aircraft to support NASA, Air Force and industry flight research and advance...

10

B-52H Flying over the Mojave Desert in California  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA obtained a B-52H bomber from the U.S. Air Force in 2001, intending to use the aircraft as an air-launch and testbed aircraft to support NASA, Air Force and industry flight research and advance...

11

Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight over Dryden  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's venerable B-52 mothership flies over the main building at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and has also been both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1996-01-01

12

X-38 Mounted on Pylon of B-52 Mothership  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A close-up view of the X-38 research vehicle mounted under the wing of the B-52 mothership prior to a 1997 test flight. The X-38, which was designed to help develop technology for an emergency crew return vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station, is one of many research vehicles the B-52 has carried aloft over the past 40 years. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

13

B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploys an experimental drag chute just after landing the runway at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1990-01-01

14

B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aerial view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1990-01-01

15

B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental drag chute deploys amidst a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1990-01-01

16

B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rear view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1990-01-01

17

Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Dryden Ramp  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's venerable B-52 mothership sits on the ramp in front of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1996-01-01

18

Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1996-01-01

19

B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A close-up of an experimental drag chute deploying in a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1990-01-01

20

B-52 Flight Mission Symbology on Side of Craft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A view of some of the mission markings, painted on the side of NASA's B-52 mothership, that tell the story of its colorful history. Just as combat aircraft would paint a bomb on the side of an aircraft for each bombing mission completed, NASA crew members painted a silhouette on the side of the B-52's fuselage to commemorate each drop of an X-15, lifting body, remotely piloted research vehicle, X-38 crew return vehicle, or other experimental vehicle or parachute system. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1993-01-01

21

Pegasus Mated to B-52 Mothership - Front View  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's B-52 launch aircraft takes off with the second Pegasus vehicle under its wing from the Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1991-01-01

22

B-52B/DTV (Drop Test Vehicle) flight test results: Drop test missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA test airplane, B-52B-008, was a carrier for drop tests of the shuttle booster recovery parachute system. The purpose of the test support by Boeing was to monitor the vertical loads on the pylon hooks. The hooks hold the Drop Test Vehicle to the B-52 pylon during drop test missions. The loads were monitored to assure the successful completion of the flight and the safety of the crew.

Doty, L. J.

1985-01-01

23

X-38 on B-52 Wing Pylon - View from Observation Window  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A unique, close-up view of the X-38 under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership prior to launch of the lifting-body research vehicle. The photo was taken from the observation window of the B-52 bomber as it banked in flight. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

24

Wind Tunnel Results of the B-52B with the X-43A Stack  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A low-speed wind-tunnel test was performed with a three-percent-scale model of a booster rocket mated to an X-43A research vehicle, a combination referred to as the Hyper-X launch vehicle. The test was conducted both in free-stream air and in the presence of a partial model of the B-52B airplane. The objectives of the test were to obtain force and moment data to generate structural loads affecting the pylon of the B-52B airplane and to determine the aerodynamic influence of the B-52B airplane on the Hyper-X launch vehicle to evaluate launch separation characteristics. The wind-tunnel test was conducted at a low-speed wind tunnel in Hampton, Virginia. All moments and forces reported are based either on the aerodynamic influence of the B-52B airplane or are for the Hyper-X launch vehicle in free-stream air. Overall, the test showed that the B-52B airplane imparts a strong downwash onto the Hyper-X launch vehicle, reducing the net lift of the Hyper-X launch vehicle. Also, pitching and rolling moments are imparted onto the booster and are a strong function of the launch-drop angle of attack.

Davis, Mark C.; Sim, Alexander G.; Rhode, Matthew; Johnson, Kevin D.

2006-01-01

25

Wind-Tunnel Results of the B-52B with the X-43A Stack  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A low-speed wind-tunnel test was performed with a 3%-scale model of a booster rocket mated to an X-43A research vehicle, a combination referred to as the Hyper-X launch vehicle. The test was conducted both in freestream air and in the presence of a partial model of the B-52B airplane. The objectives of the test were to obtain force and moment data to generate structural loads affecting the pylon of the B-52B airplane and to determine the aerodynamic influence of the B-52B on the Hyper-X launch vehicle for evaluating launch separation characteristics. The windtunnel test was conducted at a low-speed wind tunnel in Hampton, Virginia. All moments and forces reported are based either on the aerodynamic influence of the B-52B airplane or are for the Hyper-X launch vehicle in freestream air. Overall, the test showed that the B-52B airplane imparts a strong downwash onto the Hyper-X launch vehicle, reducing the net lift of the Hyper-X launch vehicle. Pitching and rolling moments are also imparted onto the booster and are a strong function of the launch-drop angle of attack.

Davis, Mark C.; Sim, Alexander G.; Rhode, Matthew; Johnson, Kevin D., Sr.

2007-01-01

26

Pre-flight transient dynamic analysis of B-52 carrying Space Shuttle solid rocket booster drop-test vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper concerns the transient dynamic analysis of the B-52 aircraft carrying the Space Shuttle solid-rocket booster drop-test vehicle (SRB/DTV). The NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) finite-element computer program was used in the analysis. The B-52 operating conditions considered for analysis were (1) landing and (2) braking on aborted takeoff runs. The transient loads for the B-52 pylon front and rear hooks were calculated. The results can be used to establish the safe maneuver envelopes for the B-52 carrying the SRB/DTV in landings and brakings.

Ko, W. L.; Schuster, L. S.

1983-01-01

27

Preflight transient dynamic analyses of B-52 aircraft carrying Space Shuttle solid rocket booster drop-test vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper concerns the transient dynamic analysis of the B-52 aircraft carrying the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster drop test vehicle (SRB/DTV). The NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) finite element computer program was used in the analysis. The B-52 operating conditions considered for analysis were (1) landing and (2) braking on aborted takeoff runs. The transient loads for the B-52 pylon front and rear hooks were calculated. The results can be used to establish the safe maneuver envelopes for the B-52 carrying the SRB/DTV in landings and brakings.

Ko, W. L.; Schuster, L. S.

1984-01-01

28

Ship Hydrodynamics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

Lafrance, Pierre

1978-01-01

29

F-15 RPRV Attached Under the Wing of the B-52 Mothership in Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph shows one of NASA's 3/8th-scale F-15 remotely piloted research vehicles under the wing of the B-52 mothership in flight during 1973, the year that the research program began. The vehicle was used to make stall-spin studies of the F-15 shape before the actual F-15s began their flight tests. B-52 Project Description: NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant. - - - - - - - - - - - F-15A RPRV/SRV Project Description: In April of 1971, Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Research and Development Grant Hanson sent a memorandum noting the comparatively small amount of research being conducted on stalls (losses of lift) and spins despite the yearly losses that they caused (especially of fighter aircraft). In the spring and summer of that year, NASA's Flight Research Center (redesignated in 1976 the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) studied the feasibility of conducting flight research with a sub-scale fighter-ty

1973-01-01

30

Optimization of the polyplanar optical display electronics for a monochrome B-52 display  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten-inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a new 200 mW green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLPTM) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments (TI). In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMDTM) chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. In order to achieve increased brightness a monochrome digitizing interface was investigated. The operation of the DMDTM divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMDTM board with the RS-170 video format specific to the B-52 aircraft will be discussed, including the increased brightness of the monochrome digitizing interface. A brief description of the electronics required to drive the new 200 mW laser is also presented.

DeSanto, Leonard

1998-09-01

31

A B-52H, tail number 61-0025, arrives at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center after landing July 30,  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, received an 'H' model B-52 Stratofortress aircraft on July 30, 2001. The B-52H will be used as an air-launch aircraft supporting NASA's flight research and advanced technology demonstration efforts. Dryden received the B-52H from the U.S. Air Force's (USAF) 23rd Bomb Squadron, 5th Bombardment Wing (Air Combat Command), located at Minot AFB, N.D. A USAF crew flew the aircraft to Dryden. The aircraft, USAF tail number 61-0025, will be loaned initially, then later transferred from the USAF to NASA. The B-52H is scheduled to leave Dryden Aug. 2 for de-militarization and Programmed Depot Maintenance (PDM) at Tinker Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma. The depot-level maintenance is scheduled to last about six months and includes a thorough maintenance and inspection process. The newly arrived B-52H is slated to replace Dryden's famous B-52B '008,' in the 2003-2004 timeframe. It will take about one year for the B-52H to be ready for flight research duties. This time includes PDM, construction of the new pylon, installation of the flight research instrumentation equipment, and aircraft envelope clearance flights.

2001-01-01

32

Digital Ship Digital Ship Ship September 2008 page 45  

E-print Network

Digital Ship Digital Ship Ship September 2008 page 45 TT he European Maritime Data Man- agement how best to improve on VDR equipment for the next generation of the technology. The ship VDR company instructions are followed. These include ensuring that ship's mas- ters are complying

33

Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The new pylon for the X-38 following a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 research vehicle to be carried aloft and launched from the B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

34

Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Andy Blua and Jeff Doughty of Dryden's Experimental Fabrication Shop, along with B-52 Crew Chief Dan Bains and assistant Mark Thompson, all eye the new X-38 pylon during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon, which was fabricated at Dryden, was mated to the B-52. The pylon served as an 'adapter' that allowed the X-38 to be attached to the B-52's wing. Earlier flight research vehicles had used the X-15 pylon for attachment to and launch from the B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

35

Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tom McMullen, Chief of Dryden's Experimental Fabrication Shop, makes adjustments to the new pylon for NASA's X-38 during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 to be attached to and launched from the B-52's wing. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

36

Pegasus Mated under Wing of B-52 Mothership - Close-up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A close-up view of the Pegasus space-booster attached to the wing pylon of NASA's B-52 launch aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Pegasus rocket booster was designed as a way to get small payloads into space orbit more easily and cost-effectively. It has also been used to gather data on hypersonic flight. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable data on aerodynamics. By conducting experiments in a piggyback mode on Pegasus, some critical and secondary design and development issues were addressed at hypersonic speeds. The vehicle was also used to develop hypersonic flight instrumentation and test techniques. NASA's B-52 carrier-launch vehicle was used to get the Pegasus airborne during six launches from 1990 to 1994. Thereafter, an Orbital Sciences L-1011 aircraft launched the Pegasus. The Pegasus launch vehicle itself has a 400- to 600-pound payload capacity in a 61-cubic-foot payload space at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle is capable of placing a payload into low earth orbit. This vehicle is 49 feet long and 50 inches in diameter. It has a wing span of 22 feet. (There is also a Pegasus XL vehicle that was introduced in 1994. Dryden has never launched one of these vehicles, but they have greater thrust and are 56 feet long.)

1994-01-01

37

Investigation of ship hydroelasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of hydroelastic analysis of large and flexible container ships of today is pointed out. A methodology for investigation of this challenging phenomenon is drawn up and a mathematical model is worked out. It includes definition of ship geometry, mass distribution, structure stiffness, and combines ship hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, wave load, ship motion and vibrations. Based on the presented theory,

Ivo Senjanovi?; 奿me Malenica

2008-01-01

38

HTS ship propulsion motors  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many modern ships, propulsion systems are so large and heavy that they force the rest of the ship to be constructed around them. Large ship propulsion motors could be made more compact and lighter by application of high temperature superconductor (HTS) technology, thus providing relief from this constraint. HTS ship propulsion motors are more compact, lighter weight, more efficient,

S. S. Kalsi

2004-01-01

39

Eur. Phys. J. B 52, 17 (2006) DOI: 10.1140/epjb/e2006-00270-2 THE EUROPEAN  

E-print Network

Eur. Phys. J. B 52, 1颅7 (2006) DOI: 10.1140/epjb/e2006-00270-2 THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL B.M. Strelniker1,a , D. Stroud2 , and A.O. Voznesenskaya3 1 Minerva Center, Jack and Pearl Resnick Institute of Advanced Technology, and Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, 52900 Ramat-Gan, Israel 2 Department

Strelniker, Yakov M.

40

Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dryden Experimental Fabrication Shop's Andy Blua and Jeff Doughty make sure the new pylon for the X-38 fits precisely during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in 1997. The 1,200-pound steel pylon, fabricated at Dryden, was an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 research vehicle to be carried aloft and launched from the bomber. The X-38 was a designed as a technology demonstrator to help develop an emergency Crew Return Vehicle for the International Space Station. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

1997-01-01

41

A B-52H, on loan to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, makes a pass down the runway prior to land  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, received an 'H' model B-52 Stratofortress aircraft on July 30, 2001. The B-52H will be used as an air-launch aircraft supporting NASA's flight research and advanced technology demonstration efforts. Dryden received the B-52H from the U.S. Air Force's (USAF) 23rd Bomb Squadron, 5th Bombardment Wing (Air Combat Command), located at Minot AFB, N.D. A USAF crew flew the aircraft to Dryden. The aircraft, USAF tail number 61-0025, will be loaned initially, then later transferred from the USAF to NASA. The B-52H is scheduled to leave Dryden Aug. 2 for de-militarization and Programmed Depot Maintenance (PDM) at Tinker Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma. The depot-level maintenance is scheduled to last about six months and includes a thorough maintenance and inspection process. The newly arrived B-52H is slated to replace Dryden's famous B-52B '008,' in the 2003-2004 timeframe. It will take about one year for the B-52H to be ready for flight research duties. This time includes PDM, construction of the new pylon, installation of the flight research instrumentation equipment, and aircraft envelope clearance flights.

2001-01-01

42

Connected Mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines mothers who were incarcerated in the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Shakopee in 1985. It establishes that their commitment to parenthoodis deeply tenacious and that when followed up five years later most of these mothers had sustained continuous, primary parenting from within prison and reunification with their children when released from prison. This study establishes that frequent contact

Mary Martin

1997-01-01

43

Sunken Slave Ship  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Lesson plan teaching how marine archaeologists find a sunken ship and how they recover and preserve their find. Activity is based on the 18th century slave ship, the Henrietta Marie, which sank off the Florida coast shortly after delivering African slaves to Jamaica. Explore what goes into resurrecting sunken ships, as well as how to minimize the damage done to the ecosystem.

44

Berkeley SHIP & Healthcare  

E-print Network

Berkeley SHIP & Healthcare Reform: What's Right for You? December 11, 2013 #12;Why are we here? 路 Help you understand your insurance options 路 Give you time to ask questions 路 Talk to Berkeley SHIP. 路 SHIP's plan meets all ACA requirements. 路 Reminder: all UC students are required to have health

Walker, Matthew P.

45

Wave energy propelling marine ship  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wave energy propelling marine ship comprises a cylindrical ship body having a hollow space therein for transporting fluid material therewithin, a ship body disposed in or on the sea; a propeller attached to the ship body for the purpose of propelling the marine ship for sailing; a rudder for controlling the moving direction of the marine ship; at least

Kitabayashi

1982-01-01

46

Pirate Ship Ride Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pirate Ship Ride Model was originally inspired by the Pirate Ride at Hershey Park. The "ship" part of the ride has a center of mass that lies 14 m from the pivot point (approximately the center of the boat). The ship swings freely from the pivot, and is driven by a roller built into the floor directly below the ship. The operator presses either the clockwise torque button or the counter clockwise torque button to change the motion of the ship. Because the drive can only push the ship when it is in contact, the drive is only available when the ship is within 30潞 of its lowest postion. The drive buttons are grey when no drive is available (simulation is paused or the ship coes not contact the drive roller), the turn white when the drive is available. When drive button is pressed, it turns green and a constant torque is exerted on the ship unitl the button is released or until the ship moves out of contact with the drive roller. Note that torque can not be applied if the simulation is paused or has not been started. The Pirate Ship Ride Model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Gallis, Michael R.

2012-01-15

47

Pirate Ship JS Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pirate Ship JavaScript Model is a JavaScript implementation of the Java version of the same model. These simulations were inspired by the Pirate Ride at Hershey Park. The "ship" part of the ride has a center of mass that lies 14 m from the pivot point (approximately the center of the boat). The ship swings freely from the pivot, and is driven by a roller built into the floor directly below the ship. The operator presses either the clockwise torque button or the counter clockwise torque button to change the motion of the ship. Because the drive can only push the ship when it is in contact, the drive is only available when the ship is within 30潞 of its lowest position. The drive buttons are grey when no drive is available (simulation is paused or the ship does not contact the drive roller), the turn white when the drive is available. When drive button is pressed, it turns green and a constant torque is exerted on the ship until the button is released or until the ship moves out of contact with the drive roller. Note that torque can not be applied if the simulation is paused or has not been started. The Pirate Ship JavaScript Model was developed using the Easy Java Simulations (EjsS) version 5. It is distributed as a ready-to-run html page and requires only a browser with JavaScript support.

Gallis, Michael R.

2014-04-22

48

Development and Testing of a Drogue Parachute System for X-37 ALTV/B-52H Separation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiple scenarios were identified in which the X-37 approach and landing test vehicle (ALTV) catastrophically recontacts the B-52H carrier aircraft after separation. The most cost-effective recontact risk mitigation is the prelaunch deployment of a drogue parachute that is released after the X-37 ALTV has safely cleared the B-52H. After release, a fully-inflated drogue parachute takes 30 min to reach ground and results in a large footprint that excessively restricts the days available for flight. To reduce the footprint, a passive collapse mechanism consisting of an elastic reefing line attached to the parachute skirt was developed. At flight loads the elastic is stretched, allowing full parachute inflation. After release, drag loads drop dramatically and the elastic line contracts, reducing the frontal drag area. A 50 percent drag reduction results in an approximately 75 percent ground footprint reduction. Eleven individual parachute designs were evaluated at flight load dynamic pressures in the High Velocity Airflow System (HIVAS) at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, California. Various options for the elastic reefing system were also evaluated at HIVAS. Two best parachute designs were selected from HIVAS to be carried forward to flight test. Detailed HIVAS test results are presented in this report.

Whitmore, Stephen A.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Jensen, Steven C.; Hennings, Elsa J.

2004-01-01

49

Development and Testing of a Drogue Parachute System for X-37 ALTV/B-52H Separation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiple scenarios were identified in which the X-37 approach and landing test vehicle (ALTV) catastrophically recontacts the B-52H carrier aircraft after separation. The most cost-effective recontact risk mitigation is the prelaunch deployment of a drogue parachute that is released after the X-37 ALTV has safely cleared the B-52H. After release, a fully-inflated drogue parachute takes 30 min to reach ground and results in a large footprint that excessively restricts the days available for flight. To reduce the footprint, a passive collapse mechanism consisting of an elastic reefing line attached to the parachute skirt was developed. At flight loads the elastic is stretched, allowing full parachute inflation. After release, drag loads drop dramatically and the elastic line contracts, reducing the frontal drag area. A 50-percent drag reduction results in an approximately 75-percent ground footprint reduction. Eleven individual parachute designs were evaluated at flight load dynamic pressures in the High Velocity Airflow System (HIVAS) at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, California. Various options for the elastic reefing system were also evaluated at HIVAS. Two best parachute designs were selected from HIVAS to be carried forward to flight test. Detailed HIVAS test results are presented in this report.

Whitmore, Stephen A.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Jensen, Steven C.; Hennings, Elsa J.

2004-01-01

50

Ocean drilling ship chosen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sedco/BP 471, owned jointly by Sedco, Inc., of Dallas, Tex., and British Petroleum, has been selected as the drill ship for the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). The contract, with a specified initial term of 4 years with 10 1-year options after that, is expected to be signed by mid March by Texas A&M University, the ODP science operator, and Sedco, Inc. Texas A&M will develop the design for scientific and laboratory spaces aboard the Sedco/BP 471 and will oversee the ship conversion. Testing and shakedown of the ship is scheduled for the coming autumn; the first scientific cruise is scheduled for next January.One year ago, the commercial drilling market sagged, opening up the option for leasing a commercial drill ship (Eos, February 22, 1983, p. 73). Previously, the ship of choice had been the Glomar Explorer; rehabilitating the former CIA salvage ship would have been extremely expensive, however.

Richman, Barbara T.

51

Mothering Curricula  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article attends to revealing complicated, intersecting, and symbiotic relationships of mothering, academia, and art education practice. The authors seek to articulate rhizomatic interconnections through their narratives and art, attempting to make sense of what it means to educate, nurture, and care within a location of power, in the

Hoeptner Poling, Linda; Suominen Guyas, Anniina; Keys, Kathleen

2012-01-01

52

Selfish Mother  

E-print Network

, selling fruit, raising and selling pigs, selling produce from greenhouses, driving tractors, and so on. Most families own cows for milk. ?????????????????????????????????????????????????? ??????? ????? ??????? ?????? ????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ??... ????????????????????????????????????? ????????? Rdo rje don 慻rub (b. 1985) recorded 25 folktales in June and July 2010 in Rta rgyugs Village. Rgyal mtshan (b. 1935) told 17 stories: A Pious Couple; A Mistreated Householder; Barley Seed Son; Donkey and Tiger; Ghost Mother; Painter Kun dga...

Rdo rje don 'grub

2011-01-01

53

Bahamian ship graffiti  

E-print Network

by documenting examples of ship graffiti throughout the Bahamas. Examples of ship graffiti were documented with photographs and tracings. The Bahamian examples all date to the 19th and 20th centuries, 100 years later than other examples from the Caribbean...

Turner, Grace Sandrena Rosita

2005-02-17

54

Ships to the Sea.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson contains materials for the U.S. Navy Museum's "Ships to the Sea" program. The program is appropriate for students in grades 2-4 and was designed in accordance with local and national social studies standards. The materials introduce students to the world of ship technology and naval terminology. The lesson is presented in five

Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

55

Ship the Chip  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore engineering package designs that meet the needs of safely shipping a product. Learners work in teams of "engineers" to design a package using standard materials that will safely ship a single chip through the mail to their address.

Ieee

2014-05-23

56

Viking Ship Design Challenge  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this design challenge, students learn about the Vikings from an engineering point-of-view. While investigating the history and anatomy of Viking ships, they learn how engineering solutions are shaped by the surrounding environment and availability of resources. Students apply this knowledge to design, build and test their own model Viking ships.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

57

Emissions from Ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently the International Maritime Organization has made the first attempt to address air pollution from ships. This article presents information showing that ships are a significant source of air pollution on a global scale and discusses the policy implications of such a finding. The air pollution components included in the survey were NOx, SO2, CO2. 34 refs., 1 fig., 2

James J. Corbett; Paul Fischbeck

1997-01-01

58

FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR  

FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR Project Title: FIRE III ACE Discipline: ... Level: L3 Platform: SHEBA Ship Instrument: Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer ... Info: Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) Ship SCAR-B Block: SCAR-B Products ...

2014-05-06

59

NOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the  

E-print Network

NOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the programs of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Southeast Fisheries Science Center. The ship conducts fisheries and living marine resource;Office of Marine and Aviation Operations Since NOAA's beginning, NOAA ships and aircraft have played

60

Ancient ships of Japan  

E-print Network

Ancient ships of Japan, which are little known outside of Japan, are presented based on the studies of past researchers, as well as a comprehensive analysis of archaeological remains. The process of development from logboats to extended logboats...

Miyashita, Hiroaki

2006-10-30

61

Optimal ship routing  

E-print Network

Fuel savings in ship navigation has always been a popular subject in the maritime industry as well as the world's largest Navies. Oil prices and environmental considerations drive the effort for more fuel-efficient navigation. ...

Avgouleas, Kyriakos

2008-01-01

62

Sailing ships for research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motor-assisted sailing ships for ocean research could perform as well as or better than many existing research vessels and could cut fuel consumption by 50-80%, according to a preliminary study by an ad hoc panel of the National Research Council's Ocean Sciences Board (OSB).Rising fuel costs plague ship owners and operators. For example, 2 years ago the U.S. oceanographic fleet had a $6 million overrun in fuel costs. Furthermore, the price of marine diesel fuel skyrocketed from $3 per barrel in 1972 to about $38 per barrel in late 1980. Cutting these costs would be welcome if the savings were not made at the expense of additional crew, longer transit times, or less efficient scientific operations. A sailing ship with auxiliary motor propulsion is a promising prospect, according to the Ad Hoc Panel on the Use of Sailing Ships for Oceanography.

Richman, Barbara T.

63

Space Ship Pilot Lesson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Space Ship Pilot lesson is a study of Newton's Laws of motion. Students use a model of a space shuttle and a ferry boat to study differences in an oject's motion with and without resistive forces.

Joiner, David; The Shodor Education Foundation, Inc.

64

Hydroelasticity of large container ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of hydroelastic analysis of large and flexible container ships of today is pointed out for structure design. A methodology for investigation of this challenging phenomenon is drawn up and a mathematical model is worked out. It includes the definition of ship geometry, mass parameters, structure stiffness, and combines ship hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, wave load, ship motion and vibrations. The

Ivo Senjanovi?; 奿me Malenica; Stipe Toma歟vi?

2009-01-01

65

Computation and Minimisation of Ship  

E-print Network

Computation and Minimisation of Ship Waves E.O. Tuck 1 Introduction Ships make waves. Sometimes extremes: the ambient sea is seldom quite as calm as in Figure 1, and most ships avoid seas as rough as in Figure 2. Most of the life of most ships is spent in seas nearer to the calm state than the rough state

Stokes, Yvonne

66

Dangerous Goods Shipping Federal and international shipping rules require that anyone wishing to ship biological materials,  

E-print Network

Dangerous Goods Shipping Federal and international shipping rules require that anyone wishing to ship biological materials, infectious substances, or dry ice must complete training in Dangerous Goods Shipping. Pitt EH&S offers a web based program that fulfills the training and certification requirements

Jiang, Huiqiang

67

Ship signatures in synthetic aperture radar imagery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ship signatures in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery have been matched to Automatic Identification System (AIS) data to yield a large database of known ships for ship signature analysis. This paper focuses on ship radar cross section and ship length derived from the ship signature length. Cross- polarization is an attractive option for ship detection.

Paris W. Vachon; Ryan A. English; John Wolfe

2007-01-01

68

Metacenter and ship stability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We address the location of the metacenter M of a floating body such as a ship. Previous studies of M in relation to the stability of a ship have mainly used geometrical approaches and were limited to near equilibrium. We develop a quantitative approach to the location of M for a general shape of the cross-section of a floating body in a rolling/pitching motion and for an arbitrary heel angle. We show that different definitions of M refer to one and the same special point of the floating body. We discuss the relation between the height of M with respect to the line of flotation and the contribution of the buoyancy force to ship stability. We provide expressions and graphs of the buoyancy, flotation, and metacentric curves for some simple shapes of floating bodies.

M間el, Jacques; Kliava, Janis

2010-07-01

69

Suicidal mothers  

PubMed Central

Abstract: Background: Epidemiological research has demonstrated that suicidal ideation is a relatively frequent complication of pregnancy in both developed and developing countries. Hence, the aims of this study are: to assess whether or not pregnancy may be considered a period highly susceptible to suicidal acts; to recognize potential contributing factors to suicidal behaviors; to describe the repercussions of suicide attempts on maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcome; to identify a typical profile of women at high risk of suicide during pregnancy. Methods: Medical literature information published in any language since 1950 was identified using MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. Search terms were: "pregnancy", (antenatal) "depression", "suicide". Searches were last updated on 28 September 2010. Forty-six articles assessing the suicidal risk during pregnancy and obstetrical outcome of pregnancies complicated by suicide attempts were analyzed, without methodological limitations. Results: Worldwide, frequency of suicidal attempts and the rate of death by suicidal acts are low. Although this clinical event is rare, the consequences of a suicidal attempt are medically and psychologically devastating for the mother-infant pair. We also found that common behaviors exist in women at high risk for suicide during pregnancy. Review data indeed suggest that a characteristic profile can prenatally identify those at highest risk for gestational suicide attempts. Conclusions: Social and health organizations should make all possible efforts to identify women at high suicidal risk, in order to establish specific programs to prevent this tragic event. The available data informs health policy makers with a typical profile to screen women at high risk of suicide during pregnancy. Those women who have a current or past history of psychiatric disorders, are young, unmarried, unemployed, have incurred an unplanned pregnancy (eventually terminated with an induced abortion), are addicted to illicit drugs and/or alcohol, lack effective psychosocial support, have suffered from episodes of sexual or physical violence are particularly vulnerable. PMID:21498972

Gentile, Salvatore

2011-01-01

70

THE NUCLEAR SHIP CONTROVERSY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plans for the development of a nuclear-powered merchant ship in Britain ; are discussed. Both boiling-water and pressurized-water reactors were considered ; and the designs are described. Objections to the package reactor concept, ; comments on the brittleness of irradiated steel, and questions on the possibility ; of salt water getting into the reactor system are answered. Economic issues are

1963-01-01

71

Recovery Ship Freedom Star  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, is towing a barge containing the third Space Shuttle Super Lightweight External Tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT was slated for use to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October 1998. This first time towing arrangement, part of a cost saving plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks were manufactured. The barge was transported up Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tug boat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allowed NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies showed a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications would be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, also underwent deck strengthening enhancements and had the necessary towing wench installed.

1998-01-01

72

Space Ship Pilot Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Space Ship Pilot model is a model of motion under Newton's laws with and without resistive forces. The first environment puts the user in control of docking a space shuttle, and the second puts the user in control of docking a boat.

Joiner, David; The Shodor Education Foundation, Inc.

73

ALASKA CRUISE SHIP INITIATIVE  

EPA Science Inventory

During the course of the annual vacation season, luxury cruise ships carrying up to 3000 passengers visit the coastal cities and small towns of Alaska. Alaska is the first state to impose regulations requiring such vessels to submit to inspection and monitoring of gray water and...

74

MERCHANT MARINE SHIP REACTOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nuclear reactor for use in a merchant marine ship is described. The ; reactor is of pressurized, light water cooled and moderated design in which three ; passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, ; and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The design ; makes a compact

M. F. Sankovich; J. F. Mumm; D. C. Jr. North; H. R. Rock; D. K. Gestson

1961-01-01

75

MERCHANT MARINE SHIP REACTOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nuclear reactor is described for use in a merchant marine ship. The ; reactor is of pressurized light water cooled and moderated design in which three ; passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, ; and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The foregoing ; design makes a

J. F. Mumm; D. C. Jr. North; H. R. Rock; D. K. Geston

1961-01-01

76

Travelers' Health: Cruise Ship Travel  

MedlinePLUS

... 2007, provide international standards for ship and port sanitation, disease surveillance, and response to infectious diseases. The ... on the high seas. CDC ensures health and sanitation aboard ships with international itineraries arriving at US ...

77

Mathematical Modeling: Convoying Merchant Ships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a mathematical model that connects mathematics with social studies. Students use mathematics to model independent versus convoyed ship deployments and sinkings to determine if the British should have convoyed their merchant ships during World War I. During the war, the British admiralty opposed sending merchant ships grouped

Mathews, Susann M.

2004-01-01

78

Trade and Introductions Shipping traffic  

E-print Network

Trade and Introductions #12;Shipping traffic #12;Shipping traffic #12;Shipping port connectivity Containers Dry bulk goods #12;Airplane traffic on the rise Tatem, 2009 #12;Interceptions McCullough et al's Animal Plant Health Inspection Service) 路 New proposals for horticulture imports must request a weed risk

Schweik, Charles M.

79

Sea & Ships: Explore online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Maritime Museum (NMM) in England notes that its goal is "working to illustrate for everyone the importance of the sea, ships, time and the stars and their relationship with people." There is so much to explore in the "Sea and Ships" portion of the NMM website, but a great way to see everything it has to offer is by using the "Sea and Ships Directory" at the bottom of the homepage. It divides the material up by "Subjects", "People", "Collections", "Online Galleries", and "Games and Interactives". Visitors interested in lessons about the ocean that come in the form of games, quizzes and stories, should definitely check out the "Your Ocean" link from the "Games and Interactives". The "Your Waste" lesson gives visitors the opportunity to test their skills at "managing an oil spill clean-up operation", in the game "Oil Crisis!" Keeping waste to a minimum is what the quiz "Pollution Solutions" addresses, and is also on the "Your Waste" page. Other lessons include "Your Energy", "Your Stuff" and "Your Climate".

80

Dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for the revised Space Shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structural integrity of B-52B-008, pylon, and hooks for the drop test missions was determined by theoretical analysis. The results of the analysis and conclusions are presented in this document. The major modification to the drop test vehicle was shortening it about 54 inches, which resulted in the forward hook attach structure being located at the base of the nosecone. The shims that are located in the aft hook structures are increased from two inches to three inches. Airspeed, aerodynamic configuration, and load charts are included.

Doty, L. J.

1983-01-01

81

Analysis of a ship-to-ship collision  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is involved in a safety assessment for the shipment of radioactive material by sea. One part of this study is investigation of the consequences of ship-to-ship collisions. This paper describes two sets of finite element analyses performed to assess the structural response of a small freighter and the loading imparted to radioactive material (RAM) packages during several postulated collision scenarios with another ship. The first series of analyses was performed to evaluate the amount of penetration of the freighter hull by a striking ship of various masses and initial velocities. Although these analyses included a representation of a single RAM package, the package was not impacted during the collision so forces on the package could not be computed. Therefore, a second series of analyses incorporating a representation of a row of seven packages was performed to ensure direct package impact by the striking ship. Average forces on a package were evaluated for several initial velocities and masses of the striking ship. In addition to. providing insight to ship and package response during a few postulated ship collisions scenarios, these analyses will be used to benchmark simpler ship collision models used in probabilistic risk assessment analyses.

Porter, V.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

1996-02-01

82

Operational options for green ships  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental issues and rising fuel prices necessitate better energy-efficiency in all sectors. The shipping industry is one of the major stakeholders, responsible for 3% of global CO2 emissions, 14%-15% of global NO X emissions, and 16% of global SO X emissions. In addition, continuously rising fuel prices are also an incentive to focus on new ways for better energy-effectiveness. The green ship concept requires exploring and implementing technology on ships to increase energy-efficiency and reduce emissions. Ship operation is an important topic with large potential to increase cost-and-energy-effectiveness. This paper provided a comprehensive review of basic concepts, principles, and potential of operational options for green ships. The key challenges pertaining to ship crew i.e. academic qualifications prior to induction, in-service training and motivation were discussed. The author also deliberated on remedies to these challenges.

Sherbaz, Salma; Duan, Wenyang

2012-09-01

83

Shipping container for tritiated water  

Microsoft Academic Search

A reusable shipping container for Type B and large quantities of tritiated water has been designed and tested at Mound Facility. An inner and an outer container are used for shipping up to 100,000 Ci of tritium in water absorbed on molecular sieve, silica gel or commercial clay absorbent. The package is commonly called configuration-5 of the model AL-M1 shipping

R. A. Watkins; T. B. Rhinehammer; J. F. Griffin

1978-01-01

84

Ship Creek bioassessment investigations  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB) personnel to conduct a series of collections of macroinvertebrates and sediments from Ship Creek to (1) establish baseline data on these populations for reference in evaluating possible impacts from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) activities at two operable units, (2) compare current population indices with those found by previous investigations in Ship Creek, and (3) determine baseline levels of concentrations of any contaminants in the sediments associated with the macroinvertebrates. A specific suite of indices established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was requested for the macroinvertebrate analyses; these follow the Rapid Bioassessment Protocol developed by Plafkin et al. (1989) and will be described. Sediment sample analyses included a Microtox bioassay and chemical analysis for contaminants of concern. These analyses included, volatile organic compounds, total gasoline and diesel hydrocarbons (EPA method 8015, CA modified), total organic carbon, and an inductive-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) metals scan. Appendix A reports on the sediment analyses. The Work Plan is attached as Appendix B.

Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.; Murphy, M.T.

1995-06-01

85

University to supervise ship construction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under the management of the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, two 41-m research ships will be built for the National Science Foundation. The `multi discipline' vessels are designed to accommodate equipment for a wide range of oceanographic research, including geophysical investigations and studies of fisheries, food resources, and pollution.The ships will cost a total of

Lee Greathouse

1980-01-01

86

46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form...

2013-10-01

87

Systems modeling for electric ship design  

E-print Network

Diesel and gas turbine electric ship propulsion are of current interest for several types of vessels that are important for commercial shipping and for the next generation of war ships. During the design process of a ...

Soultatis, Charalambos

2004-01-01

88

Options for Advanced Smoke Control Onboard Ships.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The complications posed by smoke disrupt all facets of the damage control (DC) problem onboard ships. Smoke will reduce visibility, which causes disorientation and deterioration of communications among the ship's crew. In turn, the ability of the ship's c...

M. J. Peatross, F. W. Williams

2002-01-01

89

Shipping and Transport of Biological Materials  

E-print Network

Shipping and Transport of Biological Materials Biological Safety General Biosafety Practices (GBP Modified Organisms (GMOs), and Infectious Substances being shipped require special packaging requires special packaging, permits, or training in order to ship, please review the EHS Hazardous

Pawlowski, Wojtek

90

7 CFR 989.106 - Ship.  

...Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ship. 989.106 Section 989.106 Agriculture Regulations...Administrative Rules and Regulations Definitions 989.106 Ship. Ship means the physical movement of raisins other than...

2014-01-01

91

Organization: ________________________________________ Ship Samples To: AHDC Endocrinology Lab  

E-print Network

Organization: ________________________________________ Ship Samples To: AHDC Endocrinology Lab Shipped:______________________________________Courier used:__________________________ Number of Samples:__________________________________Condition when shipped:____________________________ (e.g. - serum, EDTA plasma, urine, heparin plasma, etc.) (e

Keinan, Alon

92

Occupational accidents aboard merchant ships  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To investigate the frequency, circumstances, and causes of occupational accidents aboard merchant ships in international trade, and to identify risk factors for the occurrence of occupational accidents as well as dangerous working situations where possible preventive measures may be initiated. Methods: The study is a historical follow up on occupational accidents among crew aboard Danish merchant ships in the period 19937. Data were extracted from the Danish Maritime Authority and insurance data. Exact data on time at risk were available. Results: A total of 1993 accidents were identified during a total of 31 140 years at sea. Among these, 209 accidents resulted in permanent disability of 5% or more, and 27 were fatal. The mean risk of having an occupational accident was 6.4/100 years at sea and the risk of an accident causing a permanent disability of 5% or more was 0.67/100 years aboard. Relative risks for notified accidents and accidents causing permanent disability of 5% or more were calculated in a multivariate analysis including ship type, occupation, age, time on board, change of ship since last employment period, and nationality. Foreigners had a considerably lower recorded rate of accidents than Danish citizens. Age was a major risk factor for accidents causing permanent disability. Change of ship and the first period aboard a particular ship were identified as risk factors. Walking from one place to another aboard the ship caused serious accidents. The most serious accidents happened on deck. Conclusions: It was possible to clearly identify work situations and specific risk factors for accidents aboard merchant ships. Most accidents happened while performing daily routine duties. Preventive measures should focus on workplace instructions for all important functions aboard and also on the prevention of accidents caused by walking around aboard the ship. PMID:11850550

Hansen, H; Nielsen, D; Frydenberg, M

2002-01-01

93

Research Ship Information and Schedules  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This unusual resource for Research Ship Information and Schedules is maintained by the University of Delaware's Ocean Information Center (OCEANIC). Complete with a searchable database of schedules and characteristics of deep-water scientific research vessels, this site is an excellent example of the range of eclectic and specialized information available on the Web. Information on facilities, research capabilities, layouts, schedules, and much more is organized by country and ship name; for US research vessels, information is also listed by agency and institution. Other features include links to a staggering array of related research ship information sites.

1999-01-01

94

Kangaroo mother care.  

PubMed

Kangaroo mother care is a safe, simple method to care for low birth weight infants. This article looks at its origins, what is involved in kangaroo mother care and reviews the evidence for improved outcomes resulting from its implementation. PMID:22585327

Bailey, Sarah

2012-05-01

95

Kangaroo mother care.  

PubMed

Kangaroo mother care (KMC), defined as skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn, frequent and exclusive or nearly exclusive breastfeeding, and early discharge from hospital, has been proposed as an alternative to conventional neonatal care for low birthweight infants. PMID:19323346

Arora, Smriti

2008-11-01

96

Mother Infant Literacy Knowledge.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based upon the Mother-Infant Literacy Knowledge (MILK) program--in which imprisoned mothers are allowed to care for their children until they are one year old--a study investigated how placing parents in a print rich environment affects parental ability to provide their children with book oriented experiences. The study was conducted in a

Sledge, Andrea Celine

97

Mother knows best  

Microsoft Academic Search

Explains recent attitude research by toy manufacturer Mattel into the need states and drivers of mothers with young children, and the impact of this on toy ownership. Outlines the changes in family life and how this affects attitudes to, and purchase of, toys: mothers often return to work relatively soon after having children, they welcome advice on parenting from their

Ruth Clement

2004-01-01

98

46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping...A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General...

2013-10-01

99

46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

2010-10-01

100

46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

2011-10-01

101

46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

2013-10-01

102

46 CFR 173.051 - Public nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Public nautical school ships. 173.051 Section 173.051 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships 173.051 Public nautical school ships. Each public nautical school ship must...

2012-10-01

103

Containerized compressed natural gas shipping  

E-print Network

In the last decades, the demand for energy is increasing. It is necessary to develop new ways to distribute the energy using economically feasible solutions. In this project an Ultra Large Container Ship is used that can ...

Skarvelis, Georgios V

2013-01-01

104

Pig shipping container test sequence  

SciTech Connect

This test plan outlines testing of the integrity of the pig shipping container. It is divided into four sections: (1) drop test requirements; (2) test preparations; (3) perform drop test; and (4) post-test examination.

Adkins, H.E. Jr.

1995-01-13

105

COGAS propulsion for LNG ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Propulsion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) ships is undergoing significant change. The traditional steam plant is losing favor because of its low cycle efficiency. Medium-speed diesel-electric and slow-speed diesel-mechanical drive ships are in service, and more are being built. Another attractive alternative is combined gas and steam turbine (COGAS) drive. This approach offers significant advantages over steam and diesel propulsion.

Edwin G. Wiggins

2011-01-01

106

COGAS propulsion for LNG ships  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Propulsion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) ships is undergoing significant change. The traditional steam plant is losing favor because of its low cycle efficiency. Medium-speed diesel-electric and slow-speed diesel-mechanical drive ships are in service, and more are being built. Another attractive alternative is combined gas and steam turbine (COGAS) drive. This approach offers significant advantages over steam and diesel propulsion. This paper presents the case for the COGAS cycle.

Wiggins, Edwin G.

2011-06-01

107

COGAS propulsion for LNG ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Propulsion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) ships is undergoing significant change. The traditional steam plant is losing favor\\u000a because of its low cycle efficiency. Medium-speed diesel-electric and slow-speed diesel-mechanical drive ships are in service,\\u000a and more are being built. Another attractive alternative is combined gas and steam turbine (COGAS) drive. This approach offers\\u000a significant advantages over steam and diesel propulsion.

Edwin G. Wiggins

2011-01-01

108

SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS  

E-print Network

SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 7.16 OVERBOARDING EQUIPMENT Originator: Approved By and lowering into the water. There are three general categories of this equipment: A. Permanent ship associated with the ship and maintained by the ship's force. B. Institution scientific equipment - is defined

Kurapov, Alexander

109

Ship Motion Prediction for Maritime Flight Operations  

E-print Network

Ship Motion Prediction for Maritime Flight Operations Xilin Yang , Hemanshu Pota , Matt Garratt procedure for ship motion in the presence of uncertain tendency of ship motion dynamic variations relationship between an observer and a ship deck is constructed, from which an initial algorithm is implemented

Pota, Himanshu Roy

110

MODELING LONGITUDINAL DAMAGE IN SHIP COLLISIONS  

E-print Network

SSC Report SR- 1426 MODELING LONGITUDINAL DAMAGE IN SHIP COLLISIONS SHIP STRUCTURE COMMITTEE 2004 and Subtitle Modeling LongitudinalDamage in Ship Collisions 5. Report Date October 2004 6. Performing or Grant No. DTCG32-02-C-R00002 12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Address Ship Structure Committee US Coast

Brown, Alan

111

NOAA Ship OSCAR DYSON The ship is named after the Alaskan  

E-print Network

out of the region of hull- generated flow noise. This feature enables the ship to moveNOAA Ship OSCAR DYSON The ship is named after the Alaskan fisherman Oscar Dyson and the ship's home that are used to ensure the net is fully open. NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson is the first of four new fisheries survey

112

Mothering to death  

PubMed Central

Three families are described in which the healthy only child was, from early childhood, put to bed and treated as if ill, dependent, and incapable. This abnormal mothering continued for 28, 45, and 48 years, respectively, and the children died as disabled adults. In each case, the three mothers evaded medical, educational, and social services. The origins of their behaviour are examined, and the links with more common forms of separation anxiety, school refusal, and perceived and factitious illness are discussed.?? PMID:10086944

Meadow, R.

1999-01-01

113

Infants of depressed mothers.  

PubMed

Depression is the most frequent psychiatric disorder and has long-term, compromising effects on the mother-infant relationship and the child's development. The infant continuously faces a climate of negative affect that disrupts the interactive experience of the infant and the mother. This article presents findings on the impact of maternal depression on the infant affective state and the specific interactive patterns associated with infant affect regulation. Mother-infant interactions were studied using microanalytic, second-by-second methods in the laboratory and also by using naturalistic home observations. The empirical findings highlight the impact of maternal depression on the infant affective state and on the capacity for repairing states of miscoordination. The impact is seen not only in severely and acutely depressed mothers, but in mothers who have only high levels of depressive symptoms. These infants develop negative affective states that bias their interactions with others and exacerbate their affective problems. Further findings with regard to gender-specific effects show that male infants are more vulnerable than female infants to maternal depression. The findings point out the need for therapeutic interventions that focus on the mother-infant dyad and infant affective state in the treatment of maternal depression. PMID:19373622

Tronick, Edward; Reck, Corrina

2009-01-01

114

Infants' Recognition of Their Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability of infants to recognize their mothers as distinct from others was investigated by presenting 6 boys and 6 girls at two age levels (5 weeks and 13 weeks) with the following six sequential stimulus conditions: (1) mother's face (MO); (2) stranger's face (SO); (3) mother's face with stranger's voice (MS); (4) stranger's face with mother's

Bigelow, Ann

115

Mobilizing Mother: From Good Mother to Patriotic Mother in World War I  

Microsoft Academic Search

The American press played a key role in the Wilson administration抯 effort to craft an image of the Patriotic Mother of the Great War. The Patriotic Mother of a soldier was encouraged to assume the mantle of the Spartan Mother. This monograph contrasts the Spartan Mother archetype used by the government and the press to another wartime maternal archetype, that

Ana C. Garner; Karen Slattery

2012-01-01

116

SHIP VELOCITY FIELDS , Lichuan Guib  

E-print Network

, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. Historically, five-hole pitot probes have been used for measuring and turbulence contain biases not accounted for in usual calibration procedures (Gui et al.4 ). Additionally of multi-hole pitot and Laser-doppler systems, they both require measurement of ship velocity fields

Gui, Lichuan

117

The History of Payload Ships  

E-print Network

PROCESS SIMPLIFICATION Design Procurement Production 1. Flexibility in using basic design building blocks 27, 2006 #12;2 Ship Design Myths of the 1980's 路 Computer architecture will never be distributed) Construction Modularity (Hull Segments) Containerization (Integrated) Containerization (Detached) Weapon

118

Updated emissions from ocean shipping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine vessel inventories demonstrate that ship emissions cannot be neglected in assessing environmental impacts of air pollution, although significant uncertainty in these inventories remains. We address this uncertainty by employing a bottom-up estimate of fuel consumption and vessel activity for internationally registered fleets, including cargo vessels, other commercial vessels, and military vessels. We identify model bias in previous work, which

James J. Corbett; Horst W. Koehler

2003-01-01

119

Portuguese Ships on Japanese Namban Screens  

E-print Network

scenes of the first European activities in Japan. Among the subjects depicted on Namban screens, some of the most intriguing are ships: the European ships of the Age of Discovery. Namban screens were created by skillful Japanese traditional painters who...

Yamafune, Kotaro

2012-10-19

120

7 CFR 989.106 - Ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations Definitions 989.106 Ship. Ship means the...

2010-01-01

121

7 CFR 953.7 - Ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order Regulating Handling Definitions 953.7 Ship. Ship is synonymous with handle and means to transport, sell, or in any manner place potatoes in the current of interstate commerce or so as directly to burden,...

2010-01-01

122

Time domain geoacoustic inversion using ship noise  

Microsoft Academic Search

A time domain geoacoustic inversion method using ship noise received on a towed horizontal array is presented. The received signal, containing ship noise, is time-reversed and then back-propagated to the vicinity of the ship. The back-propagated signal is correlated with the received signal which is expected to peak at the ship's location in case of a good match for the

Woojae Seong; Peter Gerstoft; David Battle; Peter Nielsen

2003-01-01

123

An automatic ship and ship wake detection system for spaceborne SAR images in coastal regions  

Microsoft Academic Search

An automatic ship and ship wake detection system for spaceborne SAR images is described and assessed. The system is designed for coastal regions with eddies, fronts, waves and swells. The system uses digital terrain models to simulate synthetic SAR images to mask out land areas. Then a search for ship targets is performed followed by wake search around detected ship

K. Eldhuset

1996-01-01

124

49 CFR 174.24 - Shipping papers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shipping papers. 174.24 Section 174.24 Transportation...Operating Requirements 174.24 Shipping papers. (a) A person may not accept a...unless that person receives a shipping paper prepared in accordance with part...

2010-10-01

125

49 CFR 176.24 - Shipping papers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shipping papers. 176.24 Section 176.24 Transportation...Operating Requirements 176.24 Shipping papers. (a) A person may not accept...unless that person has received a shipping paper prepared in accordance with part...

2010-10-01

126

49 CFR 177.817 - Shipping papers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shipping papers. 177.817 Section 177.817 Transportation...and Regulations 177.817 Shipping papers. (a) General requirements. ...unless that person has received a shipping paper prepared in accordance with part...

2010-10-01

127

Interactive Visualization of Weather and Ship Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focus on the development of a tool for Ship and Weather Information Monitoring (SWIM) visualizing weather data combined with data from ship voyages. The project was done in close collaboration with the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) who also evaluated the result. The goal was to implement a tool which will help shipping companies to monitor their

Patrik Lundblad; Oskar Eurenius; Tobias Heldring

2009-01-01

128

Line Defaults Modify Line/Shipping/Accounting  

E-print Network

Line Defaults and Modify Line/Shipping/Accounting NUFinancials Supply Chain FMS815 03/31/2010 --rkw, vlr Line Defaults & Modify Line/Shipping/Accounting 漏 2010 Northwestern University FMS815颅 Job Aid Page 1 of 5 This job aid describes how and when to use Line Defaults and Modify Line/Shipping/Accounting

Shull, Kenneth R.

129

Hydrodynamics of a ship\\/whale collision  

Microsoft Academic Search

All endangered large whale species are vulnerable to collisions with large ships; and ship strikes are the greatest known threat to one of the world's rarest whales, the North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis). The magnitude of this threat is likely to increase as maritime commerce expands. Factors influencing the incidence and severity of ship strikes are not well understood,

Gregory K. Silber; Jonathan Slutsky; Shannon Bettridge

2010-01-01

130

Perceiving tomorrow's marine shipping spill risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in ship design and construction mark advancement in the maritime industry. Also, continuous developments in regulatory efforts identify the need to manage and ensure the advancement in design parameters is a step forward - toward a future which remembers marine shipping's disastrous, historical events. The goal of this paper is to outline a method of quantifying marine shipping spill

Ryan Morton; Det Norske Veritas

2010-01-01

131

Emissions from International Shipping in the Arctic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies assessing the potential impacts of international shipping on climate and air pollution demonstrate that ships contribute significantly to global climate change and health impacts through emission of GHGs and raised the potential for disproportionate impacts from shipping in the Arctic region. We present an activity- based model inventory of emissions of CO2, BC, NOx, SOx, PM, and CO for

J. J. Corbett; J. J. Winebrake; M. Gold; S. Harder

2008-01-01

132

Ship Patrol: Multiagent Patrol in Complex  

E-print Network

point to another. For example, in marine environments, the travel time of ships depends on parameters) in marine environments. When designing algorithms for ships in such environments, it is critical to considerShip Patrol: Multiagent Patrol in Complex Environmental Conditions Noa Agmon1 , Daniel Urieli2

Stone, Peter

133

Underwater radiated noise from modern commercial ships.  

PubMed

Underwater radiated noise measurements for seven types of modern commercial ships during normal operating conditions are presented. Calibrated acoustic data (<1000 Hz) from an autonomous seafloor-mounted acoustic recorder were combined with ship passage information from the Automatic Identification System. This approach allowed for detailed measurements (i.e., source level, sound exposure level, and transmission range) on ships of opportunity. A key result was different acoustic levels and spectral shapes observed from different ship-types. A 54 kGT container ship had the highest broadband source level at 188 dB re 1 ?Pa@1m; a 26 kGT chemical tanker had the lowest at 177 dB re 1 ?Pa@1m. Bulk carriers had higher source levels near 100 Hz, while container ship and tanker noise was predominantly below 40 Hz. Simple models to predict source levels of modern merchant ships as a group from particular ship characteristics (e.g., length, gross tonnage, and speed) were not possible given individual ship-type differences. Furthermore, ship noise was observed to radiate asymmetrically. Stern aspect noise levels are 5 to 10 dB higher than bow aspect noise levels. Collectively, these results emphasize the importance of including modern ship-types in quantifying shipping noise for predictive models of global, regional, and local marine environments. PMID:22280574

McKenna, Megan F; Ross, Donald; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

2012-01-01

134

SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS  

E-print Network

SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 6.5 A-FRAME AND BOOM OPERATIONS Originator: Approved The operation of the A-frame and Hydro Boom in the conduct of ship's work and training other personnel to operate it is under the direction of the ship's Boatswain or other person designated by the Master

Kurapov, Alexander

135

SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS  

E-print Network

SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 2.2 DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY Originator: Approved By Oceanus and shoreside Ship Operations facilities. 2.2.2. General The passage of the Drug-Free Workplace. Notification of the terms and conditions of the Act are distributed to all Ship Operations personnel

Kurapov, Alexander

136

SHIPPING MEMO FORM FEDERAL EXPRESS / UPS  

E-print Network

SHIPPING MEMO FORM FEDERAL EXPRESS / UPS Senders Name: Date:Phone: Email Address: Budget to Charge: Ship via [check appropriate box(es)]: Next Day Standard (3 p.m. delivery) Federal Express Shipments UPS International First UPS Ground Amount Insurance Requested SHIPPING INFORMATION: Recipient's Name: Company Name

Kolner, Brian H.

137

6, 10231071, 2006 Impact of ship  

E-print Network

ACPD 6, 1023颅1071, 2006 Impact of ship emissions on properties of marine stratus M. Schreier et al and Physics Discussions Impact of ship emissions on the microphysical, optical and radiative properties Commons License. 1023 #12;ACPD 6, 1023颅1071, 2006 Impact of ship emissions on properties of marine stratus

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

138

SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS  

E-print Network

SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 7.20 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Originator responsibility for enforcing this procedure resides with the Master, the Chief Scientist and the ship's Department Heads. They are responsible to ensure that work in progress aboard the ship is carried out safely

Kurapov, Alexander

139

What's right SHIP & Healthcare Reform Forum  

E-print Network

&Health Reform What's right for you SHIP & Healthcare Reform Forum: What's Right for You Berkeley SHIP compares with the plans available on Covered California health benefit exchange and * offer a Q & A session featuring representatives from Berkeley SHIP and Covered California at the end

Walker, Matthew P.

140

6, 85538604, 2006 Impact of ship  

E-print Network

ACPD 6, 8553颅8604, 2006 Impact of ship emissions on chemistry and climate V. Eyring et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions Multi-model simulations of the impact of international shipping颅8604, 2006 Impact of ship emissions on chemistry and climate V. Eyring et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

141

46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME...AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General Agents are...

2012-10-01

142

46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME...AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General Agents are...

2010-10-01

143

46 CFR Sec. 5 - Measures to protect ship's payrolls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measures to protect ship's payrolls. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME...AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 5 Measures to protect ship's payrolls. (a) General Agents are...

2011-10-01

144

47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Station Requirements-Ship Stations 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of a ship station or a marine utility station on board ship within the frequency band 30-200 MHz must be vertically...

2011-10-01

145

47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Station Requirements-Ship Stations 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of a ship station or a marine utility station on board ship within the frequency band 30-200 MHz must be vertically...

2010-10-01

146

47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Special Procedures-Ship Stations 80.141 General provisions for ship stations. (a) Points of communication. Ship stations and marine utility stations on board ships are authorized to communicate with any station in the maritime...

2010-10-01

147

47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Special Procedures-Ship Stations 80.141 General provisions for ship stations. (a) Points of communication. Ship stations and marine utility stations on board ships are authorized to communicate with any station in the maritime...

2011-10-01

148

47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Special Procedures-Ship Stations 80.141 General provisions for ship stations. (a) Points of communication. Ship stations and marine utility stations on board ships are authorized to communicate with any station in the maritime...

2012-10-01

149

47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Station Requirements-Ship Stations 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of a ship station or a marine utility station on board ship within the frequency band 30-200 MHz must be vertically...

2012-10-01

150

47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...Compulsory Ships 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels equipped with a Ship Security Alert System pursuant to the Safety...

2013-10-01

151

47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...Compulsory Ships 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels equipped with a Ship Security Alert System pursuant to the Safety...

2011-10-01

152

47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...Compulsory Ships 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels equipped with a Ship Security Alert System pursuant to the Safety...

2012-10-01

153

47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277 Section...Compulsory Ships 80.277 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). (a) Vessels equipped with a Ship Security Alert System pursuant to the Safety...

2010-10-01

154

46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

2010-10-01

155

46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

2012-10-01

156

46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

2013-10-01

157

46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052 Shipping...SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school...

2011-10-01

158

Mothering against the Odds: Diverse Voices of Contemporary Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the view that increasing numbers of mothers who do not fit a narrow traditional image are often maligned, misunderstood, or ignored, this book presents the stories of a diverse group of mothers whose life circumstances place them outside the mainstream. Chapters explore the lives of mothers of exceptional children and biracial children;

Coll, Cynthia Garcia, Ed.; Surrey, Janet L., Ed.; Weingarten, Kathy, Ed.

159

bottom board mother board  

E-print Network

-dimensional (3D) integration, inkjet-printing, RFID. I. INTRODUCTION The rapid development of wireless mother board BGA BGA RF SwitchFilter Antenna RFReceiverRFTransmitter Embedded RFpassives 3D Multilayer@ece.gatech.edu Abstract- In this paper, solutions for developing low-cost 3D multilayer integration and packaging

Tentzeris, Manos

160

Trees for Mother Earth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Trees for Mother Earth, a program in which secondary students raise funds to buy fruit trees to plant during visits to the Navajo Reservation. Benefits include developing feelings of self-worth among participants, promoting cultural exchange and understanding, and encouraging self-sufficiency among the Navajo. (LP)

Greer, Sandy

1993-01-01

161

Mothers, Toddlers and Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Exploring the stresses and dangers substitute mothering may pose to a toddler's personality development, this paper points out behavioral hallmarks of toddlerhood, describes the main developmental tasks toddlers have to master, and discusses factors that facilitate healthy development during this phase. Special emphasis is given to the most

Furman, Erna

162

Early Mother-Child Interaction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This journal issue presents an overview of mother-child interaction during the first year of the child's life. Contents of the first section, which concern the development of the mother-child relationship, focus on the concept of the maternal instinct, mother and child during intrauterine life, birth of the child, the postnatal period (including

d'Agostino, Micheline

1986-01-01

163

Predicting ship fuel consumption: Update. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report is concerned with the prediction of ship propulsion fuel consumption as a function of ship speed for U.S. Navy combatant and auxiliary ships. Prediction is based on fitting an analytic function to published ship class speed-fuel use data using nonlinear regression. The form of the analytic function fitted is motivated by the literature on ship powering and resistance. The report discusses data sources and data issues, and the impact of ship propulsion plant configuration on fuel use. The regression coefficients of the exponential function fitted, tabular numerical comparison of predicted and actual fuel use data, the standard error of the estimate, and plots of actual and fitted data are given for 22 classes of Navy ships.

Schrady, D.A.; Smyth, G.K.; Vassian, R.B.

1996-07-01

164

TMI-2 core shipping preparations  

SciTech Connect

Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

1988-01-01

165

Relationship between container ship underwater noise levels and ship design, operational and oceanographic conditions  

PubMed Central

Low-frequency ocean ambient noise is dominated by noise from commercial ships, yet understanding how individual ships contribute deserves further investigation. This study develops and evaluates statistical models of container ship noise in relation to design characteristics, operational conditions, and oceanographic settings. Five-hundred ship passages and nineteen covariates were used to build generalized additive models. Opportunistic acoustic measurements of ships transiting offshore California were collected using seafloor acoustic recorders. A 510?dB range in broadband source level was found for ships depending on the transit conditions. For a ship recorded multiple times traveling at different speeds, cumulative noise was lowest at 8?knots, 65% reduction in operational speed. Models with highest predictive power, in order of selection, included ship speed, size, and time of year. Uncertainty in source depth and propagation affected model fit. These results provide insight on the conditions that produce higher levels of underwater noise from container ships.

McKenna, Megan F.; Wiggins, Sean M.; Hildebrand, John A.

2013-01-01

166

Relationship between container ship underwater noise levels and ship design, operational and oceanographic conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low-frequency ocean ambient noise is dominated by noise from commercial ships, yet understanding how individual ships contribute deserves further investigation. This study develops and evaluates statistical models of container ship noise in relation to design characteristics, operational conditions, and oceanographic settings. Five-hundred ship passages and nineteen covariates were used to build generalized additive models. Opportunistic acoustic measurements of ships transiting offshore California were collected using seafloor acoustic recorders. A 5-10 dB range in broadband source level was found for ships depending on the transit conditions. For a ship recorded multiple times traveling at different speeds, cumulative noise was lowest at 8 knots, 65% reduction in operational speed. Models with highest predictive power, in order of selection, included ship speed, size, and time of year. Uncertainty in source depth and propagation affected model fit. These results provide insight on the conditions that produce higher levels of underwater noise from container ships.

McKenna, Megan F.; Wiggins, Sean M.; Hildebrand, John A.

2013-05-01

167

Turning Mothers into Villains  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article deconstructs news media representations of two custody abductions that took place in Aotearoa New Zealand in the mid-2000s. In the first case, the father abducted his five-month-old daughter; in the second case, the mother was held responsible for the abduction of her six-year-old son even though he was in the presence of his maternal grandfather. The analysis demonstrates

Vivienne Elizabeth

2010-01-01

168

Incarcerated mothers and parenting  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes as a primary prevention strategy, a parent-education program aimed at enhancing the parenting skills and knowledge of incarcerated women (the majority of whom were mothers). Data are presented which describe changes in program participants' self-evaluations, parenting attitudes, and expectations of children. Upon completing of the parenting program, few differences were observed for the various pre- and post-test

Dorothy C. Howze Browne

1989-01-01

169

Study on photovoltaic power system on ships  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the application of photovoltaic power systems to ships. Two types of leisure or fishing boats powered by photovoltaics are designed. The boats described are single hull and catamaran type with twin hulls. The design of a new electric power system using a photovoltaic power system in a harbor ship having 20 tons is also proposed. The results of this study show that the photovoltaic power system can apply to small ships.

Katagi, Takeshi; Fujii, Yoshimi; Nishikawa, Eiichi; Hashimoto, Takeshi [Kobe Univ. of Mercantile Marine (Japan)

1995-11-01

170

2, 525575, 2002 Modeling of ship  

E-print Network

ACPD 2, 525颅575, 2002 Modeling of ship exhaust in the MBL R. von Glasow et al. Title Page Abstract effects of ship exhaust in the cloud-free marine boundary layer R. von Glasow 1,3 , M. G. Lawrence 1 , R #12;ACPD 2, 525颅575, 2002 Modeling of ship exhaust in the MBL R. von Glasow et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

171

Canonical correlation of shipping forward curves  

E-print Network

The behavior and interrelations between the main shipping forward curves are analyzed using multivariate statistics after removing the volatility distortions dictated by the Samuelson hypothesis. Principal Components ...

Hadjiyiannis, Nicholas

2010-01-01

172

First Results from SHIP Experiment  

SciTech Connect

At present, the GDT facility is being upgraded. The first stage of the upgrade is the Synthesised Hot Ion Plasmoid (SHIP) experiment. It aims, on the one hand, at the investigation of plasmas which are expected to appear in the region of high neutron production in a GDT based fusion neutron source proposed by the Budker Institute and, on the other hand, at the investigation of plasmas the parameters of which have never been achieved before in axisymmetric magnetic mirrors.The experiment is performed in a small mirror section which is installed at the end of one side of GDT. The magnetic field on axis is in the range of 0.5-2.0 Tesla and the mirror ratio is 1.2-1.4. The mirror is filled with background plasma streaming in from the central cell. This plasma component is maxwellised and has an electron temperature of about 100 eV. Two neutral beam injectors perpendicularly inject a total current of about 50 Atom Amperes of deuterium neutrals with an energy of 20 keV as a pulse with a duration of about 1 ms. Ionisation of the beams generates the high-energy ion component. The device has been equipped with several diagnostic methods which are successfully used in GDT experiments.The paper presents first results of plasma parameter measurements in SHIP experiment.

Bagryansky, P.A. (and others)

2005-01-15

173

Effects of uncertain geoacoustic parameters and coastal shipping densities on shipping noise directionality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bearing-elevation directionality of low-frequency shipping noise is influenced both by the sediment geoacoustic parameters and by the coastal shipping density. This study examines the effects of geoacoustic parameter and shipping density uncertainties on noise directionality through simulations for a North Pacific site. The simulations are based in part on stochastic models of the spatial variations of geoacoustic parameters that

Thomas J. Hayward; Richard M. Heitmeyer

2005-01-01

174

JOIDES Resolution Ship Security Plan The JOIDES Resolution is operating under the International Ship &  

E-print Network

JOIDES Resolution Ship Security Plan The JOIDES Resolution is operating under the International Ship & Port Facility Security Code (ISPS). These security measures & procedures have been adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to enhance the protection of ships, personnel, cargo, and ports

175

Simulations of open water and ship-attached propeller flows  

E-print Network

Home Simulations of open water and ship- attached propeller flows J.P. Pontaza and H.C. Chen of propeller operation are defined by the ship velocity V and the propeller angular velocity , as follows propeller attached to series-60 ship hull #12;Home Ship attachedShip attached ""aheadahead

176

Shipping and Receiving Dangerous Goods at Georgia Tech  

E-print Network

Shipping and Receiving Dangerous Goods at Georgia Tech Contacts: Biological Shipments: Shane 404-385-9531 ryan.lisk@ehs.gatech.edu SHIPPING FORMS: Biological Shipments (http://www.ehs.gatech.edu/shipping/biological_shipping.pdf) Domestic Chemical Shipments (http://www.ehs.gatech.edu/shipping/chem_domestic.pdf) International Chemical

177

(Unsafe Ship-handling) ,f<,,, SC"ZOE--,--\\`  

E-print Network

(Unsafe Ship-handling) ,f criteria of unsafe situation judgment of unsafe ship handling operation detection of unsafe ship handling situation water area ship motion (u,v,r) operational condition (rudder, engine, etc.) (XG,YG,?路j own ship

Ishii, Hitoshi

178

Ship-Track Clouds, Aerosol, and Ship Dynamic Effects; A Climate Perspective from Ship-Based Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Ship-track clouds are marine boundary layer clouds that form behind ocean ships and are observed from satellites in the visible and near infrared. Ship-track clouds provide a rare opportunity to connect aerosol cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) emissions and observable changes in marine stratiform clouds. A very small change in the reflectivity of these eastern Pacific and Atlantic clouds (about 4%) provides a climate feedback of similar magnitude to doubling CO{sub 2} (increasing cloud reflectivity corresponds to global cooling). The Department of Energy sponsored research from 1991 to 1995 to study ship-track clouds including two ocean-based experiments in the summers of 1991 and 1994. These experiments showed that ship-track cloud properties were often more complex those related to a reduction of droplet size with an increase in number associated with increasing CCN from the ship's plume. The clouds showed evidence of morphological changes more likely to be associated with cloud dynamic effects either initiated by the increased CCN or directly by the ship's heat output or turbulent air wake. The fact that marine stratiform clouds, that are susceptible to ship track formation, are starved for both CCN and convective turbulence complicates the separation of the two effects.

Porch, W.M.

1998-10-13

179

Hearing My Mother's Voice: A Study of Sisters and Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There seems to be an assumption among many people that parents can mold the later adult personality of their offspring by manipulating their childhood upbringing. To tease out the variables in childrearing and to discover some of the sources of the childbearing practices of mothers in the 1980s, a study of sisters and their mothers (N=48) in the

Morris, Beverley

180

Load and dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for finned configuration 1 space shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle. Volume 2: Airplane flutter and load analysis results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The airplane flutter and maneuver-gust load analysis results obtained during B-52B drop test vehicle configuration (with fins) evaluation are presented. These data are presented as supplementary data to that given in Volume 1 of this document. A brief mathematical description of airspeed notation and gust load factor criteria are provided as a help to the user. References are defined which provide mathematical description of the airplane flutter and load analysis techniques. Air-speed-load factor diagrams are provided for the airplane weight configurations reanalyzed for finned drop test vehicle configuration.

Quade, D. A.

1978-01-01

181

Assessment of early mothering: A tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much has been written in the last few years about the importance of early mother?infant contact in order to establish the mother?infant bond. The success or failure of this early bonding may have lasting effects on both mother and infant. Mothers give behavioral clues that indicate their progress toward mothering (bonding). But far too often the nurses caring for both

Elaine E. Hayes

1983-01-01

182

A life-saving device for ships  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A life-saving device is described which can be used on either ships or airplanes. The device consists of an airtight container for passengers equipped with elements needed for survival (oxygen, food, medicines, etc.), an energy source, and a parachute. This device can be ejected from the plane or ship when an emergency arises.

Converti, P.

1985-01-01

183

Automatic recognition of ISAR ship images  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) produces images of ships at sea which human operators can be trained to recognize. Because ISAR uses the ship's own varying angular motions (roll, pitch, and yaw) for cross-range resolution, the viewing aspect and cross-range scale factor are continually changing on time scales of a few seconds. This and other characteristics of ISAR imaging make

S. Musman; D. Kerr; C. Bachmann

1996-01-01

184

Underwater explosive cutting in ship salvage  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sensitive use of explosives in ship salvage operations is described with a brief review of the physical phenomena involved in underwater explosive cutting. Specific problems encountered in the design and use of shaped charge cutters are identified; actual on site improvisations are summarized from recent and current case histories of ship salvage involving extensive explosive cutting. Prime factors leading

C. Bartholomew; A. Rynecki; D. Saveker

1975-01-01

185

Moving from Ship to Arctic Sea Ice  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Two U.S. Coast Guard members are being transported by crane from U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy onto a piece of multi-year Arctic sea ice. This was during a scientific expedition to map the Arctic seafloor. The expedition was a joint effort using two ships, the Healy and the Canadian Coast Guard Ship...

2008-12-29

186

Early Stage Integrated Parametric Ship Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Innovative ship design projects often require an extensive concept design phase to allow a wide range of potential solutions to be investigated, identifying which best suits the requirements. In these situations, the majority of ship design tools do not provide the best solution, limiting quick reconfiguration by focusing on detailed definition only. Parametric design, including generation of the hull surface,

M. Bole; C. Forrest

187

Way-point tracking control of ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper considers way-point tracking control of ships using yaw torque control. A full state feedback control law is developed using a cascaded approach, and proved to globally asymptotically stabilize the heading and the cross-track error of the ship. Simulation results are presented

K. Y. Pettersen; E. Lefeber

2001-01-01

188

Mice Acquire Flavor Preferences During Shipping  

PubMed Central

Vigorous motion can cause rodents to develop flavor aversions and show other signs of malaise. We tested whether a flavor aversion could be induced by shipping mice from an animal breeder to a test site. Boxes of 12 male C57BL/6J mice were shipped ~950 km from Bar Harbor, ME to Philadelphia, PA by truck. For some boxes, the gel provided for hydration was flavored with almond and for others it was flavored with banana. After the journey, the mice were individually housed and allowed to recover for 5 days. They then received a choice between the two flavors of gel. Contrary to expectations, mice preferred the flavor they had previously ingested during shipping. Controls given flavored gel under similar conditions but while stationary did not show a preference. These results suggest that mice find shipping or its sequelae pleasurable. If mice are travel sick this must be inconsequential relative to other components of the shipping experience. PMID:16154605

Tordoff, Michael G.; Alarcon, Laura K.; Byerly, Erica A.; Doman, Samantha A.

2006-01-01

189

47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

2012-10-01

190

47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

2011-10-01

191

47 CFR 80.51 - Ship earth station licensing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship earth station licensing. 80.51 Section 80.51... Applications and Licenses 80.51 Ship earth station licensing. A ship earth station must display the Commission...

2013-10-01

192

46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship's service refrigeration systems. 128.410 Section 128.410 Shipping ...Requirements for Specific Systems 128.410 Ship's service refrigeration systems. No self-contained unit either for...

2010-10-01

193

46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship's service refrigeration systems... OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND...Specific Systems 128.410 Ship's service refrigeration systems...or for refrigerated spaces for ship's stores need comply...

2012-10-01

194

47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...During its hours of service, each ship station must be capable of: ...no longer desired. (e) Each ship station using a multi-channel...the same sub-band. (f) Each ship station and marine-utility station using a...

2012-10-01

195

47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...During its hours of service, each ship station must be capable of: ...no longer desired. (e) Each ship station using a multi-channel...the same sub-band. (f) Each ship station and marine-utility station using a...

2011-10-01

196

46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship's service refrigeration systems... OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND...Specific Systems 128.410 Ship's service refrigeration systems...or for refrigerated spaces for ship's stores need comply...

2011-10-01

197

46 CFR 115.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. ...have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...cognizant Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection (OCMI) to issue the original SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate after...

2012-10-01

198

47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...During its hours of service, each ship station must be capable of: ...no longer desired. (e) Each ship station using a multi-channel...the same sub-band. (f) Each ship station and marine-utility station using a...

2010-10-01

199

46 CFR 115.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. ...have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...cognizant Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection (OCMI) to issue the original SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate after...

2011-10-01

200

78 FR 27984 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...or other forms of information. Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

2013-05-13

201

47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

2012-10-01

202

48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

2012-10-01

203

47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

2011-10-01

204

48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

2013-10-01

205

32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

2011-07-01

206

47 CFR 80.81 - Antenna requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Antenna requirements for ship stations. 80.81 Section 80.81 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations 80.81 Antenna requirements for ship stations. All telephony emissions of...

2013-10-01

207

78 FR 15031 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...information collection requirement concerning the Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...following information collection: Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

2013-03-08

208

76 FR 13655 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...or other forms of information. Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

2011-03-14

209

32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

2012-07-01

210

32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

2011-07-01

211

47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

2010-10-01

212

32 CFR 700.872 - Ships and craft in drydock.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ships and craft in drydock. 700.872 Section...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards 700.872 Ships and craft in drydock. (a) The...

2013-07-01

213

32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

2013-07-01

214

76 FR 2403 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration AGENCY: U.S...information collection requirement concerning the Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303...following information collection: Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number:...

2011-01-13

215

47 CFR 80.155 - Ship station operator requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship station operator requirements. 80.155...MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Ship Station Operator Requirements 80.155 Ship station operator requirements. Except...

2013-10-01

216

47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80 Section 80.80 Telecommunication...Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point...

2013-10-01

217

48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

2010-10-01

218

48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118...

2011-10-01

219

29 CFR 1926.30 - Shipbuilding and ship repairing.  

... 2014-07-01 false Shipbuilding and ship repairing. 1926.30 Section 1926.30...Provisions 1926.30 Shipbuilding and ship repairing. (a) General. Shipbuilding, ship repairing, alterations, and maintenance...

2014-07-01

220

29 CFR 1918.87 - Ship's cargo elevators.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ship's cargo elevators. 1918.87 Section...LONGSHORING Handling Cargo 1918.87 Ship's cargo elevators. (a) Safe working load. The safe working loads of ship's cargo elevators shall be...

2014-07-01

221

32 CFR 761.12 - Ships: Group authorizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ships: Group authorizations. 761.12 Section 761...PACIFIC ISLANDS Entry Authorization 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations. Ships or other craft in the following categories,...

2012-07-01

222

47 CFR 80.141 - General provisions for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false General provisions for ship stations. 80.141 Section 80.141 ...Requirements and Procedures Special Procedures-Ship Stations 80.141 General provisions for ship stations. (a) Points of...

2013-10-01

223

29 CFR 1918.87 - Ship's cargo elevators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Ship's cargo elevators. 1918.87 Section 1918.87...Cargo 1918.87 Ship's cargo elevators. (a) Safe working load. The safe working loads of ship's cargo elevators shall be determined and...

2011-07-01

224

SNF shipping cask shielding analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management and Remedial Action Division has planned a modification sequence for storage facility 7827 in the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA). The modification cycle is: (1) modify an empty caisson, (2) transfer the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of an occupied caisson to a hot cell in building 3525 for inspection and possible repackaging, and (3) return the package to the modified caisson in the SWSA. Although the SNF to be moved is in the solid form, it has different levels of activity. Thus, the following 5 shipping casks will be available for the task: the Loop Transport Carrier, the In- Pile Loop LITR HB-2 Carrier, the 6.5-inch HRLEL Carrier, the HFIR Hot Scrap Carrier, and the 10-inch ORR Experiment Removal Shield Cask. This report describes the shielding tasks for the 5 casks: determination of shielding characteristics, any streaming avenues, estimation of thermal limits, and shielding calculational uncertainty for use in the transportation plan.

Johnson, J.O.; Pace, J.V. III

1996-01-01

225

Where's the Feminism in Mothering?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a reflective narrative bringing together personal, collective, and action learning reflections from three women: all mothers, feminists, and community psychology practitioners. Its focus on mothering highlights the interconnectedness and tensions across these roles, as well as the shared learnings arising from this collaboration.

D'Arcy, Catherine; Turner, Colleen; Crockett, Belinda; Gridley, Heather

2012-01-01

226

Mother's Leading: Models of Maternalism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When examining basic leadership models, the traits of one of the most important leaders in society, the mother, are rarely considered. This paper reflects on models of leadership found in textbooks and feminist literature and conjures a model, inclusive of popularly held beliefs, of the role of mothers in family and society. The paper asks whether

Masini, Douglas E.

227

Commentary on ;;Protecting my mother  

Microsoft Academic Search

Protecting my mother offers a moving account of a daughter's experiences of her mother's placement(s) in long term care and her exposure to poor care and\\/or abuse. The article highlights a number of the key features of the care of nursing home residents that need to addressed if standards are to improve and abuse become a rarity. The very dependent

Alisoun Milne

2011-01-01

228

Mothers as family change agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studied the impact of a counseling program for mothers on the perceptions and behavior of family members. The mother, father, and 1 8-12 yr old problem child of 13 experimental and 11 control families were evaluated before and after 7 weekly counseling sessions. Pre- and postexperimental measures included the Family Concept Q Sort, a family decision-making task, and a behavioral

Gregg F. Reiter; Peter R. Kilmann

1975-01-01

229

Our Mother Tongues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Frequently when one hears about the Native American experience in the United States, the focus is on the loss of traditions, folkways, and language. In contrast, this website was created to highlight a recent documentary by Anne Makepeace that focuses on the ways in which Native American languages have recovered and thrived in recent times. On the site, visitors should start by clicking on the interactive "Language Map." Here visitors can learn about twelve different languages, including Crow, Cherokee, Dakota, Euchee, and Lakota. Clicking on the "Voices" area gives visitors the opportunity to listen to Native Americans from different tribal communities speaking in their mother tongues. Additionally, visitors can send an electronic postcard from the site, read the site blog, and learn more about the project and the documentary.

2012-01-06

230

Role of SHIP1 in bone biology.  

PubMed

The bone marrow milieu comprising both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic lineages has a unique structural organization. Bone undergoes continuous remodeling throughout life. This dynamic process involves a balance between bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) derived from multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Src homology 2-domain-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) regulates cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and survival via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway initiated at the plasma membrane. SHIP1-deficient mice also exhibit profound osteoporosis that has been proposed to result from hyperresorptive activity by OCs. We have previously observed that SHIP1 is expressed in primary OBs, which display defective development in SHIP1-deficient mice. These findings led us to question whether SHIP1 plays a functional role in osteolineage development from MSC in vivo, which contributes to the osteoporotic phenotype in germline SHIP1 knockout mice. In this short review, we discuss our current understanding of inositol phospholipid signaling downstream of SHIP1 in bone biology. PMID:23551095

Iyer, Sonia; Margulies, Bryan S; Kerr, William G

2013-03-01

231

Infrared ship signature analysis and optimisation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The last decade has seen an increase in the awareness of the infrared signature of naval ships. New ship designs show that infrared signature reduction measures are being incorporated, such as exhaust gas cooling systems, relocation of the exhausts and surface cooling systems. Hull and superstructure are cooled with dedicated spray systems, in addition to special paint systems that are being developed for optimum stealth. This paper presents a method to develop requirements for the emissivity of a ship's coating that reduces the contrast of the ship against its background in the wavelength band or bands of threat sensors. As this contrast strongly depends on the atmospheric environment, these requirements must follow from a detailed analysis of the infrared signature of the ship in its expected areas of operation. Weather statistics for a large number of areas have been collected to produce a series of 'standard environments'. These environments have been used to demonstrate the method of specifying coating emissivity requirements. Results are presented to show that the optimised coatings reduce the temperature contrast. The use of the standard environments yields a complete, yet concise, description of the signature of the ship over its areas of operation. The signature results illustrate the strong dependence of the infrared signature on the atmospheric environment and can be used to identify those conditions where signature reduction is most effective in reducing the ship's susceptibility to detection by IR sensors.

Neele, Filip

2005-05-01

232

The use of wingsails on oceanographic ships  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There has been considerable discussion over the last few years about ships that the oceanographie field needs to carry it into the 21st century. Many of the ships in use today were built in the 1960s and will need replacing in the 1990s [Dinsmore, 1982; Barbee, 1986]. This is not only true of the Universities National Oceanographic Laboratories System (UNOLS) fleet in the United States, but of many European ships as well. The British research vessel Discovery was completed in 1963, the Frenchman Charcot in 1965.

Francis, T. J. G.

233

Ship motion pattern directed VTOL letdown guidance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper examines ship motion pattern directed letdown guidance strategies for landing a VTOL aircraft onboard a small aviation ship under adverse environmental conditions. Off-line computer simulation of the shipboard landing task is utilized for assessing the relative merits of the proposed guidance schemes. A sum of seventy sinusoids representation is used to model the ship motion time histories. The touchdown performance of a nonimal constant-rate-of-descent (CROD) letdown strategy serves as a benchmark for ranking the performance of the alternative letdown schemes.

Phatak, A. V.; Karmali, M. S.; Paulk, C. H., Jr.

1983-01-01

234

Ship wakes: Kelvin or Mach angle?  

E-print Network

From the analysis of a set of airborne images of ship wakes, we show that the wake angles decrease as $U^{-1}$ at large velocities, in a way similar to the Mach cone for supersonic airplanes. This previously unnoticed Mach-like regime is in contradiction with the celebrated Kelvin prediction of a constant angle of $19.47\\degree$ independent of the ship's speed. We propose here a model, confirmed by numerical simulations, in which the finite size of the disturbance explains this transition between the Kelvin and Mach regimes at a Froude number $Fr = U/\\sqrt{gL} \\simeq 0.5$, where $L$ is the hull ship length.

Rabaud, Marc

2013-01-01

235

the good mother: neutralization techniques used by pageant mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines Sykes and Matza's (1957) techniques of neutralization through accounts by 43 mothers whose children participated in six national beauty pageants between September 1996 and May 1997. Respondents used \\

Martha Heltsley; Thomas C. Calhoun

2003-01-01

236

Lactating Mother and Psychotropic Drugs  

PubMed Central

Usage of psychotropics during pregnancy and lactation has always been a topic of debate and controversy. The debate stems from the potential adverse effects on the growing fetus or infants due to the transfer of psychotropic drugs through placenta or breast milk of mothers receiving them; and the problem of discontinuing psychotropics in lactating mother considering chances of relapse. However, most of the psychotropics are found to be relatively safe when used cautiously during the lactation phase. This article describes available data on the use of psychotropics in lactating mothers, in particular, in relation to the safety profile of infants. PMID:21327172

Tripathi, B. M.; Majumder, Pradipta

2010-01-01

237

Studies of SHE at SHIP  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell-closure beyond {sup 208}Pb is at a proton number Z = 114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N = 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical 'Super-Heavy Elements'(SHEs). Experimental methods are described, which allowed for the identification of elements produced on a cross-section level of about 1 pb. Reactions used at SHIP are based on targets of lead and uranium. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is alpha emission, not fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results obtained at other laboratories and with results of theoretical investigations. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental setup and the application of new techniques, as for instance the precise mass measurement of the produced nuclei using ion traps. At increased sensitivity, detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will start, after first steps on the island of SHEs were made in recent years.

Hofmann, Sigurd [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max von Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2010-04-30

238

Study of SHE at SHIP  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell-closure beyond {sup 208}Pb is at a proton number Z = 114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N = 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical 'SuperHeavy Elements'(SHEs). Experimental methods are described, which allowed for the identification of elements produced on a cross-section level of about 1 pb. Reactions used at SHIP are based on targets of lead and uranium. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is alpha emission, not fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results obtained at other laboratories and with results of theoretical investigations. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental set-up and the application of new techniques, as for instance the precise mass measurement of the produced nuclei using ion traps. At increased sensitivity, detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will start, after first steps on the island of SHEs were made in recent years.

Hofmanna, Sigurd [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max von Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2010-06-01

239

Ship hull resistance calculations using CFD methods  

E-print Network

In past years, the computational power and run-time required by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes restricted their use in ship design space exploration. Increases in computational power available to designers, in ...

Voxakis, Petros

2012-01-01

240

31 CFR 361.3 - Shipping procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT CLAIMS PURSUANT TO THE GOVERNMENT LOSSES IN SHIPMENT ACT 361.3 Shipping procedure. Shipments of valuables shall be made so...

2011-07-01

241

QuickShip: Create your account  

Cancer.gov

HOME牋|牋 RESEARCH牋|牋 CAREERS牋|牋 CAMPUS牋|牋 PHONE牋|牋 CONTACT Shipping Wizard Frederick National Lab Shipment Wizard Log In Step 2 Welcome to the Frederick National Lab Shipment Wizard. All items are required except where noted. Create a New Account:

242

75 FR 35873 - Meeting; Shipping Coordinating Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Consideration of Its Report. --Status of Constituent and Other Instruments. --Global Maritime Distress and Safety Systems (GMDSS). --Long Range Identification and Tracking of Ships (LRIT). --Advisory Committee. --Implementation of the...

2010-06-23

243

Radioactive materials shipping cask anticontamination enclosure  

DOEpatents

An anticontamination device for use in storing shipping casks for radioactive materials comprising (1) a seal plate assembly; (2) a double-layer plastic bag; and (3) a water management system or means for water management.

Belmonte, Mark S. (Irwin, PA); Davis, James H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Williams, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01

244

Eighteenth-century merchant ship interiors  

E-print Network

: Anthropology EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY MERCHANT SHIP INTERIORS A Thesis by MARY ANNE RENNER Approved as to style and content by: Don L. Hamilton (Chairman of Committee) David L. Carlson (Member) Clark E. Adams (Member) Vaughn M. B ant, Jr. (Head...: Anthropology EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY MERCHANT SHIP INTERIORS A Thesis by MARY ANNE RENNER Approved as to style and content by: Don L. Hamilton (Chairman of Committee) David L. Carlson (Member) Clark E. Adams (Member) Vaughn M. B ant, Jr. (Head...

Renner, Mary Anne

2012-06-07

245

Nuclear shipping and waste disposal cost estimates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cost estimates for the shipping of spent fuel from the reactor, shipping of waste from the reprocessing plant, and disposal of reprocessing plant wastes have been made for five reactor types. The reactors considered are the light-water reactor (LWR), the mixed-oxide-fueled light-water reactor (MOX), the Canadian deuterium-uranium reactor (CANDU), the fast breeder reactor (FBR), and the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR).

C. R. II

2009-01-01

246

Ship Detection Using Polarization Cross-Entropy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this letter, polarization cross-entropy is introduced based on the eigendecomposition of the polarimetric coherence matrix. Then, the new parameter is employed for ship detection. From experimental results, it is derived that the distribution of the polarization cross-entropy in ocean regions can be well approximated by a generalized exponential distribution. Then, a constant-false-alarm-rate ship-detection method is proposed based on the

Jiong Chen; Yilun Chen; Jian Yang

2009-01-01

247

The Voltage Stability Research of Ship Electric Power System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ship electric power system is an independent electric power system, and is important in ships. At present, with the increasing tonnage of ships and more and more ships propelled by electric power, the capacity of generator in a marine power station is getting larger and larger. Because of electric propulsion technology applied by modern marines, the control system of voltage

Fanyinhai Zhaomin

2006-01-01

248

Pre-Ship Review November 13 &14, 2001  

E-print Network

Ship Review- November 2001 10 Nov 11 Introduction: High-level Requirements 路 Photon noise-limited skyPre-Ship Review November 13 &14, 2001 #12;Pre Ship Review- November 2001 2 Nov 11 Agenda 1) 10. Documentation (David C) 11. Shipping and handling (David C) 12. Integration and commissioning

249

Vertical arrival structure of shipping noise in deep water channels  

Microsoft Academic Search

In passive sonar systems, knowledge of low-frequency shipping noise is significant for target detection performance. However, an accurate model for the shipping noise structure is difficult to obtain, because of the varying distributions of ships and complicated underwater environment. This work characterizes low-frequency distant shipping noise observed in deep water environments as a function of receiver depth and vertical arrival

Zizheng Li; Lisa M. Zurk; Barry Ma

2010-01-01

250

Automatic Ship Photo Interpretation by the Method of Moments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a study undertaken to determine the feasibility of automatic interpretation of ship photographs using the spatial moments of the image as features to characterize the image are reported. The photo interpretation consisted of estimating the location, orientation, dimensions, and heading of the ship. The study used simulated ship images in which the outline of the ship was

F. W. Smith; M. H. Wright

1971-01-01

251

Page 1 of 2 Intent to Ship Chemicals  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 2 Intent to Ship Chemicals All shipments of chemicals must be prepared by trained. Please complete this form and email it to hazmatshipping@northwestern.edu with "Intent to Ship will be emailed to you once the package has shipped. The lab must provide a chart string suitable for shipping

Shull, Kenneth R.

252

Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair  

E-print Network

Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair: Your displays and materials can be shipped to the following address: Location to be determined Note: Packages should arrive at least one for preparing your materials to be shipped back, including shipping labels that will be provided to you. You may

253

Access to and Usage of Offshore Liberty Ship  

E-print Network

Access to and Usage of Offshore Liberty Ship Reefs in Texas ROBERT B. DITTON, ALAN R. GRAEFE, ANTHONY J. FEDLER, and JOHN D. SCHWARTZ Sinking aLiberty Ship offthe Texas coast. Texas Coastal and Marine for surplus Liberty Ships and to use these ships for establish- ABSTRACT-Allhou[?h arlificial reefs have been

254

Outsourcing ship management: Implications for the logistics chain  

E-print Network

EA 4272 Outsourcing ship management: Implications for the logistics chain Pierre Cariou* Francois,version1-17May2011 #12;Outsourcing ship management: Implications for the logistics chain Pierre Cariou that shipping companies outsource the management of vessels to ship management companies, a decision with many

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

255

Adaptive Interacting Multiple Model Algorithm for Manoeuvring Ship Tracking1  

E-print Network

Adaptive Interacting Multiple Model Algorithm for Manoeuvring Ship Tracking1 Emil Semerdjiev Science Fund Abstract. A fixed structure adaptive IMM algorithm for manoeuvring ship tracking is proposed of problems are also valid for the marine moving objects (ships). The complex dynamics of the ship motion

Mihaylova, Lyudmila

256

Mothers' Home Business Network (MHBN)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Established in 1984, the Mothers' Home Business Network (MHBN) provides ideas, inspiration and support for mothers who choose to work at home. Home entrepreneur mom resources include a daily success strategy tip, the newsletter HomeWorkingMom Monthly, and Mom-to-Mom--a list of recommended home business opportunities. Readers may also view MHBN book selections on related topics via the Homeworking Mom Bookshelf.

1997-01-01

257

Mother and Daughter Reports about Upward Transfers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using 619 mother-daughter dyads interviewed in the 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Mature Women and Young Women, this study examines the assistance that adult daughters provide to their mothers and its covariates. Mothers and daughters have low levels of agreement on transfers. Using mothers' reports identifies different covariates of

Lin, I-Fen

2008-01-01

258

Breastfeeding in Depressed Mother-Infant Dyads.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviewed depressed and non-depressed mothers on their breastfeeding practices and perceptions of their infants' feeding behavior. Found that, compared to non-depressed mothers, depressed mothers breast fed less often, stopped breastfeeding earlier, and scored lower on a breastfeeding confidence scale. Mothers who breastfed rather than bottle

Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Feijo, Larissa

2002-01-01

259

47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations...Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations...earth stations that receive a distress alert must, as soon as possible, inform...

2012-10-01

260

47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations...Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations...earth stations that receive a distress alert must, as soon as possible, inform...

2013-10-01

261

47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations...Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations...earth stations that receive a distress alert must, as soon as possible, inform...

2010-10-01

262

47 CFR 80.1121 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations...Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by ship stations and ship earth stations...earth stations that receive a distress alert must, as soon as possible, inform...

2011-10-01

263

Training for how to ship `excepted quantities' of regulated chemicals Addendum 1 to the Shipping Biological Materials Quick Reference Guide  

E-print Network

Training for how to ship `excepted quantities' of regulated chemicals Addendum 1 to the Shipping/9/2007 Purpose International and federal shipping laws require appropriate training for anyone who transports ship regulated chemicals, you normally need to 1) attend multiple-day, vendor-taught training or 2

California at Irvine, University of

264

Speckle noise reduction in SAR images ship detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At present, there are two types of method to detect ships in SAR images. One is a direct detection type, detecting ships directly. The other is an indirect detection type. That is, it firstly detects ship wakes, and then seeks ships around wakes. The two types all effect by speckle noise. In order to improve the accuracy of ship detection and get accurate ship and ship wakes parameters, such as ship length, ship width, ship area, the angle of ship wakes and ship outline from SAR images, it is extremely necessary to remove speckle noise in SAR images before data used in various SAR images ship detection. The use of speckle noise reduction filter depends on the specification for a particular application. Some common filters are widely used in speckle noise reduction, such as the mean filter, the median filter, the lee filter, the enhanced lee filter, the Kuan filter, the frost filter, the enhanced frost filter and gamma filter, but these filters represent some disadvantages in SAR image ship detection because of the various types of ship. Therefore, a mathematical function known as the wavelet transform and multi-resolution analysis were used to localize an SAR ocean image into different frequency components or useful subbands, and effectively reduce the speckle in the subbands according to the local statistics within the bands. Finally, the analysis of the statistical results are presented, which demonstrates the advantages and disadvantages of using wavelet shrinkage techniques over standard speckle filters.

Yuan, Ji; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Qingqing; Chen, Jingbo; Ren, Lin

2012-09-01

265

Shipping and the competitive advantage of nations: the role of international ship registers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper argues that the creation of international ship registries by traditional maritime countries will not sufficient to halt the decline of their fleets. Over the last two decades shipping has undergone profound restructuring, characterized by a trend towards globalization and a search for a more efficient factor input combination. While shipowners from OECD countries have relied increasingly on flags

Gunnar K. Sletmo; Susanne Hoste

1993-01-01

266

Mother Britain and her Sons  

E-print Network

TRANSCRIPTION; MESSAGE: Sat Morning, My Dear Eileen, Many thanks for nice P C. We wish you a very bright [and] happy new year I do so hope Harry gets off soon The weather is just horrid again What dreadful news for the new year the Ship...

Kaufman, Herbert, 1878-1947 [author; Connie [writer of accompanying material

2012-03-05

267

Radiative forcing over ocean by Ship Wakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -0.00014 53% Wm^-2 assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size ?100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Wm^-2), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

Gatebe, C. K.; Wilcox, E. M.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

2011-12-01

268

Radiative Forcing Over Ocean by Ship Wakes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -0.00014 plus or minus 53% Watts per square meter assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size of greater than or equal to 100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Watts per square meter), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

Gatebe, Charles K.; Wilcox, E.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

2011-01-01

269

What maritime ISAR designers should know about ship dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ISAR has enjoyed some success in imaging maritime targets, particularly ships. In fact, a number of maritime ISAR systems have been operational for a number of years. With ISAR, the ship's own motion is critical to forming well-resolved ISAR images. Seemingly important to accounting for ship motion is to first understand the nature of the ship motion that we are likely to encounter. Designing ships for specific motion characteristics is the domain of naval architecture. This paper presents some preliminary analysis of naval architecture principles, and typical ship designs' impact on the ISAR problem.

Doerry, A. W.

2012-06-01

270

Mother Love: Natural Mothering, Birth to Three Years.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book discusses aspects of natural parenthood based largely on the author's own experiences, with references to other supportive studies and expert opinions. Topics covered include emotional changes brought on by pregnancy; home type delivery; family sleeping quarters and baby-led nursing. Chapters are (1) On Becoming a Mother; (2) Conscious,

Bricklin, Alice G.

271

Mother and Student: The Experience of Mothering in College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditionally the academic discussion and popular discourse surrounding how a female will engage the role of mother primarily focuses on the decision of whether to be "at-home" or "at-work". However, this ignores the many different parents, parenting decisions, and role conflict experiences that exist in contemporary society. For instance, a

Pare, Elizabeth R.

2009-01-01

272

National Geographic: SpaceShipOne  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Geographic presents Burt Rutan's accomplishments with his rocketship, SpaceShipOne. Users can learn about the preparation and flight through a series of fascinating images and a concise article. The website features photographer Jim Sugar's experience covering the event. Visitors can find interesting facts and links to outside resources. For those who would like to discuss the topic, individuals can join in the online forum. Everyone should visit the Multimedia link to take a closer look at SpaceShipOne's cockpit.

273

5.G Battle Ship Using Grid Paper  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Materials The students will need grid paper and colored pencils; some color for the ships and (for example) red for explosions on their ships and their...

274

Ship Trim Optimization: Assessment of Influence of Trim on Resistance of MOERI Container Ship  

PubMed Central

Environmental issues and rising fuel prices necessitate better energy efficiency in all sectors. Shipping industry is a stakeholder in environmental issues. Shipping industry is responsible for approximately 3% of global CO2 emissions, 14-15% of global NOX emissions, and 16% of global SOX emissions. Ship trim optimization has gained enormous momentum in recent years being an effective operational measure for better energy efficiency to reduce emissions. Ship trim optimization analysis has traditionally been done through tow-tank testing for a specific hullform. Computational techniques are increasingly popular in ship hydrodynamics applications. The purpose of this study is to present MOERI container ship (KCS) hull trim optimization by employing computational methods. KCS hull total resistances and trim and sinkage computed values, in even keel condition, are compared with experimental values and found in reasonable agreement. The agreement validates that mesh, boundary conditions, and solution techniques are correct. The same mesh, boundary conditions, and solution techniques are used to obtain resistance values in different trim conditions at Fn = 0.2274. Based on attained results, optimum trim is suggested. This research serves as foundation for employing computational techniques for ship trim optimization. PMID:24578649

Duan, Wenyang

2014-01-01

275

Mothers Speaking: A Study on the Experience of Mothers within the Mother-Child Education Programme (MOCEP)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to investigate the experiences of mothers participating in MOCEP in Istanbul, through a qualitative research methodology. Overall effectiveness of the programme, its implementation and how the mothers benefited were the main concerns. The study was carried out with 20 mothers. Individual and focus interviews, participant

Kocak, Aylon; Bekman, Sevda

2004-01-01

276

Mother Tongue Maintenance: The Debate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This debate presents two viewpoints on mother tongue maintenance: (1) that all individuals have a fundamental right to education in their native tongue, and that multilingual societies should actively promote multilingualism for all individuals; and (2) that the multitude of languages and rapid economic development in many countries calls for

Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove; Sridhar, Kamal

1994-01-01

277

Postpartum nursing for Korean mothers.  

PubMed

Growing numbers of Korean-Americans require US health care workers to become knowledgeable of and sensitive to the cultural beliefs and customs of Korean patients. To further such understanding, health behaviors related to infant care and family involvement in the postpartum period were observed in a Los Angeles, California, hospital located in a Korean community. Notable in unassimilated Korean families were the power of the mother-in-law to assume control of decisions regarding infant care and the tendency of new mothers to defer to their mothers-in-law rather than ask nurses for advice. There is a cultural perception that the new mother is sick and unable to handle her infant. Other practices identified include a special diet of seaweed soup, avoidance of cold (including the rejection of ice packs against pain), resistance to breast feeding, preference for a male child, and modesty in the presence of men. In some cases, clinical considerations conflicted with cultural traditions. Respectful teaching, in nonverbal ways if there is a language barrier, and modeling of infant care techniques are recommended. Disregard for childbirth-associated cultural traditions on the part of medical staff can only increase the stress for the infant and family. PMID:8857400

Schneiderman, J U

1996-01-01

278

75 FR 26875 - Mother's Day, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...to raise children while pursuing their careers, or as single parents working to provide for their families. They have carried...forms, and children may be raised by two parents, a single mother, two mothers, a step-mom, a...

2010-05-12

279

PAM: A Program for Adolescent Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Program for Adolescent Mothers (PAM) established to provide opportunities for teen mothers in Louisiana to increase their self-esteem, become productive citizens, and become aware of the physical and emotional development of children. (JOW)

Robichaux, Faye B.; And Others

1989-01-01

280

When Should a Mother Avoid Breastfeeding?  

MedlinePLUS

... H1N1) Virus Transmission When should a mother avoid breastfeeding? Health professionals agree that human milk provides the ... to Strategies to Support Breastfeeding Mothers and Babies Breastfeeding Information for Families Breastfeeding Hotline The HHS Office ...

281

NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson June 1527  

E-print Network

Galveston, Texas on June 15 for its third research mission to study the Deepwater Horizon/BP oil spill samples show conditions that existed in an area before any impacts from the spill have occurred. The ship the wellhead to study the structure of the main plume of oil rising from the seafloor to the surface. Water

282

Optimum Reset of Ship's Inertial Navigation System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optimum linear filter and control theory is applied to the practical problem of supplementing an inertial navigation system with discrete reference information. The information takes the form of position obtained from Loran C or Decca, for example, and occasional azimuth fixes obtained from star sightings. In particular, optimum use of this information is discussed for the Ship's Inertial Navigation System

B. E. Bona; Robert J. Smay

1966-01-01

283

49 CFR 174.24 - Shipping papers.  

...HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY RAIL General Operating Requirements 174...transportation or transport a hazardous material by rail unless that person receives a shipping...may be the date a shipper notifies the rail carrier that a shipment is ready for...

2014-10-01

284

Propagation of light through ship exhaust plumes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Looking through the atmosphere, it is sometimes difficult to see the details of an object. Effects like scintillation and blur are the cause of these difficulties. Exhaust plumes of e.g. a ship can cause extreme scintillation and blur, making it even harder to see the details of what lies behind the plume. Exhaust plumes come in different shapes, sizes, and opaqueness and depending on atmospheric parameters like wind speed and direction, as well as engine settings (power, gas or diesel, etc.). A CFD model is used to determine the plume's flow field outside the stack on the basis of exhaust flow properties, the interaction with the superstructure of the ship, the meteorological conditions and the interaction of ship's motion and atmospheric wind fields. A modified version of the NIRATAM code performs the gas radiation calculations and provides the radiant intensity of the (hot) exhaust gases and the transmission of the atmosphere around the plume is modeled with MODTRAN. This allows assessing the irradiance of a sensor positioned at some distance from the ship and its plume, as function of the conditions that influence the spatial distribution and thermal properties of the plume. Furthermore, an assessment can be made of the probability of detecting objects behind the plume. This plume module will be incorporated in the TNO EOSTAR-model, which provides estimates of detection range and image quality of EO-sensors under varying meteorological conditions.

van Iersel, M.; Mack, A.; van Eijk, A. M. J.; Schleijpen, H. M. A.

2014-10-01

285

Response analysis of an automobile shipping container  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design and development of automobile shipping containers to reduce enroute damage are discussed. Vibration tests were conducted to determine the system structural integrity. A dynamic analysis was made using NASTRAN and the results of the test and the analysis are compared.

Hua, L.; Lee, S. H.; Johnstone, B.

1973-01-01

286

Advanced insulations for refrigerated shipping containers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on a research project that was recently conducted to find a cost effective insulation for refrigerated shipping containers (reefers) that avoids the environmental problems associated with CFCs currently used in foam insulated reefers. Advanced vacuum insulations (which contain no CFCs and have high thermal resistances) have been studied at U.S. National Laboratories and at several companies in

K. T. Jr

1993-01-01

287

Carbonaceous aerosols of aviation and shipping emissions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a study of the physical and chemical properties of carbonaceous aerosols emitted by transport systems (namely, by aircraft gas turbine engines and large ship diesel engines) into the atmosphere. A comparative analysis of the morphology, size, elemental composition, and surface chemistry between aviation and diesel soot particles reveals the general and characteristic features of emissions from each source.

O. B. Popovicheva; E. D. Kireeva; M. A. Timofeev; N. K. Shonija; V. P. Mogil'Nikov

2010-01-01

288

Government response to marine pollution from ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Marine Pollution Control Unit (MPCU) is the competent national authority for discharging the Secretary of State for Transport responsibility for pollution from ships under the Prevention of Oil Pollution Act 1971 and subsequent legislation covering other hazardous substances. It is an integral part of The Coastguard Agency, an executive agency of The Department of Transport. MPCU is responsible for

John Bywater

1995-01-01

289

Ship noise spectrum analysis based on HHT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ship noise spectrum analysis by HHT is a new method and essential for underwater target recognition. In the process, the end swings and overshoots\\/undershoots exist during empirical mode decomposition. Analyzing the feature of the cubic spline interpolation and cubic Hermite polynomial interpolation, a new method was proposed which made use of cubic Hermite polynomial interpolation for envelopes fitting, and the

Zhang Zhimeng; Liu Chenchen; Liu Bosheng

2010-01-01

290

EFFECT OF SHIP NOISE ON SLEEP  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of a steady sound level of 65 dB(A) from a diesel ship engine on nocturnal sleep were studied using polygraphic and subjective sleep parameters. Three healthy men, aged 29 to 33 years, participated in the experiment. Sleep polygrams and the sound level in a sleep laboratory were recorded for each subject for five exposure nights and five control

Y. Tamura; T. Kawada; Y. Sasazawa

1997-01-01

291

Sea loads on ships and offshore structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The book introduces the theory of the structural loading on ships and offshore structures caused by wind, waves and currents, and goes on to describe the applications of this theory in terms of real structures. The main topics described are linear-wave induced motions, loads on floating structures, numerical methods for ascertaining wave induced motions and loads, viscous wave loads and

O. M. Faltinsen

1990-01-01

292

Container Shipping And Ports: An Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Globalisation, deregulation, logistics integration and containerisation have reshaped the port and shipping industry. Port and maritime companies are challenged to redefine their functional role in the value chain for the sake of creating customer value and of ensuring the survival and growth of the company. Companies are busily trying to disrupt the status quo rather than preserve it. Based on

Theo E. Notteboom

2004-01-01

293

Shipping : is it a high risk low return business?  

E-print Network

The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the risk and return characteristics of the shipping business. Shipping profitability and returns are evaluated and an analysis is performed to examine whether the returns are ...

Patitsas, Leon S

2004-01-01

294

77 FR 76164 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...atmospheric pollution --Development of international measures for minimizing the transfer of invasive aquatic species through biofouling of ships --Development of international code of safety for ships using gases or other low-flashpoint fuels...

2012-12-26

295

13.122 Ship Structural Analysis & Design, Spring 2003  

E-print Network

Ship longitudinal strength and hull primary stresses. Ship structural design concepts. Effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength. Transverse shear stresses in the hull girder. Torsional strength ...

Burke, David V.

296

46 CFR 111.10-7 - Dead ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...111.10-7 Section 111.10-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply 111.10-7 Dead ship. (a) The...

2011-10-01

297

46 CFR 111.10-7 - Dead ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...111.10-7 Section 111.10-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply 111.10-7 Dead ship. (a) The...

2010-10-01

298

10 CFR 72.166 - Handling, storage, and shipping control.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 false Handling, storage, and shipping control. 72.166 ...LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL...Quality Assurance 72.166 Handling, storage, and shipping control. The...

2010-01-01

299

7 CFR 984.472 - Reports of merchantable walnuts shipped.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Reports of merchantable walnuts shipped. 984.472 Section 984...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules... 984.472 Reports of merchantable walnuts shipped. (a) Reports of...

2010-01-01

300

Optimal control theory applied to ship maneuvering in restricted waters  

E-print Network

Ship drivers have long understood that powerful interaction forces exist when ships operate in close proximity to rigid boundaries or other vessels. Controlling the effects of these forces has been traditionally handled ...

Thomas, Brian S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01

301

27 CFR 26.114 - Permit to ship required.  

...TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL LIQUORS AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Taxpayment of Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Permit to Ship Liquors and Articles 26.114 Permit to ship...

2014-04-01

302

27 CFR 26.114 - Permit to ship required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL LIQUORS AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Taxpayment of Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Permit to Ship Liquors and Articles 26.114 Permit to ship...

2013-04-01

303

Aerial view of construction of both LTA ship hangars (looking ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Aerial view of construction of both LTA ship hangars (looking north) circa 1942. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

304

Aerial view of reroofing of northern LTA ship hangar, circa ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Aerial view of re-roofing of northern LTA ship hangar, circa 1957. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

305

Ship Noise Evaluation Based On Segmented Decision Trees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Signature recognition can be useful in a wide range of applications. A decision tree method for ship noise classification is presented. Thie ship noise, once transposed to the frequency's domain through the application of a b\\

Jose M. Fonseca; Fernando Moura-Pires

1992-01-01

306

FINISHED CASTINGS ARE ONLY GROUND BEFORE THEY ARE SHIPPED TO ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FINISHED CASTINGS ARE ONLY GROUND BEFORE THEY ARE SHIPPED TO CUSTOMERS WHO COMPLETE THE FINISHING IN THEIR OWN MACHINE SHOPS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Grinding & Shipping, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

307

75 FR 10546 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of IACS unified interpretations --Fixed hydrocarbon gas detection systems on double-hull tankers --Harmonization...ships --Requirements for ships carrying hydrogen and compressed natural gas vehicles --Guidelines for a visible element to...

2010-03-08

308

ShippingInfectious Substances, Genetically Modified Microorganisms, and Exempt Specimens  

E-print Network

ShippingInfectious Substances, Genetically Modified Microorganisms, and Exempt Specimens Goods: Biological Substances, Category B (BSCB), Genetically Modified Microorganisms (GMMO) and Exempt 路 Individuals wishing to ship Biological Substances Category B (BSCB) and/or Genetically Modified

Jia, Songtao

309

75 FR 64390 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Capacity-building for the implementation of new measures --Role of the human element --Formal safety assessment --Piracy and armed robbery against ships --General cargo ship safety --Implementation of instruments and related matters...

2010-10-19

310

76 FR 19176 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Capacity-building for the implementation of new measures --Formal safety assessment --General cargo ship safety --Piracy and armed robbery against ships --Implementation of instruments and related matters --Relations with other...

2011-04-06

311

77 FR 21619 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...security; Capacity-building for the implementation of new measures; Role of the human element; Formal safety assessment; Piracy and armed robbery against ships; General cargo ship safety; Implementation of instruments and related matters;...

2012-04-10

312

78 FR 17466 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...mandatory Code for ships operating in polar waters --Review and modernization of the Global Maritime DIstress and Safety System (GMDSS) --Review of general cargo ship safety --Proposed amendment to the STCW Code's colour vision requirements...

2013-03-21

313

78 FR 77773 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...mandatory Code for ships operating in polar waters --Review and modernization of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) --Proposed review of STCW passenger ship specific safety training --Training in hot work procedures on crude oil...

2013-12-24

314

31. Floating original Ship Canal draw (in background) to University ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

31. Floating original Ship Canal draw (in background) to University Heights location. New Ship Canal draw in foreground. June 1906 photograph. - University Heights Bridge, Spanning Harlem River at 207th Street & West Harlem Road, New York, New York County, NY

315

View southsouthwest of drydock no. 2 caisson with receiving ship ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View south-southwest of drydock no. 2 caisson with receiving ship and ship FS 2 in background. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 2, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

316

1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR AND DATE, SOURCE: BISHOP MUSEUM, HONOLULU, HI. - Ship "Falls of Clyde", Hawaii Maritime Center,Pier 7, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

317

The bunkering industry and its effect on shipping tanker operations  

E-print Network

The bunkering industry provides the shipping industry with the fuel oil that the vessels consume. The quality of the fuel oil provided will ensure the safe operation of vessels. Shipping companies under their fuel oil ...

Boutsikas, Angelos

2004-01-01

318

Environmental accounting for Arctic shipping - A framework building on ship tracking data from satellites.  

PubMed

Arctic shipping is on the rise, leading to increased concern over the potential environmental impacts. To better understand the magnitude of influence to the Arctic environment, detailed modelling of emissions and environmental risks are essential. This paper describes a framework for environmental accounting. A cornerstone in the framework is the use of Automatic Identification System (AIS) ship tracking data from satellites. When merged with ship registers and other data sources, it enables unprecedented accuracy in modelling and geographical allocation of emissions and discharges. This paper presents results using two of the models in the framework; emissions of black carbon (BC) in the Arctic, which is of particular concern for climate change, and; bunker fuels and wet bulk carriage in the Arctic, of particular concern for oil spill to the environment. Using the framework, a detailed footprint from Arctic shipping with regards to operational emissions and potential discharges is established. PMID:25168183

Mjelde, A; Martinsen, K; Eide, M; Endresen, O

2014-10-15

319

Integrated power system brings innovation to naval ship designs  

SciTech Connect

The development of an integrated power system (IPS) with lower life-cycle costs for the U.S. Navy is outlined in this article. The IPS combines electric propulsion, DC ship service distribution, and power management. Integrating ship service and propulsion power reduces the ship operating costs and improves overall life-cycle cost; generation capacity is controlled to closely match actual load requirements. The IPS design, ship arrangement studies, and land based evaluation are described in some detail in the article.

Spotts, T.E. [Lockheed Martin, Liverpool, NY (United States)

1997-07-01

320

State of the World's Mothers 2002: Mothers & Children in War & Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides a comprehensive look at the challenges facing mothers and children during and after armed conflict. The examination is divided into the sections "Mothers in War,""Mothers Rebuilding," and "Call to Action." Key findings include the following: (1) the nature of war has changed dramatically in recent decades, putting mothers and

Geoghegan, Tracy

321

Lesbian mothers and their children: A comparison with solo parent heterosexual mothers and their children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two types of single-parent households and their effects on children ages 311 years were compared. One type comprised 50 homosexual mothers and their 56 children, and the other was a group of 40 heterosexual mothers and their 48 children. There were 30 daughters and 26 sons of homosexual mothers and 28 daughters and 20 sons of heterosexual mothers. The sexual

Richard Green; Jane Barclay Mandel; Mary E. Hotvedt; James Gray; Laurel Smith

1986-01-01

322

3 CFR 8817 - Proclamation 8817 of May 11, 2012. Mother抯 Day, 2012  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ensure their children have every opportunity to pursue their dreams. Our Nation first came together to celebrate Mother...hereby proclaim May 13, 2012, as Mother抯 Day. I urge all Americans to express love and gratitude to mothers everywhere,...

2013-01-01

323

Mothers' Working Models of Attachment Relationships and Mother and Child Behavior during Separation and Reunion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between mother's models of attachment and mother and child behaviors related to separation were explored in a study of 45 mothers and their 2- to 4-year-old children. Results showed that mother behaviors before and after separation and child reunion behaviors varied according to attachment classification. (SH)

Crowell, Judith A.; Feldman, S. Shirley

1991-01-01

324

Children of depressed and schizophrenic mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of psychotic mothers and their children who were five years or younger when first recruited for our study of high risk children was followed up five years later. The current sample, obtained from our previous work, consisted of 18 schizophrenic, 12 depressed and psychotic, and 22 well mothers and their six to 12 year old children. The mothers

Henry Grunebaum; Bertram J. Cohler; Carol Kauffman; David Gallant

1978-01-01

325

Attention Deficit Disorder: Two Mothers' Perceptions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report discusses the outcomes of a study that investigated the decision-making process of two mothers' selection of treatment for their sons' attention deficit disorder (ADD). One mother opted for a medical treatment, and the other mother opted for a non-medical treatment. The boy who is medically treated is 14, and the non-medically treated

Fernandez, Roy C.; O'Connor, Carol

326

Mothers' Coping and Hope in Early Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goals of the study were to examine the relations between maternal coping and hope among mothers who participated in early intervention program for their infants. Earlier studies focused attention on mothers' experiences of stress and their coping. Within the salutogenic construct, we aim at examining relations between mothers' coping and hope

Einav, Michal; Levi, Uzi; Margalit, Malka

2012-01-01

327

Child labor and mothers' work in Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore associations between children's and mothers work. Design\\/methodology\\/approach Brazilian household survey data are used to examine characteristics of children's and mothers' work in tandem. Findings Children are more likely to be in the labor force if their mothers are working, especially girls, younger children and rural children. There are

Deborah DeGraff; Deborah Levison; Mary Robison

2009-01-01

328

Mothers' Repartnering after a Nonmarital Birth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the prevalence, predictors and outcomes of unmarried mothers' repartnering patterns following a nonmarital birth. Results indicate that, within five years after a birth, approximately two-thirds of unmarried mothers end their relationship with the focal child's biological father, and more than half of these mothers enter new

Bzostek, Sharon H.; McLanahan, Sara S.; Carlson, Marcia J.

2012-01-01

329

Reclaiming the Mother('s) Tongue: "Beloved,""Ceremony,""Mothers and Shadows."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores Toni Morrison's "Beloved," Leslie Marmon Silko's "Ceremony," and Marta Traba's "Mothers and Shadows." Identifies the novels as resistance tales that articulate minority perspectives. Points out that all three are dialogic and contain fundamental moments of captivity and liberation. Observes that, in each story, empowerment springs from

Cummings, Kate

1990-01-01

330

29 CFR 1915.163 - Ship's piping systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ship's piping systems. 1915.163 Section 1915.163 Labor...SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems 1915.163 Ship's piping systems. (a) Before work is performed on a...

2011-07-01

331

29 CFR 1915.163 - Ship's piping systems.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ship's piping systems. 1915.163 Section 1915.163 Labor...SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Ship's Machinery and Piping Systems 1915.163 Ship's piping systems. (a) Before work is performed on a...

2014-07-01

332

15 CFR 806.9 - Airlines and ship operators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airlines and ship operators. 806.9 Section...DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS 806.9 Airlines and ship operators. Foreign stations...terminal and port facilities of U.S. airlines and ship operators; and U.S....

2011-01-01

333

15 CFR 806.9 - Airlines and ship operators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airlines and ship operators. 806.9 Section...DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS 806.9 Airlines and ship operators. Foreign stations...terminal and port facilities of U.S. airlines and ship operators; and U.S....

2012-01-01

334

The maximum shipping capacity of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the determination of the maximum shipping capacity of the Suez canal. Initially, some assumptions are made in order to calculate the 憈heoretical maximum capacity in terms of 憇tandard ships. This last term defines ships which transit the Canal at a given speed and at a given time interval from the vessel ahead and astern. Data has been

J. D. Griffiths; Emtissal M. Hassan

1977-01-01

335

47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

2012-10-01

336

47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

2011-10-01

337

47 CFR 80.1189 - Portable ship earth stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable ship earth stations. 80.1189 Section 80.1189 Telecommunication...Mobile-Satellite Stations 80.1189 Portable ship earth stations. (a) Portable ship earth stations are authorized to operate on board...

2013-10-01

338

OBJECT-ORIENTED SHIP DETECTION FROM VHR SATELLITE IMAGES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Within today's security environment and with increasing worldwide travel and transport of dangerous goods the need of vessel traffic services, ship routing and monitoring of ship movements on sea and along coastlines becomes more time consuming and an important responsibility for coastal authorities. This paper describes the architecture of a ship detection prototype based on an object-oriented methodology to

Gregor Willhauck; Juan J. Caliz; Christian Hoffmann; Iris Lingenfelder; Markus Heynen

339

Graph-based ship extraction scheme for optical satellite image  

Microsoft Academic Search

Automatic detection and recognition of ship in satellite images is very important and has a wide array of applications. This paper concentrates on optical satellite sensor, which provides an important approach for ship monitoring. Graph-based fore\\/background segmentation scheme is used to extract ship candidant from optical satellite image chip after the detection step, from course to fine. Shadows on the

Feng Chen; Wenxian Yu; Xingzhao Liu; Kaizhi Wang; Lin Gong; Wentao Lv

2011-01-01

340

Matthew D. Garner Director, Ship Integrity & Performance Engineering  

E-print Network

Surface Ship, Submarine, and Aircraft Carrier Structural Integrity, Ship Vulnerability/Shock, Signatures Protection, Fuels and Lubricants, Weight, Stability, Hydrodynamics and Arrangements for all in-service and new acquisition ships and submarines. In 2012, Mr. Garner served as the Deputy Director for Submarine

341

Conceptual designs for LMFBR spent fuel shipping casks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A spent-fuel shipping cask for use at both the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is being developed. In compliance with milestones established for the Sandia Labs LMFBR spent-fuel shipping activity, conceptual designs of an LMFBR shipping cask are described. The detailed design based on one of the concepts will commence after review

G. C. Jr. Allen; R. G. Eakes; J. M. Freedman; R. B. Pope; S. A. Dupree; W. P. Jr. Schimmel

1978-01-01

342

ADRC Based Ship Course Controller Design and Simulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of the strong non-linearity, uncertainty and the dynamics restraints of rudder, designing a high performance ship course controller is yet a challenge work. First, the ADRC control method was introduced briefly. Then the ship course motion characteristics were analyzed and the nonlinear model with the autopilot dynamic restrictions was given. Then the ship course motion system was expressed as

Jiuhong Ruan; Yibin Li

2007-01-01

343

15 CFR 806.9 - Airlines and ship operators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airlines and ship operators. 806.9 Section...DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS 806.9 Airlines and ship operators. Foreign stations...terminal and port facilities of U.S. airlines and ship operators; and U.S....

2010-01-01

344

Celebrating 10 years of Centre for Ships and  

E-print Network

Celebrating 10 years of Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Marine Technology Centre Otto knowledge about how ships and other ocean structures behave in the ocean environment, using analytical been inspired by the future needs for structures and operations in shipping, oil and gas, aqua- culture

Malinnikova, Eugenia

345

Diatom community structure on commercially available ship hull coatings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diatoms are primary colonizers of both antifouling and fouling-release ship hull coatings. There are few published studies which report on diatom community development on modern ship hull coatings. This study reports diatom communities on eight commercial marine ship hull coatings exposed at three static immersion sites along the east coast of Florida, viz. Daytona, Sebastian, and Miami. The coatings tested

Kelli A. Zargiel; Jeffrey S. Coogan; Geoffrey W. Swain

2011-01-01

346

NAFTA Countries' Strategies for Addressing Marine Invasive Species through Shipping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Maritime shipping has two vectors of spreading marine invasive species: ballast water inside the ship and biofouling on the hulls outside the ship. While someattention has focused on ballast water, virtually no effort has been made to address biofouling. This paper offers a quantitative analysis of economic incentives for shippers and regulating ports to address both vectors. The strategies

Linda Fernandez

347

The Collection Volume Method for lightning protection of marine ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates and demonstrates a developed technique to use the Collection Volume Method (CVM), for the placement of either conventional or non-conventional lightning protection systems (LPS) for ships. Each lightning eliminator is assigned a striking distance, which is calculated as a function of its height, radius of curvature, ship location, ship dimensions, risk factor, and lightning related parameters. The

Ahmed A. Hossam-Eldin; E. A. M. Omran

2006-01-01

348

Beam forming on bottom-interacting tow-ship noise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ship noise received on a horizontal array towed behind the ship is shown to be useful as a potentially diagnostic tool for estimating local acoustic bottom properties. In numerical simulations, tow-ship noise which bounces off the bottom is processed on a beamformer that shows the arrival angles; the beamformer output is readily interpreted by relating it to the Green's function

WILLIAM A. KUPERMAN; MICHAEL F. WERBY; KENNETH E. GILBERT; GERARD J. TANGO

1985-01-01

349

POSSIBLE STEPS TOWARDS REDUCING IMPACTS OF SHIPPING NOISE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concerns about increases in offshore ambient noise due to commercial shipping have resulted in a work program by the International Maritime Organization to develop technical guidelines to reduce shipping noise. Targets to reduce the contribution from shipping noise to ambient noise have also been endorsed by the IWC Scientific Committee. At frequencies below 300Hz, the underwater noise signature from large

Russell Leaper; Martin Renilson; Veronica Frank; Vassili Papastavrou

350

46 CFR 151.45-7 - Shipping papers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Operations 151.45-7 Shipping papers. Each barge carrying...bill of lading, manifest, or shipping document giving the...shall either have a copy of the shipping papers for each barge in his...entry in the towing vessel's log book giving the name of...

2010-10-01

351

7 CFR 948.8 - Handle or ship.  

...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Handle or ship. 948.8 Section 948.8 Agriculture Regulations...Regulating Handling Definitions 948.8 Handle or ship. Handle or ship means to transport, sell, or in any way to...

2014-01-01

352

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (BERKELEY SHIP)  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (BERKELEY SHIP) WAIVER REVERSAL REQUEST FORM FALL 2014 As a UC Berkeley registered student, you must enroll in SHIP if 1. You for this academic year OR 2. Your insurance does not meet minimum requirements for a waiver of Berkeley SHIP

Jacobs, Lucia

353

27 CFR 26.82 - Permit to ship.  

...Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permit to ship. 26.82 Section 26.82 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and...Articles in Puerto Rico Distilled Spirits 26.82 Permit to ship. Distilled spirits may not be shipped to the United...

2014-04-01

354

46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2011-10-01

355

47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

2013-10-01

356

Shipping and climate change: Scope for unilateral action  

E-print Network

Shipping and climate change: Scope for unilateral action Paul Gilbert, Tyndall Manchester Alice on international shipping emissions and climate change undertaken at The University of Manchester by the Tyndall considers the role that the shipping sector could play in mitigating total global emissions

Matthews, Adrian

357

Ship To Methods PeopleSoft Supply Chain  

E-print Network

Ship To Methods PeopleSoft Supply Chain FMS803 Method 1 (basic) Use for single line item requisition. Method 2 (advanced) Use for multi-line item requisition if same Ship To applies to multiple line items. IMPORTANT NOTE: Catalog Requisitions See reverse side of this job aid. Ship To Methods 颅 job aid

Shull, Kenneth R.

358

OSU SHIP OPERATIONS SMS MANAGEMENT REVIEW FOR 20____  

E-print Network

OSU SHIP OPERATIONS SMS MANAGEMENT REVIEW FOR 20____ Number: SMF 12.2 Revision: 0 Effective Date: 1 not discussed elsewhere) Attendees: Name Position #12;OSU SHIP OPERATIONS SMS MANAGEMENT REVIEW FOR 20: ADDITIONAL REVIEWER: DATE OF REVIEW: NO. ITEM SMS REFERENCE OBSERVATIONS/REMARKS #12;OSU SHIP OPERATIONS SMS

Kurapov, Alexander

359

46 CFR 115.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 115.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2013-10-01

360

47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

2011-10-01

361

46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2010-10-01

362

Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management  

E-print Network

EA 4272 Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management Pierre Cariou* Francois-Charles Wolff,version1-17May2011 #12;Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management Pierre CARIOU Corresponding, France. E-mail: francois.wolff@univ-nantes.fr www.sc-eco.univ-nantes.fr/~fcwolff Abstract Shipping

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

363

7 CFR 927.8 - Ship or handle.  

...Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ship or handle. 927.8 Section 927.8 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions 927.8 Ship or handle. Ship or handle means to sell, deliver, consign,...

2014-01-01

364

DETERMINATION OF SHIP SQUAT AND UKC USING GPS-OTF  

E-print Network

DETERMINATION OF SHIP SQUAT AND UKC USING GPS-OTF Brian Morse, St茅phanie Michaud and Rock Santerre and under-keel clearance (UKC) of merchant ships using GPS NETWORK OF CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE IN GEOMATICS 路 Economical fuel consumption 路 Protection of the ship's hull 路 Protection of the waterway 路 Protection

Santerre, Rock

365

LOGIC BASED DESIGN OF OPTIMAL RECONFIGURATION STRATEGIES FOR SHIP  

E-print Network

LOGIC BASED DESIGN OF OPTIMAL RECONFIGURATION STRATEGIES FOR SHIP POWER SYSTEMS Harry G. Kwatny: A ship electric power system is characterized by a family of nonlinear differential algebraic equations dynamics 1. INTRODUCTION In a ship integrated power system (IPS), electricity supplies the propulsive power

Kwatny, Harry G.

366

S. S. PACI FIC EX PLORER FACTORY SHIP  

E-print Network

S. S. PACI FIC EX PLORER FACTORY SHIP FISHERY LEAFLET 414 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE , UNITED STATES for Operators of Tl1na Receiving Ships 316 - BeloH Deck ArranCe1'le nts and Refri era on Eq1.lipmen 326 completed factory ship, the Pacific Explorer, left in January for Central and South American waters

367

SHIP UW (03-2012) LifeWise Assurance Company  

E-print Network

SHIP UW (03-2012) LifeWise Assurance Company Home Office: 7001-220th Street SW Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2124 student.lifewiseac.com University of Washington Policyholder SHIP UW (03-2012) Policy President and Chief Executive Officer LifeWise Assurance Company #12;SHIP UW (03-2013) P-1 Policy

Borenstein, Elhanan

368

Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair  

E-print Network

Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair: Your displays and materials can be shipped to the following address: LANL Bikini Atoll Road, SM-30 Mary Anne With, MS-M719 TA-00, 199, Drop: At the conclusion of the Career Fair, you are responsible for preparing your materials to be shipped back, including

369

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (SHIP)  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (SHIP) WAIVER REVERSAL REQUEST FORM SPRING 2012 As a UC Berkeley registered student, you must enroll in SHIP if 1. You are no longer OR 2. Your insurance does not meet minimum requirements for a waiver of SHIP. In order to reverse

Walker, Matthew P.

370

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (SHIP)  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (SHIP) WAIVER REVERSAL REQUEST FORM FALL 2011 As a UC Berkeley registered student, you must enroll in SHIP if 1. You are no longer OR 2. Your insurance does not meet minimum requirements for a waiver of SHIP. In order to reverse

Doudna, Jennifer A.

371

NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON S-222 The National Oceanic and  

E-print Network

NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON S-222 Mission The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship Thomas Jefferson in one of a fleet of research and survey vessels owned and operated by NOAA surveys for the primary purpose of updating NOAA's suite of nautical charts. Commercial shipping

372

46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2013-10-01

373

46 CFR 115.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 115.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) 115.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2010-10-01

374

Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair  

E-print Network

Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair: Your displays and materials can be shipped to the following address; you should arrange for your packages to arrive no later than September 5: At the conclusion of the Career Fair, you are responsible for preparing your materials to be shipped back, including

375

SHIPPING AND ALIGNMENT FOR THE SNS CRYOMODULE* T. Whitlatch  

E-print Network

SHIPPING AND ALIGNMENT FOR THE SNS CRYOMODULE* T. Whitlatch , C. Curtis, E.F. Daly, C. Graves, J and how it is preserved during the shipping and operation of the cryomodule. It includes a description of the support scheme developed to preserve the alignment during shipping and operation, and how the support

376

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (UC SHIP)  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (UC SHIP) August 1, 2012 Blue View Vision, you may request, in writing, that the systemwide UC Student Health Insurance Plan (UC SHIP, 10 th Floor, Oakland, CA 94607. The decision of the UC SHIP Administrative Office will be final. UC

Kammen, Daniel M.

377

46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section...Amended (SOLAS) 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel...voyage must have a valid SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. The Commandant...

2012-10-01

378

Manoeuvring Ship Model Identification and Interacting Multiple Model Tracking Algorithm  

E-print Network

Manoeuvring Ship Model Identification and Interacting Multiple Model Tracking Algorithm Design 1/95 with Bulgarian Science Fund. Abstract. Precise discrete models of the manoeuvring ship motion and xtended Kalman target motions [2, 5, 8] do not describe the nonlinear specificity of the manoeuvring ship. To solve

Mihaylova, Lyudmila

379

Page 1 of 2 Intent to Ship Radioactive Materials  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 2 Intent to Ship Radioactive Materials All shipments of radioactive materials must. Please complete this form and email it to radiation-safety@northwestern.edu with "Intent to Ship the materials to be shipped, to the Research Safety office. A tracking number will be provided to you once

Shull, Kenneth R.

380

47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

2010-10-01

381

15 CFR 8b.15 - Employment on ships.  

... 2014-01-01 false Employment on ships. 8b.15 Section 8b.15 Commerce...Employment Practices 8b.15 Employment on ships. No qualified handicapped individual...subjected to discrimination in employment on ships under any program or activity to which...

2014-01-01

382

47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11 Section 97...Provisions 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the...

2012-10-01

383

47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

2010-10-01

384

46 CFR 153.12 - IMO Certificates for United States Ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false IMO Certificates for United States Ships. 153.12 Section 153.12 Shipping...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS...12 IMO Certificates for United States Ships. Either a classification...

2013-10-01

385

47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

2013-10-01

386

47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

2011-10-01

387

46 CFR 98.30-14 - Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. 98...Tanks 98.30-14 Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. (a) The person in charge of a ship, except a ship under subpart...

2012-10-01

388

32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

2011-07-01

389

47 CFR 80.115 - Operational conditions for use of associated ship units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. 80.115 Section 80.115...and Procedures Operating Procedures-Ship Stations 80.115 Operational conditions for use of associated ship units. (a) Associated ship...

2012-10-01

390

UNOLS Ship Time Request Form -Section ONE UNOLS Request ID #: 20010807112419  

E-print Network

UNOLS Ship Time Request Form - Section ONE, Palisades, NY 10964 USA X Principal Use _ No Ship Required _ Long Range Planning Document =============================================================================== Ship(s) Requested # Science Year (Name or Size) Days Req. Optimum Dates Alternate Dates

Menke, William

391

32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

2010-07-01

392

32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

2012-07-01

393

32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. 700.873 Section 700.873 National...Commanding Officer Special Circumstances/ships in Naval Stations and Shipyards 700...Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be...

2013-07-01

394

46 CFR 98.30-14 - Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. 98...Tanks 98.30-14 Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. (a) The person in charge of a ship, except a ship under subpart...

2013-10-01

395

46 CFR 98.30-14 - Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. 98...Tanks 98.30-14 Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. (a) The person in charge of a ship, except a ship under subpart...

2010-10-01

396

46 CFR 98.30-14 - Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. 98...Tanks 98.30-14 Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks. (a) The person in charge of a ship, except a ship under subpart...

2011-10-01

397

Evaluating landing aids to support helicopter\\/ship testing and operations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pilot effort involved in a helicopter ship landing is a function of the helicopter flying qualities, the ship airwake and associated turbulence, ship motion, ship visual landing aids, and shipboard obstructions. There are no visual landing aids (VLA) on USA surface combatant ships to aid the pilot in anticipating a ship flight deck quiescent period. The Landing Period Designator

D. Carico; B. Ferrier

2006-01-01

398

Marine Ship Automatic Identification System (AIS) for Enhanced Coastal Security Capabilities: An Oil Spill Tracking Application  

Microsoft Academic Search

National and international trade via shipping is already significant, and expected to continue increasing rapidly over the next decade. Both more ships and larger ships will contribute to this trade, including ships from countries with less rigorous shipping maintenance and inspection standards than the United States, and less strict pollution monitoring regulations. Changes in ship traffic management protocols have been

Kurt D. Schwehr; Philip A. McGillivary

2007-01-01

399

Surrogate mothering: exploitation or empowerment?  

PubMed

The morality of surrogate mothering is analyzed from a "consequentialist" framework which attempts to separate those consequences that invariably accompany a given act from those that accompany it only in particular circumstances. Critics of surrogacy argue that it transfers the burden and risk of pregnancy onto another woman, separates sex and reproduction, and separates reproduction and childrearing; none of these acts is necessarily wrong, either morally or for women's or society's basic interests. While surrogate mothering can be rendered immoral if women are coerced into the practice or become victims of subordinating or penalizing contracts, it has the potential to empower women and increase their status in society by providing a job that is less risky and more enjoyable than other jobs women are forced to take and by achieving greater social recognition for reproductive labor. PMID:11650110

Purdy, Laura M

1989-01-01

400

Ship extraction and categorization from ASTER VNIR imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a methodology for ship extraction and categorization from relatively low resolution multispectral ASTER imagery, corresponding to the sea region south east of Athens in Greece. At a first level, in the radiometrically corrected image, quad tree decomposition and bounding rectangular extraction automatically outline location of objects - possible ships, by statistically evaluating spectral responses throughout the segmented image. Subsequently, the object borders within the rectangular regions are extracted, while connected component labelling combined by size and shape filtering allows ship characterization. The ships' spectral signature is determined in green, red and infrared bands while cluster analysis allows the identification of ship categories on the basis of their size and reflectance. Additional pixel- based measures reveal estimated ship orientation, direction, movement, stability and turning. The results are complemented with additional geographic information and inference tools are formed towards the determination of probable ship type and its destination.

Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Miliaresis, George

2014-08-01

401

Cluster Analysis and Fuzzy Query in Ship Maintenance and Design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cluster analysis and fuzzy query win wide-spread applications in modern intelligent information processing. In allusion to the features of ship maintenance data, a variant of hypergraph-based clustering algorithm, i.e., Correlation Coefficient-based Minimal Spanning Tree(CC-MST), is proposed to analyze the bulky data rooting in ship maintenance process, discovery the unknown rules and help ship maintainers make a decision on various device fault causes. At the same time, revising or renewing an existed design of ship or device maybe necessary to eliminate those device faults. For the sake of offering ship designers some valuable hints, a fuzzy query mechanism is designed to retrieve the useful information from large-scale complicated and reluctant ship technical and testing data. Finally, two experiments based on a real ship device fault statistical dataset validate the flexibility and efficiency of the CC-MST algorithm. A fuzzy query prototype demonstrates the usability of our fuzzy query mechanism.

Che, Jianhua; He, Qinming; Zhao, Yinggang; Qian, Feng; Chen, Qi

402

DEPLOYMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

A new Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) was designed by the Savannah River National Laboratory to be a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The BTSP was certified by the National Nuclear Safety Administration in 2011 for shipments of up to 150 grams of Tritium. Thirty packages were procured and are being delivered to various DOE sites for operational use. This paper summarizes the design features of the BTSP, as well as associated engineered material improvements. Fabrication challenges encountered during production are discussed as well as fielding requirements. Current approved tritium content forms (gas and tritium hydrides), are reviewed, as well as, a new content, tritium contaminated water on molecular sieves. Issues associated with gas generation will also be discussed.

Blanton, P.

2013-10-10

403

Carbonaceous aerosols of aviation and shipping emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is a study of the physical and chemical properties of carbonaceous aerosols emitted by transport systems (namely, by aircraft gas turbine engines and large ship diesel engines) into the atmosphere. A comparative analysis of the morphology, size, elemental composition, and surface chemistry between aviation and diesel soot particles reveals the general and characteristic features of emissions from each source. The high pollution rate of diesel soot particles, considerable fraction of metal admixtures, and availability of char particles characterize the specific features of the formation of particles of this type. The main characteristics characterizing the interaction between aviation and shipping emission aerosols in the moist atmosphere (the composition of organic and water-soluble fractions at the surface) have been obtained. Due to high hygroscopicity, the microparticles can generate cloud condensation nuclei and initiate contrails and additional tropospheric cloudiness.

Popovicheva, O. B.; Kireeva, E. D.; Timofeev, M. A.; Shonija, N. K.; Mogil'Nikov, V. P.

2010-06-01

404

H1616 Shipping Container Radiographic Inspection Report  

SciTech Connect

The HI616 shipping container is a certified type B(U) packaging used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship tritium in support of defense programs. During the 1997 recertification of the container, DOE became concerned about the possible cracking of the polyurethane foam in the overpacks of the 2300 containers currently in service. In response, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) initiated a radiographic inspection program to determine if cracking of the foam was occurring in the H1616 overpacks. SNL developed the radiographic technique for inspecting the foam and contracted the Savannah River Site's Tritium Engineering division to inspect a representative sample of overpacks in service. This report details the development process and the results of all of the radiography performed both at SNL and Savannah River.

Tipton, D.G.

1998-11-01

405

Storage of photovoltaic arrays on a ship  

SciTech Connect

A system is described for installing and storing photovoltaic arrays on a ship, comprising: solar photovoltaic cell arrays laying substantially horizontal, means for framing said photovoltaic arrays, means for rolling and unrolling said arrays connected to said arrays by ropes located along at least one side of said arrays, rigging means connected to said means for rolling and unrolling, guide means for said rigging means and for said rolling and unrolling means to facilitate installing and storing operations.

Newman, E.

1993-08-17

406

First Wartsila 200 diesel generator set shipped  

Microsoft Academic Search

In early June, Wartsila SACM Diesel shipped its first Wartsila 200 diesel generator set from Mulhouse, France. This 12-cylinder generator set, rated 1870 kW at 1500 r\\/min, is being installed in India for base-load power generation service on a floating crane. The Cummins Wartsila Engine Company will have the responsibility to continue the development and production of the 200 series

Wadman

1995-01-01

407

Carbonaceous aerosols of aviation and shipping emissions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a study of the physical and chemical properties of carbonaceous aerosols emitted by transport systems (namely, by\\u000a aircraft gas turbine engines and large ship diesel engines) into the atmosphere. A comparative analysis of the morphology,\\u000a size, elemental composition, and surface chemistry between aviation and diesel soot particles reveals the general and characteristic\\u000a features of emissions from each source.

O. B. Popovicheva; E. D. Kireeva; M. A. Timofeev; N. K. Shonija; V. P. Mogil抧ikov

2010-01-01

408

Propulsion of space ships by nuclear explosion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent progress in the research on deuterium-tritium (D-T) inertially confined microexplosions encourages one to reconsider the nuclear propulsion of spaceships based on the concept originally proposed in the Orion project. We discuss first the acceleration of medium-sized spaceships by D-T explosions whose output is in the range of 0.110 t of TNT. The launching of such a ship into an

J. G. Linhart; J. Krav醨ik

2005-01-01

409

Arctic shipping scenarios and coastal state challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Arctic Council, an intergovernmental forum of the eight Arctic states, is currently embarked on a comprehensive assessment\\u000a of Arctic marine activity in the 21st century the Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment (AMSA). One of the challenges for theAMSA study team has been to identify\\u000a the major uncertainties that will be central to shaping the future of Arctic marine use

Lawson W. Brigham

2008-01-01

410

WORLD SURFACE CURRENTS FROM SHIP'S DRIFT OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Over 4 million observations of ship's drift are on file at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Centre, in Washington, D. C., representing a vast amount of information on ocean surface currents. The observed drift speeds are dependent on the frequency of occurence of the particular current speeds and the frequency of observation. By comparing frequency of observation with the drift speeds observed it is possible to confirm known current patterns and detect singularities in surface currents.

Duncan, C.P.; Schladow, S.G.

1980-11-01

411

Enhanced situational technologies applied to ship channels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Houston Ship Channel ranks as America's number one port in foreign tonnage by welcoming more than 50,000 cargo ships and barges annually. Locally 196,000 jobs, 5.5 billion dollars in business revenue and 213 million dollars in taxes are generated. Unfortunately, 32 days of each year vessel traffic stops for hours due to fog causing an estimated 40- 100 million dollars loss as ships idly wait in the channel for weather to clear. In addition, poor visibility has contributed to past vessel collisions which have resulted in channel closure, and associated damage to property and the environment. Today's imaging technology for synthetic vision systems and enhanced situational awareness systems offers a new solution to this problem. Whereas, typically these systems have been targeted at aircraft landing systems the channel navigation application provides a peripheral ground based market. This paper describes two imaging solutions to the problem. One using an active 35 GHz scanning radar and the other using a 94 GHz passive millimeter wave camera.

Helgeson, Michael A.; Wacker, Roger A.

1997-06-01

412

DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING  

SciTech Connect

A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50-1/2 inches high by 24-1/2 inches in outside diameter. With contents the gross weight of the BTSP is 650 lbs. The BTSP is designed for the safe shipment of 150 grams of tritium in a solid or gaseous state. To comply with the federal regulations that govern Type B shipping packages, the BTSP is designed so that it will not lose tritium at a rate greater than the limits stated in 10CFR 71.51 of 10{sup -6} A2 per hour for the 'Normal Conditions of Transport' (NCT) and an A2 in 1 week under 'Hypothetical Accident Conditions' (HAC). Additionally, since the BTSP design incorporates a valve as part of the tritium containment boundary, secondary containment features are incorporated in the CV Lid to protect against gas leakage past the valve as required by 10CFR71.43(e). This secondary containment boundary is designed to provide the same level of containment as the primary containment boundary when subjected to the HAC and NCT criteria.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2008-09-14

413

46 CFR 153.7 - Ships built before December 27, 1977 and non-self-propelled ships built before July 1, 1983...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ships built before December 27, 1977 and non-self-propelled ships built before July 1, 1983: Application...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED...

2011-10-01

414

46 CFR 153.7 - Ships built before December 27, 1977 and non-self-propelled ships built before July 1, 1983...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ships built before December 27, 1977 and non-self-propelled ships built before July 1, 1983: Application...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED...

2013-10-01

415

46 CFR 153.7 - Ships built before December 27, 1977 and non-self-propelled ships built before July 1, 1983...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ships built before December 27, 1977 and non-self-propelled ships built before July 1, 1983: Application...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED...

2012-10-01

416

46 CFR 153.7 - Ships built before December 27, 1977 and non-self-propelled ships built before July 1, 1983...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ships built before December 27, 1977 and non-self-propelled ships built before July 1, 1983: Application...CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED...

2010-10-01

417

Why mother's milk is best.  

PubMed

Breast milk substitutes made of water, porridge, or animal milk were given to babies only as a life-saving effort prior to World War II, in the event of lack of mother's milk, breast infection or the death of the mother. In the post-war era of the early 1950's, improperly constituted infant formulas became prevalent in the industrialized world to allow the release of women into the work force. Advertising and marketing techniques were also launched in Third World countries, which became easy victims of this ploy because of ignorance, poverty, and inadequate sanitation. Medical consequences include infections from contamination at the source (infantile botulism); hyponatremia, hypocalcaemia, with poor muscle, heart, and brain functioning, from over dilution with water; and infectious diarrhea, which can lead to marasmus and kwashiorkor, from mixture contaminated water. Breast milk contains colostrum, a supercharged nutrient that ensures meeting the infant's immediate energy needs as well as providing antibodies to most childhood diseases. Infant formulas cannot provide this protection. The introduction of weaning foods occurs around 5-6 months of age, when local foodstuffs rather than commercial supplements ought to be used. However, semi-literate mothers are often exposed to radio advertising about substitutes that overwhelm them. Their infants get formula diluted in unclean water and unsuitable solids too early. They will eventually live on fresh cow's milk with the attendant problems of anemia and bovine tuberculosis. Breast-feeding also provides a practical means of birth control and child spacing. The government should enact a national code on the manufacture, nutritional contents, and sale of these substitutes. PMID:12287501

Choto, R G

1993-01-01

418

Emissions from Ships with respect to Their Effects on Clouds.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emissions of particles, gases, heat, and water vapor from ships are discussed with respect to their potential for changing the microstructure of marine stratiform clouds and producing the phenomenon known as `ship tracks.' Airborne measurements are used to derive emission factors of SO2 and NO from diesel-powered and steam turbine-powered ships, burning low-grade marine fuel oil (MFO); they were 15-89 and 2-25 g kg1 of fuel burned, respectively. By contrast a steam turbine-powered ship burning high-grade navy distillate fuel had an SO2 emission factor of 6 g kg1.Various types of ships, burning both MFO and navy distillate fuel, emitted from 4 1015 to 2 1016 total particles per kilogram of fuel burned (4 1015-1.5 1016 particles per second). However, diesel-powered ships burning MFO emitted particles with a larger mode radius (0.03-0.05 m) and larger maximum sizes than those powered by steam turbines burning navy distillate fuel (mode radius 0.02 m). Consequently, if the particles have similar chemical compositions, those emitted by diesel ships burning MFO will serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at lower supersaturations (and will therefore be more likely to produce ship tracks) than the particles emitted by steam turbine ships burning distillate fuel. Since steam turbine-powered ships fueled by MFO emit particles with a mode radius similar to that of diesel-powered ships fueled by MFO, it appears that, for given ambient conditions, the type of fuel burned by a ship is more important than the type of ship engine in determining whether or not a ship will produce a ship track. However, more measurements are needed to test this hypothesis.The particles emitted from ships appear to be primarily organics, possibly combined with sulfuric acid produced by gas-to-particle conversion of SO2. Comparison of model results with measurements in ship tracks suggests that the particles from ships contain only about 10% water-soluble materials. Measurements of the total particles entering marine stratiform clouds from diesel-powered ships fueled by MFO, and increases in droplet concentrations produced by these particles, show that only about 12% of the particles serve as CCN.The fluxes of heat and water vapor from ships are estimated to be 2-22 MW and 0.5-1.5 kg s1, respectively. These emissions rarely produced measurable temperature perturbations, and never produced detectable perturbations in water vapor, in the plumes from ships. Nuclear-powered ships, which emit heat but negligible particles, do not produce ship tracks. Therefore, it is concluded that heat and water vapor emissions do not play a significant role in ship track formation and that particle emissions, particularly from those burning low-grade fuel oil, are responsible for ship track formation. Subsequent papers in this special issue discuss and test these hypotheses.

Hobbs, Peter V.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Ferek, Ronald J.; Strader, Scott R.; Hegg, Dean A.; Frick, Glendon M.; Hoppel, William A.; Gasparovic, Richard F.; Russell, Lynn M.; Johnson, Douglas W.; O'Dowd, Colin; Durkee, Philip A.; Nielsen, Kurt E.; Innis, George

2000-08-01

419

Optimization of ship抯 subdivision arrangement for offshore sequential ballast water exchange using a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ship抯 subdivision arrangement is a multi-objective combinatorial optimization problem with multiple nonlinear constraints. This study focuses on finding a methodology for ship抯 subdivision arrangement that can guarantee ship抯 offshore sequential ballast water exchanging (SBWE) performances in the preliminary design stage. A mathematical model is built using minimizing trims and hull girder longitudinal bending moments and shearing forces occurred in the

Jing Chen; Yan Lin; Jun Zhou Huo; Ming Xia Zhang; Zhuo Shang Ji

2010-01-01

420

Mothers' speech in three social classes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Functional and linguistic aspects of the speech of Dutch-speaking mothers from three social classes to their 2-year-old children were studied. Mothers' speech in Dutch showed the same characteristics of simplicity and redundancy found in other languages. In a free play situation, both academic and lower middle class mothers produced more expansions and used fewer imperatives, more substantive deixis, and fewer

C. E. Snow; A. Arlman-Rupp; Y. Hassing; J. Jobse; J. Joosten; J. Vorster

1976-01-01

421

MOTHERS' UNION HISTORIES AND THE MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH OF ADOLESCENTS BORN TO UNMARRIED MOTHERS  

PubMed Central

As nonmarital childbearing becomes a dominant pathway to family formation, understanding its long-term consequences for children抯 well-being is increasingly important. Analysis of linked mother-child data from the NLSY79 indicates a negative association of having been born to a never-married mother with adolescent self-assessed health, but not with depressive symptoms. We also consider the role of mothers subsequent union histories in shaping the adolescent health outcomes of youth born to unmarried mothers. With two exceptions, unmarried mothers subsequent unions appear to have little consequence for the health of their offspring during adolescence. Adolescents whose mothers subsequently married and remained with their biological fathers reported better health, yet adolescents whose mothers continuously cohabited with the biological father without subsequent marriage reported worse adolescent mental health when compared with adolescents whose mothers remained continually unpartnered. PMID:23956357

Williams, Kristi; Sassler, Sharon; Frech, Adrianne; Addo, Fenaba; Cooksey, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

422

Creating Mother: Mother's Legacies in the Context of the Conduct Literature of Seventeenth-Century England  

E-print Network

This thesis, focusing on seventeenth-century English writers, examines the genre of Mothers Legacies in relation to the conduct literature being written around the same time. It discusses the manner in which the women writers of Mothers Legacies...

Morales, Cecilia Ann

2013-02-04

423

The Breastfeeding Mother and the Pediatrician  

PubMed Central

An estimated 70% of mothers in the United States initiate breastfeeding annually. Mothers often discuss breastfeeding problems with their infant抯 pediatrician. Pediatricians may feel unsure about their role when assisting the nonpatient, breastfeeding mother. By having practical solutions and support systems in place to anticipate and tend to breastfeeding mothers needs, pediatricians can be instrumental in preventing early weaning. The purpose of this article is to provide practical suggestions to outpatient-based pediatric health care providers when assisting the breastfeeding dyad. PMID:18689721

Geraghty, Sheela R.; Riddle, Sarah W.; Shaikh, Ulfat

2009-01-01

424

Impact of adulthood trauma on homeless mothers.  

PubMed

Using the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients (NSHAPC), we found that among homeless mothers (n = 588), those living without their children were more likely to: be older than 35 years, unmarried, have been incarcerated, have been homeless for at least 1 year, and to have used psychiatric medication. Many homeless mothers had histories of childhood trauma, but it was the accumulation of adulthood traumas that was associated with not living with one's children. Without mental health treatment, younger homeless mothers living with their children today may become the homeless mothers living without their children in the future. PMID:17143729

Zlotnick, Cheryl; Tam, Tammy; Bradley, Kimberly

2007-02-01

425

EFFECTS OF RISING FUEL COSTS ON CONTAINER SHIPPING NETWORKS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fuel cost increase forces liner shipping companies to bear higher ship operation costs and subsequently a lager total cost. To cope with such a fuel cost increase, they attempt to reduce the ship speed to maintain the low operation costs, even resulting in increase of the transit time. This study examines effects of ship speed reduction on fuel savings as well as profit increase, by using a mathematical model for a container liner service network design with a consideration o f empty container repositioning. Throughout numeric al experiments for the Asia-North America trade, the ship speed reduction is effective in fuel cost savings. Furthermore, it was found that the reduction of ship dwell time at port offset the longer transit time resulting from the cruising speed reduction.

Shintani, Koichi; Imai, Akio

426

A review of mother朿hild relational interventions and their usefulness for mothers with schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review evaluates empirical studies that have attempted to improve observed mother杋nfant relationships in order to inform\\u000a a potential approach for mothers with schizophrenia, a growing group of vulnerable families where mothers are known to have\\u000a relational difficulties. Parenting intervention studies in: (1) mothers with a mental disorder; (2) other vulnerable groups\\u000a were reviewed. Only interventions that empirically evaluated observations

Ming Wai Wan; Steff Moulton; Kathryn M. Abel

2008-01-01

427

Amphibious assault ship local area network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Amphibious Assault Ship, USS Makin Island (LHD 8) encompasses multiple systems to support the Navy's missions. The USS Makin Island systems include ballast, steering, propulsion, fresh water, power distribution as well as many damage control systems. The systems utilize various signal types to operate the systems while receiving signals to monitor the system components via the Machinery Control System (MCS). Many input/output (I/O) signals exchange information between the MCS and the various systems' equipment. The MCS monitors and controls the system components using a Human Machine Interface (HMI). The user-friendly HMI permits authorized operators to perform many daily operations remotely allowing operators to address system issues from multiple MCS units located throughout the ship. The MCS utilizes a fiber optic network that serves as the backbone connecting the Local Area Network (LAN) switches via blown optical fiber. Each MCS unit is intricately connected to the LAN switches for maximum redundancy via fiber optic connections to non-adjacent LAN switches to ensure system communications continuity. The LAN switches are connected in a star configuration for added system survivability. The backbone's blown fiber is designed and installed with a sufficient percentage of spare blowing tubes to ensure the potential of future growth. Conventional optical fiber is used to interconnect the MCS consoles, workstations, and Data Acquisition Units (DAU) to each other and the LAN switches. The conventional fiber also contains sufficient spare conductors in a combination of eight and four conductor optical fiber. The network backbone is redundantly connected allowing for continuous transmission of information throughout the ship.

Goff, Jonathan S.; Million, Troy P.

2010-08-01

428

Alternative Sources of Energy in Shipping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, there have been strategy changes in international and European policies and procedures about the environment and sustainable development. The focus has been on the agents and activities that exhaust natural resources and harm the environment. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) and shipping companies' international organisations are trying to reduce the polluting emissions and greenhouse gases generated by vessels. This article looks at various alternative energy sources that can be used to power vessels and their auxiliary equipment, as well as at their economic and environmental repercussions on the transport of goods by sea.

Fern醤dez Soto, J. L.; Garay Seijo, R.; Fraguela Formoso, J. A.; Gregorio Iglesias, G.; Carral Couce, L.

429

The environmental management of a ship channel-harbor complex  

E-print Network

in this study are dredge spoil disposal; waste, bilge, and ballast water from ships; tank and barge washi ngs; rural and urban runoff; domestic sewage discharges; water withdrawals and returns; industrial wastes; oil spills; floating debris; sea food... that most coavnerical oceangoing vessels only use oil-water separators to clean bilge discharges. Shi Ballast Water Ship ballast water is sea water pumped aboard in the port of des- tination as the cargo is unloaded. It provides the ship with greater...

Reavis, Marvin William

2012-06-07

430

Motion estimation and optimum time selection for ship ISAR imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of angular motion estimation and optimum time selection for ship ISAR imaging is addressed. The aim is to estimate ship angular motion and to select proper imaging intervals in order to obtain high quality top-view or side-view ship images suitable for processing by classification\\/identification procedures. To this purpose a novel analytical model for the phase\\/Doppler frequency of the

D. Pastina; A. Montanari; A. Aprile

2003-01-01

431

Sexual Health Discussions between African-American Mothers and Mothers of Latino Descent and Their Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined approaches used by African-American mothers and mothers of Latino descent for informal sex-related discussions with their children to inform sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV intervention development efforts. We recruited mothers (of children aged 12-15) from youth service agencies and a university in southern California.

Murray, Ashley; Ellis, Monica U.; Castellanos, Ted; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Sneed, Carl D.

2014-01-01

432

Mothers' Experiences with a Mother-Child Education Programme in Five Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although previous quantitative studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of the mother-child education programme (MOCEP) that originated in Turkey in 1993, the study reported here uses a qualitative approach to gain an in-depth understanding of mothers' views of the outcomes of the programme. The study was conducted with 100 mothers from

Bekman, Sevda; Ko鏰k, Aylin Atmaca

2013-01-01

433

Mothering while Imprisoned: The Effects of Family and Child Dynamics on Mothering Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the early 1990s, the number of children with imprisoned mothers has increased 131%. A mother's imprisonment potentially exposes children to a concentrated disadvantage that undermines their cognitive, emotional, and intellectual abilities. Additionally, such experiences can have deleterious effects on mother-child relationships, stand-in

Stringer, Ebonie Cunningham; Barnes, Sandra L.

2012-01-01

434

Disciplinary Choices of Mothers of Deaf Children and Mothers of Normally Hearing Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To assess the disciplinary preferences of mothers of profoundly deaf children and normally hearing children in a test of the hypothesized link between child disabilities and punitive parenting. Method: Disciplinary preferences of mothers seeking a cochlear implant for their profoundly deaf child (n = 57), mothers not seeking an implant

Knutson, John F.; Johnson, Christina R.; Sullivan, Patricia M.

2004-01-01

435

The Impact of Daughters' Eating Disorders in Mothers' Sense of Self: Contextualizing Mothering Experiences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines how daughters' anorexia influence the mothers' understandings of mothering and self within the greater context of societal influences. Using constructivist theory and discursive psychology, four themes characterized participants' relationship to cultural myths and discourses associated with eating disorders and mothering. (Contains 48

Hoskins, Marie L.; Lam, Eugenie

2001-01-01

436

Mothering Differently: Narratives of Mothers with Intellectual Disability Whose Children Have Been Compulsorily Removed  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Despite the frequency with which mothers with intellectual disability have their children removed, little theoretical or empirical work has understood the mothers' perspectives on this. A few studies have reported mothers' feelings of grief and loss and their sense of powerlessness in the child protection system. Method: This

Mayes, Rachel; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

2012-01-01

437

The Ship of Classics: The Ark, the Titanic, or the Good Ship Lollipop?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various problems confronting teachers of the classics are explored through frequent reference to the metaphor of the classics viewed as a sailing ship in a sea of troubled waters. Several of the difficulties confronting classics teachers are seen to be related to an anti-intellectual mood prevailing in academe, scheduling problems, shifting school

Wolverton, Robert E.

438

Geoacoustic inversion using ship noise received on the ship-towed line array  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been increased interest in geoacoustic inversion using a ship-towed line array including recent work by M. Siderius et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 11, 1523 (2002), D. J. Battle et al., IEEE J. Ocean Eng. 28, 454 (2003), and M. R. Fallat et al., IEEE J. Ocean Eng. 29, 78 (2004). One notes that bottom properties in the

T. C. Yang; Kwang Yoo; Laurie Fialkowski

2005-01-01

439

[Medicine aboard cruise ships--law insurance specifics].  

PubMed

The booming cruise industry, associated with ships with more passengers and crew on board, results in growing medical needs for the ship doctor. The ship's doctor insurance policy includes different jurisdictions, namely national law, international law, tort law, insurance law and labor law. In addition, international agreements must be taken into account, which complicates the design of an adequate insurance policy. Equally high are the costs and defense costs for the ship's doctor in case of liability. In order to limit the liability for all parties is to ask for appropriately qualified medical staff, hired on board. PMID:23589048

Ottomann, C; Frenzel, R; Muehlberger, T

2013-04-01

440

Radar imagery from the 1994 Lock Linnhe ship wake experiment  

SciTech Connect

The 1994 Loch Linnhe radar ocean imaging trials were held from September 4 through September 17. Two ships were used: the R.V. Colonel Templer, and the RMAS Collie. Thorn EMI, Inc., fielded a dual band, dual polarization radar on a hillside overlooking the loch. A primary purpose of the experiment was to obtain highly visible images of ship generated internal waves. Presented here is imagery for a few of the good ship runs, as well as a study of the environment of the visibility of ship generated internal waves.

Mullenhoff, C.J.; Lehman, S.K.; Jones, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1994-11-15

441

The complex network of global cargo ship movements  

PubMed Central

Transportation networks play a crucial role in human mobility, the exchange of goods and the spread of invasive species. With 90 per cent of world trade carried by sea, the global network of merchant ships provides one of the most important modes of transportation. Here, we use information about the itineraries of 16 363 cargo ships during the year 2007 to construct a network of links between ports. We show that the network has several features that set it apart from other transportation networks. In particular, most ships can be classified into three categories: bulk dry carriers, container ships and oil tankers. These three categories do not only differ in the ships' physical characteristics, but also in their mobility patterns and networks. Container ships follow regularly repeating paths whereas bulk dry carriers and oil tankers move less predictably between ports. The network of all ship movements possesses a heavy-tailed distribution for the connectivity of ports and for the loads transported on the links with systematic differences between ship types. The data analysed in this paper improve current assumptions based on gravity models of ship movements, an important step towards understanding patterns of global trade and bioinvasion. PMID:20086053

Kaluza, Pablo; Kolzsch, Andrea; Gastner, Michael T.; Blasius, Bernd

2010-01-01

442

Intelligent Decision Support System of Ship Unsinkability Design in the First Design Stage  

Microsoft Academic Search

If the ship is damaged, we should try our best to guarantee its unsinkability. Ship unsinkability is one of the most important aspects of ship survivability. The intelligent decision support system of ship unsinkability design in the first design stage is founded in this paper. The intelligent decision support system consists of two main functions. One is manual ship unsinkability

Hou Yue; Pu Jin-yun; Chen Xiao-hong

2009-01-01

443

Variable-and Fixed-Structure Augmented Interacting Multiple Model Algorithms for Manoeuvring Ship  

E-print Network

Ship Tracking Based on New Ship Models 1 Emil Semerdjiev Ludmila Mihaylova Bulgarian Academy of the manoeuvring ship motion. A solution of these problems is to derive more adequate descriptions of the real ship ship models are derived in the paper. They are implemented in two versions of the recently very popular

Mihaylova, Lyudmila

444

The 揙ther Mother and Second Parent Adoption  

Microsoft Academic Search

As lesbian couples increasingly choose to have children, there are correspondingly more 搊ther mothers, the woman in a lesbian couple whose parental status is jeopardized because she is neither the biological nor adoptive parent of the child.This article considers the remedy of second parent adoption through the eyes of the other mother. Her legal status is reviewed. Data from a

Daphne L. McClellan

2001-01-01

445

The Mother-Child Education Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present article focuses on a presentation of the education programs that are based on the mothers' active inclusion, and it aims to provide some preventive measures for parent-child interaction, methods of bringing up children, play, problems that can be faced in the home environment, and informing the mothers about their children's feelings.

Aksoy, Ayse B.

2006-01-01

446

Supporting the mother tongue: pedagogical approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the development and evaluation of a project to support the learning of the mother tongue by children aged 48 years. The aim of the project was to: actively involve and engage children with learning their mother tongue for functional use; involve parents in the learning process and support them in doing so; and increase children抯 regular

Theodora Papatheodorou

2007-01-01

447

The Father's Impact on Mother and Child.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the father's contribution to child development in the context of a triadic family constellation, integrating data that parallel previous investigations of fathers: differences in children's behavior to mother and father, differences in mothers' and fathers' behavior to the child, and correlations between parental and child

Clarke-Stewart, Alison

448

Low-income mothers' views on breastfeeding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nourishing infants presents women today with choices, desires, obligations and constraints. Despite mounting evidence about the health, psychosocial and societal benefits of breastfeeding both for women and infants, current breastfeeding rates worldwide are far from optimal, particularly among low-income women. Many mothers choose to use infant formula. Drawing from structured interviews with 154 mothers from an urban low-income multiethnic population

Nurit Guttman; Deena R. Zimmerman

2000-01-01

449

Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl  

ScienceCinema

Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

Ritchie, Robert

2013-05-29

450

How Mothers Perceive Their Own Sexuality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For women, the transition to motherhood is often a time period filled with excitement, changes, and challenges. Mothers often face changes in their own sexuality in their adjustment to motherhood. The majority of research on the sexual changes during motherhood has focused on the first year postpartum of mothers and has emphasized biological,

Trice-Black, Shannon

2009-01-01

451

Mothering and Intellectual Disability: Partnership Rhetoric?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is about mothering an intellectually disabled child identified with special educational needs. It specifically looks at the parent partnership rhetoric that has dominated UK government policy and directives for nearly three decades and yet research suggests parents and more often mothers have to battle to be recognised as legitimate

Rogers, Chrissie

2011-01-01

452

Looking Mother Tongue Instruction through Different Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mother Tongue Instruction has been a debatable issue since long. There may be two options in the medium of instruction: either to teach especially primary and preprimary schoolchildren in their own mother tongue or continue using second or foreign language as the medium of instruction. Both of the approaches bear some pros and cons. This article

Regmi, Kapil Dev

2008-01-01

453

Treatment - mother-infant relationship psychotherapy.  

PubMed

In this chapter, we briefly describe several modes of parent-infant-psychotherapy, an efficient way of treating parent-infant relationship disorders. We then focus on treatment for postnatally depressed mothers. Perinatal depression defines an episode of major or minor depression occurring during pregnancy or the first 12 months after birth. Attachment-based parent-infant interventions are particularly helpful in the context of maternal perinatal depression, as postpartum depression has a special link with unresolved trauma and losses in the mother's childhood. The goal of treatment is to improve the mother's mood but also to prevent or reduce the effects of postpartum depression on the child. Infants of perinatally depressed mothers are at risk for a large array of negative outcomes, including attachment insecurity (particularly disorganised attachment), social-skills deficits, cognitive difficulties, behaviour problems, and later psychopathology. The 'ghosts in the nursery' concept refers to the painful or disturbed early childhood experiences coming from the mother's past, which haunt the present mother-infant relationship. By addressing the mother's unresolved attachment conflicts (in her relationship to her own parents), it is believed that the development of a more adaptive parenting and a more secure and less disorganised attachment between the mother and her infant is facilitated. Changes in parent- infant interaction are not dependent on the port of entry (e.g. child's behaviour, parent's representation or parent-infant relationship). The perspective of attachment is key to install a therapeutic alliance with parents. PMID:24045134

Guedeney, Antoine; Guedeney, Nicole; Wendland, Jaqueline; Burtchen, Nina

2014-01-01

454

Predictors of Coping in Divorced Single Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the effects of demographic variables, variables specific to marriage and divorce, and coping resources (internal and external) on the adjustment of single mothers. Results indicate that four classes of variables have an effect on the mother's adjustment: phase of divorce and/or separation; numbers and ages of children; style of coping;

Propst, L. Rebecca; And Others

1986-01-01

455

Mothers' Discussion Groups in Public Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a community outreach program that is aimed at mothers of preschool children for the purposes of primary and secondary prevention of mental illness. The goals of the group meetings are to expand the mothers' problem-solving capacities and share child-rearing experiences. The groups are lead by health care professionals. (NG)

Witkin, Lynne J.

1976-01-01

456

Early interventions for infants of depressed mothers.  

PubMed

Infants of mothers who remain depressed for 1 year after birth have a distinct profile of behavioral, physiologic, and biochemical dysregulation. Their mothers also have a distinct profile that can be used to target those in need of intervention. These interventions may include mood induction, massage therapy, interaction coaching, and natural buffers such as nondepressed fathers and caregivers. PMID:9794974

Field, T

1998-11-01

457

Teen Mothers: Marriage, Cohabitation, and Educational Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the proportions of ethnically diverse low-income teen mothers who are cohabitating and/or married to the father of their child(ren) at approximately 14, 24, and 36 months after birth of their child. In addition, the relationship between marital status and education among teen mothers is explored. At 36 months after giving

Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

2008-01-01

458

Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and

Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

2012-01-01

459

Breastfeeding promotion for the employed mother  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing numbers of mothers are returning to work during the first year of their infant's life. Maternal employment has been associated with decreased duration of breastfeeding. Breast milk remains the optimal source of infant nutrition, yet only 50% of families choose breastfeeding for their newborns. Clinicians in pediatrics are well positioned to promote the specific benefits to mother and baby

Patricia Corbett-Dick; Susan K Bezek

1997-01-01

460

Significance of Waterway Navigation Positioning Systems On Ship's Manoeuvring Safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main goal of navigation is to lead the ship to the point of destination safety and efficiently. Various factors may affect ship realisating this process. The ship movement on waterway are mainly limited by water area dimensions (surface and depth). These limitations cause the requirement to realise the proper of ship movement trajectory. In case when this re requirement cant't fulfil then marine accident may happend. This fact is unwanted event caused losses of human health and life, damage or loss of cargo and ship, pollution of natural environment, damage of port structures or blocking the port of its ports and lost of salvage operation. These losses in same cases can be catas- trophical especially while e.i. crude oil spilling could be place. To realise of safety navigation process is needed to embrace the ship's movement trajectory by waterways area. The ship's trajectory is described by manoeuvring lane as a surface of water area which is require to realise of safety ship movement. Many conditions affect to ship manoeuvring line. The main are following: positioning accuracy, ship's manoeuvring features and phenomena's of shore and ship's bulk common affecting. The accuracy of positioning system is most important. This system depends on coast navigation mark- ing which can range many kinds of technical realisation. Mainly used systems based on lights (line), radionavigation (local system or GPS, DGPS), or radars. If accuracy of positiong is higer, then safety of navigation is growing. This article presents these problems exemplifying with approaching channel to ports situated on West Pomera- nian water region.

Galor, W.

461

Diatom community structure on in-service cruise ship hulls.  

PubMed

Diatoms are an important component of marine biofilms found on ship hulls. However, there are only a few published studies that describe the presence and abundance of diatoms on ships, and none that relate to modern ship hull coatings. This study investigated the diatom community structure on two in-service cruise ships with the same cruise cycles, one coated with an antifouling (AF) system (copper self-polishing copolymer) and the other coated with a silicone fouling-release (FR) system. Biofilm samples were collected during dry docking from representative areas of the ship and these provided information on the horizontal and vertical zonation of the hull, and intact and damaged coating and niche areas. Diatoms from the genera Achnanthes, Amphora and Navicula were the most common, regardless of horizontal ship zonation and coating type. Other genera were abundant, but their presence was more dependent on the ship zonation and coating type. Samples collected from damaged areas of the hull coating had a similar community composition to undamaged areas, but with higher diatom abundance. Diatom fouling on the niche areas differed from that of the surrounding ship hull and paralleled previous studies that investigated differences in diatom community structure on static and dynamically exposed coatings; niche areas were similar to static immersion and the hull to dynamic immersion. Additionally, diatom richness was greater on the ship with the FR coating, including the identification of several new genera to the biofouling literature, viz. Lampriscus and Thalassiophysa. These results are the first to describe diatom community composition on in-service ship hulls coated with a FR system. This class of coatings appears to have a larger diatom community compared to copper-based AF systems, with new diatom genera that have the ability to stick to ship hulls and withstand hydrodynamic forces, thus creating the potential for new problematic species in the biofilm. PMID:25377486

Hunsucker, Kelli Zargiel; Koka, Abhishek; Lund, Geir; Swain, Geoffrey

2014-10-01

462

How Mother Bear Taught the Children about Lead  

MedlinePLUS

... Print this page Share How Mother Bear Taught the Children about Lead Download the Mother Bear Books and ... Environment What's Wrong Whiskers? How Mother Bear Taught the Children about Lead You and Your Genes The Lead ...

463

Differential prefrontal response to infant facial emotions in mothers compared with non-mothers.  

PubMed

A considerable body of research has focused on neural responses evoked by emotional facial expressions, but little is known about mother-specific brain responses to infant facial emotions. We used near-infrared spectroscopy to investigate prefrontal activity during discriminating facial expressions of happy, angry, sad, fearful, surprised and neutral of unfamiliar infants and unfamiliar adults by 14 mothers and 14 age-matched females who have never been pregnant (non-mothers). Our results revealed that discriminating infant facial emotions increased the relative oxyHb concentration in mothers' right prefrontal cortex but not in their left prefrontal cortex, compared with each side of the prefrontal cortices of non-mothers. However, there was no difference between mothers and non-mothers in right or left prefrontal cortex activation while viewing adult facial expressions. These results suggest that the right prefrontal cortex is involved in human maternal behavior concerning infant facial emotion discrimination. PMID:21352862

Nishitani, Shota; Doi, Hirokazu; Koyama, Atsuko; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

2011-06-01

464

UCSD Shipping Rate Quote Please fill out this form completely. Print and Fax to: Tom Pugh, Shipping Coordinator, (858) 693-0864.  

E-print Network

UCSD Shipping Rate Quote Please fill out this form completely. Print and Fax to: Tom Pugh, Shipping Coordinator, (858) 693-0864. Please Note: This is not a Shipping Memo; it is only a quote request. Shipper: ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Please contact Tom Pugh, Shipping Coordinator, (858) 536-3225 x244. Print Form #12;

Russell, Lynn

465

Brown, A.J., Thomas, M., "Reengineering the Naval Ship Concept Design Process", From Research to Reality in Ship Systems Engineering Sy m-posium, ASNE, September, 1998.  

E-print Network

Brown, A.J., Thomas, M., "Reengineering the Naval Ship Concept Design Process", From Research to Reality in Ship Systems Engineering Sy m- posium, ASNE, September, 1998. Reengineering the Naval Ship Concept Design Process Dr. Alan Brown, Virginia Tech and LCDR Mark Thomas, USN Abstract Naval ship concept

Brown, Alan

466

Intention to Ship Hazardous Materials Complete and submit this form to EHS if you intend to ship material that may be  

E-print Network

Intention to Ship Hazardous Materials Complete and submit this form to EHS if you intend to ship, overnight, specific carrier, etc.): Preferred shipping method (FedEx, UPS, DHL, etc.): Do you plan boxes allowed, provide destination telephone number): Provide CSM account number for the shipping

467

The ship power electronic revolution: Issues and answers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Power electronics can enable dramatic improvements in marine platforms and ships - increased power, greater automation, with enhanced capabilities and missions. Systems with many power electronic components are emerging, driven by the need for power quality, availability, security, and efficiency. Mechanical ship propulsion systems are being replaced by electric propulsion. Variable speed motor drives are replacing across-the-line motor starters to

T. Ericsen

2008-01-01

468

Extension of ship accident analysis to multiple-package shipments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Severe ship accidents and the probability of radioactive material release from spent reactor fuel casks were investigated previously. Other forms of RAM, e.g., plutonium oxide powder, may be shipped in large numbers of packagings rather than in one to a few casks. These smaller, more numerous packagings are typically placed in ISO containers for ease of handling, and several ISO

G. S. Mills; K. S. Neuhauser

1997-01-01

469

Columbia University Guide to Shipping With Dry Ice, Excepted  

E-print Network

Columbia University Guide to Shipping With Dry Ice, Excepted Quantities of Dangerous Goods, and Exempt Human or Animal Specimens #12;Training Requirements 路 Individuals wishing to ship dry ice and involving dry ice or specimens. 路 Individuals viewing this presentation outside of RASCAL, if unable

Jia, Songtao

470

Lidar observations of the plumes of incineration ships  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Operations of a lidar system on board a ship in the incineration area of the North Sea are summarized. The plumes of incineration ships were observed, to study propagation processes in the boundary layer above the sea surface. Examples of lidar soundings are presented.

Klapheck, K.

1984-01-01

471

Guide for preparing operating procedures for shipping packages  

SciTech Connect

This report provides guidance for writing manuals of operating procedures for shipping packages used for radioactive materials. Guidelines are provided which are based on the broad experience that exists in the shipping industry and are consistent with Subpart G to 10 CFR 71. 9 refs.

Witte, M.C.

1988-12-01

472

The Numerical Simulation of Ship Waves Using Cartesian Grid Methods  

E-print Network

-fitted grids to model the ship hull. For the calculation of ship waves, VOF and level- set methods have certain advantages and disadvantages. VOF uses the volume fraction (F) to track the interface. F = 0 corresponds VOF method. Level-set methods use a level- set function () to model the gas-liquid interface

Sussman, Mark

473

Insertion loss prediction of floating floors used in ship cabins  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, vibration reduction in ship cabins by using floating floor is studied. Two theoretical models are developed and predicted insertion losses of floating floors are compared to experimental results, where measurements are done in the mock-up built for simulating typical ship cabins. The floating floor consists of upper board and mineral wool, which is in turn laid on

Sun-Il Cha; Ho-Hwan Chun

2008-01-01

474

Make a Model Home Made From Shipping Containers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Watch an interview with a couple who built a home from shipping containers. Then, design and construct a scale model of a unique shipping container home using printed templates, and estimate the cost of flooring and paint based on model dimensions.

Education, Science F.

475

7 CFR 948.8 - Handle or ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions 948.8 Handle or ship. Handle or ship means to transport, sell, or in any way to place potatoes in the current of the commerce between the State of Colorado and any point...

2010-01-01

476

Interior of the shipping room with doorway leading to processing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Interior of the shipping room with doorway leading to processing room. A pass-through window with conveyor allowed the fresh packed oysters to be sent from the processing room into the shipping room. - J.C. Lore Oyster House, 14430 Solomons Island Road, Solomons, Calvert County, MD

477

Altered responsiveness to chemokines due to targeted disruption of SHIP  

PubMed Central

SHIP has been implicated in negative signaling in a number of hematopoietic cell types and is postulated to downregulate phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3K) initiated events in diverse receptor signaling pathways. Because PI-3K is implicated in chemokine signaling, we investigated whether SHIP plays any role in cellular responses to chemokines. We found that a number of immature and mature hematopoietic cells from SHIP-deficient mice manifested enhanced directional migration (chemotaxis) in response to the chemokines stromal cell杁erived factor-1 (SDF-1) and B-lymphocyte chemoattractant (BLC). SHIP/ cells were also more active in calcium influx and actin polymerization in response to SDF-1. However, colony formation by SHIP-deficient hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPCs) was not inhibited by 13 myelosuppressive chemokines that normally inhibit proliferation of HPCs. These altered biologic activities of chemokines on SHIP-deficient cells are not caused by simple modulation of chemokine receptor expression in SHIP-deficient mice, implicating SHIP in the modulation of chemokine-induced signaling and downstream effects. J. Clin. Invest. 104:17511759 (1999). PMID:10606629

Kim, Chang H.; Hangoc, Giao; Cooper, Scott; Helgason, Cheryl D.; Yew, Sandie; Humphries, R. Keith; Krystal, Gerald; Broxmeyer, Hal E.

1999-01-01

478

Ship Detection Using Texture Statistics from Optical Satellite Images  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a method for ship detection using texture statistics from optical satellite images. The proposed method focuses on the extraction of ship candidates. First, a structural texture descriptor derived from local multiple patterns is introduced to describe image texture features, and then two statistical histograms are generated by quantizing texture features to describe the texture difference between sea

Gaopan Huang; Yanqing Wang; Yushuang Zhang; Yuan Tian

2011-01-01

479

Practical ship positioning technology for general asynchronous marine network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relative positioning, which is used in the flight of spacecraft with flying in formation, satellite network, and mobile robot network and so on, is highly available scheme for marine intelligent transportation network to guarantee the positioning accuracy and performance. Currently, some ship relative positioning method based on the original measurement and local positioning estimate in marine ship network have been

Quan-Bo Ge; Bing-Lei Guan; Tao Wen

2009-01-01

480

Global tracking for an underactuated ships with bounded feedback controllers  

E-print Network

. INTRODUCTION Precise tracking control of surface marine vessels (ships and boats) is often required in critical1 Global tracking for an underactuated ships with bounded feedback controllers Salah Laghrouche marine vessels. This controller is based on saturated control inputs and, under an assumption

Boyer, Edmond

481

Fireproof impact limiter aggregate packaging inside shipping containers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The invention is a product and a process for making a fireproof, impact limiter, homogeneous aggregate material for casting inside a hazardous material shipping container, or a double-contained Type-B nuclear shipping container. The homogeneous aggregate material is prepared by mixing inorganic compounds with water, pouring the mixture into the void spaces between an inner storage containment vessel and an outer

Gerald A. Byington; Oakes Jr. Raymon Edgar; Matthew Rookes Feldman

2001-01-01

482

Ship noise and cortisol secretion in European freshwater fishes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Underwater noise pollution is a growing problem in aquatic environments and as such may be a major source of stress for fish. In the present study, we addressed the effects of ship noise and continuous Gaussian noise on adrenal activity in three European freshwater spe- cies. Underwater ship noise recorded in the Danube River and two Austrian lakes was played

Lidia Eva Wysocki; John P. Dittami; Friedrich Ladich

2005-01-01

483

Numerical method for predicting ship propeller cavitation noise  

Microsoft Academic Search

During ship travels in high-velocity, propeller cavitation noise predominates in the radiated noise sources. However, experiential data regress method was use to predicate propeller cavitation noise in the past. In this article, propeller cavitation noise has been calculated by numerical computation method. From the engineering point of view, ship propeller has been disposed as a dipole bubble. Bubble volume pulse

Yong-Kun Zhang; Ying Xiong

2011-01-01

484

Ship noise and cortisol secretion in European freshwater fishes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Underwater noise pollution is a growing problem in aquatic environments and as such may be a major source of stress for fish. In the present study, we addressed the effects of ship noise and continuous Gaussian noise on adrenal activity in three European freshwater species. Underwater ship noise recorded in the Danube River and two Austrian lakes was played back

Lidia Eva Wysocki; John P. Dittami; Friedrich Ladich

2006-01-01

485

Handling and Shipping. ERIC Processing Manual, Section IV.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rules and guidelines are provided for the handling and shipping of document and journal article information intended for announcement in ERIC's abstract journals "Resources in Education" and "Current Index to Journals in Education." The handling and shipping involved takes place between the ERIC Facility and the ERIC Clearinghouses (both ways). A

Brandhorst, Ted, Ed.; And Others

486

Hydrogen fuel cells could power ships at port  

ScienceCinema

Sandia National Laboratories researcher Joe Pratt conducted a study on the use of hydrogen fuel cells to power docked ships at major ports. He found the potential environmental and cost benefits to be substantial. Here, he discusses the study and explains how hydrogen fuel cells can provide efficient, pollution-free energy to ships at port.

Pratt, Joe

2013-11-22

487

Visualization of airflow in the wake of a ship superstructure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Helicopter landings on naval surface ships, such as cruisers and destroyers, must take place in the presence of an air wake created by flow over the ship superstructure. Wake turbulence over the flight deck makes piloted landings dangerous and difficult, and poses significant problems for the use of unmanned rotorcraft. To address this problem, a comprehensive set of experimental and

C. J. Brownell; W. P. Stillman; J. H. Golden; S. A. Simpson; L. Luznik; D. S. Miklosovic; G. White; J. S. Burks; M. R. Snyder

2009-01-01

488

27 CFR 26.105a - Permit to ship.  

...Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permit to ship. 26.105a Section 26.105a Alcohol, Tobacco Products...and Articles in Puerto Rico Beer 26.105a Permit to ship. Beer released from bonded storage under 26.104...

2014-04-01

489

Moment analysis of ambient noise dominated by local shipping  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stationarity and local Gaussianity of ambient shipping noise recorded during an experiment conducted in the San Diego port area is investigated. First through fourth order moments are used to identify time periods of nonstationarity in the noise. Comparison of the shipping data with colored Gaussian noise indicates that the third order moments deviate from Gaussianity more than the fourth

Lisa A. Pflug; Pam M. Jackson; J. W. Ioup; G. E. Ioup

1996-01-01

490

Loads on Ships in Oblique Seas (Semi-Cylindrical Model).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 'static balance' technique for determining loads and forces on a ship in 'head' seas, was extended to a ship on 'oblique' seas. The present method, combining analytical and computational techniques, was developed for a wall-sided, semi-cylindrical hul...

R. Rung, V. L. Salerno

1967-01-01

491

Acoustic ship signature measurements by cross-correlation method.  

PubMed

Cross-correlation methods were applied for the estimation of the power spectral density and modulation spectrum of underwater noise generated by moving vessels. The cross-correlation of the signal from two hydrophones allows the separation of vessel acoustic signatures in a busy estuary. Experimental data recorded in the Hudson River are used for demonstration that cross-correlation method measured the same ship noise and ship noise modulation spectra as conventional methods. The cross-correlation method was then applied for the separation of the acoustic signatures of two ships present simultaneously. Presented methods can be useful for ship traffic monitoring and small ship classification, even in noisy harbor environments. PMID:21361436

Fillinger, Laurent; Sutin, Alexander; Sedunov, Alexander

2011-02-01

492

Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS) Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published in nine volumes between 1959 and 1991, DANFS is regarded as the foremost reference work on US naval vessels, chronicling virtually every ship that the US Navy has put to sea. Under the guidance of project manager Andrew Toppan, a team of international volunteers have been transcribing DANFS (without updates or corrections) and placing it online. Currently, the site includes over 7,000 ship histories. These are listed by ship type under two main headings: The Modern Era (post-1880s) and The "Old Navy" (pre-1880s), with additional information on the Confederate States Navy. The length of each ship's tale varies, but most include basic physical information, when and where the ship was first commissioned, its service record and notable actions, and its decomissioning, sale, or sinking. Naval and military history buffs will quickly lose themselves in this fascinating collection of miniature naval epics.

493

33 CFR 165.1157 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California. 165.1157 Section...1157 Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California. (a) Location...ship located within 3 nautical miles of the Santa Barbara Harbor Breakwater Light...

2013-07-01

494

49 CFR 172.201 - Preparation and retention of shipping papers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Preparation and retention of shipping papers. 172.201 Section 172.201 Transportation...REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Shipping Papers 172.201 Preparation and retention of shipping papers. (a) Contents. When a...

2010-10-01

495

46 CFR 166.15 - Training for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Training for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills. 166...for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills. ...instructed in the fundamentals of ship sanitation as prescribed by law and...

2012-10-01

496

46 CFR 166.15 - Training for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Training for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills. 166...for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills. ...instructed in the fundamentals of ship sanitation as prescribed by law and...

2011-10-01

497

46 CFR 166.15 - Training for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Training for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills. 166...for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills. ...instructed in the fundamentals of ship sanitation as prescribed by law and...

2013-10-01

498

46 CFR 166.15 - Training for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Training for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills. 166...for maintenance of discipline; ship sanitation; fire and lifeboat drills. ...instructed in the fundamentals of ship sanitation as prescribed by law and...

2010-10-01

499

46 CFR 42.07-35 - American Bureau of Shipping as an assigning authority.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false American Bureau of Shipping as an assigning authority...Rights of Appeal 42.07-35 American Bureau of Shipping as an assigning authority. (a) The American Bureau of Shipping, with...

2013-10-01

500

46 CFR 42.07-35 - American Bureau of Shipping as an assigning authority.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false American Bureau of Shipping as an assigning authority...Rights of Appeal 42.07-35 American Bureau of Shipping as an assigning authority. (a) The American Bureau of Shipping, with...

2011-10-01